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Sample records for high salinity environment

  1. Salinization and Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most conspicuous phenomena of water-quality degradation, particularly in arid and semi-arid zones, is salinization of water and soil resources. Salinization is a long-term phenomenon, and during the last century many aquifers and river basins have become unsuitable for human consumption owing to high levels of salinity. Future exploitation of thousands of wells in the Middle East and in many other water-scarce regions in the world depends, to a large extent, on the degree and rate of salinization. Moreover, every year a large fraction of agricultural land is salinized and becomes unusable.Salinization is a global environmental phenomenon that affects many different aspects of our life (Williams, 2001a, b): changing the chemical composition of natural water resources (lakes, rivers, and groundwater), degrading the quality of water supply to the domestic and agriculture sectors, contribution to loss of biodiversity, taxonomic replacement by halotolerant species ( Williams, 2001a, b), loss of fertile soil, collapse of agricultural and fishery industries, changing of local climatic conditions, and creating severe health problems (e.g., the Aral Basin). The damage due to salinity in the Colorado River Basin alone, for example, ranges between 500 and 750 million per year and could exceed 1 billion per year if the salinity in the Imperial Dam increases from 700 mg L-1 to 900 mg L-1 (Bureau of Reclamation, 2003, USA). In Australia, accelerating soil salinization has become a massive environmental and economic disaster. Western Australia is "losing an area equal to one football oval an hour" due to spreading salinity ( Murphy, 1999). The annual cost for dryland salinity in Australia is estimated as AU700 million for lost land and AU$130 million for lost production ( Williams et al., 2002). In short, the salinization process has become pervasive.Salinity in water is usually defined by the chloride content (mg L-1) or total dissolved solids content (TDS, mg L-1or g

  2. Salinization and Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most conspicuous phenomena of water-quality degradation, particularly in arid and semi-arid zones, is salinization of water and soil resources. Salinization is a long-term phenomenon, and during the last century many aquifers and river basins have become unsuitable for human consumption owing to high levels of salinity. Future exploitation of thousands of wells in the Middle East and in many other water-scarce regions in the world depends, to a large extent, on the degree and rate of salinization. Moreover, every year a large fraction of agricultural land is salinized and becomes unusable.Salinization is a global environmental phenomenon that affects many different aspects of our life (Williams, 2001a, b): changing the chemical composition of natural water resources (lakes, rivers, and groundwater), degrading the quality of water supply to the domestic and agriculture sectors, contribution to loss of biodiversity, taxonomic replacement by halotolerant species ( Williams, 2001a, b), loss of fertile soil, collapse of agricultural and fishery industries, changing of local climatic conditions, and creating severe health problems (e.g., the Aral Basin). The damage due to salinity in the Colorado River Basin alone, for example, ranges between 500 and 750 million per year and could exceed 1 billion per year if the salinity in the Imperial Dam increases from 700 mg L-1 to 900 mg L-1 (Bureau of Reclamation, 2003, USA). In Australia, accelerating soil salinization has become a massive environmental and economic disaster. Western Australia is "losing an area equal to one football oval an hour" due to spreading salinity ( Murphy, 1999). The annual cost for dryland salinity in Australia is estimated as AU700 million for lost land and AU$130 million for lost production ( Williams et al., 2002). In short, the salinization process has become pervasive.Salinity in water is usually defined by the chloride content (mg L-1) or total dissolved solids content (TDS, mg L-1or g

  3. Involvement of Coat Proteins in Bacillus subtilis Spore Germination in High-Salinity Environments.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Katja; Setlow, Peter; Reineke, Kai; Driks, Adam; Moeller, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    The germination of spore-forming bacteria in high-salinity environments is of applied interest for food microbiology and soil ecology. It has previously been shown that high salt concentrations detrimentally affect Bacillus subtilis spore germination, rendering this process slower and less efficient. The mechanistic details of these salt effects, however, remained obscure. Since initiation of nutrient germination first requires germinant passage through the spores' protective integuments, the aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the proteinaceous spore coat in germination in high-salinity environments. Spores lacking major layers of the coat due to chemical decoating or mutation germinated much worse in the presence of NaCl than untreated wild-type spores at comparable salinities. However, the absence of the crust, the absence of some individual nonmorphogenetic proteins, and the absence of either CwlJ or SleB had no or little effect on germination in high-salinity environments. Although the germination of spores lacking GerP (which is assumed to facilitate germinant flow through the coat) was generally less efficient than the germination of wild-type spores, the presence of up to 2.4 M NaCl enhanced the germination of these mutant spores. Interestingly, nutrient-independent germination by high pressure was also inhibited by NaCl. Taken together, these results suggest that (i) the coat has a protective function during germination in high-salinity environments; (ii) germination inhibition by NaCl is probably not exerted at the level of cortex hydrolysis, germinant accessibility, or germinant-receptor binding; and (iii) the most likely germination processes to be inhibited by NaCl are ion, Ca(2+)-dipicolinic acid, and water fluxes. PMID:26187959

  4. Involvement of Coat Proteins in Bacillus subtilis Spore Germination in High-Salinity Environments

    PubMed Central

    Nagler, Katja; Setlow, Peter; Reineke, Kai; Driks, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The germination of spore-forming bacteria in high-salinity environments is of applied interest for food microbiology and soil ecology. It has previously been shown that high salt concentrations detrimentally affect Bacillus subtilis spore germination, rendering this process slower and less efficient. The mechanistic details of these salt effects, however, remained obscure. Since initiation of nutrient germination first requires germinant passage through the spores' protective integuments, the aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the proteinaceous spore coat in germination in high-salinity environments. Spores lacking major layers of the coat due to chemical decoating or mutation germinated much worse in the presence of NaCl than untreated wild-type spores at comparable salinities. However, the absence of the crust, the absence of some individual nonmorphogenetic proteins, and the absence of either CwlJ or SleB had no or little effect on germination in high-salinity environments. Although the germination of spores lacking GerP (which is assumed to facilitate germinant flow through the coat) was generally less efficient than the germination of wild-type spores, the presence of up to 2.4 M NaCl enhanced the germination of these mutant spores. Interestingly, nutrient-independent germination by high pressure was also inhibited by NaCl. Taken together, these results suggest that (i) the coat has a protective function during germination in high-salinity environments; (ii) germination inhibition by NaCl is probably not exerted at the level of cortex hydrolysis, germinant accessibility, or germinant-receptor binding; and (iii) the most likely germination processes to be inhibited by NaCl are ion, Ca2+-dipicolinic acid, and water fluxes. PMID:26187959

  5. Geophysical and geochemical characterization and delineation of a crude oil spill in a highly saline environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Cameron Stuart

    Geophysical and geochemical methods were used at Grand Terre 1 (GT1) Island off the coast of Louisiana, an island that had been heavily contaminated with crude oil associated with the April 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Electrical methods and aqueous geochemistry have proven sensitive in the detection of contaminates, as well as the biological and chemical processes associated with the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. However, to the author's knowledge, all of these studies have dealt with mature (or aged) spills within a freshwater environment. The BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill therefor provided a unique opportunity to not only use traditional geophysical and geochemical methods to characterize and delineate fresh crude oil in a highly saline environment and to capture the early time biogeophysical signals resulting from the physical, chemical, and microbial transformation of crude oil in a highly saline environment. Electrical resistivity and electromagnetic methods were used. Barometric pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity, and water level values for the shallow groundwater were continuously logged. Geochemical analysis was performed on water samples collected from piezometers networks installed in the impacted, transitional, and background areas. Sediment cores were retrieved throughout the site and used for grain size analysis, magnetic susceptibility, total organic and inorganic carbon, and x-ray fluorescence. Soil samples were collected for microbial analyses from the impacted and background areas. Microcosms were set up to determine the microbial diversity analysis was used to determine microbial community composition, and biodegradation potential of indigenous populations. Based on the geochemical, microbial, and soil analysis, the relatively higher apparent resistivity anomaly observed between the depths of 0.20 m to 1.20 m bgs could be explained by two scenarios(1): elevated resistivity was caused by gas in the

  6. Systematic investigation of germination responses of Bacillus subtilis spores in different high-salinity environments.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Katja; Moeller, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    High-salinity environments play an increasingly important role in ecology regarding soil salinization due to human-induced processes, but also need to be considered in terms of natural soil desiccation and extreme habitats. It has been shown previously that spore germination of the ubiquitous soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is detrimentally affected by the presence of high NaCl concentrations, but the underlying mechanisms and effects of other salts remained obscure. To address these two points, we performed a systematic analysis with 32 different salts using spectrophotometric and microscopic methods. It could be shown that inhibitory strength varies considerably among different salts. Although osmotic effects seem to play an important role, ionic composition and concentration (especially of the anion) as well as chemical properties seem to be decisive for the extent of germination inhibition. At the current state of knowledge, fluxes of ions, Ca(2+)-DPA and water are likely affected by all salts, whereas the exact inhibition mechanism of each salt might further depend on the respective properties of the involved ions. Hence, the observed inhibition likely is a result of several phenomena interacting with each other. Altogether this study highlights the complex impact of ionic environments on the life cycle of spore formers. PMID:25764471

  7. Water sources accessed by arid zone riparian trees in highly saline environments, Australia.

    PubMed

    Costelloe, Justin F; Payne, Emily; Woodrow, Ian E; Irvine, Elizabeth C; Western, Andrew W; Leaney, Fred W

    2008-05-01

    The flow regimes of arid zone rivers are often highly variable, and shallow groundwater in the alluvial aquifers can be very saline, thus constraining the availability and quality of the major water sources available to riparian trees-soil water, shallow groundwater and stream water. We have identified water sources and strategies used by riparian trees in more highly saline and arid conditions than previously studied for riparian trees of arid zone rivers. Our research focused on the riparian species Eucalyptus coolabah, one of the major riparian trees of ephemeral arid zone rivers in Australia. The water sources available to this riparian tree were examined using delta(18)O isotope data from xylem, soil water, groundwater and surface water. Additionally, soil chloride and matric potential data were used to infer zones of water availability for root uptake. Despite the saline conditions, the trees used a mixture of soil water and groundwater sources, but they did not use surface water directly. The study identified three strategies used to cope with typically high groundwater and soil water salinities. Firstly, the trees preferentially grow in zones of most frequent flushing by infiltrating streamflow, such as the bank-tops of channels. Secondly, the trees limit water use by having low transpiration rates. Thirdly, the trees are able to extract water at very low osmotic potentials, with water uptake continuing at chloride concentrations of at least 20,000-30,000 mg L(-1). PMID:18270743

  8. Hydrogeochemistry of thermal springs in saline salar-like environments in the High Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos Durán, L. V.; Reich, M.; Achurra, L.; Morata, D.

    2014-12-01

    Evaporitic deposits and precipitates represent significant sinks of mobile cations (Li, As, B) and halides (Cl, I) in salar-like basin environments along the Andean volcanic belt in northern Chile. Li and B are particularly interesting because of their high concentrations in evaporitic minerals and geothermal waters in the region. Although these compositional features have been previously recognized in high-altitude salt lakes in northern Chile, the nature and extent of mixing processes between true evaporitic and geothermal endmembers in such environments is poorly understood. In a context where geothermal targeting methods need to be increasingly precise, a clearer understanding of what controls the localization of concealed geothermal resources is a prerequisite for more efficient exploration. Therefore, it is necessary to constrain surface saline inputs that can mask the deep imprints of the geothermal reservoir. On this basis, northern Chile offers a unique opportunity to test these features due to the large number of evaporitic closed basins containing thermal springs. To date, only a very limited number of studies have reported trace element concentrations and B, Li and Sr isotopes in salar-like waters aimed at differentiating the relative contributions of both members. In this study, we sampled water from high-altitude lakes with and without surficial thermal activity. This was complemented with geothermal water analyses from northern Chile and previously published data. In addition, we report preliminary dissolution experiments of evaporite minerals (e.g. ulexite, halite, gypsum, aragonite) to pure distilled water. These minerals were taken from two selected hydrological domains, located in the southern and northern part of the Chilean Central Volcanic Zone. Geochemical analyses of water run products from the aforementioned experiments at different temperatures (25 and 87°C, 500 hours of interaction each), confirmed that selected common elements (Cl, Li

  9. Polymer tensiometers in a saline environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ploeg, Martine; Gooren, H. P. A.; Bakker, G.; Russell, W.; Hoogendam, C. W.; Huiskes, C.; Shouse, P.; de Rooij, G. H.

    2010-05-01

    It is estimated that 20% of all cultivated land and nearly half of the irrigated land is salt-affected, which pose major economic and environmental problems. Salinity may be the result of two processes; dryland and irrigation salinity. Dryland salinity is caused by a rise in the groundwater table, which occurs as a result of the replacement of deep-rooted, perennial native vegetation by shallow-rooted annual species meant for production. Irrigation salinity may occur as a result of poor water quality, poor drainage, or inefficient use of water. Consequently, new strategies to enhance crop yield stability on saline soils represent a major research priority (Botella et al. 2005). At the same time, native vegetation is capable of thriving under saline and/or dry conditions. The plant physiology of such vegetation has been investigated thoroughly, but the relation with in situ soil properties (soil moisture and salinity) may be more difficult to unravel as soil moisture sensors are less sensitive in dry soil, and the signal of most soil moisture content sensors is strongly attenuated by soil salinity. Recently, polymer tensiometer were developed that are able to measure matric potentials (closely related to a soil's moisture status) in dry soils. Polymer tensiometers consist of a solid ceramic, a stainless steel cup and a pressure transducer. The ceramic consist of a support layer and a membrane with 2 nm pore-size to prevent polymer leakage. Between the ceramic membrane and the pressure transducer a tiny chamber is located, which contains the polymer solution. The polymer's osmotic potential strongly reduces the total water potential inside the polymer tensiometer, which causes build-up of osmotic pressure. Polymer tensiometers would thus be an ideal instrument to measure in dry soil, if the polymer inside the tensiometer is not affected by the salts in the soil solution. We will address some key issues regarding the use of POTs in saline environments by showing

  10. Amoebae and Legionella pneumophila in saline environments

    PubMed Central

    Gast, Rebecca J.; Moran, Dawn M.; Dennett, Mark R.; Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A.; Amaral- Zettler, Linda A.

    2011-01-01

    Amoeboid protists that harbor bacterial pathogens are of significant interest as potential reservoirs of disease-causing organisms in the environment, but little is known about them in marine and other saline environments. We enriched amoeba cultures from sediments from four sites in the New England estuarine system of Mt. Hope Bay, Massachusetts and from sediments from six sites in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Cultures of amoebae were enriched using both minimal- and non-nutrient agar plates, made with fresh water, brackish water or saltwater. Recovered amoeba cultures were assayed for the presence of Legionella species using nested polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and primers specific for the genus. Positive samples were then screened with nested amplification using primers specific for the macrophage infectivity potentiator surface protein (mip) gene from L. pneumophila. Forty-eight percent (185 out of 388) of isolated amoeba cultures were positive for the presence of Legionella species. Legionella pneumophila was detected by PCR in 4% of the amoeba cultures (17 out of 388), and most of these amoebae were growing on marine media. Our results show that amoebae capable of growing in saline environments may harbor not only a diverse collection of Legionella species, but also species potentially pathogenic to humans. PMID:21301113

  11. Phreatophytes under stress: transpiration and stomatal conductance of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) in a high-salinity environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glenn, Edward P.; Nagler, Pamela L.; Morino, Kiyomi; Hultine, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Salts accumulated in the vadose zone at both sites so usable water was confined to the saturated capillary fringe above the aquifer. Existence of a saline aquifer imposes several types of constraints on phreatophyte EG, which need to be considered in models of plant water uptake. The heterogeneous nature of saltcedar EG over river terraces introduces potential errors into estimates of ET by wide-area methods.

  12. Survival strategies of microorganisms in extreme saline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, J. F.

    Halophilic representatives are found in all main lines of evolutionary descendence of microbes: in archaebacteria, Gram-negative and Gram-positive eubacteria, and also in eucaryotes. In principe all halophilic microorganisms have to adapt their surface and membrane structures to their highly ionic environments. Concerning their intracellular compartment two different strategies have been developed: Inorganic ions are largely excluded in some microorganisms while such ions are actively accumulated in others. In particular the second group of organisms has to adapt the whole metabolic machinery to the highly ionic conditions of several molar salts, whereas in the first group only the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane and the extracytoplasmic structures are in contact with high concentrations of inorganic ions. In this latter group, a variety of organic solutes is accumulated in response to increases of the salinity of the environment.

  13. Biogeography and Adaptive evolution of Streptomyces Strains from saline environments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Qin, Yu-Hua; Zheng, Xin; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Chai, Dong-Yan; Li, Wei; Pu, Ming-Xiang; Zuo, Xing-Sheng; Qian, Wen; Ni, Ping; Zhang, Yong; Mei, Han; He, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    The genus Streptomyces is a widespread genus within the phylum Actinobacteria and has been isolated from various environments worldwide. However, little is known about whether biogeography affects distributional pattern of Streptomyces in salty environments. Such information is essential for understanding the ecology of Streptomyces. Here we analyzed four house-keeping genes (16S rRNA, rpoB, recA and atpD) and salty-tolerance related genes (ectA-ectD) of 38 Streptomyces strains isolated from saline environments in Yunnan and Xinjiang Provinces of western China. The obtained Streptomyces strains were classified into three operational taxonomic units, each comprising habitat-specific geno- and ecotype STs. In combination with expressional variations of salty-tolerance related genes, the statistical analyses showed that spatial distance and environmental factors substantially influenced Streptomyces distribution in saline environments: the former had stronger influence at large spatial scales (>700 km), whereas the latter was influential at large (>700 km) and small spatial scales (<700 km). Plus, the quantitative analyses of salty-tolerence related genes (ectA-D) indicated that Streptomyces strains from salt lakes have higher expression of ectA-D genes and could accumulate larger quantities of ectoine and hydroxyectoine than strains from salt mines, which could help them resist to salinity in the hypersaline environments. PMID:27596681

  14. Biogeography and Adaptive evolution of Streptomyces Strains from saline environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Qin, Yu-Hua; Zheng, Xin; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Chai, Dong-Yan; Li, Wei; Pu, Ming-Xiang; Zuo, Xing-Sheng; Qian, Wen; Ni, Ping; Zhang, Yong; Mei, Han; He, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    The genus Streptomyces is a widespread genus within the phylum Actinobacteria and has been isolated from various environments worldwide. However, little is known about whether biogeography affects distributional pattern of Streptomyces in salty environments. Such information is essential for understanding the ecology of Streptomyces. Here we analyzed four house-keeping genes (16S rRNA, rpoB, recA and atpD) and salty-tolerance related genes (ectA-ectD) of 38 Streptomyces strains isolated from saline environments in Yunnan and Xinjiang Provinces of western China. The obtained Streptomyces strains were classified into three operational taxonomic units, each comprising habitat-specific geno- and ecotype STs. In combination with expressional variations of salty-tolerance related genes, the statistical analyses showed that spatial distance and environmental factors substantially influenced Streptomyces distribution in saline environments: the former had stronger influence at large spatial scales (>700 km), whereas the latter was influential at large (>700 km) and small spatial scales (<700 km). Plus, the quantitative analyses of salty-tolerence related genes (ectA-D) indicated that Streptomyces strains from salt lakes have higher expression of ectA-D genes and could accumulate larger quantities of ectoine and hydroxyectoine than strains from salt mines, which could help them resist to salinity in the hypersaline environments. PMID:27596681

  15. Measurement of streaming potential coupling coefficient in sandstones saturated with high salinity NaCl brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafar, M. Z.; Vinogradov, J.; Jackson, M. D.

    2009-11-01

    We present measurements of the streaming potential coupling coefficient in intact sandstone samples saturated with NaCl brines at concentrations up to 5.5 molL-1. The values we record at low salinity are consistent with those reported previously. As brine salinity increases, the coupling coefficient decreases in magnitude, but is still measureable up to the saturated concentration limit. The magnitude of the zeta potential also decreases with increasing salinity, but approaches a constant value at high salinity. This behaviour is not captured by current models of the electrical double layer. Our results suggest that streaming potential measurements may be used to monitor flow in saline subsurface environments such as deep saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, they were obtained at laboratory temperature. Future work will focus on the effect of elevated temperatures at high salinity.

  16. Capacitive Deionization of High-Salinity Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ketki; Gabitto, Jorge; Mayes, Richard T.; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Walker, Lakeisha M.H.; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-12-22

    Desalination of high salinity solutions has been studied using a novel experimental technique and a theoretical model. Neutron imaging has been employed to visualize lithium ions in mesoporous carbon materials, which are used as electrodes in capacitive deionization for water desalination. Experiments were conducted with a flow-through capacitive deionization cell designed for neutron imaging and with lithium chloride (6LiCl) as the electrolyte. Sequences of neutron images have been obtained at a relatively high concentration of lithium chloride (6LiCl) solution to provide information on the transport of ions within the electrodes. A new model that computes the individual ionic concentration profiles inside mesoporous carbon electrodes has been used to simulate the capacitive deionization process. Modifications have also been introduced into the simulation model to calculate results at high electrolyte concentrations. Experimental data and simulation results provide insight into why capacitive deionization is not effective for desalination of high ionic-strength solutions. The combination of experimental information, obtained through neutron imaging, with the theoretical model will help in the design of capacitive deionization devices, which can improve the process for high ionic-strength solutions.

  17. Capacitive Deionization of High-Salinity Solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sharma, Ketki; Gabitto, Jorge; Mayes, Richard T.; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Walker, Lakeisha M.H.; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-12-22

    Desalination of high salinity solutions has been studied using a novel experimental technique and a theoretical model. Neutron imaging has been employed to visualize lithium ions in mesoporous carbon materials, which are used as electrodes in capacitive deionization for water desalination. Experiments were conducted with a flow-through capacitive deionization cell designed for neutron imaging and with lithium chloride (6LiCl) as the electrolyte. Sequences of neutron images have been obtained at a relatively high concentration of lithium chloride (6LiCl) solution to provide information on the transport of ions within the electrodes. A new model that computes the individual ionic concentration profilesmore » inside mesoporous carbon electrodes has been used to simulate the capacitive deionization process. Modifications have also been introduced into the simulation model to calculate results at high electrolyte concentrations. Experimental data and simulation results provide insight into why capacitive deionization is not effective for desalination of high ionic-strength solutions. The combination of experimental information, obtained through neutron imaging, with the theoretical model will help in the design of capacitive deionization devices, which can improve the process for high ionic-strength solutions.« less

  18. Monitoring The Dynamics Of Hyper-Saline Environments With Polarimetric SAR: Death Valley, California Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasne, Y.; McDonald, K.; Paillou, P.; Freeman, A.; Chapman, B.; Farr, T.; Ruffié, G.; Malézieux, J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil salinization in arid and semi-arid regions still remains one of the most important threats not only for socio-economical issues when dealing with water ressources management, but also for ecological matters such as: desertification, climate changes, and biomass reduction. Then, monitoring and mapping of soil salinity distribution represent today a key challenge in our understanding of such environmental processes. Being highly dependent on the dielectric properties of soils, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) appears to be an efficient tool for the remote sensing of hyper-saline environments. More precisely, the influence of saline deposits on SAR imagery lies in the solubility and ionic properties of the minerals which strongly influence both real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity of such deposits, and thus the radar backscattering coefficient. Based on temporal series acquired with spaceborne SAR systems (ALOS/PALSAR, SIR-C) over the Death Valley (CA), we show that the copolarized backscattering ratio and phase difference derived from SAR data can be used as suitable indicators to monitor the dynamics of hyper-saline deposits. In particular, we propose these copolar parameters to follow the variations in the dielectric properties of moistened and salt-affected soils on a seasonal time scale because of the close relationship between the salinity (governed by the soil moisture content) and the complex permittivity of the soils. We also highlight a strong temporal correlation between the copolar parameters and weather data since precipitation events control the soil moisture and salinity. In order to allow for a better interpretation of the saline deposits signatures observed on SAR data, we also perform analytical simulations of the radar backscattering associated with saline deposits by means of the IEM scattering model. Using laboratory and in~ situ dielectric measurements as input parameters, we simulate the copolar ratio and phase difference as

  19. Corrosion Behavior of Reverse-Pulse Electrodeposited Zn-Ni Alloys in Saline Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonyongmaneerat, Yuttanant; Saengkiettiyut, Kanokwan; Saenapitak, Sawalee; Sangsuk, Supin

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates the relationship of the reverse-pulse electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings' characteristics and their corrosion behaviors in a saline environment, using both anodic polarization and electrochemical impedance analysis. The introduction of anodic pulsation gives deposits of more refined grain sizes and increased nickel contents, resulting in improvement of the corrosion resistance. High anodic current densities employed in the reverse-pulse electrodeposition, however, modulate crystallographic orientations of the grains, introduce porosity to the structure, and hence adversely affect the corrosion resistance of the coating deposits.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Aluminum Alloys in Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holroyd, N. J. Henry; Scamans, G. M.

    2013-03-01

    80 to 85 kJ/mol, whereas for high-copper-containing alloys (>~0.8 wt pct), they are typically ranging from 20 to 40 kJ/mol for under- and peak-aged alloys, and based on limited data, around 85 kJ/mol for over-aged tempers. This means that crack propagation in saline environments is most likely to occur by a hydrogen-related process for low-copper-containing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys in under-, peak- and over-aged tempers, and for high-copper alloys in under- and peak-aged tempers. For over-aged high-copper-containing alloys, cracking is most probably under anodic dissolution control. Future stress corrosion studies should focus on understanding the factors that control crack initiation, and insuring that the next generation of higher performance Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys has similar longer crack initiation times and crack propagation rates to those of the incumbent alloys in an over-aged condition where crack rates are less than 1 mm/month at a high stress intensity factor.

  1. Genotype-by-environment interaction for salinity tolerance in the freshwater-invading copepod Eurytemora affinis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carol Eunmi; Petersen, Christine H

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the extent of phenotypic plasticity for salinity tolerance and genetic variation in plasticity in the invasive copepod Eurytemora affinis. Euryemora affinis is a species complex inhabiting brackish to hypersaline environments but has invaded freshwater lakes and reservoirs within the past century. Reaction norm experiments were performed on a relatively euryhaline population collected from a brackish lake with fluctuating salinity. Life history traits (hatching rate, survival, and development time) were measured for 20 full-sib clutches that were split and reared at four salinities (fresh, 5, 10, and 27 practical salinity units [PSU]). On average, higher salinities (10 and 27 PSU) were more favorable for larval growth, yielding greater survival and faster development rate. Clutches differed significantly in their response to salinity, with a significant genotype-by-environment interaction for development time. In addition, genetic (clutch) effects were evident in response to low salinity, given that survival in fresh (lake) water was significantly positively correlated with survival at 5 PSU for individual clutches. Clutches raised in fresh water could not survive beyond metamorphosis, suggesting that acclimation to fresh water could not occur in a single generation. Results suggest the importance of natural selection during freshwater invasion events, given the inability of plasticity to generate a freshwater phenotype, and the presence of genetic variation for plasticity upon which natural selection could act. PMID:12324889

  2. Modeling and Optimization of Printed Spiral Coils in Air, Saline, and Muscle Tissue Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jow, Uei-Ming; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2010-01-01

    Printed spiral coils (PSCs) are viable candidates for near-field wireless power transmission to the next generation of high-performance neuroprosthetic devices with extreme size constraints, which will target intraocular and intracranial spaces. Optimizing the PSC geometries to maximize the power transfer efficiency of the wireless link is imperative to reduce the size of the external energy source, heating of the tissue, and interference with other devices. Implantable devices need to be hermetically sealed in biocompatible materials and placed in a conductive environment with high permittivity (tissue), which can affect the PSC characteristics. We have constructed a detailed model that includes the effects of the surrounding environment on the PSC parasitic components and eventually on the power transfer efficiency. We have combined this model with an iterative design method that starts with a set of realistic design constraints and ends with the optimal PSC geometries. We applied our design methodology to optimize the wireless link of a 1-cm2 implantable device example, operating at 13.56 MHz. Measurement results showed that optimized PSC pairs, coated with 0.3 mm of silicone, achieved 72.2%, 51.8%, and 30.8% efficiencies at a face-to-face relative distance of 10 mm in air, saline, and muscle, respectively. The PSC, which was optimized for air, could only bear 40.8% and 21.8% efficiencies in saline and muscle, respectively, showing that by including the PSC tissue environment in the design process the result can be more than a 9% improvement in the power transfer efficiency. PMID:20948991

  3. Modeling and Optimization of Printed Spiral Coils in Air, Saline, and Muscle Tissue Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jow, Uei-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Printed spiral coils (PSC) are viable candidates for near field wireless power transmission to the next generation of high performance neuroprosthetic devices with extreme size constraints, which will target intra-ocular and intracranial spaces. Optimizing the PSC geometries to maximize the power transfer efficiency of the wireless link is imperative to reduce the size of the external energy source, heating of the tissue, and interference with other devices. Implantable devices need to be hermetically sealed in biocompatible materials and placed in a conductive environment with high permittivity (tissue), which can affect the PSC characteristics. We have constructed a detailed model that includes the effects of the surrounding environment on the PSC parasitic components and eventually on the power transfer efficiency. We have combined this model with an iterative design method that starts with a set of realistic design constraints and ends with the optimal PSC geometries. We applied our design methodology to optimize the wireless link of a 1 cm2 implantable device example, operating at 13.56 MHz. Measurement results showed that optimized PSC pairs, coated with 0.3 mm of silicone, achieved 72.2%, 51.8%, and 30.8% efficiencies at a face to face relative distance of 10 mm, in air, saline, and muscle, respectively. The PSC which was optimized for air could only bear 40.8% and 21.8% efficiencies in saline and muscle, respectively, showing that including the PSC tissue environment in the design process can result in more than 9% improvement in the power transfer efficiency. PMID:19964693

  4. Treatment of high salinity brines by direct contact membrane distillation: Effect of membrane characteristics and salinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guan, Yunshan; Cheng, Fangqin; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) is one of the attractive technologies for high salinity brine treatment. In this study, four polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes were examined in treating highly concentrated salt solutions. Results showed that non-supported membranes generally have a higher overall mass transfer coefficient but porosity seems to be the most important parameter controlling membrane flux and thermal efficiency. Supported membranes with large thickness had relatively higher thermal efficiency than small thickness. This can be attributed to their reduced heat loss through heat condition. In addition, KCl, NaCl and MgCl2 solutions showed distinct trends over flux decline at high salt concentrations (⩾2.0M). The difference in flux was largely due to the discrepancy in water activities of these solutions (KCl>NaCl>MgCl2). However, the effect of viscosity on permeate flux could not be neglected for MgCl2 at high salt concentrations as the suddenly increased viscosity could lead to serious temperature polarization. This study indicates that membrane distillation is a promising technology for high salinity brine treatment. PMID:25563165

  5. Regulation of sodium in the shore crab Carcinus maenas, adapted to environments of constant and changing salinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebers, D.; Winkler, A.; Leweck, K.; Madian, A.

    1983-09-01

    The activity of Na-K-ATPase was determined in the posterior gills of the shore crab Carcinus maenas during a period following transfer from 35 to 10 ‰ salinity and vice versa at 15 °C. After transfer from high to low salinity, Na-K-ATPase activity increased from 3.2 to 7.0 μmoles Pi mg protein-1 h-1 within a period of 2 to 3 weeks. Transfer of crabs from low to high salinity resulted in reduction of activity from 7.4 to 4.5 μmoles Pi mg protein-1 h-1 within about the same period. The relatively slow response following salinity change indicates that the amounts of Na-K-ATPase in the gills may play a role in hyperionic Na regulation in relatively constant brackish-water environments. Instant responses to salinity result from activation and inhibition of Na-K-ATPase activity by Na. Gill Na-K-ATPase is activated by the Na concentration of the incubation medium to attain a steep maximum at about 75 mM Na, which corresponds to the lowest environmental Na levels tolerated by C. maenas equivalent to a salinity of ca 6 ‰. Activity greatly decreased towards higher Na levels, equivalent to the salinity of normal sea water, at which hyperregulation no longer occurs. Selective addition of either Na or Cl to brackish water of 9 ‰ S resulted in effective hyperregulation of the non-increased ion, and passive distribution between medium and blood of the increased ion. These data indicate that under appropriate conditions the normally coupled transport of Na and Cl may be uncoupled and take place independently of each other.

  6. Contribution of water chemistry and fish condition to otolith chemistry: comparisons across salinity environments.

    PubMed

    Izzo, C; Doubleday, Z A; Schultz, A G; Woodcock, S H; Gillanders, B M

    2015-06-01

    This study quantified the per cent contribution of water chemistry to otolith chemistry using enriched stable isotopes of strontium ((86) Sr) and barium ((137) Ba). Euryhaline barramundi Lates calcarifer, were reared in marine (salinity 40), estuarine (salinity 20) and freshwater (salinity 0) under different temperature treatments. To calculate the contribution of water to Sr and Ba in otoliths, enriched isotopes in the tank water and otoliths were quantified and fitted to isotope mixing models. Fulton's K and RNA:DNA were also measured to explore the influence of fish condition on sources of element uptake. Water was the predominant source of otolith Sr (between 65 and 99%) and Ba (between 64 and 89%) in all treatments, but contributions varied with temperature (for Ba), or interactively with temperature and salinity (for Sr). Fish condition indices were affected independently by the experimental rearing conditions, as RNA:DNA differed significantly among salinity treatments and Fulton's K was significantly different between temperature treatments. Regression analyses did not detect relations between fish condition and per cent contribution values. General linear models indicated that contributions from water chemistry to otolith chemistry were primarily influenced by temperature and secondly by fish condition, with a relatively minor influence of salinity. These results further the understanding of factors that affect otolith element uptake, highlighting the necessity to consider the influence of environment and fish condition when interpreting otolith element data to reconstruct the environmental histories of fish. PMID:26033292

  7. Anammox Coupled With Nitrification Impacts a Saline, High Ammonia Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, L. A.; Landkamer, L.; Peterson, D. M.; Metzler, D.

    2007-05-01

    High amounts of ammonia (130 to 2200 mg-N/l) in a saline environment (TDS = 10-20 g/l) are present in a groundwater plume adjacent to the Colorado River near Moab, Utah. Ammonia levels sufficient to affect aquatic life have been observed in limited sections of the river adjacent to the site, which has prompted interim treatment efforts. Microcosm studies were performed to assess the potential for microbial transformations of ammonia in the hyporheic zone sediment and the effect of ground/river-water mixing on transformations. Experiments were conducted using sub-riverbed sediment and mixtures of groundwater (290 mg-N/L ammonia) and river water (100%, 50% and 10% plume water) in anaerobic and aerobic environments. Aqueous NH4+, NO2-, NO3-, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were monitored over 38 days. Interestingly, the ammonia concentration decreased in all microcosms (29% to 100%) with the highest removal occurring in the oxic microcosms. Total nitrogen removal ranged from 27% to 83%. Three lines of evidence suggest that anammox occurred in the anaerobic microcosms: 1) NH4+ concentrations decreased, 2) little change in DOC occurred and 3) DIC decreased. DIC should increase if denitrification were the dominant process. It is possible that small amounts of O2 diffused into the microcosms, driving some nitrification that supplied NO2- for anammox. In the aerobic microcosms, denitrification or anammox occurred in addition to nitrification because nitrate did not accumulate in general. Again, we believe anammox occurred because of DOC and DIC trends. In the aerobic 10% groundwater microcosm, NO3- accumulated once the ammonia concentration became low and the nitrate level stabilized after the ammonia was gone. This also indicated that anammox was the dominant process because denitrification should not stop due to ammonia depletion. The aerobic microcosms were only agitated twice per week, which would allow the sediments to become

  8. How salinity and temperature combine to affect physiological state and performance in red knots with contrasting non-breeding environments.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Jorge S; Soriano-Redondo, Andrea; Dekinga, Anne; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Masero, José A; Piersma, Theunis

    2015-08-01

    Migratory shorebirds inhabit environments that may yield contrasting salinity-temperature regimes-with widely varying osmoregulatory demands, even within a given species-and the question is: by which physiological means and at which organisational level do they show adjustments with respect to these demands? Red knots Calidris canutus winter in coastal areas over a range of latitudes. The nominal subspecies winters in salty areas in the tropics, whereas the subspecies Calidris canutus islandica winters in north-temperate regions of comparatively lower salinities and temperatures. In this study, both subspecies of red knot were acclimated to different salinity (28/40‰)-temperature (5/35 °C) combinations for 2-week periods. We then measured food/salt intakes, basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass and temperature, fat and salt gland scores, gizzard mass, heat-shock proteins, heterophils/lymphocytes (H/L) ratio and plasma Na(+) to assess the responses of each taxon to osmoregulatory challenges. High salinity (HS)-warm-acclimated birds reduced food/salt intake, BMR, body mass, fat score and gizzard mass, showing that salt/heat loads constrained energy acquisition rates. Higher salt gland scores in saltier treatments indicated that its size was adjusted to higher osmoregulatory demands. Elevated plasma Na(+) and H/L ratio in high-salinity-warm-acclimated birds indicated that salt/heat loads might have a direct effect on the water-salt balance and stress responses of red knots. Subspecies had little or no effect on most measured parameters, suggesting that most adjustments reflect phenotypic flexibility rather than subspecific adaptations. Our results demonstrate how salinity and temperature affect various phenotypic traits in a migrant shorebird, highlighting the importance of considering these factors jointly when evaluating the environmental tolerances of air-breathing marine taxa. PMID:25851406

  9. Plasticity in sunflower leaf and cell growth under high salinity.

    PubMed

    Céccoli, G; Bustos, D; Ortega, L I; Senn, M E; Vegetti, A; Taleisnik, E

    2015-01-01

    A group of sunflower lines that exhibit a range of leaf Na(+) concentrations under high salinity was used to explore whether the responses to the osmotic and ionic components of salinity can be distinguished in leaf expansion kinetics analysis. It was expected that at the initial stages of the salt treatment, leaf expansion kinetics changes would be dominated by responses to the osmotic component of salinity, and that later on, ion inclusion would impose further kinetics changes. It was also expected that differential leaf Na(+) accumulation would be reflected in specific changes in cell division and expansion rates. Plants of four sunflower lines were gradually treated with a relatively high (130 mm NaCl) salt treatment. Leaf expansion kinetics curves were compared in leaves that were formed before, during and after the initiation of the salt treatment. Leaf areas were smaller in salt-treated plants, but the analysis of growth curves did not reveal differences that could be attributed to differential Na(+) accumulation, since similar changes in leaf expansion kinetics were observed in lines with different magnitudes of salt accumulation. Nevertheless, in a high leaf Na(+) -including line, cell divisions were affected earlier, resulting in leaves with proportionally fewer cells than in a Na(+) -excluding line. A distinct change in leaf epidermal pavement shape caused by salinity is reported for the first time. Mature pavement cells in leaves of control plants exhibited typical lobed, jigsaw-puzzle shape, whereas in treated plants, they tended to retain closer-to-circular shapes and a lower number of lobes. PMID:24942979

  10. Mapping Porewater Salinity with Electromagnetic Methods in Shallow Coastal Environments: Tampa Bay, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, W. J.; Kruse, S. E.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Meunier, J. K.

    2004-05-01

    The feasibility of predicting porewater salinity based on surface electromagnetic and resistivity methods was assessed in the shallow coastal waters and wetlands of Tampa Bay, Florida. The most successful method combined an initial core or surface resistivity measurement with pore water samples in order to determine formation factors in the shallow marine sediment. Data were collected over broader areas of interest using Geonics, Inc. EM-31 and EM-34 electromagnetic instruments and the Advanced Geosciences, Inc. SuperSting R8 marine resistivity instrument. To map coastal porewater conductivities, the EM instruments were adapted for use in shallow marine waters (<1 meter). In such high-conductivity environments, interpretation of EM readings requires processing with layered models of terrain conductivity that include direct sampling data. Typically, nearby marine resistivity readings are necessary to distinguish between equivalent EM model solutions. Porewater conductivities estimated from the layered EM models and the resistivity-derived formation factors show very good agreement with measured pore water conductivities. The use of EM systems in very shallow waters has potential application in locating prospective submarine groundwater discharge in areas that are difficult to reach with conventional towed marine resistivity arrays. Electromagnetic and direct sampling data show that salt exclusion by mangroves significantly increases pore water conductivities, and hence terrain conductivity readings within 10m of a mangrove shoreline. Terrain conductivities fall off to background values within 15m of the mangrove shoreline. The marine EM-31 measurements were effective at sensing the magnitude and lateral extent of high and low salinity porewaters within wetlands and mangrove lined ditches and ponds, which may be useful for interdisciplinary studies of coastal ecosystems.

  11. Electrochemical behavior of titanium in saline environments: The effects of temperature, pH, and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    VanVliet, K.J.; Wang, Z.F.; Briant, C.L.; Kumar, K.S.

    1998-12-31

    This research investigates the effects of temperature, pH, degree of salinity, galvanic coupling, microstructure, and composition on the electrochemical behavior of commercially pure titanium in a saline environment. Essentially, the findings establish that increased temperature, altered microstructure, decreased pH, and decreased purity of titanium all serve to increase the corrosion potential and cathodic reaction rate, thus making the metal more susceptible to hydrogen absorption. Further, the data indicate that galvanic coupling with certain metals such as naval brass and stainless steel can anodically polarize titanium, whereas coupling with metals such as aluminum, HY80 steel, and zinc catholically polarizes titanium, thus promoting hydrogen evolution on the titanium surface.

  12. Integration of herbicides with manual weeding for controlling the weeds in rice under saline environment.

    PubMed

    Hakim, M A; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hanafi, M M; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Karim, S M Rezaul; Kausar, H

    2015-11-01

    The pot experiment was conducted to select appropriate integrated weed management method in rice under different salinity levels (0, 4 and 8 dS m(-1)). All the parameters including rice and weed measured were significantly influenced by weed control treatments at all salinity levels. Treatments including weed-free condition, Pretilachlor @0.375 kg ai ha(-1) + hand weeding, Propanil + Thiobencarb @ 0.9 kg ai ha(-1) and 1.8 kg ai ha(-1)+ hand weeding performed better under all salinity levels. Pretilachlor @ 0.375 kg ai ha(-1) with one round of hand weeding and propanil + thiobencarb 0.9 kg ai ha(-1) + 1.8 kg ai ha(-1) with one round of hand weeding were comparable to weed-free yields, and were superior to other treatments under salinity condition. Considering all the parameters, pretilachlor @ 0.375 kg ai ha(-1) + one round of hand weeding (at 65 DAT), propanil + thiobencarb 0.9 kg ai ha(-1) +1.8 kg ai ha(-1) + one round of hand weeding (at 65 DAT) gave the most effective control of weeds in rice under saline environments. PMID:26688966

  13. Biogeochemical and hydrological controls in mobilizing Se in a saline wetland environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S.; Hettiarachchi, G. M.; Crawford, M.; Karna, R.; Allmendinger, N. E.; Khatiwada, R.

    2010-12-01

    Selenium (Se) contamination in watersheds remains a challenge to water and land and wildlife managers throughout the west and mid west of US. In that sense, understanding the fundamentals of Se mobilization, fixation and bioconcentration is the current research endeavor. The challenge for Se research is developing watershed-geochemical models that are well founded in Se geochemical/biologcial principles that can be applied in a wide range of situations to inform decisions. Pariette Wetlands, a 9000 acre Bureau of Land Management controlled wetland system composed of 20 ponds located at the confluence of Pariette Draw and the Green River is the present location of this study. The agricultural and irrigation practices and the water-rock interactions leading to salinization can be associated with changes in Se chemistry in the rivers. Since its inception Pariette Wetlands has been home to a rich and diverse wetland ecosystem located in the arid Uintah Basin of Northeastern Utah. Detailed sampling of surficial sediments (0-1 m) from stream banks, channel beds and for water sampling have been undergone in 2 separate field trips throughout the entire reach of the wetland. To establish Pariette Draw’s contribution of Se to the Green river, water and sediments were also sampled from the Green River up and downstream of its confluence with Pariette Draw. In situ measurements of water parameters within the wetland suggest a clear trend of increased pH from upstream, 8, to downstream, 9.2 and combined with TDS suggest a pH controlled saline environment system. The headwaters near Flood Control Dam have an added input of Se from a possible irrigation source upstream in Pleasant Valley area while Se drastically decreases downstream towards the Red Head Pond. Se fractionation in sediments is being analyzed via a sequential extraction procedure to locate the labile fractions of mostly inorganic bound Se. Solid state speciation of Se via μ-XRF aided μ-XANES is being combined

  14. Zwitterionic Antifouling Coatings for the Purification of High-Salinity Shale Gas Produced Water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Goktekin, Esma; Gleason, Karen K

    2015-11-01

    Fouling refers to the undesirable attachment of organic molecules and microorganisms to submerged surfaces. It is an obstacle to the purification of shale gas produced water and is currently without an effective solution due to the highly contaminated nature of produced water. Here, we demonstrate the direct vapor application of a robust zwitterionic coating to a variety of substrates. The coating remains unprecedentedly hydrophilic, smooth, and effectively antifouling in extremely high salinity solutions (with salt concentration of 200,000 ppm). The fouling resistance is assessed rapidly and quantitatively with a molecular force spectroscopy-based method and corroborated using quartz crystal microbalance system with dissipation monitoring. Grazing angle attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared is used in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry to lend insight into the underlying mechanism for the exceptional stability and effectiveness of the zwitterionic coating under high-salinity conditions. A unique coating architecture, where the surface is concentrated with mobile zwitterionic moieties while the bulk is cross-linked to enhance coating durability, was discovered to be the origin of its stable fouling resistance under high salinity. Combined with previously reported exceptional stability in highly oxidative environments and strong fouling resistance to oil and grease, the zwitterionic surface here has the potential to enable low-cost, membrane-based techniques for the purification of produced water and to eventually balance the favorable economics and the concerning environmental impacts of the hydraulic fracturing industry. PMID:26449686

  15. Growth and nitrogen fixation of legumes at increased salinity under field conditions: implications for the use of green manures in saline environments.

    PubMed

    Bruning, Bas; van Logtestijn, Richard; Broekman, Rob; de Vos, Arjen; González, Andrés Parra; Rozema, Jelte

    2015-01-01

    The use of legumes as green manure can potentially increase crop productivity in saline environments and thus contribute to the sustainability of agricultural systems. Here, we present results from a field experiment conducted in the Netherlands that addressed the efficiency of nitrogen (N) fixation by a legume at varying salinities. We grew Melilotus officinalis in an agricultural field using drip irrigation with water salinity varying in electrical conductivity between 1.7 and 20 dS m(-1). In the experiment, nearly 100 % of total plant N in M. officinalis was derived from symbiotic fixation at all but the highest salinity level (20 dS m(-1)). Our results indicated that this species derived substantial amounts of N via symbiotic fixation, the N becoming available in the soil (and thus available to crops) when cultivated legumes senesce and decompose. Based on the growth performance of M. officinalis and its ability to fix N at moderate soil salinity in our field experiments, we identified this species as a promising source for green manure in saline agriculture in temperate regions. PMID:25661201

  16. Growth and nitrogen fixation of legumes at increased salinity under field conditions: implications for the use of green manures in saline environments

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, Bas; van Logtestijn, Richard; Broekman, Rob; de Vos, Arjen; González, Andrés Parra; Rozema, Jelte

    2015-01-01

    The use of legumes as green manure can potentially increase crop productivity in saline environments and thus contribute to the sustainability of agricultural systems. Here, we present results from a field experiment conducted in the Netherlands that addressed the efficiency of nitrogen (N) fixation by a legume at varying salinities. We grew Melilotus officinalis in an agricultural field using drip irrigation with water salinity varying in electrical conductivity between 1.7 and 20 dS m−1. In the experiment, nearly 100 % of total plant N in M. officinalis was derived from symbiotic fixation at all but the highest salinity level (20 dS m−1). Our results indicated that this species derived substantial amounts of N via symbiotic fixation, the N becoming available in the soil (and thus available to crops) when cultivated legumes senesce and decompose. Based on the growth performance of M. officinalis and its ability to fix N at moderate soil salinity in our field experiments, we identified this species as a promising source for green manure in saline agriculture in temperate regions. PMID:25661201

  17. Denitrifying sulfide removal process on high-salinity wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Chaocheng; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Yadong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-08-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide, and acetate into nitrogen gas, elemental sulfur (S(0)), and carbon dioxide, respectively. Sulfide- and nitrate-laden wastewaters at 2-35 g/L NaCl were treated by DSR process. A C/N ratio of 3:1 was proposed to maintain high S(0) conversion rate. The granular sludge with a compact structure and smooth outer surface was formed. The microbial communities of DSR consortium via high-throughput sequencing method suggested that salinity shifts the predominating heterotrophic denitrifiers at <10 g/L NaCl to autotrophic denitrifiers at >10 g/L NaCl. PMID:25773977

  18. Quantifying the degradation of TNT and RDX in a saline environment with and without UV-exposure.

    PubMed

    Sisco, Edward; Najarro, Marcela; Bridge, Candice; Aranda, Roman

    2015-06-01

    Terrorist attacks in a maritime setting, such as the bombing of the USS Cole in 2000, or the detection of underwater mines, require the development of proper protocols to collect and analyse explosive material from a marine environment. In addition to proper analysis of the explosive material, protocols must also consider the exposure of the material to potentially deleterious elements, such as UV light and salinity, time spent in the environment, and time between storage and analysis. To understand how traditional explosives would be affected by such conditions, saline solutions of explosives were exposed to natural and artificial sunlight. Degradation of the explosives over time was then quantified using negative chemical ionization gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/NCI-MS). Two explosives, trinitrotoluene (TNT) and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), were exposed to different aqueous environments and light exposures with salinities ranging from freshwater to twice the salinity of ocean water. Solutions were then aged for up to 6 months to simulate different conditions the explosives may be recovered from. Salinity was found to have a negligible impact on the degradation of both RDX and TNT. RDX was stable in solutions of all salinities while TNT solutions degraded regardless of salinity. Solutions of varying salinities were also exposed to UV light, where accelerated degradation was seen for both explosives. Potential degradation products of TNT were identified using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and correspond to proposed degradation products discussed in previously published works [1]. PMID:25909992

  19. Salinity and High Temperature Tolerance in Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] from a Physiological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    HanumanthaRao, Bindumadhava; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Nayyar, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic constraints seriously affect the productivity of agriculture worldwide. The broadly recognized benefits of legumes in cropping systems—biological nitrogen fixation, improving soil fertility and broadening cereal-based agro-ecologies, are desirable now more than ever. Legume production is affected by hostile environments, especially soil salinity and high temperatures (HTs). Among legumes, mungbean has acceptable intrinsic tolerance mechanisms, but many agro-physiological characteristics of the Vigna species remain to be explored. Mungbean has a distinct advantage of being short-duration and can grow in wide range of soils and environments (as mono or relay legume). This review focuses on salinity and HT stresses on mungbean grown as a fallow crop (mungbean-rice-wheat to replace fallow-rice-wheat) and/or a relay crop in cereal cropping systems. Salinity tolerance comprises multifaceted responses at the molecular, physiological and plant canopy levels. In HTs, adaptation of physiological and biochemical processes gradually may lead to improvement of heat tolerance in plants. At the field level, managing or manipulating cultural practices can mitigate adverse effects of salinity and HT. Greater understanding of physiological and biochemical mechanisms regulating these two stresses will contribute to an evolving profile of the genes, proteins, and metabolites responsible for mungbean survival. We focus on abiotic stresses in legumes in general and mungbean in particular, and highlight gaps that need to be bridged through future mungbean research. Recent findings largely from physiological and biochemical fronts are examined, along with a few agronomic and farm-based management strategies to mitigate stress under field conditions. PMID:27446183

  20. Salinity and High Temperature Tolerance in Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] from a Physiological Perspective.

    PubMed

    HanumanthaRao, Bindumadhava; Nair, Ramakrishnan M; Nayyar, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic constraints seriously affect the productivity of agriculture worldwide. The broadly recognized benefits of legumes in cropping systems-biological nitrogen fixation, improving soil fertility and broadening cereal-based agro-ecologies, are desirable now more than ever. Legume production is affected by hostile environments, especially soil salinity and high temperatures (HTs). Among legumes, mungbean has acceptable intrinsic tolerance mechanisms, but many agro-physiological characteristics of the Vigna species remain to be explored. Mungbean has a distinct advantage of being short-duration and can grow in wide range of soils and environments (as mono or relay legume). This review focuses on salinity and HT stresses on mungbean grown as a fallow crop (mungbean-rice-wheat to replace fallow-rice-wheat) and/or a relay crop in cereal cropping systems. Salinity tolerance comprises multifaceted responses at the molecular, physiological and plant canopy levels. In HTs, adaptation of physiological and biochemical processes gradually may lead to improvement of heat tolerance in plants. At the field level, managing or manipulating cultural practices can mitigate adverse effects of salinity and HT. Greater understanding of physiological and biochemical mechanisms regulating these two stresses will contribute to an evolving profile of the genes, proteins, and metabolites responsible for mungbean survival. We focus on abiotic stresses in legumes in general and mungbean in particular, and highlight gaps that need to be bridged through future mungbean research. Recent findings largely from physiological and biochemical fronts are examined, along with a few agronomic and farm-based management strategies to mitigate stress under field conditions. PMID:27446183

  1. Osmolality and δ 13C of Leaf Tissues of Mangrove Species from Environments of Contrasting Rainfall and Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, E.; Francisco, M.

    1997-09-01

    Neotropical species of the generaRhizophora, LagunculariaandAvicenniagrow in environments of variable salinity and flooding stress. Species ofRhizophorapredominate in riverine and low-energy coastal fringe environments with continuous water movement, whileLaguncularia racemosa, and particularlyAvicennia germinans, grow in areas with stagnating water.Avicennia germinansappears to have the largest range of salinity tolerance. The osmotic characteristics ofRhizophoraspp.,L. racemosaandA. germinansin riverine and coastal environments of north-eastern Venezuela are described and correlated with edaphic and climatic factors. Mature, fully-exposed leaves were collected in humid riverine sites (San Juan River Estuary, Monagas and Sucre States), and seasonally dry coastal fringe habitats (the Unare Coastal Lagoon, and the Chimana Islands off-shore Puerto de La Cruz, Anzoátegui State). Cleaned leaf samples were frozen until measurement of leaf dimensions, chlorophyll, phosphorus and nitrogen contents, δ13C, osmolality of cell sap, and cell sap content of Na, K and Cl. Results indicate: (1) in all species, leaf sap osmolality is highly and positively correlated with interstitial water salinity, and negatively correlated with leaf area; (2) nitrogen and phosphorus contents of leaves are generally lower in dry areas, but average values are not significantly different. Therefore, it appears that nutrient deficiency is not a main factor determining variations in community structure. Nitrogen content per unit dry weight is, in general, twice as high inA. germinanscompared toRhizophoraspecies andL. racemosa; (3) cell sap osmolality is mostly explained by the concentration of Na and Cl; (4) osmolality of riverine plants (957-1253 mmol kg-1) is lower than that of coastal plants (1558-1761 mmol kg-1); and (5) δ13C values are more negative in riverine (-27·4 to -28·1‰) than in coastal plants (-25·4 to -27·2‰), indicating a higher water-use efficiency in the latter. Coastal

  2. Evaluation of materials for systems using cooled, treated geothermal or high-saline brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, D. F.; Wikoff, P. M.

    1982-09-01

    Lack of adequate quantities of clean surface water for use in wet (evaporative) cooling systems indicates the use of high-salinity waste waters, or cooled geothermal brines, for makeup purposes. High-chloride, aerated water represents an extremely corrosive environment. In order to determine metals suitable for use in such an environment, metal coupons were exposed to aerated, treated geothermal brine salted to a chloride concentration of 10,000 and 50,000 ppM (mg/L) for periods of up to 30 days. The exposed coupons were evaluated to determine the general, pitting, and crevice corrosion characteristics of the metals. Results indicate that ferritic stainless steels (29-4-2 and SEACURE) exhibit excellent corrosion resistance at all levels of chloride concentration. Copper-nickel alloys (70/30 and Monel 400) exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the high-saline water. The 70/30 copper-nickel alloy, which showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, exhibited mild pitting in the 30-day tests.

  3. Golden alga presence and abundance are inversely related to salinity in a high-salinity river ecosystem, Pecos River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Israël, Natascha M.D.; VanLandeghem, Matthew M.; Denny, Shawn; Ingle, John; Patino, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Prymnesium parvum (golden alga, GA) is a toxigenic harmful alga native to marine ecosystems that has also affected brackish inland waters. The first toxic bloom of GA in the western hemisphere occurred in the Pecos River, one of the saltiest rivers in North America. Environmental factors (water quality) associated with GA occurrence in this basin, however, have not been examined. Water quality and GA presence and abundance were determined at eight sites in the Pecos River basin with or without prior history of toxic blooms. Sampling was conducted monthly from January 2012 to July 2013. Specific conductance (salinity) varied spatiotemporally between 4408 and 73,786 mS/cm. Results of graphical, principal component (PCA), and zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression analyses indicated that the incidence and abundance of GA are reduced as salinity increases spatiotemporally. LOWESS regression and correlation analyses of archived data for specific conductance and GA abundance at one of the study sites retrospectively confirmed the negative association between these variables. Results of PCA also suggested that at <15,000 mS/cm, GA was present at a relatively wide range of nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) concentrations whereas at higher salinity, GA was observed only at mid-to-high nutrient levels. Generally consistent with earlier studies, results of ZIP regression indicated that GA presence is positively associated with organic phosphorus and in samples where GA is present, GA abundance is positively associated with organic nitrogen and negatively associated with inorganic nitrogen. This is the first report of an inverse relation between salinity and GA presence and abundance in riverine waters and of interaction effects of salinity and nutrients in the field. These observations contribute to a more complete understanding of environmental conditions that influence GA distribution in inland waters.

  4. Physiological and proteomic analyses of leaves from the halophyte Tangut Nitraria reveals diverse response pathways critical for high salinity tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tielong; Chen, Jinhui; Zhang, Jingbo; Shi, Shengqing; Zhou, Yanwei; Lu, Lu; Wang, Pengkai; Jiang, Zeping; Yang, Jinchang; Zhang, Shougong; Shi, Jisen

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinization poses a serious threat to the environment and agricultural productivity worldwide. Studies on the physiological and molecular mechanisms of salinity tolerance in halophytic plants provide valuable information to enhance their salt tolerance. Tangut Nitraria is a widely distributed halophyte in saline–alkali soil in the northern areas of China. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the molecular pathways of the high salt tolerance of T. Nitraria. We analyzed the changes in biomass, photosynthesis, and redox-related enzyme activities in T. Nitraria leaves from plant seedlings treated with high salt concentration. Comparative proteomic analysis of the leaves revealed that the expression of 71 proteins was significantly altered after salinity treatments of T. Nitraria. These salinity-responsive proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, stress/defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction, and membrane transport. Results showed that the reduction of photosynthesis under salt stress was attributed to the down-regulation of the enzymes and proteins involved in the light reaction and Calvin cycle. Protein–protein interaction analysis revealed that the proteins involved in redox homeostasis, photosynthesis, and energy metabolism constructed two types of response networks to high salt stress. T. Nitraria plants developed diverse mechanisms for scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in their leaves to cope with stress induced by high salinity. This study provides important information regarding the salt tolerance of the halophyte T. Nitraria. PMID:25713577

  5. Organohalogen emissions from saline environments - spatial extrapolation using remote sensing as most promising tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotte, K.; Löw, F.; Huber, S. G.; Krause, T.; Mulder, I.; Schöler, H. F.

    2012-03-01

    Due to their negative water budget most recent semi-/arid regions are characterized by vast evaporates (salt lakes and salty soils). We recently identified those hyper-saline environments as additional sources for a multitude of volatile halogenated organohalogens (VOX). These compounds can affect the ozone layer of the stratosphere and play a key role in the production of aerosols. A remote sensing based analysis was performed in the Southern Aral Sea basin, providing information of major soil types as well as their extent and spatial and temporal evolution. VOX production has been determined in dry and moist soil samples after 24 h. Several C1- and C2 organohalogens have been found in hyper-saline topsoil profiles, including CH3Cl, CH3Br, CHBr3 and CHCl3. The range of organohalogens also includes trans-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE), which is reported here to be produced naturally for the first time. Using MODIS time series and supervised image classification a daily production rate for DCE has been calculated for the 15 000 km2 ranging research area in the southern Aralkum. The applied laboratory setup simulates a short-term change in climatic conditions, starting from dried-out saline soil that is instantly humidified during rain events or flooding. It describes the general VOX production potential, but allows only for a rough estimation of resulting emission loads. VOX emissions are expected to increase in the future since the area of salt affected soils is expanding due to the regressing Aral Sea. Opportunities, limits and requirements of satellite based rapid change detection and salt classification are discussed.

  6. C:N:P Stoichiometry and Leaf Traits of Halophytes in an Arid Saline Environment, Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lilong; Zhao, Guanxiang; Li, Meng; Zhang, Mingting; Zhang, Lifang; Zhang, Xinfang; An, Lizhe; Xu, Shijian

    2015-01-01

    Salinization is an important and increasingly prevalent issue which has broad and profound effects on plant survival and distribution pattern. To understand the patterns and potential drivers of leaf traits in saline environments, we determined the soil properties, leaf morphological traits (specific leaf area, SLA, and leaf dry matter content, LDMC), leaf chemical traits (leaf carbon, C, nitrogen, N, and phosphorus, P, stoichiometry) based on 142 observations collected from 23 sites in an arid saline environment, which is a vulnerable ecosystem in northwest China. We also explored the relationships among leaf traits, the responses of leaf traits, and plant functional groups (herb, woody, and succulent woody) to various saline environments. The arid desert halophytes were characterized by lower leaf C and SLA levels, higher N, but stable P and N:P. The leaf morphological traits were correlated significantly with the C, N, and P contents across all observations, but they differed within each functional group. Succulent woody plants had the lowest leaf C and highest leaf N levels among the three functional groups. The growth of halophytes might be more limited by N rather than P in the study area. GLM analysis demonstrated that the soil available nutrients and plant functional groups, but not salinity, were potential drivers of leaf C:N:P stoichiometry in halophytes, whereas species differences accounted for the largest contributions to leaf morphological variations. Our study provides baseline information to facilitate the management and restoration of arid saline desert ecosystem. PMID:25798853

  7. Increased Deuterium Discrimination in Micronesian Mangroves Growing at High Salinity: Insights from Leaf and Xylem Water Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, N.; Sachs, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios of plant leaf waxes are increasingly used as a proxy for past hydrologic variability. However, a number of environmental variables influence the net fractionation between leaf waxes and the environmental water from which their hydrogen is ultimately derived. Salinity effects are of particular importance in coastal tropical and subtropical settings, where deuterium discrimination increases by 1.5‰ per salinity unit in the leaf wax n-alkanes of the grey mangrove, Avicennia marina. It is not possible to tell whether sedimentary n-alkanes are from mangrove plants, or from terrestrial plants that are not exposed to salt water. The salinity component of hydrogen isotope fractionation therefore complicates leaf wax hydrogen isotopes in most tropical coastal marine and lacustrine settings. However, a strong relationship between salinity and a more specific mangrove lipid biomarker could provide the basis for a paleosalinity and water isotope proxy in low-latitude coastal environments. Here we present results from a calibration study of Rhizophora spp. (red mangroves) growing on the Micronesian islands of Pohnpei and Palau, using taraxerol, a biomarker that is largely specific to this genus in these settings. We observed an increase in net deuterium discrimination between surface water and taraxerol of 1.2‰ per salinity unit. We investigated potential mechanisms for this increase at high salinity by measuring the hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf and xylem water from Rhizophora spp. Contrary to most terrestrial plants, xylem water in these trees is depleted relative to surface water, with greater relative depletion at higher salinities. This could be the result of increased deuterium discrimination during water uptake, as a greater percentage of salt is excluded by roots at higher salinity. Alternatively, it could indicate that some of the water in the xylem is from relatively depleted freshwater (rain and or dew) that enters the plant

  8. Desalination and reuse of high-salinity shale gas produced water: drivers, technologies, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Devin L; Arias Chavez, Laura H; Ben-Sasson, Moshe; Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-09-01

    In the rapidly developing shale gas industry, managing produced water is a major challenge for maintaining the profitability of shale gas extraction while protecting public health and the environment. We review the current state of practice for produced water management across the United States and discuss the interrelated regulatory, infrastructure, and economic drivers for produced water reuse. Within this framework, we examine the Marcellus shale play, a region in the eastern United States where produced water is currently reused without desalination. In the Marcellus region, and in other shale plays worldwide with similar constraints, contraction of current reuse opportunities within the shale gas industry and growing restrictions on produced water disposal will provide strong incentives for produced water desalination for reuse outside the industry. The most challenging scenarios for the selection of desalination for reuse over other management strategies will be those involving high-salinity produced water, which must be desalinated with thermal separation processes. We explore desalination technologies for treatment of high-salinity shale gas produced water, and we critically review mechanical vapor compression (MVC), membrane distillation (MD), and forward osmosis (FO) as the technologies best suited for desalination of high-salinity produced water for reuse outside the shale gas industry. The advantages and challenges of applying MVC, MD, and FO technologies to produced water desalination are discussed, and directions for future research and development are identified. We find that desalination for reuse of produced water is technically feasible and can be economically relevant. However, because produced water management is primarily an economic decision, expanding desalination for reuse is dependent on process and material improvements to reduce capital and operating costs. PMID:23885720

  9. Bio-inspired anti-oil-fouling chitosan-coated mesh for oil/water separation suitable for broad pH range and hyper-saline environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyan; Lu, Fei; Tao, Lei; Liu, Na; Gao, Changrui; Feng, Lin; Wei, Yen

    2013-11-27

    Here, we report a bio-inspired chitosan (CS)-based mesh with high separation efficiency, oil-fouling repellency, and stability in a complex liquid environment. The surface of the CS coating maintains underwater superoleophobicity and low oil adhesion (<1 μN) in pure water and hyper-saline solutions, and it can keep stable special wettability in broad pH range environments after the CS mesh is fully cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and then reduced by sodium borohydride to form a stable carbon-nitrogen single bond. The separation process is solely gravity-driven, and the mesh can separate a range of different oil/water mixtures with >99% separation efficiency in hyper-saline and broad pH range conditions. We envision that such a separation method will be useful in oil spill cleanup and industrial oily wastewater treatment in extreme environments. PMID:24180691

  10. Evaluation of materials for systems using cooled, treated geothermal or high-saline brines

    SciTech Connect

    Suciu, D.F.; Wikoff, P.M.

    1982-09-01

    Lack of adequate quantities of clean surface water for use in wet (evaporative) cooling systems indicates the use of high-salinity waste waters, or cooled geothermal brines, for makeup purposes. High-chloride, aerated water represents an extremely corrosive environment. In order to determine metals suitable for use in such an environment, metal coupons were exposed to aerated, treated geothermal brine salted to a chloride concentration of 10,000 and 50,000 ppM (mg/L) for periods of up to 30 days. The exposed coupons were evaluated to determine the general, pitting, and crevice corrosion characteristics of the metals. The metals exhibiting corrosion resistance at 50,000 ppM chloride were then evaluated at 100,000 and 200,000 ppM chloride. Since these were screening tests to select materials for components to be used in a cooling system, with primary emphasis on condenser tubing, several materials were exposed for 4 to 10 months in pilot cooling tower test units with heat transfer for further corrosion evaluation. The results of the screening tests indicate that ferritic stainless steels (29-4-2 and SEA-CURE) exhibit excellent corrosion resistance at all levels of chloride concentration. Copper-nickel alloys (70/30 and Monel 400) exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the high-saline water. The 70/30 copper-nickel alloy, which showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, exhibited mild pitting in the 30-day tests. This pitting was not apparent, however, after 6 months of exposure in the pilot cooling tower tests. The nickel-base alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance, but their high cost prevents their use unless no other material is found feasible. Other materials tested, although unsuitable for condenser tubing material, would be suitable as tube sheet material.

  11. Nonmagnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes from low-saline, nonmarine aquatic environments and their unusual negative phototactic behavior.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2010-05-01

    Magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes (MMPs) are unique magnetotactic bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria class and the first found to biomineralize the magnetic mineral greigite (Fe(3)S(4)). Thus far they have been reported only from marine habitats. We questioned whether MMPs exist in low-saline, nonmarine environments. MMPs were observed in samples from shallow springs in the Great Boiling Springs geothermal field and Pyramid Lake, both located in northwestern Nevada. The temperature at all sites was ambient, and salinities ranged from 5 to 11 ppt. These MMPs were not magnetotactic and did not contain magnetosomes (called nMMPs here). nMMPs ranged from 7 to 11 microm in diameter, were composed of about 40 to 60 Gram-negative cells, and were motile by numerous flagella that covered each cell on one side, characteristics similar to those of MMPs. 16S rRNA gene sequences of nMMPs show that they form a separate phylogenetic branch within the MMP group in the Deltaproteobacteria class, probably representing a single species. nMMPs exhibited a negative phototactic behavior to white light and to wavelengths of < or =480 nm (blue). We devised a "light racetrack" to exploit this behavior, which was used to photoconcentrate nMMPs for specific purposes (e.g., DNA extraction) even though their numbers were low in the sample. Our results show that the unique morphology of the MMP is not restricted to marine and magnetotactic prokaryotes. Discovery of nonmagnetotactic forms of the MMP might support the hypothesis that acquisition of the magnetosome genes involves horizontal gene transfer. To our knowledge, this is the first report of phototaxis in bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria class. PMID:20363801

  12. [Ecophysiological adaptability of tropical water organisms to salinity changes].

    PubMed

    Chung, K S

    2001-03-01

    Physiological response of tropical organisms to salinity changes was studied for some marine, estuarine and freshwater fishes (Astyanax bimaculatus, Petenia karussii, Cyprinodon dearborni, and Oreochromis mossambicus), marine and freshwater crustaceans (Penaeus brasiliensis, Penaeus schmitti and Macrobrachium carcinus), and marine bivalves (Perna perna, Crassostrea rhizophorae, and Arca zebra) collected from Northeast Venezuela. They were acclimated for four weeks at various salinities, and (1) placed at high salinities to determine mean lethal salinity, (2) tested by increasing salinity 5@1000 per day to define upper lethal salinity tolerance limit, or (3) observed in a saline gradient tank to determine salinity preference. Acclimation level was the most significant factor. This phenomenon is important for tropical aquatic organisms in shallow waters, where they can adapt to high salinity during the dry season and cannot lose their acclimation level at low salinity during abrupt rain. For saline adaptation of tropical organisms, this behavior will contribute to their proliferation and distribution in fluctuating salinity environments. PMID:11795174

  13. Conformational Free-Energy Landscapes for a Peptide in Saline Environments

    PubMed Central

    Gaborek, Timothy J.; Chipot, Christophe; Madura, Jeffry D.

    2012-01-01

    The conformations that proteins adopt in solution are a function of both their primary structure and surrounding aqueous environment. Recent experimental and computational work on small peptides, e.g., polyK, polyE, and polyR, have highlighted an interesting and unusual behavior in the presence of aqueous ions such as ClO4−, Na+, and K+. Notwithstanding the aforementioned studies, as of this writing, the nature of the driving force induced by the presence of ions and its role on the conformational stability of peptides remains only partially understood. Molecular-dynamics simulations have been performed on the heptapeptide AEAAAEA in NaCl and KCl solutions at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 M. Metadynamics in conjunction with a three-dimensional model reaction coordinate was used to sample the conformational space of the peptide. All simulations were run for 2 μs. Free-energy landscapes were computed over the model reaction coordinate for the peptide in each saline assay as well as in the absence of ions. Circular dichroism spectra were also calculated from each trajectory. In the presence of Na+ and K+ ions, no increase in helicity is observed with respect to the conformation in pure water. PMID:23260053

  14. Natural protein engineering: a uniquely salt-tolerant, but not halophilic, alpha-type carbonic anhydrase from algae proliferating in low- to hyper-saline environments.

    PubMed

    Bageshwar, Umesh K; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Gokhman, Irena; Savchenko, Tatyana; Sussman, Joel L; Zamir, Ada

    2004-02-01

    Dunaliella salina is a unicellular green alga thriving in environments ranging from fresh water to hyper-saline lakes, such as the Dead Sea. An unusual, internally duplicated, 60 kDa alpha-type carbonic anhydrase (dCA I), located on the surface of this alga, is expected to function over a broad range of salinities. It would therefore differ from other carbonic anhydrases that already lose activity at low salinities and also from halophilic proteins that require high salinities for conformational stability. Enzymatic analyses indeed indicated that dCA I retained activity at salt concentrations ranging from low salt to at least 1.5 M NaCl or KCl for CO(2) hydration, 2.0 M NaCl for esterase activity and 0.5 M for bicarbonate dehydration. Although measurements at higher salinities were constrained by the interference of salt in the respective assayed reactions, activity was noticeable even at 4.0 M NaCl. Comparisons of the internally duplicated dCA I to single-domain derivatives indicated that inter-domain interactions played a decisive role in the stability, activity, salt tolerance and pH responses of dCA I. Hence dCA I is a uniquely salt- tolerant protein, retaining an active conformation over a large range of salinities and, as a Zn metalloenzyme, largely immune to the specific inhibitory effects of anions. Its unique features make dCA I a useful model to understand the physico-chemical basis of halotolerance and protein-salt interactions in general. PMID:15047915

  15. Effect of high salinity on anaerobic treatment of low strength effluents.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, G; Gomec, C Y; Ozturk, I; Gonuldinc, S; Altinbas, M

    2003-01-01

    In anaerobic treatment, it is obligatory to know the effect of potentially inhibitory compounds due to the fact that methane formation may retard severely and may proceed slower than organic acid production. One of the most important inhibitory substances in anaerobic treatment is high salinity. In many cases, the main collectors of a municipal sewer system should have been built in the coastal zone and below the ground water level due to the available topography of wastewater catchments area, which is carrying the risk of seawater infiltration. Besides, one of the most convenient methods for leachate control is to treat landfill leachates with domestic wastewaters in the central municipal wastewater treatment plants such as in Istanbul. Thus, the nitrogen load of the treatment plants increase significantly. In this study, the effects of high salinity and ammonium nitrogen levels on mesophilic anaerobic tretament processes were investigated. In the first part of the study, high salinity effect on anaerobic treatment was investigated by feeding synthetic wastewater containing high salinity between 0.15%-1.5% ratios. In the second part of the study, the simultaneous effect of high salinity and ammonia (1.5% salinity+1,000 mg NH3/l) was examined by a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed Reactor (UASBR). Results indicated no significant inhibition in both cases and effective COD removals (89%) and total biogas productions having methane content of 84% could be achieved. PMID:14753538

  16. Optimization of Geological Environments for Carbon Dioxide Disposan in Saline Aquifers in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, Susan

    1999-02-01

    Recent research and applications have demonstrated technologically feasible methods, defined costs, and modeled processes needed to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline-water-bearing formations (aquifers). One of the simplifying assumptions used in previous modeling efforts is the effect of real stratigraphic complexity on transport and trapping in saline aquifers. In this study we have developed and applied criteria for characterizing saline aquifers for very long-term sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate a methodology for optimizing matches between CO{sub 2} sources and nearby saline formations that can be used for sequestration. This project identified 14 geologic properties used to prospect for optimal locations for CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline-water-bearing formations. For this demonstration, we digitized maps showing properties of saline formations and used analytical tools in a geographic information system (GIS) to extract areas that meet variably specified prototype criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Through geologic models, realistic aquifer properties such as discontinuous sand-body geometry are determined and can be used to add realistic hydrologic properties to future simulations. This approach facilitates refining the search for a best-fit saline host formation as our understanding of the most effective ways to implement sequestration proceeds. Formations where there has been significant drilling for oil and gas resources as well as extensive characterization of formations for deep-well injection and waste disposal sites can be described in detail. Information to describe formation properties can be inferred from poorly known saline formations using geologic models in a play approach. Resulting data sets are less detailed than in well-described examples but serve as an effective screening tool to identify prospects for more detailed work.

  17. Calcium transport in gill cells of Ucides cordatus, a mangrove crab living in variable salinity environments.

    PubMed

    Leite, V P; Zanotto, F P

    2013-10-01

    Crustaceans show discontinuous growth and have been used as a model system for studying cellular mechanisms of calcium transport, which is the main mineral found in their exoskeleton. Ucides cordatus, a mangrove crab, is naturally exposed to fluctuations in calcium and salinity. To study calcium transport in this species during isosmotic conditions, dissociated gill cells were marked with fluo-3 and intracellular Ca(2+) change was followed by adding extracellular Ca(2+) as CaCl2 (0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0 and 5mM), together with different inhibitors. For control gill cells, Ca(2+) transport followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Vmax=0.137±0.001 ∆Ca(2+)i (μM×22.10(4)cells(-1)×180s(-1); N=4; r(2)=0.99); Km=0.989±0.027mM. The use of different inhibitors for gill cells showed that amiloride (Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange inhibitor) inhibited 80% of Ca(2+) transport in gill cells (Vmax). KB-R, an inhibitor of Ca influx in vertebrates, similarly caused a decrease in Ca(2+) transport and verapamil (Ca(2+) channel inhibitor) had no effect on Ca(2+) transport, while nifedipine (another Ca(2+) channel inhibitor) caused a 20% decrease in Ca(2+) affinity compared to control values. Ouabain, on the other hand, caused no change in Ca(2+) transport, while vanadate increased the concentration of intracellular calcium through inhibition of Ca(2+) efflux probably through the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase. Results show that transport kinetics for Ca(2+) in these crabs under isosmotic conditions is lower compared to a hyper-regulator freshwater crab Dilocarcinus pagei studied earlier using fluorescent Ca(2+) probes. These kinds of studies will help understanding the comparative mechanisms underlying the evolution of Ca transport in crabs living in different environments. PMID:23867752

  18. Ky-2, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Enhances High-Salinity Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sako, Kaori; Kim, Jong-Myong; Matsui, Akihiro; Nakamura, Kotaro; Tanaka, Maho; Kobayashi, Makoto; Saito, Kazuki; Nishino, Norikazu; Kusano, Miyako; Taji, Teruaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-04-01

    Adaptation to environmental stress requires genome-wide changes in gene expression. Histone modifications are involved in gene regulation, but the role of histone modifications under environmental stress is not well understood. To reveal the relationship between histone modification and environmental stress, we assessed the effects of inhibitors of histone modification enzymes during salinity stress. Treatment with Ky-2, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhanced high-salinity stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. We confirmed that Ky-2 possessed inhibition activity towards histone deacetylases by immunoblot analysis. To investigate how Ky-2 improved salt stress tolerance, we performed transcriptome and metabolome analysis. These data showed that the expression of salt-responsive genes and salt stress-related metabolites were increased by Ky-2 treatment under salinity stress. A mutant deficient inAtSOS1(Arabidopis thaliana SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE 1), which encodes an Na(+)/H(+)antiporter and was among the up-regulated genes, lost the salinity stress tolerance conferred by Ky-2. We confirmed that acetylation of histone H4 atAtSOS1was increased by Ky-2 treatment. Moreover, Ky-2 treatment decreased the intracellular Na(+)accumulation under salinity stress, suggesting that enhancement of SOS1-dependent Na(+)efflux contributes to increased high-salinity stress tolerance caused by Ky-2 treatment. PMID:26657894

  19. Geologic CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers accounting for dual permeability/porosity environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randolph, J. B.; Saar, M. O.

    2008-12-01

    The State of Minnesota, like many regions of the United States and beyond, has mandated significant reductions in CO2 emissions by mid-century, and geologic CO2 sequestration is recognized as one means by which to meet emissions goals. Unfortunately, the state, like many other regions, does not contain sedimentary basins that meet the currently established criteria for CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. That is, existing basins, though expansive, are shallower (e.g., the Mount Simon aquifer in Minnesota) or less permeable (e.g., the Midcontinental Rift System) than sedimentary units that are typically considered for sequestration. The field of karst hydrogeology recognizes the importance of multiple permeability/porosity systems in groundwater transport and storage. High permeability fracture networks permit rapid groundwater transport while the large, lower permeability matrix allows for significant storage. With this motivation, we develop a geologic CO2 sequestration model, using TOUGH2 and TOUGHREACT, which accounts for the presence of multiple permeability/porosity structures. Capillary forces play an important role in these multiphase, multi-permeability and porosity systems. Our preliminary models investigate whether the Midcontinental Rift System could prove a viable candidate for geologic CO2 sequestration, should suitable fracture networks (among other criteria) be located there.

  20. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) exposed to low and high salinity.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Carreño, Santiago; Valencia-Yáñez, Ricardo; Correa-Sandoval, Francisco; Ruíz-García, Noé; Díaz-Herrera, Fernando; Giffard-Mena, Ivone

    2014-09-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has a worldwide distribution and is considered one of the most pathogenic and devastating viruses to the shrimp industry. A few studies have explored the effect of WSSV on shrimp acclimated to low (5 practical salinity units [psu]) or high ([40 psu) salinity conditions. In this work, we analysed the physiological response of WSSV-infected Litopenaeus vannamei juveniles that were acclimated to different salinities (5, 15, 28, 34 and 54 psu). We evaluated the osmotic response and survival of the shrimp at different times after infection (0 to 48 hours), and we followed the expression levels of a viral gene (vp664) in shrimp haemolymph using real-time PCR. Our results indicate that the susceptibility of the shrimp to the virus increased at extreme salinities (5 and 54 psu), with higher survival rates at 15 and 28 psu, which were closer to the iso-osmotic point (24.7 psu, 727.5 mOsmol/kg). Acute exposure to the virus made the haemolymph less hyperosmotic at 5 and 15 psu and less hypo-osmotic at higher salinities ([28 psu). The capacity of white shrimp to osmoregulate, and thus survive, significantly decreased following WSSV infection. According to our results, extreme salinities (5 or 54 psu) are more harmful than seawater. PMID:24658782

  1. Denitrifying sulfide removal process on high-salinity wastewaters in the presence of Halomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Dongfeng; Ma, Wenjuan; Guo, Yadong; Wang, Aijie; Wang, Qilin; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-02-01

    Biological conversion of sulfide, acetate, and nitrate to, respectively, elemental sulfur (S(0)), carbon dioxide, and nitrogen-containing gas (such as N2) at NaCl concentration of 35-70 g/L was achieved in an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor. A C/N ratio of 1:1 was noted to achieve high sulfide removal and S(0) conversion rate at high salinity. The extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) quantities were increased with NaCl concentration, being 11.4-mg/g volatile-suspended solids at 70 mg/L NaCl. The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) consortium incorporated Thauera sp. and Halomonas sp. as the heterotrophs and Azoarcus sp. being the autotrophs at high salinity condition. Halomonas sp. correlates with the enhanced DSR performance at high salinity. PMID:26454867

  2. Hyperspectral data recognition and mapping of soil salinization in arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ning; Zhang, Zhi; Gao, Yang

    2005-10-01

    Hyperspectral imagery of airborne imaging spectrometer (Pushbroom Hyperspectral Imager (PHI)) was acquired over KeLaMaYi, which situated in arid region of northwestern China. In situ hyperspectral data obtained with FieldSpec HandHeld spectrometer (ASD) simultaneously were analyzed for recognition of soil salinization. Some types of transformation were applied to the reflectance data of 60 soil samples, which preprocessed with a simple smoothing followed by band merging. A comparative study among these methods was made to ascertain their applicability for recognition accuracies. After multivariate analysis between ion concentration and reflectance data or their derivatives, a best statistical model was then extracted to predict the soil salinity and PH. Using this prediction model, subpixel classification applied to the corrected imagery helped to yield quantitative maps of soil salinity and PH. Such maps contributed to suggesting soil distribution and aggregation, estimating the spatial controls of erosion, and consequently, helping to plan soil improvement and soil conservation schemes.

  3. Ultrasonic Measurements of Unconsolidated Saline Sediments During Freeze/Thaw Cycles: The Seismic Properties of Cryopeg Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Saline permafrost and cryopegs (hypersaline unfrozen layers/zones within permafrost) are widespread in the Arctic coastal area as a result of marine transgression and regression in recent geological history. Owing to the freezing-point depression effect of soluble salts, they contain more unfrozen water than non-saline frozen sediments when subjected to the same permafrost temperatures (e.g., from 0 to -15 °C). Mapping subsurface cryopeg structure remains a challenging geophysical task due to the poor penetration of GPR in highly conductive fluids and related limitations for lower frequency EM techniques. Seismic profiling, particularly surface wave characterization, provides one possible approach to delineate the extent of cryopeg bodies. However, interpretation of such surveys is currently limited by the sparse database of measurements examining the seismic properties of unconsolidated materials saturated with saline fluids at sub-zero temperatures. We present the results of experiments examining seismic velocity in the ultrasonic range for both synthetic and natural permafrost sediments during freeze/thaw cycles; in these experiments, use of a range of brine salinities allows us to evaluate the properties of cryopeg sediments at in-situ conditions, a prerequisite for quantitative interpretation of seismic imaging results. Because of the abundant unfrozen water and less developed inter-granular ice structure, the seismic properties of saline permafrost typically falls between frozen and unfrozen soils. We conducted ultrasonic measurements of a freeze-thaw cycle on 20-30 Ottawa sand (grain size 590-840 μm) as well as natural mineral soils from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) saturated with brines of different salinities (0-2.5 M NaCl). For each salinity, seismic properties were measured using the ultrasonic (~1 MHz) pulse-transmission method in the temperature range from 20 to -30 °C. Similar to sediments saturated with low salinity fluids, seismic

  4. Salinity, pressure and heavy-metal stress response of moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from hydrothermal-vent environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, J. Z.; Baross, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    Moderately halophilic bacteria comprised 0.01-10% of the total microbial community in low-temperature hydrothermal emissions and in the overlying water column. The presence of these microorganisms was initially thought to be linked to brines that are produced by super-critical phase separation beneath deep-sea mid-ocean ridges. While there is conclusive evidence that these brines exist at extremely hot (>400°C) temperatures, it is difficult to construct geochemical and fluid-flow models which would delineate extensive subseafloor brine environments in mesophilic to hyperthermophilic temperature ranges. An alternative hypothesis is that halotolerance is actually induced by an environmental stress other than salt. Pressure and heavy metals are likely candidates. Diffuse flow environments at Axial Seamount and the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and along the Southern East Pacific Rise are both elevated in concentrations of heavy metals and under moderate pressure (150-270 atm; higher beneath the seafloor). From these fluids we isolated numerous strains of moderately halophilic bacteria belonging to the genera Halomonas and Marinobacter. At ambient pressure, isolates grew between -1 and 40°C, with up to 25% NaCl, and with 2.0-3.0 mM cadmium. The isolates displayed widely varying pressure maxima and cell yields as a function of temperature and salinity. High pressure and salt (and heavy metals?) may independently induce a stress response that enables these bacteria to cope with all of these stresses. Also in progress are molecular-phylogenetic analyses of moderately halophilic bacterial populations from diffuse flow sites along the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We expect that many of the organisms detected using our novel primers will have been cultured. With the knowledge of their physiologies and how their diversity changes in relation to fluid chemistry, these data may shed light on the dynamic subseafloor hydrothermal system that supports them.

  5. The Effect of Growth Environment and Salinity on Lipid Production and Composition of Salicornia virginica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bomani, Bilal Mark McDowell; Link, Dirk; Kail, Brian; Morreale, Bryan; Lee, Eric S.; Gigante, Bethany M.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Finding a viable and sustainable source of renewable energy is a global task. Biofuels as a renewable energy source can potentially be a viable option for sustaining long-term energy needs. Biodiesel from halophytes shows great promise due to their ability to serve not only as a fuel source, but a food source as well. Halophytes are one of the few biomass plant species that can tolerate a wide range of saline conditions. We investigate the feasibility of using the halophyte, Salicornia virginica as a biofuel source by conducting a series of experiments utilizing various growth and salinity conditions. The goal is to determine if the saline content of Salicornia virginica in our indoor growth vs outdoor growth conditions has an influence on lipid recovery and total biomass composition. We focused on using standard lipid extraction protocols and characterization methods to evaluate twelve Salicornia virginica samples under six saline values ranging from freshwater to seawater and two growth conditions. The overall goal is to develop an optimal lipid extraction protocol for Salicornia virginica and potentially apply this protocol to halophytes in general.

  6. The high reutilization value potential of high-salinity anchovy fishmeal wastewater through microbial degradation.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Juan Gerardo Santoyo; Jung, Hyun Yi; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Joong Kyun

    2015-10-01

    To provide an option for the reutilization of high-salinity anchovy fishmeal wastewater (FMW), generated during the anchovy fishmeal manufacturing processes, its potential for biodegradation was assessed in 1-l five-neck flasks using a halotolerant and proteolytic microbial consortium. During the first 41 h of biodegradation, the pH, DO, ORP, and dry-sludge weight decreased as the total cell number of the microbial consortium increased steadily; the COD(Cr)/TN ratios remained between 4.0 and 5.5, respectively, indicating the stable metabolic degradation of organic matter. The ORP tended to increase after 41 h, and the unpleasant fishy smell disappeared once positive ORP values were achieved. The removal percentages of COD(Cr) and TN were 59.0 and 54.4%, respectively, and the dry-sludge weight decreased from 115.5 to 68.0 g, with a degradation rate of 0.59 g h(-1), during the 80 h experiment. The supernatant from the culture of the anchovy FMW at 70 h (culture supernatant) was phytotoxin-free, and the level of total amino acids was 8.04 g 100 g(-1), comparable to that of commercial fertilizers. In hydroponic cultures containing red bean and barley, the culture supernatant demonstrated a good fertilizing ability. The culture supernatant also exhibited a high degree of antioxidant activity, with a 52.3% hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity and 0.16 reducing power (at OD 700 nm). Moreover, the culture supernatant inhibited DNA damage from hydroxyl radicals, enhancing the reutilization value of anchovy FMW. This report presents the first description of high-salinity anchovy FMW possessing a high reutilization value potential both for agriculture and medicine. PMID:26201424

  7. Isolation of UV-B resistant bacteria from two high altitude Andean lakes (4,400 m) with saline and non saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Flores, María R; Ordoñez, Omar F; Maldonado, Marcos J; Farías, María E

    2009-12-01

    Laguna (L.) Negra and L. Verde are high altitude Andean lakes located at the 4,400 m altitude in the Andean desert (Puna) in the Argentine northwest. Both lakes are exposed to extreme weather conditions but differ in salinity contents (salinity 6.7% for L. Negra and 0.27% for L. Verde). The aim of this work was to isolate ultraviolet B fraction (UV-B) resistant bacteria under UV-stress in order to determine, a possible connection, between resistance to UV-B and tolerance to salinity. DNA damage was determined by measuring CPDs accumulation. Connection among pigmentation production and UV resistance was also studied. Water samples were exposed to artificial UV-B radiation for 24 h. Water aliquots were plated along the exposition on different media, with different salinity and carbon source content (Lake medium (LM) done with the lake water plus agar and LB). CFU were counted and DNA damage accumulation was determined. Isolated bacteria were identified by 16S rDNA sequence. Their salinity tolerance, were measured at 1, 5 and 10% NaCl and their pigment production in both media was determined. In general it was found that UV resistance and pigment production were the optimum in Lake Medium done with lake water which maintained similar salinity. The most resistant bacteria in L. Negra were different strains of Exiguobacterium sp. and, in L. Verde, Staphylococcus sp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. These bacteria showed the production and increase of UV-Vis absorbing compounds under UV stress and in LM. Bacterial communities from both lakes were well adapted to high UV-B exposure under the experimental conditions, and in many cases UV-B even stimulated growth. The idea that resistance to UV-B could be related to adaptation to high salinity is still an open question that has to be answered with future experiments. PMID:20118609

  8. High Tolerance to Salinity and Herbivory Stresses May Explain the Expansion of Ipomoea Cairica to Salt Marshes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Huang, Qiao-Qiao; Lin, Zhen-Guang; Huang, Fang-Fang; Liao, Hui-Xuan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasive plants are often confronted with heterogeneous environments and various stress factors during their secondary phase of invasion into more stressful habitats. A high tolerance to stress factors may allow exotics to successfully invade stressful environments. Ipomoea cairica, a vigorous invader in South China, has recently been expanding into salt marshes. Methodology/Principal Findings To examine why this liana species is able to invade a stressful saline environment, we utilized I. cairica and 3 non-invasive species for a greenhouse experiment. The plants were subjected to three levels of salinity (i.e., watered with 0, 4 and 8 g L−1 NaCl solutions) and simulated herbivory (0, 25 and 50% of the leaf area excised) treatments. The relative growth rate (RGR) of I. cairica was significantly higher than the RGR of non-invasive species under both stress treatments. The growth performance of I. cairica was not significantly affected by either stress factor, while that of the non-invasive species was significantly inhibited. The leaf condensed tannin content was generally lower in I. cairica than in the non-invasive I. triloba and Paederia foetida. Ipomoea cairica exhibited a relatively low resistance to herbivory, however, its tolerance to stress factors was significantly higher than either of the non-invasive species. Conclusions/Significance This is the first study examining the expansion of I. cairica to salt marshes in its introduced range. Our results suggest that the high tolerance of I. cairica to key stress factors (e.g., salinity and herbivory) contributes to its invasion into salt marshes. For I. cairica, a trade-off in resource reallocation may allow increased resources to be allocated to tolerance and growth. This may contribute to a secondary invasion into stressful habitats. Finally, we suggest that I. cairica could spread further and successfully occupy salt marshes, and countermeasures based on herbivory could be ineffective for

  9. The geomorphology of two hyper-saline springs in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. K.; Pollard, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    On Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic a number of low temperature perennial saline springs occur despite being subject to a cold polar desert climate with a mean annual air temperature of -18°C. Associated with 2 groups of hyper-saline springs are distinctive landforms resulting from winter deposition of salt minerals. These deposits resemble tufas structurally but unlike true tufas which are composed of carbonate minerals, these landforms are formed mainly of salt. This study hypothesizes that the extreme cold winter air temperatures cools water temperatures triggering rapid precipitation of various salt minerals (mainly hydrohalite, NaCl*2H2O) which subsequently alters the flow hydrology by obstructing summer flow paths. The tufa-like appearance of these salt deposits reflects the interaction between changing water temperature, chemistry and flow. This research characterises the geomorphology and geochemistry of two hyper-saline springs on Axel Heiberg Island: the first is located at Wolf Diapir (79°07'23'N; 90°14'39'W), the deposit at this site resembles a large conical mound (2.5m tall x 3m diameter). The second is located at Stolz Diapir (79°04'30'N; 87°04'30'W), in this case a series of pool and barrage structures staircase down a narrow valley for approximately 300m (several pools are 10 m wide x 3 m deep). The springs have very different seasonal surface hydrologic regimes and topographic settings which influence the pattern of mineral precipitates. The accumulation of precipitates occurs during the winter and is dominated by the formation of hydrohalite. In the summer, the accumulated hydrohalite melts incongruently to form halite; spring water and snowmelt dissolves various parts of the accumulations, changing the morphology of the deposits. The aim of this poster is to present preliminary observations characterising the processes driving tufa formation in a permafrost environment, a process that has not been described in detail in

  10. Adaptability of Typha domingensis to high pH and salinity.

    PubMed

    Mufarrege, M M; Di Luca, G A; Hadad, H R; Maine, M A

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the adaptability of two different populations of Typha domingensis exposed to high pH and salinity. The plants were sampled from an uncontaminated natural wetland (NW) and a constructed wetland (CW) for the treatment of an industrial effluent with high pH and salinity. The plants from each population were exposed to the following combined treatments of salinity (mg l(-1)) and pH: 8,000/10 (values found in the CW); 8,000/7; 200/10 and 200/7 (typical values found in the NW). Chlorophyll concentration, relative growth rates (RGR) and root structure parameters (cross-sectional areas of root, stele and metaxylem vessels) were measured. Images of roots and leaves by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were obtained, and X-ray microanalysis in different tissues was carried out. In all treatments, the RGR and chlorophyll increase were significantly lower in the plants from the NW than in the plants from the CW. However, stress was observed when the plants from the CW were exposed to treatment 200/7. In treatment 8,000/10 the tissues of the plants from the NW showed severe damages. The root structure of plants from the CW was modified by salinity, while pH did not produce changes. In plants from the CW there were no differences between Na concentration in leaves of the treatments 8,000/10 and 200/7, indicating that Na was not transported to leaves. The CW population already possesses physiological and morphological adaptations due to the extreme conditions of pH and salinity. Because of its adaptive capacity, T. domingensis is an efficient species to treat wastewater of high pH and salinity. PMID:21287266

  11. Evidence for high salinity of Early Cretaceous sea water from the Chesapeake Bay crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Doughten, Michael W.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Bullen, Thomas D.

    2013-11-01

    High-salinity groundwater more than 1,000 metres deep in the Atlantic coastal plain of the USA has been documented in several locations, most recently within the 35-million-year-old Chesapeake Bay impact crater. Suggestions for the origin of increased salinity in the crater have included evaporite dissolution, osmosis and evaporation from heating associated with the bolide impact. Here we present chemical, isotopic and physical evidence that together indicate that groundwater in the Chesapeake crater is remnant Early Cretaceous North Atlantic (ECNA) sea water. We find that the sea water is probably 100-145 million years old and that it has an average salinity of about 70 per mil, which is twice that of modern sea water and consistent with the nearly closed ECNA basin. Previous evidence for temperature and salinity levels of ancient oceans have been estimated indirectly from geochemical, isotopic and palaeontological analyses of solid materials in deep sediment cores. In contrast, our study identifies ancient sea water in situ and provides a direct estimate of its age and salinity. Moreover, we suggest that it is likely that remnants of ECNA sea water persist in deep sediments at many locations along the Atlantic margin.

  12. High salinity in molasses wastewaters shifts anaerobic digestion to carboxylate production.

    PubMed

    De Vrieze, Jo; Coma, Marta; Debeuckelaere, Matthias; Van der Meeren, Paul; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-07-01

    Biorefinery wastewaters are often treated by means of anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. Alternatively, these wastewaters can be fermented, leading to the formation of carboxylates. Here, we investigated how lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors could be shifted to fermentation by changing organic loading rate, hydraulic retention time, pH, and salinity. A strong increase in volatile fatty acid concentration up to 40 g COD L(-1) was achieved through increasing salinity above 30 mS cm(-1), as well as a decrease in methane production by more than 90%, which could not be obtained by adjusting the other parameters, thus, indicating a clear shift from methane to carboxylate production. Microbial community analysis revealed a shift in bacterial community to lower evenness and richness values, following the increased salinity and VFA concentration during the fermentation process. A selective enrichment of the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales took place upon the shift to fermentation, despite a severe decrease in methane production. Particle size distribution revealed a strong degranulation of the sludge in the reactor, related to the high salinity, which resulted in a wash-out of the biomass. This research shows that salinity is a key parameter enabling a shift from methane to carboxylate production in a stable fermentation process. PMID:27110885

  13. Evidence for high salinity of Early Cretaceous sea water from the Chesapeake Bay crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.; Doughten, Michael W.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Bullen, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    High salinity groundwater more than 1000 metres deep in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the United States has been documented in several locations1,2, most recently within the 35 million-year-old Chesapeake Bay impact crater3,4,5. Suggestions for the origin of increased salinity in the crater have included evaporite dissolution6, osmosis6, and evaporation from heating7 associated with the bolide impact. Here we present chemical, isotopic and physical evidence that together indicate that groundwater in the Chesapeake crater is remnant Early Cretaceous North Atlantic (ECNA) seawater. We find that the seawater is likely 100-145 million years old and that it has an average salinity of about 70 per mil, which is twice that of modern seawater and consistent with the nearly closed ECNA basin8. Previous evidence for temperature and salinity levels of ancient oceans have been estimated indirectly from geochemical, isotopic and paleontological analyses of solid materials in deep sediment cores. In contrast, our study identifies ancient seawater in situ and provides a direct estimate of its age and salinity. Moreover, we suggest that it is likely that remnants of ECNA seawater persist in deep sediments at many locations along the Atlantic margin.

  14. High salinity volatile phases in magmatic Ni-Cu-platinum group element deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J. J.; Mungall, J. E.

    2004-12-01

    The role of "deuteric" fluids (exsolved magmatic volatile phases) in the development of Ni-Cu-PGE (platinum group element) deposits in mafic-ultramafic igneous systems is poorly understood. Although considerable field evidence demonstrates unambiguously that fluids modified most large primary Ni-Cu-PGE concentrations, models which hypothesize that fluids alone were largely responsible for the economic concentration of the base and precious metals are not widely accepted. Determination of the trace element composition of magmatic volatile phases in such ore-forming systems can offer considerable insight into the origin of potentially mineralizing fluids in such igneous environments. Laser ablation ICP-MS microanalysis allows researchers to confirm the original metal budget of magmatic volatile phases and quantify the behavior of trace ore metals in the fluid phase in the absence of well-constrained theoretical or experimental predictions of ore metal solubility. In this study, we present new evidence from major deposits (Sudbury, Ontario, Canada; Stillwater Complex, Montana, U.S.A.) that compositionally distinct magmatic brines and halide melt phases were exsolved from crystallizing residual silicate melt and trapped within high-T fluid conduits now comprised of evolved rock compositions (albite-quartz graphic granite, orthoclase-quartz granophyre). Petrographic evidence demonstrates that brines and halide melts coexisted with immiscible carbonic phases at the time of entrapment (light aliphatic hydrocarbons, CO2). Brine and halide melt inclusions are rich in Na, Fe, Mn, K, Pb, Zn, Ba, Sr, Al and Cl, and homogenize by either halite dissolution at high T ( ˜450-700° C) or by melting of the salt phase (700-800° C). LA-ICPMS analyses of single inclusions demonstrate that high salinity volatile phases contained abundant base metals (Cu, Fe, Sn, Bi) and precious metals (Pt, Pd, Au, Ag) at the time of entrapment. Notably, precious metal concentrations in the inclusions

  15. A modified resistance equation for modeling underwater spark discharge with salinity and high pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Pengfei; Roy, Subrata

    2014-05-07

    This work investigates the performance of underwater spark discharge relating to bubble growth and decay under high pressure and with salinity conditions by introducing a modified form of the resistance equation. Here, we study salinity influence on circuit parameters by fitting the experimental data for which gap resistance is much larger in conductive water than in dielectric water. Accordingly, the resistance equation is modified by considering the influence of both plasma and its surrounding liquid. Thermal radiation effect of the bubble is also studied by comparing two different radiation models. Numerical results predict a larger bubble pressure for saline water but a reduced size and a smaller bubble cycle at a greater water depth. Such study may be useful in many saltwater applications, including that for deep sea conditions.

  16. Coping with naturally high levels of soil salinity and boron in the westside of central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Westside of central California, over 200,000 ha exhibit naturally high levels of salinity and boron (B). The Coast Ranges of the west central California evolved from complex folding and faulting of sedimentary and igneous rocks of Mesozoic and Tertiary age. Cretaceous and Tertiary marine sedi...

  17. Measuring Salinity by Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapworth, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines procedures for constructing an instrument which uses an electrode and calibration methods to measure the salinity of waters in environments close to and affected by a saline estuary. (Author/DC)

  18. High-dose diazepam facilitates core cooling during cold saline infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hostler, David; Northington, William E; Callaway, Clifton W

    2009-08-01

    Studies have suggested that inducing mild hypothermia improves neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury, major stroke, cardiac arrest, or exertional heat illness. While infusion of cold normal saline is a simple and inexpensive method for reducing core temperature, human cold-defense mechanisms potentially make this route stressful or ineffective. We hypothesized that intravenous administration of diazepam during a rapid infusion of 30 mL.kg-1 of cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline to healthy subjects would be more comfortable and reduce core body temperature more than the administration of cold saline alone. Fifteen subjects received rapidly infused cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive, intravenously, 20 mg diazepam (HIGH), 10 mg diazepam (LOW), or placebo (CON). Main outcomes were core temperature, skin temperature, and oxygen consumption. Data for the main outcomes were analyzed with generalized estimating equations to identify differences in group, time, or a group x time interaction. Core temperature decreased in all groups (CON, 1.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C; LOW, 1.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C; HIGH, 1.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C), while skin temperature was unchanged. Mean (95% CI) oxygen consumption was 315.3 (253.8, 376.9) mL.kg-1.min-1 in the CON group, 317.9 (275.5, 360.3) in the LOW group, and 226.1 (216.4, 235.9) in the HIGH group. Significant time and group x time interaction was observed for core temperature and oxygen consumption (p < 0.001). Administration of high-dose diazepam resulted in decreased oxygen consumption during cold saline infusion, suggesting that 20 mg of intravenous diazepam may reduce the shivering threshold without compromising respiratory or cardiovascular function. PMID:19767791

  19. Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteriophage Φ241 isolated from an industrial cucumber fermentation at high acidity and salinity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongjing; Breidt, Fred

    2015-01-01

    A novel phage, Φ241, specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7 was isolated from an industrial cucumber fermentation where both acidity (pH ≤ 3.7) and salinity (≥5% NaCl) were high. The phage belongs to the Myoviridae family. Its latent period was 15 min and average burst size was 53 phage particles per infected cell. The phage was able to lyse 48 E. coli O157:H7 strains, but none of the 18 non-O157 strains (including E. coli O104:H7) or the 2 O antigen-negative mutants of O157:H7 strain, 43895Δper (also lacking H7 antigen) and F12 (still expressing H7 antigen). However, the phage was able to lyse a per-complemented strain (43895ΔperComp) which expresses O157 antigen. These results indicated that phage Φ241 is specific for O157 antigen, and E. coli strains lacking O157 antigen were resistant to the phage infection, regardless of the presence or absence of H7 antigen. SDS-PAGE profile revealed at least 13 structural proteins of the phage. The phage DNA was resistant to many commonly used restriction endonucleases, suggesting the presence of modified nucleotides in the phage genome. At the multiplicity of infection of 10, 3, or 0.3, the phage caused a rapid cell lysis within 1 or 2 h, resulting in 3.5- or 4.5-log-unit reduction in cell concentration. The high lytic activity, specificity and tolerance to low pH and high salinity make phage Φ241 a potentially ideal biocontrol agent of E. coli O157:H7 in various foods. To our knowledge, this is the first report on E. coli O157:H7 phage isolated from high acidity and salinity environment. PMID:25741324

  20. Long-term durability of the interface in FRP composites after exposure to simulated physiologic saline environments.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M R; Friedman, R J; Del Schutte, H; Latour, R A

    1994-10-01

    Fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength significantly influences the mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Interfacial bond strength durability is therefore particularly important in the development of FRP composites for implant applications where diffused moisture may potentially weaken the material over time. In this study, the long-term durability of interfacial bonding in carbon fiber/380 grade polyetheretherketone (C/PEEK) and carbon fiber/polysulfone (C/PSF) composites was investigated after exposure to hygrothermal environments. A single fiber pull-out test was used to quantitatively determine the ultimate bond strength (UBS) of the samples following exposure. Samples were tested at three temperatures (37, 65, and 95 degrees C) for six time periods (0-5000 h) and in two environments (dry and physiologic saline-immersed). A mathematical model based on nth order chemical reaction kinetics was applied to describe the long-term durability of the interface. The results of this study indicate that interfacial bond strengths in C/PSF and C/PEEK (380 grade) composites are significantly decreased by exposure to physiologic saline and are functions of both time and temperature. For each material, the kinetics of degradation analysis predicts further bond strength losses following initial saturation, which then stabilizes at temperature-dependent equilibrium bond strength levels. PMID:7829551

  1. A model of the formation of high-salinity shelf water on polar continental shelves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grumbine, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents a model of the flow and salinity fields forced by sea-surface salinity flux and wind stress curl and examines the processes that create High-Salinity Shelf Water (HSSW). To investigate the relative effects of wind stress and buoyancy forcing in HSSW production, the polynya freezing rate in the model is varied from 0.0 to 0.30 m/d, and the Ekman pumping derived from the wind stress curl is varied independently from 0.0 to 1.8 x 10 exp 6 m/s. The Ekman pumping was found to control the magnitude of the circulation, while the polynya freezing rate controlled the extent of salinization in the shelf water. The flux of HSSW increases linearly with increasing Ekman pumping above 0.3 x 10 exp -6 m/s. The modeled flux of HSSW and the flux of derived Botttom Water for the present estimates of the forcings (a peak freezing rate of 0.10 m/d and Ekman pumping of 0.2 x 10 exp -6 m/s) agree with the fluxes inferred from physical and chemical observations in the deep Weddel Sea by oceanographic field programs.

  2. Development of a Rapid, Nondestructive Method to Measure Aqueous Carbonate in High Salinity Brines Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, L.; Phillips-Lander, C. M.; Elwood Madden, A. S.; Parnell, S.; Elwood Madden, M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional methods of quantitative analysis are often ill-suited to determining the bulk chemistry of high salinity brines due to their corrosive and clogging properties. Such methods are also often difficult to apply remotely in planetary environments. However, Raman spectroscopy can be used remotely without physical contact with the fluid and is not affected by many ionic brines. Developing methods to study aqueous carbonates is vital to future study of brines on Mars and other planetary bodies, as they can reveal important information about modern and ancient near-surface aqueous processes. Both sodium carbonate standards and unknown samples from carbonate mineral dissolution experiments in high salinity brines were analyzed using a 532 nm laser coupled to an inVia Renishaw spectrometer to collect carbonate spectra from near-saturated sodium chloride and sodium sulfate brines. A calibration curve was determined by collecting spectra from solutions of known carbonate concentrations mixed with a pH 13 buffer and a near-saturated NaCl or Na2SO4 brine matrix. The spectra were processed and curve fitted to determine the height ratio of the carbonate peak at 1066 cm-1 to the 1640 cm-1 water peak. The calibration curve determined using the standards was then applied to the experimental data after accounting for dilutions. Concentrations determined based on Raman spectra were compared against traditional acid titration measurements. We found that the two techniques vary by less than one order of magnitude. Further work is ongoing to verify the method and apply similar techniques to measure aqueous carbonate concentrations in other high salinity brines.Traditional methods of quantitative analysis are often ill-suited to determining the bulk chemistry of high salinity brines due to their corrosive and clogging properties. Such methods are also often difficult to apply remotely in planetary environments. However, Raman spectroscopy can be used remotely without physical

  3. Response of performance and ammonia oxidizing bacteria community to high salinity stress in membrane bioreactor with elevated ammonia loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Luo, Gan; Li, Jun; Chen, Shi-Yu; Li, Yan; Li, Wen-Tao; Li, Ai-Min

    2016-09-01

    Effect of elevated ammonia loading rate (ALR) and increasing salinity on the operation of membrane bioreactor (MBR) and the response of microbial community were investigated. Results showed that MBR started up with 1% NaCl stress achieved amazing nitrification performance at high salinity up to 4% when treating wastewater containing 1000mg/L NH(+)4-N. Further increasing salinity to 7% led to failure of MBR unrecoverably. Steep decline of sludge activity contributed to the extremely worse performance. High-throughput sequencing analysis showed that both ALR and salinity had selective effects on the microbial community structure. In genus level, Methyloversatilis and Maribacter were enriched during the operation. Survival of salt-resistant microbes contributed to the rising of richness and diversity at 2% and 4% NaCl stress. Analysis of amoA-gene-based cloning revealed Nitrosomonas marina are chiefly responsible for catalyzing ammonia oxidation in high ALR at high salinity stress. PMID:27290667

  4. High temperature and vapor pressure deficit aggravate architectural effects but ameliorate non-architectural effects of salinity on dry mass production of tomato

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsu-Wei; Nguyen, Thi M. N.; Kahlen, Katrin; Stützel, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an important vegetable crop and often cultivated in regions exposed to salinity and high temperatures (HT) which change plant architecture, decrease canopy light interception and disturb physiological functions. However, the long-term effects of salinity and HT combination (S+HT) on plant growth are still unclear. A dynamic functional-structural plant model (FSPM) of tomato was parameterized and evaluated for different levels of S+HT combinations. The evaluated model was used to quantify the contributions of morphological changes (architectural effects) and physiological disturbances (non-architectural effects) on the reduction of shoot dry mass under S+HT. The model predicted architectural variables with high accuracy (>85%), which ensured the reliability of the model analyses. HT enhanced architectural effects but reduced non-architectural effects of salinity on dry mass production. The stronger architectural effects of salinity under HT could not be counterbalanced by the smaller non-architectural effects. Therefore, long-term influences of HT on shoot dry mass under salinity were negative at the whole plant level. Our model analysis highlights the importance of plant architecture at canopy level in studying the plant responses to the environments and shows the merits of dynamic FSPMs as heuristic tools. PMID:26539203

  5. Modeling regional salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, TX, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehta, S.; Fryar, A.E.; Brady, R.M.; Morin, R.H.

    2000-01-01

    Two extensive plumes (combined area > 1000 km2) have been delineated within the Ogallala aquifer in the Southern High Plains, TX, USA. Salinity varies within the plumes spatially and increases with depth; Cl ranges from 50 to >500 mg 1-1. Variable-density flow modeling using SUTRA has identified three broad regions of upward cross-formational flow from the underlying evaporite units. The upward discharge within the modeled plume area is in the range of 10-4-10-5 m3 day-1, and the TDS concentrations are typically >3000 mg 1-1. Regions of increased salinity, identified within the Whitehorse Group (evaporite unit) underlying the Ogallala aquifer, are controlled by the structure and thickness variations relative to the recharge areas. Distinct flow paths, on the order of tens of km to >100 km in length, and varying flow velocities indicate that the salinization of the Ogallala aquifer has been a slow, ongoing process and may represent circulation of waters recharged during Pleistocene or earlier times. On-going pumping has had negligible impact on the salinity distribution in the Ogallala aquifer, although simulations indicate that the velocity distribution in the underlying units may have been affected to depths of 150 m after 30 years of pumping. Because the distribution of saline ground water in this region of the Ogallala aquifer is heterogeneous, careful areal and vertical characterization is warranted prior to any well-field development. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.Two extensive plumes (combined area >1000 km2) have been delineated within the Ogallala aquifer in the Southern High Plains, TX, USA. Salinity varies within the plumes spatially and increases with depth; Cl ranges from 50 to >500 mg l-1. Variable-density flow modeling using SUTRA has identified three broad regions of upward cross-formational flow from the underlying evaporite units. The upward discharge within the modeled plume area is in the range of 10-4-10-5 m3 day-1, and the TDS concentrations

  6. High salinity effect on bioremediation of pretreated pesticide lixiviates from greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Micó, María M; González, Óscar; Bacardit, Jordi; Malfeito, Jorge; Sans, Carme

    2015-01-01

    Hydroponics culture greenhouses usually work in closed and semi-closed irrigation systems for nutrients and water-saving purposes. Photo-Fenton reaction has been revealed as an efficient way to depollute that kind of recycled effluents containing pesticides, even for high salinity concentrations. However, the inefficacy of organic matter chemical depletion imposes the use of a subsequent treatment. This work proposes the suitability of an integration of advanced oxidation process with a subsequent bioreactor to treat greenhouse lixiviates effluents at high or extremely high conductivity (salts concentration: up to 42 g L⁻¹). As a first step in this study, the performance of a series of sequencing batch reactors was monitored in order to check the biocompatibility of photo-Fenton pretreated effluents depending on their salinity content. In the second step, those same pretreated effluents were loaded to a biofiltration column filled with expanded clay. Finally, bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing was carried out to analyse microbial diversity of the biomass developed in the column. Results stated that the chemical-biological coupled system is effective for the treatment of water effluents containing pesticides. The integrated system is able to deplete more than 80% of the organic load, even under extremely high salinity. PMID:26041507

  7. High Salinity Induces Different Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Responses in Maize Seedlings Organs

    PubMed Central

    AbdElgawad, Hamada; Zinta, Gaurav; Hegab, Momtaz M.; Pandey, Renu; Asard, Han; Abuelsoud, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Salinity negatively affects plant growth and causes significant crop yield losses world-wide. Maize is an economically important cereal crop affected by high salinity. In this study, maize seedlings were subjected to 75 mM and 150 mM NaCl, to emulate high soil salinity. Roots, mature leaves (basal leaf-pair 1,2) and young leaves (distal leaf-pair 3,4) were harvested after 3 weeks of sowing. Roots showed the highest reduction in biomass, followed by mature and young leaves in the salt-stressed plants. Concomitant with the pattern of growth reduction, roots accumulated the highest levels of Na+ followed by mature and young leaves. High salinity induced oxidative stress in the roots and mature leaves, but to a lesser extent in younger leaves. The younger leaves showed increased electrolyte leakage (EL), malondialdehyde (MDA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations only at 150 mM NaCl. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and polyphenol content increased with the increase in salinity levels in roots and mature leaves, but showed no changes in the young leaves. Under salinity stress, reduced ascorbate (ASC) and glutathione (GSH) content increased in roots, while total tocopherol levels increased specifically in the shoot tissues. Similarly, redox changes estimated by the ratio of redox couples (ASC/total ascorbate and GSH/total glutathione) showed significant decreases in the roots. Activities of enzymatic antioxidants, catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1), increased in all organs of salt-treated plants, while superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), glutathione-s-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) increased specifically in the roots. Overall, these results suggest that Na+ is retained and detoxified mainly in roots, and less stress impact is observed in mature and younger leaves. This study also indicates a possible role of ROS in the systemic

  8. High Salinity Induces Different Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Responses in Maize Seedlings Organs.

    PubMed

    AbdElgawad, Hamada; Zinta, Gaurav; Hegab, Momtaz M; Pandey, Renu; Asard, Han; Abuelsoud, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Salinity negatively affects plant growth and causes significant crop yield losses world-wide. Maize is an economically important cereal crop affected by high salinity. In this study, maize seedlings were subjected to 75 mM and 150 mM NaCl, to emulate high soil salinity. Roots, mature leaves (basal leaf-pair 1,2) and young leaves (distal leaf-pair 3,4) were harvested after 3 weeks of sowing. Roots showed the highest reduction in biomass, followed by mature and young leaves in the salt-stressed plants. Concomitant with the pattern of growth reduction, roots accumulated the highest levels of Na(+) followed by mature and young leaves. High salinity induced oxidative stress in the roots and mature leaves, but to a lesser extent in younger leaves. The younger leaves showed increased electrolyte leakage (EL), malondialdehyde (MDA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations only at 150 mM NaCl. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and polyphenol content increased with the increase in salinity levels in roots and mature leaves, but showed no changes in the young leaves. Under salinity stress, reduced ascorbate (ASC) and glutathione (GSH) content increased in roots, while total tocopherol levels increased specifically in the shoot tissues. Similarly, redox changes estimated by the ratio of redox couples (ASC/total ascorbate and GSH/total glutathione) showed significant decreases in the roots. Activities of enzymatic antioxidants, catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1), increased in all organs of salt-treated plants, while superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), glutathione-s-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) increased specifically in the roots. Overall, these results suggest that Na(+) is retained and detoxified mainly in roots, and less stress impact is observed in mature and younger leaves. This study also indicates a possible role of ROS in the systemic

  9. Use of constructed wetland systems with Arundo and Sarcocornia for polishing high salinity tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Calheiros, Cristina S C; Quitério, Paula V B; Silva, Gabriela; Crispim, Luís F C; Brix, Hans; Moura, Sandra C; Castro, Paula M L

    2012-03-01

    Treatment of tannery wastewater is problematic due to high and variable concentrations of complex pollutants often combined with high salinity levels. Two series of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (CWs) planted with Arundo donax and Sarcocornia fruticosa were set up after a conventional biological treatment system operating at a tannery site. The aim of the CWs was polishing organics and nitrogen from the high salinity effluent (2.2-6.6 g Cl(-) L(-1)). Both plant species established and grew well in the CW. Arundo, however, had more vigorous growth and a higher capacity to take up nutrients. The CWs were efficient in removing COD and BOD(5) with removal efficiencies varying between 51 and 80% for COD (inlet: 68-425 mg L(-1)) and between 53 and 90% for BOD(5) (inlet: 16-220 mg L(-1)). Mass removal rates were up to 615 kg COD ha(-1) d(-1) and 363 BOD(5) kg ha(-1) d(-1). Removal efficiencies were 40-93% for total P, 31-89% for NH(4)(+) and 41-90% for Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen. CW systems planted with salt tolerant plant species are a promising solution for polishing saline secondary effluent from the tannery industry to levels fulfilling the discharge standards. PMID:22115512

  10. Multiple PLDs required for high salinity and water deficit tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Laxalt, Ana M; ter Riet, Bas; van Schooten, Bas; Merquiol, Emmanuelle; Testerink, Christa; Haring, Michel A; Bartels, Dorothea; Munnik, Teun

    2009-01-01

    High salinity and drought have received much attention because they severely affect crop production worldwide. Analysis and comprehension of the plant's response to excessive salt and dehydration will aid in the development of stress-tolerant crop varieties. Signal transduction lies at the basis of the response to these stresses, and numerous signaling pathways have been implicated. Here, we provide further evidence for the involvement of phospholipase D (PLD) in the plant's response to high salinity and dehydration. A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) alpha-class PLD, LePLDalpha1, is transcriptionally up-regulated and activated in cell suspension cultures treated with salt. Gene silencing revealed that this PLD is indeed involved in the salt-induced phosphatidic acid production, but not exclusively. Genetically modified tomato plants with reduced LePLDalpha1 protein levels did not reveal altered salt tolerance. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), both AtPLDalpha1 and AtPLDdelta were found to be activated in response to salt stress. Moreover, pldalpha1 and plddelta single and double knock-out mutants exhibited enhanced sensitivity to high salinity stress in a plate assay. Furthermore, we show that both PLDs are activated upon dehydration and the knock-out mutants are hypersensitive to hyperosmotic stress, displaying strongly reduced growth. PMID:19017627

  11. Multi-Scale Studies of Transport and Adsorption Phenomena of Cement-based Materials in Aqueous and Saline Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Se Yoon

    The transport and adsorption phenomena in cement-based materials are the most important processes in the durability of concrete structures or nuclear waste containers, as they are precursors to a number of deterioration processes such as chloride-induced corrosion, sulfate attack, carbonation, etc. Despite this importance, our understanding of these processes remains limited because the pore structure and composition of concrete are complex. In addition, the range of the pore sizes, from nanometers to millimeters, requires the multi-scale modeling of the transport and adsorption processes. Among the various environments that cement-based materials are exposed to, aqueous and saline environments represent the most common types. Therefore, this dissertation investigates the adsorption and transport phenomena of cement-based materials exposed to an aqueous and saline environment from atomic to macro-scales using different arrays of novel spectroscopic techniques and simulation methods, such as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), molecular dynamics (MD), and finite element method (FEM). The structure and transport of water molecules through interlayer spacing of tobermorite was investigated using MD simulations because the interlayer water of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel influences various material properties of concrete. The adsorption processes of cementitious phases interacting with sodium and chloride ions at the nano-scale were identified using STXM and XANES measurements. A mathematical model and FEM procedure were developed to identify the effect of surface treatments at macro-scale on ionic transport phenomena of surface-treated concrete. Finally, this dissertation introduced a new material, calcined layered double hydroxide (CLDH), to prevent chloride-induced deterioration.

  12. High-performance ionic diode membrane for salinity gradient power generation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Guo, Wei; Feng, Dan; Wang, Huanting; Zhao, Dongyuan; Jiang, Lei

    2014-09-01

    Salinity difference between seawater and river water is a sustainable energy resource that catches eyes of the public and the investors in the background of energy crisis. To capture this energy, interdisciplinary efforts from chemistry, materials science, environmental science, and nanotechnology have been made to create efficient and economically viable energy conversion methods and materials. Beyond conventional membrane-based processes, technological breakthroughs in harvesting salinity gradient power from natural waters are expected to emerge from the novel fluidic transport phenomena on the nanoscale. A major challenge toward real-world applications is to extrapolate existing single-channel devices to macroscopic materials. Here, we report a membrane-scale nanofluidic device with asymmetric structure, chemical composition, and surface charge polarity, termed ionic diode membrane (IDM), for harvesting electric power from salinity gradient. The IDM comprises heterojunctions between mesoporous carbon (pore size ∼7 nm, negatively charged) and macroporous alumina (pore size ∼80 nm, positively charged). The meso-/macroporous membrane rectifies the ionic current with distinctly high ratio of ca. 450 and keeps on rectifying in high-concentration electrolytes, even in saturated solution. The selective and rectified ion transport furthermore sheds light on salinity-gradient power generation. By mixing artificial seawater and river water through the IDM, substantially high power density of up to 3.46 W/m(2) is discovered, which largely outperforms some commercial ion-exchange membranes. A theoretical model based on coupled Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations is established to quantitatively explain the experimental observations and get insights into the underlying mechanism. The macroscopic and asymmetric nanofluidic structure anticipates wide potentials for sustainable power generation, water purification, and desalination. PMID:25137214

  13. High genetic diversity and novelty in eukaryotic plankton assemblages inhabiting saline lakes in the Qaidam basin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Wang, Fang; Chu, Limin; Wang, Hao; Zhong, Zhiping; Liu, Zhipei; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene) of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes) in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing <90% identity to any previously reported sequence in GenBank. At least 4 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in mesosaline lakes, while up to eighteen OTUs in hypersaline lakes show very low CCM and CEM scores, indicating that these sequences are highly distantly related to any existing sequence. Most of the 18S rRNA gene sequence reads obtained in investigated mesosaline lakes is closely related to Holozoa group (48.13%), whereas Stramenopiles (26.65%) and Alveolates (10.84%) are the next most common groups. Hypersaline lakes in the Qaidam Basin are also dominated by Holozoa group, accounting for 26.65% of the total number of sequence reads. Notably, Chlorophyta group are only found in high abundance in Lake Gasikule (28.00%), whereas less represented in other hypersaline lakes such as Gahai (0.50%) and Xiaochaidan (1.15%). Further analysis show that the compositions of planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper) saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution. PMID:25401703

  14. High Genetic Diversity and Novelty in Eukaryotic Plankton Assemblages Inhabiting Saline Lakes in the Qaidam Basin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Wang, Fang; Chu, Limin; Wang, Hao; Zhong, Zhiping; Liu, Zhipei; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene) of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes) in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing <90% identity to any previously reported sequence in GenBank. At least 4 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in mesosaline lakes, while up to eighteen OTUs in hypersaline lakes show very low CCM and CEM scores, indicating that these sequences are highly distantly related to any existing sequence. Most of the 18S rRNA gene sequence reads obtained in investigated mesosaline lakes is closely related to Holozoa group (48.13%), whereas Stramenopiles (26.65%) and Alveolates (10.84%) are the next most common groups. Hypersaline lakes in the Qaidam Basin are also dominated by Holozoa group, accounting for 26.65% of the total number of sequence reads. Notably, Chlorophyta group are only found in high abundance in Lake Gasikule (28.00%), whereas less represented in other hypersaline lakes such as Gahai (0.50%) and Xiaochaidan (1.15%). Further analysis show that the compositions of planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper) saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution. PMID:25401703

  15. Purification of High Salinity Brine by Multi-Stage Ion Concentration Polarization Desalination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bumjoo; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kwon, Hyukjin J.; Pham, Van Sang; Kim, Minseok; Al-Anzi, Bader; Lim, Geunbae; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for the desalination of high concentration brine (>TDS 35,000 ppm) efficiently and economically, either for the treatment of produced water from shale gas/oil development, or minimizing the environmental impact of brine from existing desalination plants. Yet, reverse osmosis (RO), which is the most widely used for desalination currently, is not practical for brine desalination. This paper demonstrates technical and economic feasibility of ICP (Ion Concentration Polarization) electrical desalination for the high saline water treatment, by adopting multi-stage operation with better energy efficiency. Optimized multi-staging configurations, dependent on the brine salinity values, can be designed based on experimental and numerical analysis. Such an optimization aims at achieving not just the energy efficiency but also (membrane) area efficiency, lowering the true cost of brine treatment. ICP electrical desalination is shown here to treat brine salinity up to 100,000 ppm of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) with flexible salt rejection rate up to 70% which is promising in a various application treating brine waste. We also demonstrate that ICP desalination has advantage of removing both salts and diverse suspended solids simultaneously, and less susceptibility to membrane fouling/scaling, which is a significant challenge in the membrane processes. PMID:27545955

  16. Purification of High Salinity Brine by Multi-Stage Ion Concentration Polarization Desalination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bumjoo; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kwon, Hyukjin J; Pham, Van Sang; Kim, Minseok; Al-Anzi, Bader; Lim, Geunbae; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for the desalination of high concentration brine (>TDS 35,000 ppm) efficiently and economically, either for the treatment of produced water from shale gas/oil development, or minimizing the environmental impact of brine from existing desalination plants. Yet, reverse osmosis (RO), which is the most widely used for desalination currently, is not practical for brine desalination. This paper demonstrates technical and economic feasibility of ICP (Ion Concentration Polarization) electrical desalination for the high saline water treatment, by adopting multi-stage operation with better energy efficiency. Optimized multi-staging configurations, dependent on the brine salinity values, can be designed based on experimental and numerical analysis. Such an optimization aims at achieving not just the energy efficiency but also (membrane) area efficiency, lowering the true cost of brine treatment. ICP electrical desalination is shown here to treat brine salinity up to 100,000 ppm of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) with flexible salt rejection rate up to 70% which is promising in a various application treating brine waste. We also demonstrate that ICP desalination has advantage of removing both salts and diverse suspended solids simultaneously, and less susceptibility to membrane fouling/scaling, which is a significant challenge in the membrane processes. PMID:27545955

  17. Evaluating the tolerance of young hybrid poplar trees to recycled waters high in salinity and boron.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, G S; LeDuc, D; Johnson, J

    2010-07-01

    The successful adoption of water recycling strategies in many arid regions will require crops able to tolerate poor-quality waters. We evaluated different clones for salt and boron (B) tolerance within each of seven genetically distinct genomic groups (e.g., deltoides, deltoides x nigra, trichocarpa x deltoides, trichocarpa x deltoides x maximowizcii, trichocarpa x deltoides x nigra, trichocarpa x nigra, trichocarpa x maximowizcii). During each evaluation period, different clones within each of the groups were irrigated with high sodium chloride (NaCl) salinity (i.e., 10-30 dS m(-1)) and B (i.e., 10 mg L(-1)) water up to a maximum of 150 days, for a 4-year testing period under micro-field plot conditions. Excessive accumulation (up to 6%) of chloride (Cl) likely caused toxicity symptoms (necrosis of the leaves) observed in the less tolerant clones, while leaf B concentrations rarely exceeded 300 mg kg(-1) DM in any clone. Increased soil salinity likely hindered the uptake of B by the clones. Our results show that a wide range of selected Populus clones, of parentage trichocarpa x nigra, followed by deltoides x nigra show potential salt and B tolerance as young trees to recycled waters high in salinity and B. PMID:21166286

  18. Nitrogen mineralization from sludge in an alkaline, saline coal gasification ash environment.

    PubMed

    Mbakwe, Ikenna; De Jager, Pieter C; Annandale, John G; Matema, Taurai

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitating coal gasification ash dumps by amendment with waste-activated sludge has been shown to improve the physical and chemical properties of ash and to facilitate the establishment of vegetation. However, mineralization of organic N from sludge in such an alkaline and saline medium and the effect that ash weathering has on the process are poorly understood and need to be ascertained to make decisions regarding the suitability of this rehabilitation option. This study investigated the rate and pattern of N mineralization from sludge in a coal gasification ash medium to determine the prevalent inorganic N form in the system and assess the effect of ash weathering on N mineralization. An incubation experiment was performed in which fresh ash, weathered ash, and soil were amended with the equivalent of 90 Mg ha sludge, and N mineralization was evaluated over 63 d. More N (24%) was mineralized in fresh ash than in weathered ash and soil, both of which mineralized 15% of the initial organic N in sludge. More nitrification occurred in soil, and most of the N mineralized in ash was in the form of ammonium, indicating an inhibition of nitrifying organisms in the ash medium and suggesting that, at least initially, plants used for rehabilitation of coal gasification ash dumps will take up N mostly as ammonium. PMID:23673951

  19. Error attribution and validation of SMOS high-level salinity products with Argo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera, Joaquim

    2015-04-01

    available for December 2013. Valid observations in the top five meters have been 2600 and 235, respectively. Comparison between Argo data and SMOS illustrates some of the systematic deficiencies of the salinity retrieval approach. Among them, land-sea contamination and model deficiencies at low and high temperatures. Moreover, Argo data may illustrate some deficiencies one of the auxiliary fields, namely the Sea Surface Temperature, used in the retrieval approach. When the Argo and SMOS match-up pairs data are properly filtered, the mean and standard deviation of the differences in the latitudinal band of 60S-60N are (L3/OI/L4): -0.00/-0.01/-0.06 and 0.49/0.29/0.28. When match-up pairs are limited to the 30S-30N band the mean and standard deviation are -0.02/-0.03/-0.12 and 0.37/0.23/0.23. While these figures have been found to be robust when Argo observations are taken deeper than five meters, their differ when Argo data is restricted to the first four meters of the ocean. However, more upper-surface measurements are required to elucidate the robustness of these changes.

  20. Virus-host interplay in high salt environments.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Nina S; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2016-08-01

    Interaction of viruses and cells has tremendous impact on cellular and viral evolution, nutrient cycling and decay of organic matter. Thus, viruses can indirectly affect complex processes such as climate change and microbial pathogenicity. During recent decades, studies on extreme environments have introduced us to archaeal viruses and viruses infecting extremophilic bacteria or eukaryotes. Hypersaline environments are known to contain strikingly high numbers of viruses (∼10(9) particles per ml). Halophilic archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes inhabiting hypersaline environments have only a few cellular predators, indicating that the role of viruses is highly important in these ecosystems. Viruses thriving in high salt are called haloviruses and to date more than 100 such viruses have been described. Virulent, temperate, and persistent halovirus life cycles have been observed among the known isolates including the recently described SNJ1-SNJ2 temperate virus pair which is the first example of an interplay between two haloviruses in one host cell. In addition to direct virus and cell isolations, metagenomics have provided a wealth of information about virus-host dynamics in hypersaline environments suggesting that halovirus populations and halophilic microorganisms are dynamic over time and spatially distributed around the highly saline environments on the Earth. PMID:26929102

  1. In Vitro Assessment of Serum-Saline Ratios for Fluid Simulator Testing of Highly Modular Spinal Implants With Articulating Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Khandha, Ashutosh; Malcolmson, George; Timm, JP

    2008-01-01

    and lower bounds of predictive implant debris generation modeling, where saline represents a worst-case scenario and as little as 20% serum masks all weight loss completely in highly modular articulating implants. Clinical Relevance Clinical Relevance = 5 (Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence). Study findings are limited to a greater understanding of the science associated with predictive wear testing of articulating spinal implants. PMID:25802619

  2. Salt resistance genes revealed by functional metagenomics from brines and moderate-salinity rhizosphere within a hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Mirete, Salvador; Mora-Ruiz, Merit R; Lamprecht-Grandío, María; de Figueras, Carolina G; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; González-Pastor, José E

    2015-01-01

    Hypersaline environments are considered one of the most extreme habitats on earth and microorganisms have developed diverse molecular mechanisms of adaptation to withstand these conditions. The present study was aimed at identifying novel genes from the microbial communities of a moderate-salinity rhizosphere and brine from the Es Trenc saltern (Mallorca, Spain), which could confer increased salt resistance to Escherichia coli. The microbial diversity assessed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed the presence of communities that are typical in such environments and the remarkable presence of three bacterial groups never revealed as major components of salt brines. Metagenomic libraries from brine and rhizosphere samples, were transferred to the osmosensitive strain E. coli MKH13, and screened for salt resistance. Eleven genes that conferred salt resistance were identified, some encoding for well-known proteins previously related to osmoadaptation such as a glycerol transporter and a proton pump, whereas others encoded proteins not previously related to this function in microorganisms such as DNA/RNA helicases, an endonuclease III (Nth) and hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Furthermore, four of the retrieved genes were cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis and they also conferred salt resistance to this bacterium, broadening the spectrum of bacterial species in which these genes can function. This is the first report of salt resistance genes recovered from metagenomes of a hypersaline environment. PMID:26528268

  3. Salt resistance genes revealed by functional metagenomics from brines and moderate-salinity rhizosphere within a hypersaline environment

    PubMed Central

    Mirete, Salvador; Mora-Ruiz, Merit R.; Lamprecht-Grandío, María; de Figueras, Carolina G.; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; González-Pastor, José E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersaline environments are considered one of the most extreme habitats on earth and microorganisms have developed diverse molecular mechanisms of adaptation to withstand these conditions. The present study was aimed at identifying novel genes from the microbial communities of a moderate-salinity rhizosphere and brine from the Es Trenc saltern (Mallorca, Spain), which could confer increased salt resistance to Escherichia coli. The microbial diversity assessed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed the presence of communities that are typical in such environments and the remarkable presence of three bacterial groups never revealed as major components of salt brines. Metagenomic libraries from brine and rhizosphere samples, were transferred to the osmosensitive strain E. coli MKH13, and screened for salt resistance. Eleven genes that conferred salt resistance were identified, some encoding for well-known proteins previously related to osmoadaptation such as a glycerol transporter and a proton pump, whereas others encoded proteins not previously related to this function in microorganisms such as DNA/RNA helicases, an endonuclease III (Nth) and hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Furthermore, four of the retrieved genes were cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis and they also conferred salt resistance to this bacterium, broadening the spectrum of bacterial species in which these genes can function. This is the first report of salt resistance genes recovered from metagenomes of a hypersaline environment. PMID:26528268

  4. Analysis of bacterial diversity in two oil blocks from two low-permeability reservoirs with high salinities

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Meng; Sun, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Wang, Jun-Ming; Qiu, Long-Wei; Sun, Hua-Yang; Song, Zhao-Zheng; Zhang, Bei-Yu; Gao, De-Li; Zhang, Guang-Qing; Wu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    The community diversities of two oil reservoirs with low permeability of 1.81 × 10−3 and 2.29 × 10−3 μm2 in Changqing, China, were investigated using a high throughput sequencing technique to analyze the influence of biostimulation with a nutrient activator on the bacterial communities. These two blocks differed significantly in salinity (average 17,500 vs 40,900 mg/L). A core simulation test was used to evaluate the effectiveness of indigenous microbial-enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The results indicated that in the two high salinity oil reservoirs, one reservoir having relatively lower salinity level and a narrow salinity range had higher bacterial and phylogenetic diversity. The addition of the nutrient activator increased the diversity of the bacterial community structure and the diversity differences between the two blocks. The results of the core simulation test showed that the bacterial community in the reservoir with a salinity level of 17,500 mg/L did not show significant higher MEOR efficiency compared with the reservoir with 40,900 mg/L i.e. MEOR efficiency of 8.12% vs 6.56% (test p = 0.291 > 0.05). Therefore, salinity levels affected the bacterial diversities in the two low permeability oil blocks remarkably. But the influence of salinity for the MEOR recovery was slightly. PMID:26786765

  5. Analysis of bacterial diversity in two oil blocks from two low-permeability reservoirs with high salinities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Sun, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Wang, Jun-Ming; Qiu, Long-Wei; Sun, Hua-Yang; Song, Zhao-Zheng; Zhang, Bei-Yu; Gao, De-Li; Zhang, Guang-Qing; Wu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    The community diversities of two oil reservoirs with low permeability of 1.81 × 10(-3) and 2.29 × 10(-3) μm(2) in Changqing, China, were investigated using a high throughput sequencing technique to analyze the influence of biostimulation with a nutrient activator on the bacterial communities. These two blocks differed significantly in salinity (average 17,500 vs 40,900 mg/L). A core simulation test was used to evaluate the effectiveness of indigenous microbial-enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The results indicated that in the two high salinity oil reservoirs, one reservoir having relatively lower salinity level and a narrow salinity range had higher bacterial and phylogenetic diversity. The addition of the nutrient activator increased the diversity of the bacterial community structure and the diversity differences between the two blocks. The results of the core simulation test showed that the bacterial community in the reservoir with a salinity level of 17,500 mg/L did not show significant higher MEOR efficiency compared with the reservoir with 40,900 mg/L i.e. MEOR efficiency of 8.12% vs 6.56% (test p = 0.291 > 0.05). Therefore, salinity levels affected the bacterial diversities in the two low permeability oil blocks remarkably. But the influence of salinity for the MEOR recovery was slightly. PMID:26786765

  6. Nonmagnetotactic Multicellular Prokaryotes from Low-Saline, Nonmarine Aquatic Environments and Their Unusual Negative Phototactic Behavior▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes (MMPs) are unique magnetotactic bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria class and the first found to biomineralize the magnetic mineral greigite (Fe3S4). Thus far they have been reported only from marine habitats. We questioned whether MMPs exist in low-saline, nonmarine environments. MMPs were observed in samples from shallow springs in the Great Boiling Springs geothermal field and Pyramid Lake, both located in northwestern Nevada. The temperature at all sites was ambient, and salinities ranged from 5 to 11 ppt. These MMPs were not magnetotactic and did not contain magnetosomes (called nMMPs here). nMMPs ranged from 7 to 11 μm in diameter, were composed of about 40 to 60 Gram-negative cells, and were motile by numerous flagella that covered each cell on one side, characteristics similar to those of MMPs. 16S rRNA gene sequences of nMMPs show that they form a separate phylogenetic branch within the MMP group in the Deltaproteobacteria class, probably representing a single species. nMMPs exhibited a negative phototactic behavior to white light and to wavelengths of ≤480 nm (blue). We devised a “light racetrack” to exploit this behavior, which was used to photoconcentrate nMMPs for specific purposes (e.g., DNA extraction) even though their numbers were low in the sample. Our results show that the unique morphology of the MMP is not restricted to marine and magnetotactic prokaryotes. Discovery of nonmagnetotactic forms of the MMP might support the hypothesis that acquisition of the magnetosome genes involves horizontal gene transfer. To our knowledge, this is the first report of phototaxis in bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria class. PMID:20363801

  7. [Membrane surface fouling properties in MBRs for high-salinity wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Wang, Zhi-Wei; An, Ying; Wu, Zhi-Chao

    2014-02-01

    The properties of membrane foulants in MBR treating high-salinity wastewater were studied. Results showed that the removal efficiency of organics and NH4(+) -N was stable and high-quality effluent was obtained after the operation time of 121 d; the ratio of VSS/ SS decreased and SVI declined at the same time, indicating that the inorganic content of sludge increased which might lead to more compact flocs and higher settling ability; SMP and EPS of the sludge were largely changed with a lower proportion of protein and a higher proportion of humic acid. Scanning electron microscope-energy diffusive X-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) demonstrated that Na, Al, Mg, Ca, K, Fe, Ti, Cr, W, Si and Cl were the major inorganic elements in membrane foulants; Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) illustrated that there were organic matters with high molecular weight trapped by membrane and formed the membrane foulants; Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluoresce spectroscopy discovered that carbohydrates, protein and humic acid were the main content of organics in membrane foulants.; quantitative analysis of membrane foulants showed that the amount of inorganic membrane foulants were significant when treating high-salinity wastewater. PMID:24812959

  8. Geochemical Modeling of pH Neutralization of High Alkaline-Saline Waste Fluids in Unsaturated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Zheng, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Leakage of high alkaline-saline fluids, such as those stored in Hanford, a site of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington State, has raised attention of scientific community. These fluids have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in the fluids are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. A number of laboratory experiments through injecting synthetic high alkaline-saline fluids (up to 10M of sodium nitrate, pH >12) into the sediments sampled from the DOE Hanford site were conducted to study the reactive transport processes of the fluids in subsurface environments. The experimental results observed show that the composition of the high alkaline sodium nitrate fluids can be drastically changed due to fluid-rock interactions, and eventually lead to pH neutralization of the fluid in the plume front. The dominant fluid-rock interactions are cation exchanges (Na+-K+-Ca+2-Mg+2-H+), precipitation of calcium and magnesium minerals, and dissolution of silica. In order to precisely model the reactive transport of these processes, a coupling of the Pitzer's ion-interaction geochemical model and a flow and transport model would be highly needed. The extended existing reactive geochemical transport code, BIO-CORE2Dc, incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model, is capable of predicting the experimental observations. In addition, the developed model was tested against two reported cases. In both cases, the measured mean ionic activity coefficients were well reproduced by our model, while the Debye-Hückel model, usually used to calculate aqueous species activities in dilute solutions, was unable to predict the experimental data. Finally, modeling study based on our laboratory column experiment was performed. Our simulation is able to capture the observed pH trends, changes in exchangeable cations such as Ca+2, Mg+2, and formation of secondary precipitation phases in the plume front.

  9. Groundwater Depletion versus Soil Salinization in Irrigated Agriculture in Semiarid Southern High Plains, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Gates, J. B.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Because irrigated agriculture is the primary consumer of global freshwater resources, there is increased emphasis on using more water conservative irrigation application techniques to reduce depletion of water resources while maintaining crop productivity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts of land use change from natural or rainfed agricultural ecosystems to irrigated agricultural ecosystems on water resources and soil salinity using data from the southern High Plains (SHP, 75,000 km2) in Texas, USA as an example. Approximately 11% of the land surface is irrigated with groundwater from the Ogallala (High Plains) Aquifer. Boreholes were drilled beneath irrigated cropland (13 boreholes) and beneath rainfed cropland (19 boreholes) and native vegetation (3 boreholes) to provide baseline control. Unsaturated zone soil samples were analyzed for water content, matric potential, and water-extractable chloride, bromide, sulfate, and nitrate concentrations. Increased drainage beneath irrigated sites displaced pre-existing salt bulges downward to 5 m in fine-grained soils and to greater than profile depths in coarser soils (4 - 17 m). Most irrigated profiles showed salt bulges which are attributed to deficit irrigation. Large inventories of nitrate and high correlations with chloride indicate overapplication of fertilizers and leaching below the root zone. Estimated drainage rates beneath irrigated sites are similar to the range of drainage/recharge rates beneath rainfed agriculture. These results emphasize the potential for soil salinization with deficit irrigation when the irrigation water quality is poor and precipitation is insufficient to flush accumulating salts.

  10. Biodiversity patterns of soil ciliates along salinity gradients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Xu, Kuidong

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated ciliate diversity in saline soils with a salinity range from 6.5 to 65 psu by the morphological method of the Ludox-quantitative protargol stain (QPS) and the molecular techniques of ciliate-specific clone library and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. No active ciliates could be detected with the Ludox-QPS method, while high molecular diversity of ciliates was found. The highest ciliate molecular diversity was obtained from the soil at salinity of 8.9 psu, moderate diversity was found at salinity of 6.5 psu, and the diversity sharply decreased at salinity of 50.5 psu. By contrast, the number of ciliate classes clearly decreased with increasing soil salinity: six, five, four and two classes from sites with salinity of 6.5 psu, 8.9 psu, 29.5 psu and 50.5 psu, respectively. Ciliate diversity pattern is different from that of bacteria, whose diversity is also high in extremely saline environments. Meanwhile, the composition of ciliate community was significantly different along salinity gradient. Colpodea and Oligohymenophorea were diverse in soils at salinity less than 29.5 psu, while absent in soils with salinity above 50.5 psu. BIOENV analysis indicated soil salinity and water content were the main factors regulating the distribution of ciliates in saline soils. PMID:26773903

  11. Using antibodies against ATPase and microarray immunoassays for the search for potential extraterrestrial life in saline environments on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Andreas; Gruber, Claudia; Blanco-López, Yolanda; Rivas, Luis A.; Parro, Victor; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2010-05-01

    For the search for extraterrestrial life it is proposed to use receptors such as labelled antibodies for the detection of organic biomarkers. One of these organic molecules to be tested is the universal enzyme ATP synthase which is present in highly conserved forms in all organisms on earth. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate antibodies against ATPase respectively ATP synthase and their subunits. As it is known, that there are halite deposits on Mars the experiments in this study have been carried out with regard to halophile microorganisms and saline environments. Standard F1F0 ATPase from Escherichia coli LE 392 and Bacillus megaterium as well as haloarchaeal A-ATPase from Halorubrum saccharovorum and Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 were used. The cultivated cells, except Bacillus, were broken by passage through a French Pressure Cell. Separation of enzyme subunits was performed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Western Blotting with antisera produced in rabbit against A-ATPase subunits A (85 kD) and subunits B (60 kD) from Halorubrrum saccharovorum (1) showed positive reactions with the membrane fraction, which should be enriched with ATPase from Halorubrum saccharovorum, Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 and Escherichia coli LE 392. Particular attention was given to the question if ATPase subunits can be detected in whole cells. Therefore whole cell preparations of all cells and spore suspensions from Geobacillus stearothermophilus were tested against the antiserum as well as against protein-A-purified antibody against A-ATPase subunit A from Halorubrum saccharovorum. A positive immuno reaction of all cell preparations with the antiserum as well as with the purified antibody was detected. The spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus reacted positively with the antiserum against subunit A of the A-ATPase from Hrr. saccharovorum. A commercial antibody Rabbit Anti-V-ATPase subunit A polyclonal antibody from the GenScript Corporation reacted positively with

  12. Responsive Stabilization of Nanoparticles for Extreme Salinity and High-Temperature Reservoir Applications.

    PubMed

    Ranka, Mikhil; Brown, Paul; Hatton, T Alan

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal stabilization of nanoparticles under extreme salinity and high temperature conditions is a key challenge in the development of next generation technologies for subsurface reservoir characterization and oil recovery. Polyelectrolytes have been investigated as nanoparticle stabilizers, but typically fail at high ionic strengths and elevated temperatures due to excessive charge screening and dehydration. We report an approach to nanoparticle stabilization that overcomes these limitations, and exploits the antipolyelectrolyte phenomenon, in which screening of intrachain electrostatic interactions causes a polyzwitterion chain to undergo a structural transition from a collapsed globule to a more open coil-like regime with increases in ionic strength and temperature. Small-angle neutron scattering on a model zwitterionic polymer in solution indicated an increase in both radius of gyration and excluded volume parameter of the polymer with increases in ionic strength and temperature. The model zwitterion was subsequently incorporated within a polymeric stabilizer for nanoparticles under harsh reservoir conditions, and used to functionalize hydrophilic (silica) as well as hydrophobic (polystyrene) nanoparticles. Long-term colloidal stability was achieved at salt concentrations up to 120,000 mg/dm3 at 90 °C, approximately twice the stability limit previously reported in the literature. The approach can be broadly generalized to a large class of synthetic polyzwitterions, and can be adapted to a wide variety of other colloidal systems in which demands placed by extreme salinity and temperature conditions must be met. PMID:26278070

  13. Partitioning of Organic Contaminants and Tracer Compounds in a CO2-Brine System at High Salinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Janesko, D.; Trutna, J.

    2011-12-01

    Nonionic chemical species including gases and organic compounds partition between the fluid CO2 phase and the aqueous phase in geologic carbon sequestration systems. The injection and migration of CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration systems covers a wide range of pressure and temperature, so it is important to understand the partitioning of these compounds at various P-T conditions and salinities. Geochemical data is particularly lacking for the partitioning of organic contaminant compounds and tracer compounds between highly saline brines and CO2. Most groundwater is relatively low in organic contaminants; however, groundwater associated with hydrocarbon migration pathways, enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and hydrocarbon storage or extraction can contain high concentrations of known organic contaminants. CO2 injection in these systems may therefore be more likely to result in partitioning of contaminants into the CO2 phase that could, upon migration, represent an important risk to groundwater resources. We present the experimental apparatus and determination of partition coefficients between brine and CO2 for a suite of compounds including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), and low molecular weight polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In addition, partition coefficients are determined for the important gas phase tracer compounds: SF6 and Krypton covering a P-T envelope consistent with CO2 injection and plume migration to the near surface.

  14. Chitinase gene responses and tissue sensitivity in an intertidal mud crab (Macrophthalmus japonicus) following low or high salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Kim, Won-Seok; Park, Kiyun; Kim, Jongkyu; Lee, Moon-Ock; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2015-05-01

    Changes in salinity affect the physiological status of the marine habitat including that of the intertidal mud crab Macrophthalmus japonicus. Chitinases play significant biological roles in crustaceans such as morphogenesis, nutrient digestion, and pathogen defense. In this study, the osmoregulatory function of three chitinase gene transcripts was determined compared to seawater (SW, 31 ± 1 psu) in M. japonicus gills and hepatopancreas under different salinities (10, 25, and 40 psu) for 1, 4, and 7 days. In SW-exposed crab, quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed chitinase 1 (Mj-chi1) and chitinase 4 (Mj-chi4) transcripts constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues with strong expression in hepatopancreas, but chitinase 5 (Mj-chi5) showed highest expression in stomach. When exposed to different salinities, Mj-chi1 showed significant up-regulation at day 4 whereas Mj-chi4 showed late up-regulation (day 7) at all the salinities in hepatopancreas. In the gills, early up-regulation (day 1) in Mj-chi1 and time-dependent late up-regulation (day 7) in Mj-chi4 at high salinity were observed. These results indicate the possibility of using Mj-chi4 as a marker against salinity changes. Moreover, our results further suggest that Mj-chi1 and Mj-chi4 transcriptions were significantly affected by changes in salinity; however, Mj-chi5 in gills was less affected by salinity and showed no effect in hepatopancreas. Thus, chitinase transcription modulations in the gills are more sensitive than hepatopancreas to salinity stress. Further, present data indicate the possible existence of different physiological roles among chitinase gene families, which need to be clarified in more detail by future biochemical and physiological functional studies. PMID:25697403

  15. Could high salinity be used to control bullfrogs in small ponds?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Finch, Colton; Blasius, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    We examined survival of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) eggs and tadpoles at 3 ppt and 6 ppt salinity in the laboratory to determine if low-level salinity could be used to eradicate bullfrogs from small ponds that contain native fishes. Bullfrog eggs and tadpoles <10 days old experienced 100% mortality when held at 6 ppt salinity for 10 days. Bullfrog tadpoles 10–15 days old experienced significantly reduced survival when exposed to salinity of 6 ppt for 10 days. Older bullfrog tadpoles (>9 months old) appeared unaffected by 14 days of 6 ppt salinity. Salinity of 3 ppt did not impact survival of bullfrog tadpole eggs or tadpoles at any of the life stages we tested. Adding salt to ponds in the early spring to increase salinity to 6 ppt may be a cost effective way to eradicate bullfrogs from small ponds without harming native fishes.

  16. Partitions and vertical profiles of 9 endocrine disrupting chemicals in an estuarine environment: Effect of tide, particle size and salinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Cheng, Qiao; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Baowei; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2016-04-01

    Phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in an estuarine water column in a depth profile of five water layers (0.05 D, 0.20 D, 0.60 D, 0.80 D and 0.90 D, D = Depth, 10.7 ± 0.7 m) and their corresponding environmental parameters (tide, salinity and particle size) were investigated over a year. Water sample from each layer was further separated into three fractions, which were dissolved, coarse (SPM-D, Φ ≥ 2.7 μm) and fine (SPM-F, 2.7 μm > Φ ≥ 0.7 μm) suspended particulate matters. Most of EDCs in the water column were presented in the dissolved fraction. Vertical profiles of salinity fluctuations showed that the upper water layer was most influenced by upstream flow. Estriol (E3), mestranol (Mes) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) concentrations were significantly higher in ebb tide than in flood tide, indicating that EDCs mainly came from terrestrial source, the upstream flow. Dissolved EDCs also exhibited high levels in the surface layer (0.05 D) due to the upstream source and atmosphere deposition, followed by the bottom layer (0.90 D) owing to the re-suspension of EDCs-containing sediment. Compared to the dissolved phase, the contents of BPA, Mes and EE2 in the solid phase were affected by particle size and exhibited a trend of SPM-F > SPM-D > sediment. On the other hand, the concentrations of octylphenol (OP) and t-nonylphenol (NP), the degradation products from common nonionic surfactants, in sediment were higher than those in suspended particles, and NP concentration was higher in flood tide than that in ebb tide. For both SPM-D and SPM-F, their corresponding EDCs concentrations were negatively related to SPM concentrations due to particle concentration effect (PCE). Owing to the "salting-out effect", salinity pushed EDCs from dissolved fraction to particulate or sedimentary phase. PMID:26736056

  17. Halophilic Microorganisms Are Responsible for the Rosy Discolouration of Saline Environments in Three Historical Buildings with Mural Paintings

    PubMed Central

    Ettenauer, Jörg D.; Jurado, Valme; Piñar, Guadalupe; Miller, Ana Z.; Santner, Markus; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    A number of mural paintings and building materials from monuments located in central and south Europe are characterized by the presence of an intriguing rosy discolouration phenomenon. Although some similarities were observed among the bacterial and archaeal microbiota detected in these monuments, their origin and nature is still unknown. In order to get a complete overview of this biodeterioration process, we investigated the microbial communities in saline environments causing the rosy discolouration of mural paintings in three Austrian historical buildings using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques as well as microscopic techniques. The bacterial communities were dominated by halophilic members of Actinobacteria, mainly of the genus Rubrobacter. Representatives of the Archaea were also detected with the predominating genera Halobacterium, Halococcus and Halalkalicoccus. Furthermore, halophilic bacterial strains, mainly of the phylum Firmicutes, could be retrieved from two monuments using special culture media. Inoculation of building materials (limestone and gypsum plaster) with selected isolates reproduced the unaesthetic rosy effect and biodeterioration in the laboratory. PMID:25084531

  18. Sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater with high salinity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xueqing; Lefebvre, Olivier; Ng, Kok Kwang; Ng, How Yong

    2014-02-01

    In this study, pharmaceutical wastewater with high total dissolved solids (TDSs) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) content was treated through a sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment process. For the anaerobic process, an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) was applied, and a COD removal efficiency of 41.3±2.2% was achieved with an organic loading rate of 8.11±0.31gCOD/L/d and a hydraulic retention time of 48h. To evaluate the salinity effect on the anaerobic process, salts in the wastewater were removed by ion exchange resin, and adverse effect of salinity was observed with a TDS concentration above 14.92g/L. To improve the anaerobic effluent quality, the UASB effluent was further treated by a membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Both the UASB+MBR and UASB+SBR systems achieved excellent organic removal efficiency, with respective COD removal of 94.7% and 91.8%. The UASB+MBR system showed better performance in both organic removal and nitrification. PMID:24355500

  19. Halopyrroles: a new group of highly toxic disinfection byproducts formed in chlorinated saline wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengting; Zhang, Xiangru

    2014-10-21

    Utilizing seawater for toilet flushing is an effective way to conserve freshwater in coastal cities. During chlorination for disinfecting saline wastewater effluents, the high levels of bromide from seawater are oxidized to hypobromous acid which may then react with effluent organics to form brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). In this research, by applying a new precursor ion scan method, we detected and identified a group of halopyrroles in a chlorinated saline wastewater effluent, including tetrabromopyrrole, tribromochloropyrrole, tribromoiodopyrrole, and tribromopyrrole, with tetrabromopyrrole as the predominant species. It is the first time that this group of halopyrroles were identified as wastewater DBPs (though 2,3,5-tribromopyrrole has been found to be a DBP in drinking water before). Detection of halopyrroles was problematic as these compounds in the pretreated samples were found to convert to halonitropyrroles; the problem was successfully solved by diluting the pretreated samples. The formation, occurrence, precursor, and toxicity of tetrabromopyrrole were investigated. This DBP showed significantly higher developmental toxicity than any of the haloaliphatic and haloaromatic DBPs previously tested. PMID:25236171

  20. Bacterial biodiversity from anthropogenic extreme environments: a hyper-alkaline and hyper-saline industrial residue contaminated by chromium and iron.

    PubMed

    Brito, Elcia M S; Piñón-Castillo, Hilda A; Guyoneaud, Rémy; Caretta, César A; Gutiérrez-Corona, J Félix; Duran, Robert; Reyna-López, Georgina E; Nevárez-Moorillón, G Virginia; Fahy, Anne; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic extreme environments are among the most interesting sites for the bioprospection of extremophiles since the selection pressures may favor the presence of microorganisms of great interest for taxonomical and astrobiological research as well as for bioremediation technologies and industrial applications. In this work, T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene library analyses were carried out to describe the autochthonous bacterial populations from an industrial waste characterized as hyper-alkaline (pH between 9 and 14), hyper-saline (around 100 PSU) and highly contaminated with metals, mainly chromium (from 5 to 18 g kg(-1)) and iron (from 2 to 108 g kg(-1)). Due to matrix interference with DNA extraction, a protocol optimization step was required in order to carry out molecular analyses. The most abundant populations, as evaluated by both T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene library analyses, were affiliated to Bacillus and Lysobacter genera. Lysobacter related sequences were present in the three samples: solid residue and lixiviate sediments from both dry and wet seasons. Sequences related to Thiobacillus were also found; although strains affiliated to this genus are known to have tolerance to metals, they have not previously been detected in alkaline environments. Together with Bacillus (already described as a metal reducer), such organisms could be of use in bioremediation technologies for reducing chromium, as well as for the prospection of enzymes of biotechnological interest. PMID:22350256

  1. Stennis Space Center Salinity Drifter Project. A Collaborative Project with Hancock High School, Kiln, MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalcic, Maria; Turowski, Mark; Hall, Callie

    2010-01-01

    Presentation topics include: importance of salinity of coastal waters, habitat switching algorithm, habitat switching module, salinity estimates from Landsat for Sabine Calcasieu Basin, percent of time inundated in 2006, salinity data, prototyping the system, system as packaged for field tests, salinity probe and casing, opening for water flow, cellular antenna used to transmit data, preparing to launch, system is launched in the Pearl River at Stennis Space Center, data are transmitted to Twitter by cell phone modem every 15 minutes, Google spreadsheet I used to import the data from the Twitter feed and to compute salinity (from conductivity) and display charts of salinity and temperature, results are uploaded to NASA's Applied Science and Technology Project Office Webpage.

  2. Identification of potential markers and sensitive tissues for low or high salinity stress in an intertidal mud crab (Macrophthalmus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Kim, Won-Seok; Park, Kiyun; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2014-12-01

    Macrophthalmus japonicus is an intertidal mud crab is an ecologically important species in Korea, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors. Environmental changes especially salinity cause physiological stress to the marine habitats. Differential gene transcription of M. japonicus tissues provided information about tissue specific responses against salinity. Five potential genes were identified and their transcription levels were determined quantitatively comparison to seawater (SW: 31 ± 1 psu) in M. japonicus gills and hepatopancreas after exposed them to different salinities. Ecdysteroid receptor (Mj-EcR), trypsin (Mj-Tryp), arginine kinase (Mj-AK), lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (Mj-LGBP) and peroxinectin (Mj-Prx) in hepatopancreas up-regulated against different salinities. In contrast, the gills, Mj-EcR, Mj-Tryp and Mj-AK showed late up-regulated responses to 40 psu compared to SW. All genes except Mj-LGBP showed up regulation in the gills as time dependent manner. These genes can be considered as potential markers to assess responses in salinity changes. This study suggests hepatopancreas is a suitable tissue for transcriptional, biochemical and physiological responses analysis on M. japonicus in low and high salinity stress. PMID:25240977

  3. Effects of low and high salinity regimes on seasonal gametogenesis of the ribbed mussel Geukensia granosissima in coastal Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honig, Aaron; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Supan, John

    2014-01-01

    Benthic intertidal bivalves play an essential role in estuarine ecosystems by contributing to habitat provision, water filtration, and host vegetation productivity. As such, ecosystem level changes that impact population distributions and persistence of local bivalve populations may have large ecosystem level consequences, making it important to better understand the population ecology of native bivalves. In order to determine potential impacts of shifting salinity and temperature regimes along the northern Gulf of Mexico, the seasonal timing of gametogenesis in the Gulf estuarine ribbed mussel, Geukensia granossisima, was examined across a salinity gradient in southeastern Louisiana, from July 2011 through October 2012. Ten mussels were randomly sampled monthly from low (~ 5) and high (~25) salinity marsh sites in southeastern Louisiana, and histologically processed to determine the seasonal progression of gametogenesis. Peak ripeness occurred at both sites between April and September, was positively correlated with temperature, and coincided with seasonal shifts in salinity. Mussels located in lower salinity waters demonstrated a shorter period of gametogenesis, and lower rates of ripeness indicating that changes in salinity regimes may impact long-term population dynamics.

  4. Dual Lattice Boltzmann method for electrokinetic coupling : behavior at high and low salinities in rough channels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Toussaint, Renaud; Jouniaux, Laurence

    2014-05-01

    We study the coupling between hydraulic and electric flows in a porous medium at small scale using the Lattice Boltzmann method. This method is a computational fluid dynamics technique that is used for advection and diffusion modeling. We implement a coupled Lattice Boltzmann algorithm that solves both the mass transport and the electric field arising from charges displacements. The streaming potential and electroosmosis phenomena occur in a variety of situations and derive from this coupling. We focus on the streaming potential which is described using the ratio between the created potential difference and the applied pressure gradient. The streaming potential is assumed to be a linear function of the fluid conductivity, but experimental results highlight anomalous behaviors at low and high salinity. We try to account for them by setting extreme conditions that are likely to generate non-linearities. Several pore radii are tested so as to determine what is the effect of a radius that is comparable to the Debye length, the screening length of the electric potential, due to the ions in the electrolyte. The volumetric integral of the electrical current is calculated for comparison with the 2D simulations. High values of zeta potential are tested to verify if the discrepancy regarding the theoretical result is concentration-dependent. We try to include a surface conductivity term in the coefficient formulation. Some tests including a rugosity on the channel walls are performed. All of these attempts show a normal behaviour of the streaming potential at high salinity. We observe a decrease of the ratio at low conductivity, showing that this ratio is modified when the pore radius becomes negligible compared with the Debye length, which is physically meaningful in little pores at low concentrations. References : S. Pride. Governing equations for the coupled electromagnetics and acoustics of porous media. Physical Review B, 50 : 15678-15696, 1994. D. A. Wolf

  5. Nutritional Status as the Key Modulator of Antioxidant Responses Induced by High Environmental Ammonia and Salinity Stress in European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    PubMed Central

    Zinta, Gaurav; Dasan, Antony Franklin; Rasoloniriana, Rindra; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    glutathione reductase), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity and reduced ascorbate (ASC) content. On the contrary, fasted fish could not activate many of these protective systems and rely mainly on CAT and ASC dependent pathways as antioxidative sentinels. The present findings exemplify that in fed fish single factors and a combination of HEA exposure and reduced seawater salinities (upto 10 ppt) were insufficient to cause oxidative damage due to the highly competent antioxidant system compared to fasted fish. However, the impact of HEA exposure at a hypo-saline environment (2.5 ppt) also defied antioxidant defence system in fed fish, suggesting this combined factor is beyond the tolerance range for both feeding groups. Overall, our results indicate that the oxidative stress mediated by the experimental conditions were exacerbated during starvation, and also suggest that feed deprivation particularly at reduced seawater salinities can instigate fish more susceptible to ammonia toxicity. PMID:26241315

  6. Nutritional Status as the Key Modulator of Antioxidant Responses Induced by High Environmental Ammonia and Salinity Stress in European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Zinta, Gaurav; Dasan, Antony Franklin; Rasoloniriana, Rindra; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    glutathione reductase), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity and reduced ascorbate (ASC) content. On the contrary, fasted fish could not activate many of these protective systems and rely mainly on CAT and ASC dependent pathways as antioxidative sentinels. The present findings exemplify that in fed fish single factors and a combination of HEA exposure and reduced seawater salinities (upto 10 ppt) were insufficient to cause oxidative damage due to the highly competent antioxidant system compared to fasted fish. However, the impact of HEA exposure at a hypo-saline environment (2.5 ppt) also defied antioxidant defence system in fed fish, suggesting this combined factor is beyond the tolerance range for both feeding groups. Overall, our results indicate that the oxidative stress mediated by the experimental conditions were exacerbated during starvation, and also suggest that feed deprivation particularly at reduced seawater salinities can instigate fish more susceptible to ammonia toxicity. PMID:26241315

  7. Isolation of an extremely halophilic arhaeon Natrialba sp. C21 able to degrade aromatic compounds and to produce stable biosurfactant at high salinity.

    PubMed

    Khemili-Talbi, Souad; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Akmoussi-Toumi, Siham; Angar, Yassmina; Gana, Mohamed Lamine

    2015-11-01

    Natrialba sp. strain C21 was isolated from oil contaminated saline water in Ain Salah (Algeria) and has exhibited a good potential for degrading phenol (3% v/v), naphthalene (3% v/v), and pyrene (3% v/v) at high salinity with high growth, enzymatic activity and biosurfactant production. Successful metabolism of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds of the strain Natrialba sp. C21 appears to require the ortho-cleavage pathway. Indeed, assays of the key enzymes involved in the ring cleavage of catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase indicated that degradation of the phenol, naphthalene and pyrene by strain Natrialba sp. C21 was via the ortho-cleavage pathway. Cells grown on aromatic hydrocarbons displayed greater ortho-activities mainly towards catechol, while the meta-activity was very low. Besides, biosurfactants derived from the strain C21 were capable of effectively emulsifying both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons and seem to be particularly promising since they have particular adaptations like the increased stability at high temperature and salinity conditions. This study clearly demonstrates for the first time that strain belonging to the genera Natrialba is able to grow at 25% (w/v) NaCl, utilizing phenol, naphthalene, and pyrene as the sole carbon sources. The results suggest that the isolated halophilic archaeon could be a good candidate for the remediation process in extreme environments polluted by aromatic hydrocarbons. Moreover, the produced biosurfactant offers a multitude of interesting potential applications in various fields of biotechnology. PMID:26334644

  8. Saline Systems highlights for 2006

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2007-01-01

    Saline Systems is a journal devoted to both basic and applied studies of saline and hypersaline environments and their biodiversity. Here, I review the reports and commentaries published in the journal in 2006, including some exploring the geochemistry of saline estuaries, lakes, and ponds, others on the ecology and molecular biology of the indigenous halophilic organisms, and still others addressing the environmental challenges facing saline environments. Several studies are relevant to applications in biotechnology and aquaculture. PMID:17244355

  9. The geomorphology of two hyper-saline springs in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Melissa; Pollard, Wayne

    2015-04-01

    On Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic, many low temperature perennial saline springs occur despite cold polar desert climate conditions marked by a mean annual air temperature of -18°C. Associated with 2 groups of hyper-saline springs are distinctive landforms resulting from winter deposition of salt minerals. These deposits resemble tufas structurally, but unlike true tufas which are composed of carbonate minerals, these landforms are formed mainly of salt. This study hypothesizes that the extreme cold winter air temperatures cool water temperatures triggering rapid precipitation of various salt minerals [mainly hydrohalite (NaCl*2H2O)]. These newly formed salt minerals subsequently alter the flow hydrology by obstructing summer flow paths. The tufa-like appearance of these salt deposits reflects the interaction between changing water temperature, chemistry and flow.This research characterises the geomorphology and geochemistry of two hyper-saline springs on Axel Heiberg Island: the first is located at Wolf Diapir (79°07'23"N; 90°14'39"W), the deposit at this site resembles a large conical mound (2.5m tall x 3m diameter). The second is located at Stolz Diapir (79°04'30"N; 87°04'30"W). In this case a series of pool and barrage structures staircase down a narrow valley for approximately 300m (several pools are up to 10 m wide x 3 m deep). The springs have very different seasonal surface hydrologic regimes and topographic settings which influence the pattern of mineral precipitates. The accumulation of precipitates occurs during the winter and is dominated by the formation of hydrohalite. In the summer, the accumulated hydrohalite melts incongruently to form halite. In addition, spring water and snowmelt dissolve various parts of the accumulations, changing the morphology of the deposits. This presentation will focus on results from four periods of fieldwork (two in spring for winter conditions and two in summer) including results from time

  10. Isolation of high salinity stress tolerant genes from Pisum sativum by random overexpression in Escherichia coli and their functional validation.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amita; Dang, Hung Quang; Vaid, Neha; Tuteja, Narendra

    2009-05-01

    Salinity stress is one of the major factors which reduce crop plants growth and productivity resulting in significant economic losses worldwide. Therefore, it would be fruitful to isolate and functionally identify new salinity stress-induced genes for understanding the mechanism and developing salinity stress tolerant plants. Based on functional gene screening assay, we have isolated few salinity tolerant genes out of one million Escherichia coli (SOLR) transformants containing pea cDNAs. Sequence analysis of three of these genes revealed homology to Ribosomal-L30E (RPL30E), Chlorophyll-a/b-binding protein (Chla/bBP) and FIDDLEHEAD (FDH). The salinity tolerance of these genes in bacteria was further confirmed by using another strain of E. coli (DH5alpha) transformants. The homology based computational modeling of these proteins suggested the high degree of conservation with the conserved domains of their homologous partners. The reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the expression of these cDNAs (except the FDH) was upregulated in pea plants in response to NaCl stress. We observed that there was no significant effect of Li(+) ion on the expression level of these genes, while an increase in response to K(+) ion was observed. Overall, this study provides an evidence for a novel function of these genes in high salinity stress tolerance. The PsFDH showed constitutive expression in planta suggesting that it can be used as constitutively expressed marker gene for salinity stress tolerance in plants. This study brings new direction in identifying novel function of unidentified genes in abiotic stress tolerance without previous knowledge of the genome sequence. PMID:19816097

  11. Transport of ions in mesoporous carbon electrodes during capacitive deionization of high-salinity solutions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K; Kim, Y-H; Gabitto, J; Mayes, R T; Yiacoumi, S; Bilheux, H Z; Walker, L M H; Dai, S; Tsouris, C

    2015-01-27

    Desalination of high-salinity solutions has been studied using a novel experimental technique and a theoretical model. Neutron imaging has been employed to visualize lithium ions in mesoporous carbon materials, which are used as electrodes in capacitive deionization (CDI) for water desalination. Experiments were conducted with a flow-through CDI cell designed for neutron imaging and with lithium-6 chloride ((6)LiCl) as the electrolyte. Sequences of neutron images have been obtained at a relatively high concentration of (6)LiCl solution to provide information on the transport of ions within the electrodes. A new model that computes the individual ionic concentration profiles inside mesoporous carbon electrodes has been used to simulate the CDI process. Modifications have also been introduced into the simulation model to calculate results at high electrolyte concentrations. Experimental data and simulation results provide insight into why CDI is not effective for desalination of high ionic-strength solutions. The combination of experimental information, obtained through neutron imaging, with the theoretical model will help in the design of CDI devices, which can improve the process for high ionic-strength solutions. PMID:25533167

  12. High temperature and salinity enhance soil nitrogen mineralization in a tidal freshwater marsh.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haifeng; Bai, Junhong; He, Xinhua; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing

    2014-01-01

    Soil nitrogen (N) mineralization in wetlands is sensitive to various environmental factors. To compare the effects of salinity and temperature on N mineralization, wetland soils from a tidal freshwater marsh locating in the Yellow River Delta was incubated over a 48-d anaerobic incubation period under four salinity concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 35‰) and four temperature levels (10, 20, 30 and 40°C). The results suggested that accumulated ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) increased with increasing incubation time under all salinity concentrations. Higher temperatures and salinities significantly enhanced soil N mineralization except for a short-term (≈10 days) inhibiting effect found under 35‰ salinity. The incubation time, temperature, salinity and their interactions exhibited significant effects on N mineralization (P<0.001) except the interactive effect of salinity and temperature (P>0.05), while temperature exhibited the greatest effect (P<0.001). Meanwhile, N mineralization processes were simulated using both an effective accumulated temperature model and a one-pool model. Both models fit well with the simulation of soil N mineralization process in the coastal freshwater wetlands under a range of 30 to 40°C (R2 = 0.88-0.99, P<0.01). Our results indicated that an enhanced NH4+-N release with increasing temperature and salinity deriving from the projected global warming could have profound effects on nutrient cycling in coastal wetland ecosystems. PMID:24733366

  13. High Temperature and Salinity Enhance Soil Nitrogen Mineralization in a Tidal Freshwater Marsh

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haifeng; Bai, Junhong; He, Xinhua; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing

    2014-01-01

    Soil nitrogen (N) mineralization in wetlands is sensitive to various environmental factors. To compare the effects of salinity and temperature on N mineralization, wetland soils from a tidal freshwater marsh locating in the Yellow River Delta was incubated over a 48-d anaerobic incubation period under four salinity concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 35‰) and four temperature levels (10, 20, 30 and 40°C). The results suggested that accumulated ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) increased with increasing incubation time under all salinity concentrations. Higher temperatures and salinities significantly enhanced soil N mineralization except for a short-term (≈10 days) inhibiting effect found under 35‰ salinity. The incubation time, temperature, salinity and their interactions exhibited significant effects on N mineralization (P<0.001) except the interactive effect of salinity and temperature (P>0.05), while temperature exhibited the greatest effect (P<0.001). Meanwhile, N mineralization processes were simulated using both an effective accumulated temperature model and a one-pool model. Both models fit well with the simulation of soil N mineralization process in the coastal freshwater wetlands under a range of 30 to 40°C (R2 = 0.88–0.99, P<0.01). Our results indicated that an enhanced NH4+-N release with increasing temperature and salinity deriving from the projected global warming could have profound effects on nutrient cycling in coastal wetland ecosystems. PMID:24733366

  14. Salinity Adaptation and the Contribution of Parental Environmental Effects in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Moriuchi, Ken S.; Friesen, Maren L.; Cordeiro, Matilde A.; Badri, Mounawer; Vu, Wendy T.; Main, Bradley J.; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.; Strauss, Sharon Y.; von Wettberg, Eric J. B.

    2016-01-01

    High soil salinity negatively influences plant growth and yield. Some taxa have evolved mechanisms for avoiding or tolerating elevated soil salinity, which can be modulated by the environment experienced by parents or offspring. We tested the contribution of the parental and offspring environments on salinity adaptation and their potential underlying mechanisms. In a two-generation greenhouse experiment, we factorially manipulated salinity concentrations for genotypes of Medicago truncatula that were originally collected from natural populations that differed in soil salinity. To compare population level adaptation to soil salinity and to test the potential mechanisms involved we measured two aspects of plant performance, reproduction and vegetative biomass, and phenological and physiological traits associated with salinity avoidance and tolerance. Saline-origin populations had greater biomass and reproduction under saline conditions than non-saline populations, consistent with local adaptation to saline soils. Additionally, parental environmental exposure to salt increased this difference in performance. In terms of environmental effects on mechanisms of salinity adaptation, parental exposure to salt spurred phenological differences that facilitated salt avoidance, while offspring exposure to salt resulted in traits associated with greater salt tolerance. Non-saline origin populations expressed traits associated with greater growth in the absence of salt while, for saline adapted populations, the ability to maintain greater performance in saline environments was also associated with lower growth potential in the absence of salt. Plastic responses induced by parental and offspring environments in phenology, leaf traits, and gas exchange contribute to salinity adaptation in M. truncatula. The ability of plants to tolerate environmental stress, such as high soil salinity, is likely modulated by a combination of parental effects and within-generation phenotypic

  15. Inadvertent high spinal anesthesia as sequelae to epidural injection of normal saline

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Vinod Bala; Sharma, Anupama Gill; Kaur, Mohandeep; Gulabani, Michell

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a case of high spinal blockade in a patient belonging to ASA Grade I which lead to need for endotracheal intubation. A 35 year old healthy male, weighing 59 kg, of height 165 cms presented with a post traumatic raw area over the left lower limb. A reverse sural graft along with skin grafting (from the thigh) was planned. In OR, the patient was placed in sitting position and the extradural space was identified by ‘loss of resistance to air’ technique at the L2-L3 intervertebral space. The catheter could not be threaded into the extradural space, hence 5ml of 0.9% saline was injected. However, still the catheter could not be negotiated. Further attempts to identify the extradural space at the L1-L2 and L3-L4 interspace levels were made. During these attempts a total of 18 ml of 0.9% saline was injected into the extradural space. Within 2 minutes blood pressure fell to 90/60 mmHg. Injection mephenteramine (3 mg) was given intravenously and a slight head up tilt was applied. After 2 more minutes the patient started complaining of tingling in his hands and difficulty in breathing. Oxygen 100% was administered via a face mask attached to the anesthesia circle system. In view of onset of respiratory failure, general anesthesia was induced. Thiopentone (200 mg) and Suxamethonium (75 mg) were given intravenously, the patient's trachea was intubated and his lungs ventilated with 40% oxygen, 60% nitrous oxide and 0.2-0.4% Isoflurane, without additional neuromuscular blockade. The arterial saturation promptly returned to 97% and, immediately after intubation, the heart rate was found to be 103 beats/min and the arterial BP 162/102 mmHg. At the end of surgery, spontaneous ventilation returned and the patient was allowed to breathe 100% oxygen via the tracheal tube until he awoke, when his trachea was extubated. PMID:25886433

  16. Inadvertent high spinal anesthesia as sequelae to epidural injection of normal saline.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Vinod Bala; Sharma, Anupama Gill; Kaur, Mohandeep; Gulabani, Michell

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a case of high spinal blockade in a patient belonging to ASA Grade I which lead to need for endotracheal intubation. A 35 year old healthy male, weighing 59 kg, of height 165 cms presented with a post traumatic raw area over the left lower limb. A reverse sural graft along with skin grafting (from the thigh) was planned. In OR, the patient was placed in sitting position and the extradural space was identified by 'loss of resistance to air' technique at the L2-L3 intervertebral space. The catheter could not be threaded into the extradural space, hence 5ml of 0.9% saline was injected. However, still the catheter could not be negotiated. Further attempts to identify the extradural space at the L1-L2 and L3-L4 interspace levels were made. During these attempts a total of 18 ml of 0.9% saline was injected into the extradural space. Within 2 minutes blood pressure fell to 90/60 mmHg. Injection mephenteramine (3 mg) was given intravenously and a slight head up tilt was applied. After 2 more minutes the patient started complaining of tingling in his hands and difficulty in breathing. Oxygen 100% was administered via a face mask attached to the anesthesia circle system. In view of onset of respiratory failure, general anesthesia was induced. Thiopentone (200 mg) and Suxamethonium (75 mg) were given intravenously, the patient's trachea was intubated and his lungs ventilated with 40% oxygen, 60% nitrous oxide and 0.2-0.4% Isoflurane, without additional neuromuscular blockade. The arterial saturation promptly returned to 97% and, immediately after intubation, the heart rate was found to be 103 beats/min and the arterial BP 162/102 mmHg. At the end of surgery, spontaneous ventilation returned and the patient was allowed to breathe 100% oxygen via the tracheal tube until he awoke, when his trachea was extubated. PMID:25886433

  17. Characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances from sludge and biofilm in a simultaneous nitrification and denitrification system under high salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linting; She, Zonglian; Jin, Chunji; Yang, Shiying; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Yangguo; Gao, Mengchun

    2016-09-01

    The composition and distribution of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) both from suspended sludge and attached biofilm were investigated in a simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) system with the increase of the salinity from 1.0 to 3.0 %. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy were used to examine proteins (PN), polysaccharides (PS) and humic substances (HS) present in EPS. High total nitrogen removal (above 83.9 %) via SND was obtained in the salinity range of 1.0-2.5 %. Total EPS in the sludge increased from 150.2 to 200.6 mg/gVSS with the increase of salinity from 1.0 to 3.0 %, whereas the corresponding values in the biofilm achieved the maximum of 288.6 mg/g VSS at 2.0 % salinity. Dominant composition of EPS was detected as HS in both sludge and biofilm, having the percentages of 50.6-68.6 and 41.1-69.9 % in total EPS, respectively. Both PN and PS contents in soluble EPS (S-EPS), loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) of sludge and biofilm increased with the increased salinity. The FTIR spectrum and 3D-EEM fluorescence spectroscopy of S-EPS, LB-EPS and TB-EPS in the sludge and biofilm showed the changes of functional groups and conformations of the compositions in EPS with the increase of salinity. The results demonstrated that the characteristics of EPS varied from sludge to biofilm. The obtained results could provide a better understanding of the salinity effect on the EPS characteristics in a SND system. PMID:27126502

  18. Intervention Research in Highly Unstable Environments

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, Kathleen C.; Grey, Margaret; Bowers, Barbara; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Gross, Deborah; Funk, Marjorie; Beck, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights issues and presents strategies for conducting intervention research in highly unstable environments such as schools, critical care units, and long-term care facilities. The authors draw on their own experiences to discuss the challenges that may be encountered in highly unstable settings. The concept of validity provides a framework for understanding the value of addressing the many methodological issues that can emerge in settings characterized by instability. We explain unstable environments by elaborating on knowable elements that contribute to instability. Strategies are provided for improving success of intervention research in unstable settings by carrying out an environmental assessment prior to beginning a study. PMID:19035619

  19. Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteriophage (phi)241 isolated from an industrial cucumber fermentation at high acidity and salinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel phage, (phi)241, specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7 was isolated from an industrial cucumber fermentation where both acidity (pH less than or equal to 3.7) and salinity (greater than or equal to 5% NaCl) were high. The phage belongs to the Myoviridae family. Its latent period was 15 min a...

  20. The improved resistance to high salinity induced by trehalose is associated with ionic regulation and osmotic adjustment in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bowen; Yang, Lei; Cong, Weiwei; Zu, Yuangang; Tang, Zhonghua

    2014-04-01

    The effects of exogenous trehalose (Tre) on salt tolerance of pharmaceutical plant Catharanthus roseus and the physiological mechanisms were both investigated in this study. The results showed that the supplement of Tre in saline condition (250 mM NaCl) largely alleviated the inhibitory effects of salinity on plant growth, namely biomass accumulation and total leaf area per plant. In this saline condition, the decreased level of relative water content (RWC) and photosynthetic rate were also greatly rescued by exogenous Tre. This improved performance of plants under high salinity induced by Tre could be partly ascribed to its ability to decrease accumulation of sodium, and increase potassium in leaves. The exogenous Tre led to high levels of fructose, glucose, sucrose and Tre inside the salt-stressed plants during whole the three-week treatment. The major free amino acids such as proline, arginine, threonine and glutamate were also largely elevated in the first two-week course of treatment with Tre in saline solution. It was proposed here that Tre might act as signal to make the salt-stressed plants actively increase internal compatible solutes, including soluble sugars and free amino acids, to control water loss, leaf gas exchange and ionic flow at the onset of salt stress. The application of Tre in saline condition also promoted the accumulation of alkaloids. The regulatory role of Tre in improving salt tolerance was optimal with an exogenous concentration of 10 mM Tre. Larger concentrations of Tre were supra-optimum and adversely affected plant growth. PMID:24589477

  1. Fructose Accelerates UV-C Induced Photochemical Degradation of Pentachlorophenol in Low and High Salinity Water.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Shaila; O'Donnell, Sean-Erik; Sales, Christopher M; Tikekar, Rohan V

    2016-06-01

    A novel process involving 254 nm UV-C and fructose to degrade pentachlorophenol (PCP), a pollutant, in low and high salinity (0-10 g/L salt) solutions is presented. The first order rate constants in the presence of 0, 300, and 500 mM fructose were 0.23 ± 0.04, 0.54 ± 0.01, and 1.18 ± 0.03 min(-1), respectively. Experimental evidence has shown generation of hydrogen peroxide and singlet oxygen from the UV-C exposure of fructose, which may have accelerated PCP degradation. Although salts (sodium, potassium, and calcium chloride, 1101:6.4:1) are expected to enhance the degradation rate due to generation of reactive halide species (RHS) from exposure to UV-C light, 10 g/L salt decreased the degradation rates in both the absence and presence of fructose. An LC-ESI-MS spectrum of the reaction mixture revealed a high relative abundance at m/z of 215 that corresponds to a fructose-chlorine adduct, indicating that fructose may have scavenged these RHS and prevented their reaction with PCP. PMID:27160945

  2. Hidden persistence of salinity and productivity gradients shaping pelagic diversity in highly dynamic marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, M; Reglero, P; Álvarez-Berastegui, D; Torres, A P; Álvarez, I; Rodriguez, J M; Carbonell, A; Balbín, R; Alemany, F

    2015-03-01

    While large-scale patterns of pelagic marine diversity are generally well described, they remain elusive at regional-scale given the high temporal and spatial dynamics of biological and local oceanographic processes. We here evaluated whether the main drivers of pelagic diversity can be more pervasive than expected at regional scale, using a meroplankton community of a frontal system in the Western Mediterranean. We evidence that regional biodiversity in a highly dynamic ecosystem can be summarized attending to both static (bathymetric) and ephemeral (biological and hydrographical) environmental axes of seascape. This pattern can be observed irrespectively of the regional hydroclimatic scenario with distance to coast, salinity gradient and chlorophyll a concentration being the main and recurrent drivers. By contrast, their effect is overridden in common analyses given that different non-linear effects are buffered between years of contrasting scenarios, emerging the influence of secondary effects on diversity. We conclude that community studies may reveal hidden persistent processes when they take into account different functional effects related to hydroclimatic variability. A better understanding of regional dynamics of the pelagic realm will improve our capability to forecast future responses of plankton communities as well as impacts of climate change on marine biodiversity. PMID:25617678

  3. Effects of high salinity wastewater discharges on unionid mussels in the Allegheny River, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kathleen Patnode; Hittle, Elizabeth A.; Robert Anderson; Lora Zimmerman; Fulton, John W.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of high salinity wastewater (brine) from oil and natural gas drilling on freshwater mussels in the Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, during 2012. Mussel cages (N = 5 per site) were deployed at two sites upstream and four sites downstream of a brine treatment facility on the Allegheny River. Each cage contained 20 juvenile northern riffleshell mussels Epioblasma torulosa rangiana). Continuous specific conductance and temperature data were recorded by water quality probes deployed at each site. To measure the amount of mixing throughout the entire study area, specific conductance surveys were completed two times during low-flow conditions along transects from bank to bank that targeted upstream (reference) reaches, a municipal wastewater treatment plant discharge upstream of the brine-facility discharge, the brine facility, and downstream reaches. Specific conductance data indicated that high specific conductance water from the brine facility (4,000–12,000 µS/cm; mean 7,846) compared to the reference reach (103–188 µS/cm; mean 151) is carried along the left descending bank of the river and that dilution of the discharge via mixing does not occur until 0.5 mi (805 m) downstream. Juvenile northern riffleshell mussel survival was severely impaired within the high specific conductance zone (2 and 34% at and downstream of the brine facility, respectively) and at the municipal wastewater treatment plant (21%) compared to background (84%). We surveyed native mussels (family Unionidae) at 10 transects: 3 upstream, 3 within, and 4 downstream of the high specific conductance zone. Unionid mussel abundance and diversity were lower for all transects within and downstream of the high conductivity zone compared to upstream. The results of this study clearly demonstrate in situ toxicity to juvenile northern riffleshell mussels, a federally endangered species, and to the native unionid mussel assemblage located downstream of a brine discharge to the

  4. Evaluating integrated strategies for robust treatment of high saline piggery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Choi, Wook Jin; Chae, A Na; Park, Joonhong; Kim, Hyung Joo; Song, Kyung Guen

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we integrated physicochemical and biological strategies for the robust treatment of piggery effluent in which high levels of organic constituents, inorganic nutrients, color, and salts remained. Piggery effluent that was stabilized in an anaerobic digester was sequentially coagulated, micro-filtered, and air-stripped prior to biological treatment with mixotrophic algal species that showed tolerance to high salinity (up to 4.8% as Cl(-)). The algae treatment was conducted with continuous O2 supplementation instead of using the combination of high lighting and CO2 injection. The microalga Scenedesmus quadricauda employed as a bio-agent was capable of assimilating both nitrogen (222 mg N g cell(-1) d(-1)) and phosphorus (9.3 mg P g cell(-1) d(-1)) and utilizing dissolved organics (2053 mg COD g cell(-1) d(-1)) as a carbon source in a single treatment process under the heterotrophic growth conditions. The heterotrophic growth of S. quadricauda proceeded rapidly by directly incorporating organic substrate in the oxidative assimilation process, which coincided with the high productivity of algal biomass, accounting for 2.4 g cell L(-1) d(-1). The algae-treated wastewater was subsequently ozonated to comply with discharge permits that limit color in the effluent, which also resulted in improved biodegradability of residual organics. The integrated treatment scheme proposed in this study also achieved 89% removal of COD, 88% removal of TN, and 60% removal of TP. The advantage of using the hybrid configuration suggests that this would be a promising strategy in full-scale treatment facilities for piggery effluent. PMID:26689659

  5. A high resolution salinity time series 1993-2012 in the North Atlantic from Argo and Altimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendardo, I.; Rhein, M.; Hollmann, R.

    2016-04-01

    The study of salinity changes has been hampered by the lack of temporal and spatial resolution of the observations. In order to improve the spatial and temporal distribution of salinity observations, we used the Gravest Empirical Mode (GEM) technique to calculate high-resolution salinity distributions as a function of dynamic height for the period 1993-2012. This technique combined Argo and altimeter data to exploit the relationship between T/S profiles and dynamic height in the North Atlantic. The method was valid in the upper 700 m mainly at and near the pathways of the North Atlantic Current (NAC), but failed in regions with weak stratification or with ambiguities in the T/S relationships. Coherent, multiannual large-scale variability was observed, with many features present in all regions, albeit with weaker amplitudes in the eastern basins. Some of the interannual features in the northeastern Atlantic basins were unrelated to the variability further south and west, pointing to an occasional advection of subtropical water in the eastern Atlantic. Origin and advection of salinity anomalies with the NAC from the North American Basin into the western subpolar North Atlantic are correlated with the state of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and dampened by the surface freshwater fluxes. Other mechanisms influencing the salinity pattern are the changing location of the subpolar front, also related to the NAO. The large multiyear variability in the 20 year time series obscured any potential trends caused by global warming. Only the Rockall Trough showed a salinity increase of 0.03 per decade.

  6. A High-Resolution Global Lake Inventory with Classified Freshwater and Saline Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Sheng, Y.; Song, C.; Urano, T.; Satori, P. J.; Ford, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Lakes are the largest surface water stock readily accessible to human need. Monitoring and understanding the distribution, change, and vulnerability of contemporary lakes remain as one of the top priorities in hydrological studies. Our recent project supported by the U.S. Geological Survey produced a high-resolution inventory of global lake extents (greater than 0.4 hectare) using circa 2000 Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery, which further enhanced human's vision on the precise physical distribution of contemporary surface water stock worldwide. Continuous advancement in understanding regional-to-global surface water stress demands expanded knowledge on not only water discharge in streams and rivers but also stock in freshwater lakes. Yet to our best knowledge, we are currently lacking detailed, reliable inventory of lake water types on a global scale. Here we represent a progressing world lake database with differentiated freshwater and saline categories by integrating hydrological analysis, climate data, and spectral remote sensing. This effort is a natural extension of our global lake mapping project and a prerequisite of our overarching goal to assess global lake vulnerability. The completed lake data will also benefit a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines and water resources management agencies.

  7. Diversity of Bacteroidetes in high-altitude saline evaporitic basins in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorador, Cristina; Meneses, Daniela; Urtuvia, Viviana; Demergasso, Cecilia; Vila, Irma; Witzel, Karl-Paul; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2009-06-01

    The phylum Bacteroidetes represents one of the most abundant bacterial groups of marine and freshwater bacterioplankton. We investigated the diversity of Bacteroidetes in water and sediment samples from three evaporitic basins located in the highlands of northern Chile. We used both 16S rRNA gene clone libraries created with targeted Bacteroidetes-specific primers and separation of specifically amplified gene fragments by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). DGGE analysis revealed a reduced richness of these organisms in samples from Salar de Huasco (two to four DGGE bands) increasing in Salar de Ascotán (two to seven DGGE bands) and Laguna Tebenquiche at Salar de Atacama (four to eight DGGE bands). Cluster analysis (WPGMA) of DGGE bands showed that bands from Salar de Huasco and Salar de Ascotán grouped together and samples from Salar de Atacama formed separate clusters in water and sediment samples, reflecting different Bacteroidetes communities between sites. Most of the sequences analyzed belonged to the family Flavobacteriaceae and clustered with the genera Psychroflexus, Gillisia, Maribacter, Muricauda, Flavobacterium, and Salegentibacter. The most abundant phylotype was highly related to Psychroflexus spp. and was recovered from all three study sites. The similarity of the analyzed sequences with their closest relatives in GenBank was typically <97% and notably lower when compared with type strains, demonstrating the unique character of these sequences. Culture efforts will be necessary to get a better description of the diversity of this group in saline evaporitic basins of northern Chile.

  8. Toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater and effects on constructed wetland plants.

    PubMed

    Calheiros, Cristina S C; Silva, Gabriela; Quitério, Paula V B; Crispim, Luís F C; Brix, Hans; Moura, Sandra C; Castro, Paula M L

    2012-08-01

    The toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater produced after an activated sludge secondary treatment on the germination and seedling growth of Trifolium pratense, a species used as indicator in toxicity tests, was evaluated. Growth was inhibited by wastewater concentrations >25% and undiluted effluent caused a complete germination inhibition. Constructed wetlands (CWs) with Arundo donax or Sarcocornia fruticosa were envisaged to further polish this wastewater. Selection of plant species to use in CWs for industrial wastewater treatment is an important issue, since for a successful establishment they have to tolerate the often harsh wastewater composition. For that, the effects of this wastewater on the growth of Arundo and Sarcocornia were assessed in pot assays. Plants were subject to different wastewater contents (0/50/100%), and both were resilient to the imposed conditions. Arundo had higher growth rates and biomass than Sarcocornia and may therefore be the preferred species for use in CWs treating tannery wastewater. CWs planted with the above mentioned plants significantly decreased the toxicity of the wastewater, as effluent from the CWs outlet stimulated the growth of Trifolium at concentrations <50%, and seed germination and growth even occurred in undiluted effluent. PMID:22908635

  9. High resolution synoptic salinity mapping to identify groundwater--surface water discharges in lowland rivers.

    PubMed

    Pai, Henry; Villamizar, Sandra R; Harmon, Thomas C

    2015-04-21

    Quantifying distributed lateral groundwater contributions to surface water (GW-SW discharges) is a key aspect of tracking nonpoint-source pollution (NPSP) within a watershed. In this study, we characterized distributed GW-SW discharges and associated salt loading using elevated GW specific conductance (SC) as a tracer along a 38 km reach of the Lower Merced River in Central California. High resolution longitudinal surveys for multiple flows (1.3-150 m(3) s(-1)) revealed river SC gradients that mainly decreased with increasing flow, suggesting a dilution effect and/or reduced GW-SW discharges due to hydraulic gradient reductions. However, exceptions occurred (gradients increasing with increasing flow), pointing to complex spatiotemporal influences on GW-SW dynamics. The surveys revealed detailed variability in salinity gradients, from which we estimated distributed GW-SW discharge and salt loading using a simple mixing model. Modeled cumulative GW discharges for two surveys unaffected by ungauged SW discharges were comparable in magnitude to differential gauging-based discharge estimates and prior GW-SW studies along the same river reach. Ungauged lateral inlets and sparse GW data limited the study, and argue for enhancing monitoring efforts. Our approach provides a rapid and economical method for characterizing NPSP for gaining rivers in the context of integrated watershed modeling and management. PMID:25837571

  10. Evaluation of the halophyte Salsola soda as an alternative crop for saline soils high in selenium and boron.

    PubMed

    Centofanti, Tiziana; Bañuelos, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Urbanization, industrial development, and intensive agriculture have caused soil contamination and land degradation in many areas of the world. Salinization is one important factor contributing to land degradation and it affects agricultural production and environmental quality. When salinization is combined with soil pollution by trace elements, as it occurs in many arid and semi-arid regions around the world, strategies to phyto-manage pollutants and sustain crop production need to be implemented. In this study, we present the case of saline soils in the West side of Central California which contain naturally-occurring selenium (Se), boron (B), and other salts, such as NaCl, CaCl2, Na2SO4, and Na2SeO4. To sustain crop production on Se- and B-laden arid saline soils, we investigated the potential of the halophyte "agretti" (Salsola soda L.) as an alternative crop. The aim of our greenhouse study was to examine adaptability, B tolerance, and Se accumulation by S. soda grown on soils collected from a typical saline-laden field site located on the West side of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Our results showed that S. soda tolerates the saline (EC ∼ 10 dS m(-1)) and B-laden soils (10 mg B L(-1)) of the SJV even with the additional irrigation of saline and B rich water (EC ∼ 3 dS m(-1) and 4 mg B L(-1)). Under these growing conditions, the plant can accumulate high concentrations of Na (80 g Na kg(-1) DW), B (100 mg B kg(-1) DW), and Se (3-4 mg Se kg(-1) DW) without showing toxicity symptoms. Hence, S. soda showed promising potential as a plant species that can be grown in B-laden saline soils and accumulate and potentially manage excessive soluble Se and B in soil. PMID:25897503

  11. Tolerance of Venerupis philippinarum to salinity: osmotic and metabolic aspects.

    PubMed

    Carregosa, Vanessa; Figueira, Etelvina; Gil, Ana M; Pereira, Sara; Pinto, Joana; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Freitas, Rosa

    2014-05-01

    In the last few decades, attention has been focused on the impacts of contamination in marine benthic populations, while the responses of aquatic organisms to natural alterations, namely changes in salinity, have received little attention. In fact, salinity is one of the dominant environmental factors affecting marine bivalves. The ebb and flood of the tide, combined with fresh water inputs from rivers or heavy rainy events, and with extremely dry and hot seasons, can dramatically alter water salinity. Therefore, the salinity of a certain environment can restrict the spatial distribution of a given population, which is especially important when assessing the spread of an invasive species into a new environment. In the present study, the main objective was to understand how clam Venerupis philippinarum copes with salinity changes and, hence biochemical and metabolomic alterations, taking place in individuals submitted to a wide range of salinities were investigated. The results showed that V. philippinarum presented high mortality at lower salinities (0 and 7 g/L) but tolerated high salinities (35 and 42 g/L). The quantification of ionic content revealed that, clams had the capacity to maintain ionic homeostasis along the salinity gradient, mainly changing the concentration of Na, but also with the influence of Mg and Ca. The results showed a decrease in protein content at lower salinities (0 to 21 g/L). Glycogen and glucose increased with increasing salinity gradient. (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra of clam aqueous extracts revealed different metabolite profiles at 7, 28 and 42 g/L salinities, thus enabling metabolite changes to be measured in relation to salinity. PMID:24556070

  12. Efficacy of silicon priming and fertigation to modulate seedling's vigor and ion homeostasis of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under saline environment.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Muhammad; Iqbal, Naeem; Kausar, Shakila; Javed, M Tariq; Akram, M Sohail; Sajid, M Asim

    2015-09-01

    Seed preconditioning, a short gun approach to modulate the effects of abiotic stresses on crop plants, has recently gained considerable attention of the researchers to induce salinity tolerance in agronomically important crops. The present study was conducted to explore the comparative efficacy of presowing seed priming with silicon (Si) and Si fertigation to modulate the wheat growth and ion dynamics. Seeds of wheat variety, PUNJAB-11, were sown in Petri plates having nutrient solutions with (120 mM) and without NaCl. Six levels of Si (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50 mM), applied as sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), were tested either as a seed priming agent or as a supplement in the nutrient solution. Priming of seeds with Si mitigated the adverse effects of salinity stress on germination percentage, root as well as shoot length, dry and fresh weight. Application of Si either as preconditioning of seeds or addition in the growth medium resulted in reduced accumulation of sodium (Na(+)) in wheat seedlings under saline environment. Seedling's potassium (K(+)) contents either remained unaffected or decreased whereas calcium (Ca(2+)) contents decreased at all Si concentrations except at 30 mM when Si primed seeds were grown under salt stress. Addition of Si, under salt stress, in cultivation medium exerted a positive effect on seedling's K(+) and Ca(2+) contents. Silicon contribution to decontamination strategies was evaluated. PMID:26154041

  13. Impact of urbanization on high-salinity estuaries in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John Vernberg, F.; Vernberg, W. B.; Blood, E.; Fortner, A.; Fulton, M.; McKellar, H.; Michener, W.; Scott, G.; Siewicki, T.; El Figi, K.

    To assess the impact of urbanization on small high-salinity estuaries, studies were initiated which had a broad temporal and spatial base. These studies utilize a geographic information system and a global positioning system technology, as well as new data collection and analytical techniques to characterize the relationship between land-use patterns, nutrient loading, water quality, chemical contaminants, bacteriology, toxicology, hydrodynamics, and primary and secondary production. Thirty monitoring stations at both an urbanized estuary (Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, U.S.A.) and a nearby, similar-sized, relatively pristine estuary (North Inlet, SC) were established. Results indicate the following trends. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in seawater and oyster tissue were higher in Murrells Inlet, and the specific PAHs found in higher concentrations in seawater are similar to the PAH composition in urban air. Copper concentrations were higher in Murrells Inlet with the highest concentrations found in oysters located near human habitation. Although total coliform levels in surface waters at both estuaries were not different, faecal coliform levels in Murrells Inlet were generally higher, particularly in oysters. Nitrate and phosphate concentrations were higher in water from Murrells Inlet but, in contrast, ammonium concentrations when significantly different were higher at North Inlet landward stations. The variability in dissolved oxygen was much greater in North Inlet and may be due to the greater marsh/creek drainage in North Inlet. Chlorophyll a values tended to be higher and more variable for North Inlet water samples but no significant differences were observed between the two estuaries during the peak of the growing season. Lower biomass was observed in Murrells Inlet when similar creeks from the two estuaries were sampled by seines.

  14. Brooding strategy in fluctuating salinity environments: oxygen availability in the pallial cavity and metabolic stress in females and offspring in the Chilean oyster Ostrea chilensis.

    PubMed

    Segura, Cristian J; Montory, Jaime A; Cubillos, Victor M; Diederich, Casey M; Pechenik, Jan A; Chaparro, Oscar R

    2015-08-01

    Organisms that encounter stressful situations in nature often cope using behavioral (e.g., avoidance) or physiological tactics. In sessile mollusks, the only available behavioral option in dealing with salinity stress is to "clam up", isolating their tissues from the environment. Though effective in the short term, prolonged isolation can have detrimental physiological consequences, particularly for females brooding embryos in a mantle cavity that is isolated from the external environment. In the Quempillén estuary, the Chilean oyster, Ostrea chilensis, spent nearly one-third of its brooding season at salinities low enough to cause female isolation. When females thus isolated themselves, the dissolved oxygen in their mantle cavity fluid dropped to hypoxic levels within 10 min. In females that were brooding embryos, this depletion of oxygen was not uniform: oxygen was depleted more quickly in the palp region (where embryos accumulate) than in the inhalant region. Additionally, oxygen was reduced even more quickly in the palp region when females were brooding late-stage embryos, which consumed oxygen significantly more quickly than embryos in earlier developmental stages. Finally, O. chilensis used anaerobic metabolism to cope with the hypoxia induced by isolation, as lactate accumulated in the tissues of both females (brooding > non-brooding) and embryos (late stage > early stage). Our findings demonstrate the trade-off between an adaptive avoidance behavior (clamming up) and the potentially detrimental consequences brought on by such a behavior (hypoxia). Cycling of embryos throughout the mantle cavity by deliberate female pumping keeps them from accumulating in the area between the palps, forestalling the creation of hypoxic conditions there. In addition, the capacity for anaerobic metabolism by both females and their embryos should help them tolerate the low oxygen levels that do eventually arise when the pallial cavity is isolated from the surrounding

  15. Effect of six kinds of scale inhibitors on calcium carbonate precipitation in high salinity wastewater at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaochen; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Ma, Defang; Rong, Hongyan; Zhao, Pin; Teng, Pengyou

    2015-03-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) scale on heat transfer surfaces is a serious and expensive problem widely occurring in numerous industrial processes. In this study, we compared the scale inhibition effect of six kinds of commercial scale inhibitors and screened out the best one (scale inhibitor SQ-1211) to investigate its scale inhibition performance in highly saline conditions at high temperature through static scale inhibition tests. The influences of scale inhibitor dosage, temperature, heating time and pH on the inhibition efficiency of the optimal scale inhibitor were investigated. The morphologies and crystal structures of the precipitates were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis. Results showed that the scale inhibition efficiency of the optimal scale inhibitor decreased with the increase of the reaction temperature. When the concentration of Ca2+ was 1600 mg/L, the scale inhibition rate could reach 90.7% at 80°C at pH8. The optimal scale inhibitor could effectively retard scaling at high temperature. In the presence of the optimal scale inhibitor, the main crystal structure of CaCO3 changed from calcite to aragonite. PMID:25766020

  16. The Pepper Lipoxygenase CaLOX1 Plays a Role in Osmotic, Drought and High Salinity Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Han, Sang-Wook; Hwang, In Sun; Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-05-01

    In plants, lipoxygenases (LOXs) are involved in various physiological processes, including defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Our previous study had shown that the pepper 9-LOX gene, CaLOX1, plays a crucial role in cell death due to pathogen infection. Here, the function of CaLOX1 in response to osmotic, drought and high salinity stress was examined using CaLOX1-overexpressing (CaLOX1-OX) Arabidopsis plants. Changes in the temporal expression pattern of the CaLOX1 gene were observed when pepper leaves were treated with drought and high salinity, but not when treated with ABA, the primary hormone in response to drought stress. During seed germination and seedling development, CaLOX1-OX plants were more tolerant to ABA, mannitol and high salinity than wild-type plants. In contrast, expression of the ABA-responsive marker genes RAB18 and RD29B was higher in CaLOX1-OX Arabidopsis plants than in wild-type plants. In response to high salinity, CaLOX1-OX plants exhibited enhanced tolerance, compared with the wild type, which was accompanied by decreased accumulation of H2O2 and high levels of RD20, RD29A, RD29B and P5CS gene expression. Similarly, CaLOX1-OX plants were also more tolerant than wild-type plants to severe drought stress. H2O2 production and the relative increase in lipid peroxidation were lower, and the expression of COR15A, DREB2A, RD20, RD29A and RD29B was higher in CaLOX1-OX plants, relative to wild-type plants. Taken together, our results indicate that CaLOX1 plays a crucial role in plant stress responses by modulating the expression of ABA- and stress-responsive marker genes, lipid peroxidation and H2O2 production. PMID:25657344

  17. Collection of High Energy Yielding Strains of Saline Microalgae from Southwestern States: Final Report Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerfield, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Approximately 1,400 individual isolates of microalgae were obtained from surface waters in the Southwest. Of the initial 23 algae screened for growth characteristics, the majority grew best at the lower salinities in both SERI Type I and Type II Media. Growth rates for selected strains approached three doublings per day.

  18. Transgenic Brassica chinensis plants expressing a bacterial codA gene exhibit enhanced tolerance to extreme temperature and high salinity*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing-bin; Xu, Wen; Xue, Qing-zhong; Su, Wei-ai

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic Brassica compestris L. spp. chinensis plants expressing a choline oxidase (codA) gene from Arthrobacter globiformis were obtained through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. In the transgenic plants, codA gene expression and its product transportation to chloroplasts were detected by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) examination, immunogold localization, and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). Stress tolerance was evaluated in the T3 plants under extreme temperature and salinity conditions. The plants of transgenic line 1 (L1) showed significantly higher net photosynthetic rate (P n) and P n recovery rate under high (45 °C, 4 h) and low temperature (1 °C, 48 h) treatments, and higher photosynthetic rate under high salinity conditions (100, 200, and 300 mmol/L NaCl, respectively) than the wild-type plants. The enhanced tolerance to high temperature and high salinity stresses in transgenic plants is associated with the accumulation of betaine, which is not found in the wild-type plants. Our results indicate that the introduction of codA gene from Arthrobacter globiformis into Brassica compestris L. spp. chinensis could be a potential strategy for improving the plant tolerance to multiple stresses. PMID:21043054

  19. Transgenic Brassica chinensis plants expressing a bacterial codA gene exhibit enhanced tolerance to extreme temperature and high salinity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-bin; Xu, Wen; Xue, Qing-zhong; Su, Wei-ai

    2010-11-01

    Transgenic Brassica compestris L. spp. chinensis plants expressing a choline oxidase (codA) gene from Arthrobacter globiformis were obtained through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. In the transgenic plants, codA gene expression and its product transportation to chloroplasts were detected by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) examination, immunogold localization, and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). Stress tolerance was evaluated in the T(3) plants under extreme temperature and salinity conditions. The plants of transgenic line 1 (L1) showed significantly higher net photosynthetic rate (P(n)) and P(n) recovery rate under high (45 °C, 4 h) and low temperature (1 °C, 48 h) treatments, and higher photosynthetic rate under high salinity conditions (100, 200, and 300 mmol/L NaCl, respectively) than the wild-type plants. The enhanced tolerance to high temperature and high salinity stresses in transgenic plants is associated with the accumulation of betaine, which is not found in the wild-type plants. Our results indicate that the introduction of codA gene from Arthrobacter globiformis into Brassica compestris L. spp. chinensis could be a potential strategy for improving the plant tolerance to multiple stresses. PMID:21043054

  20. Arhodomonas sp. Strain Seminole and Its Genetic Potential To Degrade Aromatic Compounds under High-Salinity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dalvi, Sonal; Nicholson, Carla; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce A.; Canaan, Patricia; Hartson, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Arhodomonas sp. strain Seminole was isolated from a crude oil-impacted brine soil and shown to degrade benzene, toluene, phenol, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA), protocatechuic acid (PCA), and phenylacetic acid (PAA) as the sole sources of carbon at high salinity. Seminole is a member of the genus Arhodomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria, sharing 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Arhodomonas aquaeolei HA-1. Analysis of the genome predicted a number of catabolic genes for the metabolism of benzene, toluene, 4-HBA, and PAA. The predicted pathways were corroborated by identification of enzymes present in the cytosolic proteomes of cells grown on aromatic compounds using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Genome analysis predicted a cluster of 19 genes necessary for the breakdown of benzene or toluene to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and pyruvate. Of these, 12 enzymes were identified in the proteome of toluene-grown cells compared to lactate-grown cells. Genomic analysis predicted 11 genes required for 4-HBA degradation to form the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Of these, proteomic analysis of 4-HBA-grown cells identified 6 key enzymes involved in the 4-HBA degradation pathway. Similarly, 15 genes needed for the degradation of PAA to the TCA cycle intermediates were predicted. Of these, 9 enzymes of the PAA degradation pathway were identified only in PAA-grown cells and not in lactate-grown cells. Overall, we were able to reconstruct catabolic steps for the breakdown of a variety of aromatic compounds in an extreme halophile, strain Seminole. Such knowledge is important for understanding the role of Arhodomonas spp. in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbon-impacted hypersaline environments. PMID:25149520

  1. Analysis of inorganic nitrogen and related anions in high salinity water using ion chromatography with tandem UV and conductivity detectors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brian; Gandhi, Jay; Zhang, Chunlong Carl

    2011-09-01

    Over 97% of the Earth's water is high salinity water in the form of gulfs, oceans, and salt lakes. There is an increasing concern for the quality of water in bays, gulfs, oceans, and other natural waters. These waters are affected by many different sources of contamination. The sources are, but not limited to, groundwater run-off of nitrogen containing fertilizer, pesticides, cleaning agents, solid wastes, industrial waters, and many more. The final destinations of these contaminants are rivers, lakes, and bayous that eventually will lead to bays, gulfs, and oceans. Many industries depend on the quality of these waters, such as the fishing industry. In addition to wild marine life, there are large aquariums and fish and shrimp farms that are required to know the quality of the water. However, the ability of these industries to monitor their processes is limited. Most analytical methods do not apply to the analysis of high salinity waters. They are dependent on wet chemistry techniques, spectrophotometers, and flow analyzers. These methods do not have the accuracy, precision, and sensitivity when compared to ion chromatography (IC). Since the inception of IC, it has become a standard practice for determining the content of many different water samples. Many IC methods are limited in the range of analytes that can be detected, as well as the numerous sample sources of which the methods are applicable. The main focus of current IC methods does not include high salinity waters. This research demonstrates an ion chromatographic method that has the ability to determine low level concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and related anions (nitrite-N, nitrate-N, phosphorous-P, sulfate, bromide, chloride, sulfide, fluoride, ammonia, calcium, and magnesium) in a single run using a combination of UV and conductivity detectors. This method is applicable to various waters, and uses both freshwater and high salinity water samples. PMID:21859532

  2. Monosaccharide absorption activity of Arabidopsis roots depends on expression profiles of transporter genes under high salinity conditions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kohji; Kanai, Motoki; Osakabe, Yuriko; Ohiraki, Haruka; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2011-12-16

    Plant roots are able to absorb sugars from the rhizosphere but also release sugars and other metabolites that are critical for growth and environmental signaling. Reabsorption of released sugar molecules could help reduce the loss of photosynthetically fixed carbon through the roots. Although biochemical analyses have revealed monosaccharide uptake mechanisms in roots, the transporters that are involved in this process have not yet been fully characterized. In the present study we demonstrate that Arabidopsis STP1 and STP13 play important roles in roots during the absorption of monosaccharides from the rhizosphere. Among 14 STP transporter genes, we found that STP1 had the highest transcript level and that STP1 was a major contributor for monosaccharide uptake under normal conditions. In contrast, STP13 was found to be induced by abiotic stress, with low expression under normal conditions. We analyzed the role of STP13 in roots under high salinity conditions where membranes of the epidermal cells were damaged, and we detected an increase in the amount of STP13-dependent glucose uptake. Furthermore, the amount of glucose efflux from stp13 mutants was higher than that from wild type plants under high salinity conditions. These results indicate that STP13 can reabsorb the monosaccharides that are released by damaged cells under high salinity conditions. Overall, our data indicate that sugar uptake capacity in Arabidopsis roots changes in response to environmental stresses and that this activity is dependent on the expression pattern of sugar transporters. PMID:22041897

  3. High contrast imaging polarimetry of circumstellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas Cabrera, H.

    2011-09-01

    The work presented in this thesis is based on the analysis of the results produced by ExPo, the Extreme Polarimeter. ExPo is an imaging polarimeter that has been designed and built by the group of prof. Christoph Keller, at Utrecht University. The purpose of this instrument is to use polarimetry to detect and characterize the circumstellar environments around different types of stars. In this work I focus on the polarized features that are produced by scattering by dust grains. Depending on the properties of the particles producing the scattering (size, shape...) and the scattering angle (forward, backward scattering), the light becomes polarized in higher or lower degree. The main problem when studying circumstellar environments is the high contrast ratios that are faced. For example, a young star is typically four orders of magnitude (10000 times) brighter than its protoplanetary disk. On the other hand, the light emitted by the star is largely unpolarized, while the light that is scattered (by the protoplanetary disk in this example) is polarized. Therefore, polarimetry offers a very elegant way to remove most of the starlight, allowing the detection of only the polarized photons. Furthermore, and as explained before, by studying the polarization of the light that we measure we can learn more about the properties of the circumstellar environments (dust composition, geometry, etc.). ExPo has produced a wealth of data, combining observations of very different targets such as protoplanetary disks, post-AGB stars, comets and planets of our Solar System (Venus and Saturn).

  4. Potential of BAC combined with UVC/H2O2 for reducing organic matter from highly saline reverse osmosis concentrate produced from municipal wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Fan, Linhua; Roddick, Felicity A

    2013-10-01

    The organic matter present in the concentrate streams generated from reverse osmosis (RO) based municipal wastewater reclamation processes poses environmental and health risks on its disposal to the receiving environment (e.g., estuaries, bays). The potential of a biological activated carbon (BAC) process combined with pre-oxidation using a UVC/H2O2 advanced oxidation process for treating a high salinity (TDS~10000 mg L(-1)) municipal wastewater RO concentrate (ROC) was evaluated at lab scale during 90 d of operation. The combined treatment reduced the UVA254 and colour of the ROC to below those for the influent of the RO process (i.e., biologically treated secondary effluent), and the reductions in DOC and COD were approximately 60% and 50%, respectively. UVC/H2O2 was demonstrated to be an effective means of converting the recalcitrant organic compounds in the ROC into biodegradable substances which were readily removed by the BAC process, leading to a synergistic effect of the combined treatment in degrading the organic matter. The tests using various BAC feed concentrations suggested that the biological treatment was robust and consistent for treating the high salinity ROC. Using Microtox analysis no toxicity was detected for the ROC after the combined treatment, and the trihalomethane formation potential was reduced from 3.5 to 2.8 mg L(-1). PMID:23820538

  5. Genomic-assisted haplotype analysis and the development of high-throughput SNP markers for salinity tolerance in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Gunvant; Do, Tuyen; Vuong, Tri D.; Valliyodan, Babu; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Chaudhary, Juhi; Shannon, J. Grover; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a limiting factor of crop yield. The soybean is sensitive to soil salinity, and a dominant gene, Glyma03g32900 is primarily responsible for salt-tolerance. The identification of high throughput and robust markers as well as the deployment of salt-tolerant cultivars are effective approaches to minimize yield loss under saline conditions. We utilized high quality (15x) whole-genome resequencing (WGRS) on 106 diverse soybean lines and identified three major structural variants and allelic variation in the promoter and genic regions of the GmCHX1 gene. The discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with structural variants facilitated the design of six KASPar assays. Additionally, haplotype analysis and pedigree tracking of 93 U.S. ancestral lines were performed using publically available WGRS datasets. Identified SNP markers were validated, and a strong correlation was observed between the genotype and salt treatment phenotype (leaf scorch, chlorophyll content and Na+ accumulation) using a panel of 104 soybean lines and, an interspecific bi-parental population (F8) from PI483463 x Hutcheson. These markers precisely identified salt-tolerant/sensitive genotypes (>91%), and different structural-variants (>98%). These SNP assays, supported by accurate phenotyping, haplotype analyses and pedigree tracking information, will accelerate marker-assisted selection programs to enhance the development of salt-tolerant soybean cultivars. PMID:26781337

  6. The Aquarius Ocean Salinity Mission High Stability L-band Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerano, Fernando A.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Triesky, Michael; Horgan, Kevin; Forgione, Joshua; Caldwell, James; Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon; Spencer, Michael; McWatters, Dalia; Freedman, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius, will measure global ocean surface salinity with approx.120 km spatial resolution every 7-days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than or equal to 0.15 K over 7 days. The instrument utilizes a push-broom configuration which makes it impractical to use a traditional warm load and cold plate in front of the feedhorns. Therefore, to achieve the necessary performance Aquarius utilizes a Dicke radiometer with noise injection to perform a warm - hot calibration. The radiometer sequence between antenna, Dicke load, and noise diode has been optimized to maximize antenna observations and therefore minimize NEDT. This is possible due the ability to thermally control the radiometer electronics and front-end components to 0.1 Crms over 7 days.

  7. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70.degree. C. to 90.degree. C., at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%.

  8. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70 C to 90 C, at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%. 68 figs.

  9. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification of highly saline aquaculture wastewater using hollow fiber membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan, C; Phong, D D; Jegatheesan, V

    2008-06-01

    A hydrogenotrophic denitrification system with a hollow fiber membrane was evaluated for treating and recycling synthetic aquaculture wastewater. Hollow fibers ensured bubble-less diffusion of hydrogen and subsequent removal of nitrate from the first bioreactor. The second aerobic reactor was used for biomass filtration and removal of organic matter. Nitrate and organic matter expressed as dissolved organic carbon were 50 mgl(-1) and 20 mgl(-1), respectively, in the inlet. Acclimatization of hydrogenotrophic bacteria to 10, 20 and 30 ppt of salinity was also observed. Optimum hydraulic retention time and denitrification rate corresponding to these salinities were 3, 5 and 6 h and 366.8, 226.2 and 193.2 gm(-3) day(-1), respectively. PMID:18702296

  10. Temperature effect on high salinity depuration of Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus from the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

    PubMed

    Larsen, A M; Rikard, F S; Walton, W C; Arias, C R

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) are opportunistic human pathogens naturally associated with the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. The abundances of both pathogens in oysters are positively correlated with temperature, thus ingestion of raw oysters during the warm summer months is a risk factor for contracting illness from these bacteria. Current post-harvest processing (PHP) methods for elimination of these pathogens are expensive and kill the oyster, changing their organoleptic properties and making them less appealing to some consumers. High salinity has proven effective in reducing Vv numbers in the wild and our research aims at developing an indoor recirculating system to reduce pathogenic Vibrios while maintaining the taste and texture of live oysters. The goal of this study was to determine the influence of temperature on the efficacy of high salinity depuration. Vv was enumerated as most probable number (MPN) per gram of oyster tissue using the FDA-approved modified cellobiose polymyxin colistin (mCPC) protocol and with an alternative Vibrio specific media CHROMagar™ Vibrio (CaV). CaV was also used to quantify Vp. Oysters were held at 35 psu for 10 days at three temperatures: low (20°C), mid (22.5°C) and high (25°C). There was no difference in MPN/g of Vv between media; however more Vv isolates were obtained from mCPC than CaV. There was no significant effect of temperature on reduction of Vv or Vp throughout depuration but there was a tendency for low temperatures to be less effective than the higher ones. High salinity resulted in a significant decrease in Vv by day 3 and again by day 10, and a decrease in Vp by day 3. Oyster condition indices were maintained throughout depuration and mortality was low (4% across three trials). Overall these results support the use of mCPC for Vv enumeration and demonstrate the promise of high salinity depuration for PHP of the Eastern oyster. The trend for lower temperatures to be less

  11. Highly saline fluids from a subducting slab as the source for fluid-rich diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Yaakov; McNeill, John; Pearson, D. Graham; Nowell, Geoff M.; Ottley, Chris J.

    2015-08-01

    The infiltration of fluids into continental lithospheric mantle is a key mechanism for controlling abrupt changes in the chemical and physical properties of the lithospheric root, as well as diamond formation, yet the origin and composition of the fluids involved are still poorly constrained. Such fluids are trapped within diamonds when they form and so diamonds provide a unique means of directly characterizing the fluids that percolate through the deep continental lithospheric mantle. Here we show a clear chemical evolutionary trend, identifying saline fluids as parental to silicic and carbonatitic deep mantle melts, in diamonds from the Northwest Territories, Canada. Fluid-rock interaction along with in situ melting cause compositional transitions, as the saline fluids traverse mixed peridotite-eclogite lithosphere. Moreover, the chemistry of the parental saline fluids--especially their strontium isotopic compositions--and the timing of host diamond formation suggest that a subducting Mesozoic plate under western North America is the source of the fluids. Our results imply a strong association between subduction, mantle metasomatism and fluid-rich diamond formation, emphasizing the importance of subduction-derived fluids in affecting the composition of the deep lithospheric mantle.

  12. Reclamation of highly calcareous saline-sodic soil using low quality water and phosphogypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, M. A.; Rusan, M. J.; Eltaif, N. I.; Shunnar, O. F.

    2014-09-01

    The efficiency of two amendments in reclaiming saline sodic soil using moderately saline (EC) and moderate sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) canal water was investigated. Phosphogypsum (PG) and reagent grade calcium chloride were applied to packed sandy loam soil columns and leached with canal water (SAR = 4, and EC = 2.16 dS m-1). Phosphogypsum was mixed with top soil prior to leaching at application rates of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 35, 40 Mg ha-1, whereas calcium chloride was dissolved directly in water at equivalent rates of 4.25, 8.5, 12.75, 17.0, 21.25, 29.75, and 34 Mg ha-1, respectively. Both amendments efficiently reduced soil salinity and sodicity. Calcium chloride removed 90 % of the total Na and soluble salts whereas PG removed 79 and 60 %, respectively. Exchangeable sodium percentage was reduced by 90 % in both amendments. Results indicated that during cation exchange reactions most of the sodium was removed when effluent SAR was at maximum. Phosphogypsum has lower total costs than calcium chloride and as an efficient amendment an application of 30 Mg ha-1 and leaching with 4 pore volume (PV) of canal water could be recommended to reclaim the studied soil.

  13. Highly saline fluids from a subducting slab as the source for fluid-rich diamonds.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Yaakov; McNeill, John; Pearson, D Graham; Nowell, Geoff M; Ottley, Chris J

    2015-08-20

    The infiltration of fluids into continental lithospheric mantle is a key mechanism for controlling abrupt changes in the chemical and physical properties of the lithospheric root, as well as diamond formation, yet the origin and composition of the fluids involved are still poorly constrained. Such fluids are trapped within diamonds when they form and so diamonds provide a unique means of directly characterizing the fluids that percolate through the deep continental lithospheric mantle. Here we show a clear chemical evolutionary trend, identifying saline fluids as parental to silicic and carbonatitic deep mantle melts, in diamonds from the Northwest Territories, Canada. Fluid-rock interaction along with in situ melting cause compositional transitions, as the saline fluids traverse mixed peridotite-eclogite lithosphere. Moreover, the chemistry of the parental saline fluids--especially their strontium isotopic compositions--and the timing of host diamond formation suggest that a subducting Mesozoic plate under western North America is the source of the fluids. Our results imply a strong association between subduction, mantle metasomatism and fluid-rich diamond formation, emphasizing the importance of subduction-derived fluids in affecting the composition of the deep lithospheric mantle. PMID:26289205

  14. Removing organic and nitrogen content from a highly saline municipal wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate by UV/H2O2-BAC treatment.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Shovana; Fan, Linhua; Roddick, Felicity A

    2015-10-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate (ROC) streams generated from RO-based municipal wastewater reclamation processes pose potential health and environmental risks on their disposal to confined water bodies such as bays. A UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process followed by a biological activated carbon (BAC) treatment was evaluated at lab-scale for the removal of organic and nutrient content from a highly saline ROC (TDS 16 g L(-1), EC 23.5 mS cm(-1)) for its safe disposal to the receiving environment. Over the 230-day operation of the UV/H2O2-BAC process, the colour and UV absorbance (254 nm) of the ROC were reduced to well below those of the influent to the reclamation process. The concentrations of DOC and total nitrogen (TN) were reduced by approximately 60% at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 60 min. The reduction in ammonia nitrogen by the BAC remained high under all conditions tested (>90%). Further investigation confirmed that the presence of residual peroxide in the UV/H2O2 treated ROC was beneficial for DOC removal, but markedly inhibited the activities of the nitrifying bacteria (i.e., nitrite oxidising bacteria) in the BAC system and hence compromised total nitrogen removal. This work demonstrated that the BAC treatment could be acclimated to the very high salinity environment, and could be used as a robust method for the removal of organic matter and nitrogen from the pre-oxidised ROC under optimised conditions. PMID:26002159

  15. Transcriptional Changes Caused by Bisphenol A in Oryzias javanicus, a Fish Species Highly Adaptable to Environmental Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seonock; Denis, Vianney; Yum, Seungshic

    2014-01-01

    The Javanese medaka, Oryzias javanicus, is a fish highly adaptable to various environmental salinities. Here, we investigated the effects of the environmental pollutant bisphenol A (BPA; an endocrine disrupting chemical) on gene expression levels in this species acclimated to different salinities. Using cDNA microarrays, we detected the induction of differential expression of genes by BPA, and compared the transcriptional changes caused by chemical exposure at different salinities. There were marked transcriptional changes induced by BPA between treatments. While 533 genes were induced by a factor of more than two when O. javanicus was exposed to BPA in seawater, only 215 genes were induced in freshwater. Among those genes, only 78 were shared and changed significantly their expression in both seawater and freshwater. Those genes were mainly involved in cellular processes and signaling pathway. We then categorized by functional group genes specifically induced by BPA exposure in seawater or freshwater. Gene expression changes were further confirmed in O. javanicus exposed to various concentrations of BPA, using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR based on primer sets for 28 selected genes. PMID:24534842

  16. Modulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isozymes by organ development and high long-term salinity in the halophyte Cakile maritima.

    PubMed

    Houmani, Hayet; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Palma, José M; Abdelly, Chedly; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. This enzyme is considered to be a first line of defense for controlling the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the number and type of SOD isozymes were identified in the principal organs (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds) of Cakile maritima. We also analyzed the way in which the activity of these SOD isozymes is modulated during development and under high long-term salinity (400 mM NaCl) stress conditions. The data indicate that this plant contains a total of ten SOD isozymes: two Mn-SODs, one Fe-SOD, and seven CuZn-SODs, with the Fe-SOD being the most prominent isozyme in the different organs analyzed. Moreover, the modulation of SOD isozymes, particularly CuZn-SODs, was only detected during development and under severe salinity stress conditions. These data suggest that, in C. maritima, the occurrence of these CuZn-SODs in roots and leaves plays an adaptive role since this CuZn-SOD isozyme might replace the diminished Fe-SOD activity under salinity stress to overcome this adverse environmental condition. PMID:26159565

  17. Temperature and salinity observations with high lateral resolution using acoustic data in the Gulf of Cadiz, NE Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biescas-Gorriz, Berta; Ruddick, Barry; Nedimovic, Mladen; Sallarès Casas, Valentí; Bornstein Ortega, Guillermo; Mojica Moncada, Jhon F.

    2015-04-01

    We present a methodology for inverting temperature and salinity from time and space-coincident acoustic reflectivity and XBT data. This method recovers low frequency content (< 10 Hz) of the impedance from XBTs and the high frequency content (> 10 Hz) from acoustic reflectivity. Afterwards, maps of temperature and salinity are calculated from impedance using the GSW equations of state and an empirical T-S relation. Acoustic data allows to recover the main physical parameters of the ocean along lateral sections of hundreds of km, covering all the full-depth water column and with vertical and lateral resolutions of 10 m and 100 m, respectively. This method was applied in the Gulf of Cadiz, NE Atlantic Ocean to recover the main physical oceanographic parameters in the ocean with accuracies of δTsd = 0.1 C, δSsd = 0.09 and δρsd = 0.02kg/m3 for temperature, salinity and potential density. Inverted temperature anomalies reveal baroclinic thermohaline fronts with intrusions. The observations support a mix of thermohaline features created by both double-diffusive and isopycnal stirring mechanisms.

  18. Remote sensing of salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The complex dielectric constant of sea water is a function of salinity at 21 cm wavelength, and sea water salinity can be determined by a measurement of emissivity at 21 cm along with a measurement of thermodynamic temperature. Three aircraft and one helicopter experiments using two different 21 cm radiometers were conducted under different salinity and temperature conditions. Single or multiple ground truth measurements were used to calibrate the data in each experiment. It is inferred from these experiments that accuracies of 1 to 2%/OO are possible with a single surface calibration point necessary only every two hours if the following conditions are met--water temperatures above 20 C, salinities above 10%/OO, and level plane flight. More frequent calibration, constraint of the aircraft's orientation to the same as it was during calibration, and two point calibration (at a high and low salinity level) rather than single point calibration may give even better accuracies in some instances.

  19. Reduced salinity tolerance in the Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) is associated with rapid development of a gill interlamellar cell mass: implications of high-saline spills on native freshwater salmonids

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Salvatore D.; Matheson, Derrick; He, Yuhe; Goss, Greg G.

    2016-01-01

    Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) are salmonids that have a strict freshwater existence in post-glacial North America. Oil and gas development is associated with production of high volumes of hypersaline water. With planned industrial expansion into northern areas of Canada and the USA that directly overlap grayling habitat, the threat of accidental saline water release poses a significant risk. Despite this, we understand little about the responses of grayling to hypersaline waters. We compared the physiological responses and survivability of Arctic grayling and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to tolerate an acute transfer to higher saline waters. Arctic grayling and rainbow trout were placed directly into 17 ppt salinity and sampled at 24 and 96 h along with control animals in freshwater at 24 h. Serum sodium, chloride and osmolality levels increased significantly in grayling at both 24 and 96 h time points, whereas trout were able to compensate for the osmoregulatory disturbance by 96 h. Sodium–potassium ATPase mRNA expression responses to salinity were also compared, demonstrating the inability of the grayling to up-regulate the seawater isoform nkaα1b. Our results demonstrated a substantially lower salinity tolerance in grayling. We also found a significant salinity-induced morphological gill remodelling by Arctic grayling, as demonstrated by the rapid growth of an interlamellar cell mass by 24 h that persisted at 96 h. We visualized and quantified the appearance of the interlamellar cell mass as a response to high salinity, although the functional significance remains to be understood fully. Compared with rainbow trout, which are used as an environmental regulatory species, Arctic grayling are unable to compensate for the osmotic stressors that would result from a highly saline produced water spill. Given these new data, collaboration between fisheries and the oil and gas industry will be vital in the long-term conservation strategies

  20. Reduced salinity tolerance in the Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) is associated with rapid development of a gill interlamellar cell mass: implications of high-saline spills on native freshwater salmonids.

    PubMed

    Blair, Salvatore D; Matheson, Derrick; He, Yuhe; Goss, Greg G

    2016-01-01

    Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) are salmonids that have a strict freshwater existence in post-glacial North America. Oil and gas development is associated with production of high volumes of hypersaline water. With planned industrial expansion into northern areas of Canada and the USA that directly overlap grayling habitat, the threat of accidental saline water release poses a significant risk. Despite this, we understand little about the responses of grayling to hypersaline waters. We compared the physiological responses and survivability of Arctic grayling and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to tolerate an acute transfer to higher saline waters. Arctic grayling and rainbow trout were placed directly into 17 ppt salinity and sampled at 24 and 96 h along with control animals in freshwater at 24 h. Serum sodium, chloride and osmolality levels increased significantly in grayling at both 24 and 96 h time points, whereas trout were able to compensate for the osmoregulatory disturbance by 96 h. Sodium-potassium ATPase mRNA expression responses to salinity were also compared, demonstrating the inability of the grayling to up-regulate the seawater isoform nkaα1b. Our results demonstrated a substantially lower salinity tolerance in grayling. We also found a significant salinity-induced morphological gill remodelling by Arctic grayling, as demonstrated by the rapid growth of an interlamellar cell mass by 24 h that persisted at 96 h. We visualized and quantified the appearance of the interlamellar cell mass as a response to high salinity, although the functional significance remains to be understood fully. Compared with rainbow trout, which are used as an environmental regulatory species, Arctic grayling are unable to compensate for the osmotic stressors that would result from a highly saline produced water spill. Given these new data, collaboration between fisheries and the oil and gas industry will be vital in the long-term conservation strategies

  1. High performance RGB LED backlight in high temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabski, Grzegorz; Gurr, Walter; Green, John

    2008-04-01

    The Aerospace and Defense display industry is in the midst of converting light the sources used in AMLCD backlighting technology from fluorescent lamps to LEDs. Although challenging, the fluorescent backlighting technology delivered good product in high end applications. LEDs, however, have the promise of even greater efficiency and lower cost. The history of LED backlighting is short and very dynamic; expectations are high and promises are many. It appears that for engineers developing backlights for high performance displays life has not become easier with the change of the technology. This paper will discuss just one of many challenges engineer's face: operation of LED backlights in high temperature environments. It will present experimental data showing several advantages of the RGB LED technology over other lamp technologies for high performance commercial and military application.

  2. Two Brassica napus genes encoding NAC transcription factors are involved in response to high-salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hui; Guo, Qian-Qian; Chen, Liang; Ren, Feng; Wang, Qing-Qing; Zheng, Yong; Li, Xue-Bao

    2012-11-01

    The NAC protein family is one of the novel classes of plant-specific transcription factors. In this study, two genes (BnNAC2 and BnNAC5) encoding the putative NAC transcription factors were identified in Brassica napus. Sequence analysis revealed that the deduced BnNAC proteins contain conserved N-terminal region (NAC domain) and highly divergent C-terminal domain. Yeast transactivation analysis showed that BnNAC2 could activate reporter gene expression, suggesting that BnNAC2 functions as a transcriptional activator. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that BnNAC2 was preferentially expressed in flowers, whereas BnNAC5 mRNAs accumulated at the highest level in stems. Further experimental results indicated that the two genes are high-salinity-, drought- and abscisic acid (ABA)-induced. Overexpression of BnNAC2 and BnNAC5 genes in yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) remarkably inhibited the growth rate of the host cells, and enhanced the cells sensitive to high-salinity and osmotic stresses. Complementation test indicated that BnNAC5 could recover the defects such as salt-hypersensitivity and accelerated-leaf senescence of vni2 T-DNA insertion mutant. Several stress-responsive genes including COR15A and RD29A were enhanced in the complemented plants. These results suggest that BnNAC5 may perform the similar function of VNI2 in response to high-salinity stress and regulation of leaf aging. Key message BnNAC2 and BnNAC5 are salt-, drought- and ABA-induced genes. Overexpression of BnNAC5 in Arabidopsis vni2 mutant recovered the mutant defects (salt-hypersensitivity and accelerated-leaf senescence) to the phenotype of wild type. PMID:22801866

  3. Siderophore production in high iron environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. A.; Hoffman, C. L.; Moffett, J. W.; Edwards, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    Up until recently, the geochemical cycling of Fe in deep sea hydrothermal plumes has assumed to be inorganically dominated, resulting in quantitative precipitation of all hydrothermally sourced Fe to the seafloor. Recent detection of organic Fe binding ligands within both the dissolved and particulate phase (Bennett et al., 2008; Toner et al., 2009), suggests that hydrothermally sourced Fe may be important on a global scale (Tagliabue et al., 2010). The source of these organic ligands is currently unknown; hypotheses include the possible entrainment of organic carbon from the biologically rich diffuse flow areas, or in-situ production from microbial processes. However, the microbial production of organic ligands is only expected when Fe is a limited micronutrient, which is not the case in the hydrothermal environment. The importance of Fe cycling microorganisms within hydrothermal systems was previously overlooked due to the poor energetics with regards to Fe oxidation and reduction. But their recent detection within the hydrothermal system, both around low temperature Fe rich mineral deposits and within hydrothermal plumes (Edwards et al., 2004; Sylvan et al., In prep) suggests that they may have an important role in the hydrothermal Fe cycle, potentially resulting in an interplay between Fe and organic carbon. Within the laboratory, we have carried out experiments to investigate an Fe oxidizing bacteria in a variety of high Fe environments. We have detected both the production of siderophores and an increase in reduced Fe when the Fe oxidizing bacteria is exposed to both Fe(III) and Fe(II) rich minerals. The role of these microbes in the mineral dissolution of Fe sulfides along the seafloor and within the hydrothermal plume, may have important implications on the speciation of Fe and the role of siderophores in the marine environment. Bennett, S.A. et al. 2008. EPSL, 270: 157-167. Edwards, K.J. et al. 2004. Geomicrobiology Journal, 21: 393-404. Sylvan, J.B. et al

  4. Coupled measurement of δ18O/δD in gypsum hydration water and salinity of fluid inclusions in gypsum: A novel tool for reconstructing parent water chemistry and depositional environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nick; Gázquez, Fernando; Turchyn, Alexandra; Chapman, Hazel; Hodell, David

    2015-04-01

    > 23.3o ; 11.3 > δ18OSO4 > 14.5o) and strontium isotopes (0.708942 > 87Sr/86Sr > 0.708971) that are similar to those measured in other Messinian evaporites of the Mediterranean. We suggest sulfate and strontium isotopes are relatively insensitive to freshwater influence because of the high concentrations of sulfate and strontium in seawater. The cyclic alternation of gypsum and marl in the Yesares Member has been interpreted as reflecting changing climate related to Earth's precession cycle, but to date direct evidence linking depositional environment and orbital forcing has been lacking. We demonstrate that the δ18O, δD and salinity of the parent brine increased from low values at the base of the cycle to a maximum in the massive gypsum palisade, and decreased again to lower values in the supercones at the top of the cycle. This pattern is consistent with precession-driven changes in climate with wetter conditions during precession minima (insolation maxima) associated with the interbedded marls and drier climate during gypsum precipitation with the driest conditions during the precession maxima (insolation minima) associated with gypsum palisade formation.

  5. Evaluating abiotic influences on soil salinity of inland managed wetlands and agricultural croplands in a semi-arid environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fowler, D.; King, Sammy L.; Weindorf, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture and moist-soil management are important management techniques used on wildlife refuges to provide adequate energy for migrant waterbirds. In semi-arid systems, the accumulation of soluble salts throughout the soil profile can limit total production of wetland plants and agronomic crops and thus jeopardize meeting waterbird energy needs. This study evaluates the effect of distinct hydrologic regimes associated with moist-soil management and agricultural production on salt accumulation in a semi-arid floodplain. We hypothesized that the frequency of flooding and quantity of floodwater in a moist-soil management hydroperiod results in a less saline soil profile compared to profiles under traditional agricultural management. Findings showed that agricultural croplands differed (p-value < 0.001, df = 9) in quantities of total soluble salts (TSS) compared to moist-soil impoundments and contained greater concentrations (TSS range = 1,160-1,750 (mg kg-1)) at depth greater than 55 cm below the surface of the profile, while moist-soil impoundments contained lower concentrations (TSS range = 307-531 (mg kg-1)) at the same depths. Increased salts in agricultural may be attributed to the lack of leaching afforded by smaller summer irrigations while larger periodic flooding events in winter and summer flood irrigations in moist-soil impoundments may serve as leaching events.

  6. Effects of salinity build-up on biomass characteristics and trace organic chemical removal: implications on the development of high retention membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenhai; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nghiem, Long D

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of salinity build-up on the performance of membrane bioreactor (MBR), specifically in terms of the removal and fate of trace organic chemicals (TrOCs), nutrient removal, and biomass characteristics. Stepwise increase of the influent salinity, simulating salinity build-up in high retention MBRs, adversely affected the metabolic activity in the bioreactor, thereby reducing organic and nutrient removal. The removal of hydrophilic TrOCs by MBR decreased due to salinity build-up. By contrast, with the exception of 17α-ethynylestradiol, the removal of all hydrophobic TrOCs was not affected at high salinity. Moreover, salinity build-up had negligible impact on the residual accumulation of TrOCs in the sludge phase except for a few hydrophilic compounds. Additionally, the response of the biomass to salinity stress also dramatically enhanced the release of both soluble microbial products (SMP) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), leading to severe membrane fouling. PMID:25496948

  7. Sub-Surface Currents and High-Salinity Intrusions in the Southern Bay of Bengal during the Northeast Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesekera, H. W.; Jarosz, E.; Teague, W. J.; Jensen, T. G.; Metzger, E. J.; Jinadasa, S. U. P.; Arulananthan, K.; Centurioni, L.; Fernando, H.

    2014-12-01

    Shipboard velocity and CTD profiles collected in December 2013 from the R/V Roger Revelle along with satellite and drifter observations, and HYCOM nowcasts and COAMPS simulations show movement of sub-surface high-salinity intrusions into the Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the northeast monsoon. These observations were made as part of the Naval Research Laboratory research program titled "The Effects of Bay of Bengal Freshwater Flux on Indian Ocean Monsoon (EBOB)" and the Office of Naval Research (ONR) DRI titled "The Air-Sea Interaction in the Northern Indian Ocean (ASIRI)". A major objective of ASIRI-EBOB program is to understand and to quantify dynamical processes and boundary transports that control fresh and salt water exchanges between the BoB and the Arabian Sea. The transects of currents collected from shipboard ADCPs in the southern BoB, southeast of Sri Lanka, along 5.25°N in December show a southeastward flowing, surface intensified boundary current (referred to as the East India Coastal Current (EICC)) in the upper 75 m with speeds as large as 1.6 m/s at 21 m depth. Outside the EICC, a sub-surface intensified, northward moving, 300 km wide current with strongest velocities as high as 1 m/s near 50-75 m depth was observed. The near surface currents derived from AVISO altimeter and drifter records show quantitatively similar flow patterns. Numerical models produce qualitatively similar flow fields. The combined observations and model results indicate that the EICC moves low-salinity water out of the BoB while the sub-surface current carries high-salinity water into the BoB.

  8. Salinity Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  9. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  10. Hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Constable, P D

    1999-11-01

    A key feature in the successful resuscitation of dehydrated or endotoxemic ruminants is the total amount of sodium administered. Administration of small volumes of HS and HSD offer major advantages over large volumes of isotonic saline because HS and HSD do not require intravenous catheterization or periodic monitoring, and are therefore suitable for use in the field. Hypertonic saline and HSD exert their beneficial effect by rapidly increasing preload and transiently decreasing afterload. Contrary to early reports, HS and HSD decrease cardiac contractility and do not activate a pulmonary reflex. The osmolality of HS and HSD should be 2400 mOsm/L (7.2% NaCl solution, 8 times normal plasma osmolality). Use of HS and HSD solutions of different osmolality to 2400 mOsm/L should be avoided at all costs, as too low a tonicity removes the main advantages of HS (low cost, decreased infusion time), whereas too high a tonicity may cause rapid vasodilation and decreased cardiac contractility, resulting in death. Rapid administration (> 1 mL/kg-1/min-1) of HS (2400 mOsm/L) should be avoided, as the induced hypotension may be fatal when coupled with a transient decrease in cardiac contractility. For treating dehydrated adult ruminants, HS (2400 mOsm/L, 4-5 mL/kg i.v. over 4-5 minutes) should be administered through the jugular vein and the cow allowed to drink water. This means that 2 L of HS should be administered to adult cattle. HSD should be administered in conjunction with isotonic oral electrolyte solutions to all calves 8% or more dehydrated (eyes recessed > or = 4 mm into the orbit, cervical skin tent duration > 6 seconds) or calves with reduced cardiac output (fetlock temperature < 29 degrees C when housed at 10-24 degrees C). For treating dehydrated calves, HSD (2400 mOsm/L NaCl in 6% dextran-70, 4-5 mL/kg i.v. over 4-5 minutes) should be administered through the jugular vein and the calf allowed to suckle an isotonic oral electrolyte solution. This means that 120

  11. Efficiency influence of exogenous betaine on anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor treating high salinity mustard tuber wastewater.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Kong, Xiang-Juan; Chai, Hong-Xiang; Fan, Ming-Yu; Du, Jun

    2012-01-01

    When treating a composite mustard tuber wastewater with high concentrations of salt (about 20 g Cl(-) L(-1)) and organics (about 8000 mg L(-1) COD) by an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR) in winter, both high salinity and low temperature will inhibit the activity of anaerobic microorganisms and lead to low treatment efficiency. To solve this problem, betaine was added to the influent to improve the activity of the anaerobic sludge, and an experimental study was carried to investigate the influence of betaine on treating high salinity mustard tuber wastewater by the ASBBR. The results show that, when using anaerobic acclimated sludge in the ASBBR, and controlling biofilm density at 50% and water temperature at 8-12 degrees C, the treatment efficiency of the reactor could be improved by adding the betaine at different concentrations. The efficiency reached the highest when the optimal dosage ofbetaine was 0.5 mmol L(-1). The average effluent COD, after stable acclimation, was 4461 mg L(-1). Relative to ASBBR without adding betaine, the activity of the sludge increased significantly. Meanwhile, the dehydrogenase activity of anaerobic microorganisms and the COD removal efficiency were increased by 18.6% and 18.1%, respectively. PMID:22988630

  12. Start-up and microbial communities of a simultaneous nitrogen removal system for high salinity and high nitrogen organic wastewater via heterotrophic nitrification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiahao; Han, Yi; Wang, Yingmu; Gong, Benzhou; Zhou, Jian; Qing, Xiaoxia

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a simultaneous nitrogen removal system for high salinity and high nitrogen organic wastewater was developed in a pressurized biofilm reactor. The result showed that under the air supply rate of 200Lh(-1), salinity of 3.0±0.2%, organic load of 10kgCODm(-3)d(-1) and nitrogen loading of 0.185kgm(-3)d(-1), the reactor started up rapidly and performed stably after 30days operation. Meanwhile, a simultaneous COD and nitrogen removal was achieved in the single-stage reactor, with COD, NH4(+)-N and TN removal efficiency of 97%, 99% and 98%, respectively. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profile demonstrated that simultaneous nitrogen removal could be achieved through heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification, and the pivotal microorganisms were Flavobacterium phragmitis and Paracoccus denitrificans. The microbial community of salt-tolerant halophilic microorganisms was developed successfully. This study can provide a more efficient and feasible solution to treat high salinity organic wastewater. PMID:27240235

  13. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny. PMID:27393920

  14. Forsterite dissolution in saline water at elevated temperature and high CO2 pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Giammar, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The rates and mechanisms of magnesium silicate dissolution can control the aqueous chemistry in ways that influence carbonate mineral precipitation during geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). A series of batch experiments was performed with forsterite (Mg(1.81)Fe(0.19)SiO(4)) powder to determine the effects of pressure (10-100 bar CO(2)), temperature (25-100 °C), and salinity (0-50,000 mg/L NaCl) on its dissolution rate at conditions relevant to GCS. Dissolution rates and products were determined by analysis of the aqueous phase, equilibrium and reaction path modeling, and solid phase characterization by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. After an initially rapid dissolution period, the dissolution rate declined significantly, an effect that is attributed to the formation of a silica-rich layer at the forsterite surface. The initial dissolution rate increased with increasing temperature and increasing CO(2) pressure; the effect of CO(2) was through its influence on the pH. The dissolution rate was enhanced by NaCl, which may have been due to its inhibition of the formation of a silica-rich surface layer. The experimental results provide information about magnesium silicate dissolution at conditions that will be encountered during GCS that can be used to predict the fate of CO(2) and the evolution of subsurface geochemistry following CO(2) injection. PMID:22650147

  15. Increasing Gas Hydrate Formation Temperature for Desalination of High Salinity Produced Water with Secondary Guests

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jong-Ho; Seol, Yongkoo

    2013-10-07

    We suggest a new gas hydrate-based desalination process using water-immiscible hydrate formers; cyclopentane (CP) and cyclohexane (CH) as secondary hydrate guests to alleviate temperature requirements for hydrate formation. The hydrate formation reactions were carried out in an isobaric condition of 3.1 MPa to find the upper temperature limit of CO2 hydrate formation. Simulated produced water (8.95 wt % salinity) mixed with the hydrate formers shows an increased upper temperature limit from -2 °C for simple CO2 hydrate to 16 and 7 °C for double (CO2 + CP) and (CO2 + CH) hydrates, respectively. The resulting conversion rate to double hydrate turned out to be similar to that with simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Hydrate formation rates (Rf) for the double hydrates with CP and CH are shown to be 22 and 16 times higher, respectively, than that of the simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Such mild hydrate formation temperature and fast formation kinetics indicate increased energy efficiency of the double hydrate system for the desalination process. Dissociated water from the hydrates shows greater than 90% salt removal efficiency for the hydrates with the secondary guests, which is also improved from about 70% salt removal efficiency for the simple hydrates.

  16. NOvel Refractory Materials for High Alkali, High Temperature Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, J.G.; Griffin, R.

    2011-08-30

    Refractory materials can be limited in their application by many factors including chemical reactions between the service environment and the refractory material, mechanical degradation of the refractory material by the service environment, temperature limitations on the use of a particular refractory material, and the inability to install or repair the refractory material in a cost effective manner or while the vessel was in service. The objective of this project was to address the need for new innovative refractory compositions by developing a family of novel MgO-Al2O3 spinel or other similar magnesia/alumina containing unshaped refractory composition (castables, gunnables, shotcretes, etc) utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques (in-situ phase formation, altered conversion temperatures, accelerated reactions, etc). This family of refractory compositions would then be tailored for use in high-temperature, highalkaline industrial environments like those found in the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries. A research team was formed to carry out the proposed work led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and was comprised of the academic institution Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T), and the industrial company MINTEQ International, Inc. (MINTEQ), along with representatives from the aluminum, chemical, glass, and forest products industries. The two goals of this project were to produce novel refractory compositions which will allow for improved energy efficiency and to develop new refractory application techniques which would improve the speed of installation. Also methods of hot installation were sought which would allow for hot repairs and on-line maintenance leading to reduced process downtimes and eliminating the need to cool and reheat process vessels.

  17. Salinity and nutrient contents of tidal water affects soil respiration and carbon sequestration of high and low tidal flats of Jiuduansha wetlands in different ways.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Wang, Lei; Fu, Xiaohua; Yan, Jianfang; Wu, Jihua; Tsang, Yiufai; Le, Yiquan; Sun, Ying

    2016-09-15

    Soils were collected from low tidal flats and high tidal flats of Shang shoal located upstream and Xia shoal located downstream with different tidal water qualities, in the Jiuduansha wetland of the Yangtze River estuary. Soil respiration (SR) in situ and soil abiotic and microbial characteristics were studied to clarify the respective differences in the effects of tidal water salinity and nutrient levels on SR and soil carbon sequestration in low and high tidal flats. In low tidal flats, higher total nitrogen (TN) and lower salinity in the tidal water of Shang shoal resulted in higher TN and lower salinity in its soils compared with Xia shoal. These would benefit β-Proteobacteria and Anaerolineae in Shang shoal soil, which might have higher heterotrophic microbial activities and thus soil microbial respiration and SR. In low tidal flats, where soil moisture was high and the major carbon input was active organic carbon from tidal water, increasing TN was a more important factor than salinity and obviously enhanced soil microbial heterotrophic activities, soil microbial respiration and SR. While, in high tidal flats, higher salinity in Xia shoal due to higher salinity in tidal water compared with Shang shoal benefited γ-Proteobacteria which might enhance autotrophic microbial activity, and was detrimental to β-Proteobacteria in Xia shoal soil. These might have led to lower soil microbial respiration and thus SR in Xia shoal compared with Shang shoal. In high tidal flats, where soil moisture was relatively lower and the major carbon input was plant biomass that was difficult to degrade, soil salinity was the major factor restraining microbial activities, soil microbial respiration and SR. PMID:27208721

  18. Larval Tolerance to Salinity in Three Species of Australian Anuran: An Indication of Saline Specialisation in Litoria aurea

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Brian D.; Byrne, Phillip G.; Reina, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent anthropogenic influences on freshwater habitats are forcing anuran populations to rapidly adapt to high magnitude changes in environmental conditions or face local extinction. We examined the effects of ecologically relevant elevated salinity levels on larval growth, metamorphosis and survival of three species of Australian anuran; the spotted marsh frog (Limnodynastes tasmaniensis), the painted burrowing frog (Neobatrachus sudelli) and the green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea), in order to better understand the responses of these animals to environmental change. Elevated salinity (16% seawater) negatively impacted on the survival of L. tasmaniensis (35% survival) and N sudelli (0% survival), while reduced salinity had a negative impact on L. aurea. (16% seawater: 85% survival; 0.4% seawater: 35% survival). L. aurea tadpoles survived in salinities much higher than previously reported for this species, indicating the potential for inter-populations differences in salinity tolerance. In L. tasmaniensis and L. aurea, development to metamorphosis was fastest in low and high salinity treatments suggesting it is advantageous for tadpoles to invest energy in development in both highly favourable and developmentally challenging environments. We propose that this response might either maximise potential lifetime fecundity when tadpoles experience favourable environments, or, facilitate a more rapid escape from pond environments where there is a reduced probability of survival. PMID:22916260

  19. Electronic ceramics in high temperature environments

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, A.W.; Meschi, D.J.

    1980-11-01

    Simple thermodynamic means are described for understanding and predicting the influence of temperature changes in various environments on electronic properties of ceramics. Thermal gradients, thermal cycling and vacuum annealing are discussed, as well as the variations of activities and solubilities with temperature.

  20. Breeding broccoli adapted to high temperature environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A breeding program to select broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. Italica Group) for adaptation to summer environments has been conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory (USVL) in Charleston, South Carolina, for almost two decades. This effort provides a case study of a concerted effort to breed polygen...

  1. Rufibacter immobilis sp. nov., isolated from a high-altitude saline lake.

    PubMed

    Polkade, Ashish V; Ramana, V Venkata; Joshi, Amaraja; Pardesi, Larrisa; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2015-05-01

    Two pinkish-red, Gram-stain-negative, non-motile aerobic bacterial strains (MCC P1(T) and MCC P2), capable of growing at low temperatures (15 °C), were isolated from water of a saline lake located in the western Himalayas of India. The strains were capable of growth in the presence of 0-2.0% NaCl and at pH 6.5-9.0. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed the closest similarity of 96.3% to the type strain of the only species of the genus Rufibacter , Rufibacter tibetensis CCTCC AB 208084(T). Strains MCC P1(T) and MCC P2 shared 99.0% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 88.6% DNA-DNA relatedness. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, C17 : 1ω6c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c/C16 : 1ω7c) and summed feature 4 (anteiso-C17 : 1 B/iso-C17 : 1 I). Predominant polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The respiratory quinone was MK-7. The DNA G+C content of the strains was 52.6-52.8 mol%. Based on morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomical and molecular characteristics, strains MCC P1(T) and MCC P2 represent a novel species of the genus Rufibacter , for which the name Rufibacter immobilis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MCC P1(T) ( =MCC 2268(T) =CCTCC AB 2013351(T)). PMID:25713038

  2. Effects of river discharge and high-tide stage on salinity intrusion in the Weeki Wachee, Crystal, and Withlacoochee River estuaries, southwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Knochenmus, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Weeki Wachee, Crystal, and Withlacoochee Rivers are coastal streams flowing into the Gulf of Mexico that may be affected by either future surface water or groundwater withdrawals. Reduction of river discharge will affect the upstream extent of saltwater intrusion in the rivers; however, under certain reduced low-flow discharges, the estimated change in upstream extent of saltwater intrusion is on the order of several tenths of a mile and frequently is within the range of predicted error. Data on flow, tides, and salinity describe the physical characteristics of the Weeki Wachee, Crystal, and Withlacoochee River systems. Vertical and longitudinal salinity profiles indicate that salinity of the rivers increases downstream and varies substantially at any given location. The Weeki Wachee River system is the best mixed of the three. The Crystal River system exhibited the next best mixed system, and the Withlacoochee River system exhibited the most variation in its salinity regime. The daily maximum upstream extent of salinity intrusion is described by multiple linear-regression analysis based on daily mean streamflow of each river and high-tide stage of the gulf. The equations are used to show the effects of discharge on the daily maximum upstream extent of salinity intrusion in the rivers. (USGS)

  3. NOVEL REFRACTORY MATERIALS FOR HIGH ALKALI, HIGH TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Smith, Jeffrey D; O'Hara, Kelley; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela; Colavito,

    2012-08-01

    A project was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with a research team comprised of the academic institution Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T), and the industrial company MINTEQ International, Inc. (MINTEQ), along with representatives from the aluminum, chemical, glass, and forest products industries. The project was to address the need for new innovative refractory compositions by developing a family of novel MgO-Al 2O3, MgAl2O4, or other similar spinel structured or alumina-based unshaped refractory compositions (castables, gunnables, shotcretes, etc.) utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques (in-situ phase formation, altered conversion temperatures, accelerated reactions, etc). This family of refractory compositions would then be tailored for use in high-temperature, high-alkaline industrial environments like those found in the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries. Both practical refractory development experience and computer modeling techniques were used to aid in the design of this new family of materials. The newly developed materials were expected to offer alternative material choices for high-temperature, high-alkali environments that were capable of operating at higher temperatures (goal of increasing operating temperature by 100-200oC depending on process) or for longer periods of time (goal of twice the life span of current materials or next process determined service increment). This would lead to less process down time, greater energy efficiency for associated manufacturing processes (more heat kept in process), and materials that could be installed/repaired in a more efficient manner. The overall project goal was a 5% improvement in energy efficiency (brought about through a 20% improvement in thermal efficiency) resulting in a savings of 3.7 TBtu/yr (7.2 billion ft3 natural gas) by the year 2030. Additionally, new

  4. Collection of High Energy Yielding Strains of Saline Microalgae from the Hawaiian Islands: Final Technical Report, Year 1

    SciTech Connect

    York, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Microalgae were collected from 48 locations in the Hawaiian Islands in 1985. The sites were an aquaculture tank; a coral reef; bays; a geothermal steam vent; Hawaiian fish ponds; a Hawaiian salt punawai (well); the ocean; river mouths; saline lakes; saline pools; saline ponds; a saline swamp; and the ponds, drainage ditches and sumps of commercial shrimp farms. From 4,800 isolations, 100 of the most productive clones were selected to be maintained by periodic transfer to sterile medium. Five clones were tested for growth rate and production in a full-spectrum-transmitting solarium.

  5. Using UCST Ionic Liquid as a Draw Solute in Forward Osmosis to Treat High-Salinity Water.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yujiang; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xinbo; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Gnanou, Yves; Lai, Zhiping

    2016-01-19

    The concept of using a thermoresponsive ionic liquid (IL) with an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) as a draw solute in forward osmosis (FO) was successfully demonstrated here experimentally. A 3.2 M solution of protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Hbet][Tf2N]) was obtained by heating and maintaining the temperature above 56 °C. This solution successfully drew water from high-salinity water up to 3.0 M through FO. When the IL solution cooled to room temperature, it spontaneously separated into a water-rich phase and an IL-rich phase: the water-rich phase was the produced water that contained a low IL concentration, and the IL-rich phase could be used directly as the draw solution in the next cycle of the FO process. The thermal stability, thermal-responsive solubility, and UV-vis absorption spectra of the IL were also studied in detail. PMID:26649525

  6. Efficient treatment of phenolic wastewater with high salinity using a novel integrated system of magnetically immobilized cells coupling with electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei; Shi, Shengnan; Song, Lun; Tan, Liang; Li, Meidi; Liu, Jiaxin; Xue, Lanlan

    2016-10-01

    A novel integrated system in which magnetically immobilized cells coupled with a pair of stainless iron meshes-graphite plate electrodes has been designed and operated to enhance the treatment performance of phenolic wastewater under high salinity. With NaCl concentration increased, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol and COD removal rates by integrated system increased significantly, which were obviously higher than the sum of removal rates by single magnetically immobilized cells and electrode reaction. This integrated system exhibited higher removal rates for all the compounds than that by single magnetically immobilized cells during six cycles for reuse, and it still performed better, even when the voltage was cut off. These results indicated that there was a coupling effect between biodegradation and electrode reaction. The investigation of phenol hydroxylase activity and cells concentration confirmed that electrode reaction played an important role in this coupling effect. PMID:27347805

  7. The use of some ion-exchange sorbing tracer cations in in-situ experiments in high saline groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Byegaard, J.; Skarnemark, G.; Skaalberg, M.

    1995-12-31

    The possibility to use alkali metals and alkaline earth metals as slightly sorbing tracers in in-situ sorption experiments in high saline groundwaters has been investigated. The cation exchange characteristics of granite and some fracture minerals (chlorite and calcite) have been studied using the proposed cations as tracers. The results show low Kd`s for Na, Ca and Sr ({approximately}0.1 ml/g), while the sorption is higher for the more electropositive cations (Rb, Cs and Ba). A higher contribution of irreversible sorption can also be observed for the latter group of cations. For calcite the sorption of all the tracers, except Ca, is lower compared to the corresponding sorption to granite and chlorite. Differences in selectivity coefficients and cation exchange capacity are obtained when using different size fractions of crushed granite. The difference is even more pronounced when comparing crushed granite to intact granite.

  8. Exogenous trehalose largely alleviates ionic unbalance, ROS burst, and PCD occurrence induced by high salinity in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xiaoju; Zhu, Hong; Paul, Matthew; Zu, Yuangang; Tang, Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    Trehalose (Tre) has been reported to play a critical role in plant response to salinity and the involved mechanisms remain to be investigated in detail. Here, the putative roles of Tre in regulation of ionic balance, cellular redox state, cell death were studied in Arabidopsis under high salt condition. Our results found that the salt-induced restrictions on both vegetative and reproductive growth in salt-stressed plants were largely alleviated by exogenous supply with Tre. The microprobe analysis of ionic dynamics in the leaf and stem of florescence highlighted the Tre ability to retain K and K/Na ratio in plant tissues to improve salt tolerance. The flow cytometry assay of cellular levels of reactive oxygen species and programmed cell death displayed that Tre was able to antagonized salt-induced damages in redox state and cell death and sucrose did not play the same role with Tre. By comparing ionic distribution in leaf and inflorescence stem (IS), we found that Tre was able to restrict Na transportation to IS from leaves since that the ratio of Na accumulation in leaves relative to IS was largely improved due to Tre. The marked decrease of Na ion and improved sucrose level in IS might account for the promoted floral growth when Tre was included in the saline solution. At the same time, endogenous soluble sugars and antioxidant enzyme activities in the salt-stressed plants were also elevated by Tre to counteract high salt stress. We concluded that Tre could improve Arabidopsis salt resistance with respect to biomass accumulation and floral transition in the means of regulating plant redox state, cell death, and ionic distribution. PMID:25400644

  9. Integrated analysis environment for high impact systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.; Davis, J.; Scott, J.; Sztipanovits, J.; Karsai, G.

    1998-02-01

    Modeling and analysis of high consequence, high assurance systems requires special modeling considerations. System safety and reliability information must be captured in the models. Previously, high consequence systems were modeled using separate, disjoint models for safety, reliability, and security. The MultiGraph Architecture facilitates the implementation of a model integrated system for modeling and analysis of high assurance systems. Model integrated computing allows an integrated modeling technique to be applied to high consequence systems. Among the tools used for analyzing safety and reliability are a behavioral simulator and an automatic fault tree generation and analysis tool. Symbolic model checking techniques are used to efficiently investigate the system models. A method for converting finite state machine models to ordered binary decision diagrams allows the application of symbolic model checking routines to the integrated system models. This integrated approach to modeling and analysis of high consequence systems ensures consistency between the models and the different analysis tools.

  10. High-current density coils for high-radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the problems of providing normal (that is, nonsuperconducting) magnet coils for present and short-term-future requirements where significant radiation doses are involved. Projects such as 100-mA deuteron accelerators and bundle diverter coils for TOKAMAKS are typical of applications where conventional organic insulation limited to 10/sup 10/ rads makes epoxy-based systems unacceptable. Moreover, even in present-day accelerators, radiation levels can be high enough to give rise to problems with oxidation of copper conductors if water is used in direct contact with the copper. The radiolytic oxygen, being formed in situ, cannot be controlled by external deoxygenators. An acceptable insulation for such environments has been described previously, and is being employed where radiation is expected to be a problem. Being a compacted magnesium oxide powder, the insulation has advantages. Analysis of constraints on maximum current densities achievable in such a coil construction, using computer codes, leads to coil configurations that operate at higher current densities than are usually found in directly cooled coils. An example of the thermal analysis of one coil configuration is given. The problems are addressed here.

  11. Evaluation of the halophyte Salsola soda as an alternative crop for saline soils high in selenium and boron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salinization is one important factor contributing to land degradation, which affects agricultural production and environmental quality, especially in the West side of central California. When salinization is combined with a natural contamination of trace elements (i.e., Se and B) in arid and semi-ar...

  12. Salinity affects the photoacclimation of Chlamydomonas raudensis Ettl UWO241.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Hüner, Norman P A; Minagawa, Jun

    2009-03-01

    Chlamydomonas raudensis Ettl UWO241, a natural variant of C. raudensis, is deficient in state transitions. Its habitat, the deepest layer of Lake Bonney in Antarctica, features low irradiance, low temperature, and high salinity. Although psychrophily and low-light acclimation of this green alga has been described, very little information is available on the effect of salinity. Here, we demonstrate that this psychrophile is halotolerant, not halophilic, and it shows energy redistribution between photosystem I and II based on energy spillover under low-salt conditions. Furthermore, we revealed that C. raudensis exhibits higher non-photochemical quenching in comparison with the mesophile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, when grown with low-salt, which is due to the lower proton conductivity across the thylakoid membrane. Significance of the C. raudensis UWO241 traits found in the low salinity culture are implicated with their natural habitats, including the high salinity and extremely stable light environments. PMID:19137412

  13. Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Share | Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Saline sinus rinses can bring relief to patients ... at a fraction of the cost. Saline Rinse Recipe Ingredients 1. Pickling or canning salt-containing no ...

  14. Chemical tracers of high-metallicity environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayet, E.; Davis, T. A.; Bell, T. A.; Viti, S.

    2012-08-01

    We present for the first time a detailed study of the properties of molecular gas in metal-rich environments such as early-type galaxies (ETGs). We have explored photon-dominated region chemistry for a wide range of physical conditions likely to be appropriate for these sources. We derive fractional abundances of the 20 most chemically reactive species as a function of the metallicity, as a function of the optical depth and for various volume number gas densities, far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation fields and cosmic ray ionization rates. We also investigate the response of the chemistry to the changes in α-element enhancement as seen in ETGs. We find that the fractional abundances of CS, H2S, H2CS, H2O, H3O+, HCO+ and H2CN seem invariant to an increase of metallicity whereas C+, CO, C2H, CN, HCN, HNC and OCS appear to be the species most sensitive to this change. The most sensitive species to the change in the fractional abundance of α-elements are C+, C, CN, HCN, HNC, SO, SO2, H2O and CS. Finally, we provide line brightness ratios for the most abundant species, especially in the range observable with Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). Discussion of favourable line ratios to be used for the estimation of supersolar metallicities and α-elements are also provided.

  15. A Study on High School Students' Perceptions of "Geographical Environment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurettin, Bilgen

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates how high school students perceive the concept "environment". The research was conducted on 191 Social Science High School students from 9 to 12th grades in Istanbul and Denizli within 2012 to 2013 academic year. In the study, students were asked to draw a picture of the "environment". The research…

  16. High resolution numerical investigation on the effect of convective instability on long term CO2 storage in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2007-07-01

    CO2 sequestration (capture, separation, and long term storage) in various geologic media including depleted oil reservoirs, saline aquifers, and oceanic sediments is being considered as a possible solution to reduce green house gas emissions. Dissolution of supercritical CO2 in formation brines is considered an important storage mechanism to prevent possible leakage. Accurate prediction of the plume dissolution rate and migration is essential. Analytical analysis and numerical experiments have demonstrated that convective instability (Rayleigh instability) has a crucial effect on the dissolution behavior and subsequent mineralization reactions. Global stability analysis indicates that a certain grid resolution is needed to capture the features of density-driven fingering phenomena. For 3-D field scale simulations, high resolution leads to large numbers of grid nodes, unfeasible for a single workstation. In this study, we investigate the effects of convective instability on geologic sequestration of CO2 by taking advantage of parallel computing using the code PFLOTRAN, a massively parallel 3-D reservoir simulator for modeling subsurface multiphase, multicomponent reactive flow and transport based on continuum scale mass and energy conservation equations. The onset, development and long-term fate of a supercritical CO2 plume will be resolved with high resolution numerical simulations to investigate the rate of plume dissolution caused by fingering phenomena.

  17. Electrochemical characterization of microbial bioanodes formed on a collector/electrode system in a highly saline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Raphaël; Rimboud, Mickaël; Délia, Marie-Line; Bergel, Alain; Basséguy, Régine

    2015-12-01

    Bioanodes were formed with electrodes made of carbon felt and equipped with a titanium electrical collector, as commonly used in microbial fuel cells. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) performed on the abiotic electrode system evidenced two time constants, one corresponding to the "collector/carbon felt" contact, the other to the "carbon felt/solution" interface. Such a two time constant system was characteristics of the two-material electrode, independent of biofilm presence. EIS was then performed during the bioanode formation around the constant applied potential of 0.1 V/SCE. The equivalent electrical model was similar to that of the abiotic system. Due to the high salinity of the electrolyte (45 g·L(-1) NaCl) the electrolyte resistance was always very low. The bioanode development induced kinetic heterogeneities that were taken into account by replacing the pure capacitance of the abiotic system by a constant phase element for the "carbon felt/solution" interface. The current increase from 0 to 20.6 A·m(-2) was correlated to the considerable decrease of the charge transfer resistance of the "carbon felt/solution" interface from 2.4 10(4) to 92 Ω·cm(2). Finally, EIS implemented at 0.4 V/SCE showed that the limitation observed at high potential values was not related to mass transfer but to a biofilm-linked kinetics. PMID:26145814

  18. Intrinsic water use efficiency controls the adaptation to high salinity in a semi-arid adapted plant, henna (Lawsonia inermis L.).

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Nieves; Olmos, Enrique; Bardisi, Enas; García-De la Garma, Jesús; López-Berenguer, Carmen; Rubio-Asensio, José Salvador

    2014-03-01

    Adaptation to salinity of a semi-arid inhabitant plant, henna, is studied. The salt tolerance mechanisms are evaluated in the belief that gas exchange (water vapor and CO2) should play a key role on its adaptation to salt stress because of the strong evaporation conditions and soil water deficit in its natural area of distribution. We grow henna plants hydroponically under controlled climate conditions and expose them to control (0mM NaCl), and two levels of salinity; medium (75mM NaCl) and high (150mM NaCl). Relative growth rate (RGR), biomass production, whole plant and leaf structure and ultrastructure adaptation, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, nutrients location in leaf tissue and its balance in the plant are studied. RGR and total biomass decreased as NaCl concentration increased in the nutrient solution. At 75mM NaCl root biomass was not affected by salinity and RGR reached similar values to control plants at the end of the experiment. At this salinity level henna plant responded to salinity decreasing shoot to root ratio, increasing leaf specific mass (LSM) and intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE), and accumulating high concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) in leaves and root. At 150mM NaCl growth was severely reduced but plants reached the reproductive phase. At this salinity level, no further decrease in shoot to root ratio or increase in LSM was observed, but plants increased iWUE, maintaining water status and leaf and root Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations were lower than expected. Moreover, plants at 150mM NaCl reallocated carbon to the root at the expense of the shoot. The effective PSII quantum yield [Y(II)] and the quantum yield of non-regulated energy dissipation [Y(NO)] were recovered over time of exposure to salinity. Overall, iWUE seems to be determinant in the adaptation of henna plant to high salinity level, when morphological adaptation fails. PMID:24484959

  19. Phase Behavior of Dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol Bilayer Membrane in Saline Water Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saeko; Goto, Masaki; Tamai, Nobutake; Matsuki, Hitoshi

    The phase transitions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) bilayer membrane in the aqueous NaCl solution were observed by means of an optical method under atmospheric and high pressures. The temperature-pressure phase diagram of the DPPG bilayer showed that the phase behavior of the DPPG bilayer was similar to that of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer except for the interdigitated gel (LβI) phase. Comparing the phase diagram with the diagram obtained in a phosphate buffer, it turned out that the formation of the LβI phase is suppressed by the shielding effect of NaCl on the repulsive interaction among polar headgroups.

  20. Effects of oceanic salinity on body condition in sea snakes.

    PubMed

    Brischoux, François; Rolland, Virginie; Bonnet, Xavier; Caillaud, Matthieu; Shine, Richard

    2012-08-01

    Since the transition from terrestrial to marine environments poses strong osmoregulatory and energetic challenges, temporal and spatial fluctuations in oceanic salinity might influence salt and water balance (and hence, body condition) in marine tetrapods. We assessed the effects of salinity on three species of sea snakes studied by mark-recapture in coral-reef habitats in the Neo-Caledonian Lagoon. These three species include one fully aquatic hydrophiine (Emydocephalus annulatus), one primarily aquatic laticaudine (Laticauda laticaudata), and one frequently terrestrial laticaudine (Laticauda saintgironsi). We explored how oceanic salinity affected the snakes' body condition across various temporal and spatial scales relevant to each species' ecology, using linear mixed models and multimodel inference. Mean annual salinity exerted a consistent and negative effect on the body condition of all three snake species. The most terrestrial taxon (L. saintgironsi) was sensitive to salinity over a short temporal scale, corresponding to the duration of a typical marine foraging trip for this species. In contrast, links between oceanic salinity and body condition in the fully aquatic E. annulatus and the highly aquatic L. laticaudata were strongest at a long-term (annual) scale. The sophisticated salt-excreting systems of sea snakes allow them to exploit marine environments, but do not completely overcome the osmoregulatory challenges posed by oceanic conditions. Future studies could usefully explore such effects in other secondarily marine taxa such as seabirds, turtles, and marine mammals. PMID:22710931

  1. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Response of the Halophyte, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (Ice Plant) to High Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Suzuki, Takamasa; Nishikawa, Kouki; Agarie, Sakae; Ishiguro, Sumie; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that convey salt tolerance in plants is a crucial issue for increasing crop yield. The ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) is a halophyte that is capable of growing under high salt conditions. For example, the roots of ice plant seedlings continue to grow in 140 mM NaCl, a salt concentration that completely inhibits Arabidopsis thaliana root growth. Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for this high level of salt tolerance in a halophyte has the potential of revealing tolerance mechanisms that have been evolutionarily successful. In the present study, deep sequencing (RNAseq) was used to examine gene expression in ice plant roots treated with various concentrations of NaCl. Sequencing resulted in the identification of 53,516 contigs, 10,818 of which were orthologs of Arabidopsis genes. In addition to the expression analysis, a web-based ice plant database was constructed that allows broad public access to the data. The results obtained from an analysis of the RNAseq data were confirmed by RT-qPCR. Novel patterns of gene expression in response to high salinity within 24 hours were identified in the ice plant when the RNAseq data from the ice plant was compared to gene expression data obtained from Arabidopsis plants exposed to high salt. Although ABA responsive genes and a sodium transporter protein (HKT1), are up-regulated and down-regulated respectively in both Arabidopsis and the ice plant; peroxidase genes exhibit opposite responses. The results of this study provide an important first step towards analyzing environmental tolerance mechanisms in a non-model organism and provide a useful dataset for predicting novel gene functions. PMID:25706745

  2. Analysis of radium-226 in high salinity wastewater from unconventional gas extraction by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tieyuan; Bain, Daniel; Hammack, Richard; Vidic, Radisav D

    2015-03-01

    Elevated concentration of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in wastewater generated from Marcellus Shale gas extraction is of great concern due to potential environmental and public health impacts. Development of a rapid and robust method for analysis of Ra-226, which is the major NORM component in this water, is critical for the selection of appropriate management approaches to properly address regulatory and public concerns. Traditional methods for Ra-226 determination require long sample holding time or long detection time. A novel method combining Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) with solid-phase extraction (SPE) to separate and purify radium isotopes from the matrix elements in high salinity solutions is developed in this study. This method reduces analysis time while maintaining requisite precision and detection limit. Radium separation is accomplished using a combination of a strong-acid cation exchange resin to separate barium and radium from other ions in the solution and a strontium-specific resin to isolate radium from barium and obtain a sample suitable for analysis by ICP-MS. Method optimization achieved high radium recovery (101 ± 6% for standard mode and 97 ± 7% for collision mode) for synthetic Marcellus Shale wastewater (MSW) samples with total dissolved solids as high as 171,000 mg/L. Ra-226 concentration in actual MSW samples with TDS as high as 415,000 mg/L measured using ICP-MS matched very well with the results from gamma spectrometry. The Ra-226 analysis method developed in this study requires several hours for sample preparation and several minutes for analysis with the detection limit of 100 pCi/L with RSD of 45% (standard mode) and 67% (collision mode). The RSD decreased to below 15% when Ra-226 concentration increased over 500 pCi/L. PMID:25642997

  3. RNA-seq analysis of the response of the halophyte, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (ice plant) to high salinity.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Suzuki, Takamasa; Nishikawa, Kouki; Agarie, Sakae; Ishiguro, Sumie; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that convey salt tolerance in plants is a crucial issue for increasing crop yield. The ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) is a halophyte that is capable of growing under high salt conditions. For example, the roots of ice plant seedlings continue to grow in 140 mM NaCl, a salt concentration that completely inhibits Arabidopsis thaliana root growth. Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for this high level of salt tolerance in a halophyte has the potential of revealing tolerance mechanisms that have been evolutionarily successful. In the present study, deep sequencing (RNAseq) was used to examine gene expression in ice plant roots treated with various concentrations of NaCl. Sequencing resulted in the identification of 53,516 contigs, 10,818 of which were orthologs of Arabidopsis genes. In addition to the expression analysis, a web-based ice plant database was constructed that allows broad public access to the data. The results obtained from an analysis of the RNAseq data were confirmed by RT-qPCR. Novel patterns of gene expression in response to high salinity within 24 hours were identified in the ice plant when the RNAseq data from the ice plant was compared to gene expression data obtained from Arabidopsis plants exposed to high salt. Although ABA responsive genes and a sodium transporter protein (HKT1), are up-regulated and down-regulated respectively in both Arabidopsis and the ice plant; peroxidase genes exhibit opposite responses. The results of this study provide an important first step towards analyzing environmental tolerance mechanisms in a non-model organism and provide a useful dataset for predicting novel gene functions. PMID:25706745

  4. Evolutionary history influences the salinity preference of bacterial taxa in wetland soils

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Ember M.; Franklin, Rima B.

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is a major driver of bacterial community composition across the globe. Despite growing recognition that different bacterial species are present or active at different salinities, the mechanisms by which salinity structures community composition remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that these patterns reflect ecological coherence in the salinity preferences of phylogenetic groups using a reciprocal transplant experiment of fresh- and saltwater wetland soils. The salinity of both the origin and host environments affected community composition (16S rRNA gene sequences) and activity (CO2 and CH4 production, and extracellular enzyme activity). These changes in community composition and activity rates were strongly correlated, which suggests the effect of environment on function could be mediated, at least in part, by microbial community composition. Based on their distribution across treatments, each phylotype was categorized as having a salinity preference (freshwater, saltwater, or none) and phylogenetic analyses revealed a significant influence of evolutionary history on these groupings. This finding was corroborated by examining the salinity preferences of high-level taxonomic groups. For instance, we found that the majority of α- and γ-proteobacteria in these wetland soils preferred saltwater, while many β-proteobacteria prefer freshwater. Overall, our results indicate the effect of salinity on bacterial community composition results from phylogenetically-clustered salinity preferences. PMID:26483764

  5. Nature of Mathematics Classroom Environments in Catholic High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Judith J.; Sink, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to reveal the various types of learning environments present in 30 mathematics classrooms in five Catholic high schools, this replication study examined student (N = 602) perceptions of their classrooms using the Classroom Environment Scale. Student attitudes toward mathematics were assessed by the Estes Attitude Scale. Extending…

  6. Illinois High School Principals' Perceptions of Alternative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Lawrence W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined Illinois high school principals' perceptions of the growth, quality, advantages and disadvantages of alternative learning environments. In this study, alternative learning environments involved the use of both synchronous and asynchronous modes of communication for course delivery. Synchronous modes of instructional delivery…

  7. Influence of Exceptionally High Salinities, Marked Variations in Freshwater Discharge and Opening of Estuary Mouth on the Characteristics of the Ichthyofauna of a Normally-Closed Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, G. C.; Potter, I. C.

    2002-08-01

    This study aimed to determine how the characteristics of the ichthyofauna of the normally-closed Wellstead Estuary on the south coast of Western Australia are influenced by the exceptionally high salinities attained during protracted periods of landlocking and, at other times, by atypically heavy freshwater discharge and consequently the opening of the estuary mouth. After 47 months of continuous closure, this estuary became open to the sea for 30 days in September/October 1997 and then closed again for a further six months. Nearshore, shallow and offshore, deeper waters of the lower, middle and upper regions of this estuary were sampled using seine and gill nets, respectively, in alternate months between July 1996 and May 1998. Mean monthly salinities in each region were >40 on all sampling occasions, except immediately preceding and following the opening of the estuary mouth and, in the lower estuary, they rose to a maximum of 112 in March 1997, before declining to a minimum of 14 in September 1997. The fish fauna of Wellstead Estuary was highly depauperate (20 species), presumably due mainly to the very limited opportunities for the immigration of marine species. However, appreciable numbers of two marine species ( Mugil cephalus and Aldrichetta forsteri) entered from the sea when the estuary was open in the period prior to October 1993 and were able to survive in the highly variable salinities found in this estuary when it was landlocked for the following 47 months. There was strong evidence that, as salinities rose to very high levels in 1997, all of the Leptatherina wallacei and Amoya bifrenatus found in the estuary died and some other species moved from the lower to upper reaches of the estuary where salinities did not rise to such high levels. The atherinid Atherinosoma elongata was the only species caught in March 1997 at the site in the lower estuary where the salinity reached 122. Subsequently, the number of species and overall density of fish in the

  8. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB112 Promotes Anthocyanin Formation during Salinity and under High Light Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lotkowska, Magda E.; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Xue, Gang-Ping; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcription factors (TFs) are important regulators of flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. Here, we report MYB112 as a formerly unknown regulator of anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Expression profiling after chemically induced overexpression of MYB112 identified 28 up- and 28 down-regulated genes 5 h after inducer treatment, including MYB7 and MYB32, which are both induced. In addition, upon extended induction, MYB112 also positively affects the expression of PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1, a key TF of anthocyanin biosynthesis, but acts negatively toward MYB12 and MYB111, which both control flavonol biosynthesis. MYB112 binds to an 8-bp DNA fragment containing the core sequence (A/T/G)(A/C)CC(A/T)(A/G/T)(A/C)(T/C). By electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we show that MYB112 binds in vitro and in vivo to MYB7 and MYB32 promoters, revealing them as direct downstream target genes. We further show that MYB112 expression is up-regulated by salinity and high light stress, environmental parameters that both require the MYB112 TF for anthocyanin accumulation under these stresses. In contrast to several other MYB TFs affecting anthocyanin biosynthesis, MYB112 expression is not controlled by nitrogen limitation or an excess of carbon. Thus, MYB112 constitutes a regulator that promotes anthocyanin accumulation under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26378103

  9. Geochemical evolution of highly alkaline and saline tank waste plumes during seepage through vadose zone sediments 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Larsen, Joern T.; Serne, R. Jeff

    2004-02-01

    Leakage of highly saline and alkaline radioactive waste from storage tanks into underlying sediments is a serious environmental problem at the Hanford Site in Washington State. This study focuses on geochemical evolution of tank waste plumes resulting from interactions between the waste solution and sediment. A synthetic tank waste solution was infused into unsaturated Hanford sediment columns (0.2, 0.6, and 2 m) maintained at 70°C to simulate the field contamination process. Spatially and temporally resolved geochemical profiles of the waste plume were obtained. Thorough OH - neutralization (from an initial pH 14 down to 6.3) was observed. Three broad zones of pore solutions were identified to categorize the dominant geochemical reactions: the silicate dissolution zone (pH > 10), pH-neutralized zone (pH 10 to 6.5), and displaced native sediment pore water (pH 6.5 to 8). Elevated concentrations of Si, Fe, and K in plume fluids and their depleted concentrations in plume sediments reflected dissolution of primary minerals within the silicate dissolution zone. The very high Na concentrations in the waste solution resulted in rapid and complete cation exchange, reflected in high concentrations of Ca and Mg at the plume front. The plume-sediment profiles also showed deposition of hydrated solids and carbonates. Fair correspondence was obtained between these results and analyses of field borehole samples from a waste plume at the Hanford Site. Results of this study provide a well-defined framework for understanding waste plumes in the more complex field setting and for understanding geochemical factors controlling transport of contaminant species carried in waste solutions that leaked from single-shell storage tanks in the past.

  10. High frequency monitoring of the coastal marine environment using the MAREL buoy.

    PubMed

    Blain, S; Guillou, J; Tréguer, P; Woerther, P; Delauney, L; Follenfant, E; Gontier, O; Hamon, M; Leilde, B; Masson, A; Tartu, C; Vuillemin, R

    2004-06-01

    The MAREL Iroise data buoy provides physico-chemical measurements acquired in surface marine water in continuous and autonomous mode. The water is pumped 1.5 m from below the surface through a sampling pipe and flows through the measuring cell located in the floating structure. Technological innovations implemented inside the measuring cell atop the buoy allow a continuous cleaning of the sensor, while injection of chloride ions into the circuit prevents biological fouling. Specific sensors for temperature, salinity, oxygen and fluorescence investigated in this paper have been evaluated to guarantee measurement precision over a 3 month period. A bi-directional link under Internet TCP-IP protocols is used for data, alarms and remote-control transmissions with the land-based data centre. Herein, we present a 29 month record for 4 parameters measured using a MAREL buoy moored in a coastal environment (Iroise Sea, Brest, France). The accuracy of the data provided by the buoy is assessed by comparison with measurements of sea water weekly sampled at the same site as part of SOMLIT (Service d'Observation du Milieu LIToral), the French network for monitoring of the coastal environment. Some particular events (impact of intensive fresh water discharges, dynamics of a fast phytoplankton bloom) are also presented, demonstrating the worth of monitoring a highly variable environment with a high frequency continuous reliable system. PMID:15173911

  11. The use of environmental tracers to determine focused recharge from a saline disposal basin and irrigation channels in a semiarid environment in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, T. C.; Webb, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    Lake Tutchewop in southeastern Australia is a former ephemeral wetland that has been used as a saline disposal basin since 1968, forming part of the salinity management of the Murray River. The extent of saline focused recharge from Lake Tutchewop and fresh recharge from nearby unlined irrigation channels was determined using pore water and groundwater stable isotope and major ion chemistry, which were able to separate the influence of lake water, irrigation water and regional groundwater. In ∼45 years, saline water from Lake Tutchewop has infiltrated only up to 165 m from the lake edge in most directions, due to the underlying relatively impermeable clay-rich sediments, and a maximum of 700 m due to preferential groundwater flow along a sandy palaeochannel. The saline leakage has had limited, if any, impact on surrounding agricultural land use. Fresh water leakage from unlined irrigation channels extends up to 10 m deep, validating the current program to replace these channels with pipelines. This study demonstrates that focused recharge from different sources can be positively identified where the recharge waters have distinctive compositions, and that underlying clay-rich sediments restrict the extent of seepage. Therefore, management of focused recharge sources, particularly those that could decrease groundwater quality, requires a detailed knowledge of both the groundwater composition around the site and the underlying geology.

  12. Politics in evaluation: Politically responsive evaluation in high stakes environments.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Tarek; Levine, Bret

    2015-12-01

    The role of politics has often been discussed in evaluation theory and practice. The political influence of the situation can have major effects on the evaluation design, approach and methods. Politics also has the potential to influence the decisions made from the evaluation findings. The current study focuses on the influence of the political context on stakeholder decision making. Utilizing a simulation scenario, this study compares stakeholder decision making in high and low stakes evaluation contexts. Findings suggest that high stakes political environments are more likely than low stakes environments to lead to reduced reliance on technically appropriate measures and increased dependence on measures better reflect the broader political environment. PMID:26283476

  13. Assessing sulfate reduction and methane cycling in a high salinity pore water system in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, J.W.; Ruppel, C.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Downer, R.; Coffin, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Pore waters extracted from 18 piston cores obtained on and near a salt-cored bathymetric high in Keathley Canyon lease block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico contain elevated concentrations of chloride (up to 838 mM) and have pore water chemical concentration profiles that exhibit extensive departures (concavity) from steady-state (linear) diffusive equilibrium with depth. Minimum ??13C dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) values of -55.9??? to -64.8??? at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) strongly suggest active anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) throughout the study region. However, the nonlinear pore water chemistry-depth profiles make it impossible to determine the vertical extent of active AOM or the potential role of alternate sulfate reduction pathways. Here we utilize the conservative (non-reactive) nature of dissolved chloride to differentiate the effects of biogeochemical activity (e.g., AOM and/or organoclastic sulfate reduction) relative to physical mixing in high salinity Keathley Canyon sediments. In most cases, the DIC and sulfate concentrations in pore waters are consistent with a conservative mixing model that uses chloride concentrations at the seafloor and the SMT as endmembers. Conservative mixing of pore water constituents implies that an undetermined physical process is primarily responsible for the nonlinearity of the pore water-depth profiles. In limited cases where the sulfate and DIC concentrations deviated from conservative mixing between the seafloor and SMT, the ??13C-DIC mixing diagrams suggest that the excess DIC is produced from a 13C-depleted source that could only be accounted for by microbial methane, the dominant form of methane identified during this study. We conclude that AOM is the most prevalent sink for sulfate and that it occurs primarily at the SMT at this Keathley Canyon site.

  14. Interactive effect of high environmental ammonia and nutritional status on ecophysiological performance of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) acclimated to reduced seawater salinities.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; Rasoloniriana, Rindra; Dasan, Antony Franklin; Pipralia, Nitin; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the interactive effect of ammonia toxicity, salinity challenge and nutritional status on the ecophysiological performance of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Fish were progressively acclimated to normal seawater (32ppt), to brackish water (20ppt and 10ppt) and to hyposaline water (2.5ppt). Following acclimation to different salinities for two weeks, fish were exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA, 20mg/L ∼1.18mM representing 50% of 96h LC50 value for ammonia) for 12h, 48h, 84h and 180h, and were either fed (2% body weight) or fasted (unfed for 7 days prior to HEA exposure). Biochemical responses such as ammonia (Jamm) and urea excretion rate, plasma ammonia, urea and lactate, plasma ions (Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+)) and osmolality, muscle water content (MWC) and liver and muscle energy budget (glycogen, lipid and protein), as well as branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and H(+)-ATPase activity, and branchial mRNA expression of NKA and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC1) were investigated in order to understand metabolic and ion- osmoregulatory consequences of the experimental conditions. During HEA, Jamm was inhibited in fasted fish at 10ppt, while fed fish were still able to excrete efficiently. At 2.5ppt, both feeding groups subjected to HEA experienced severe reductions and eventually a reversion in Jamm. Overall, the build-up of plasma ammonia in HEA exposed fed fish was much lower than fasted ones. Unlike fasted fish, fed fish acclimated to lower salinities (10ppt-2.5ppt) could maintain plasma osmolality, [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and MWC during HEA exposure. Thus fed fish were able to sustain ion-osmotic homeostasis which was associated with a more pronounced up-regulation in NKA expression and activity. At 2.5ppt both feeding groups activated H(+)-ATPase. The expression of NKCC1 was down-regulated at lower salinities in both fed and fasted fish, but was upregulated within each salinity after a few days of HEA exposure. Though an

  15. Salinization of aquifers at the regional scale by marine transgression: Time scales and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armandine Les Landes, A.; Davy, P.; Aquilina, L.

    2014-12-01

    Saline fluids with moderate concentrations have been sampled and reported in the Armorican basement at the regional scale (northwestern France). The horizontal and vertical distributions of high chloride concentrations (60-1400mg/L) at the regional scale support the marine origin and provide constraints on the age of these saline fluids. The current distribution of fresh and "saline" groundwater at depth is the result mostly of processes occurring at geological timescales - seawater intrusion processes followed by fresh groundwater flushing -, and only slightly of recent anthropogenic activities. In this study, we focus on seawater intrusion mechanisms in continental aquifers. We argue that one of the most efficient processes in macrotidal environments is the gravity-driven downconing instability below coastal salinized rivers. 2-D numerical experiments have been used to quantify this process according to four main parameter types: (1) the groundwater system permeability, (2) the salinity degree of the river, (3) the river width and slope, and (4) the tidal amplitude. A general expression of the salinity inflow rates have been derived, which has been used to estimate groundwater salinization rates in Brittany, given the geomorphological and environmental characteristics (drainage basin area, river widths and slopes, tidal range, aquifer permeability). We found that downconing below coastal rivers entail very high saline rates, indicating that this process play a major role in the salinization of regional aquifers. This is also likely to be an issue in the context of climate change, where sea-level rise is expected.

  16. Salinity tolerance and mycorrhizal responsiveness of native xeroriparian plants in semi-arid western USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Walz, C.; Shafroth, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    Restoration of salt-affected soils is a global concern. In the western United States, restoration of salinized land, particularly in river valleys, often involves control of Tamarix, an introduced species with high salinity tolerance. Revegetation of hydrologically disconnected floodplains and terraces after Tamarix removal is often difficult because of limited knowledge regarding the salinity tolerance of candidate native species for revegetation. Additionally, Tamarix appears to be non-mycorrhizal. Extended occupation of Tamarix may deplete arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the soil, further decreasing the success of revegetation efforts. To address these issues, we screened 42 species, races, or ecotypes native to southwestern U.S. for salinity tolerance and mycorrhizal responsiveness. As expected, the taxa tested showed a wide range of responses to salinity and mycorrhizal fungi. This variation also occurred between ecotypes or races of the same species, indicating that seed collected from high-salinity reference systems is likely better adapted to harsh conditions than seed originating from less saline environments. All species tested had a positive or neutral response to mycorrhizal inoculation. We found no clear evidence that mycorrhizae increased salinity tolerance, but some species were so dependent on mycorrhizal fungi that they grew poorly at all salinity levels in pasteurized soil. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Practically Saline.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Jonathan; O'Neal, Catherine; Jagneaux, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2), and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak. PMID:26668812

  18. Saline Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Figure 2

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  19. Practically Saline

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jonathan; O’Neal, Catherine; Jagneaux, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2), and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak. PMID:26668812

  20. Ecophysiological constraints of two invasive plant species under a saline gradient: Halophytes versus glycophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, B.; Santos, D.; Marques, J. C.; Caçador, I.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marsh environments are harsh environments where salinity comprises one of the most important species distribution shaping factor, presenting sediment salinities from 0 to 855 mM (0-50 ppt). Invasive species have often a high colonizing potential, due to its high plasticity and adaptation ability. Spartina patens is an invasive species already spread along several Mediterranean countries, like France and Spain. Cyperus longus is typically a freshwater species that has been spreading across the Mediterranean. In order to evaluate the ecophysiological fitness of these species, mesocosmos trials were performed subjecting both species to increasing realistic salinity levels and their photochemical and biochemical feedback was evaluated. Both species presented very different behaviours. S. patens appears to be insensitive to salt stress, mostly due to elevated proline concentrations in its leaves allowing it to maintain its osmotic balance, and thus preventing the damaging of its photochemical mechanisms. C. longus, on the other hand, was highly affected by elevated salt levels mostly due to the lack of osmotic balance driven by an incapacity to counteract the elevated ionic strength of the external medium by osmocompatible solutes. S. patens is physiologically highly adapted to saline environments and thus is capable to colonize all the marsh saline environments, while C. longus appears to be an opportunistic invader colonizing the marsh during periods of lower salinities typical from rainy seasons.

  1. High School Students' Metaphorical Perceptions of Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çimen, Osman

    2014-01-01

    This study examines high school students' metaphorical perceptions in relation to the concept of environment. The study employs the phenomenological research design. The participants were 112 students studying at two different high schools in Ankara. As the data gathering tool, a survey form developed by the researcher was used in the study.…

  2. Silicon carbide semiconductor technology for high temperature and radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on silicon carbide semiconductor technology and its potential for enabling electronic devices to function in high temperature and high radiation environments are presented. Topics covered include silicon carbide; sublimation growth of 6H-SiC boules; SiC chemical vapor deposition reaction system; 6H silicon carbide p-n junction diode; silicon carbide MOSFET; and silicon carbide JFET radiation response.

  3. Indicating the Attitudes of High School Students to Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkan, Recep

    2013-01-01

    Within this work in which it has been aimed to indicate the attitudes of High School Students to environment, indication of the attitudes of high school students in Nigde has been regarded as the problem matter. This analysis has the qualification of survey model and techniques of questionnaire and observation have been used. The investigation has…

  4. Salinity control in a clay soil beneath an orchard irrigated with treated waste water in the presence of a high water table: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David; Laufer, Asher; Bardhan, Gopali; Levy, Guy J.

    2015-12-01

    A citrus orchard planted on a structured, clay soil associated with a high water table, irrigated by drip irrigation system using treated waste water (TWW) and local well water (LWW) was considered here. The scope of the present study was to analyze transport of mixed-ion, interacting salts in a combined vadose zone-groundwater flow system focusing on the following issues: (i) long-term effects of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system, identifying the main factors (e.g., soil salinity, soil sodicity) that control these effects, and (ii) salinity control aiming at improving both crop productivity and groundwater quality. To pursue this two-fold goal, 3-D numerical simulations of field-scale flow and transport were performed for an extended period of time, considering realistic features of the soil, water table, crop, weather and irrigation, and the coupling between the flow and the transport through the dependence of the soil hydraulic functions, K(ψ) and θ(ψ), on soil solution concentration C, and sodium adsorption ratio, SAR. Results of the analyses suggest that in the case studied, the long-term effect of irrigation with TWW on the response of the flow system is attributed to the enhanced salinity of the TWW, and not to the increase in soil sodicity. The latter findings are attributed to: (i) the negative effect of soil salinity on water uptake, and the tradeoff between water uptake and drainage flux, and, concurrently, solute discharge below the root zone; and, (ii) the tradeoff between the effects of C and SAR on K(ψ) and θ(ψ). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that a data-driven protocol for soil salinity control, based on alternating irrigation water quality between TWW and desalinized water, guided by the soil solution salinity at the centroid of the soil volume active in water uptake, may lead to a substantial increase in crop yield, and to a substantial decrease in the salinity load in the groundwater.

  5. Transformations of the chemical compositions of high molecular weight DOM along a salinity transect: Using two dimensional correlation spectroscopy and principal component analysis approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulla, Hussain A. N.; Minor, Elizabeth C.; Dias, Robert F.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2013-10-01

    In a study of chemical transformations of estuarine high-molecular-weight (HMW, >1000 Da) dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected over a period of two years along a transect through the Elizabeth River/Chesapeake Bay system to the coastal Atlantic Ocean off Virginia, USA, δ13C values, N/C ratios, and principal component analysis (PCA) of the solid-state 13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra of HMW-DOM show an abrupt change in both its sources and chemical structural composition occurring around salinity 20. HMW-DOM in the lower salinity region had lighter isotopic values, higher aromatic and lower carbohydrate contents relative to that in the higher salinity region. These changes around a salinity of 20 are possibly due to introduction of a significant amount of new carbon (autotrophic DOM) to the transect. PC-1 loadings plot shows that spatially differing DOM components are similar to previously reported 13C NMR spectra of heteropolysaccharides (HPS) and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM). Applying two dimensional correlation spectroscopy techniques to 1H NMR spectra from the same samples reveals increases in the contribution of N-acetyl amino sugars, 6-deoxy sugars, and sulfated polysaccharides to HPS components along the salinity transect, which suggests a transition from plant derived carbohydrates to marine produced carbohydrates within the HMW-DOM pool. In contrast to what has been suggested previously, our combined results from 13C NMR, 1H NMR, and FTIR indicate that CRAM consists of at least two different classes of compounds (aliphatic polycarboxyl compounds and lignin-like compounds).

  6. Teamwork in high-risk environments analogous to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    1990-01-01

    Mountaineering expeditions combine a number of factors which make them potentially good analogs to the planetary exploration facet of long-duration space missions. A study of mountain climbing teams was conducted in order to evaluate the usefulness of the environment as a space analog and to specifically identify the factors and issues surrounding teamwork and 'successful' team performance in two mountaineering environments. This paper focuses on social/organizational factors, including team size and structure, leadership styles and authority structure which were found in the sample of 22 climb teams (122 individuals). The second major issue discussed is the construction of a valid performance measure in this high-risk environment.

  7. Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

    2010-01-05

    This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

  8. High concentrations of Na+ and Cl– ions in soil solution have simultaneous detrimental effects on growth of faba bean under salinity stress

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Rengasamy, Pichu; McDonald, Glenn K.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that most plants accumulate both sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl–) ions to high concentration in their shoot tissues when grown in saline soils, most research on salt tolerance in annual plants has focused on the toxic effects of Na+ accumulation. There have also been some recent concerns about the ability of hydroponic systems to predict the responses of plants to salinity in soil. To address these two issues, an experiment was conducted to compare the responses to Na+ and to Cl– separately in comparison with the response to NaCl in a soil-based system using two varieties of faba bean (Vicia faba), that differed in salinity tolerance. The variety Nura is a salt-sensitive variety that accumulates Na+ and Cl– to high concentrations while the line 1487/7 is salt tolerant which accumulates lower concentrations of Na+ and Cl–. Soils were prepared which were treated with Na+ or Cl– by using a combination of different Na+ salts and Cl– salts, respectively, or with NaCl. While this method produced Na+-dominant and Cl–-dominant soils, it unavoidably led to changes in the availability of other anions and cations, but tissue analysis of the plants did not indicate any nutritional deficiencies or toxicities other than those targeted by the salt treatments. The growth, water use, ionic composition, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured. Both high Na+ and high Cl– reduced growth of faba bean but plants were more sensitive to Cl– than to Na+. The reductions in growth and photosynthesis were greater under NaCl stress and the effect was mainly additive. An important difference to previous hydroponic studies was that increasing the concentrations of NaCl in the soil increased the concentration of Cl– more than the concentration of Na+. The data showed that salinity caused by high concentrations of NaCl can reduce growth by the accumulation of high concentrations of both Na+ and Cl– simultaneously, but the effects of the two

  9. High concentrations of Na+ and Cl- ions in soil solution have simultaneous detrimental effects on growth of faba bean under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Rengasamy, Pichu; McDonald, Glenn K

    2010-10-01

    Despite the fact that most plants accumulate both sodium (Na(+)) and chloride (Cl(-)) ions to high concentration in their shoot tissues when grown in saline soils, most research on salt tolerance in annual plants has focused on the toxic effects of Na(+) accumulation. There have also been some recent concerns about the ability of hydroponic systems to predict the responses of plants to salinity in soil. To address these two issues, an experiment was conducted to compare the responses to Na(+) and to Cl(-) separately in comparison with the response to NaCl in a soil-based system using two varieties of faba bean (Vicia faba), that differed in salinity tolerance. The variety Nura is a salt-sensitive variety that accumulates Na(+) and Cl(-) to high concentrations while the line 1487/7 is salt tolerant which accumulates lower concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-). Soils were prepared which were treated with Na(+) or Cl(-) by using a combination of different Na(+) salts and Cl(-) salts, respectively, or with NaCl. While this method produced Na(+)-dominant and Cl(-)-dominant soils, it unavoidably led to changes in the availability of other anions and cations, but tissue analysis of the plants did not indicate any nutritional deficiencies or toxicities other than those targeted by the salt treatments. The growth, water use, ionic composition, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured. Both high Na(+) and high Cl(-) reduced growth of faba bean but plants were more sensitive to Cl(-) than to Na(+). The reductions in growth and photosynthesis were greater under NaCl stress and the effect was mainly additive. An important difference to previous hydroponic studies was that increasing the concentrations of NaCl in the soil increased the concentration of Cl(-) more than the concentration of Na(+). The data showed that salinity caused by high concentrations of NaCl can reduce growth by the accumulation of high concentrations of both Na(+) and Cl(-) simultaneously, but

  10. Highly robust thin-film composite pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) hollow fiber membranes with high power densities for renewable salinity-gradient energy generation.

    PubMed

    Han, Gang; Wang, Peng; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-07-16

    The practical application of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) technology for renewable blue energy (i.e., osmotic power generation) from salinity gradient is being hindered by the absence of effective membranes. Compared to flat-sheet membranes, membranes with a hollow fiber configuration are of great interest due to their high packing density and spacer-free module fabrication. However, the development of PRO hollow fiber membranes is still in its infancy. This study aims to open up new perspectives and design strategies to molecularly construct highly robust thin film composite (TFC) PRO hollow fiber membranes with high power densities. The newly developed TFC PRO membranes consist of a selective polyamide skin formed on the lumen side of well-constructed Matrimid hollow fiber supports via interfacial polymerization. For the first time, laboratory PRO power generation tests demonstrate that the newly developed PRO hollow fiber membranes can withstand trans-membrane pressures up to 16 bar and exhibit a peak power density as high as 14 W/m(2) using seawater brine (1.0 M NaCl) as the draw solution and deionized water as the feed. We believe that the developed TFC PRO hollow fiber membranes have great potential for osmotic power harvesting. PMID:23772898

  11. Alloy performance in high temperature oil refining environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sorell, G.; Humphries, M.J.; McLaughlin, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The performance of steels and alloys in high temperature petroleum refining applications is strongly influenced by detrimental interactions with aggressive process environments. These are encountered in conventional refining processes and especially in processing schemes for fuels conversion and upgrading. Metal-environment interactions can shorten equipment life and cause impairment of mechanical properties, metallurgical stability and weldability. Corrosion and other high temperature attack modes discussed are sulfidation, hydrogen attack, carburization, and metal dusting. Sulfidation is characterized by bulky scales that are generally ineffective corrosion barriers. Metal loss is often accompanied by sub-surface sulfide penetration. Hydrogen attack and carburization proceed without metal loss and are detectable only by metallographic examination. In advanced stages, these deterioration modes cause severe impairment of mechanical properties. Harmful metal-environment interactions are characterized and illustrated with data drawn from test exposures and plant experience. Alloys employed for high temperature oil refining equipment are identified, including some promising newcomers.

  12. Radiation environment at high-mountains stations and onboard spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Spurny, Frantisek; Ploc, Ondrej; Jadrmickova, Iva

    2008-08-07

    Radiation environment has been studied at high-mountain observatories and onboard spacecraft. The most important contribution to this environment at high-mountain observatories represents cosmic radiation component. We have been studied this environment in two high-mountain observatories: one situated on the top of Lomnicky Stit, High Tatras, Slovakia, and another one close to the top of Moussala, Rila, Bulgaria (Basic Environment Observatory--BEO). The studies have been performed using: an energy deposition spectrometer with a Si-diode (MDU) developed at BAS, Sofia, permitting to estimate non-neutron as well as neutron component of the radiation field; other active equipment designated to measure natural radiation background, and thermoluminescent detectors as passive dosimeters. Basic dosimetry characteristics of these fields are presented, analyzed, and discussed; they are also compared with the estimation of cosmic radiation component as published in the Report of UNSCEAR 2000. Measuring instruments mentioned above, together with an LET spectrometer based on chemically etched track detectors have been also used to characterize radiation environment onboard spacecraft, particularly International Space Station. They have been exposed on the surface and/or inside a phantom. Some of results obtained are presented, and discussed.

  13. Diffuser/ejector system for a very high vacuum environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, K. E.; Wojciechowski, C. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Turbo jet engines are used to furnish the necessary high temperature, high volume, medium pressure gas to provide a high vacuum test environment at comparatively low cost for space engines at sea level. Moreover, the invention provides a unique way by use of the variable area ratio ejectors with a pair of meshing cones are used. The outer cone is arranged to translate fore and aft, and the inner cone is interchangeable with other cones having varying angles of taper.

  14. Characterization of CCTα and evaluating its expression in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain when challenged by low temperatures alone and in combination with high and low salinity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kun; Gong, Jie; Huang, Chencui; Huang, Huiyang; Ye, Haihui; Wang, Guizhong; Zeng, Chaoshu

    2015-09-01

    demonstrated that at both 10 and 15 °C, the expression of SpCCTα under the high salinity of 35 was significantly lower than that at low salinity of 10, implying that the damages caused by low temperatures with high salinity were less than that under low salinity. PMID:26122201

  15. A Compact L-band Radiometer for High Resolution sUAS-based Imaging of Soil Moisture and Surface Salinity Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Stachura, M.; Dai, E.; Elston, J.; McIntyre, E.; Leuski, V.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the long electrical wavelengths required along with practical aperture size limitations the scaling of passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture and salinity from spaceborne low-resolution (~10-100 km) applications to high resolution (~10-1000 m) applications requires use of low flying aerial vehicles. This presentation summarizes the status of a project to develop a commercial small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) hosting a microwave radiometer for mapping of soil moisture in precision agriculture and sea surface salinity studies. The project is based on the Tempest electric-powered UAS and a compact L-band (1400-1427 MHz) radiometer developed specifically for extremely small and lightweight aerial platforms or man-portable, tractor, or tower-based applications. Notable in this combination are a highly integrated sUAS/radiometer antenna design and use of both the upwelling emitted signal from the surface and downwelling cold space signal for precise calibration using a unique lobe-differencing correlating radiometer architecture. The system achieves a spatial resolution comparable to the altitude of the UAS above the surface while referencing upwelling measurements to the constant and well-known background temperature of cold space. The radiometer has been tested using analog correlation detection, although future builds will include infrared, near-infrared, and visible (red) sensors for surface temperature and vegetation biomass correction and digital sampling for radio frequency interference mitigation. This NASA-sponsored project is being developed for commercial application in cropland water management (for example, high-value shallow root-zone crops), landslide risk assessment, NASA SMAP satellite validation, and NASA Aquarius salinity stratification studies. The system will ultimately be capable of observing salinity events caused by coastal glacier and estuary fresh water outflow plumes and open ocean rainfall events.

  16. High Temperature Electronics for Intelligent Harsh Environment Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of intelligent instrumentation systems is of high interest in both public and private sectors. In order to obtain this ideal in extreme environments (i.e., high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation), both sensors and electronics must be developed concurrently in order that the entire system will survive for extended periods of time. The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. The advantages of SiC over conventional materials include its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical properties in harsh environments, and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  17. Sensitivity of coastal polynyas and high-salinity shelf water production in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, to the atmospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiot, Pierre; Jourdain, Nicolas C.; Barnier, Bernard; Gallée, Hubert; Molines, Jean Marc; Le Sommer, Julien; Penduff, Thierry

    2012-05-01

    Coastal polynyas around Antarctica are the place of intense air-sea exchanges which eventually lead to the formation of high-salinity shelf waters (HSSW) over continental shelves. Here, the influence of atmospheric forcing on coastal polynyas in the Ross Sea is studied by contrasting the response of a regional ocean/sea-ice circulation model to two different atmospheric forcing sets. A first forcing (DFS3) is based on ERA40 atmospheric surface variables and satellite products. A second forcing (MAR) is produced on the basis of ERA40 with a dynamical downscaling procedure. As compared to DFS3, MAR forcing is shown to improve substantially the representation of small-scale patterns of coastal winds with stronger katabatic winds along the coast. The response of the ocean/sea-ice model to the two forcing sets shows that the MAR forcing improves substantially the geographical distribution of polynyas in the Ross Sea. With the MAR forcing, the polynya season is also shown to last longer with a greater ice-production rate. As a consequence, a greater flow of dense water out of the polynyas is found with the MAR forcing and the properties of HSSW are notably improved as compared to the DFS3 forcing. The factors contributing to the activity of Terra Nova Bay and Ross Ice Shelf polynyas in the model are studied in detail. The general picture that emerges from our simulations is that the properties of HSSW are mostly set by brine rejection when the polynya season resume. We found that coastal polynyas in the Ross Sea export about 0.4 Sv of HSSW which then flows along three separate channels over the Ross Shelf. A 6-month time lag is observed between the peak of activity of polynyas and the maximum transport across the sills in the channels with a maximum transport of about 1 Sv in February. This lag corresponds to the time it takes to the newly formed HSSW to spread from the polynya to the sills (at a speed of nearly 2 cm s-1).

  18. Changes in the salinity tolerance of sweet pepper plants as affected by nitrogen form and high CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Piñero, María C; Pérez-Jiménez, Margarita; López-Marín, Josefa; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    The assimilation and availability of nitrogen in its different forms can significantly affect the response of primary productivity under the current atmospheric alteration and soil degradation. An elevated CO2 concentration (e[CO2]) triggers changes in the efficiency and efficacy of photosynthetic processes, water use and product yield, the plant response to stress being altered with respect to ambient CO2 conditions (a[CO2]). Additionally, NH4(+) has been related to improved plant responses to stress, considering both energy efficiency in N-assimilation and the overcoming of the inhibition of photorespiration at e[CO2]. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the response of sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) receiving an additional supply of NH4(+) (90/10 NO3(-)/NH4(+)) to salinity stress (60mM NaCl) under a[CO2] (400μmolmol(-1)) or e[CO2] (800μmolmol(-1)). Salt-stressed plants grown at e[CO2] showed DW accumulation similar to that of the non-stressed plants at a[CO2]. The supply of NH4(+) reduced growth at e[CO2] when salinity was imposed. Moreover, NH4(+) differentially affected the stomatal conductance and water use efficiency and the leaf Cl(-), K(+), and Na(+) concentrations, but the extent of the effects was influenced by the [CO2]. An antioxidant-related response was prompted by salinity, the total phenolics and proline concentrations being reduced by NH4(+) at e[CO2]. Our results show that the effect of NH4(+) on plant salinity tolerance should be globally re-evaluated as e[CO2] can significantly alter the response, when compared with previous studies at a[CO2]. PMID:27317970

  19. Physiological Responses to Salinity Vary with Proximity to the Ocean in a Coastal Amphibian.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Gareth R; Brodie, Edmund D; Neuman-Lee, Lorin A; Mohammadi, Shabnam; Brusch, George A; Hopkins, Zoë M; French, Susannah S

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater organisms are increasingly exposed to elevated salinity in their habitats, presenting physiological challenges to homeostasis. Amphibians are particularly vulnerable to osmotic stress and yet are often subject to high salinity in a variety of inland and coastal environments around the world. Here, we examine the physiological responses to elevated salinity of rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa) inhabiting a coastal stream on the Pacific coast of North America and compare the physiological responses to salinity stress of newts living in close proximity to the ocean with those of newts living farther upstream. Although elevated salinity significantly affected the osmotic (body weight, plasma osmolality), stress (corticosterone), and immune (bactericidal ability) responses of newts, animals found closer to the ocean were generally less reactive to salt stress than those found farther upstream. Our results provide possible evidence for some physiological tolerance in this species to elevated salinity in coastal environments. As freshwater environments become increasingly saline and more stressful, understanding the physiological tolerances of vulnerable groups such as amphibians will become increasingly important to our understanding of their abilities to respond, to adapt, and, ultimately, to survive. PMID:27327182

  20. Specialty fiber optic applications for harsh and high radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risch, Brian G.

    2015-05-01

    Since the first commercial introduction in the 1980s, optical fiber technology has undergone an almost exponential growth. Currently over 2 billion fiber kilometers are deployed globally with 2014 global optical fiber production exceeding 300 million fiber kilometers. 1 Along with the staggering growth in optical fiber production and deployment, an increase in optical fiber technologies and applications has also followed. Although the main use of optical fibers by far has been for traditional data transmission and communications, numerous new applications are introduced each year. Initially the practical application of optical fibers was limited by cost and sensitivity of the optical fibers to stress, radiation, and other environmental factors. Tremendous advances have taken place in optical fiber design and materials allowing optical fibers to be deployed in increasingly harsh environments with exposure to increased mechanical and environmental stresses while maintaining high reliability. With the increased reliability, lower cost, and greatly expanded range of optical fiber types now available, new optical fiber deployments in harsh and high radiation environments is seeing a tremendous increase for data, communications, and sensing applications. An overview of key optical fiber applications in data, communications, and sensing for harsh environments in industrial, energy exploration, energy generation, energy transmission, and high radiation applications will be presented. Specific recent advances in new radiation resistant optical fiber types, other specialty optical fibers, optical fiber coatings, and optical fiber cable materials will be discussed to illustrate long term reliability for deployment of optical fibers in harsh and high radiation environments.

  1. Student Perceptions of High-Security School Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracy, Nicole L.

    2011-01-01

    Public schools have transformed significantly over the past several decades in response to concerns about rising school violence. Today, most public schools are high-security environments employing police officers, security cameras, and metal detectors, as well as strict discipline policies to keep students in line and maintain safe campuses.…

  2. Advocacy for Child Wellness in High-Poverty Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Child wellness needs to be understood holistically so that children and youth from high-poverty environments can succeed in schooling and life. Teachers who foster advocacy in themselves are well equipped to teach students to take ownership of their own well-being. Such advocacy can enrich the classroom curriculum and mitigate the negative effects…

  3. Nonflammable coating compositions. [for use in high oxygen environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupnick, A. C.; Key, C. F.; Harwell, R. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Nonflammable coating compositions are described for use in high-oxygen environments which include an aqueous suspension of synthetic mica, an alkali metal silicate gelant and a waterbase latex resin emulsion. Inorganic white and/or color pigments and additives such as glass microballoons are employed to provide a wide range of colors and optical properties.

  4. FLASH requirements for the high intensity radiated field electromagnetic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    The worldwide proliferation of high intensity emitting sources and the more electric aircraft increase the intensity of the Electromagnetic Environment (EME) in which aircraft must operate. A FLASH program HIRF (High Intensity Radiated Field) EME requirement is derived to cover both commercial and military fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This requirement is derived from the radiated susceptibility requirement documents of both the FAA and U.S. military. Specific test data and analysis will show that we can meet this requirement.

  5. Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Strontium isotopic-paleontological method as a high-resolution paleosalinity tool for lagoonal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Eduard G.; Stanley, Daniel Jean; Patterson, R. Timothy

    1998-11-01

    A combined strontium isotopic (87Sr/86Sr) and paleontological method is newly applied to a modern lagoon in Egypt's Nile River delta to test its applicability as a paleosalinity proxy. Analyses of 22 surficial samples collected throughout the lagoon include 81 Sr isotopic analyses of mollusks, foraminifera, ostracods, barnacles, bryozoans, serpulid worm tubes, pore water, and gypsum crystals. Two salinity groups are distinguished in each sample: a lower salinity group (˜1 ppt) mixed with a higher salinity group (˜3 10 ppt) that, respectively, are interpreted as the modern biocoenosis and an older relict fauna. The relict fauna denotes higher salinity conditions in the lagoon prior to closure of the Aswan High Dam (1964), and the modern fauna records freshening of the lagoon. Recent decreased salinity is a response to regulated Nile River flow and increased discharge into Manzala of fresh water via canals and drains. Quantification of this short-term salinity change holds promise for study of modern lagoons in other world settings, and may provide paleoclimatic information for older lagoon sequences in the Nile River delta and the geologic record.

  7. Diffuser-ejector system for a very high vacuum environment

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, K.E.

    1984-06-19

    A system for testing space engines at sea level under a very low pressure environment. The system includes a space simulation chamber connected to a diffuser, which has two variable area ratio ejectors connected to it in tandem. Each of the ejectors is driven by a jet engine, preferably a turbo jet. The system is capable of providing a low pressure environment of about three or four millimeters of mercury for testing of engines mounted in the space simulation chamber. The system also may be used for other purposes requiring very high vacuum, such as evaporation and dehydration of food products or drugs.

  8. Effects of high combustion chamber pressure on rocket noise environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The acoustical environment for a high combustion chamber pressure engine was examined in detail, using both conventional and advanced theoretical analysis. The influence of elevated chamber pressure on the rocket noise environment was established, based on increase in exit velocity and flame temperature, and changes in basic engine dimensions. Compared to large rocket engines, the overall sound power level is found to be 1.5 dB higher, if the thrust is the same. The peak Strouhal number shifted about one octave lower to a value near 0.01. Data on apparent sound source location and directivity patterns are also presented.

  9. Involvement of the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) in the physiological compensation of the freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus to low temperature and high salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Prymaczok, Natalia C; Pasqualino, Valeria M; Viau, Verónica E; Rodríguez, Enrique M; Medesani, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    This study was aimed at determining the role of the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) in the physiological compensation to both saline and thermal stress, in the freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. By determining the expression of the CHH gene in the eyestalk of juvenile crayfish, we found that maximal induction of CHH was induced at high salinity (10 g/L) and low temperature (20 °C). In order to investigate the role of CHH in the physiological compensation to such stressful conditions, recombinant CHH was supplied to stressed animals. CHH-injected crayfish showed increased hemolymphatic levels of glucose, in accordance with a significant utilization of glycogen reserves from the hepatopancreas. Furthermore, CHH administration allowed stressed animals to regulate hemolymphatic sodium and potassium at more constant levels than controls. Taken together, these results suggest a relevant role of CHH in increasing the energy available intended for processes involved in the physiological compensation of C. quadricarinatus to both saline and thermal stress. PMID:26660884

  10. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues. PMID:26025417

  11. Molecular analysis of enrichment cultures of ammonia oxidizers from the Salar de Huasco, a high altitude saline wetland in northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Dorador, Cristina; Busekow, Annika; Vila, Irma; Imhoff, Johannes F; Witzel, Karl-Paul

    2008-05-01

    We analyzed enrichment cultures of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) collected from different areas of Salar de Huasco, a high altitude, saline, pH-neutral water body in the Chilean Altiplano. Samples were inoculated into mineral media with 10 mM NH4+ at five different salt concentrations (10, 200, 400, 800 and 1,400 mM NaCl). Low diversity (up to three phylotypes per enrichment) of beta-AOB was detected using 16S rDNA and amoA clone libraries. Growth of beta-AOB was only recorded in a few enrichment cultures and varied according to site or media salinity. In total, five 16S rDNA and amoA phylotypes were found which were related to Nitrosomonas europaea/Nitrosococcus mobilis, N. marina and N. communis clusters. Phylotype 1-16S was 97% similar with N. halophila, previously isolated from Mongolian soda lakes, and phylotypes from amoA sequences were similar with yet uncultured beta-AOB from different biofilms. Sequences related to N. halophila were frequently found at all salinities. Neither gamma-AOB nor ammonia-oxidizing Archaea were recorded in these enrichment cultures. PMID:18305895

  12. Soil salinity detection from satellite image analysis: an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Md Manjur; Islam, Md Tazmul; Jamil, Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This paper attempts to detect soil salinity from satellite image analysis using remote sensing and geographic information system. Salinity intrusion is a common problem for the coastal regions of the world. Traditional salinity detection techniques by field survey and sampling are time-consuming and expensive. Remote sensing and geographic information system offer economic and efficient salinity detection, monitoring, and mapping. To predict soil salinity, an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data was used to develop a multiple regression equation. The correlations between different indices and field data of soil salinity were calculated to find out the highly correlated indices. The best regression model was selected considering the high R (2) value, low P value, and low Akaike's Information Criterion. About 20% variation was observed between the field data and predicted EC from the satellite image analysis. The precision of this salinity detection technique depends on the accuracy and uniform distribution of field data. PMID:26815557

  13. High-precision Photogrammetric Surface Figure Measurements under Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Z.; Qian, Y.; Fan, S. H.; Liu, C. R.; Wang, H. R.; Zuo, Y. X.; Cheng, J. Q.; Yang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Limited by the working temperature of the measurement equipments, most of the high-precision surface figure measurement techniques cannot be applied under a cryogenic environment. This paper reports the first attempt to measure the surface figure of a high-precision terahertz reflector panel under low temperatures based on photogrammetry. The measurement employs a high resolution industrial camera sitting on an automatic experimental platform which enables photos been taken in an automatic fashion inside a climate chamber. A repeatable accuracy of 2.1 μm rms is achieved under the cryogenic environment. Furthermore, surface figure measured by a three-coordinate measuring machine under room temperature is used to calibrate the thickness variation of the paper targets. By this technique, the surface figure of an aluminum prototype panel of the 5 meter Dome A Terahertz Telescope (DATE5) is measured from room temperature down to -55°C.

  14. The 2GCHAS: A high productivity software development environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, Larry

    1986-01-01

    To the user, the most visible feature of the Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) is its very powerful user interface. To the programmer, TAE's user interface, proc concept, standardized interface definitions, and hierarchy search provide a set of tools for rapidly prototyping or developing production software. The 2GCHAS (Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System) project has extended and enhanced these mechanisms, creating a powerful and high productivity programming environment where the 2GCHAS development environment is 2GCHAS itself and where a sustained rate for certified, documented, and tested software above 30 delivered source instructions per programmer day has been achieved. The 2GCHAS environment is not limited to helicopter analysis, but is applicable to other disciplines where software development is important.

  15. Correlation between subsurface high-salinity water in the northern South China Sea and the North Equatorial Current-Kuroshio circulation system from HYCOM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Du, Y.; Zhuang, W.; Qi, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The North Pacific Tropical Water (NPTW), characterized by subsurface high salinity, is observed in the South China Sea (SCS) and is often used as an indicator of the water intrusion from the northwestern Pacific into the SCS. Based on the assimilation product from a global high-resolution Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) from 2008 through 2013, this study investigates the seasonal variability of subsurface high-salinity water (SHSW) in the northern SCS and its relationship with the North Equatorial Current-Kuroshio circulation system. Results show that the obvious seasonal variability of the SHSW appears at about 100-200 m in depth. It extends as far west as southeast of Hainan, reaching its volume maximum (minimum) in January (May). The seasonal variance contribution (seasonal variance accounting for the entire variance) is 0.38 in the period we considered, albeit with significant annual variance in other years. Further analysis shows that the changes in high-salinity water volume are highly correlated with the shift in the North Equatorial Current bifurcation latitude (NECBL), which reaches its northernmost point in December and its southernmost point in May. Due to the large-scale wind changes in the Pacific, the Luzon Strait transport (LST) weakens (strengthens) when the NECBL shifts to the south (north) during summer (winter), which results in the reduced (enhanced) SHSW intrusion from the northwestern Pacific into the northern SCS. It is also found that, on a seasonal timescale, the Kuroshio transport (KT) does not vary in phase with NECBL, LST and SHSW, indicating that the KT changes are probably not the governing factor for the seasonal variability of SHSW in the northern SCS.

  16. Toward the high-environment society from the high-information society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiso, Hideo

    The society in the 21st century may be cal[ed 'high-environmental society', in which information science and technology will play an essential role in creating new environments. 'Environments' in this context mean the whole outside world which is perceived by a human being, a living body, or a machine (these are 'systems' in a broad sense). The infrastructures needed for creation of the high-environmental society and plans for entering this society are discussed. In the high-environmental society, information environments and artificial environments will be greatly improved besides natural, living, and organizational environments. We should build the technological, social, and educational infrastructures for this society so that we can live a good life together with all environments.

  17. Effects of partial deforestation on hydrology and salinity in high salt storage landscapes. I. Extensive block clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht, J. K.; Schofield, N. J.

    1991-12-01

    A small (344ha) experimental catchment in southwest Western Australia was partially deforested (western 53% of the catchment) in 1976 to study the effects of agricultural development on water quantity and quality. The impact on the groundwater system in the cleared area was dramatic. Initial rates of rise were only 0.11 m year -1 but this increased after 10 years to average 2.3 m year -1. Groundwater rises of 15 m in the valley and 20-25 m on the lower sideslopes were observed over 13 years. A small seep (groundwater discharge area) appeared for the first time in 1988 and by 1989 it covered an area of 1 ha. Streamflow initially increased by 30 mm year -1 (4.0% rainfall) compared with a native forest average streamflow of 8 mm year -1 (1.0% rainfall). However, since the seep area developed, the increase in streamflow has been 50 mm year -1 (6.6% rainfall). Stream salinity was low prior to clearing (30 mgl -1Cl -) and remained low for 9 years after clearing. However, since 1987, stream salinity increased dramatically as the ground water approached the ground surface, and by 1989 reached an annual average of 290 mgl -1Cl -. The daily maximum in 1989 was 2200 mgl -1Cl - compared with 92 mgl -Cl - from 1976 to 1986. The catchment changed from net salt accumulation pre-clearing to net salt export after 1987. Thirteen years after clearing, the groundwater level, stream yield, stream salt load and stream salinity had not reached equilibrium but were all still increasing.

  18. High-Rise Buildings versus Outdoor Thermal Environment in Chongqing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Chen, Jin-hua; Tang, Ying; Feng, Yuan; Wang, Jin-sha

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the over quick urbanization since Chongqing, one of the biggest cities in China, has been a municipality directly under the Central Government in 1997, excessive development and exceeding increase of high-rise buildings because of its special geographical position which finally leads to the worsening of the urban outdoor thermal environment. Then, this paper makes a bright balance to the field measurement and simulated results of the wind speed field, temperature field of one multifunctional high-rise building in Chongqing university located in the city center, and the contrasted results validate the correctness of CFD in the outdoor thermal environmental simulation, expose the disadvantages of high-rise buildings on the aspects of blocking the wind field, decreasing wind speed which results in accumulation of the air-conditioning heat revolving around and periscian region where sunshine can not rip into. Finally, in order to improve the urban outdoor thermal environment near the high-rise buildings especially for the angle of natural ventilation, this paper simulates the wind environment in different architectural compositions and architectural layouts by CFD, and the simulated results show that freestyle and tower buildings which can guarantee the wind speed and take the air-conditioning heat away are much suitable and reasonable for the special Chongqing geography. These conclusions can also be used as a reference in other mountain cities, especially for the one with a great number of populations.

  19. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  20. NASA's New High Intensity Solar Environment Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    Across the world, new spaceflight missions are being designed and executed that will place spacecraft and instruments into challenging environments throughout the solar system. To aid in the successful completion of these new missions, NASA has developed a new flexible space environment test platform. The High Intensity Solar Environment Test (HISET) capability located at NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center provides scientists and engineers with the means to test spacecraft materials and systems in a wide range of solar wind and solar photon environments. Featuring a solar simulator capable of delivering approximately 1 MW/m2 of broad spectrum radiation at maximum power, HISET provides a means to test systems or components that could explore the solar corona. The solar simulator consists of three high-power Xenon arc lamps that can be operated independently over a range of power to meet test requirements; i.e., the lamp power can be greatly reduced to simulate the solar intensity at several AU. Integral to the HISET capability are charged particle sources that can provide a solar wind (electron and proton) environment. Used individually or in combination, the charged particle sources can provide fluxes ranging from a few nA/cm2 to 100s of nA/cm2 over an energy range of 50 eV to 100 keV for electrons and 100 eV to 30 keV for protons. Anchored by a high vacuum facility equipped with a liquid nitrogen cold shroud for radiative cooling scenarios, HISET is able to accommodate samples as large as 1 meter in diameter. In this poster, details of the HISET capability will be presented, including the wide ]ranging configurability of the system.

  1. Proteomics, metabolomics, and ionomics perspectives of salinity tolerance in halophytes.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Asha; Das, Paromita; Parida, Asish Kumar; Agarwal, Pradeep K

    2015-01-01

    Halophytes are plants which naturally survive in saline environment. They account for ∼1% of the total flora of the world. They include both dicots and monocots and are distributed mainly in arid, semi-arid inlands and saline wet lands along the tropical and sub-tropical coasts. Salinity tolerance in halophytes depends on a set of ecological and physiological characteristics that allow them to grow and flourish in high saline conditions. The ability of halophytes to tolerate high salt is determined by the effective coordination between various physiological processes, metabolic pathways and protein or gene networks responsible for delivering salinity tolerance. The salinity responsive proteins belong to diverse functional classes such as photosynthesis, redox homeostasis; stress/defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction and membrane transport. The important metabolites which are involved in salt tolerance of halophytes are proline and proline analog (4-hydroxy-N-methyl proline), glycine betaine, pinitol, myo-inositol, mannitol, sorbitol, O-methylmucoinositol, and polyamines. In halophytes, the synthesis of specific proteins and osmotically active metabolites control ion and water flux and support scavenging of oxygen radicals under salt stress condition. The present review summarizes the salt tolerance mechanisms of halophytes by elucidating the recent studies that have focused on proteomic, metabolomic, and ionomic aspects of various halophytes in response to salinity. By integrating the information from halophytes and its comparison with glycophytes could give an overview of salt tolerance mechanisms in halophytes, thus laying down the pavement for development of salt tolerant crop plants through genetic modification and effective breeding strategies. PMID:26284080

  2. Proteomics, metabolomics, and ionomics perspectives of salinity tolerance in halophytes

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Asha; Das, Paromita; Parida, Asish Kumar; Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2015-01-01

    Halophytes are plants which naturally survive in saline environment. They account for ∼1% of the total flora of the world. They include both dicots and monocots and are distributed mainly in arid, semi-arid inlands and saline wet lands along the tropical and sub-tropical coasts. Salinity tolerance in halophytes depends on a set of ecological and physiological characteristics that allow them to grow and flourish in high saline conditions. The ability of halophytes to tolerate high salt is determined by the effective coordination between various physiological processes, metabolic pathways and protein or gene networks responsible for delivering salinity tolerance. The salinity responsive proteins belong to diverse functional classes such as photosynthesis, redox homeostasis; stress/defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction and membrane transport. The important metabolites which are involved in salt tolerance of halophytes are proline and proline analog (4-hydroxy-N-methyl proline), glycine betaine, pinitol, myo-inositol, mannitol, sorbitol, O-methylmucoinositol, and polyamines. In halophytes, the synthesis of specific proteins and osmotically active metabolites control ion and water flux and support scavenging of oxygen radicals under salt stress condition. The present review summarizes the salt tolerance mechanisms of halophytes by elucidating the recent studies that have focused on proteomic, metabolomic, and ionomic aspects of various halophytes in response to salinity. By integrating the information from halophytes and its comparison with glycophytes could give an overview of salt tolerance mechanisms in halophytes, thus laying down the pavement for development of salt tolerant crop plants through genetic modification and effective breeding strategies. PMID:26284080

  3. Diversity and food web structure of nematode communities under high soil salinity and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Salamún, Peter; Kucanová, Eva; Brázová, Tímea; Miklisová, Dana; Renčo, Marek; Hanzelová, Vladimíra

    2014-10-01

    A long-term and intensive magnesium (Mg) ore processing in Slovenské Magnezitové Závody a.s. in Jelšava has resulted in a high Mg content and alkaline pH of the soil environment, noticeable mainly in the close vicinity of the smelter. Nematode communities strongly reacted to the contamination mostly by a decrease in abundance of the sensitive groups. Nematodes from c-p 1 group and bacterivores, tolerant to pollution played a significant role in establishing the dominance at all sites. With increasing distance from the pollution source, the nematode communities were more structured and complex, with an increase in proportion of sensitive c-p 4 and 5 nematodes, composed mainly of carnivores and omnivores. Various ecological indices (e.g. MI2-5, SI, H') indicated similar improvement of farther soil ecosystems. PMID:24996531

  4. Enhanced salinities, as a proxy of seawater desalination discharges, impact coastal microbial communities of the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Belkin, Natalia; Rahav, Eyal; Elifantz, Hila; Kress, Nurit; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2015-10-01

    Seawater desalination plants increase local coastal salinities by discharging concentrated brine back to the sea with ∼ 50% higher than ambient salinities. The impacts of high salinities on microbial coastal populations of the eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) were examined in two mesocosm experiments; first, during the mixed-spring and second, during the stratified-summer periods with average salinity of ∼ 39. Ambient salinities were increased by 5% and 15%. Higher salinity (15%) mesocosms induced rapid (within 2 h) declines in both primary productivity (PP) and algal biomass parallel to an increase in bacterial productivity. Subsequently, for the duration of the experiments (11-12 days), both Chlorophyll a and PP rates increased (2 to 5 and 1.5 to 2.5-fold, respectively) relative to unamended controls. The initial assemblages of the ambient microbial populations and intensity of salinity enrichments influenced the community responses. During the mixed-spring experiment, the composition of prokaryotic and eukaryotic populations shifted only slightly, suggesting high functional plasticity of the initial populations. While during the stratified-summer experiment, high salinity changed the composition and reduced the biodiversity of the microbial communities. In an ultra-oligotrophic environment such as the EMS, salinity induced declines in microbial diversity may provide a tipping point destabilizing the local aquatic food web. PMID:26178627

  5. Deciphering the salinity adaptation mechanism in Penicilliopsis clavariiformis AP, a rare salt tolerant fungus from mangrove.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Prem Lal; Rai, Anuradha; Singh, Ruchi; Chakdar, Hillol; Kumar, Sudheer; Srivastava, Alok Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Penicilliopsis clavariiformis AP, a rare salt tolerant fungus reported for the first time from India was identified through polyphasic taxonomy. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the fungus has unique features such as biverticillate penicilli bearing masses of oval to ellipsoidal conidia. The fungus has been characterized for salt tolerance and to understand the relevance of central carbon metabolism in salt stress adaptation. It showed optimal growth at 24 °C and able to tolerate up to 10% (w/v) NaCl. To understand the mechanism of adaptation to high salinity, activities of the key enzymes regulating glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle were investigated under normal (0% NaCl) and saline stress environment (10% NaCl). The results revealed a re-routing of carbon metabolism away from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), served as a cellular stress-resistance mechanism in fungi under saline environment. The detection and significant expression of fungus genes (Hsp98, Hsp60, HTB, and RHO) under saline stress suggest that these halotolerance conferring genes from the fungus could have a role in fungus protection and adaptation under saline environment. Overall, the present findings indicate that the rearrangement of the metabolic fluxes distribution and stress related genes play an important role in cell survival and adaptation under saline environment. PMID:26663001

  6. High Temperature Wireless Communication And Electronics For Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Beheim, G. M.; Ponchak, G. E.; Chen, L.-Y

    2007-01-01

    In order for future aerospace propulsion systems to meet the increasing requirements for decreased maintenance, improved capability, and increased safety, the inclusion of intelligence into the propulsion system design and operation becomes necessary. These propulsion systems will have to incorporate technology that will monitor propulsion component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This implies the development of sensors, actuators, and electronics, with associated packaging, that will be able to operate under the harsh environments present in an engine. However, given the harsh environments inherent in propulsion systems, the development of engine-compatible electronics and sensors is not straightforward. The ability of a sensor system to operate in a given environment often depends as much on the technologies supporting the sensor element as the element itself. If the supporting technology cannot handle the application, then no matter how good the sensor is itself, the sensor system will fail. An example is high temperature environments where supporting technologies are often not capable of operation in engine conditions. Further, for every sensor going into an engine environment, i.e., for every new piece of hardware that improves the in-situ intelligence of the components, communication wires almost always must follow. The communication wires may be within or between parts, or from the engine to the controller. As more hardware is added, more wires, weight, complexity, and potential for unreliability is also introduced. Thus, wireless communication combined with in-situ processing of data would significantly improve the ability to include sensors into high temperature systems and thus lead toward more intelligent engine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presently leading the development of electronics, communication systems, and sensors capable of prolonged stable

  7. Zinc Excess Triggered Polyamines Accumulation in Lettuce Root Metabolome, As Compared to Osmotic Stress under High Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Rouphael, Youssef; Colla, Giuseppe; Bernardo, Letizia; Kane, David; Trevisan, Marco; Lucini, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity and metal contaminations are the major environmental stresses that adversely affect crop productivity worldwide. Crop responses and tolerance to abiotic stress are complex processes for which “-omic” approaches such as metabolomics is giving us a newest view of biological systems. The aim of the current research was to assess metabolic changes in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), by specifically probing the root metabolome of plants exposed to elevated isomolar concentrations of NaCl and ZnSO4. Most of the metabolites that were differentially accumulated in roots were identified for stress conditions, however the response was more intense in plants exposed to NaCl. Compounds identified in either NaCl or ZnSO4 conditions were: carbohydrates, phenolics, hormones, glucosinolates, and lipids. Our findings suggest that osmotic stress and the consequent redox imbalance play a major role in determining lettuce root metabolic response. In addition, it was identified that polyamines and polyamine conjugates were triggered as a specific response to ZnSO4. These findings help improve understanding of how plants cope with abiotic stresses. This information can be used to assist decision-making in breeding programs for improving crop tolerance to salinity and heavy metal contaminations. PMID:27375675

  8. Zinc Excess Triggered Polyamines Accumulation in Lettuce Root Metabolome, As Compared to Osmotic Stress under High Salinity.

    PubMed

    Rouphael, Youssef; Colla, Giuseppe; Bernardo, Letizia; Kane, David; Trevisan, Marco; Lucini, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity and metal contaminations are the major environmental stresses that adversely affect crop productivity worldwide. Crop responses and tolerance to abiotic stress are complex processes for which "-omic" approaches such as metabolomics is giving us a newest view of biological systems. The aim of the current research was to assess metabolic changes in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), by specifically probing the root metabolome of plants exposed to elevated isomolar concentrations of NaCl and ZnSO4. Most of the metabolites that were differentially accumulated in roots were identified for stress conditions, however the response was more intense in plants exposed to NaCl. Compounds identified in either NaCl or ZnSO4 conditions were: carbohydrates, phenolics, hormones, glucosinolates, and lipids. Our findings suggest that osmotic stress and the consequent redox imbalance play a major role in determining lettuce root metabolic response. In addition, it was identified that polyamines and polyamine conjugates were triggered as a specific response to ZnSO4. These findings help improve understanding of how plants cope with abiotic stresses. This information can be used to assist decision-making in breeding programs for improving crop tolerance to salinity and heavy metal contaminations. PMID:27375675

  9. Climate and Geomorphic Risks in High-Mountain Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, Christian; Kääb, Andreas; Schneider, Jean

    2010-03-01

    Glacier Hazards, Permafrost Hazards, and Glacier Lake Outburst Floods in Mountain Areas: Processes, Assessment, Prevention, Mitigation; Vienna, Austria, 10-13 November 2009; Recent atmospheric warming is profoundly affecting high-mountain environments around the world. Glaciers are thinning and retreating, new and often unstable lakes are forming at glacier margins, other lakes are suddenly draining, and permafrost is degrading. These changes pose serious hazards to people and property in mountain valleys. Several tens of thousands of people were killed by landslides, floods, and debris flows from high-mountain regions during the twentieth century, and there is concern that such events will increase as temperatures warm through the 21st century.

  10. Using EPSAT to analyze high power systems in the space environment. [Environment Power System Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuharski, Robert A.; Jongeward, Gary A.; Wilcox, Katherine G.; Rankin, Tom R.; Roche, James C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors review the Environment Power System Analysis Tool (EPSAT) design and demonstrate its capabilities by using it to address some questions that arose in designing the SPEAR III experiment. It is shown that that the rocket body cannot be driven to large positive voltages under the constraints of this experiment. Hence, attempts to measure the effects of a highly positive rocket body in the plasma environment should not be made in this experiment. It is determined that a hollow cathode will need to draw only about 50 mA to ground the rocket body. It is shown that a relatively small amount of gas needs to be released to induce a bulk breakdown near the rocket body, and this gas release should not discharge the sphere. Therefore, the experiment provides an excellent opportunity to study the neutralization of a differential charge.

  11. Nitrogen removal properties in a continuous marine anammox bacteria reactor under rapid and extensive salinity changes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiaoyan; Kawagoshi, Yasunori; Huang, Xiaowu; Hong, Nian; Van Duc, Luong; Yamashita, Yuki; Hama, Takehide

    2016-04-01

    Salinity tolerance is one of the most important factors for the application of bioreactors to high-salinity wastewater. Although marine anammox bacteria (MAB) might be expected to tolerate higher salinities than freshwater anammox bacteria, there is little information on the effects of salinity on MAB activity. This study aimed to reveal the nitrogen removal properties in a continuous MAB reactor under conditions of rapid and extensive salinity changes. The reactor demonstrated stable nitrogen removal performance with a removal efficiency of over 85% under salinity conditions ranging from 0 to 50 g/L NaCl. The reactor performance was also well maintained, even though the salinity was rapidly changed from 30 to 50 g/L and from 30 to 0 g/L. Other evidence suggested that the seawater medium used contained components essential for effective MAB performance. Bacterial community analysis using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) showed that planctomycete UKU-1, the dominant MAB species in the inoculum, was the main contributor to anammox activity under all conditions. The PCR-DGGE using a universal bacterial primer set showed different DNA band patterns between the reactor biomass sample collected under conditions of 75 g/L NaCl and all other conditions (0, 30, 50 and freshwater-medium). All DNA sequences determined were very similar to those of bacterial species from marine environments, anaerobic environments, or wastewater-treatment facilities. PMID:26845464

  12. Influence of salinity and temperature on uptake of perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) by hydroponically grown wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongxia; Qu, Baocheng; Guan, Yue; Jiang, Jingqiu; Chen, Xiuying

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have recently attracted increasing concerns due to their ubiquitous existence, adverse effects and persistence in environment. This study employed four perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) to examine effects of salinity and temperature on the PFAS uptake in wheat, one of the major crops in the North China Plain. Wheat plants were grown in the spiked-PFCA hydroponic culture system at different salinities and temperatures. As expected, salinity and temperature significantly impacted the root uptake and translocation of wheat to four PFCAs, and the concentrations for each of PFCAs in wheat root and shoot increased with increasing salinity and temperature, respectively. PFCA concentrations at high salinity or high temperature were up to thrice those found at low salinity or low temperature. Except for perfluorobutanoic acid, the amount of PFCAs in root was always higher than that in shoot at the ranges of salinity and temperature tested. Additionally salinity and temperature were also capable of influencing the transfer factors (TFs) of four PFCAs, and significant increase was observed in the TFs in response to the increases in salinity and temperature. PMID:27186505

  13. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for High Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Laster, Kimala L.

    2008-01-01

    The need for sensors to operate in harsh environments is illustrated by the need for measurements in the turbine engine hot section. The degradation and damage that develops over time in hot section components can lead to catastrophic failure. At present, the degradation processes that occur in the harsh hot section environment are poorly characterized, which hinders development of more durable components, and since it is so difficult to model turbine blade temperatures, strains, etc, actual measurements are needed. The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in harsh environments. The effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines is described, first in the fan and compressor modules, and then in the hot section. The near-term goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. A thorough literature search was conducted for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges chemically and physically compatible with the NASA GRCs microfabrication procedures and substrate materials. Test results are given for tantalum, titanium and zirconium-based nitride and oxynitride ceramic films.

  14. Removal of high-salinity matrices through polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration for the detection of trace levels of REEs using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hualing; Lin, Jijun; Gong, Zhenbin; Huang, Jiahua; Yang, Shifeng

    2015-10-01

    The polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration (PCUF) technique was applied to separate trace levels of rare earth elements (REEs), including scandium, yttrium and the lanthanides, from high-salinity matrices prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The REEs were converted into REE-polymer complexes using the water-soluble polymer polyacrylic acid (PAA) at a specified pH, retained on the ultrafiltration membrane of centrifugal filter units, and finally eluted using diluted nitric acid to achieve separation from matrices with relatively high levels of various inorganic ions, such as sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chlorine ions. Numerous factors affecting the PCUF efficiency were optimized. The optimal conditions included the addition of 30 mg L(-1) of PAA, a pH of 7.5, a reaction time of 40 min at room temperature, and 5.0 mL of 3% nitric acid (v/v) eluent. Under these conditions, the analytes were quantitatively separated and recovered, with a resulting relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 4.0% (0.05 µg L(-1), n=5) and standard addition recoveries between 89.2% (La) and 95.8% (Sm) for matrices of various salinities. The blank samples for the method ranged from 0.0003 µg L(-1) (Dy) to 0.0031 µg L(-1) (Sc), and the limits of quantification (LOQs, 10σ) were between 0.0006 µg L(-1) (Dy) and 0.0026 µg L(-1) (Sc). Furthermore, the salinity of the sample exhibited no effect on the REE-polymer complex formation process. Finally, the method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of dissolved Sc, Y, and lanthanides in coastal and estuarine seawater samples. PMID:26078161

  15. High-Performance, Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.; Frazier, Donald O.; Adams, James H.; Johnson, Michael A.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project endeavors to advance the current state-of-the-art in high-performance, radiation-hardened electronics and processors, ensuring successful performance of space systems required to operate within extreme radiation and temperature environments. Because RHESE is a project within the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP), RHESE's primary customers will be the human and robotic missions being developed by NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) in partial fulfillment of the Vision for Space Exploration. Benefits are also anticipated for NASA's science missions to planetary and deep-space destinations. As a technology development effort, RHESE provides a broad-scoped, full spectrum of approaches to environmentally harden space electronics, including new materials, advanced design processes, reconfigurable hardware techniques, and software modeling of the radiation environment. The RHESE sub-project tasks are: SelfReconfigurable Electronics for Extreme Environments, Radiation Effects Predictive Modeling, Radiation Hardened Memory, Single Event Effects (SEE) Immune Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) (SIRF), Radiation Hardening by Software, Radiation Hardened High Performance Processors (HPP), Reconfigurable Computing, Low Temperature Tolerant MEMS by Design, and Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Integrated Electronics for Extreme Environments. These nine sub-project tasks are managed by technical leads as located across five different NASA field centers, including Ames Research Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. The overall RHESE integrated project management responsibility resides with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Initial technology development emphasis within RHESE focuses on the hardening of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA)s and Field Programmable Analog

  16. High-Pressure Transvenous Perfusion of the Upper Extremity in Human Muscular Dystrophy: A Safety Study with 0.9% Saline.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Kocis, Keith; Valley, Robert; Howard, James F; Chopra, Manisha; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Lin, Weili; Muenzer, Joseph; Powers, William

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated safety and feasibility of high-pressure transvenous limb perfusion in an upper extremity of adult patients with muscular dystrophy, after completing a similar study in a lower extremity. A dose escalation study of single-limb perfusion with 0.9% saline was carried out in nine adults with muscular dystrophies under intravenous analgesia. Our study demonstrates that it is feasible and definitely safe to perform high-pressure transvenous perfusion with 0.9% saline up to 35% of limb volume in the upper extremities of young adults with muscular dystrophy. Perfusion at 40% limb volume is associated with short-lived physiological changes in peripheral nerves without clinical correlates in one subject. This study provides the basis for a phase 1/2 clinical trial using pressurized transvenous delivery into upper limbs of nonambulatory patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Furthermore, our results are applicable to other conditions such as limb girdle muscular dystrophy as a method for delivering regional macromolecular therapeutics in high dose to skeletal muscles of the upper extremity. PMID:25953425

  17. Development of a High-Stability Microstrip-based L-band Radiometer for Ocean Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a microstrip-based L-band Dicke radiometer with the long-term stability required for future ocean salinity measurements to an accuracy of 0.1 psu is presented. This measurement requires the L-band radiometers to have calibration stabilities of less than or equal to 0.05 K over 2 days. This research has focused on determining the optimum radiometer requirements and configuration to achieve this objective. System configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer test beds at both JPL and GSFC. The GSFC testbed uses a cryogenic chamber that allows long-term characterization at radiometric temperatures in the range of 70 - 120 K. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature and DC bias, system linearity, optimum noise diode injection calibration, and precision temperature control of components. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability.

  18. A modified method for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) for samples with high salinity and low organics.

    PubMed

    Vyrides, I; Stuckey, D C

    2009-01-01

    This study proposes a modification to the standard method for the determination of the chemical oxygen demand of samples with a salinity up to 40 g NaCl/L and low organic concentrations (20-230 mg COD/L). The masking of chloride by the use of a HgSO(4):Cl ratio of 20:1 prior to digestion, and the use of 3g K(2)Cr(2)O(7)/L in the digestion solution resulted in an error of less than 10% and 12% for samples containing 40 g NaCl/L at 20-190 mg COD/L and 230 mg COD/L, respectively. Comparison of the standard method with the new proposed method using a synthetic sewage highlights the large errors (50-85%) of the standard method in contrast to an error of less than 10% for the proposed modified method. PMID:18693009

  19. High incidence of plant growth-stimulating bacteria associated with the rhizosphere of wheat grown on salinated soil in Uzbekistan.

    PubMed

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Kamilova, Faina; Validov, Shamil; Gafurova, Laziza; Kucharova, Zulfiya; Lugtenberg, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Soil salinization is increasing steadily in many parts of the world and causes major problems for plant productivity. Under these stress conditions, root-associated beneficial bacteria can help improve plant growth and nutrition. In this study, salt-tolerant bacteria from the rhizosphere of Uzbek wheat with potentially beneficial traits were isolated and characterized. Eight strains which initially positively affect the growth of wheat plants in vitro were investigated in detail. All eight strains are salt tolerant and have some of the following plant growth-beneficial properties: production of auxin, HCN, lipase or protease and wheat growth promotion. Using sequencing of part of the 16S rDNA, the eight new isolates were identified as Acinetobacter (two strains), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Bacillus cereus, Enterobacter hormaechei, Pantoae agglomerans and Alcaligenes faecalis. All these strains are potential human pathogens. Possible reasons for why these bacteria present in the rhizosphere and establish there are discussed. PMID:18211262

  20. Java-based communication in a High Performance Computing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, A.; de Mora, J. Portell I.; Sirvent, R.

    2011-02-01

    Java is one of the most widely used computer programming languages, however its use in High Performance Computing (HPC) is relatively low. A typical HPC environment consists of a number of multi-core computing nodes, while a typical application running in such an environment will normally contain CPU intensive code that can be executed in parallel. Such an application may require inter-node as well as intra-node communication. Message Passing Interface (MPI) is a language independent specification of an API to allow such communication. MPJExpress (Baker et al. 2006) and F-MPJ (Taboada et al. 2009) are Java-based implementations of MPI, designed with the efficient performance of data transfers as a main objective. In this paper we discuss the scalability of one approach of distributing data to compute nodes in HPC and we propose the design of an alternative data transfer system, building upon MPI.

  1. Investigation of high voltage spacecraft system interactions with plasma environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Berkopec, F. D.; Purvis, C. K.; Grier, N.; Staskus, J.

    1978-01-01

    The exposure of high voltage spacecraft systems to the charged particle environment of space can produce interactions that will influence system operation. An experimental investigation of these interactions has been undertaken for insulator and conductor test surfaces biased up to plus or minus 1 kV in a simulated low earth orbit charged particle environment. It has been found that these interactions are controlled by the insulator surfaces surrounding the biased conductors. For positive applied voltages the electron current collection can be enhanced by the insulators. For negative applied voltages the insulator surface confines the voltage to the conductor region; this can cause arcing. Understanding these interactions and the technology to control their impact on system operation is essential to the design of solar cell arrays for ion drive propulsion applications that use direct drive power processing.

  2. Using Highly Interactive Virtual Environments for Safeguards Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Bradley S; Alcala, Benjamin S; Alcala, Scott; Eipeldauer, Mary D; Weil, Logan B

    2010-01-01

    Highly interactive virtual environment (HIVE) is a term that refers to interactive educational simulations, serious games and virtual worlds. Studies indicate that learning with the aid of interactive environments produces better retention and depth of knowledge by promoting improved trainee engagement and understanding. Virtual reality or three dimensional (3D) visualization is often used to promote the understanding of something when personal observation, photographs, drawings, and/or sketches are not possible or available. Subjects and situations, either real or hypothetical, can be developed using a 3D model. Models can be tailored to the audience allowing safeguards and security features to be demonstrated for educational purposes in addition to engineering evaluation and performance analysis. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has begun evaluating the feasibility of HIVEs for improving safeguards activities such as training, mission planning, and evaluating worker task performance. This paper will discuss the development workflow of HIVEs and present some recent examples.

  3. Decision making in high-velocity environments: implications for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Stepanovich, P L; Uhrig, J D

    1999-01-01

    Healthcare can be considered a high-velocity environment and, as such, can benefit from research conducted in other industries regarding strategic decision making. Strategic planning is not only relevant to firms in high-velocity environments, but is also important for high performance and survival. Specifically, decision-making speed seems to be instrumental in differentiating between high and low performers; fast decision makers outperform slow decision makers. This article outlines the differences between fast and slow decision makers, identifies five paralyses that can slow decision making in healthcare, and outlines the role of a planning department in circumventing these paralyses. Executives can use the proposed planning structure to improve both the speed and quality of strategic decisions. The structure uses planning facilitators to avoid the following five paralyses: 1. Analysis. Decision makers can no longer afford the luxury of lengthy, detailed analysis but must develop real-time systems that provide appropriate, timely information. 2. Alternatives. Many alternatives (beyond the traditional two or three) need to be considered and the alternatives must be evaluated simultaneously. 3. Group Think. Decision makers must avoid limited mind-sets and autocratic leadership styles by seeking out independent, knowledgeable counselors. 4. Process. Decision makers need to resolve conflicts through "consensus with qualification," as opposed to waiting for everyone to come on board. 5. Separation. Successful implementation requires a structured process that cuts across disciplines and levels. PMID:10537497

  4. High versus low crewmember autonomy in space simulation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanas, Nick; Saylor, Stephanie; Harris, Matthew; Neylan, Thomas; Boyd, Jennifer; Weiss, Daniel S.; Baskin, Pamela; Cook, Colleen; Marmar, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Given the long distances involved and the kinds of activities planned, crewmembers participating in long-duration exploratory space missions such as an expedition to Mars will have more autonomy than in previous space missions. In order to study the impact of high versus low crew autonomy on crewmembers and the crew-mission control interaction, we conducted a series of pilot studies involving three space simulation settings: NEEMO missions, the Haughton-Mars Project, and the pilot phase of the Mars 500 Program. As in our previous on-orbit studies on the Mir and International Space Station, crew and mission control subjects working in missions involving these three settings completed a weekly study questionnaire that assessed mood and interpersonal interactions using the Profile of Mood States, the Group Environment Scale, and the Work Environment Scale. The Mars 500 pilot study also directly assessed individual and group autonomy. In these studies, high autonomy periods were those where crewmembers planned much of their work schedule, whereas low autonomy periods were those where mission control personnel developed the schedule, much as happens now during actual space flight conditions. Our results suggested that high work autonomy was well-received by the crews, mission goals were accomplished, and there were no adverse effects. During high autonomy periods, crewmember mood was generally reported as being better and creativity was higher, but mission control personnel reported some confusion about their work role. The crewmember group environment in the Mars 500 pilot study was dependent on the nationality mix. Despite scoring lower in work pressure overall, the four Russian crewmembers reported a greater rise in work pressure from low to high autonomy than the two Europeans. In contrast, the European crewmembers reported a greater rise in dysphoric mood in going from low to high autonomy, whereas the Russians' emotional state remained the same or slightly

  5. Chemical Vapor Deposition at High Pressure in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, Sonya; Bachmann, Klaus; LeSure, Stacie; Sukidi, Nkadi; Wang, Fuchao

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of critical requirements of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) at elevated pressure for a channel flow reactor in a microgravity environment. The objective of using high pressure is to maintain single-phase surface composition for materials that have high thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature. Access to microgravity is needed to maintain conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for process analysis. Based on ground based observations we present an optimized reactor design for OMCVD at high pressure and reduced gravity. Also, we discuss non-intrusive real-time optical monitoring of flow dynamics coupled to homogeneous gas phase reactions, transport and surface processes. While suborbital flights may suffice for studies of initial stages of heteroepitaxy experiments in space are essential for a complete evaluation of steady-state growth.

  6. Salinity gradient power: utilizing vapor pressure differences.

    PubMed

    Olsson, M; Wick, G L; Isaacs, J D

    1979-10-26

    By utilizing the vapor pressure difference between high-salinity and lowsalinity wvater, one can obtain power from the gradients of salinity. This scheme eliminates the major problems associated with conversion methods in which membranes are used. The method we tested gave higher conversion efficiencies than membrane methods. Furthermore, hardware and techniques being developed for ocean thermal energy conversion may be applied to this approach to salinity gradient energy conversion. PMID:17809370

  7. Spray characterization in high pressure environment using optical line patternator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Hyeonseok; Kim, Dongjun; Shin, Sanghee; Yoon, Youngbin

    2006-08-01

    For the quantitative measurement in an optically dense spray, the intensity of the attenuated signal should be corrected. Therefore, the optical line patternator was applied to get the original distribution of the dense spray injected from a swirl injector at high ambient pressure up to 4.0 MPa. The optical line patternator is a combined technique of laser extinction measurement and image processing for the spray characterization. The spray was scanned with the laser beam and the line image of Mie scattering was captured simultaneously in the path of each laser beam by using a CCD camera. A photo-diode was used to obtain the transmission data that was the amount of the incident laser beam passing through the spray region. The distribution of the attenuation coefficients in the spray was obtained by processing the transmission data and Mie-scattering distribution data by an algebraic reconstruction technique. From the distribution of attenuation coefficients, we can obtain the accurate surface distribution from the Mie-scattering signal. Because the optical line patternator uses a laser beam instead of a laser sheet to scan the spray, the effect of multiple scattering, due to the increased number density of droplets in a high pressure environment is reduced significantly. The optical line patternator is suitable for investigating the characteristics of a relatively large spray under high pressure environments such as liquid rocket engines.

  8. Plasma cleaning device. [designed for high vacuum environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High vacuum cleaning of contaminated surfaces such as hydrocarbon containment films can be accomplished by a plasma cleaning device which includes a plasma discharge housing to permit generation of a plasma in an environment having a higher pressure than the surface which is to be cleaned. A ground electrode and a radio frequency electrode partially surround a quartz plasma tube, for the introduction of an ionizable gas. These electrodes ionize the gas and help generate the plasma. This plasma flows through a non-constrictive aperture, through the plasma discharge housing and then on to the contaminated surface.

  9. Evaluating alternative refrigerants for high ambient temperature environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shrestha, Som S.

    2016-01-01

    According to the Montreal Protocol, developing countries have started the phase out schedule of the ozone depleting substances, including HCFC refrigerants, in 2015 and expect them to reach 35% reduction in 2020. This commitment to the start the phase out of HCFC refrigerants, especially R-22, in developing countries is seen as an opportunity to introduce lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerants. Furthermore, this paper summarizes an investigation into the performance of lower GWP refrigerants in high ambient temperature environments, experienced in some of the developed countries, in mini-split air conditioning units.

  10. Management and performance of APPLE battery in high temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, M. S.; Subrahmanyam, A.; Agrawal, B. L.

    1984-09-01

    India's first experimental communication satellite, APPLE, carried a 12 AH Ni-Cd battery for supplying power during eclipse. Failure to deploy one of the two solar panels resulted in the battery operating in a high temperature environment, around 40 C. This also resulted in the battery being used in diurnal cycles rather than just half yearly eclipse seasons. The management and performance of the battery during its life of two years are described. An attempt to identify the probable degradation mechanisms is also made.

  11. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  12. Evaluating Alternative Refrigerants for High Ambient Temperature Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shrestha, Som S

    2016-01-01

    According to the Montreal Protocol, developing countries have started the phase out schedule of the ozone depleting substances, including HCFC refrigerants, in 2015 and expect them to reach 35% reduction in 2020. This commitment to the start the phase out of HCFC refrigerants, especially R-22, in developing countries is seen as an opportunity to introduce lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerants. This paper summarizes an investigation into the performance of lower GWP refrigerants in high ambient temperature environments, experienced in some of the developed countries, in mini-split air conditioning units.

  13. Management and Performance of APPLE Battery in High Temperature Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, M. S.; Subrahmanyam, A.; Agrawal, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    India's first experimental communication satellite, APPLE, carried a 12 AH Ni-Cd battery for supplying power during eclipse. Failure to deploy one of the two solar panels resulted in the battery operating in a high temperature environment, around 40 C. This also resulted in the battery being used in diurnal cycles rather than just half yearly eclipse seasons. The management and performance of the battery during its life of two years are described. An attempt to identify the probable degradation mechanisms is also made.

  14. Effect of salinity on the toxicity of road dust in an estuarine amphipod Grandidierella japonica.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Kyoshiro; Nakajima, Fumiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Urban runoff can reach coastal aquatic environments; however, little is known about the effect of salinity on road runoff toxicity. The objective of this study is to investigate the toxicity of highway road dust over a salinity gradient from 5 to 35‰, in an estuarine benthic amphipod, Grandidierella japonica. Road dust toxicity was evaluated by assessing mortality after 10 days of exposure and short-term microbead ingestion activity of the amphipod. For all road dust samples considered, amphipod mortality increased with increasing salinity, whereas no significant difference in mortality was observed among test salinities in the reference river sediment. Ingestion activity during exposure to road dust decreased with increasing salinity. In fact, none of the individuals ingested any microbeads at salinity of 35‰. If assumed microbead ingestion is a proxy for feeding activity, high mortality at 35‰ could be attributed to aquatic exposure and not to dietary exposure. These findings suggest that road dust may have considerable impact on benthic organisms at high salinity levels. PMID:26360764

  15. High temperature, harsh environment sensors for advanced power generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohodnicki, P. R.; Credle, S.; Buric, M.; Lewis, R.; Seachman, S.

    2015-05-01

    One mission of the Crosscutting Technology Research program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory is to develop a suite of sensors and controls technologies that will ultimately increase efficiencies of existing fossil-fuel fired power plants and enable a new generation of more efficient and lower emission power generation technologies. The program seeks to accomplish this mission through soliciting, managing, and monitoring a broad range of projects both internal and external to the laboratory which span sensor material and device development, energy harvesting and wireless telemetry methodologies, and advanced controls algorithms and approaches. A particular emphasis is placed upon harsh environment sensing for compatibility with high temperature, erosive, corrosive, and highly reducing or oxidizing environments associated with large-scale centralized power generation. An overview of the full sensors and controls portfolio is presented and a selected set of current and recent research successes and on-going projects are highlighted. A more detailed emphasis will be placed on an overview of the current research thrusts and successes of the in-house sensor material and device research efforts that have been established to support the program.

  16. Morphological Evidence For Dike Emplacement in a High Pressure Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Head, J. W., III; Smith, D. K.

    1996-03-01

    We have undertaken a detailed study of the morphology of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 24 degrees 50'N, 45 degrees 50'W and 29 degrees 10'N, 43 degrees 10'W, in order to characterize the emplacement of volcanics under high pressure environments analogous to Venus and to better understand the processes involved in the formation of oceanic crust. Using high resolution side-scan sonar data we have mapped four segments of the axial volcanic ridge (AVR) along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and have defined a series of geological units on the basis of morphology and morphometry, the dominant unit being long linear ridges apparently emplaced by dike intrusion. We compare the evolution of the AVR along our study area using these ridges as indicators of dike width and intrusion rate.

  17. High Molecular Weight Petrogenic and Pyrogenic Hydrocarbons in Aquatic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajano, T. A., Jr.; Yan, B.; O'Malley, V.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemistry is ultimately the study of sources, movement, and fate of chemicals in the geosphere at various spatial and temporal scales. Environmental organic geochemistry focuses such studies on organic compounds of toxicological and ecological concern (e.g., Schwarzenbach et al., 1993, 1998; Eganhouse, 1997). This field emphasizes not only those compounds with potential toxicological properties, but also the geological systems accessible to the biological receptors of those hazards. Hence, the examples presented in this chapter focus on hydrocarbons with known health and ecological concern in accessible shallow, primarily aquatic, environments.Modern society depends on oil for energy and a variety of other daily needs, with present mineral oil consumption throughout the 1990s exceeding 3×109 t yr-1 (NRC, 2002). In the USA, e.g., ˜40% of energy consumed and 97% of transportation fuels are derived from oil. In the process of extraction, refinement, transport, use, and waste production, a small but environmentally significant fraction of raw oil materials, processed products, and waste are released inadvertently or purposefully into the environment. Because their presence and concentration in the shallow environments are often the result of human activities, these organic materials are generally referred to as "environmental contaminants." Although such reference connotes some form of toxicological or ecological hazard, specific health or ecological effects of many organic "environmental contaminants" remain to be demonstrated. Some are, in fact, likely innocuous at the levels that they are found in many systems, and simply adds to the milieu of biogenic organic compounds that naturally cycle through the shallow environment. Indeed, virtually all compounds in crude oil and processed petroleum products have been introduced naturally to the shallow environments as oil and gas seepage for millions of years ( NRC, 2002). Even high molecular weight (HMW) polyaromatic

  18. Effect of calcium carbonate on low carbon steel corrosion behavior in saline CO2 high pressure environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Lisiane Morfeo; Costa, Eleani Maria da; Andrade, Jairo José de Oliveira; Hubler, Roberto; Huet, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    The CaCO3 influence on the corrosion properties of low carbon steel in aqueous solutions saturated with CO2 and NaCl at 80 °C and 15 MPa was investigated over time with respect to morphology, thickness, structure, chemical composition and corrosion rate. The corrosion product formed in CaCO3-based solution was a calcium-enriched siderite and the scales were thinner and more porous than the ones formed in solutions without CaCO3. The CaCO3 reduced the corrosion rate, but the scales produced in the presence of this compound presented depassivation followed by formation of pits during electrochemical measurements effectuated on corroded samples.

  19. Preparation of non-aggregating aqueous fullerenes in highly saline solutions with a biocompatible non-ionic polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aich, Nirupam; Boateng, Linkel K.; Flora, Joseph R. V.; Saleh, Navid B.

    2013-10-01

    Size-tunable stable aqueous fullerenes were prepared with different concentrations of biocompatible block-copolymer pluronic (PA) F-127, ranging from 0.001% to 1% (w/v). Size uniformity increased with the increase in PA concentration, yielding optimum 58.8 ± 5.6 and 61.8 ± 5.6 nm nC60s and nC70s, respectively (0.10%w/v PA), as observed using a dynamic light scattering technique. Fullerene aqueous suspensions also manifested enhanced stability in saline solution, Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium (DMEM), and Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) culture medium. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to elaborate on the morphology and size specificity of fullerene clusters. Physicochemical characterizations of the suspended fullerenes were performed through UV-vis spectroscopy and electrophoretic mobility measurements. PA molecules showed size restriction by encasement, as observed via molecular dynamics simulations. Such solubilization with controllable size and non-aggregating behavior can facilitate application enhancement and mechanistic environmental and toxicological studies of size-specific fullerenes.

  20. The effects of magnetic fields exposure on relative permittivity of saline solutions measured by a high resolution SPR system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Zhao, Xinyuan; Fei, Yue; Yu, Dongdong; Qian, Jun; Tong, Jinguang; Chen, Guangdi; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A measurement system for the relative permittivity of a physiological solution under 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF) is presented. It is based on a phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Relative permittivity was analyzed for different solute concentrations of sodium chloride under various MF exposure parameters. We found that MF exposure at 0.2-4.0 mT step-wise decreased significantly the SPR phase signal of a 0.9% sodium chloride solution while 0.1 mT of MF exposure did not. The decreases in the SPR phase signal depended on the duration of MF exposure, and the signal reached a plateau after 15 min of exposure. Interestingly, the decreased SPR phase signal showed a gradual increase and approached the background level when the exposure was drawn off. In addition, we found that the response of the sodium chloride solution to MF also depended on its concentration. In brief, the relative permittivity of sodium chloride in solutions appears to be practically affected by 50 Hz MF exposure. Our data indicates that the relative permittivity of the saline solution influenced by MF exposure should be considered when investigating the biological effects of MF exposure on organisms in experimental study. PMID:27121618

  1. The effects of magnetic fields exposure on relative permittivity of saline solutions measured by a high resolution SPR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhao, Xinyuan; Fei, Yue; Yu, Dongdong; Qian, Jun; Tong, Jinguang; Chen, Guangdi; He, Sailing

    2016-04-01

    A measurement system for the relative permittivity of a physiological solution under 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF) is presented. It is based on a phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Relative permittivity was analyzed for different solute concentrations of sodium chloride under various MF exposure parameters. We found that MF exposure at 0.2–4.0 mT step-wise decreased significantly the SPR phase signal of a 0.9% sodium chloride solution while 0.1 mT of MF exposure did not. The decreases in the SPR phase signal depended on the duration of MF exposure, and the signal reached a plateau after 15 min of exposure. Interestingly, the decreased SPR phase signal showed a gradual increase and approached the background level when the exposure was drawn off. In addition, we found that the response of the sodium chloride solution to MF also depended on its concentration. In brief, the relative permittivity of sodium chloride in solutions appears to be practically affected by 50 Hz MF exposure. Our data indicates that the relative permittivity of the saline solution influenced by MF exposure should be considered when investigating the biological effects of MF exposure on organisms in experimental study.

  2. The effects of magnetic fields exposure on relative permittivity of saline solutions measured by a high resolution SPR system

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Zhao, Xinyuan; Fei, Yue; Yu, Dongdong; Qian, Jun; Tong, Jinguang; Chen, Guangdi; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A measurement system for the relative permittivity of a physiological solution under 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF) is presented. It is based on a phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Relative permittivity was analyzed for different solute concentrations of sodium chloride under various MF exposure parameters. We found that MF exposure at 0.2–4.0 mT step-wise decreased significantly the SPR phase signal of a 0.9% sodium chloride solution while 0.1 mT of MF exposure did not. The decreases in the SPR phase signal depended on the duration of MF exposure, and the signal reached a plateau after 15 min of exposure. Interestingly, the decreased SPR phase signal showed a gradual increase and approached the background level when the exposure was drawn off. In addition, we found that the response of the sodium chloride solution to MF also depended on its concentration. In brief, the relative permittivity of sodium chloride in solutions appears to be practically affected by 50 Hz MF exposure. Our data indicates that the relative permittivity of the saline solution influenced by MF exposure should be considered when investigating the biological effects of MF exposure on organisms in experimental study. PMID:27121618

  3. Isolation of high-salinity-tolerant bacterial strains, Enterobacter sp., Serratia sp., Yersinia sp., for nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mpongwana, N; Ntwampe, S K O; Mekuto, L; Akinpelu, E A; Dyantyi, S; Mpentshu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyanides (CN(-)) and soluble salts could potentially inhibit biological processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), such as nitrification and denitrification. Cyanide in wastewater can alter metabolic functions of microbial populations in WWTPs, thus significantly inhibiting nitrifier and denitrifier metabolic processes, rendering the water treatment processes ineffective. In this study, bacterial isolates that are tolerant to high salinity conditions, which are capable of nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions, were isolated from a poultry slaughterhouse effluent. Three of the bacterial isolates were found to be able to oxidise NH(4)-N in the presence of 65.91 mg/L of free cyanide (CN(-)) under saline conditions, i.e. 4.5% (w/v) NaCl. The isolates I, H and G, were identified as Enterobacter sp., Yersinia sp. and Serratia sp., respectively. Results showed that 81% (I), 71% (G) and 75% (H) of 400 mg/L NH(4)-N was biodegraded (nitrification) within 72 h, with the rates of biodegradation being suitably described by first order reactions, with rate constants being: 4.19 h(-1) (I), 4.21 h(-1) (H) and 3.79 h(-1) (G), respectively, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.82 and 0.89. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates were 38% (I), 42% (H) and 48% (G), over a period of 168 h with COD reduction being highest at near neutral pH. PMID:27148718

  4. Energy metabolism and the high-altitude environment.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    At high altitude the barometric pressure falls, challenging oxygen delivery to the tissues. Thus, whilst hypoxia is not the only physiological stress encountered at high altitude, low arterial P(O2) is a sustained feature, even after allowing adequate time for acclimatization. Cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism is altered in subjects at, or returning from, high altitude. In the heart, energetic reserve falls, as indicated by lower phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but in the hypoxic rat heart fatty acid oxidation and respiratory capacity are decreased, whilst pyruvate oxidation is also lower after sustained hypoxic exposure. In skeletal muscle, there is not a consensus. With prolonged exposure to extreme high altitude (>5500 m) a loss of muscle mitochondrial density is seen, but this was not observed in a simulated ascent of Everest in hypobaric chambers. At more moderate high altitude, decreased respiratory capacity may occur without changes in mitochondrial volume density, and fat oxidation may be downregulated, although this is not seen in all studies. The underlying mechanisms, including the possible role of hypoxia-signalling pathways, remain to be resolved, particularly in light of confounding factors in the high-altitude environment. In high-altitude-adapted Tibetan natives, however, there is evidence of natural selection centred around the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway, and metabolic features in this population (e.g. low cardiac phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios, increased cardiac glucose uptake and lower muscle mitochondrial densities) share similarities with those in acclimatized lowlanders, supporting a possible role for the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway in the metabolic response of cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism to high altitude. PMID:26315373

  5. Living up to its name? The effect of salinity on development, growth, and phenotype of the "marine" toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Wijethunga, Uditha; Greenlees, Matthew; Shine, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The highly permeable integument of amphibians renders them vulnerable to chemical characteristics of their environment, especially during the aquatic larval stage. As the cane toad (Rhinella marina, Bufonidae) invades southwards along the east coast of Australia, it is encountering waterbodies with highly variable conditions of temperature, pH, and salinity. Understanding the tolerance of toads to these conditions can clarify the likely further spread of the invader, as well as the adaptability of the species to novel environmental challenges. We measured salinity in waterbodies in the field and conducted laboratory trials to investigate the impacts of salinity on toad viability. Eggs and tadpoles from the southern invasion front tolerated the most saline conditions we found in potential spawning ponds during surveys [equivalent to 1200 ppm (3.5 % the salinity of seawater)]. Indeed, high-salinity treatments increased tadpole body sizes, accelerated metamorphosis, and improved locomotor ability of metamorphs (but did not affect metamorph morphology). At very low salinity [40 ppm (0.1 % seawater)], eggs hatched but larvae did not develop past Gosner stage 37. Our study shows that the egg and larval life stages of cane toads can tolerate wide variation in the salinity of natal ponds and that this aspect of waterbody chemistry is likely to facilitate rather than constrain continued southward expansion of the toad invasion front in eastern Australia. PMID:26553545

  6. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  7. Progress in decontamination by halophilic microorganisms in saline wastewater and soil.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xuliang; Han, Zhen; Bai, Zhihui; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Shim, Hojae

    2010-05-01

    Environments with high-salt concentrations are often populated by dense microbial communities. Halophilic microorganisms can be isolated from different saline environments and different strains even belonging to the same genus have various applications. Wastewater and soil rich in both organic matter and salt are difficult to treat using conventional microorganisms typically found in wastewater treatment and soil bioremediation facilities. Studies on decontaminative capabilities and decontamination pathways of organic contaminants (i.e., aromatic compounds benzoate, cinnamate, 3-phenylpropionate, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid), heavy metals (i.e., tellurium, vanadium), and nutrients in the biological treatment of saline wastewater and soil by halophilic microorganisms are discussed in this review. PMID:20163899

  8. Radiation counting technique allows density measurement of metals in high-pressure/ high-temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillion, I. G.; Nelson, P. A.; Swanson, B. S.

    1967-01-01

    Radioactive tracers induced by neutron irradiation provide a gamma ray flux proportional to the density of a metal, allowing density measurement of these metals in extreme high-temperature and high-pressure environments. This concept is applicable to most metals, as well as other substances.

  9. Identification of Soybean Accessions with High Germinability in High-temperature Environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] seed produced in high-temperature, high-humidity production environments is prone to have sub-standard germinations. Hardseededness, wrinkled seed coats, and infection by Phomopsis longicolla Hobbs are all known to affect soybean seed germinability. Genotypic vari...

  10. The single event upset environment for avionics at high latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.J.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L. . Space and Communications Dept.); Johansson, K.; Pettersson, H. ); Farren, J. . Harwell Lab.)

    1994-12-01

    Modern avionic systems for civil and military applications are becoming increasingly reliant upon embedded microprocessors and associated memory devices. The phenomenon of single event upset (SEU) is well known in space systems and designers have generally been careful to use SEU tolerant devices or to implement error detection and correction (EDAC) techniques where appropriate. In the past, avionics designers have had no reason to consider SEU effects but is clear that the more prevalent use of memory devices combined with increasing levels of IC integration will make SEU mitigation an important design consideration for future avionic systems. To this end, it is necessary to work towards producing models of the avionics SEU environment which will permit system designers to choose components and EDAC techniques which are based on predictions of SEU rates correct to much better than an order of magnitude. Measurements of the high latitude SEU environment at avionics altitude have been made on board a commercial airliner. Results are compared with models of primary and secondary cosmic rays and atmospheric neutrons. Ground based SEU tests of static RAMs are used to predict rates in flight.

  11. Enabling Efficient Climate Science Workflows in High Performance Computing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, H.; Byna, S.; Wehner, M. F.; Gu, J.; O'Brien, T. A.; Loring, B.; Stone, D. A.; Collins, W.; Prabhat, M.; Liu, Y.; Johnson, J. N.; Paciorek, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    A typical climate science workflow often involves a combination of acquisition of data, modeling, simulation, analysis, visualization, publishing, and storage of results. Each of these tasks provide a myriad of challenges when running on a high performance computing environment such as Hopper or Edison at NERSC. Hurdles such as data transfer and management, job scheduling, parallel analysis routines, and publication require a lot of forethought and planning to ensure that proper quality control mechanisms are in place. These steps require effectively utilizing a combination of well tested and newly developed functionality to move data, perform analysis, apply statistical routines, and finally, serve results and tools to the greater scientific community. As part of the CAlibrated and Systematic Characterization, Attribution and Detection of Extremes (CASCADE) project we highlight a stack of tools our team utilizes and has developed to ensure that large scale simulation and analysis work are commonplace and provide operations that assist in everything from generation/procurement of data (HTAR/Globus) to automating publication of results to portals like the Earth Systems Grid Federation (ESGF), all while executing everything in between in a scalable environment in a task parallel way (MPI). We highlight the use and benefit of these tools by showing several climate science analysis use cases they have been applied to.

  12. Sublethal salinity stress contributes to habitat limitation in an endangered estuarine fish.

    PubMed

    Komoroske, Lisa M; Jeffries, Ken M; Connon, Richard E; Dexter, Jason; Hasenbein, Matthias; Verhille, Christine; Fangue, Nann A

    2016-09-01

    As global change alters multiple environmental conditions, predicting species' responses can be challenging without understanding how each environmental factor influences organismal performance. Approaches quantifying mechanistic relationships can greatly complement correlative field data, strengthening our abilities to forecast global change impacts. Substantial salinity increases are projected in the San Francisco Estuary, California, due to anthropogenic water diversion and climatic changes, where the critically endangered delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) largely occurs in a low-salinity zone (LSZ), despite their ability to tolerate a much broader salinity range. In this study, we combined molecular and organismal measures to quantify the physiological mechanisms and sublethal responses involved in coping with salinity changes. Delta smelt utilize a suite of conserved molecular mechanisms to rapidly adjust their osmoregulatory physiology in response to salinity changes in estuarine environments. However, these responses can be energetically expensive, and delta smelt body condition was reduced at high salinities. Thus, acclimating to salinities outside the LSZ could impose energetic costs that constrain delta smelt's ability to exploit these habitats. By integrating data across biological levels, we provide key insight into the mechanistic relationships contributing to phenotypic plasticity and distribution limitations and advance the understanding of the molecular osmoregulatory responses in nonmodel estuarine fishes. PMID:27606005

  13. Towards high-speed autonomous navigation of unknown environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Charles; Roy, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we summarize recent research enabling high-speed navigation in unknown environments for dynamic robots that perceive the world through onboard sensors. Many existing solutions to this problem guarantee safety by making the conservative assumption that any unknown portion of the map may contain an obstacle, and therefore constrain planned motions to lie entirely within known free space. In this work, we observe that safety constraints may significantly limit performance and that faster navigation is possible if the planner reasons about collision with unobserved obstacles probabilistically. Our overall approach is to use machine learning to approximate the expected costs of collision using the current state of the map and the planned trajectory. Our contribution is to demonstrate fast but safe planning using a learned function to predict future collision probabilities.

  14. A High Throughput Workflow Environment for Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, Erickson; Evrard, A. E.; Singh, R.; Marru, S.; Pierce, M.; Becker, M. R.; Kravtsov, A.; Busha, M. T.; Wechsler, R. H.; Ricker, P. M.; DES Simulations Working Group

    2013-01-01

    The Simulation Working Group (SimWG) of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) is collaborating with an XSEDE science gateway team to develop a distributed workflow management layer for the production of wide-area synthetic galaxy catalogs from large N-body simulations. We use the suite of tools in Airavata, an Apache Incubator project, to generate and archive multiple 10^10-particle N-body simulations of nested volumes on XSEDE supercomputers. Lightcone outputs are moved via Globus Online to SLAC, where they are transformed into multi-band, catalog-level descriptions of gravitationally lensed galaxies covering 10,000 sq deg to high redshift. We outline the method and discuss efficiency and provenance improvements brought about in N-body production. Plans to automate data movement and post-processing within the workflow are sketched, as are risks associated with working in an environment of constantly evolving services.

  15. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Murphy, Bart L

    2014-05-20

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a first work-piece holding means for holding a first work-piece, the first work-piece holding means being disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla. The first work-piece holding means is further disposed in operable connection with a second work-piece holding means for holding a second work-piece so that, as the first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, the second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  16. Advantages of High Tolerance Measurements in Fusion Environments Applying Photogrammetry

    SciTech Connect

    T. Dodson, R. Ellis, C. Priniski, S. Raftopoulos, D. Stevens, M. Viola

    2009-02-04

    Photogrammetry, a state-of-the-art technique of metrology employing digital photographs as the vehicle for measurement, has been investigated in the fusion environment. Benefits of this high tolerance methodology include relatively easy deployment for multiple point measurements and deformation/distortion studies. Depending on the equipment used, photogrammetric systems can reach tolerances of 25 microns (0.001 in) to 100 microns (0.004 in) on a 3-meter object. During the fabrication and assembly of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) the primary measurement systems deployed were CAD coordinate-based computer metrology equipment and supporting algorithms such as both interferometer-aided (IFM) and absolute distance measurementbased (ADM) laser trackers, as well as portable Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) arms. Photogrammetry was employed at NCSX as a quick and easy tool to monitor coil distortions incurred during welding operations of the machine assembly process and as a way to reduce assembly downtime for metrology processes.

  17. Corrosion of ceramics in high temperature steam environments

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Howell, M.; Gondolfe, J.M.; Arnold, D.T.

    1997-02-01

    Ethylene is one of the principal building blocks in the petrochemical industry, and world-wide production and consumption have been steadily increasing. Production of ethylene is accomplished primarily by the pyrolytic stripping of hydrogen from ethane or a higher molecular weight hydrocarbon. This cracking process, sometimes referred to as steam cracking, is currently accomplished in metallic tubes in high temperature furnaces with a conversion efficiency, for ethane of 60-65%. Operation at significantly higher temperature could increase the efficiency as much as 20%, but materials with better high temperature strength would be required. To help identify suitable materials, tests have been conducted to determine the behavior of selected ceramic materials in environments similar to those anticipated for a high-efficiency, advanced steam cracking system. The effects of exposure on weight change, mechanical strength, and microstructure have been determined in a series of 100 hour tests. In addition, 500 hour tests have been conducted to determine the effect of time on material behavior. From these tests, several strong candidates have been identified.

  18. Effects of Fluctuating Environments on the Selection of High Yielding Microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J. R.; Tillett, D. M.

    1987-02-27

    Microalgae have the potential of producing biomass with a high content of lipids at high productivities using seawater or saline ground water resources. Microalgal lipids are similar to vegetable oils and suitable for processing to liquid fuels. Engineering cost analysis studies have concluded that, at a favorable site, microalgae cultivation for fuel production could be economically viable. The major uncertainties involve the microalgae themselves: biomass and lipid productivity and culture stability.

  19. CVD diamond for optics applications in high heat flux environments

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Diamond has a cubic lattice structure and a very wide bandgap, which suggests that this material should exhibit excellent optical properties at wavelengths ranging from the far infrared to the near ultraviolet. Since diamond also exhibits unusually favorable properties in terms of mechanical strength, chemical stability, and thermal conductivity, there is considerable interest in using diamond for optics applications that involve adverse environmental conditions. The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated assessment of some of the issues that arise in connection with the use of chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond for applications such as missile system windows or domes, and for designing components that must function in the high photon flux of high-power lasers. Specifically, since the flight velocities of future air-intercept missiles are projected to far exceed those of contemporary systems, this raises the issue of how to assess the capability of window/dome material candidates in an aero-thermal shock environment. In this context, it can be demonstrated that, compared to other candidate materials, diamond windows promise to deliver superior performances and should be able to meet any foreseeable requirement. Operation at high speeds, however, imposes limits on the tolerable window emittance to prevent blinding the seeker, and this issue leads to the conclusion that diamond is intrinsically unsuitable for operation in the 3- to 5-{micro}m spectral band. Concerning high-energy lasers, note that operational systems always include an optical train consisting of mirrors and windows, which must be capable of transporting and directing the beam without seriously degrading the nominal performance of the laser. In this regard, mirror-faceplate material candidates can be ranked on the basis of appropriate figures of merit, which demonstrate that diamond is of particular promise for high-heat-load applications that require efficient cooling.

  20. The relationship between environmental parameters of saline and underground karst - patients with different diseases in the course of speleotherapy - anthropogenic effect - keeping intact the underground environment and curative properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simionca, Iu.; Hoteteu, M.; Chonka, Ia.; Slavik, P.; Kubas, J.; Grudnicki, N.

    2009-04-01

    One of the non-pharmacological therapy in patients with bronchial asthma (AB) and other BPOC is speleotherapy (ST), recognized as a complementary therapy. The curative effect of ST depends on geophysic structure of massive salt or karst, of mine or cave cavities, lack of noxes and toxic gas, also on the lack of the plant and microbial allergen, on the microclimatic parameters, sanitary and other parameters of the underground environment, on the mechanism of curative factors in these specific environments, on the medical particularities and disease specific speleotherapeutic methodology. An essential role they have environmental studies of underground cavities that own speleotherapeutic properties and use in medical and balneoclimatic tourism purposes. Among these studies are: - Air temperature, soil and salt layer; - Atmospheric pressure and the difference from the outside; - Relative humidity of the air underground; - Velocity of air currents; - Concentration of positive and negative air ions; - Particle size and concentration of saline aerosol; - Concentration of microorganisms, including pathogens, conditioning-pathogenic and saprophytic in air, soil saline and salt walls in rooms designed for speleotherapy; - Concentration of allergens; - Concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide, the presence and concentration of ozone, the gaseous pollutants (NO2, SO2, hydrocarbons and derivatives of ozone); - Radioactivity (type, value), the presence and concentration of radon. Taking into consideration the possibility of anthropogenic effect on the underground salt or karst environment produced by patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, respiratory or skin allergic diseases is needed to assess the underground environmental sanitary parameters in various main locations (the entrance in the underground, the artificial or natural air flow; the sanatory area " - the location where patients or tourists are keeped for a period of 1-3 or more hours, bathroom) and the

  1. A robust and efficient numerical method for multiphase equilibrium calculations: Application to CO2-brine-rock systems at high temperatures, pressures and salinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Allan M. M.; Blunt, Martin J.; LaForce, Tara C.

    2013-12-01

    We present a robust and efficient method for calculating chemical equilibria of general multiphase systems. The method is based on a stoichiometric approach, which uses Newton's method to solve a system of mass-action equations coupled with a system of equilibrium constraints. A stabilisation procedure is developed to promote convergence of the calculation when a presupposed phase in the chemical system is absent in the equilibrium state. The formulation of the chemical equilibrium problem is developed by presuming no specific details of the involved phases and species. As a consequence, the method is flexible and general enough so that the calculation can be customised with a combination of thermodynamic models that are appropriate for the problem of interest. Finally, we show the use of the method to solve relevant geochemical equilibrium problems for modelling carbon storage in highly saline aquifers.

  2. 40 CFR 436.120 - Applicability; description of the salines from brine lakes subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... salines from brine lakes subcategory. 436.120 Section 436.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Salines From Brine Lakes Subcategory § 436.120 Applicability; description of the salines from brine lakes subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of salines...

  3. The use of salinity contrast for density difference compensation to improve the thermal recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lopik, Jan H.; Hartog, Niels; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of heat recovery in high-temperature (>60 °C) aquifer thermal energy storage (HT-ATES) systems is limited due to the buoyancy of the injected hot water. This study investigates the potential to improve the efficiency through compensation of the density difference by increased salinity of the injected hot water for a single injection-recovery well scheme. The proposed method was tested through numerical modeling with SEAWATv4, considering seasonal HT-ATES with four consecutive injection-storage-recovery cycles. Recovery efficiencies for the consecutive cycles were investigated for six cases with three simulated scenarios: (a) regular HT-ATES, (b) HT-ATES with density difference compensation using saline water, and (c) theoretical regular HT-ATES without free thermal convection. For the reference case, in which 80 °C water was injected into a high-permeability aquifer, regular HT-ATES had an efficiency of 0.40 after four consecutive recovery cycles. The density difference compensation method resulted in an efficiency of 0.69, approximating the theoretical case (0.76). Sensitivity analysis showed that the net efficiency increase by using the density difference compensation method instead of regular HT-ATES is greater for higher aquifer hydraulic conductivity, larger temperature difference between injection water and ambient groundwater, smaller injection volume, and larger aquifer thickness. This means that density difference compensation allows the application of HT-ATES in thicker, more permeable aquifers and with larger temperatures than would be considered for regular HT-ATES systems.

  4. The use of salinity contrast for density difference compensation to improve the thermal recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lopik, Jan H.; Hartog, Niels; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of heat recovery in high-temperature (>60 °C) aquifer thermal energy storage (HT-ATES) systems is limited due to the buoyancy of the injected hot water. This study investigates the potential to improve the efficiency through compensation of the density difference by increased salinity of the injected hot water for a single injection-recovery well scheme. The proposed method was tested through numerical modeling with SEAWATv4, considering seasonal HT-ATES with four consecutive injection-storage-recovery cycles. Recovery efficiencies for the consecutive cycles were investigated for six cases with three simulated scenarios: (a) regular HT-ATES, (b) HT-ATES with density difference compensation using saline water, and (c) theoretical regular HT-ATES without free thermal convection. For the reference case, in which 80 °C water was injected into a high-permeability aquifer, regular HT-ATES had an efficiency of 0.40 after four consecutive recovery cycles. The density difference compensation method resulted in an efficiency of 0.69, approximating the theoretical case (0.76). Sensitivity analysis showed that the net efficiency increase by using the density difference compensation method instead of regular HT-ATES is greater for higher aquifer hydraulic conductivity, larger temperature difference between injection water and ambient groundwater, smaller injection volume, and larger aquifer thickness. This means that density difference compensation allows the application of HT-ATES in thicker, more permeable aquifers and with larger temperatures than would be considered for regular HT-ATES systems.

  5. CID-720 aircraft high-environment flight instrumentation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    The high-environment flight instrumentation system was designed to acquire Langley's structural response data during the full scale transport-controlled impact demonstration test. There was only one opportunity for data acquisition. Thus, a high reliability and crashworthy design approach was implemented. The approach featured multi-level redundancy and a vigorous quality assurance testing program. Complying with an accelerated schedule, the instrumentation system was developed, tested and shipped within 18 months to Dryden Flight Research Facility. The flight instrumentation system consists of two autonomous data systems, DAS #1 and #2, and an excellent checkout subsystem. Each data system is partitioned into four pallets. The system was designed to operate on manned and unmanned flights. There are 176 data channels per data system. These channels are sequentially sampled and encoded into 1 megabit/sec pulse code modulation (PCM) data signal. To increase the probability of success, a special PCM distribution subsystem was developed. This subsystem distributes the PCM signal to two transmitters, one delay memory, and eight recorder tracks. The data on four of these trackes was digitally delayed approximately 300 msec to maximize data acquisition during impact. Therefore each data system's data is redundantly recorded onboard and on the ground. There are two time code generators. Parallel time from each is encoded into both data systems. Serial time from each is redundantly recorded on both onboard recorders. Instrumentation power is independent of aircraft power and self-contained.

  6. Motion Planning Under Uncertainty In Highly Deformable Environments

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sachin; van den, Jur; Alterovitz, Berg Ron

    2012-01-01

    Many tasks in robot-assisted surgery, food handling, manufacturing, and other applications require planning and controlling the motions of manipulators or other devices that must interact with highly deformable objects. We present a unified approach for motion planning under uncertainty in deformable environments that maximizes probability of success by accounting for uncertainty in deformation models, noisy sensing, and unpredictable actuation. Unlike prior planners that assume deterministic deformations or treat deformations as a type of small perturbation, our method explicitly considers the uncertainty in large, time-dependent deformations. Our method requires a simulator of deformable objects but places no significant restrictions on the simulator used. We use a sampling-based motion planner in conjunction with the simulator to generate a set of candidate plans based on expected deformations. Our method then uses the simulator and optimal control to numerically estimate time-dependent state distributions based on uncertain parameters (e.g. deformable material properties or actuation errors). We then select the plan with the highest estimated probability of successfully avoiding obstacles and reaching the goal region. Using FEM-based simulation of deformable tissues, we demonstrate the ability of our method to generate high quality plans in two medical-inspired scenarios: (1) guiding bevel-tip steerable needles through slices of deformable tissue around obstacles for minimally invasive biopsies and drug-delivery, and (2) manipulating planar tissues to align interior points at desired coordinates for precision treatment. PMID:25030775

  7. Performance of BGO in a high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bobbink, G.J.; Engler, A.; Kraemer, R.W.; Nash, J.; Sutton, R.B.; Gearhart, R.A.; Linde, F.L.; Sens, J.C.

    1984-05-01

    Bismuth Germanate (Bi/sub 4/Ge/sub 3/O/sub 12/), an inert, high Z, and non-hygroscopic material, with a short radiation length L/sub RAD/ = 1.1 cm, has been proposed as the scintillator in a 4..pi.. electromagnetic calorimeter at LEP. Recently long BGO crystals have become available and studies of the effect of radiation have been made by several groups. We report here on the decrease of the light output of long BGO crystals due to irradiation by /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays and 25 MeV electrons with doses from 50 to 5000 rad and on the performance of a 4 x 4 matrix of BGO crystals located at small angles (5 to 9 mrad, a high radiation environment) at the e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring PEP at SLAC. All crystals used are 2 x 2 x 23 or 2 x 2 x 24 cm/sup 3/, have all six faces polished, and are wrapped in white teflon tape. 9 references, 11 figures.

  8. The Combined Effects of Salinity and Excess Boron on Mineral Ion Relations in Broccoli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two plant stress factors, salinity and high levels of boron, often co-occur in natural and agricultural environments. Many investigations have been conducted to document the influence of the combined stresses on crop growth and yield. Only limited information, however, is available concerning the c...

  9. Reflux Brines and Saline Groundwater, Murray Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, I.; Weaver, T. R.; Swane, I.

    2001-12-01

    Groundwater in the Murray Basin typically becomes more saline along its flowpaths; however, geochemical data, particularly Br/Cl ratios, indicate limited dissolution of salt from the aquifer is occurring. In the southern Murray Basin, recharge of groundwater to the deeper aquifers (Renmark Formation) is generally considered to occur at the highlands at the south basin margin while recharge to the shallow unconfined Parilla Sands aquifer occurs across much of the region. Regionally, discharge of groundwater occurs within the centre of the basin in zones of salt lakes. Groundwater in the regional recharge area of the southern Murray Basin shows dramatic variations in salinity (TDS contents ranging from 650 to >100,000 mg/L) over distances of a few kilometres in both shallow and deep aquifers. While the variation in topography is low (<70 m over 15,000 km2), local recharge and discharge processes control groundwater composition. Fresher groundwater underlies sand ridges that contain freshwater lakes located above the water table. The high salinity areas underlie a major palaeochannel, the Douglas Depression, which forms a topographic low. This depression contains abundant salt lakes and playas that represent local discharge sites for shallow groundwater. Stable isotope data show that the water in the high salinity zones underwent evaporation. Major element data (particularly Mg/Ca/SO4 ratios) indicate that the saline groundwaters have precipitated gypsum. Together the data indicate that brines produced in these saline lakes reflux into the underlying aquifers to depths of up to 180 m. In the semi-arid environment of SE Australia, reflux brines in both local and regional discharge areas are important in controlling the distribution of salinity in the Murray Basin as a whole. The observation that both shallow and deep aquifers show similar chemical trends implies that there is significant vertical interconnection throughout the basin. The confining layers are thin

  10. Using euhalophytes to understand salt tolerance and to develop saline agriculture: Suaeda salsa as a promising model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Wang, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Background As important components in saline agriculture, halophytes can help to provide food for a growing world population. In addition to being potential crops in their own right, halophytes are also potential sources of salt-resistance genes that might help plant breeders and molecular biologists increase the salt tolerance of conventional crop plants. One especially promising halophyte is Suaeda salsa, a euhalophytic herb that occurs both on inland saline soils and in the intertidal zone. The species produces dimorphic seeds: black seeds are sensitive to salinity and remain dormant in light under high salt concentrations, while brown seeds can germinate under high salinity (e.g. 600 mm NaCl) regardless of light. Consequently, the species is useful for studying the mechanisms by which dimorphic seeds are adapted to saline environments. S. salsa has succulent leaves and is highly salt tolerant (e.g. its optimal NaCl concentration for growth is 200 mm). A series of S. salsa genes related to salt tolerance have been cloned and their functions tested: these include SsNHX1, SsHKT1, SsAPX, SsCAT1, SsP5CS and SsBADH. The species is economically important because its fresh branches have high value as a vegetable, and its seed oil is edible and rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Because it can remove salts and heavy metals from saline soils, S. salsa can also be used in the restoration of salinized or contaminated saline land. Scope Because of its economic and ecological value in saline agriculture, S. salsa is one of the most important halophytes in China. In this review, the value of S. salsa as a source of food, medicine and forage is discussed. Its uses in the restoration of salinized or contaminated land and as a source of salt-resistance genes are also considered. PMID:25288631

  11. Imaging cross fault multiphase flow using time resolved high pressure-temperature synchrotron fluid tomography: implications for the geological storage of carbon dioxide within sandstone saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seers, Thomas; Andrew, Matthew; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin; Dobson, Kate; Hodgetts, David; Lee, Peter; Menke, Hannah; Singh, Kamaljit; Parsons, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Applied shear stresses within high porosity granular rocks result in characteristic deformation responses (rigid grain reorganisation, dilation, isovolumetric strain, grain fracturing and/or crushing) emanating from elevated stress concentrations at grain contacts. The strain localisation features produced by these processes are generically termed as microfaults (also shear bands), which occur as narrow tabular regions of disaggregated, rotated and/or crushed grains. Because the textural priors that favour microfault formation make their host rocks (esp. porous sandstones) conducive to the storage of geo-fluids, such structures are often abundant features within hydrocarbon reservoirs, aquifers and potential sites of CO2 storage (i.e. sandstone saline aquifers). The porosity collapse which accompanies microfault formation typically results in localised permeability reduction, often encompassing several orders of magnitude. Given that permeability is the key physical parameter that governs fluid circulation in the upper crust, this petrophysical degradation implicates microfaults as being flow impeding structures which may act as major baffles and/or barriers to fluid flow within the subsurface. Such features therefore have the potential to negatively impact upon hydrocarbon production or CO2 injection, making their petrophysical characterisation of considerable interest. Despite their significance, little is known about the pore-scale processes involved in fluid trapping and transfer within microfaults, particularly in the presence of multiphase flow analogous to oil accumulation, production and CO2 injection. With respect to the geological storage of CO2 within sandstone saline aquifers it has been proposed that even fault rocks with relatively low phyllosilicate content or minimal quartz cementation may act as major baffles or barriers to migrating CO2 plume. Alternatively, as ubiquitous intra-reservoir heterogeneities, micro-faults also have the potential to

  12. Salinity Management in Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Existing guidelines and standards for reclamation of saline soils and management to control salinity exist but have not been updated for over 25 years. In the past few years a looming water scarcity has resulted in questioning of the long term future of irrigation projects in arid and semi arid regi...

  13. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L−1) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na+/K+–ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  14. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L(-1)) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  15. Measuring soil salinity.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Marcus; Doyle, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Soil salinity is a form of land degradation in which salts accumulate in the soil profile to an extent that plant growth or infrastructure are negatively affected. A range of both field and laboratory procedures exist for measuring soil salinity. In the field, soil salinity is usually inferred from apparent electrical conductivity (EC(a)) using a range of devices, depending on the required depth of analysis, or size of the survey area. Field measurements of EC(a) require calibration to the actual salt content by laboratory analysis. In the laboratory, soil salinity is usually assessed by determining either the total soluble salts by evaporation of a soil water extract (TSS), or by determining the electrical conductivity (EC) of either a 1:5 distilled water:soil dilution, or a saturated paste extract. Although procedures for measuring soil salinity appear relatively straightforward, differences in methodology have considerable influence on measured values and interpretation of results. PMID:22895776

  16. Saline infusion sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Saline infusion sonohysterography consists of ultrasonographic imaging of the uterus and uterocervical cavity, using real-time ultrasonography during injection of sterile saline into the uterus. When properly performed, saline infusion sonohysterography can provide information about the uterus and endometrium. The most common indication for sonohysterography is abnormal uterine bleeding. sonohysterography should not be performed in a woman who is pregnant or could be pregnant or in a woman with a pelvic infection or unexplained pelvic tenderness. Physicians who perform or supervise diagnostic saline infusion sonohysterograpy should have training, experience, and demonstrated competence in gynecologic ultrasonography and saline infusion sonohysterography. Portions of this document were developed jointly with the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. PMID:14968760

  17. Composition and distribution of planktonic ciliates from ponds of different salinity in the solar saltwork of Sfax, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elloumi, Jannet; Carrias, Jean-François; Ayadi, Habib; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Boukhris, Mekki; Bouaïn, Abderrahmen

    2006-03-01

    The planktonic ciliated protozoa of 14 ponds of increasing salinity were investigated in the saline of Sfax, Tunisia. Taxa of the classes of Spirotrichea and Heterotrichea were the numerous ciliates. Abundance of the community ranged from 0.0 to 11.8 × 10 4 ciliates per litre. Values decrease significantly with salinity gradient, as species richness does. Based on the range of salinity over which ciliate taxa appeared, we distinguished three groups of ciliates. The first group is mainly composed of oligotrichs and choreotrichs that are commonly found in marine coastal waters. Small ciliates belonging to the order Prostomatida were found in a large range of salinity values, but their densities also decreased with salt concentration. In contrast, large-size species of heterotrichous ciliates were found in ponds with high salinity values only. In these ponds, the presence of prey appeared as an important factor in controlling the abundances of these halotolerant ciliates. Our data also suggest that Fabrea salina, a common halophile ciliate, acts as a competitor of the brine shrimp Artemia salina in the saline of Sfax. Salinity, prey availability, and the presence of competitors seem to be the main factors for the distribution of ciliate taxa in this hypersaline environment.

  18. Physiological and proteomic analysis in chloroplasts of Solanum lycopersicum L. under silicon efficiency and salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Park, Yoo Gyeong; Manivannan, Abinaya; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Tomato plants often grow in saline environments in Mediterranean countries where salt accumulation in the soil is a major abiotic stress that limits its productivity. However, silicon (Si) supplementation has been reported to improve tolerance against several forms of abiotic stress. The primary aim of our study was to investigate, using comparative physiological and proteomic approaches, salinity stress in chloroplasts of tomato under silicon supplementation. Tomato seedlings (Solanum lycopersicum L.) were grown in nutrient media in the presence or absence of NaCl and supplemented with silicon for 5 days. Salinity stress caused oxidative damage, followed by a decrease in silicon concentrations in the leaves of the tomato plants. However, supplementation with silicon had an overall protective effect against this stress. The major physiological parameters measured in our studies including total chlorophyll and carotenoid content were largely decreased under salinity stress, but were recovered in the presence of silicon. Insufficient levels of net-photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance were also largely improved by silicon supplementation. Proteomics analysis of chloroplasts analyzed by 2D-BN-PAGE (second-dimensional blue native polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis) revealed a high sensitivity of multiprotein complex proteins (MCPs) such as photosystems I (PSI) and II (PSII) to the presence of saline. A significant reduction in cytochrome b6/f and the ATP-synthase complex was also alleviated by silicon during salinity stress, while the complex forms of light harvesting complex trimers and monomers (LHCs) were rapidly up-regulated. Our results suggest that silicon plays an important role in moderating damage to chloroplasts and their metabolism in saline environments. We therefore hypothesize that tomato plants have a greater capacity for tolerating saline stress through the improvement of photosynthetic metabolism and chloroplast proteome expression

  19. Intergranular failures of Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; Roberge, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the results of our investigation of two commonly observed modes of failure of Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environment namely, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and intergranular attack (IGA). Specimens are studied as C-rings under constant deflection, wires with and without any externally applied load, and as straining electrodes. The potential dependence of average crack propagation rate is established in a single test by using several C-rings held at different potentials, by using a modification of the static potential gradient method of Seys and Van Haute. SCC appears to be governed by a film rupture mechanism and its propagation rate is significantly influenced by the electrochemical potential and associated surface film formation. The maximum crack propagation rate for C-rings and constant load specimens is very similar but much smaller than that calculated for a straining electrode at the same potential. IGA occurs over a wide range of potential - starting from a few tens of millivolts cathodic to the corrosion potential up to the lower end of anodic potentials normally required for SCC. IGA seems to be rather independent of stress and is generally more pronounced in the crevice area under the nuts used in C-rings. Examination of several creviced coupons shows that outside the crevice, enrichment of iron and chromium occurs on the surface as the potential is raised anodically, whereas the Ni:Fe and Ni:Cr ratios remain relatively independent of potential within the crevice.

  20. High temperature oxidation of molybdenum in water vapor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A. T.; Sooby, E. S.; Kim, Y.-J.; Cheng, B.; Maloy, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    Molybdenum has recently gained attention as a candidate cladding material for use in light water reactors. Its excellent high temperature mechanical properties and stability under irradiation suggest that it could offer benefits to performance under a wide range of reactor conditions, but little is known about its oxidation behavior in water vapor containing atmospheres. The current study was undertaken to elucidate the oxidation behavior of molybdenum in water vapor environments to 1200 °C in order to provide an initial assessment of its feasibility as a light water reactor cladding. Initial observations indicate that at temperatures below 1000 °C, the kinetics of mass loss in water vapor would not be detrimental to cladding integrity during an off-normal event. Above 1000 °C, degradation is more rapid but remains slower than observed for optimized zirconium cladding alloys. The effect of hydrogen-water vapor and oxygen-water vapor mixtures on material loss was also explored at elevated temperatures. Parts-per-million levels of either hydrogen or oxygen will minimally impact performance, but hydrogen contents in excess of 1000 ppm were observed to limit volatilization at 1000 °C.

  1. Learning rate and temperament in a high predation risk environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DePasquale, C.; Wagner, Tyler; Archard, G.A.; Ferguson, B.; Braithwaite, V.A.

    2014-01-01

    Living in challenging environments can influence the behavior of animals in a number of ways. For instance, populations of prey fish that experience frequent, nonlethal interactions with predators have a high proportion of individuals that express greater reaction to risk and increased activity and exploration—collectively known as temperament traits. Temperament traits are often correlated, such that individuals that are risk-prone also tend to be active and explore more. Spatial learning, which requires the integration of many sensory cues, has also been shown to vary in fish exposed to different levels of predation threat. Fish from areas of low predation risk learn to solve spatial tasks faster than fish from high predation areas. However, it is not yet known whether simpler forms of learning, such as learning associations between two events, are similarly influenced. Simple forms of associative learning are likely to be affected by temperament because a willingness to approach and explore novel situations could provide animals with a learning advantage. However, it is possible that routine-forming and inflexible traits associated with risk-prone and increased exploratory behavior may act in the opposite way and make risk-prone individuals poorer at learning associations. To investigate this, we measured temperament in Panamanian bishop fish (Brachyrhaphis episcopi) sampled from a site known to contain many predators. The B. episcopi were then tested with an associative learning task. Within this population, fish that explored more were faster at learning a cue that predicted access to food, indicating a link between temperament and basic learning abilities.

  2. CVD diamond for optics applications in high heat flux environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Claude A.

    1996-11-01

    Diamond has a cubic lattice structure and a very wide bandgap, which suggests that this material should exhibit excellent optical properties at wavelengths ranging from the far infrared to the near ultraviolet. Since diamond also exhibits unusually favorable properties in terms of mechanical strength, chemical stability, and thermal conductivity, there is considerable interest in using diamond for optics applications that involve adverse environmental conditions. The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated assessment of some of the issues that arise in connection with the use of chemically vapor- deposited diamond for applications such as missile system windows or domes, and for designing components that must function in the high photon flux of high-power lasers. Specifically, since the flight velocities of future air- intercept missiles are projected to far exceed those of contemporary systems, this raises the issue of how to access the capability of window/dome material candidates in an aero-thermal shock environment.In this context, it can be demonstrated that, compared to other candidate materials, diamond windows promise to deliver superior performances and should be able to meet any foreseeable requirement. Operation at high speeds, however, imposes limits on the tolerable window emittance to prevent 'blinding' the seeker, and this issue leads to the conclusion that diamond is intrinsically unsuitable for operation in the 3- to 5-micrometers spectral band. Concerning high-energy lasers, note that operational systems always include an optical train consisting of mirrors and windows, which must be capable of transporting and directing the beam without seriously degrading the nominal performance of the laser. In this regard, mirror-faceplate material candidates can be ranked on the basis of appropriate applications that require efficient cooling. Finally, we emphasize that the power- handling capability of diamond laser windows must be examined in the

  3. Motivating Environments: A Systemic Analysis of Four Rural High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    Motivating environments include elements across the whole school-as-system, with contributions made by teachers, students, administrators, and factors outside the school in the surrounding community. Positive motivating environments can support self-determination and intrinsic motivation of both students and teachers despite a number of risk…

  4. Mineral resources and mineral resource potential of the Saline Valley and Lower Saline Wilderness Study Areas, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wrucke, C.T.; Marsh, S.P.; Raines, G.L.; Werschky, R.S.; Blakely, R.J.; Hoover, D.B.; McHugh, E.L.; Rumsey, C.M.; Gaps, R.S.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Saline Valley Wilderness Study Area and the Lower Saline Wilderness Study Area, California Desert Conservation Area, Inyo County, California. The Saline Valley Wilderness Study Area and the Lower Saline Wilderness Study Area were studied in 1981-83 using geologic, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical surveys and the examination of mines and prospects to evaluate mineral resources and the potential for mineral resources. The Saline Valley Wilderness Study Area has a high potential for the occurrence of gold resources in two areas. One area, largely outside the study area, is in the vicinity of the Crater mine in the Last Chance Range, and it has potential for the occurrence of gold in a disseminated deposit in an epithermal environment. The other area is in Marble Canyon in the western part of the study area, and it has high potential for the occurrence of gold placer deposits. Marble Canyon also has a moderate potential for gold in placer deposits downstream from the area of high potential. Seven areas, scattered from the Inyo Mountains to the Last Chance Range, have a low potential for the occurrence of gold in disseminated deposits, and one area that lies astride the border of Death Valley National Monument has a low potential for the occurrence of gold in vein deposits. The southern end of Eureka Valley has a low potential for the occurrence of lithium and uranium resources in buried sedimentary deposits for the occurrence of lithium and uranium resources in buried sedimentary deposits beneath the valley floor. Demonstrated resources of native sulfur exist at the Crater mine but no resource potential was identified nearby in adtacent parts of the study area. 3 figs. (ACR)

  5. Mycelial bacteria of saline soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2008-10-01

    The actinomycetal complexes of saline soils comprise the representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, the number of which are hundreds and thousands of CFU/g soil. Complexes of mycelial bacteria in saline soils are poorer in terms of number (by 1-3 orders of magnitude) and taxonomic composition than the complexes of the zonal soil types. A specific feature of the actinomycetal complexes of saline soils is the predominance of halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes that well grow at pH 8-9 and concentrations of NaCl close to 5%. Actinomycetes in saline soils grow actively, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m in 1 gram of soil. The haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes grow fast and inhibit the formation of spores at pH 9 and high concentrations of salts (Na2SO4 and MgCl2, 5%) as compared to their behavior on a neutral medium with a salt concentration of 0.02%. They are characterized by the maximal radial growth rate of colonies on an alkaline medium with 5% NaCl.

  6. How to Sustain Warm Northern High Latitudes during the Late Pliocene? Roles of CO2, Orbital Changes and Increased Mediterranean Salinity on Oceanic Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contoux, C.; Zhang, Z.; Li, C.; Nisancioglu, K. H.; Risebrobakken, B.

    2014-12-01

    Northern high latitudes are thought to have been especially warm during the late Pliocene (e.g. Dowsett et al., 2013). However, the mechanisms sustaining these warm high latitude conditions are debated, especially because warm high latitudes are not necessarily depending on a stronger AMOC (Zhang et al., 2013). On the global scale, several authors reported CO2 level variability during the Pliocene ranging from 280 ppm to 450 ppm (e.g. Badger et al., 2013), which could be linked with orbital variability. More regionally, an aridification of the Mediterranean region is thought to have increased the Mediterranean outflow during the same period (e.g. Khélifi et al., 2009). These different forcings must have impacted on salinity and temperature profiles in the North Atlantic/Arctic oceans, which are then recorded at the local scale in the proxies derived from sediment cores. In order to carefully interpret these proxies, it is necessary to understand the large scale dynamics of the region during that period and its potential maximum variability with CO2 and orbital changes as well as Mediterranean outflow increase. Using the NorESM-L coupled atmosphere ocean model, which has a refined oceanic grid in the Nordic Seas region, we investigate the roles of extreme CO2and orbital variability on the Atlantic and Arctic oceanic circulation. An additional test to higher salinity in the Mediterranean is carried out. This study is part of a larger project which aims at characterising the state of the Nordic Seas during the Pliocene, and includes multi-proxy reconstructions and sensitivity model studies. References Badger et al., 2013. High resolution alkenone palaeobarometry indicates relatively stable pCO2 during the Pliocene (3.3 - 2.8 Ma), Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, 371, 20130094. Dowsett et al., 2013. Sea surface temperature of the mid-Piacenzian ocean: a data-model comparison, Nature Scientific Reports, 3, 2013, doi:10.1038/srep02013. Khélifi et al

  7. Three-dimensional graphene/metal oxide nanoparticle hybrids for high-performance capacitive deionization of saline water.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huajie; Zhao, Shenlong; Wan, Jiawei; Tang, Hongjie; Chang, Lin; He, Liangcan; Zhao, Huijun; Gao, Yan; Tang, Zhiyong

    2013-11-20

    A novel and general method is proposed to construct three-dimensional graphene/metal oxide nanoparticle hybrids. For the first time, it is demonstrated that this graphene-based composite with open pore structures can be used as the high-performance capacitive deionization (CDI) electrode materials, which outperform currently reported materials. This work will offer a promising way to develop highly effective CDI electrode materials. PMID:23963808

  8. DOES SALINITY REDUCE BORON’S TOXIC EFFECT IN BROCCOLI?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High salinity and boron often occur together in irrigation water in arid climates, but very little research has been done to study the interaction of the two. A greenhouse experiment was conducted at the U.S. Salinity Laboratory in sand tanks to evaluate the interactions between B and saline draina...

  9. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine.

    PubMed

    Silva-Castro, G A; Uad, I; Gonzalez-Martinez, A; Rivadeneyra, A; Gonzalez-Lopez, J; Rivadeneyra, M A

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments. PMID:26273646

  10. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Castro, G. A.; Uad, I.; Gonzalez-Martinez, A.; Rivadeneyra, A.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.; Rivadeneyra, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments. PMID:26273646

  11. Intergranular failures of alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.; Roberge, R.

    1985-03-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation of two commonly observed modes of failure of Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environment, namely, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and intergranular attack (IGA). Specimens are studied as C-rings under constant deflection, wires with and without any externally applied load, and as straining electrodes. The potential dependence of average crack propagation rate is established in a single test in which several C-rings are held at different potentials by using a modification of the static potential gradient method of Seys and Van Haute. SCC appears to be governed by a film rupture mechanism, and its propagation rate is significantly influenced by the electrochemical potential and associated surface film formation. The maximum crack propagation rate for C-rings and constant load specimens is very similar but much smaller than that calculated for a straining electrode at the same potential. IGA occurs over a wide range of potential, starting from a few multiples of ten millivolts cathodic to the corrosion potential up to the lower end of anodic potentials normally required for SCC. IGA seems to be rather independent of stress and is generally more pronounced in the crevice area under the nuts used in C-rings. Examination of several creviced coupons shows that outside the crevice, enrichment of iron and chromium occurs on the surface as the potential is raised anodically, whereas the Ni:Fe and Ni:Cr ratios remain relatively independent of potential within the crevice. It is believed that a better knowledge of the crevice chemistry and its mass transport characteristics will provide a clue to the origin and extent of IGA.

  12. High missing OH reactivity in summertime boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Williams, J.; Sinha, V.; Song, W.; Johnson, A.; Yassaa, N.; Phillips, G.; Crowley, J.; Axinte, R.; Fischer, H.; Gonzales, D.; Valverde-Canossa, J.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Rantala, P.; Rinne, J.; Kulmala, M.; Ouwersloot, H.; Vila, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-04-01

    Forest emissions represent a strong potential sink for the main tropospheric oxidant, the hydroxyl radical (OH). Resulting photochemical products can influence ambient ozone, contribute to particle formation and growth processes, and therefore impact climate and air quality. Direct measurements of total OH reactivity in ambient air can reveal gaps in the general understanding of reactive gaseous emissions from the biosphere to the atmosphere. By comparing the contribution from individually measured compounds to the overall OH sink and the directly measured total OH reactivity, the size of any unaccounted for, or "missing" sink can be deduced. In July and August 2010 an intensive field measurement campaign (HUMPPA-COPEC 2010) was performed at the Finnish boreal forest station SMEAR II in Hyytiälä (Latitude 61° 51' N; Longitude 24° 17' E) to investigate the summertime emissions and photochemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [1]. Speciated VOCs, the key oxidants OH, O3 and NO3, as well as aerosol, ions and other trace gases were quantified. Total OH reactivity was measured directly using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) [2]. This total OH reactivity method is an in-situ determination of the total loss rate of OH radicals caused by all reactive species in ambient air. During HUMPPA-COPEC 2010, total OH reactivity was monitored both inside and directly above the canopy. The impact of various parameters such as temperature and light dependent biogenic emissions and reaction products in "normal" and "stressed" conditions, the long-range transport of pollution and the boundary layer height development were characterized. For "normal" boreal conditions a missing reactivity of 58% was determined, whereas for "stressed" boreal conditions this increased to 89 %. Possible explanations are proposed to explain the high missing OH reactivity in summertime boreal forest environment. [1] J. Williams et al, 2011, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 10599-10618 [2] V. Sinha et

  13. Reuse/disposal of agricultural drainage water with high levels of salinity and toxic trace elements in central California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural drainage waters in the western San Joaquin Valley of Central California contain high levels of salts, boron (B) and selenium (Se). Discharge of the drainage water directly into the Kesterson Reservoir in 1980's was hazardous to plants and wildlife. To investigate the plausibility of usi...

  14. Salinized rivers: degraded systems or new habitats for salt-tolerant faunas?

    PubMed

    Kefford, Ben J; Buchwalter, David; Cañedo-Argüelles, Miguel; Davis, Jenny; Duncan, Richard P; Hoffmann, Ary; Thompson, Ross

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic salinization of rivers is an emerging issue of global concern, with significant adverse effects on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Impacts of freshwater salinization on biota are strongly mediated by evolutionary history, as this is a major factor determining species physiological salinity tolerance. Freshwater insects dominate most flowing waters, and the common lotic insect orders Ephemeroptera (mayflies), Plecoptera (stoneflies) and Trichoptera (caddisflies) are particularly salt-sensitive. Tolerances of existing taxa, rapid adaption, colonization by novel taxa (from naturally saline environments) and interactions between species will be key drivers of assemblages in saline lotic systems. Here we outline a conceptual framework predicting how communities may change in salinizing rivers. We envision that a relatively small number of taxa will be saline-tolerant and able to colonize salinized rivers (e.g. most naturally saline habitats are lentic; thus potential colonizers would need to adapt to lotic environments), leading to depauperate communities in these environments. PMID:26932680

  15. High Molybdenum availability for evolution in a Mesoproterozoic lacustrine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, John; Spinks, Samuel; Andrews, Steven; Thayalan, Wanethon; Bowden, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Trace metal data for Proterozoic marine euxinic sediments imply that the expansion of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and diversification of eukaryotes were delayed while the availability of bioessential metals such as molybdenum in the ocean was limited. However, there is increasing recognition that the Mesoproterozoic evolution of nitrogen fixation and eukaryotic life may have been promoted in marginal marine and terrestrial environments, including lakes, rather than in the deep ocean. Molybdenum availability is critical to life in lakes, just as it is in the oceans. It is, therefore, important to assess molybdenum availability to the lacustrine environment in the Mesoproterozoic. Here we show that the flux of molybdenum to a Mesoproterozoic lake was 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater than typical fluxes in the modern and ancient marine environment. Thus, there was no barrier to availability to prevent evolution in the terrestrial environment, in contrast to the nutrient-limited Mesoproterozoic oceans.

  16. High Molybdenum availability for evolution in a Mesoproterozoic lacustrine environment.

    PubMed

    Parnell, John; Spinks, Samuel; Andrews, Steven; Thayalan, Wanethon; Bowden, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Trace metal data for Proterozoic marine euxinic sediments imply that the expansion of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and diversification of eukaryotes were delayed while the availability of bioessential metals such as molybdenum in the ocean was limited. However, there is increasing recognition that the Mesoproterozoic evolution of nitrogen fixation and eukaryotic life may have been promoted in marginal marine and terrestrial environments, including lakes, rather than in the deep ocean. Molybdenum availability is critical to life in lakes, just as it is in the oceans. It is, therefore, important to assess molybdenum availability to the lacustrine environment in the Mesoproterozoic. Here we show that the flux of molybdenum to a Mesoproterozoic lake was 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater than typical fluxes in the modern and ancient marine environment. Thus, there was no barrier to availability to prevent evolution in the terrestrial environment, in contrast to the nutrient-limited Mesoproterozoic oceans. PMID:25988499

  17. Plasma simulations of emission line regions in high energy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.

    This dissertation focuses on understanding two different, but in each case extreme, astrophysical environments: the Crab Nebula and emission line galaxies. These relatively local objects are well constrained by observations and are test cases of phenomena seen at high-z where detailed observations are rare. The tool used to study these objects is the plasma simulation code known as Cloudy. The introduction provides a brief summary of relevant physical concepts in nebular astrophysics and presents the basic features and assumptions of Cloudy. The first object investigated with Cloudy, the Crab Nebula, is a nearby supernova remnant that previously has been subject to photoionization modeling to reproduce the ionized emission seen in the nebula's filamentary structure. However, there are still several unanswered questions: (1) What excites the H2 emitting gas? (2) How much mass is in the molecular component? (3) How did the H2 form? (4) What is nature of the dust grains? A large suite of observations including long slit optical and NIR spectra over ionized, neutral and molecular gas in addition to HST and NIR ground based images constrain a particularly bright region of H2 emission, Knot 51, which exhibits a high excitation temperature of ˜3000 K. Simulations of K51 revealed that only a trace amount of H2 is needed to reproduce the observed emission and that H2 forms through an uncommon nebular process known as associative detachment. The final chapters of this dissertation focus on interpreting the narrow line region (NLR) in low-z emission line galaxies selected by a novel technique known as mean field independent component analysis (MFICA). A mixture of starlight and radiation from an AGN excites the gas present in galaxies. MFICA separates galaxies over a wide range of ionization into subsets of pure AGN and pure star forming galaxies allowing simulations to reveal the properties responsible for their observed variation in ionization. Emission line ratios can

  18. Test Before You Fly - High Fidelity Planetary Environment Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd; Nehls, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The lunar surface environment will present many challenges to the survivability of systems developed for long duration lunar habitation and exploration of the lunar, or any other planetary, surface. Obstacles will include issues pertaining especially to the radiation environment (solar plasma and electromagnetic radiation) and lunar regolith dust. The Planetary Environments Chamber is one piece of the MSFC capability in Space Environmental Effects Test and Analysis. Comprised of many unique test systems, MSFC has the most complete set of SEE test capabilities in one location allowing examination of combined space environmental effects without transporting already degraded, potentially fragile samples over long distances between tests. With this system, the individual and combined effects of the lunar radiation and regolith environment on materials, sub-systems, and small systems developed for the lunar return can be investigated. This combined environments facility represents a unique capability to NASA, in which tests can be tailored to any one aspect of the lunar environment (radiation, temperature, vacuum, regolith) or to several of them combined in a single test.

  19. Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and milk

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Georget, Erika S.; Aganovic, Kemal; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) opens up new areas for dynamic high pressure assisted thermal sterilization of liquids. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores are resistant to high isostatic pressure and temperature and were suggested as potential surrogate for high pressure thermal sterilization validation. B. amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in PBS buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0), low fat milk (1.5%, pH 6.7), and whole milk (3.5%, pH 6.7) at initial concentration of ~106 CFU/mL were subjected to UHPH treatments at 200, 300, and 350 MPa with an inlet temperature at ~80°C. Thermal inactivation kinetics of B. amyloliquefaciens spores in PBS and milk were assessed with thin wall glass capillaries and modeled using first-order and Weibull models. The residence time during UHPH treatments was estimated to determine the contribution of temperature to spore inactivation by UHPH. No sublethal injury was detected after UHPH treatments using sodium chloride as selective component in the nutrient agar medium. The inactivation profiles of spores in PBS buffer and milk were compared and fat provided no clear protective effect for spores against treatments. Treatment at 200 MPa with valve temperatures lower than 125°C caused no reduction of spores. A reduction of 3.5 log10CFU/mL of B. amyloliquefaciens spores was achieved by treatment at 350 MPa with a valve temperature higher than 150°C. The modeled thermal inactivation and observed inactivation during UHPH treatments suggest that temperature could be the main lethal effect driving inactivation. PMID:26236296

  20. Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and milk.

    PubMed

    Dong, Peng; Georget, Erika S; Aganovic, Kemal; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) opens up new areas for dynamic high pressure assisted thermal sterilization of liquids. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores are resistant to high isostatic pressure and temperature and were suggested as potential surrogate for high pressure thermal sterilization validation. B. amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in PBS buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0), low fat milk (1.5%, pH 6.7), and whole milk (3.5%, pH 6.7) at initial concentration of ~10(6) CFU/mL were subjected to UHPH treatments at 200, 300, and 350 MPa with an inlet temperature at ~80°C. Thermal inactivation kinetics of B. amyloliquefaciens spores in PBS and milk were assessed with thin wall glass capillaries and modeled using first-order and Weibull models. The residence time during UHPH treatments was estimated to determine the contribution of temperature to spore inactivation by UHPH. No sublethal injury was detected after UHPH treatments using sodium chloride as selective component in the nutrient agar medium. The inactivation profiles of spores in PBS buffer and milk were compared and fat provided no clear protective effect for spores against treatments. Treatment at 200 MPa with valve temperatures lower than 125°C caused no reduction of spores. A reduction of 3.5 log10CFU/mL of B. amyloliquefaciens spores was achieved by treatment at 350 MPa with a valve temperature higher than 150°C. The modeled thermal inactivation and observed inactivation during UHPH treatments suggest that temperature could be the main lethal effect driving inactivation. PMID:26236296

  1. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  2. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-15

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  3. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-17

    In high material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. Our paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 degrees C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. Our work covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  4. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; et al

    2015-12-17

    In high material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. Our paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 degrees C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition,more » examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. Our work covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.« less

  5. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Małgorzata G; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N; Lauridsen, Erik M; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Molaison, Jamie J; Santodonato, Louis J; Tremsin, Anton S; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components. PMID:26724075

  6. Functional genes (dsr) approach reveals similar sulphidogenic prokaryotes diversity but different structure in saline waters from corroding high temperature petroleum reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jing; Zhang, Bing-Liang; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Liu, Jin-Feng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2014-02-01

    Oil reservoirs and production facilities are generally contaminated with H2S resulting from the activity of sulphidogenic prokaryotes (SRP). Sulphidogenesis plays a major role in reservoir souring and microbial influenced corrosion in oil production systems. In the present study, sulphidogenic microbial diversity and composition in saline production fluids retrieved from three blocks of corroding high temperature (79 ~ 95 °C) oil reservoirs with high sulfate concentrations were investigated by phylogenetic analyses of gene fragments of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr). Analysis of dsr gene fragments revealed the presence of several clusters of sulphidogenic prokaryotes that cover the orders Desulfovibrionales (Desulfovibrio, Desulfomicrobium thermophilum), Desulfobacterales (Desulfobacterium, Desulfosarcina, Desulfococcus, Desulfotignum, Desulfobotulus, Desulfobulbus), Syntrophobacterales (Desulfacinum, Thermodesulforhabdus, Desulforhabdus), Clostridiales (Desulfotomaculum) and Archaeoglobales (Archaeoglobus); among which sequences affiliated to members of Desulfomicrobium, Desulfotomaculum and Desulfovibrio appeared to be the most encountered genera within the three blocks. Collectively, phylogenetic and non-metric multidimensional scaling analyses indicated similar but structurally different sulphidogenic prokaryotes communities within the waters retrieved from the three Blocks. This study show the diversity and composition of sulphidogenic prokaryotes that may play a role in the souring mediated corrosion of the oilfield and also provides a fundamental basis for further investigation to control oil reservoir souring and corrosion of pipelines and topside installations. PMID:23949995

  7. Effects of plant downtime on the microbial community composition in the highly saline brine of a geothermal plant in the North German Basin.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Anke; Lerm, Stephanie; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Seibt, Andrea; Wolfgramm, Markus; Würdemann, Hilke

    2016-04-01

    The microbial biocenosis in highly saline fluids produced from the cold well of a deep geothermal heat store located in the North German Basin was characterized during regular plant operation and immediately after plant downtime phases. Genetic fingerprinting revealed the dominance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and fermentative Halanaerobiaceae during regular plant operation, whereas after shutdown phases, sequences of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) were also detected. The detection of SOB indicated oxygen ingress into the well during the downtime phase. High 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and dsrA gene copy numbers at the beginning of the restart process showed an enrichment of bacteria, SRB, and SOB during stagnant conditions consistent with higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), sulfate, and hydrogen sulfide in the produced fluids. The interaction of SRB and SOB during plant downtimes might have enhanced the corrosion processes occurring in the well. It was shown that scale content of fluids was significantly increased after stagnant phases. Moreover, the sulfur isotopic signature of the mineral scales indicated microbial influence on scale formation. PMID:26610802

  8. A high-salinity solution with calcium chloride enables RNase-free, easy plasmid isolation within 55 minutes.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Noboru; Koebis, Michinori; Yonemura, Yoji; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2013-12-01

    We dramatically improved a plasmid-isolation protocol based on the popular alkaline-sodium dodecyl sulfate plasmid isolation method. Our modified method provides significant time and cost savings. We used a modified solution during the neutralization step, which allowed us to skip several subsequent handling steps, saving a great amount of time. The plasmids purified by this method were of high quality, and the optical density ratio 260 and 280 was approximately 1.8. Plasmid DNA isolated by our method was of sufficient quality to perform subsequent restriction enzyme cuts and other downstream experiments, including budding yeast transformation, cultured cell transfection, and Caenorhabditis elegans injection experiments. PMID:24390365

  9. Fluid source and pressure temperature conditions of high-salinity fluids in syn-tectonic veins from the Northeastern Apuan Alps (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montomoli, Chiara; Ruggieri, Giovanni; Carosi, Rodolfo; Dini, Andrea; Genovesi, Marianna

    the high-salinity fluids found in the syn-tectonic veins: the high-salinity and NaCl-rich nature of the trapped fluids suggest that the original metamorphic fluids interacted with evaporite levels present at the base of the Tuscan Nappe, overlying Apuan Alps metamorphic Units. These fluids then infiltrated downward, possibly through shear zones crosscutting the stratigraphic sequence, into the syn-tectonic veins and interacted with the host-rocks to produce a local element mobilization and their precipitation in the vein minerals; as a result the latter reflect the mineralogy of the host-rocks.

  10. Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heat of the sun also forces evaporation at the ocean's surface, which puts water vapor into the atmosphere but leaves minerals and salts behind, keeping the ocean salty. The salinity of the oce...

  11. Effects of salinity, temperature, and cadmium stress on cadmium-binding protein in the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    In 96-hour bioassays, shrimp were exposed to zero or one of three levels of cadmium, under one of six different salinity and temperature regimes. CdBP concentrations were quantified in survivors from the 24 exposure groups. Salinity and temperature did not affect survivorship unless the shrimp were also exposed to cadmium. Grass shrimp were most sensitive to cadmium at low salinity-high temperature, and least sensitive at high salinity-low temperature. The incidence of cadmium-associated black lesions in gill tissue was influenced by salinity and temperature stress. P. pugio produced a 10,000 dalton metallothionein-like CdBP when exposed to at least 0.1 mg Cd{sup 2+}/L for 96 hours. Accumulation of CdBP was increased with increases in the exposure cadmium level, increases in temperature and decreases in salinity, independently and in conjunction with one another. Maximum CdBP concentrations occurred in grass shrimp that survived the salinity-temperature-cadmium conditions creating maximum stress as measured by highest mortality, not necessarily in shrimp exposed to the highest cadmium levels. The potential utility of this method as a monitor of physiological stress in estuarine biota inhabiting metal-polluted environments is discussed.

  12. Monitoring Expression Profiles of Rice Genes under Cold, Drought, and High-Salinity Stresses and Abscisic Acid Application Using cDNA Microarray and RNA Gel-Blot Analyses1[w

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, M. Ashiq; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Abe, Hiroshi; Khan, M. Ayub; Katsura, Koji; Ito, Yusuke; Yoshiwara, Kyoko; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2003-01-01

    To identify cold-, drought-, high-salinity-, and/or abscisic acid (ABA)-inducible genes in rice (Oryza sativa), we prepared a rice cDNA microarray including about 1,700 independent cDNAs derived from cDNA libraries prepared from drought-, cold-, and high-salinity-treated rice plants. We confirmed stress-inducible expression of the candidate genes selected by microarray analysis using RNA gel-blot analysis and finally identified a total of 73 genes as stress inducible including 58 novel unreported genes in rice. Among them, 36, 62, 57, and 43 genes were induced by cold, drought, high salinity, and ABA, respectively. We observed a strong association in the expression of stress-responsive genes and found 15 genes that responded to all four treatments. Venn diagram analysis revealed greater cross talk between signaling pathways for drought, ABA, and high-salinity stresses than between signaling pathways for cold and ABA stresses or cold and high-salinity stresses in rice. The rice genome database search enabled us not only to identify possible known cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of several stress-inducible genes but also to expect the existence of novel cis-acting elements involved in stress-responsive gene expression in rice stress-inducible promoters. Comparative analysis of Arabidopsis and rice showed that among the 73 stress-inducible rice genes, 51 already have been reported in Arabidopsis with similar function or gene name. Transcriptome analysis revealed novel stress-inducible genes, suggesting some differences between Arabidopsis and rice in their response to stress. PMID:14645724

  13. Administration of hydrogen-saturated saline decreases plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and improves high-density lipoprotein function in high-fat diet-fed hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chuanlong; Song, Guohua; Yao, Shutong; Li, Luqin; Yu, Yang; Feng, Lei; Guo, Shoudong; Luo, Tian; Qin, Shucun

    2012-06-01

    Hydrogen (dihydrogen; H(2)) has an antiatherosclerotic effect in apolipoprotein (apo) E knockout mice. The goals of this study were to further characterize the effects of H(2) on the content, composition, and biological activities of plasma lipoproteins in golden hamsters. Plasma analysis by enzymatic method and fast protein liquid chromatography showed that 4-week intraperitoneal injection of hydrogen-saturated saline remarkably decreased plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in high-fat diet-fed hamsters. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of apolipoproteins from ultracentrifugally isolated plasma lipoproteins revealed a marked decrease of apo B100 and apo B48 in LDL. A profound decrease of apo E level in very low-density lipoprotein was also observed. Besides, we determined the functional quality of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles isolated from H(2)-treated and control mice. H(2) significantly improved HDL functionality assessed in 2 independent ways, namely, (1) stimulation of cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells by measuring HDL-induced [(3)H]cholesterol efflux and (2) protection against LDL oxidation as a measure of Cu(2+)-induced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation. Administration of hydrogen-saturated saline decreases plasma LDL cholesterol and apo B levels and improves hyperlipidemia-injured HDL functions, including the capacity of enhancing cellular cholesterol efflux and playing antioxidative properties, in high-fat diet-fed hamsters. PMID:22153840

  14. Associations between land use and Perkinsus marinus infection of eastern oysters in a high salinity, partially urbanized estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Brian R.; Bushek, David; Drane, J. Wanzer; Porter, Dwayne

    2009-01-01

    Infection levels of eastern oysters by the unicellular pathogen Perkinsus marinus have been associated with anthropogenic influences in laboratory studies. However, these relationships have been difficult to investigate in the field because anthropogenic inputs are often associated with natural influences such as freshwater inflow, which can also affect infection levels. We addressed P. marinus-land use associations using field-collected data from Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, USA, a developed, coastal estuary with relatively minor freshwater inputs. Ten oysters from each of 30 reefs were sampled quarterly in each of 2 years. Distances to nearest urbanized land class and to nearest stormwater outfall were measured via both tidal creeks and an elaboration of Euclidean distance. As the forms of any associations between oyster infection and distance to urbanization were unknown a priori, we used data from the first and second years of the study as exploratory and confirmatory datasets, respectively. With one exception, quarterly land use associations identified using the exploratory dataset were not confirmed using the confirmatory dataset. The exception was an association between the prevalence of moderate to high infection levels in winter and decreasing distance to nearest urban land use. Given that the study design appeared adequate to detect effects inferred from the exploratory dataset, these results suggest that effects of land use gradients were largely insubstantial or were ephemeral with duration less than 3 months.

  15. Identification of Ice Plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) MicroRNAs Using RNA-Seq and Their Putative Roles in High Salinity Responses in Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-Pin; Yim, Won C.; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Ohnishi, Miwa; Mimura, Tetsuro; Cushman, John C.; Yen, Hungchen E.

    2016-01-01

    The halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (common or crystalline ice plant) is a useful model for studying molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance. The morphology, physiology, metabolism, and gene expression of ice plant have been studied and large-scale analyses of gene expression profiling have drawn an outline of salt tolerance in ice plant. A rapid root growth to a sudden increase in salinity was observed in ice plant seedlings. Using a fluorescent dye to detect Na+, we found that ice plant roots respond to an increased flux of Na+ by either secreting or storing Na+ in specialized cells. High-throughput sequencing was used to identify small RNA profiles in 3-day-old seedlings treated with or without 200 mM NaCl. In total, 135 conserved miRNAs belonging to 21 families were found. The hairpin precursor of 19 conserved mcr-miRNAs and 12 novel mcr-miRNAs were identified. After 6 h of salt stress, the expression of most mcr-miRNAs showed decreased relative abundance, whereas the expression of their corresponding target genes showed increased mRNA relative abundance. The cognate target genes are involved in a broad range of biological processes: transcription factors that regulate growth and development, enzymes that catalyze miRNA biogenesis for the most conserved mcr-miRNA, and proteins that are involved in ion homeostasis and drought-stress responses for some novel mcr-miRNAs. Analyses of the functions of target genes revealed that cellular processes, including growth and development, metabolism, and ion transport activity are likely to be enhanced in roots under salt stress. The expression of eleven conserved miRNAs and two novel miRNAs were correlated reciprocally with predicted targets within hours after salt stress exposure. Several conserved miRNAs have been known to regulate root elongation, root apical meristem activity, and lateral root formation. Based upon the expression pattern of miRNA and target genes in combination with the observation of Na

  16. Identification of Ice Plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) MicroRNAs Using RNA-Seq and Their Putative Roles in High Salinity Responses in Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Pin; Yim, Won C; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Ohnishi, Miwa; Mimura, Tetsuro; Cushman, John C; Yen, Hungchen E

    2016-01-01

    The halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (common or crystalline ice plant) is a useful model for studying molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance. The morphology, physiology, metabolism, and gene expression of ice plant have been studied and large-scale analyses of gene expression profiling have drawn an outline of salt tolerance in ice plant. A rapid root growth to a sudden increase in salinity was observed in ice plant seedlings. Using a fluorescent dye to detect Na(+), we found that ice plant roots respond to an increased flux of Na(+) by either secreting or storing Na(+) in specialized cells. High-throughput sequencing was used to identify small RNA profiles in 3-day-old seedlings treated with or without 200 mM NaCl. In total, 135 conserved miRNAs belonging to 21 families were found. The hairpin precursor of 19 conserved mcr-miRNAs and 12 novel mcr-miRNAs were identified. After 6 h of salt stress, the expression of most mcr-miRNAs showed decreased relative abundance, whereas the expression of their corresponding target genes showed increased mRNA relative abundance. The cognate target genes are involved in a broad range of biological processes: transcription factors that regulate growth and development, enzymes that catalyze miRNA biogenesis for the most conserved mcr-miRNA, and proteins that are involved in ion homeostasis and drought-stress responses for some novel mcr-miRNAs. Analyses of the functions of target genes revealed that cellular processes, including growth and development, metabolism, and ion transport activity are likely to be enhanced in roots under salt stress. The expression of eleven conserved miRNAs and two novel miRNAs were correlated reciprocally with predicted targets within hours after salt stress exposure. Several conserved miRNAs have been known to regulate root elongation, root apical meristem activity, and lateral root formation. Based upon the expression pattern of miRNA and target genes in combination with the observation of Na

  17. Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gilbert F.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are perspectives on the emergence of environmental problems. Six major trends in scientific thinking are identified including: holistic approaches to examining environments, life support systems, resource management, risk assessment, streamlined methods for monitoring environmental change, and emphasis on the global framework. (Author/SA)

  18. The effects of olive mill waste compost and poultry manure on the availability and plant uptake of nutrients in a highly saline soil.

    PubMed

    Walker, David J; Bernal, M Pilar

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a compost (produced from by-products of the olive oil industry) and a poultry manure on mineral ion solubility and exchangeability in a highly saline agricultural soil (electrical conductivity for a 1:5 soil:water extract=1.85 dS m(-1)) from Murcia (SE Spain) were studied. The organic amendments did not change significantly the soil electrical conductivity or the soluble Na(+), Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Only soluble K(+) increased, due to the K(+) supplied by the amendments. The cation exchange capacity increased in treated soils, the exchange complex being mainly saturated with Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and K(+). However, Na(+) was not retained in the exchange sites, and the sodium absorption ratio remained low. The compost and manure increased markedly the shoot growth of the salt-tolerant Beta maritima L. (sea beet) and Beta vulgaris L. (sugar beet). For B. maritima, this seemed to be related to decreases in the shoot concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) and increases in K(+) and H(2)PO(4)(-). In the case of B. vulgaris, increases in shoot H(2)PO(4)(-) and B and, for manure-treated soil, a decrease in shoot Na(+) may have been involved. Cultivation of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Moneymaker) in the soil used previously for B. vulgaris indicated that the effects of the manure on tissue cation concentrations were longer-lasting than those of the compost. PMID:17275292

  19. GhMPK17, a Cotton Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase, Is Involved in Plant Response to High Salinity and Osmotic Stresses and ABA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Sun, Xiang; Wang, Na-Na; Gong, Si-Ying; Zheng, Yong; Li, Xue-Bao

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play pivotal roles in mediating biotic and abiotic stress responses. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is the most important textile crop in the world, and often encounters abiotic stress during its growth seasons. In this study, a gene encoding a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was isolated from cotton, and designated as GhMPK17. The open reading frame (ORF) of GhMPK17 gene is 1494 bp in length and encodes a protein with 497 amino acids. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that GhMPK17 expression was up-regulated in cotton under NaCl, mannitol and ABA treatments. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing GhMPK17 gene showed higher seed germination, root elongation and cotyledon greening/expansion rates than those of the wild type on MS medium containing NaCl, mannitol and exogenous ABA, suggesting that overexpression of GhMPK17 in Arabidopsis increased plant ABA-insensitivity, and enhanced plant tolerance to salt and osmotic stresses. Furthermore, overexpression of GhMPK17 in Arabidopsis reduced H2O2 level and altered expression of ABA- and abiotic stress-related genes in the transgenic plants. Collectively, these data suggested that GhMPK17 gene may be involved in plant response to high salinity and osmotic stresses and ABA signaling. PMID:24743296

  20. Characterization of salt-tolerant β-glucosidase with increased thermostability under high salinity conditions from Bacillus sp. SJ-10 isolated from jeotgal, a traditional Korean fermented seafood.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Yu-Ri; Kim, Joong Kyun; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Ha, Jeong-Chul; Kong, In-Soo

    2015-07-01

    The β-glucosidase gene, bglC, was cloned from Bacillus sp. SJ-10 isolated from the squid jeotgal. Recombinant BglC protein overexpression was induced in Escherichia coli. The optimal pH and temperature of the enzyme, using p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (pNPβGlc) as a substrate, were pH 6 and 40 °C, respectively. Enzymatic activity increased by 3.3- and 3.5-fold in the presence of 15% NaCl and KCl, respectively. Furthermore, enzyme thermostability improved in the presence of NaCl or KCl. At 45 °C in the presence of salts, the enzyme was stable for 2 h and maintained 80% activity. In the absence of salts, BglC completely lost activity after 110 min at 45 °C. Comparison of the kinetic parameters at various salt concentrations revealed that BglC had approximately 1.5- and 1.2-fold higher affinity and hydrolyzed pNPβGlc 1.9- and 2.1-fold faster in the presence of 15% NaCl and KCl, respectively. Additionally, the Gibb's free energy for denaturation was higher in the presence of 15% salt than in the absence of salt at 45 and 50 °C. Since enzymatic activity and thermostability were enhanced under high salinity conditions, BglC is an ideal salt-tolerant enzyme for further research and industrial applications. PMID:25682105

  1. EXPLORING ENVIRONMENTAL DATA IN A HIGHLY IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL REALITY ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geography inherently fills a 3D space and yet we struggle with displaying geography using, primaarily, 2D display devices. Virtual environments offer a more realistically-dimensioned display space and this is being realized in the expanding area of research on 3D Geographic Infor...

  2. Material evaluation program, high-temperature nitriding environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcy, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a program conducted to evaluate materials for construction of a space shuttle hydrazine monopropellant gas generator are presented. The program was designed to select those materials that maintain the properties of strength and ductility after exposure to an 1800 F nitriding environment for 1000 hours.

  3. Mapping of soil salinity: a comparative study between deterministic and geostatistical methods, case of the Tadla plain (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbouchi, Meriem; Chokmani, Karem; Ben Aissa, Nadhira; Lhissou, Rachid; El Harti, Abderrazak; Abdelfattah, Riadh

    2013-04-01

    Soil salinization hazard in semi-arid regions such as Central Morocco is increasingly affecting arable lands and this is due to combined effects of anthropogenic activities (development of irrigation) and climate change (Multiplying drought episodes). In a rational strategy of fight against this hazard, salinity mapping is a key step to ensure effective spatiotemporal monitoring. The objective of this study is to test the effectiveness of geostatistical approach in mapping soil salinity compared to more forward deterministic interpolation methods. Three soil salinity sampling campaigns (27 September, 24 October and 19 November 2011) were conducted over the irrigated area of the Tadla plain, situated between the High and Middle Atlasin Central Morocco. Each campaign was made of 38 surface soil samples (upper 5 cm). From each sample the electrical conductivity (EC) was determined in saturated paste extract and used subsequently as proxy of soil salinity. The potential of deterministic interpolation methods (IDW) and geostatistical techniques (Ordinary Kriging) in mapping surface soil salinity was evaluated in a GIS environment through cross-validation technique. Field measurements showed that the soil salinity was generally low except during the second campaign where a significant increase in EC values was recorded. Interpolation results showed a better performance with geostatistical approach compared to deterministic one. Indeed, for all the campaigns, cross-validation yielded lower RMSE and bias for Kriging than IDW. However, the performance of the two methods was dependent on the range and the structure of the spatial variability of salinity. Indeed, Kriging showed better accuracy for the second campaign in comparison with the two others. This could be explained by the wider range of values of soil salinity during this campaign, which has resulted in a greater range of spatial dependence and has a better modeling of the spatial variability of salinity, which 'was

  4. Experimental assessment of the effects of sublethal salinities on growth performance and stress in cultured tra catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuc Trong Hong; Do, Huong Thi Thanh; Mather, Peter B; Hurwood, David A

    2014-12-01

    The effects of a range of different sublethal salinities were assessed on physiological processes and growth performance in the freshwater 'tra' catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) juveniles over an 8-week experiment. Fish were distributed randomly among 6 salinity treatments [2, 6, 10, 14 and 18 g/L of salinity and a control (0 g/L)] with a subsequent 13-day period of acclimation. Low salinity conditions from 2 to 10 g/L provided optimal conditions with high survival and good growth performance, while 0 g/L and salinities >14 g/L gave poorer survival rates (p < 0.05). Salinity levels from freshwater to 10 g/L did not have any negative effects on fish weight gain, daily weight gain, or specific growth rate. Food conversion ratio, however, was lowest in the control treatment (p < 0.05) and highest at the maximum salinities tested (18 g/L treatment). Cortisol levels were elevated in the 14 and 18 g/L treatments after 6 h and reached a peak after 24-h exposure, and this also led to increases in plasma glucose concentration. After 14 days, surviving fish in all treatments appeared to have acclimated to their respective conditions with cortisol levels remaining under 5 ng/mL with glucose concentrations stable. Tra catfish do not appear to be efficient osmoregulators when salinity levels exceed 10 g/L, and at raised salinity levels, growth performance is compromised. In general, results of this study confirm that providing culture environments in the Mekong River Basin do not exceed 10 g/L salinity and that cultured tra catfish can continue to perform well. PMID:25139325

  5. Constitutive and damage material modeling in a high pressure hydrogen environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, D. A.; Fritzemeier, L. G.

    1991-05-01

    Numerous components in reusable space propulsion systems such as the SSME are exposed to high pressure gaseous hydrogen environments. Flow areas and passages in the fuel turbopump, fuel and oxidizer preburners, main combustion chamber, and injector assembly contain high pressure hydrogen either high in purity or as hydrogen rich steam. Accurate constitutive and damage material models applicable to high pressure hydrogen environments are therefore needed for engine design and analysis. Existing constitutive and cyclic crack initiation models were evaluated only for conditions of oxidizing environments. The main objective is to evaluate these models for applicability to high pressure hydrogen environments.

  6. Constitutive and damage material modeling in a high pressure hydrogen environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.; Fritzemeier, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous components in reusable space propulsion systems such as the SSME are exposed to high pressure gaseous hydrogen environments. Flow areas and passages in the fuel turbopump, fuel and oxidizer preburners, main combustion chamber, and injector assembly contain high pressure hydrogen either high in purity or as hydrogen rich steam. Accurate constitutive and damage material models applicable to high pressure hydrogen environments are therefore needed for engine design and analysis. Existing constitutive and cyclic crack initiation models were evaluated only for conditions of oxidizing environments. The main objective is to evaluate these models for applicability to high pressure hydrogen environments.

  7. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  8. Biomass Yield Efficiency of the Marine Anammox Bacterium, “Candidatus Scalindua sp.,” is Affected by Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Takanori; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ozaki, Noriatsu; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The growth rate and biomass yield efficiency of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria are markedly lower than those of most other autotrophic bacteria. Among the anammox bacterial genera, the growth rate and biomass yield of the marine anammox bacterium “Candidatus Scalindua sp.” is still lower than those of other anammox bacteria enriched from freshwater environments. The activity and growth of marine anammox bacteria are generally considered to be affected by the presence of salinity and organic compounds. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of salinity and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on the anammox activity, inorganic carbon uptake, and biomass yield efficiency of “Ca. Scalindua sp.” enriched from the marine sediments of Hiroshima Bay, Japan, were investigated in batch experiments. Differences in VFA concentrations (0–10 mM) were observed under varying salinities (0.5%–4%). Anammox activity was high at 0.5%–3.5% salinity, but was 30% lower at 4% salinity. In addition, carbon uptake was higher at 1.5%–3.5% salinity. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated that the biomass yield efficiency of the marine anammox bacterium “Ca. Scalindua sp.” was significantly affected by salinity. On the other hand, the presence of VFAs up to 10 mM did not affect anammox activity, carbon uptake, or biomass yield efficiency. PMID:25740428

  9. Growth potential of blue mussels (M. edulis) exposed to different salinities evaluated by a Dynamic Energy Budget model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maar, Marie; Saurel, Camille; Landes, Anja; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf

    2015-08-01

    For blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, one major constrain in the Baltic Sea is the low salinities that reduce the efficiency of mussel production. However, the effects of living in low and variable salinity regimes are rarely considered in models describing mussel growth. The aim of the present study was to incorporate the effects of low salinity into an eco-physiological model of blue mussels and to identify areas suitable for mussel production. A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model was modified with respect to i) the morphological parameters (DW/WW-ratio, shape factor), ii) change in ingestion rate and iii) metabolic costs due to osmoregulation in different salinity environments. The modified DEB model was validated with experimental data from different locations in the Western Baltic Sea (including the Limfjorden) with salinities varying from 8.5 to 29.9 psu. The identified areas suitable for mussel production in the Baltic Sea are located in the Little Belt area, the Great Belt, the southern Kattegat and the Limfjorden according to the prevailing salinity regimes. The new model can be used for supporting site selection of new mussel nutrient extraction cultures in the Baltic Sea that suffers from high eutrophication symptoms or as part of integrated multi-trophic aquaculture production. The model can also be used to predict the effects of salinity changes on mussel populations e.g. in climate change studies.

  10. Temporal variations of groundwater salinity and temperature in a tidal flat in front of a tide pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashita, Shinya; Hibino, Tadashi; Komai, Katsuaki; Narong, Touch

    2016-07-01

    A tidal flat in an estuary is a complex hydrological system, which is characterized by interactions between surface water in river and groundwater and is particularly driven by tides. Small-scale variability in the discharge or inflow could lead to variable results of surface groundwater salinity and temperature. In particular, there is a high possibility that a hydraulic head difference due to the presence of a tide pool, lagoon, or seep would cause the generation of small-scale spatial submarine groundwater discharge. This study investigates the spatio-temporal variations in surface groundwater salinity and temperature (0-50 cm depth) and the groundwater table in a tidal flat in the presence and absence of a tide pool. A tide pool formed in the Ota River diversion channel at the study observation site following the construction of a masonry revetment in the intertidal zone. We established observation sites at three locations to consider the effects of the presence or absence of a tide pool. Specifically, we measured the surface water in river and groundwater salinity, temperature, and level in the presence and absence of a tide pool in 2007 and 2009. Reviewing the past data based on these results, we found the characteristic variation of groundwater salinity around the tide pool during flood event in 2004. Groundwater salinity and temperature were directly measured by setting conductivity-temperature meters in the tidal flat. We conclude that the groundwater table in the presence of the tide pool was 20 cm higher than in areas where no tide pool existed. The temporal variation of groundwater salinity in the presence of the tide pool was 5 psu lower than those where a tide pool was absent. Moreover, we confirmed the increase in groundwater salinity up to 8 psu in the tidal flat during flood, when river water salinity was at 0 psu and groundwater salinity in the tide pool was at 10 psu. We consider that the high groundwater table, the low salinity, and the increase

  11. Archaeal viruses from Yellowstone’s high temperature environments

    SciTech Connect

    M. Young; B. Wiedenheft; J. Snyder; J. Spuhler; F. Roberto; T. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    In general, our understanding of Archaea lags far behind our knowledge of the other two domains of life—Bacteria and Eukarya. Unlike the other domains of life, very few viruses of Archaea have been characterized. Of the approximately 4000 viruses described to date, only 36 are associated with archaeal hosts--many of these from thermophilic Crenarchaeota. In this work we describe the discovery, isolation and preliminary characterization of viruses and novel virus-like particles isolated directly from diverse thermal environments in Yellowstone National Park.

  12. Low-Flammability PTFE for High-Oxygen Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walle, E.; Fallon, B.; Sheppard, A.

    1986-01-01

    Modified forming process removes volatile combustible materials. Flammability of cable-wrapping tape reduced by altering tape-manufacturing process. In new manufacturing process, tape formed by proprietary process of screw extrusion, followed by washing in solvent and drying. Tape then wrapped as before. Spectrogram taken after extrusion, washing, and drying shows lower hydrocarbon content. PTFE formed by new process suited to oxygen-rich environments. Safe in liquid oxygen of Space Shuttle tank and in medical uses; thin-wall shrinkable tubing in hospital test equipment, surgical instruments, and implants.

  13. Use of Classroom and School Environment Scales in Evaluating Alternative High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, John C.; And Others

    In this research, some alternative high schools were evaluated in terms of both students' perceptions of classroom environment and teachers' perceptions of school environment. A sample of 742 students in 62 classes in alternative and conventional schools responded to the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory's seven scales…

  14. Some Determinants of Classroom Psychosocial Environment in Australian Catholic High Schools: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.

    2009-01-01

    This research investigated some determinants of classroom environment in Australian Catholic high schools. The Catholic School Classroom Environment Questionnaire (CSCEQ) was used to assess 7 dimensions of the classroom psychosocial environment: student affiliation, interactions, cooperation, task orientation, order and organization,…

  15. Estimation of soil salinity by using Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation for multi-configuration electromagnetic induction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadoon, K. Z.; Altaf, M. U.; McCabe, M. F.; Hoteit, I.; Moghadas, D.

    2014-12-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, soil salinity has a major impact on agro-ecosystems, agricultural productivity, environment and sustainability. High levels of soil salinity adversely affect plant growth and productivity, soil and water quality, and may eventually result in soil erosion and land degradation. Being essentially a hazard, it's important to monitor and map soil salinity at an early stage to effectively use soil resources and maintain soil salinity level below the salt tolerance of crops. In this respect, low frequency electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems can be used as a noninvasive method to map the distribution of soil salinity at the field scale and at a high spatial resolution. In this contribution, an EMI system (the CMD Mini-Explorer) is used to estimate soil salinity using a Bayesian approach implemented via a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling for inversion of multi-configuration EMI measurements. In-situ and EMI measurements were conducted across a farm where Acacia trees are irrigated with brackish water using a drip irrigation system. The electromagnetic forward model is based on the full solution of Maxwell's equation, and the subsurface is considered as a three-layer problem. In total, five parameters (electrical conductivity of three layers and thickness of top two layers) were inverted and modeled electrical conductivities were converted into the universal standard of soil salinity measurement (i.e. using the method of electrical conductivity of a saturated soil paste extract). Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme successfully recovers soil salinity and reduces the uncertainties in the prior estimate. Analysis of the resulting posterior distribution of parameters indicates that electrical conductivity of the top two layers and the thickness of the first layer are well constrained by the EMI measurements. The proposed approach allows for quantitative mapping and monitoring of the spatial electrical conductivity

  16. Review of buried cystalline rocks of Eastern United States in selected hydrogeologic environments potentially suitable for isolating high-level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Among the concepts suggested for the deep disposal of high-level radioactive wastes from nuclear power reactors is the excavation of a repository in suitable crystalline rocks overlain by a thick sequence of sedimentary strata in a hydrogeologic environment that would effectively impede waste transport. To determine the occurrence of such environments in the Eastern United States, a review was made of available sources of published or unpublished information, using the following hydrogeologic criteria: The top of the crystalline basement rock is 1000 to 4000 feet below and surface, the crystalline rock is overlain by sedimentary rock whose lowermost part, at least, contains ground water with a dissolved-solids concentration of 10,000 milligrams per liter or more, shale or clay confining beds overlie the saline-water aquifer, and the flow system in the saline-water aquifer is known or determinable from presently available data. All of these hydrogeologic conditions occur in two general areas: (1) parts of Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky, underlain by part of the geologic structure known as the Cincinnati arch, and (2) parts of the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Georgia to New Jersey. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Review of buried crystalline rocks of eastern United States in selected hydrogeologic environments potentially suitable for isolating high-level radioactive wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Among the concepts suggested for the deep disposal of high-level radioactive wastes from nuclear power reactors is the excavation of a repository in suitable crystalline rocks overlain by a thick sequence of sedimentary strata in a hydrogeologic environment that would effectively impede waste transport. To determine the occurrence of such environments in the Eastern United States, a review was made of available sources of published or unpublished information, using the following hydrogeologic criteria: (1) the top of the crystalline basement rock is 1,000 to 4,000 feet below land surface; (2) the crystalline rock is overlain by sedimentary rock whose lowermost part, at least, contains groundwater with a dissolved-solids concentration of 10,000 milligrams per liter or more; (3) shale and or clay confining beds overlie the saline-water aquifer; and (4) the flow system in the saline-water aquifer is known or determinable from presently available data. All of these hydrogeologic conditions occur in two general areas: (1) parts of Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky, underlain by part of the geologic structure known as the Cincinnati arch, and (2) parts of the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Georgia to New Jersey. (USGS)

  18. High dynamic, spectral, and polarized natural light environment acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porral, Philippe; Callet, Patrick; Fuchs, Philippe; Muller, Thomas; Sandré-Chardonnal, Etienne

    2015-03-01

    In the field of image synthesis, the simulation of material's appearance requires a rigorous resolution of the light transport equation. This implies taking into account all the elements that may have an influence on the spectral radiance, and that are perceived by the human eye. Obviously, the reflectance properties of the materials have a major impact in the calculations, but other significant properties of light such as spectral distribution and polarization must also be taken into account, in order to expect correct results. Unfortunately real maps of the polarized or spectral environment corresponding to a real sky do not exist. Therefore, it seemed necessary to focus our work on capturing such data, in order to have a system that qualifies all the properties of light and capable of powering simulations in a renderer software. As a consequence, in this work, we develop and characterize a device designed to capture the entire light environment, by taking into account both the dynamic range of the spectral distribution and the polarization states, in a measurement time of less than two minutes. We propose a data format inspired by polarimetric imaging and fitted for a spectral rendering engine, which exploits the "Stokes-Mueller formalism."

  19. Hydrothermal Vent Sampler: Does Life Exist in High Temperature Environments?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivadeneyra, Cesar R.

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to search for the existence of biomass under extreme temperature and pressure conditions to determine the upper bounds of environments on which life can exist. Vents are, simply put, underwater volcano openings located at the bottom of the sea. The conditions at these locations are considerably extreme with pressures of up to 10,000 psi, and enormous temperature gradients. The temperature of the water near these vents is around 400 C, while that of the surrounding water is about 3 C. The extremity of these conditions makes it hard to estimate the existence of life in those environments. I n order to find whether such existence happens, we need to search for biomass inside these vents. The vent sampler is a device that has the purpose of safely and accurately collecting this biomass for examination. This sampler is constituted of a Series of filters of the order of 100-0.2 microns in size. Since this is a 3-year project, it has not concluded yet; however, during the time I contributed to this project, I worked with the mechanical design of this sampler device including the selection, assembly, and testing of the various subsystems and the design and construction of the electronics enclosure.

  20. On observing acoustic backscattering from salinity turbulence.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Louis; Sastre-Cordova, Marcos M

    2011-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that at sufficiently high levels of oceanic salinity turbulence it should be possible to observe acoustic backscattering. However, there have been limited in situ measurements to confirm this hypothesis. Using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with upward and downward looking 1.2 MHz acoustic Doppler current profilers and with turbulence and fine scale sensors, measurements were performed in a region of intense turbulence and a strong salinity gradient. The approach taken was to correlate variations in the backscattered acoustic intensity, I, with a theoretical acoustic backscattering cross section per volume for salinity turbulence, σ(s), to obtain an estimated scattering cross section per volume, σ(e). Results indicated that of order 50% of the observed region was characterized by salinity turbulence induced backscattering. PMID:21877785

  1. Characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in high frequency, high shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Davie, N.T.; Brown, F.A.

    1993-12-31

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer with and without mechanical isolation in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. Two different Hopkinson bar materials are being used: titanium and beryllium. The characteristics of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of DC-10 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 4,000 g as determined from measurements with a titanium Hopkinson bar are presented. The SNL uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to +186{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These characteristics have been verified by the calibration of the Hopkinson bar used for accelerometer testing. The beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration is described. Preliminary characteristics of the piezoresistive accelerometer at a nominal shock level of 17,000 g for a frequency range of DC-50 kHz are presented.

  2. Creative Personality and Anticreative Environment for High School Dropouts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Hull, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the possible roles that creativity plays in students dropping out of high school. It used data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS: 88), the Educational Longitudinal Study (ELS: 2002), and 87 high school students from a low income area in southeastern Michigan. NELS and ELS questions related to creative…

  3. Assessing the impact of soil salinity on manganese distribution in sierozem soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant availability of heavy metals from soil depends on factors such as soil type, organic matter, base saturation, texture, and salinity. Plant availability of mobile manganese (Mn) was accessed from various horizons of non-saline, medium saline, and highly saline sieriozem soils and a pasture. Man...

  4. Phosphorylation of serine residue modulates cotton Di19-1 and Di19-2 activities for responding to high salinity stress and abscisic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li-Xia; Nie, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Rong; Li, Gang; Xu, Wen-Liang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Di19 (drought-induced protein 19) family is a novel type of Cys2/His2 zinc-finger proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that cotton Di19-1 and Di19-2 (GhDi19-1/-2) proteins could be phosphorylated in vitro by the calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). Mutation of Ser to Ala in N-terminus of GhDi19-1/-2 led to the altered subcellular localization of the two proteins, but the constitutively activated form (Ser was mutated to Asp) of GhDi19-1/-2 still showed the nuclear localization. GhDi19-1/-2 overexpression transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings displayed the hypersensitivity to high salinity and abscisic acid (ABA). However, Ser site-mutated GhDi19-1(S116A) and GhDi19-2(S114A), and Ser and Thr double sites-mutated GhDi19-1(S/T-A/A) and GhDi19-2(S/T-A/A) transgenic Arabidopsis did not show the salt- and ABA-hypersensitive phenotypes. In contrast, overexpression of Thr site-mutated GhDi19-1(T114A) and GhDi19-2(T112A) in Arabidopsis still resulted in salt- and ABA-hypersensitivity phenotypes, like GhDi19-1/-2 transgenic lines. Overexpression of GhDi19-1/-2 and their constitutively activated forms in Atcpk11 background could recover the salt- and ABA-insensitive phenotype of the mutant. Thus, our results demonstrated that Ser phosphorylation (not Thr phosphorylation) is crucial for functionally activating GhDi19-1/-2 in response to salt stress and ABA signaling during early plant development, and GhDi19-1/-2 proteins may be downstream targets of CDPKs in ABA signal pathway. PMID:26829353

  5. The ecology of Dunaliella in high-salt environments.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2014-12-01

    Halophilic representatives of the genus Dunaliella, notably D. salina and D. viridis, are found worldwide in salt lakes and saltern evaporation and crystallizer ponds at salt concentrations up to NaCl saturation. Thanks to the biotechnological exploitation of D. salina for β-carotene production we have a profound knowledge of the physiology and biochemistry of the alga. However, relatively little is known about the ecology of the members of the genus Dunaliella in hypersaline environments, in spite of the fact that Dunaliella is often the main or even the sole primary producer present, so that the entire ecosystem depends on carbon fixed by this alga. This review paper summarizes our knowledge about the occurrence and the activities of different Dunaliella species in natural salt lakes (Great Salt Lake, the Dead Sea and others), in saltern ponds and in other salty habitats where members of the genus have been found. PMID:25984505

  6. High-Speed Mobile Communications in Hostile Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, S.; Sierra, R.; Chapron, F.

    2015-12-01

    With the inexorable increase in the use of mobile devices, wireless connectivity is expected by users anywhere, anytime. In general, this requirement is addressed in office buildings or public locations through the use of Wi-Fi technology but Wi-Fi is not well adapted for use in large experiment halls and complex underground environments, especially those where radiation exposure is an issue, such as the LHC tunnel and experimental caverns. 4G/LTE technology, however, looks to be well adapted to addressing mobility needs in such areas. We report here the studies CERN has undertaken on the use of 4G/LTE in the LHC tunnel, presenting results on the data throughput that can be achieved and discussing issues such as the provision of a consistent user experience.

  7. Can Tomato Inoculation with Trichoderma Compensate Yield and Soil Health Deficiency due to Soil Salinity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Karl; Apostolakis, Antonios; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major soil degradation threat, especially for arid coastal environments where it hinders agricultural production and soil health. Protected horticultural crops in the Mediterranean region, typically under deficit irrigation and intensive cultivation practices, have to cope with increasing irrigation water and soil salinization. This study quantifies the beneficial effects of the Trichoderma harzianum (TH) on the sustainable production of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato), a major greenhouse crop of the RECARE project Case Study in Greece, the semi-arid coastal Timpaki basin in south-central Crete. 20 vigorous 20-day-old Solanum lycopersicum L. cv Elpida seedlings are treated with TH fungi (T) or without (N) and transplanted into 35 L pots under greenhouse conditions. Use of local planting soil with initial Electrical Conductivity (ECe) 1.8 dS m‑1 and local cultivation practices aim to simulate the prevailing conditions at the Case Study. In order to simulate seawater intrusion affected irrigation, plants are drip irrigated with two NaCl treatments: slightly (S) saline (ECw = 1.1 dS m‑1) and moderately (M) saline water (ECw = 3.5 dS m‑1), resulting to very high and excessively high ECe, respectively. Preliminary analysis of below and aboveground biomass, soil quality, salinity, and biodiversity indicators, suggest that TH pre-inoculation of tomato plants at both S and M treatments improve yield, soil biodiversity and overall soil health.

  8. Combined effect of boron and salinity on water transport: The role of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen Martínez-Ballesta, Maria; Bastías, Elizabeth; Carvajal, Micaela

    2008-10-01

    Boron toxicity is an important disorder that can limit plant growth on soils of arid and semi arid environments throughout the world. Although there are several reports about the combined effect of salinity and boron toxicity on plant growth and yield, there is no consensus about the experimental results. A general antagonistic relationship between boron excess and salinity has been observed, however the mechanisms for this interaction is not clear and several options can be discussed. In addition, there is no information, concerning the interaction between boron toxicity and salinity with respect to water transport and aquaporins function in the plants. We recently documented in the highly boron- and salt-tolerant the ecotype of Zea mays L. amylacea from Lluta valley in Northern Chile that under salt stress, the activity of specific membrane components can be influenced directly by boron, regulating the water uptake and water transport through the functions of certain aquaporin isoforms. PMID:19704850

  9. Microbiome composition and geochemical characteristics of deep subsurface high-pressure environment, Pyhäsalmi mine Finland

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Hanna; Kietäväinen, Riikka; Sohlberg, Elina; Numminen, Mikko; Ahonen, Lasse; Itävaara, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Pyhäsalmi mine in central Finland provides an excellent opportunity to study microbial and geochemical processes in a deep subsurface crystalline rock environment through near-vertical drill holes that reach to a depth of more than two kilometers below the surface. However, microbial sampling was challenging in this high-pressure environment. Nucleic acid yields obtained were extremely low when compared to the cell counts detected (1.4 × 104 cells mL−1) in water. The water for nucleic acid analysis went through high decompression (60–130 bar) during sampling, whereas water samples for detection of cell counts by microscopy could be collected with slow decompression. No clear cells could be identified in water that went through high decompression. The high-pressure decompression may have damaged part of the cells and the nucleic acids escaped through the filter. The microbial diversity was analyzed from two drill holes by pyrosequencing amplicons of the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and from the fungal ITS regions from both DNA and RNA fractions. The identified prokaryotic diversity was low, dominated by Firmicute, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria species that are common in deep subsurface environments. The archaeal diversity consisted mainly of Methanobacteriales. Ascomycota dominated the fungal diversity and fungi were discovered to be active and to produce ribosomes in the deep oligotrophic biosphere. The deep fluids from the Pyhäsalmi mine shared several features with other deep Precambrian continental subsurface environments including saline, Ca-dominated water and stable isotope compositions positioning left from the meteoric water line. The dissolved gas phase was dominated by nitrogen but the gas composition clearly differed from that of atmospheric air. Despite carbon-poor conditions indicated by the lack of carbon-rich fracture fillings and only minor amounts of dissolved carbon detected in formation waters, some methane was found in the drill

  10. Microbiome composition and geochemical characteristics of deep subsurface high-pressure environment, Pyhäsalmi mine Finland.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Hanna; Kietäväinen, Riikka; Sohlberg, Elina; Numminen, Mikko; Ahonen, Lasse; Itävaara, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Pyhäsalmi mine in central Finland provides an excellent opportunity to study microbial and geochemical processes in a deep subsurface crystalline rock environment through near-vertical drill holes that reach to a depth of more than two kilometers below the surface. However, microbial sampling was challenging in this high-pressure environment. Nucleic acid yields obtained were extremely low when compared to the cell counts detected (1.4 × 10(4) cells mL(-1)) in water. The water for nucleic acid analysis went through high decompression (60-130 bar) during sampling, whereas water samples for detection of cell counts by microscopy could be collected with slow decompression. No clear cells could be identified in water that went through high decompression. The high-pressure decompression may have damaged part of the cells and the nucleic acids escaped through the filter. The microbial diversity was analyzed from two drill holes by pyrosequencing amplicons of the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and from the fungal ITS regions from both DNA and RNA fractions. The identified prokaryotic diversity was low, dominated by Firmicute, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria species that are common in deep subsurface environments. The archaeal diversity consisted mainly of Methanobacteriales. Ascomycota dominated the fungal diversity and fungi were discovered to be active and to produce ribosomes in the deep oligotrophic biosphere. The deep fluids from the Pyhäsalmi mine shared several features with other deep Precambrian continental subsurface environments including saline, Ca-dominated water and stable isotope compositions positioning left from the meteoric water line. The dissolved gas phase was dominated by nitrogen but the gas composition clearly differed from that of atmospheric air. Despite carbon-poor conditions indicated by the lack of carbon-rich fracture fillings and only minor amounts of dissolved carbon detected in formation waters, some methane was found in the drill

  11. Biomarker-based salinity reconstruction immediately prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis (Sorbas Basin, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayser, Jan Peter; Martins, Cesar; Flecker, Rachel; Pancost, Rich D.

    2014-05-01

    The salinity crisis which occurred in the Mediterranean at the end of the Miocene (5.97 to 5.33 Ma) was a time of large-scale environmental change and thick evaporite deposits formed both in the deep basins and on the surrounding margins. Late Miocene successions in the Sorbas Basin, south east Spain preserve sediments that were deposited immediately prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) and during the initial phase of gypsum precipitation (Sierro et al., 2001). Salinity changes are indicated by evaporite formation and fluctuations in faunal assemblages, but these provide threshold measurements only e.g. gypsum forms at a salinity of 130 psu. By analysing the lipid biomarker composition by GC and HPLC-MS after Soxhlet extraction of pre-MSC sediments we aim to reconstruct granular changes in salinity leading up to initial gypsum precipitation. The pre-MSC sediments comprise regular alternations of marine marls and terrigenous clays with interspersed diatomites. This lithological cyclicity is climatically forced by orbitally-driven changes in insolation (Krijgsman et al., 1999) such that specific lithologies are thought to accumulate during precession minima (homogeneous marls) and maxima (laminated marls). By targeting these lithologies for salinity reconstruction we can evaluate the orbital control on quantified environmental change. The reconstruction of the salinity is predominantly based on the ACE proxy introduced by Turich and Freeman (2011). The GDGT-based proxy can show differences over a wide range of salinity, because Archaea can survive over a much larger salinity range than haptophyte algae or other plankton and can therefore also record the salinity signal over a wider range. This makes it suitable for the broad salinity ranges leading up to the MSC e.g. ~35 to 130 psu. Turich et al. (2011) already have published 10 low resolution salinity values for pre-MSC sediments from Torrente Vaccarizzo and Serra Pirciata on Sicily. Our high resolution

  12. High Temperature Polyimide Materials in Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    At the end of the NASA High Speed Research (HSR) Program, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began a program to screen the high-temperature Polymeric Composite Materials (PMCs) characterized by the HSR Durability Program for possible use in Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) operating under extreme temperature conditions. The HSR Program focused on developing material-related technologies to enable a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) capable of operating temperatures ranging from 54 C (-65 F) to 177 C (350 F). A high-temperature polymeric resin, PETI-5 was used in the HSR Program to satisfy the requirements for performance and durability for a PMC. For RLVs, it was anticipated that this high temperature material would contribute to reducing the overall weight of a vehicle by eliminating or reducing the thermal protection required to protect the internal structural elements of the vehicle and increasing the structural strain limits. The tests were performed to determine temperature-dependent mechanical and physical proper-ties of IM7/PETI-5 composite over a temperature range from cryogenic temperature -253 C (-423F) to the material's maximum use temperature of 230 C (450 F). This paper presents results from the test program for the temperature-dependent mechanical and physical properties of IM7/PETI-5 composite in the temperature range from -253 C (-423 F) to 27 C (80 F).

  13. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction with the aid of experimental design for determination of benzimidazole fungicides in high salinity samples by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yingying; Li, Jinhua; Yang, Fangfang; Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Weiran; Liao, Chunyang; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-03-15

    A novel method for the simultaneous separation and determination of four benzimidazole fungicides (i.e., carbendazim, fuberidazole, thiophanate-methyl and thiophanate) in high salinity samples was developed by using salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) via water-miscible acetonitrile as the extractant coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography. Box-Behnken design and response surface were employed to assist the optimization of SALLE conditions, including volume of salting-out solvent, the pH of sample solution and salting-out solvent as variable factors. The optimal salting-out parameters were obtained as follows: 2 mL of acetonitrile was added to 2 mL of sample solution with pH=4 and then 2 mL salting-out solvent containing 5 mol L(-1) sodium chloride at a pH of 7 was added to the solution for extraction. This procedure afforded a convenient and cost-saving operation with good cleanup ability for the benzimidazole fungicides, such as good linear relationships (R>0.996) between peak area and concentration from 2.5 ng mL(-1) to 500 ng mL(-1), low limits of detection between 0.14 ng mL(-1) and 0.38 ng mL(-1) and the intra-day precisions of retention time below 1.0%. The method recoveries obtained at fortified three concentrations for three seawater samples ranged from 60.4% to 99.1%. The simple, rapid and eco-benign SALLE based method proved potentially applicable for trace benzimidazole fungicides analysis in high salinity samples. PMID:23598103

  14. Effects of Salinity and Nutrient Addition on Mangrove Excoecaria agallocha

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaping; Ye, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Effects of salinity on seed germination and growth of young (1 month old) and old (2-year old) seedlings of Excoecaria agallocha were investigated. Combined effects of salinity and nutrient level were also examined on old seedlings. Seed germination was best at 0 and 5 psu salinity. 15 psu salinity significantly delayed root initiation and decreased final establishment rate. All seeds failed to establish at 25 psu salinity. Young seedlings performed best at 0 and 5 psu, but growth was stunned at 15 psu, and all seedlings died within 90 days at 25 psu. Old seedlings grew best at salinities below 5 psu and they survived the whole cultivation at 25 psu. This indicated that E. agallocha increased salt tolerance over time. Gas exchange was significantly compromised by salinities above 15 psu but evidently promoted by high nutrient. Proline accumulated considerably at high nutrient, and its contents increased from 0 to 15 psu but decreased at 25 psu salinity. Lipid peroxidation was aggravated by increasing salinity beyond 15 psu but markedly alleviated by nutrient addition. These responses indicated that E. agallocha was intolerant to high salinity but it can be greatly enhanced by nutrient addition. PMID:24691495

  15. Hardening electronic devices against very high total dose radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, B.; Shedd, W.; Roosild, S.; Dolan, R.

    1972-01-01

    The possibilities and limitations of hardening silicon semiconductor devices to the high neutron and gamma radiation levels and greater than 10 to the eighth power rads required for the NERVA nuclear engine development are discussed. A comparison is made of the high dose neutron and gamma hardening potential of bipolar, metal insulator semiconductors and junction field effect transistors. Experimental data is presented on device degradation for the high neutron and gamma doses. Previous data and comparisons indicate that the JFET is much more immune to the combined neutron displacement and gamma ionizing effects than other transistor types. Experimental evidence is also presented which indicates that p channel MOS devices may be able to meet the requirements.

  16. Radiation environment and shielding for a high luminosity collider detector

    SciTech Connect

    Diwan, M.V.; Fisyak, Y.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1995-12-01

    Detectors now under design for use in the proposed high energy high luminosity colliders must deal with unprecedented radiation levels. We have performed a comprehensive study for the GEM detector at the SSC to determine the best way to shield critical detector components from excessive radiation, with special attention paid to the low energy neutrons and photons. We have used several detailed Monte-Carlo simulations to calculate the particle fluxes in the detector. We describe these methods and demonstrate that two orders of magnitude reduction in the neutron and photon fluxes can be obtained with appropriate shielding of critical forward regions such as the low beta quadrupoles and the forward calorimeter.

  17. Development of Thin Film Ceramic Thermocouples for High Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Blaha, Charles A.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2004-01-01

    The maximum use temperature of noble metal thin film thermocouples of 1100 C (2000 F) may not be adequate for use on components in the increasingly harsh conditions of advanced aircraft and next generation launch technology. Ceramic-based thermocouples are known for their high stability and robustness at temperatures exceeding 1500 C, but are typically found in the form of rods or probes. NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the feasibility of ceramics as thin film thermocouples for extremely high temperature applications to take advantage of the stability and robustness of ceramics and the non-intrusiveness of thin films. This paper will discuss the current state of development in this effort.

  18. The Role of Groundwater and Reservoir Interaction in Salinity Distribution in a Saline Area in the Northeastern Part of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeboonruang, U.

    2012-12-01

    Salinity is a process by which the concentration of soluble salt in soil and water increases. Human activities can, however, disrupt this natural equilibrium by changing the distribution of salt in the environment. Reservoirs have played a number of crucial roles in the development of human civilization. The main purposes of reservoirs are to prevent floods, to supply water for domestic consumption, to generate electricity, and to irrigate farmlands. Despite various benefits, reservoirs could bring about adverse environmental and social impacts. Infiltration or leakage from man-made reservoirs or dams could cause the change of the groundwater level, thus forcing the deposited salt onto the soil surface and/or waterways. Until now, it is nevertheless unclear as to how the operation and maintenance of reservoirs could impact in a saline soil area physically, environmentally, and/or socially. The purpose of this research is therefore to assess the impacts of reservoirs on groundwater and salinity levels in a saline soil area in the northeastern part of Thailand. Saline soil can be found in many regions of Thailand, particularly in the northeast of Thailand where the Maha Sarakham Foundation, which is composed of imbedded salt rock layers, is the main source of salinity in the region. The salinity accumulation on the surface soil is influenced by the brackish groundwater upward flow and evaporation processes. The study area is located in Nakhon Panom Province in the northeastern part of Thailand along the Great Mekong River and has a total area of approximately 1,300 km2. The yearly evaporation rate in this region is as high as the annual evaporation rate. A reservoir was constructed in the low-lying floodplain area of the Nam Kam basin and started operation since a few years ago. The reservoir is located right in the middle of the floodplain where flood always occurs every rainy season. Groundwater levels are measured and groundwater samples are collected for p

  19. The influence of salinity on the abundance, transcriptional activity, and diversity of AOA and AOB in an estuarine sediment: a microcosm study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Lujun; Dai, Tianjiao; Tian, Jinping; Wen, Donghui

    2015-11-01

    Estuarine sediment-seawater microcosms were established to evaluate the influence of salinity on the population, transcriptional activity, and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). AOA was found to show the most abundant and the highest transcriptional activity under moderate salinity; on the other hand, AOB abundance was not sensitive to salinity variation but showed the highest transcriptional activity in the low-salinity microcosms. AOA exhibited more advantages than AOB on growth and ammonia-oxidizing activity under moderate- and high-salinity environments. The highest richness and diversity of active AOA were found under salinity of 15 psu. All the active AOA detected under the salinities studied were clustered into Nitrosopumilus maritimus linage, with the composition shifted from N. maritimus C12 cluster, N. maritimus like 1.1 cluster, N. maritimus SCM1 cluster, and N. maritimus like 1.2 cluster to N. maritimus C12 and N. maritimus A10 clusters when salinity was increased from 5 to 30 psu. PMID:26219499

  20. The Potential Roles of the G1LEA and G3LEA Proteins in Early Embryo Development and in Response to Low Temperature and High Salinity in Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Yao, Feng; Zhang, Mengchen; Jing, Ting; Zhang, Shuang; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant proteins (LEA) are stress resistance-related proteins that play crucial roles in protecting against desiccation, cold and high salinity in a variety of animals and plants. However, the expression pattern, distribution and functions of LEA proteins in the post-diapause period of Artemia sinica, and under high salinity and low temperature stresses, remain unknown. In this study, the complete cDNA sequences of the group 1 LEA (As-g1lea) and group 3 LEA (As-g3lea) genes from A. sinica were cloned. The expression patterns and location of As-G1LEA and As-G1LEA were investigated. The protein abundances of As-G1LEA, As-G3LEA and Trehalase were analyzed during different developmental stages of the embryo and under low temperature and high salinity stresses in A. sinica. The full-length cDNA of As-g1lea was 960 bp, encoding a 182 amino acid protein, and As-g3lea was 2089 bp, encoding a 364 amino acid protein. As-g1lea and As-g3lea showed their highest expressions at 0 h of embryonic development and both showed higher relative expression in embryonic, rather than adult, development stages. The abundances of As-G1LEA, As-G3LEA and trehalose were upregulated under low temperature and downregulated under high salinity stress. These two genes did not show any tissue or organ specific expression. Our results suggested that these LEA proteins might play a pivotal role in stress tolerance in A. sinica. PMID:27603306

  1. Evolution of a saline wetland in western boreal Canada: a study based on diatoms, pollen, and non-pollen palynomorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volik, O.; Petrone, R. M.; Wells, C. M.; Hall, R. I.; Price, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems, which comprise over 50% of northern Alberta's land base, are under increasing pressures as a result of intensive development related to oil sands extraction. According to provincial guidelines, mined area must be reclaimed to an "equivalent capacity" and should contain ~33% wetlands by area. Paleoecological studies have proven useful for the development of restoration strategies through establishment of pre-disturbance baselines and assessing the possibility of returning ecosystems to pre-disturbance state. The task of wetland reclamation is challenged by salinization in the post mined environment, thus understanding the evolution of natural saline wetlands will aid in the development of improved reclamation strategies. The study was carried out in a natural saline wetland situated ~10 km southeast of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Paleoecological changes were investigated using diatoms, pollen and non-pollen palynomorphs in sediment cores taken from a pond in the central part of the wetland. Variations in physicochemical properties and microfossils assemblages in the core demonstrate dynamic changes associated with saline wetland initiation and its trajectory. The transition from clay sediments, characterized by low concentration of microfossils, to gyttja indicates that lake drainage preceded establishment of the wetland. Upcore shifts in microfossil assemblages reflect cycling between periods of very high salinity (recorded by a dominance of marine-brackish and brackish diatoms) followed by period of decreased salinity (indicted by a rise in fresh-brackish species) with gradual increases in salinity thereafter. Identification of the processes driving variation in salinity over time may be useful in the post-mined reclamation setting. Assessment of temporal changes in ecosystem functioning associated with differences in level of dissolved salts may lead to different reclamation approaches capable of dealing with the higher salinity conditions.

  2. Impacts on Poverty of Encroaching Salinity on the Bengal (GBM) Delta: A Spatial Case Study in Southern Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoako Johnson, F.; Hutton, C.; Hornby, D.; Lazar, A.; Mukhopadhyay, A.

    2014-12-01

    Salinity intrusion is a major climate and human induced hazard in coastal deltaic regions resulting in substantial adverse effects on crop production. Impacts are ‎exacerbated by intensified cyclones, sea level rise and storm surges. In this regard, many farmers in the populous Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta of ‎Bangladesh have adopted saline shrimp (Bagda) farming with associated displacement of tenant farmers and potential long term damage to the soil through chemicals used to enhance shrimp production. Despite the impact of salinity intrusion on the environment and the commonly perceived effects of shrimp farming on poverty, there has not been any systematic study that examines the associative relationships between salinisation, shrimp farming and poverty in this delta region. Using the 2011 Bangladesh Population and Housing Census and 2010 LandSat remote sensing data this study examines the spatially explicit impact of salinization as well as saline and freshwater shrimp farming on poverty in the Delta, ‎accounting for important environmental and socio-economic predictors. The findings shows that after accounting for important environmental and socioeconomic predictors, levels and intensities of salinization as well as the extent of saline and freshwater shrimp farming in a union are significantly associated with poverty. The results of the study demonstrate that increases in levels and intensities of salinity increases the probability of a union being in the poorest quintile. As such saline water shrimp farming has the potential to reduce poverty only at high intensities, whilst low levels of freshwater shrimp farming are associated with a reduction in poverty.

  3. MINERAL CHARACTERIZATION OF TEMPERATE GRASSES FROM A HIGH RAINFALL ENVIRONMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Straw produced as a co-product of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), tall fescue [Schedonorus phoenix (Scop.) Holub] (formerly Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), and Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) seed production in the high rainfall area of western Orego...

  4. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza: Intersecting Humans, Animals, and the Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Eurasian-African H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus has caused an unprecedented epizootic affecting mainly poultry, but has crossed multiple species barriers to infect captive and wild birds, carnivorous mammals and humans. There is still great concern over the continued infecti...

  5. Mineral accumulation by perennial grasses in a high rainfall environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Straw produced as a co-product of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata), tall fescue (Schedonorus phoenix (Scop.) Holub), and Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) seed production in the high rainfall area of western Oregon as well as clippings from urban and recr...

  6. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, Gene H.; Smith, James L.; Sim, James W.

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  7. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, G.H.; Smith, J.L.; Sim, J.W.

    1983-11-10

    This invention pertains to a high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  8. Efficient High Performance Collective Communication for Distributed Memory Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Qasim

    2009-01-01

    Collective communication allows efficient communication and synchronization among a collection of processes, unlike point-to-point communication that only involves a pair of communicating processes. Achieving high performance for both kernels and full-scale applications running on a distributed memory system requires an efficient implementation of…

  9. Reliability of High I/O High Density CCGA Interconnect Electronic Packages under Extreme Thermal Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non-destructive inspection tools were used to assess the reliability of high density CCGA packages for deep space extreme temperature missions. Ceramic column grid array (CCGA) packages have been increasing in use based on their advantages such as high interconnect density, very good thermal and electrical performances, compatibility with standard surface-mount packaging assembly processes, and so on. CCGA packages are used in space applications such as in logic and microprocessor functions, telecommunications, payload electronics, and flight avionics. As these packages tend to have less solder joint strain relief than leaded packages or more strain relief over lead-less chip carrier packages, the reliability of CCGA packages is very important for short-term and long-term deep space missions. We have employed high density CCGA 1152 and 1272 daisy chained electronic packages in this preliminary reliability study. Each package is divided into several daisy-chained sections. The physical dimensions of CCGA1152 package is 35 mm x 35 mm with a 34 x 34 array of columns with a 1 mm pitch. The dimension of the CCGA1272 package is 37.5 mm x 37.5 mm with a 36 x 36 array with a 1 mm pitch. The columns are made up of 80% Pb/20%Sn material. CCGA interconnect electronic package printed wiring polyimide boards have been assembled and inspected using non-destructive x-ray imaging techniques. The assembled CCGA boards were subjected to extreme temperature thermal atmospheric cycling to assess their reliability for future deep space missions. The resistance of daisy-chained interconnect sections were monitored continuously during thermal cycling. This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non

  10. Impact of salinity on organic matter and nitrogen removal from a municipal wastewater RO concentrate using biologically activated carbon coupled with UV/H2O2.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Shovana; Fan, Linhua; Roddick, Felicity A; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Ball, Andrew S

    2016-05-01

    The concentrate streams generated from reverse osmosis (RO)-based municipal wastewater reclamation processes contain organic substances and nutrients at elevated concentrations, posing environmental and health risks on their disposal to confined receiving environments such as bays. The impact of salinity (TDS at 7, 10 and 16 g/L) of a RO concentrate (ROC) on the treatment efficiency of a biological activated carbon (BAC) system after pre-oxidation with UV/H2O2 was characterised in terms of removal of organic matter and nitrogen species, and the bacterial communities. Organic matter removal was comparable for the ROC over the tested salinity range, with 45-49% of DOC and 70-74% of UVA254 removed by the combined treatment. However, removal in total nitrogen (TN) was considerably higher for the ROC at the high salinity (TDS ∼ 16 mg/L) compared with the low (∼7 g/L) and medium salinity (∼10 g/L). Effective nitrification with high ammonium removal (>90%) was achieved at all salinity levels, whereas greater denitrification (39%) was obtained at high salinity than low (23%) and medium salinity (27%) which might suggest that the bacterial communities contributing to the greater denitrification were more halotolerant. Microbiological characterisation using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and culture based techniques showed that diversified bacterial communities were present in the BAC system as evident from different 16S rDNA. The major bacterial groups residing on the BAC media belonged to Bacillus (Firmicutes), Pseudomonas (γ-Proteobacteria), and Rhodococcus (Actinobacteria) for all salinity levels, confirming that these microbial communities could be responsible for carbon and nitrogen removal at the different salinity levels. This has implications in understanding the effectiveness and robustness of the BAC system over the salinity range of the ROC and so would be useful for optimising the treatment efficiency of

  11. Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation on Intestinal Barrier Function in Rats Exposed to High Altitude Hypoxia Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rui; Qiao, Xiangjin; Xu, Cuicui; Shang, Xiaoya; Niu, Weining; Chao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the role of vitamin E in the high altitude hypoxia-induced damage to the intestinal barrier in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (Control), high altitude hypoxia (HH), and high altitude hypoxia+vitamin E (250 mg/kg BW*d) (HV) groups. After the third day, the HH and HV groups were placed in a hypobaric chamber at a stimulated elevation of 7000 m for 5 days. The rats in the HV group were given vitamin E by gavage daily for 8 days. The other rats were given equal volume saline. The results showed that high altitude hypoxia caused the enlargement of heart, liver, lung and kidney, and intestinal villi damage. Supplementation with vitamin E significantly alleviated hypoxia-caused damage to the main organs including intestine, increased the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p< 0.05), diamino oxidase (DAO) (p< 0.01) levels, and decreased the serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) (p< 0.01), interleukin-4 (IL-4) (p<0.001), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) (p<0.01) and malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.001), and decreased the serum erythropoietin (EPO) activity (p<0.05). Administration of vitamin E significantly increased the S-IgA (p<0.001) in ileum and significantly improved the expression levels of occludin and IκBα, and decreased the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and 2 alpha (HIF-1α and HIF-2α), Toll-like receptors (TLR4), P-IκBα and nuclear factor-κB p65(NF-κB P65) in ileum compared to the HH group. This study suggested that vitamin E protectis from intestinal injury caused by high altitude hypoxia environment. These effects may be related to the HIF and TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25177163

  12. Superconducting magnets in high-radiation environment at supercolliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Chichili, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Van Sciver, S.; Zeller, A.

    2006-07-01

    The principal challenges arising from beam-induced energy deposition in superconducting (SC) magnets at high-energy high-luminosity hadron and lepton colliders are described. Radiation constraints are analyzed that include quench stability, dynamic heat loads on the cryogenic system, radiation damage limiting the component lifetime, and residual dose rates related to hands-on maintenance. These issues are especially challenging for the interaction regions (IR), particularly for the considered upgrade layouts of the Large Hadron Collider. Up to a few kW of beam power can dissipate in a single SC magnet, and a local peak power density can substantially exceed the quench levels. Just formally, the magnet lifetime is limited to a few months under these conditions. Possible solutions and the ways to mitigate these problems are described in this paper along with R&D needed.

  13. The Corrosion of High Performance Steel in Adverse Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Desmond C.

    2005-04-01

    The corrosion products that have formed on weathering steel bridges exposed to different weather conditions in the United States have been evaluated. They have been analyzed by spectroscopic techniques to determine the relationship between protective and non-protective rust coatings, and their relationship to the exposure conditions. Bridges constructed recently using High Performance Steel, as well as older bridges built with Type A588B weathering steel, were evaluated for corrosion performance of the rust coatings. In locations where the steel is subjected to regular wet-dry cycling, where the surface is wet for less than about 20% of the time, a protective patina starts to form after a few months exposure, and continues to an adherent, impervious coating after a decade. The protective patina is characterized by the formation of only goethite and lepidocrocite. The goethite makes up about 80% of the rust, and itself consists of a nanophase component, < 15 nm, making up about 70% of the goethite. The nanophase goethite is basically undetected by X-ray diffraction. In the presence of high time-of-wetness, >40%, or infrequent drying cycles, (regions close to waterways, fog or having high humidity), the weathering steel forms a rust coating that consists of a large amount of maghemite, and goethite that contains very little of the nanophase component. The rust coating ex-foliates from the steel and is not protective. Under exposure conditions in which chlorides are deposited onto the weathering steel surface, (marine or de-icing salt locations), the protective patina also does not form. Instead, the rust coating consists of a large fraction of akaganeite that forms at the expense of the lepidocrocite and nanophase goethite. The bridges exposed to high chloride concentrations, 1.5 wt%, and therefore having no protective patina, have corrosion rates measured to be 6 times larger than expected for weathering steel with the protective patina.

  14. The Corrosion of High Performance Steel in Adverse Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Desmond C.

    2005-04-26

    The corrosion products that have formed on weathering steel bridges exposed to different weather conditions in the United States have been evaluated. They have been analyzed by spectroscopic techniques to determine the relationship between protective and non-protective rust coatings, and their relationship to the exposure conditions. Bridges constructed recently using High Performance Steel, as well as older bridges built with Type A588B weathering steel, were evaluated for corrosion performance of the rust coatings. In locations where the steel is subjected to regular wet-dry cycling, where the surface is wet for less than about 20% of the time, a protective patina starts to form after a few months exposure, and continues to an adherent, impervious coating after a decade. The protective patina is characterized by the formation of only goethite and lepidocrocite. The goethite makes up about 80% of the rust, and itself consists of a nanophase component, < 15 nm, making up about 70% of the goethite. The nanophase goethite is basically undetected by X-ray diffraction. In the presence of high time-of-wetness, >40%, or infrequent drying cycles (regions close to waterways, fog or having high humidity), the weathering steel forms a rust coating that consists of a large amount of maghemite, and goethite that contains very little of the nanophase component. The rust coating ex-foliates from the steel and is not protective. Under exposure conditions in which chlorides are deposited onto the weathering steel surface (marine or de-icing salt locations), the protective patina also does not form. Instead, the rust coating consists of a large fraction of akaganeite that forms at the expense of the lepidocrocite and nanophase goethite. The bridges exposed to high chloride concentrations, 1.5 wt%, and therefore having no protective patina, have corrosion rates measured to be 6 times larger than expected for weathering steel with the protective patina.

  15. Behavior of TPC's in a high particle flux environment

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, A.; Eisemann, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C. ); Lindenbaum, S.J. City Coll., New York, NY ); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y. ); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L

    1991-12-13

    TPC's (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) were exposed to fluxes equivalent to more than 10{sup 7} minimum ionizing particles per second to find if such high fluxes cause gain changes or distortions of the electric field. Initial results of these and other tests are presented and the consequences for the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) TPC-based experiments are discussed.

  16. Acoustic analysis of explosions in high noise environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Hong; Desai, Sachi

    2008-04-01

    Explosion detection and recognition is a critical capability to provide situational awareness to the war-fighters in battlefield. Acoustic sensors are frequently deployed to detect such events and to trigger more expensive sensing/sensor modalities (i.e. radar, laser spectroscope, IR etc.). Acoustic analysis of explosions has been intensively studied to reliably discriminate mortars, artillery, round variations, and type of blast (i.e. chemical/biological or high-explosive). One of the major challenges is high level of noise, which may include non-coherent noise generated from the environmental background and coherent noise induced by possible mobile acoustic sensor platform. In this work, we introduce a new acoustic scene analysis method to effectively enhance explosion classification reliability and reduce the false alarm rate at low SNR and with high coherent noise. The proposed method is based on acoustic signature modeling using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). Special frequency domain acoustic features characterizing explosions as well as coherent noise are extracted from each signal segment, which forms an observation vector for HMM training and test. Classification is based on a unique model similarity measure between the HMM estimated from the test observations and the trained HMMs. Experimental tests are based on the acoustic explosion dataset from US ARMY ARDEC, and experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y203 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with failing. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 2 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12 percent Y2O3 or ZrO2-20 percent Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  18. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with falling. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 1 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12 percent Y2O3 or ZrO2-2O percent Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  19. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8%Y2O3 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with failing. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 2 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12%Y2O3 or ZrO2-20%Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  20. 0.9% saline is neither normal nor physiological

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Sun, Shi-ren; Yap, John Q.; Chen, Jiang-hua; Qian, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to objectively evaluate the biochemical and pathophysiological properties of 0.9% saline (henceforth: saline) and to discuss the impact of saline infusion, specifically on systemic acid-base balance and renal hemodynamics. Studies have shown that electrolyte balance, including effects of saline infusion on serum electrolytes, is often poorly understood among practicing physicians and inappropriate saline prescribing can cause increased morbidity and mortality. Large-volume (>2 L) saline infusion in healthy adults induces hyperchloremia which is associated with metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, and negative protein balance. Saline overload (80 ml/kg) in rodents can cause intestinal edema and contractile dysfunction associated with activation of sodium-proton exchanger (NHE) and decrease in myosin light chain phosphorylation. Saline infusion can also adversely affect renal hemodynamics. Microperfusion experiments and real-time imaging studies have demonstrated a reduction in renal perfusion and an expansion in kidney volume, compromising O2 delivery to the renal parenchyma following saline infusion. Clinically, saline infusion for patients post abdominal and cardiovascular surgery is associated with a greater number of adverse effects including more frequent blood product transfusion and bicarbonate therapy, reduced gastric blood flow, delayed recovery of gut function, impaired cardiac contractility in response to inotropes, prolonged hospital stay, and possibly increased mortality. In critically ill patients, saline infusion, compared to balanced fluid infusions, increases the occurrence of acute kidney injury. In summary, saline is a highly acidic fluid. With the exception of saline infusion for patients with hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and volume depletion due to vomiting or upper gastrointestinal suction, indiscriminate use, especially for acutely ill patients, may cause unnecessary complications and should be avoided. More

  1. 0.9% saline is neither normal nor physiological.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Sun, Shi-Ren; Yap, John Q; Chen, Jiang-Hua; Qian, Qi

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to objectively evaluate the biochemical and pathophysiological properties of 0.9% saline (henceforth: saline) and to discuss the impact of saline infusion, specifically on systemic acid-base balance and renal hemodynamics. Studies have shown that electrolyte balance, including effects of saline infusion on serum electrolytes, is often poorly understood among practicing physicians and inappropriate saline prescribing can cause increased morbidity and mortality. Large-volume (>2 L) saline infusion in healthy adults induces hyperchloremia which is associated with metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, and negative protein balance. Saline overload (80 ml/kg) in rodents can cause intestinal edema and contractile dysfunction associated with activation of sodium-proton exchanger (NHE) and decrease in myosin light chain phosphorylation. Saline infusion can also adversely affect renal hemodynamics. Microperfusion experiments and real-time imaging studies have demonstrated a reduction in renal perfusion and an expansion in kidney volume, compromising O2 delivery to the renal parenchyma following saline infusion. Clinically, saline infusion for patients post abdominal and cardiovascular surgery is associated with a greater number of adverse effects including more frequent blood product transfusion and bicarbonate therapy, reduced gastric blood flow, delayed recovery of gut function, impaired cardiac contractility in response to inotropes, prolonged hospital stay, and possibly increased mortality. In critically ill patients, saline infusion, compared to balanced fluid infusions, increases the occurrence of acute kidney injury. In summary, saline is a highly acidic fluid. With the exception of saline infusion for patients with hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and volume depletion due to vomiting or upper gastrointestinal suction, indiscriminate use, especially for acutely ill patients, may cause unnecessary complications and should be avoided. More

  2. Creating High Energy Density Jets in Laboratory Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Robert

    2005-04-01

    A new experimental platform for the investigation of high Mach-number, high energy-density jets has been developed at the University of Rochester's Omega laser facility. Assuming the scalability of the Euler equations, the resulting mm-sized jets should scale to astrophysical objects such as Herbig-Haro objects and jet-driven supernovae that may involve jets with similar internal Mach numbers. This scalability still holds in the presence of radiation as long as the relative importance of radiative cooling is similar. In these experiments, either direct or indirect laser drive is used to launch a strong shock into a 125 micron thick titanium foil target that caps a 700 micron thick titanium washer. After the shock breaks out into the 300 micron diameter cylindrical hole in the washer, a dense, well-collimated jet with an energy density of more than 0.1 MJ per cc is formed. The jet is then imaged as it propagates for 100s of ns down a cylinder of low-density polymer foam. The experiments are diagnosed by point-projection with a micro-dot vanadium backligher. The field of view is several mm and the resolution is 15 microns. The X-ray radiographs show the hydrodynamically unstable jet and the bow shock driving into the surrounding foam. Such complex experimental data provide a challenge to hydrocodes and so are being used to test the hydrodynamic simulations of these types of flows. Initial comparisons between the data and LANL and AWE simulations will be shown. However, the high Reynolds numbers of both the laboratory and astrophysical jets suggest that, given sufficient time and shear, turbulence should develop; this cannot be reliably modeled by present, resolution-limited simulations. Future work concerning the applicability of the Omega experiments to astrophysical objects and the quantitative study of turbulent mixing via subgrid-scale models will be discussed.

  3. Polymer concrete pipe for high-temperature corrosive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; Schroeder, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Polymer concrete is a composite material which has strength and durability characteristics greatly superior to those of Portland cement concrete and better durability than steel. Polymer concrete has been successfully tested in brine, flashing brine and steam at temperatures up to 260/sup 0/C. Exposures were as long as 960 days. Glass filament wound polymer concrete pipe was developed with excellent strength, low weight, and a cost comparable to or less than schedule 40 steel. Connections can be made with slip joints for low pressure applications and flanged joints for high pressure applications.

  4. Towards a paleo-salinity proxy: Decreasing D/H fractionation in algal and bacterial lipids with increasing salinity in Christmas Island saline ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachse, D.; Sachs, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    We investigated the effect of a wide range of salinities (13 -149 PSU) on the D/H ratio of lipids in microbial mat sediments from hypersaline ponds on Christmas Island. The hydrogen isotope ratios (expressed as δD values) of total lipid extracts, and the individual hydrocarbons heptadecane, heptadecene, octadecane, octadecene, diploptene and phytene from algae and bacteria, became increasingly enriched in deuterium as salinity increased, spanning a range of 100‰ while lake water δD values spanned a range of just 12‰. D/H fractionation between lipids and source water thus decreased as salinity increased. Isotope fractionation factors (αlipid-water) were strongly correlated with salinity and increased in all compound classes studied. The apparent isotope fractionation (ɛlipid-water) decreased by 0.8 to 1.1‰ per PSU increase in salinity. Differences in the hydrogen isotopic composition of lipids derived from three biosynthetic pathways (acetogenic, MVA and DOXP/MEP) remained similar irrespective of the salinity, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the observed αlipid-water - salinity relationship originates prior to the last common biosynthetic branching point, the Calvin Cycle. These findings imply that caution must be exercised when attempting to reconstruct source water δD values using lipid δD values from aquatic environments that may have experienced salinity variations of ~3 PSU or more (based on a 1‰ per PSU response of D/H fractionation to salinity changes, and a lipid δD measurement precision of 3‰). On the other hand our results can be used to establish a paleo-salinity proxy based on algal and bacterial lipid δD values if salinity variations exceeded ~3 PSU and/or if additional constraints on source water δD values can be made.

  5. High temperature erosion testing in a gasifier environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Rawers, James C.; Adler, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of materials with the ability to operate in adverse conditions while resisting the effects of erosion and corrosion is essential to the future success of high efficiency power plants. Many next generation coal power plants are envisioned as combined cycle, with gasifiers used to produce both steam and syngas. The gasifier sections of these plants require materials of construction that are resistant to the effects of erosion from silica found in the gas streams and corrosion caused by a reducing atmosphere that may contain sulfur and chloride compounds. The Albany Research Center has developed a test apparatus designed to test the erosion-resistance of candidate materials under a range of environmental conditions, including those found in gasifiers. This Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear test apparatus (HAET) has been used to evaluate a group of high alloy candidate materials such as iron aluminide and Haynes HR 160, and compare them to a conventional 310 stainless steel. Erosion tests were conducted using 270μm silica abrasive, a typical impact velocities of 20 m/sec at temperatures up to 700°C in an atmosphere simulating gasifier conditions. The effects of erosion under these conditions on the surface scales that form are described. The total loss rate, loss rates due to erosion and corrosion for the test materials are compared.

  6. Integrated geophysical and chemical study of saline water intrusion.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Kalpan; Saha, D K

    2004-01-01

    Surface geophysical surveys provide an effective way to image the subsurface and the ground water zone without a large number of observation wells. DC resistivity sounding generally identifies the subsurface formations-the aquifer zone as well as the formations saturated with saline/brackish water. However, the method has serious ambiguities in distinguishing the geological formations of similar resistivities such as saline sand and saline clay, or water quality such as fresh or saline, in a low resistivity formation. In order to minimize the ambiguity and ascertain the efficacy of data integration techniques in ground water and saline contamination studies, a combined geophysical survey and periodic chemical analysis of ground water were carried out employing DC resistivity profiling, resistivity sounding, and shallow seismic refraction methods. By constraining resistivity interpretation with inputs from seismic refraction and chemical analysis, the data integration study proved to be a powerful method for identification of the subsurface formations, ground water zones, the subsurface saline/brackish water zones, and the probable mode and cause of saline water intrusion in an inland aquifer. A case study presented here illustrates these principles. Resistivity sounding alone had earlier failed to identify the different formations in the saline environment. Data integration and resistivity interpretation constrained by water quality analysis led to a new concept of minimum resistivity for ground water-bearing zones, which is the optimum value of resistivity of a subsurface formation in an area below which ground water contained in it is saline/brackish and unsuitable for drinking. PMID:15457790

  7. Providing a computing environment for a high energy physics workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, J.

    1991-03-01

    Although computing facilities have been provided at conferences and workshops remote from the hose institution for some years, the equipment provided has rarely been capable of providing for much more than simple editing and electronic mail over leased lines. This presentation describes the pioneering effort involved by the Computing Department/Division at Fermilab in providing a local computing facility with world-wide networking capability for the Physics at Fermilab in the 1990's workshop held in Breckenridge, Colorado, in August 1989, as well as the enhanced facilities provided for the 1990 Summer Study on High Energy Physics at Snowmass, Colorado, in June/July 1990. Issues discussed include type and sizing of the facilities, advance preparations, shipping, on-site support, as well as an evaluation of the value of the facility to the workshop participants.

  8. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs-Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events. PMID:26177366

  9. A high performance scientific cloud computing environment for materials simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, K.; Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the development of a scientific cloud computing (SCC) platform that offers high performance computation capability. The platform consists of a scientific virtual machine prototype containing a UNIX operating system and several materials science codes, together with essential interface tools (an SCC toolset) that offers functionality comparable to local compute clusters. In particular, our SCC toolset provides automatic creation of virtual clusters for parallel computing, including tools for execution and monitoring performance, as well as efficient I/O utilities that enable seamless connections to and from the cloud. Our SCC platform is optimized for the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). We present benchmarks for prototypical scientific applications and demonstrate performance comparable to local compute clusters. To facilitate code execution and provide user-friendly access, we have also integrated cloud computing capability in a JAVA-based GUI. Our SCC platform may be an alternative to traditional HPC resources for materials science or quantum chemistry applications.

  10. Ultracold molecular Rydberg physics in a high density environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiles, Matthew T.; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Robicheaux, F.; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-06-01

    Sufficiently high densities in Bose–Einstein condensates provide favorable conditions for the production of ultralong-range polyatomic molecules consisting of one Rydberg atom and a number of neutral ground state atoms. The chemical binding properties and electronic wave functions of these exotic molecules are investigated analytically via hybridized diatomic states. The effects of the molecular geometry on the system’s properties are studied through comparisons of the adiabatic potential curves and electronic structures for both symmetric and randomly configured molecular geometries. General properties of these molecules with increasing numbers of constituent atoms and in different geometries are presented. These polyatomic states have spectral signatures that lead to non-Lorentzian line-profiles.

  11. Integrated control system environment for high-throughput tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhriakov, Igor; Lottermoser, Lars; Gehrke, Rainer; Kracht, Thorsten; Wintersberger, Eugen; Kopmann, Andreas; Vogelgesang, Matthias; Beckmann, Felix

    2014-09-01

    A new control system for high-throughput experiments (X-Ray, Neutrons) is introduced in this article. The system consists of several software components which are required to make optimized use of the beamtime and to fulfill the demand to implement the new standardized data format established within the Helmholtz Association in Germany. The main components are: PreExperiment Data Collector; Status server; Data Format Server. Especially for tomography a concept for an online reconstruction based on GPU computing is presented. One of the main goals of the system is to collect data that extends standard experimental data, e.g. instrument's hardware state, preinvestigation data, experiment description data etc. The collected data is stored together with the experiment data in the permanent storage of the user. The stored data is then used for post processing and analysis of the experiment.

  12. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs—Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events. PMID:26177366

  13. Hemolymph ion regulation and kinetic characteristics of the gill (Na⁺, K⁺)-ATPase in the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Decapoda, Anomura) acclimated to high salinity.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Malson N; Garçon, Daniela P; Mantelatto, Fernando L M; Pinto, Marcelo R; McNamara, John C; Leone, Francisco A

    2012-04-01

    We examine hemolymph ion regulation and the kinetic properties of a gill microsomal (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase from the intertidal hermit crab, Clibanarius vittatus, acclimated to 45‰ salinity for 10 days. Hemolymph osmolality is hypo-regulated (1102.5 ± 22.1 mOsm kg(-1) H(2)O) at 45‰ but elevated compared to fresh-caught crabs (801.0 ± 40.1 mOsm kg(-1) H(2)O). Hemolymph [Na(+)] (323.0 ± 2.5 mmol L(-1)) and [Mg(2+)] (34.6 ± 1.0 mmol L(-1)) are hypo-regulated while [Ca(2+)] (22.5 ± 0.7 mmol L(-1)) is hyper-regulated; [K(+)] is hyper-regulated in fresh-caught crabs (17.4 ± 0.5 mmol L(-1)) but hypo-regulated (6.2 ± 0.7 mmol L(-1)) at 45‰. Protein expression patterns are altered in the 45‰-acclimated crabs, although Western blot analyses reveal just a single immunoreactive band, suggesting a single (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase α-subunit isoform, distributed in different density membrane fractions. A high-affinity (Vm=46.5 ± 3.5 Umg(-1); K(0.5)=7.07 ± 0.01 μmol L(-1)) and a low-affinity ATP binding site (Vm=108.1 ± 2.5 U mg(-1); K(0.5)=0.11 ± 0.3 mmol L(-1)), both obeying cooperative kinetics, were disclosed. Modulation of (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity by Mg(2+), K(+) and NH(4)(+) also exhibits site-site interactions, but modulation by Na(+) shows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity is synergistically stimulated up to 45% by NH(4)(+) plus K(+). Enzyme catalytic efficiency for variable [K(+)] and fixed [NH(4)(+)] is 10-fold greater than for variable [NH(4)(+)] and fixed [K(+)]. Ouabain inhibited ≈80% of total ATPase activity (K(I)=464.7 ± 23.2 μmol L(-1)), suggesting that ATPases other than (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase are present. While (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activities are similar in fresh-caught (around 142 nmol Pi min(-1)mg(-1)) and 45‰-acclimated crabs (around 154 nmol Pi min(-1)mg(-1)), ATP affinity decreases 110-fold and Na(+) and K(+) affinities increase 2-3-fold in 45‰-acclimated crabs. PMID:22260788

  14. Geochemistry of highly saline fluids in siliciclastic sequences: genetic implications for post-Variscan fluid flow in the Moravosilesian Palaeozoic of the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučera, Jan; Muchez, Philippe; Slobodník, Marek; Prochaska, Walter

    2010-03-01

    Ubiquitous post-Variscan dolomites occur in Zn-Pb-Cu veins at the Nízký Jeseník Mountains and the Upper Silesian Basin (Lower and Upper Carboniferous siliciclastics at the eastern part of the Bohemian Massif). Crush-leach, stable isotope (oxygen and carbon) and microthermometry analysis of the fluid inclusions in dolomites enable understanding the geochemistry, origin and possible migration pathways of the fluids. Homogenisation temperatures of fluid inclusions range between 66 and 148°C, with generally higher temperatures in the Nízký Jeseník Mountains area than in the Upper Silesian Basin. The highest homogenisation temperatures (up to 148°C) have been found near major regional faults and the lowest in a distant position or at higher stratigraphic levels. Highly saline (16.6-28.4 eq. wt% NaCl) H2O-NaCl-CaCl2 ± MgCl2 fluids occur in inclusions. Na-Cl-Br systematics of trapped fluids and a calculated oxygen isotopic fluid composition between -0.9 and +3.0‰ V-SMOW indicate that the fluid was derived from evaporated seawater. Stable isotopic modelling has been used to explain stable isotopic trends. Isotopic values (δ13C = -6.0/+2.0‰ V-PDB, δ18O = +15.5/+22.5‰ V-SMOW of dolomites) resulted from fractionation and crystallisation within an open system at temperatures between 80 and 160°C. Rock-buffering explains the isotopic composition at low w/r ratios. Organic matter maturation caused the presence of isotopically light carbon in the fluids and fluid-rock interactions largely controlled the fluid chemistry (K, Li, Br and Na contents, K/Cl, I/Cl and Li/Cl molar ratios). The fluid chemistry reflects well the interaction between the fluid and underlying limestones as well as with clay- and organic-rich siliciclastics. No regional trends in temperature or fluid geochemistry favour a fluid migration model characterised by an important vertical upward migration along major faults. A permeable basement and fractured sedimentary sequence enhanced the

  15. Rain Impact Model V2.0 for Sea Surface Salinity: A Flag for Salinity Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Garcia, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Central Florida Remote Sensing Laboratory has analyzed Aquarius (AQ) sea surface salinity (SSS) and ESA's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) retrievals in the presence of rain and has developed a Rain Impact Model (RIM V2.0) that predicts transient near-surface salinity stratification based upon the corresponding rain accumulation over the previous 24 hours and the effect of the wind speed. For both of the satellite SSS measurements, a common reference for comparison is the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) for ocean salinity, but there is a significant mismatch between the remote sensing sampling depth of approximately 0.01 m and the typical range of 5 m to 10 m of in situ instruments. Under normal ocean conditions the upper layer of the ocean is well mixed and there is an approximately uniform salinity for the first 10 m depth; therefore satellite measurements are good estimates of the bulk salinity. Conversely, under rainy conditions, there is a dilution of the near-surface salinity that mixed downward by diffusion and mechanical mixing of gravity waves, where the wind speed information play a significant role in the model. This transient phenomena, known as salinity stratification, significantly modifies the salinity gradient in the upper 1 m of the ocean; and therefore invalidates the usual assumption of well-mixed salinity. Generally, these salinity stratifications dissipate in less than a couple of hours and the upper layer becomes well mixed at a slightly fresher salinity. The Rain Impact Model V2.0 is based on the RIM V1.0, previously published, which includes the rain accumulation effect but ignores the variations on wind speed using a constant vertical diffusivity value. This research addresses the effects of rainfall on the AQ and SMOS SSS retrieval using a macro-scale Rain Impact Model (RIM) in regions of high convective rain. This model, based on the superposition of a one-dimension eddy diffusion (turbulent diffusion) model, relates sea

  16. Effects of Soil Salinity on Sucrose Metabolism in Cotton Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingran; Luo, Junyu; Zhao, Xinhua; Dong, Helin; Ma, Yan; Sui, Ning; Zhou, Zhiguo; Meng, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Cotton (Gosspium hirsutum L.) is classified as a salt tolerant crop. However, its yield and fiber quality are negatively affected by soil salinity. Studies on the enzymatic differences in sucrose metabolism under different soil salinity levels are lacking. Therefore, field experiments, using two cotton cultivars, CCRI-79 (salt-tolerant) and Simian 3 (salt-sensitive), were conducted in 2013 and 2014 at three different salinity levels (1.15 dS m-1 [low soil salinity], 6.00 dS m-1 [medium soil salinity], and 11.46 dS m-1 [high soil salinity]). The objective was to elucidate the effects of soil salinity on sucrose content and the activity of key enzymes that are related to sucrose metabolism in cotton fiber. Results showed that as the soil salinity increased, cellulose content, sucrose content, and sucrose transformation rate declined; the decreases in cellulose content and sucrose transformation rate caused by the increase in soil salinity were more in Simian 3 than those in CCRI-79. With increase in soil salinity, activities of sucrose metabolism enzymes sucrose phophate synthase (SPS), acidic invertase, and alkaline invertase were decreased, whereas sucrose synthase (SuSy) activity increased. However, the changes displayed in the SuSy and SPS activities in response to increase in soil salinity were different and the differences were large between the two cotton cultivars. These results illustrated that suppressed cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism under high soil salinity were mainly due to the change in SPS, SuSy, and invertase activities, and the difference in cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism in fiber for the two cotton cultivars in response to soil salinity was determined mainly by both SuSy and SPS activities. PMID:27227773

  17. Effects of Soil Salinity on Sucrose Metabolism in Cotton Fiber.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Jingran; Luo, Junyu; Zhao, Xinhua; Dong, Helin; Ma, Yan; Sui, Ning; Zhou, Zhiguo; Meng, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Cotton (Gosspium hirsutum L.) is classified as a salt tolerant crop. However, its yield and fiber quality are negatively affected by soil salinity. Studies on the enzymatic differences in sucrose metabolism under different soil salinity levels are lacking. Therefore, field experiments, using two cotton cultivars, CCRI-79 (salt-tolerant) and Simian 3 (salt-sensitive), were conducted in 2013 and 2014 at three different salinity levels (1.15 dS m-1 [low soil salinity], 6.00 dS m-1 [medium soil salinity], and 11.46 dS m-1 [high soil salinity]). The objective was to elucidate the effects of soil salinity on sucrose content and the activity of key enzymes that are related to sucrose metabolism in cotton fiber. Results showed that as the soil salinity increased, cellulose content, sucrose content, and sucrose transformation rate declined; the decreases in cellulose content and sucrose transformation rate caused by the increase in soil salinity were more in Simian 3 than those in CCRI-79. With increase in soil salinity, activities of sucrose metabolism enzymes sucrose phophate synthase (SPS), acidic invertase, and alkaline invertase were decreased, whereas sucrose synthase (SuSy) activity increased. However, the changes displayed in the SuSy and SPS activities in response to increase in soil salinity were different and the differences were large between the two cotton cultivars. These results illustrated that suppressed cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism under high soil salinity were mainly due to the change in SPS, SuSy, and invertase activities, and the difference in cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism in fiber for the two cotton cultivars in response to soil salinity was determined mainly by both SuSy and SPS activities. PMID:27227773

  18. Long-term impact of salinity on the performance and microbial population of an aerobic granular reactor treating a high-strength aromatic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carlos; Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Carrera, Julián

    2015-12-01

    The effect of salinity over granular biomass treating a mixture of aromatic compounds (phenol, o-cresol and p-nitrophenol) was evaluated in a continuous airlift reactor. To mimic an industrial wastewater, increasing concentrations (from 2.0 to 29.0 g salts L(-1)) of a mixture of salts (MgSO4, NaCl, KCl, CaCl2 and NaHCO3) were introduced in the influent. The gradual salinity increase led to a good acclimation of the biomass obtaining complete biodegradation of the aromatic compounds and no accumulation of metabolic intermediates. However, a deterioration of the morphology of aerobic granules with a complete loss of granulation after 125 days was produced at 29.0 g salts L(-1). At that moment, anaerobic granules were added to promote granulation and after 50 days new aerobic granules were formed. These new aerobic granules remained stable for more than 100 days at the highest salinity condition with 100% removal of the mixture of aromatic compounds. PMID:26457833

  19. Reliability of high I/O high density CCGA interconnect electronic packages under extreme thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2012-03-01

    Ceramic column grid array (CCGA) packages have been increasing in use based on their advantages such as high interconnect density, very good thermal and electrical performances, compatibility with standard surfacemount packaging assembly processes, and so on. CCGA packages are used in space applications such as in logic and microprocessor functions, telecommunications, payload electronics, and flight avionics. As these packages tend to have less solder joint strain relief tha