Science.gov

Sample records for high salt concentrations

  1. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-02-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

  2. Microbial life at high salt concentrations: phylogenetic and metabolic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2008-01-01

    Halophiles are found in all three domains of life. Within the Bacteria we know halophiles within the phyla Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Bacteroidetes. Within the Archaea the most salt-requiring microorganisms are found in the class Halobacteria. Halobacterium and most of its relatives require over 100–150 g/l salt for growth and structural stability. Also within the order Methanococci we encounter halophilic species. Halophiles and non-halophilic relatives are often found together in the phylogenetic tree, and many genera, families and orders have representatives with greatly different salt requirement and tolerance. A few phylogenetically coherent groups consist of halophiles only: the order Halobacteriales, family Halobacteriaceae (Euryarchaeota) and the anaerobic fermentative bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales (Firmicutes). The family Halomonadaceae (Gammaproteobacteria) almost exclusively contains halophiles. Halophilic microorganisms use two strategies to balance their cytoplasm osmotically with their medium. The first involves accumulation of molar concentrations of KCl. This strategy requires adaptation of the intracellular enzymatic machinery, as proteins should maintain their proper conformation and activity at near-saturating salt concentrations. The proteome of such organisms is highly acidic, and most proteins denature when suspended in low salt. Such microorganisms generally cannot survive in low salt media. The second strategy is to exclude salt from the cytoplasm and to synthesize and/or accumulate organic 'compatible' solutes that do not interfere with enzymatic activity. Few adaptations of the cells' proteome are needed, and organisms using the 'organic-solutes-in strategy' often adapt to a surprisingly broad salt concentration range. Most halophilic Bacteria, but also the halophilic methanogenic Archaea use such organic solutes. A variety of such solutes are known, including glycine betaine

  3. Microbial life at high salt concentrations: phylogenetic and metabolic diversity.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2008-01-01

    Halophiles are found in all three domains of life. Within the Bacteria we know halophiles within the phyla Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Bacteroidetes. Within the Archaea the most salt-requiring microorganisms are found in the class Halobacteria. Halobacterium and most of its relatives require over 100-150 g/l salt for growth and structural stability. Also within the order Methanococci we encounter halophilic species. Halophiles and non-halophilic relatives are often found together in the phylogenetic tree, and many genera, families and orders have representatives with greatly different salt requirement and tolerance. A few phylogenetically coherent groups consist of halophiles only: the order Halobacteriales, family Halobacteriaceae (Euryarchaeota) and the anaerobic fermentative bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales (Firmicutes). The family Halomonadaceae (Gammaproteobacteria) almost exclusively contains halophiles. Halophilic microorganisms use two strategies to balance their cytoplasm osmotically with their medium. The first involves accumulation of molar concentrations of KCl. This strategy requires adaptation of the intracellular enzymatic machinery, as proteins should maintain their proper conformation and activity at near-saturating salt concentrations. The proteome of such organisms is highly acidic, and most proteins denature when suspended in low salt. Such microorganisms generally cannot survive in low salt media. The second strategy is to exclude salt from the cytoplasm and to synthesize and/or accumulate organic 'compatible' solutes that do not interfere with enzymatic activity. Few adaptations of the cells' proteome are needed, and organisms using the 'organic-solutes-in strategy' often adapt to a surprisingly broad salt concentration range. Most halophilic Bacteria, but also the halophilic methanogenic Archaea use such organic solutes. A variety of such solutes are known, including glycine betaine

  4. Effect of high salt concentrations on water structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leberman, R.; Soper, A. K.

    1995-11-01

    THE characteristic tetrahedral structure of water is known to be disrupted by changes in pressure and temperature1-3. It has been suggested that ions in solution may have a similar perturbing effect4,5. Here we use neutron diffraction to compare the effects of applied pressure and high salt concentrations on the hydrogen-bonded network of water. We find that the ions induce a change in structure equivalent to the application of high pressures, and that the size of the effect is ion-specific. Ionic concentrations of a few moles per litre have equivalent pressures that can exceed a thousand atmospheres. We propose that these changes may be understood in terms of the partial molar volume of the ions, relative to those of water molecules. The equivalent induced pressure of a particular ion species is correlated with its efficacy in precipitating, or salting-out, proteins from solution6.

  5. Plasma 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentration of Dahl salt-sensitive rats decreases during high salt intake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Tewolde, Teclemicael K.; Forte, Camille; Wang, Min; Bayorh, Mohamed A.; Emmett, Nerimiah L.; White, Jolanda; Griffin, Keri

    2002-01-01

    Dahl salt-sensitive rats, but not salt-resistant rats, develop hypertension in response to high salt intake. We have previously shown an inverse relationship between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration and blood pressure of Dahl salt-sensitive rats during high salt intake. In this study, we report on the relationship between high salt intake and plasma 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25-(OH)(2)D) concentration of Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant rats. Rats were fed a high salt diet (8%) and sacrificed at day 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentrations of salt-sensitive rats were reduced to 50% of that at baseline at day 2-when blood pressure and plasma 25-OHD concentration were unchanged, but 25-OHD content in the kidney was 81% of that at baseline. Plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration was reduced further to 10% of that at baseline from day 7 to 14 of high salt intake, a reduction that was prevented in rats switched to a low salt (0.3%) diet at day 7. Exogenous 24,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (24,25-(OH)(2)D(3)), administered at a level that increased plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration to five times normal, did not attenuate the salt-induced hypertension of salt-sensitive rats. Plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration of salt-resistant rats was gradually reduced to 50% of that at baseline at day 14 and returned to baseline value at day 28 of high salt intake. We conclude that the decrease in plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration in salt-sensitive rats during high salt intake is caused by decreased 25-OHD content in the kidney and also by another unidentified mechanism.

  6. High dietary cholecalciferol increases plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol concentration, but does not attenuate the hypertension of Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed a high salt diet

    PubMed Central

    Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Cephas, Stacy; Muttardy, Farah F.; Al-Mahmoud, Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    The Dahl salt-sensitive rat, a model for salt-induced hypertension, develops hypovitaminosis D during high salt intake, which is caused by loss of protein-bound vitamin D metabolites into urine. We tested the hypothesis that high dietary cholecalciferol (5- and 10-fold standard) would increase plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OHD3) concentration (indicator of vitamin D status) of salt-sensitive rats during high salt intake. Salt-sensitive rats were fed 0.3% salt (low salt, LS), 3% salt (high salt, HS), 3% salt and 7.5 μg cholecalciferol/d (HS-D5), or 3% salt and 15 μg cholecalciferol/d (HS-D10) and sacrificed at week 4. Plasma 25-OHD3 concentrations of the two groups of HS-D rats were similar to that of LS rats and more than twice that of HS rats. Urinary cholecalciferol metabolite content of HS-D rats was more than seven times that of HS rats. Systolic blood pressures of the hypertensive HS and HS-D rats did not significantly differ, whereas LS rats were not hypertensive. We conclude that high dietary cholecalciferol increases plasma 25-OHD3 concentration, but does not attenuate the hypertension of salt-sensitive rats during high salt intake. Low salt intake may be necessary to both maintain optimal vitamin D status and prevent hypertension in salt-sensitive individuals. PMID:18554900

  7. Life at high salt concentrations, intracellular KCl concentrations, and acidic proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Extremely halophilic microorganisms that accumulate KCl for osmotic balance (the Halobacteriaceae, Salinibacter) have a large excess of acidic amino acids in their proteins. This minireview explores the occurrence of acidic proteomes in halophiles of different physiology and phylogenetic affiliation. For fermentative bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales, known to accumulate KCl, an acidic proteome was predicted. However, this is not confirmed by genome analysis. The reported excess of acidic amino acids is due to a high content of Gln and Asn, which yield Glu and Asp upon acid hydrolysis. The closely related Halorhodospira halophila and Halorhodospira halochloris use different strategies to cope with high salt. The first has an acidic proteome and accumulates high KCl concentrations at high salt concentrations; the second does not accumulate KCl and lacks an acidic proteome. Acidic proteomes can be predicted from the genomes of some moderately halophilic aerobes that accumulate organic osmotic solutes (Halomonas elongata, Chromohalobacter salexigens) and some marine bacteria. Based on the information on cultured species it is possible to understand the pI profiles predicted from metagenomic data from hypersaline environments. PMID:24204364

  8. Capillary electrophoresis of proteins in buffers containing high concentrations of zwitterionic salts.

    PubMed

    Bushey, M M; Jorgenson, J W

    1989-10-20

    A method for improving protein separations in capillary zone electrophoresis utilizing high concentrations of zwitterionic buffer additives was examined. Lysozyme and alpha-chymotrypsinogen A were used as test proteins in untreated fused-silica capillaries in buffers of pH ca. 7.0 and 9.0 The zwitterion-containing buffers were compared with buffers containing high ionic salt concentrations and a buffer containing a combination of high ionic salt and high zwitterion concentrations. Over 100,000 theoretical plates were obtained in less than 30 min. for both test proteins in a pH 7 buffer containing both trimethylglycine and potassium sulfate. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique compared with those of other methods used to prevent protein adsorption are discussed. PMID:2592485

  9. Flow-Electrode Capacitive Deionization Using an Aqueous Electrolyte with a High Salt Concentration.

    PubMed

    Yang, SeungCheol; Choi, Jiyeon; Yeo, Jeong-Gu; Jeon, Sung-Il; Park, Hong-Ran; Kim, Dong Kook

    2016-06-01

    Flow-electrode capacitive deionization (FCDI) is novel capacitive deionization (CDI) technology that exhibits continuous deionization and a high desalting efficiency. A flow-electrode with high capacitance and low resistance is required for achieving an efficient FCDI system with low energy consumption. For developing high-performance flow-electrode, studies should be conducted considering porous materials, conductive additives, and electrolytes constituting the flow-electrode. Here, we evaluated the desalting performances of flow-electrodes with spherical activated carbon and aqueous electrolytes containing various concentrations of NaCl in the FCDI unit cell for confirming the effect of salt concentration on the electrolyte of a flow-electrode on desalting efficiency. We verified the necessity of a moderate amount of salt in the flow-electrode for compensating for the reduction in the performance of the flow-electrode, attributed to the resistance of water used as the electrolyte. Simultaneously, we confirmed the potential use of salt water with a high salt concentration, such as seawater, as an aqueous electrolyte for the flow-electrode. PMID:27162028

  10. Crystallization of DNA-capped gold nanoparticles in high-concentration, divalent salt environments.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shawn J; Kahn, Jason S; Derrien, Thomas L; Campolongo, Michael J; Zhao, Mervin; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Luo, Dan

    2014-01-27

    The multiparametric nature of nanoparticle self-assembly makes it challenging to circumvent the instabilities that lead to aggregation and achieve crystallization under extreme conditions. By using non-base-pairing DNA as a model ligand instead of the typical base-pairing design for programmability, long-range 2D DNA-gold nanoparticle crystals can be obtained at extremely high salt concentrations and in a divalent salt environment. The interparticle spacings in these 2D nanoparticle crystals can be engineered and further tuned based on an empirical model incorporating the parameters of ligand length and ionic strength. PMID:24459055

  11. Interactions between Adsorbed Hydrogenated Soy Phosphatidylcholine (HSPC) Vesicles at Physiologically High Pressures and Salt Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Ronit; Schroeder, Avi; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Klein, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Using a surface force balance, we measured normal and shear interactions as a function of surface separation between layers of hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine (HSPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) adsorbed from dispersion at physiologically high salt concentrations (0.15 M NaNO3). Cryo-scanning electron microscopy shows that each surface is coated by a close-packed HSPC-SUV layer with an overlayer of liposomes on top. A clear attractive interaction between the liposome layers is seen upon approach and separation, followed by a steric repulsion upon further compression. The shear forces reveal low friction coefficients (μ = 0.008–0.0006) up to contact pressures of at least 6 MPa, comparable to those observed in the major joints. The spread in μ-values may be qualitatively accounted for by different local liposome structure at different contact points, suggesting that the intrinsic friction of the HSPC-SUV layers at this salt concentration is closer to the lower limit (μ = ∼0.0006). This low friction is attributed to the hydration lubrication mechanism arising from rubbing of the hydrated phosphocholine-headgroup layers exposed at the outer surface of each liposome, and provides support for the conjecture that phospholipids may play a significant role in biological lubrication. PMID:21575574

  12. Decondensation behavior of DNA chains induced by multivalent cations at high salt concentrations: Molecular dynamics simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yang-Wei; Ran, Shi-Yong; He, Lin-Li; Wang, Xiang-Hong; Zhang, Lin-Xi

    2015-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we study the decondensation process of DNA chains induced by multivalent cations at high salt concentrations in the presence of short cationic chains in solutions. The typical simulation conformations of DNA chains with varying salt concentrations for multivalent cations imply that the concentration of salt cations and the valence of multivalent cations have a strong influence on the process of DNA decondensation. The DNA chains are condensed in the absence of salt or at low salt concentrations, and the compacted conformations of DNA chains become loose when a number of cations and anions are added into the solution. It is explicitly demonstrated that cations can overcompensate the bare charge of the DNA chains and weaken the attraction interactions between the DNA chains and short cationic chains at high salt concentrations. The condensation-decondensation transitions of DNA are also experimentally observed in mixing spermidine with λ-phage DNA at different concentrations of NaCl/MgCl2 solutions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31340026), the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. Z13F20019 and LQ12E01003), and the Science and Technology Project of Zhejiang Science and Technology Department, China (Grant No. 2014C31147).

  13. Structural evidence for solvent-stabilisation by aspartic acid as a mechanism for halophilic protein stability in high salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Samuel; Walsh, Danielle L; Rhys, Natasha H; Soper, Alan K; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-21

    Halophilic organisms have adapted to survive in high salt environments, where mesophilic organisms would perish. One of the biggest challenges faced by halophilic proteins is the ability to maintain both the structure and function at molar concentrations of salt. A distinct adaptation of halophilic proteins, compared to mesophilic homologues, is the abundance of aspartic acid on the protein surface. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of halophilic proteins suggest an important role for solvent interactions with the surface aspartic acid residues. This interaction, between the regions of the acidic protein surface and the solvent, is thought to maintain a hydration layer around the protein at molar salt concentrations thereby allowing halophilic proteins to retain their functional state. Here we present neutron diffraction data of the monomeric zwitterionic form of aspartic acid solutions at physiological pH in 0.25 M and 2.5 M concentration of potassium chloride, to mimic mesophilic and halophilic-like environmental conditions. We have used isotopic substitution in combination with empirical potential structure refinement to extract atomic-scale information from the data. Our study provides structural insights that support the hypothesis that carboxyl groups on acidic residues bind water more tightly under high salt conditions, in support of the residue-ion interaction model of halophilic protein stabilisation. Furthermore our data show that in the presence of high salt the self-association between the zwitterionic form of aspartic acid molecules is reduced, suggesting a possible mechanism through which protein aggregation is prevented. PMID:27327567

  14. Geobacter sp. SD-1 with enhanced electrochemical activity in high-salt concentration solutions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dan; Call, Douglas; Wang, Aijie; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-12-01

    An isolate, designated strain SD-1, was obtained from a biofilm dominated by Geobacter sulfurreducens in a microbial fuel cell. The electrochemical activity of strain SD-1 was compared with type strains, G. sulfurreducens PCA and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, and a mixed culture in microbial electrolysis cells. SD-1 produced a maximum current density of 290 ± 29 A m−3 in a high-concentration phosphate buffer solution (PBS-H, 200 mM). This current density was significantly higher than that produced by the mixed culture (189 ± 44 A m−3) or the type strains (< 70 A m−3). In a highly saline water (SW; 50 mM PBS and 650 mM NaCl), current by SD-1 (158 ± 4 A m−3) was reduced by 28% compared with 50 mM PBS (220 ± 4 A m−3), but it was still higher than that of the mixed culture (147 ± 19 A m−3), and strains PCA and GS-15 did not produce any current. Electrochemical tests showed that the improved performance of SD-1 was due to its lower charge transfer resistance and more negative potentials produced at higher current densities. These results show that the electrochemical activity of SD-1 was significantly different than other Geobacter strains and mixed cultures in terms of its salt tolerance. PMID:25756125

  15. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Lining; Lu, Minxu; Meng, Yao; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhang, Lei

    2014-09-01

    A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH- ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH- on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Aluminosilicate Gels Prepared in High-Alkaline and Salt-Concentrated Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Parker, Kent E.; Hobbs, David T.; McCready, David E.

    2005-01-11

    We have examined the formation of aluminosilicate in high alkaline and salt concentrated solutions characteristic of nuclear tank wastes. Information on the mechanism and kinetics of the phase formation under hydrothermal conditions was obtained by characterization the structures of gel phases as a function of time and composition using multinuclear NMR techniques in combination with x-ray diffraction. This work offers a new insight into the aluminum and aluminosilicate chemistry in simulated nuclear tank wastes.

  17. Effect of salt types and concentrations on the high-pressure inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in ground chicken.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, S; Ahmed, Rafath; Chibeu, Andrew; Gao, Anli; Koutchma, Tatiana; Strange, Phil

    2016-02-01

    National and international health agencies have recommended a significant reduction in daily intake of sodium by reducing the amount of NaCl in foods, specifically processed meats. However, sodium reduction could increase the risk of survival and growth of spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms on these products. Therefore, alternate processing technologies to improve safety of sodium reduced foods are necessary. This study examined the effects of three different salt types and concentrations on high-pressure inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in pre-blended ground chicken formulations. Ground chicken formulated with three salt types (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2), at three concentrations (0, 1.5, 2.5%) and inoculated with a four strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (10(8) CFU g(-1)) were subjected to four pressure treatments (0, 100, 300, 600 MPa) and two durations (60, 180 s) in an experiment with factorial design. Surviving cells were enumerated by plating on Oxford agar and analysed by factorial ANOVA. Pressure treatments at 100 or 300 MPa did not significantly (P=0.19-050) reduce L. monocytogenes populations. Neither salt type nor concentration had a significant effect on L. monocytogenes populations at these pressure levels. At 600 MPa, salt types, concentrations and duration of pressure treatment all had a significant effect on L. monocytogenes populations. Formulations with increasing concentrations of NaCl or KCl showed significantly lower reduction in L. monocytogenes, while increase in CaCl2 concentration resulted in a significantly higher L. monocytogenes reduction. For instance, increase in NaCl concentration from 0 to 1.5 or 2.5% resulted in a log reduction of 6.16, 2.49 and 1.29, respectively, when exposed to 600 MPa for 60s. In the case of CaCl2, increase from 0 to 1.5 or 2.5% resulted in a log reduction of 6.16, 7.28 and 7.47, respectively. These results demonstrate that high-pressure processing is a viable process to improve microbial safety of sodium

  18. Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Shelly X. Li; Steven D. Herrmann; Michael F. Simpson

    2009-09-01

    Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations Shelly X. Li, Steven D. Herrmann, and Michael F. Simpson Pyroprocessing Technology Department Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 USA Abstract - A series of six bench-scale liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) tests was performed to obtain basic separation data with focus on the behavior of rare earth elements. The electrolyte used for the tests was a mixed salt from the Mk-IV and Mk-V electrorefiners, in which spent metal fuels from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) had been processed. Rare earth (RE) chlorides, such as NdCl3, CeCl3, LaCl3, PrCl3, SmCl3, and YCl3, were spiked into the salt prior to the first test to create an extreme case for investigating rare earth contamination of the actinides collected by a LCC. For the first two LCC tests, an alloy with the nominal composition of 41U-30Pu-5Am-3Np-20Zr-1RE was loaded into the anode baskets as the feed material. The anode feed material for Runs 3 to 6 was spent ternary fuel (U-19Pu-10Zr). The Pu/U ratio in the salt varied from 0.6 to 1.3. Chemical and radiochemical analytical results confirmed that U and transuranics can be collected into the LCC as a group under the given run conditions. The RE contamination level in the LCC product was up to 6.7 wt% of the total metal collected. The detailed data for partitioning of actinides and REs in the salt and Cd phases are reported in the paper.

  19. Spectroscopical Determination of ground-level concentrations of Reactive Halogen Species (RHS) above salt lakes, salt pans and other areas with high halogen emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holla, Robert; Landwehr, Sebastian; Platt, Ulrich; Kotte, Karsten; Lisitsyna, Linda V.; Mulder, Ines; Emmerich, Maren; Huber, Stefan; Heidak, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Reactive Halogen Species (RHS), especially BrO and IO, are crucial for the photo chemistry of ozone, the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and have an impact on the equilibria of many atmospheric reaction cycles. This also induces a potential influence on the earth's climate. Beside polar regions, volcanoes and the marine boundary layer salt lakes are an important source for reactive halogen species. At the Dead Sea BrO mixing ratios of up to 176 ppt were measured in summer 2001 [Matveev et al., 2001] and IO was identified with maximal mixing ratios of more than 10 ppt by [Zingler and Platt, 2005]. The Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia showed the presence of up to 20 ppt BrO [Hönninger et al., 2004]. Salt pans and salt deserts may be important halogen sources as well. Saline soils cover 2.5% of the land surface of the earth and might increase in the near future due to desertification as one aspect of the global climate change. Within the scope of the DFG research group HALOPROC a measurement campaign in Southern Russia was performed in August 2009. The ground-level concentrations of BrO, IO, Ozone and other trace gases above the salt lakes El'Ton, Baskuntschak and other local areas were measured using the Multi-AXis-DOAS technique. A further campaign was performed in Mauritania in November/December 2009 in cooperation with the BMBF project SOPRAN. In addition to the above-mentioned measurements the Long-Path DOAS technique was used in order to measure the ground-level concentrations at two different sites: 1. the salt pan Sebkha N'Dramcha and 2. close to a sea weed field at Poste Iwik in a coastal area. We present results from both campaigns concerning the concentrations of bromine oxide (BrO), iodine oxide (IO), ozone (O3)and formaldehyde (HCHO) and give an outlook on possible further campaigns in the future.

  20. Erosion-corrosion in carbon dioxide saturated systems in presence of sand, inhibitor, oil, and high concentration of salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Shokrollah

    Oil and gas production is usually accompanied by formation water which typically contains high levels of chloride. Some effects of chloride concentration on corrosion are not widely known in the literature, and this can result in misleading conclusions. One goal of this research was to contribute to a better understanding of the effects of chloride concentration in CO2 corrosion. Experimental and theoretical studies conducted in the present work have shown that increasing the NaCl concentration in solution has three important effects on corrosion results. First, standard pH meter readings in high NaCl concentration solutions require corrections. Second, increasing the NaCl concentration decreases the CO2 concentration in solution and therefore contributes to a decrease in the corrosion rate. Third, increasing the NaCl concentration increases the solubility of FeCO3 and therefore reduces the likelihood of forming an iron carbonate scale. High NaCl concentration also decreases the sand erosion rate of the metal slightly by increasing the density and viscosity of the liquid. There are two main contributions of this research. The first contribution is the experimental characterization of inhibited erosion-corrosion behavior of mild steel under CO2-saturated conditions with a high salt concentration. Chemical inhibition is one the most important techniques for controlling erosion-corrosion in offshore mild steel pipelines, tubing and pipe fittings in oil and gas industry. The second contribution is the introduction of a new approach for predicting inhibited erosion-corrosion in mild steel pipes including the effects of flow and environmental conditions, sand production, and an oil phase. Sand erosion can decrease the efficiency of corrosion protection systems including iron-carbonate scale formation and chemical inhibition. The need to be able to predict inhibitor performance under sand production conditions is particularly acute when the wells are deep or off

  1. Surface viscoelasticity of concentrated salt solutions: specific ion effects.

    PubMed

    Safouane, Mahassine; Langevin, Dominique

    2009-01-12

    Herein, we study the viscoelastic response of concentrated salt solutions using surface waves excited by electrocapillarity. We show that the hydrodynamic behaviour of the solutions is similar to that of water at concentrations up to 2 m-well above the concentration C*, at which inhibition of bubble coalescence occurs in these solutions. This result excludes the occurrence of changes in the slip conditions at C*, postulated to explain this inhibition. Our study is carried out on salts that both increase and decrease the surface tension. We observe that the salt that decreases the tension does not change the surface behaviour at all, whereas the other two salts essentially produce negative contributions to the surface viscoelasticity at very high salt concentrations. The effects observed are quite large and remain to be explained. PMID:19072821

  2. Influence of high concentrations of mineral salts on production process and NaCl accumulation by Salicornia europaea plants as a constituent of the LSS phototroph link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, N. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Kovaleva, N. P.; Gribovskaya, I. V.; Tikhomirov, A. A.

    Use of halophytes (salt-tolerant vegetation), in a particular vegetable Salicornia europaea plants which are capable of utilizing NaCl in rather high concentrations, is one of possible means of NaCl incorporation into mass exchange of bioregenerative life support systems. In preliminary experiments it was shown that S. europaea plants, basically, could grow on urine pretreated with physicochemical processing and urease-enzyme decomposing of urea with the subsequent ammonia distillation. But at the same time inhibition of the growth process of the plants was observed. The purpose of the given work was to find out the influence of excessive quantities of some mineral elements contained in products of physicochemical processing of urine on the production process and NaCl accumulation by S. europaea plants. As the content of mineral salts in the human liquid wastes (urine) changed within certain limits, two variants of experimental solutions were examined. In the first variant, the concentration of mineral salts was equivalent to the minimum salt content in the urine and was: K - 1.5 g/l, P - 0.5 g/l, S - 0.5 g/l, Mg - 0.07 g/l, Ca - 0.2 g/l. In the second experimental variant, the content of mineral salts corresponded to the maximum salt content in urine and was the following: K - 3.0 g/l, P - 0.7 g/l, S - 1.2 g/l, Mg - 0.2 g/l, Ca - 0.97 g/l. As the control, the Tokarev nutrient solution containing nitrogen in the form of a urea, and the Knop nutrient solution with nitrogen in the nitrate form were used. N quantity in all four variants made up 177 mg/l. Air temperature was 24 °C, illumination was continuous. Light intensity was 690 μmol/m 2s of photosynthetically active radiation. NaCl concentration in solutions was 1%. Our researches showed that the dry aboveground biomass of an average plant of the first variant practically did not differ from the control and totaled 11 g. In the second variant, S. europaea productivity decreased and the dry aboveground biomass

  3. Rice potassium transporter OsHAK1 is essential for maintaining potassium-mediated growth and functions in salt tolerance over low and high potassium concentration ranges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Hu, Qingdi; Luo, Le; Yang, Tianyuan; Zhang, Song; Hu, Yibing; Yu, Ling; Xu, Guohua

    2015-12-01

    Potassium (K) absorption and translocation in plants rely upon multiple K transporters for adapting varied K supply and saline conditions. Here, we report the expression patterns and physiological roles of OsHAK1, a member belonging to the KT/KUP/HAK gene family in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The expression of OsHAK1 is up-regulated by K deficiency or salt stress in various tissues, particularly in the root and shoot apical meristem, the epidermises and steles of root, and vascular bundles of shoot. Both oshak1 knockout mutants in comparison to their respective Dongjin or Manan wild types showed a dramatic reduction in K concentration and stunted root and shoot growth. Knockout of OsHAK1 reduced the K absorption rate of unit root surface area by ∼50-55 and ∼30%, and total K uptake by ∼80 and ∼65% at 0.05-0.1 and 1 mm K supply level, respectively. The root net high-affinity K uptake of oshak1 mutants was sensitive to salt stress but not to ammonium supply. Overexpression of OsHAK1 in rice increased K uptake and K/Na ratio. The positive relationship between K concentration and shoot biomass in the mutants suggests that OsHAK1 plays an essential role in K-mediated rice growth and salt tolerance over low and high K concentration ranges. PMID:26046301

  4. Multiple phosphorylated forms of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm1 protein include an isoform induced in response to high salt concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, M H; Nadeau, E T; Grayhack, E J

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm1 protein is an essential multifunctional transcription factor which is highly homologous to human serum response factor. Mcm1 protein acts on a large number of distinctly regulated genes: haploid cell-type-specific genes, G2-cell-cycle-regulated genes, pheromone-induced genes, arginine metabolic genes, and genes important for cell wall and cell membrane function. We show here that Mcm1 protein is phosphorylated in vivo. Several (more than eight) isoforms of Mcm1 protein, resolved by isoelectric focusing, are present in vivo; two major phosphorylation sites lie in the N-terminal 17 amino acids immediately adjacent to the conserved MADS box DNA-binding domain. The implications of multiple species of Mcm1, particularly the notion that a unique Mcm1 isoform could be required for regulation of a specific set of Mcm1's target genes, are discussed. We also show here that Mcm1 plays an important role in the response to stress caused by NaCl. G. Yu, R. J. Deschenes, and J. S. Fassler (J. Biol. Chem. 270:8739-8743, 1995) showed that Mcm1 function is affected by mutations in the SLN1 gene, a signal transduction component implicated in the response to osmotic stress. We find that mcm1 mutations can confer either reduced or enhanced survival on high-salt medium; deletion of the N terminus or mutation in the primary phosphorylation site results in impaired growth on high-salt medium. Furthermore, Mcm1 protein is a target of a signal transduction system responsive to osmotic stress: a new isoform of Mcm1 is induced by NaCl or KCl; this result establishes that Mcm1 itself is regulated. PMID:9001236

  5. Rock-salt structure lithium deuteride formation in liquid lithium with high-concentrations of deuterium: a first-principles molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Carter, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    Because of lithium’s possible use as a first wall material in a fusion reactor, a fundamental understanding of the interactions between liquid lithium (Li) and deuterium (D) is important. We predict structural and dynamical properties of liquid Li samples with high concentrations of D, as derived from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid Li samples with four concentrations of inserted D atoms (LiDβ , β =0.25 , 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) are studied at temperatures ranging from 470 to 1143 K. Densities, diffusivities, pair distribution functions, bond angle distribution functions, geometries, and charge transfer between Li and D atoms are calculated and analyzed. The analysis suggests liquid-solid phase transitions can occur at some concentrations and temperatures, forming rock-salt LiD within liquid Li. We also observe formation of some D2 molecules at high D concentrations.

  6. Double inversion of emulsions induced by salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingchun; Li, Lu; Wang, Jun; Sun, Haigang; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2012-05-01

    The effects of salt on emulsions containing sorbitan oleate (Span 80) and Laponite particles were investigated. Surprisingly, a novel double phase inversion was induced by simply changing the salt concentration. At fixed concentration of Laponite particles in the aqueous phase and surfactant in paraffin oil, emulsions are oil in water (o/w) when the concentration of NaCl is lower than 5 mM. Emulsions of water in oil (w/o) are obtained when the NaCl concentration is between 5 and 20 mM. Then the emulsions invert to o/w when the salt concentration is higher than 50 mM. In this process, different emulsifiers dominate the composition of the interfacial layer, and the emulsion type is correspondingly controlled. When the salt concentration is low in the aqueous dispersion of Laponite, the particles are discrete and can move to the interface freely. Therefore, the emulsions are stabilized by particles and surfactant, and the type is o/w as particles are in domination. At intermediate salt concentrations, the aqueous dispersions of Laponite are gel-like, the viscosity is high, and the transition of the particles from the aqueous phase to the interface is inhibited. The emulsions are stabilized mainly by lipophilic surfactant, and w/o emulsions are obtained. For high salt concentration, flocculation occurs and the viscosity of the dispersion is reduced; thus, the adsorption of particles is promoted and the type of emulsions inverts to o/w. Laser-induced fluorescent confocal micrographs and cryo transmission electron microscopy clearly confirm the adsorption of Laponite particles on the surface of o/w emulsion droplets, whereas the accumulation of particles at the w/o emulsion droplet surfaces was not observed. This mechanism is also supported by the results of rheology and interfacial tension measurements. PMID:22475400

  7. Influence of high concentrations of mineral salts on production process and NaCl accumulation by Salicornia europaea plants as a constituent of the LSS phototroph link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, N. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Kovaleva, N. P.; Gribovskaya, I. V.; Tikhomirov, A. A.

    Use of halophytes, in particular vegetable Salicornia europaea plants which are capable to utilize NaCl in rather high concentrations, is one of possible means of NaCl incorporation into mass exchange of biological life support systems (BLSS). In preliminary experiments it was shown, that S.europaea plants, basically, can grow on urine subjected to physicochemical processing and urease-fermentative decomposing of urea with the subsequent ammonia distillation, but for all that oppression of plants growth process was observed. In this connection, the purpose of the given work was to find out the influence of excessive quantity of some mineral elements contained in products of physicochemical processing of urine on production process and NaCl accumulation by S. europaea plants. As the content of mineral salts in the human's fluid excretions changed within certain limits two variants of modeling solutions were prepared. In the first variant concentration of mineral salts was equivalent to minimum salt content in the human's fluid excretions and compounded: K - 1,5 g/l, P - 0,5 g/l, S - 0,5 g/l, Mg - 0,07 g/l, Ca - 0,2 g/l. In the second variant the content of mineral salts corresponded to maximum salt content in the human's fluid excretions and was the following: K - 3,0 g/l, P - 0,7g/l, S - 1,2 g/l, Mg - 0,2 g/l, Ca - 0,97 g/l. As the control the modified solution under B.I.Tokarev's formulation containing nitrogen in the form of a urea, and Knop's solution with nitrogen in the nitrate form were used. N quantity in all 4 variants made up 177 mg/l. Air temperature was 24°, illumination was continuous. Light intensity was 150 W/m2 PAR. NaCl concentration in solutions compounded 1 %. The researches conducted showed that the dry above-ground biomass of an average plant of the first variant practically did not differ from the control and compounded 11,2 g. In the second variant S.europaea productivity decreased, and the dry above-ground biomass of an average plant

  8. Enhanced cycling performance of a Li metal anode in a dimethylsulfoxide-based electrolyte using highly concentrated lithium salt for a lithium-oxygen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togasaki, Norihiro; Momma, Toshiyuki; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    Stable charge-discharge cycling behavior for a lithium metal anode in a dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-based electrolyte is strongly desired of lithium-oxygen batteries, because the Li anode is rapidly exhausted as a result of side reactions during cycling in the DMSO solution. Herein, we report a novel electrolyte design for enhancing the cycling performance of Li anodes by using a highly concentrated DMSO-based electrolyte with a specific Li salt. Lithium nitrate (LiNO3), which forms an inorganic compound (Li2O) instead of a soluble product (Li2S) on a lithium surface, exhibits a >20% higher coulombic efficiency than lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide, and lithium perchlorate, regardless of the loading current density. Moreover, the stable cycling of Li anodes in DMSO-based electrolytes depends critically on the salt concentration. The highly concentrated electrolyte 4.0 M LiNO3/DMSO displays enhanced and stable cycling performance comparable to that of carbonate-based electrolytes, which had not previously been achieved. We suppose this enhancement is due to the absence of free DMSO solvent in the electrolyte and the promotion of the desolvation of Li ions on the solid electrolyte interphase surface, both being consequences of the unique structure of the electrolyte.

  9. Highly-resolved Modeling of Emissions and Concentrations of Carbon Monoxide, Carbon Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, and Fine Particulate Matter in Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate, high-resolution data on air pollutant emissions and concentrations are needed to understand human exposures and for both policy and pollutant management purposes. An important step in this process is also quantification of uncertainties. We present a spatially explicit and highly resolved emissions inventory for Salt Lake County, Utah, and trace gas concentration estimates for carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and fine particles (PM2.5) within Salt Lake City. We assess the validity of this approach by comparing measured concentrations against simulated values derived from combining the emissions inventory with an atmospheric model. The emissions inventory for the criteria pollutants was constructed using the 2011 National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The spatial and temporal allocation methods from the Emission Modeling Clearinghouse data set are used to downscale the NEI data from annual to hourly scales and from county-level to 500 m x 500 m resolution. Onroad mobile source emissions were estimated by combining a bottom-up emissions calculation approach for large roadway links with a top-down spatial allocation approach for other roadways. Vehicle activity data for road links were derived from automatic traffic responder data. The emissions inventory for CO2 was obtained from the Hestia emissions data product at an hourly, building, facility, and road link resolution. The AERMOD and CALPUFF dispersion models were used to transport emissions and estimate air pollutant concentrations at an hourly temporal and 500 m x 500 m spatial resolution. Modeled results were compared against measurements from a mobile lab equipped with trace gas measurement equipment traveling on pre-determined routes in the Salt Lake City area. The comparison between both approaches to concentration estimation highlights spatial locations and hours of high variability/uncertainty. Results presented here will inform understanding of variability and

  10. Microbial Successions and Metabolite Changes during Fermentation of Salted Shrimp (Saeu-Jeot) with Different Salt Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Se Hee; Jung, Ji Young; Jeon, Che Ok

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of salt concentration on saeu-jeot (salted shrimp) fermentation, four sets of saeu-jeot samples with 20%, 24%, 28%, and 32% salt concentrations were prepared, and the pH, bacterial and archaeal abundances, bacterial communities, and metabolites were monitored during the entire fermentation period. Quantitative PCR showed that Bacteria were much more abundant than Archaea in all saeu-jeot samples, suggesting that bacterial populations play more important roles than archaeal populations even in highly salted samples. Community analysis indicated that Vibrio, Photobacterium, Psychrobacter, Pseudoalteromonas, and Enterovibrio were identified as the initially dominant genera, and the bacterial successions were significantly different depending on the salt concentration. During the early fermentation period, Salinivibrio predominated in the 20% salted samples, whereas Staphylococcus, Halomonas, and Salimicrobium predominated in the 24% salted samples; eventually, Halanaerobium predominated in the 20% and 24% salted samples. The initially dominant genera gradually decreased as the fermentation progressed in the 28% and 32% salted samples, and eventually Salimicrobium became predominant in the 28% salted samples. However, the initially dominant genera still remained until the end of fermentation in the 32% salted samples. Metabolite analysis showed that the amino acid profile and the initial glycerol increase were similar in all saeu-jeot samples regardless of the salt concentration. After 30–80 days of fermentation, the levels of acetate, butyrate, and methylamines in the 20% and 24% salted samples increased with the growth of Halanaerobium, even though the amino acid concentrations steadily increased until approximately 80–107 days of fermentation. This study suggests that a range of 24–28% salt concentration in saeu-jeot fermentation is appropriate for the production of safe and tasty saeu-jeot. PMID:24587230

  11. Microbial successions and metabolite changes during fermentation of salted shrimp (saeu-jeot) with different salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Hee; Jung, Ji Young; Jeon, Che Ok

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of salt concentration on saeu-jeot (salted shrimp) fermentation, four sets of saeu-jeot samples with 20%, 24%, 28%, and 32% salt concentrations were prepared, and the pH, bacterial and archaeal abundances, bacterial communities, and metabolites were monitored during the entire fermentation period. Quantitative PCR showed that Bacteria were much more abundant than Archaea in all saeu-jeot samples, suggesting that bacterial populations play more important roles than archaeal populations even in highly salted samples. Community analysis indicated that Vibrio, Photobacterium, Psychrobacter, Pseudoalteromonas, and Enterovibrio were identified as the initially dominant genera, and the bacterial successions were significantly different depending on the salt concentration. During the early fermentation period, Salinivibrio predominated in the 20% salted samples, whereas Staphylococcus, Halomonas, and Salimicrobium predominated in the 24% salted samples; eventually, Halanaerobium predominated in the 20% and 24% salted samples. The initially dominant genera gradually decreased as the fermentation progressed in the 28% and 32% salted samples, and eventually Salimicrobium became predominant in the 28% salted samples. However, the initially dominant genera still remained until the end of fermentation in the 32% salted samples. Metabolite analysis showed that the amino acid profile and the initial glycerol increase were similar in all saeu-jeot samples regardless of the salt concentration. After 30-80 days of fermentation, the levels of acetate, butyrate, and methylamines in the 20% and 24% salted samples increased with the growth of Halanaerobium, even though the amino acid concentrations steadily increased until approximately 80-107 days of fermentation. This study suggests that a range of 24-28% salt concentration in saeu-jeot fermentation is appropriate for the production of safe and tasty saeu-jeot. PMID:24587230

  12. Spatiotemporal comparison of highly-resolved emissions and concentrations of carbon dioxide and criteria pollutants in Salt Lake City, Utah for health and policy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Gurney, K. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Fasoli, B.; Bares, R.; o'Keefe, D.; Song, T.; Huang, J.; Horel, J.; Crosman, E.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses the need for robust highly-resolved emissions and concentration data required for planning purposes and policy development aimed at managing pollutant sources. Adverse health effects resulting from urban pollution exposure are dependent on proximity to emission sources and atmospheric mixing, necessitating models with high spatial and temporal resolution. As urban emission sources co-emit carbon dioxide (CO2) and criteria pollutants (CAPs), efforts to reduce specific pollutants would synergistically reduce others. We present emissions inventories and modeled concentrations for CO2 and CAPs: carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10), and sulfur oxides (SOx) for Salt Lake County, Utah. We compare the resulting concentrations against stationary and mobile measurement data and present a systematic quantification of uncertainties. The emissions inventory for CO2 is based on the Hestia emissions data inventory that resolves emissions at an hourly, building and road link resolution as well as hourly gridded emissions with a 0.002o x 0.002o spatial resolution. Two methods for deriving criteria pollutant emission inventories were compared. One was constructed using methods similar to Hestia but downscales total emissions based on the 2011 National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The other used Emission Modeling Clearinghouse spatial and temporal surrogates to downscale the NEI data from annual and county-level resolution to hourly and 0.002o x 0.002o grid cells. The gridded emissions from both criteria pollutant methods were compared against the Hestia CO2 gridded data to characterize spatial similarities and differences between them. Correlations were calculated at multiple scales of aggregation. The CALPUFF dispersion model was used to transport emissions and estimate air pollutant concentrations at an hourly 0.002o x 0.002o resolution. The resulting concentrations were spatially compared in the same manner

  13. Simulation of osmotic pressure in concentrated aqueous salt solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Roux, B.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    Accurate force fields are critical for meaningful simulation studies of highly concentrated electrolytes. The ion models that are widely used in biomolecular simulations do not necessarily reproduce the correct behavior at finite concentrations. In principle, the osmotic pressure is a key thermodynamic property that could be used to test and refine force field parameters for concentrated solutions. Here we describe a novel, simple, and practical method to compute the osmotic pressure directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of concentrated aqueous solutions by introducing an idealized semipermeable membrane. Simple models for Na+, K+, and Cl- are tested and calibrated to accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic pressure at high salt concentration, up to the solubility limit of 4-5 M. The methodology is general and can be extended to any type of solute as well as nonadditive polarizable force fields.

  14. Nitrite toxicity of Litopenaeus vannamei in water containing low concentrations of sea salt or mixed salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sowers, A.; Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.; Browdy, C.L.; Tomasso, J.R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake, depuration and toxicity of environmental nitrite was characterized in Litopenaeus vannamei exposed in water containing low concentrations of artificial sea salt or mixed salts. In 2 g/L artificial sea salts, nitrite was concentrated in the hemolymph in a dose-dependent and rapid manner (steady-state in about 2 d). When exposed to nitrite in 2 g/L artificial sea salts for 4 d and then moved to a similar environment without added nitrite, complete depuration occurred within a day. Increasing salinity up to 10 g/L decreased uptake of environmental nitrite. Nitrite uptake in environments containing 2 g/L mixed salts (combination of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium chlorides) was similar to or lower than rates in 2 g/L artificial sea salt. Toxicity was inversely related to total dissolved salt and chloride concentrations and was highest in 2 g/L artificial sea salt (96-h medial lethal concentration = 8.4 mg/L nitrite-N). Animals that molted during the experiments did not appear to be more susceptible to nitrite than animals that did not molt. The shallow slope of the curve describing the relationship between toxicity and salinity suggests that management of nitrite toxicity in low-salinity shrimp ponds by addition of more salts may not be practical. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2004.

  15. Americium separations from high salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mary E. Barr; Gordon D. Jarvinen; Louis D. Schulte; Peter C. Stark; Rebecca M. Chamberlin; Kent D. Abney; Thomas E. Ricketts; Yvette E. Valdez; Richard A. Bartsch

    2000-03-01

    Americium (III) exhibits an unexpectedly high affinity for anion-exchange material from the high-salt evaporator bottoms solutions--an effect which has not been duplicated using simple salt solutions. Similar behavior is observed for its lanthanide homologue, Nd(III), in complex evaporator bottoms surrogate solutions. There appears to be no single controlling factor--acid concentration, total nitrate concentration or solution ionic strength--which accounts for the approximately 2-fold increase in retention of the trivalent ions from complex solutions relative to simple solutions. Calculation of species activities (i.e., water, proton and nitrate) in such concentrated mixed salt solutions is difficult and of questionable accuracy, but it is likely that the answer to forcing formation of anionic nitrate complexes of americium lies in the relative activities of water and nitrate. From a practical viewpoint, the modest americium removal needs (ca. 50--75%) from nitric acid evaporator bottoms allow sufficient latitude for the use of non-optimized conditions such as running existing columns filled with older, well-used Reillex HPQ. Newer materials, such as HPQ-100 and the experimental bifunctional resins, which exhibit higher distribution coefficients, would allow for either increased Am removal or the use of smaller columns. It is also of interest that one of the experimental neutral-donor solid-support extractants, DHDECMP, exhibits a similarly high level of americium (total alpha) removal from EV bottoms and is much less sensitive to total acid content than commercially-available material.

  16. Iodine concentration in household salt in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Jooste, P. L.; Weight, M. J.; Lombard, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the iodine concentration in household salt, the coverage of adequately iodized salt, the use of non-iodized agricultural and producers' salt, and the usefulness of salt as a carrier of iodine, and to relate these observations to socioeconomic status in South Africa. METHOD: The iodometric titration method was used to analyse 2043 household salt samples collected using a national, multistage, stratified, cluster survey. FINDINGS: The national mean and median iodine concentrations of household salt were 27 mg/kg (95% confidence interval (CI): 25-29 mg/kg) and 30 mg/kg (range = 0-155 mg/kg), respectively. There was considerable variation within and between geographical areas. Coverage of adequately iodized household salt, i.e. iodized at > 15 mg/kg, was 62.4% of households (95% CI: 58.8-66.0%) two years after the introduction of compulsory iodization at a level of 40-60 mg/kg. A total of 7.3% of households used non-iodized agricultural salt and salt obtained directly from producers. People at the lower end of the socioeconomic spectrum were more likely to suffer the consequences of using under-iodized salt because more of them used agricultural or coarse salt than did people in the higher socioeconomic categories. The iodine concentration in salt was lower in rural areas than in urban and periurban areas. CONCLUSIONS: The consequences of using under-iodized or non-iodized salt were most likely to be experienced in the country's three northern provinces, among people in the low socioeconomic categories, and in rural households. Since 95.4% of households in South Africa use salt regularly and 2.9% use it occasionally, the national iodization programme has the potential to meet the iodine requirements of the population. However, this can only be achieved if the primary reasons for the inadequate iodization of salt are eliminated and if special attention is given to vulnerable groups. PMID:11436475

  17. Bile salt-phospholipid aggregation at submicellar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Rebekah; Frost, Laura D

    2008-04-01

    The aggregation behavior of the bile salts taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC) and sodium cholate (NaC), are followed at concentrations below critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) using the environment sensitive, fluorescent-labeled phospholipid, 2-(6-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoyl-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-C(6)-HPC). A buffer solution containing NBD-C(6)-HPC is titrated with increasing NaC or NaTDC and the fluorescence changes followed. Both bile salts induced fluorescence changes below their critical micelle concentration indicating the presence of a bile salt-phospholipid aggregate. A critical control experiment using 6-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino) hexanoic acid (NBD-X) shows that the bile salts are interacting with the longer, C16 hydrocarbon tail, not the NBD probe. The fluorescence curves were fitted to the Hill equation as a model for cooperative aggregation. The cooperativity model provides a minimum estimate for the number of bile salts to give maximal fluorescence. This number was calculated for NaC and NaTDC to have a minimum value of approximately 2. A small aggregation number supports the existence of primary micellar aggregates at submicellar concentrations for bile salt-phospholipid aqueous solutions. PMID:18035524

  18. Separation, concentration and determination of chloramphenicol in environment and food using an ionic liquid/salt aqueous two-phase flotation system coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Han, Juan; Wang, Yun; Yu, Cuilan; Li, Chunxiang; Yan, Yongsheng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Liang

    2011-01-31

    Ionic liquid-salt aqueous two-phase flotation (ILATPF) is a novel, green, non-toxic and sensitive samples pretreatment technique. ILATPF coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for the analysis of chloramphenicol, which combines ionic liquid aqueous two-phase system (ILATPS) based on imidazolium ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, [C(4)mim]Cl) and inorganic salt (K(2)HPO(4)) with solvent sublation. In ILATPF systems, phase behaviors of the ILATPF were studied for different types of ionic liquids and salts. The sublation efficiency of chloramphenicol in [C(4)mim]Cl-K(2)HPO(4) ILATPF was influenced by the types of salts, concentration of K(2)HPO(4) in aqueous solution, solution pH, nitrogen flow rate, sublation time and the amount of [C(4)mim]Cl. Under the optimum conditions, the average sublation efficiency is up to 98.5%. The mechanism of ILATPF contains two principal processes. One is the mechanism of IL-salt ILATPS formation, the other is solvent sublation. This method was practical when applied to the analysis of chloramphenicol in lake water, feed water, milk, and honey samples with the linear range of 0.5-500 ng mL(-1). The method yielded limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 ng mL(-1) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.3 ng mL(-1). The recovery of CAP was 97.1-101.9% from aqueous samples of environmental and food samples by the proposed method. Compared with liquid-liquid extraction, solvent sublation and ionic liquid aqueous two-phase extraction, ILATPF can not only separate and concentrate chloramphenicol with high sublation efficiency, but also efficiently reduce the wastage of IL. This novel technique is much simpler and more environmentally friendly and is suggested to have important applications for the concentration and separation of other small biomolecules. PMID:21168562

  19. Acetate concentrations and oxidation in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Acetate concentrations and rates of acetate oxidation and sulfate reduction were measured in S. alterniflora sediments in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Pore water extracted from cores by squeezing or centrifugation contained in greater than 0.1 mM acetate and, in some instances, greater than 1.0 mM. Pore water sampled nondestructively contained much less acetate, often less than 0.01 mM. Acetate was associated with roots, and concentrations varied with changes in plant physiology. Acetate turnover was very low whether whole core or slurry incubations were used. Radiotracers injected directly into soils yielded rates of sulfate reduction and acetate oxidation not significantly different from core incubation techniques. Regardless of incubation method, acetate oxidation did not account for a substantial percentage of sulfate reduction. These results differ markedly from data for unvegetated coastal sediments where acetate levels are low, oxidation rate constants are high, and acetate oxication rates greatly exceed rates of sulfate reduction. The discrepancy between rates of acetate oxidation and sulfate reduction in these marsh soils may be due either to the utilization of substrates other than acetate by sulfate reducers or artifacts associated with measurements of organic utilization by rhizosphere bacteria. Care must be taken when interpreting data from salt marsh sediments since the release of material from roots during coring may affect the concentrations of certain compounds as well as influencing results obtained when sediment incubations are employed.

  20. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Ramana G.

    2013-10-23

    The explicit UA program objective is to develop low melting point (LMP) molten salt thermal energy storage media with high thermal energy storage density for sensible heat storage systems. The novel Low Melting Point (LMP) molten salts are targeted to have the following characteristics: 1. Lower melting point (MP) compared to current salts (<222ºC) 2. Higher energy density compared to current salts (>300 MJ/m3) 3. Lower power generation cost compared to current salt In terms of lower power costs, the program target the DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Program year 2020 goal to create systems that have the potential to reduce the cost of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) to less than $15/kWh-th and achieve round trip efficiencies greater than 93%. The project has completed the experimental investigations to determine the thermo-physical, long term thermal stability properties of the LMP molten salts and also corrosion studies of stainless steel in the candidate LMP molten salts. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics modeling have been conducted to identify heat transfer geometry and relative costs for TES systems that would utilize the primary LMP molten salt candidates. The project also proposes heat transfer geometry with relevant modifications to suit the usage of our molten salts as thermal energy storage and heat transfer fluids. The essential properties of the down-selected novel LMP molten salts to be considered for thermal storage in solar energy applications were experimentally determined, including melting point, heat capacity, thermal stability, density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, vapor pressure, and corrosion resistance of SS 316. The thermodynamic modeling was conducted to determine potential high temperature stable molten salt mixtures that have thermal stability up to 1000 °C. The thermo-physical properties of select potential high temperature stable (HMP) molten salt mixtures were also experimentally determined. All the salt mixtures align with the go

  1. Can tree ring chemistry indicate soil salt concentrations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volesky, S.; Gillikin, D. P.; Verheyden, A.; Interlichia, K.

    2008-12-01

    Soil salt concentrations are a major ecological concern, especially in coastal zones and colder climates where road salt is heavily applied. To test if trees could be an archive of soil salinity, we collected sediment and tree stem disks along a transect from a salt-marsh inland. The two species of tree studied were Pinus taeda (Loblolly Pine) and Juniperus virginiana (Eastern Red Cedar). Soil and individual tree rings were analyzed by ICP-OES to determine elemental concentrations. We hypothesized that Sr/Ca ratios in the wood would provide an excellent proxy of soil salinity. Strontium mimics calcium biologically, so Sr/Ca ratios are often taken up in the same ratio as is found in the environment, and at salinities less than 5, Sr/Ca ratios in water typically show a strong positive correlation with salinity. We found that every element studied (Mg, Mn, K, Sr, Ca, Ba, and S) reacted very similarly in the pines. For soil sodium levels less than 60 μg/g, all element concentrations increased sharply, but at 60 μg/g and higher, the element concentrations decreased gradually. In the cedars, a linear correlation was established with each of the elements versus sodium in the soil with R2 values ranging from 0.01 (sulfur) to 0.50 (magnesium). The relationships are not robust, but there is some promise that this tool may eventually be developed.

  2. Salt concentration effects on equilibrium melting curves from DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, J; Fiche, J-B; Buhot, A; Calemczuk, R; Livache, T

    2010-09-22

    DNA microarrays find applications in an increasing number of domains where more quantitative results are required. DNA being a charged polymer, the repulsive interactions between the surface of the microarray and the targets in solution are increasing upon hybridization. Such electrostatic penalty is generally reduced by increasing the salt concentration. In this article, we present equilibrium-melting curves obtained from dedicated physicochemical experiments on DNA microarrays in order to get a better understanding of the electrostatic penalty incurred during the hybridization reaction at the surface. Various salt concentrations have been considered and deviations from the commonly used Langmuir adsorption model are experimentally quantified for the first time in agreement with theoretical predictions. PMID:20858434

  3. Capillary Ion Concentration Polarization for Power-Free Salt Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungmin; Jung, Yeonsu; Cho, Inhee; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Sung Jae

    2014-11-01

    In this presentation, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrated the capillary based ion concentration polarization for power-free salt purification system. Traditional ion concentration polarization phenomenon has been studied for a decade for both fundamental nanoscale fluid dynamics and novel engineering applications such as desalination, preconcentration and energy harvesting devices. While the conventional system utilizes an external power source, the system based on capillary ion concentration polarization is capable of perm-selective ion transportation only by capillarity so that the same ion depletion zone can be formed without any external power sources. An ion concentration profile near the nanostructure was tracked using fluorescent probes and analyzed by solving the modified Nernst-Planck equation. As a result, the concentration in the vicinity of the nanostructure was at least 10 times lower than that of bulk electrolyte and thus, the liquid absorbed into the nanostructure had the low concentration. This mechanism can be used for the power free salt purification system which would be significantly useful in underdeveloped and remote area. This work was supported by Samsung Research Funding Center of Samsung Electronics under Project Number SRFC-MA1301-02.

  4. High-temperature vacuum distillation separation of plutonium waste salts

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.

    1996-10-01

    In this task, high-temperature vacuum distillation separation is being developed for residue sodium chloride-potassium chloride salts resulting from past pyrochemical processing of plutonium. This process has the potential of providing clean separation of the salt and the actinides with minimal amounts of secondary waste generation. The process could produce chloride salt that could be discarded as low-level waste (LLW) or low actinide content transuranic (TRU) waste, and a concentrated actinide oxide powder that would meet long-term storage standards (DOE-DTD-3013-94) until a final disposition option for all surplus plutonium is chosen.

  5. Vapor pressure measurements on non-aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 2. Tetraalkylammonium salts in methanol. Activity coefficients of various 1-1 electrolytes at high concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, J.; Lauermann, G.; Neueder, R.

    1986-10-01

    Precise vapor pressure data for solutions of Et/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/Nl, Bu/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/, and Am/sub 4/NBr in methanol at 25/sup 0/C in the concentration range 0.04 < m(mol-(kg of solvent)/sup -1/) < 1.6 are communicated and discussed. Polynomials in molalities are given which may be used for calculating precise vapor pressure depressions of these solutions. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of methanol vapor. Discussion of the data at low concentrations is based on the chemical model of electrolyte solutions taking into account non-coulombic interactions; ion-pair association constants are compared to those of conductance measurements. Pitzer equations are used to reproduce osmotic and activity coefficient at high concentrations; the set of Pitzer parameters b = 3.2, ..cap alpha../sub 1/ = 2.0 and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ = 20.0 is proposed for methanol solutions.

  6. Modelling Salt Intrusion and Nitrate Concentrations in the Ythan Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Balls, P. W.

    1998-12-01

    A one-dimensional salt intrusion model is used to investigate the hydrography of the Ythan estuary, a small shallow macrotidal estuary in the north-east of Scotland. The model simulates the longitudinal distributions of water level, salinity and total oxidized nitrogen (TON) in the estuary. The model employs upstream differencing and the Smolarkiewicz anti-diffusion scheme to avoid the numerical difficulties typically encountered when modelling strong tidal flows using centred differences. The physical mechanisms driving the simulations are the tide at the entrance to the estuary and freshwater discharge at the head. The model was calibrated against measurements of water level made at three locations in the estuary, salinity observations made at a central platform and axial salinity distributions. At both spring and neap tides, the full range of salinity observed at the central platform was simulated. However, at the midway stage between springs and neaps, the simulated peak salinity was less than that observed. This was probably due to the sensitivity of the model to the digitisation of the estuarine bathymetry. The model successfully simulated salinity distributions for periods of high and low river flow, and was used to illustrate how TON concentrations fluctuated in response to variations in river flow. The potential implications of variations in the bathymetry of the estuary on salinity and nutrient distributions were predicted to be slight. However, the four fold increase in riverine TON concentrations that has occurred over the past 30 years was shown to increase TON distributions along the entire length of the estuary. The calculated estuary flushing time was strongly dependent on river flow and varied between 11-60 h.

  7. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Multivalent Ion Concentrations in Molten Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Peter A. Zink; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson; Ben F. Cowan; Steven D. Herrmann; Shelly X. Li

    2010-07-01

    Electrorefining of spent metallic nuclear fuel in high temperature molten salt systems is a core technology in pyroprocessing, which in turn plays a critical role in the development of advanced fuel cycle technologies. In electrorefining, spent nuclear fuel is treated electrochemically in order to effect separations between uranium, noble metals, and active metals, which include the transuranics. The accumulation of active metals in a lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) eutectic molten salt electrolyte occurs at the expense of the UCl3-oxidant concentration in the electrolyte, which must be periodically replenished. Our interests lie with the accumulation of active metals in the molten salt electrolyte. The real-time monitoring of actinide concentrations in the molten salt electrolyte is highly desirable for controlling electrochemical operations and assuring materials control and accountancy. However, real-time monitoring is not possible with current methods for sampling and chemical analysis. A new solid-state electrochemical sensor is being developed for real-time monitoring of actinide ion concentrations in a molten salt electrorefiner. The ultimate function of the sensor is to monitor plutonium concentrations during electrorefining operations, but in this work gadolinium was employed as a surrogate material for plutonium. In a parametric study, polycrystalline sodium beta double-prime alumina (Na-ß?-alumina) discs and tubes were subject to vapor-phase exchange with gadolinium ions (Gd3+) using a gadolinium chloride salt (GdCl3) as a precursor to produce gadolinium beta double-prime alumina (Gd-ß?-alumina) samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and microstructural analysis were performed on the ion-exchanged discs to determine the relationship between ion exchange and Gd3+ ion conductivity. The ion-exchanged tubes were configured as potentiometric sensors in order to monitor real-time Gd3+ ion concentrations in mixtures of gadolinium

  8. Selenium accumulation and selenium tolerance of salt grass from soils with elevated concentrations of Se and salinity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Huang, Z.Z. )

    1991-12-01

    Biomass production, selenium accumulation, and the role of the bioextraction of selenium by salt grass (Distichlis spicata L.) in soils with elevated concentrations of Se and salinity at Kesterson, California, were studied. Salt grass contributed more than 80% vegetative coverage and 90% dry weight in the grassland communities where the soil Se concentrations were 100 times (1000 to 3000 micrograms kg-1) higher than the Se concentrations found in soils of the control sites. No evidence for evolution of Se tolerance was found in the salt grass populations. The successful colonization of salt grass in the soil with elevated Se and salinity is attributable to the presence of high concentrations of soil sulfate. Salt grass accumulated less Se than other salt-tolerant plant species existing in the same area, and no predation of animals and insects on salt grass has been noticed. Salt grass can transpire substantial amounts of volatile Se through its plant tissue. Under field conditions, a 1-m2 salt grass plot may produce 180 micrograms volatile selenium per day. However, no reduction of soil Se concentration in the salt grass habitat was detected over a period of 1 year. A long-term monitoring of Se status is needed in order to make predictions of the effectiveness of efforts to clean up Se-contaminated soils through the use of native plant species.

  9. Selenium accumulation and selenium tolerance of salt grass from soils with elevated concentrations of Se and salinity.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Huang, Z Z

    1991-12-01

    Biomass production, selenium accumulation, and the role of the bioextraction of selenium by salt grass (Distichlis spicata L.) in soils with elevated concentrations of Se and salinity at Kesterson, California, were studied. Salt grass contributed more than 80% vegetative coverage and 90% dry weight in the grassland communities where the soil Se concentrations were 100 times (1000 to 3000 micrograms kg-1) higher than the Se concentrations found in soils of the control sites. No evidence for evolution of Se tolerance was found in the salt grass populations. The successful colonization of salt grass in the soil with elevated Se and salinity is attributable to the presence of high concentrations of soil sulfate. Salt grass accumulated less Se than other salt-tolerant plant species existing in the same area, and no predation of animals and insects on salt grass has been noticed. Salt grass can transpire substantial amounts of volatile Se through its plant tissue. Under field conditions, a 1-m2 salt grass plot may produce 180 micrograms volatile selenium per day. However, no reduction of soil Se concentration in the salt grass habitat was detected over a period of 1 year. A long-term monitoring of Se status is needed in order to make predictions of the effectiveness of efforts to clean up Se-contaminated soils through the use of native plant species. PMID:1778115

  10. Role of salt concentration in blend polymer for energy storage conversion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Anil; Sadiq, M.; Sharma, A. L.

    2016-05-01

    Solid Polymer Electrolytes (SPE) are materials of considerable interest worldwide, which serves dual purpose of electrolyte and separator between electrode compartments in renewable energy conversion/storage devices such as; high energy density batteries, electrochromic display devices, and supercapacitors. Polymer blend electrolytes are prepared for various concentration of salt (Ö/Li) with the constant ratio (0.5 gm) of each PEO and PAN polymers (blend polymer) using solution casting technique. Solid polymeric ionic conductor as a separator is the ultimate substitute to eliminate the drawback related to liquid and gel polymer ionic conductors. In the present work, solid polymer electrolyte film consisting of PEO, PAN and LiPF6 are examined for various concentration of lithium salt by keeping PEO/PAN blend ratio as a constant with a view to optimize the dominant salt concentration which could give the maximum conductivity at ambient temperature.

  11. Surface Potential of DPPC Monolayers on Concentrated Aqueous Salt Solutions.

    PubMed

    Casper, Clayton B; Verreault, Dominique; Adams, Ellen M; Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C

    2016-03-01

    The presence and exchange of electrical charges on the surfaces of marine aerosols influence their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei and play a role in thundercloud electrification. Although interactions exist between surface-active inorganic ions and organic compounds, their role in surface charging of marine aerosols is not well understood. In this study, the surface potential of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers, a zwitterionic phospholipid found in the sea surface microlayer, is measured on concentrated (0.3-2.0 M) chloride salt solutions containing marine-relevant cations (Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+)) to model and elucidate the electrical properties of organic-covered marine aerosols. Monovalent cations show only a weak effect on the surface potential of DPPC monolayers in the condensed phase compared to water. In contrast, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) increase the surface potential, indicating different cation binding modes and affinities for the PC headgroup. Moreover, it is found that for divalent chloride salt solutions, the PC headgroup and interfacial water molecules make the largest dipolar contribution to the surface potential. This study shows that for equal charge concentrations, divalent cations impact surface potential of DPPC monolayers more strongly than monovalents likely through changes in the PC headgroup orientation induced by their complexation along with the lesser ordering of interfacial water molecules caused by phosphate group charge screening. PMID:26761608

  12. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Adam M.; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A.; Peretz, Fred J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Wilson, Dane F.; Yoder, Jr, Graydon L.

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  13. High temperature desulfurization using molten salt carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Nobuhiro; Iwahashi, Takashi; Kosaka, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Kunio; Yamashita, Keijiro; Murata, Keiji; Hori, Michio

    1998-07-01

    A new desulfurization process using molten salt carbonate as an absorber is proposed. Main feature of this process is its high operating temperature (600{approximately}800 C) as well as the possibility of simultaneous desulfurization and dechlorination. Some chemical equilibrium calculations and basic experiments of this process have been done as the first step of basic theoretical investigations for this new gas cleanup concept. It is confirmed from this calculation that this new gas cleanup concept has enough ability of desulfurization and regeneration of molten salt carbonate.

  14. Determining salt concentrations for equivalent water activity in reduced-sodium cheese by use of a model system.

    PubMed

    Grummer, J; Schoenfuss, T C

    2011-09-01

    The range of sodium chloride (salt)-to-moisture ratio is critical in producing high-quality cheese products. The salt-to-moisture ratio has numerous effects on cheese quality, including controlling water activity (a(w)). Therefore, when attempting to decrease the sodium content of natural cheese it is important to calculate the amount of replacement salts necessary to create the same a(w) as the full-sodium target (when using the same cheese making procedure). Most attempts to decrease sodium using replacement salts have used concentrations too low to create the equivalent a(w) due to the differences in the molecular weight of the replacers compared with salt. This could be because of the desire to minimize off-flavors inherent in the replacement salts, but it complicates the ability to conclude that the replacement salts are the cause of off-flavors such as bitter. The objective of this study was to develop a model system that could be used to measure a(w) directly, without manufacturing cheese, to allow cheese makers to determine the salt and salt replacer concentrations needed to achieve the equivalent a(w) for their existing full-sodium control formulas. All-purpose flour, salt, and salt replacers (potassium chloride, modified potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, and calcium chloride) were blended with butter and water at concentrations that approximated the solids, fat, and moisture contents of typical Cheddar cheese. Salt and salt replacers were applied to the model systems at concentrations predicted by Raoult's law. The a(w) of the model samples was measured on a water activity meter, and concentrations were adjusted using Raoult's law if they differed from those of the full-sodium model. Based on the results determined using the model system, stirred-curd pilot-scale batches of reduced- and full-sodium Cheddar cheese were manufactured in duplicate. Water activity, pH, and gross composition were measured and evaluated statistically by linear mixed model

  15. Novel graphite salts of high oxidizing potential

    SciTech Connect

    McCarron, E.M. III

    1980-08-01

    The intercalation of graphite by the third-transition-series metal hexafluorides has yielded the graphite salts, C/sub 8//sup +/OsF/sub 6//sup -/, C/sub 8//sup +/IrF/sub 6//sup -/ and C/sub 12//sup 2 +/PtF/sub 6//sup 2 -/. The fluoroplatinate salt represents the highest electron withdrawal from the graphite network yet achieved. Analogues to the Os and Ir salts have been obtained both by fluorination of Group V pentaflouride intercalates, C/sub 8/MF/sub 5/ (M = As, Sb), and by the interaction of the dioxygenyl salts with graphite (8C + O/sub 2/MF/sub 6/ ..-->.. C/sub 8/MF/sub 6/ + O/sub 2/+). Non-intercalating binary fluorides have been observed to intercalate in the presence of a fluorine-rich environment (e.g., 8C + PF/sub 5/ + 1/2 F/sub 2/ ..-->.. C/sub 8/PF/sub 6/). GeF/sub 4/, which also does not spontaneously intercalate graphite, has been observed to interact with graphite in the presence of 2 atmospheres of fluorine overpressure to give the fluoroplatinate salt analogue, C/sub 12//sup 2 +/GeF/sub 6//sup 2 -/. This material is in equilibrium with the pentafluorogermanate at ordinary pressures and temperatures. C/sub 12//sup 2 +/GeF/sub 6//sup 2 -/ ..-->.. C/sub 12//sup +/GeF/sub 5//sup -/ + 1/2 F/sub 2/. C/sub 12/GeF/sub 6/ must have an oxidizing potential close to that of fluorine itself. The graphite fluorometallate salts are both electronic and ionic (F/sup -/) conductors. For the C/sub 8//sup +/MF/sub 6//sup -/ salts, a maximum electronic conductivity an order of magnitude greater than the parent graphite has been observed for stage two. The high oxidizing potential, coupled with the fluoride ion transport capability of the graphite salts, has been exploited in the construction of solid-state galvanic cells. These cells use the graphite fluorometallate salts as electrode materials in combination with a superionic fluoride-ion-conducting solid electrolyte.

  16. Direct Grout Stabilization of High Cesium Salt Waste: Salt Alternative Phase III Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    1998-12-07

    The direct grout alternative is a viable option for treatment/stabilization and disposal of salt waste containing Cs-137 concentrations of 1-3 Ci/gal. The composition of the direct grout salt solution is higher in sodium salts and contains up to a few hundred ppm Cs-137 more than the current reference salt solution. However it is still similar to the composition of the current reference salt solution. Consequently, the processing, setting, and leaching properties (including TCLP for Cr and Hg) of the direct grout and current saltstone waste forms are very similar. The significant difference between these waste solutions is that the high cesium salt solution will contain between 1 and 3 Curies of Cs-137 per gallon compared to a negligible amount in the current salt solution. This difference will require special engineering and shielding for a direct grout processing facility and disposal units to achieve acceptable radiation exposure conditions. The Cs-137 concentration in the direct grout salt solution will also affect the long-term curing temperature of the waste form since 4.84 Watts of energy are generated per 1000 Ci of Cs-137. The temperature rise of the direct grout during long-term curing has been calculated by A. Shaddy, SRTC.1 The effect of curing temperature on the strength, leaching and physical durability of the direct grout saltstone is described in this report. At the present time, long term curing at 90 degrees C appears to be unacceptable because of cracking which will affect the structural integrity as evaluated in the immersion test. (The experiments conducted in this feasibility study do not address the effect of cracking on leaching of contaminants other than Cr, Hg, and Cs.) No cracking of the direct grout or reference saltstone waste forms was observed for samples cured at 70 degrees C. At the present time the implications of waste form cracking at elevated curing temperatures has not been fully addressed. The direct grout falls within the

  17. Concentration memory-dependent synaptic plasticity of a taste circuit regulates salt concentration chemotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kunitomo, Hirofumi; Sato, Hirofumi; Iwata, Ryo; Satoh, Yohsuke; Ohno, Hayao; Yamada, Koji; Iino, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    It is poorly understood how sensory systems memorize the intensity of sensory stimulus, compare it with a newly sensed stimulus, and regulate the orientation behaviour based on the memory. Here we report that Caenorhabditis elegans memorizes the environmental salt concentration during cultivation and exhibits a strong behavioural preference for this concentration. The right-sided amphid gustatory neuron known as ASER, senses decreases in salt concentration, and this information is transmitted to the postsynaptic AIB interneurons only in the salt concentration range lower than the cultivation concentration. In this range, animals migrate towards higher concentration by promoting turning behaviour upon decreases in salt concentration. These observations provide a mechanism for adjusting the orientation behaviour based on the memory of sensory stimulus using a simple neural circuit. PMID:23887678

  18. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  19. Effect of salt and surfactant concentration on the structure of polyacrylate gel/surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter; Unga, Johan; Hansson, Per

    2007-09-20

    Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to elucidate the structure of crosslinked polyacrylate gel/dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide complexes equilibrated in solutions of varying concentrations of surfactant and sodium bromide (NaBr). Samples were swollen with no ordering (micelle free), or they were collapsed with either several distinct peaks (cubic Pm3n) or one broad correlation peak (disordered micellar). The main factor determining the structure of the collapsed complexes was found to be the NaBr concentration, with the cubic structure existing up to approximately 150 mM NaBr and above which only the disordered micellar structure was found. Increasing the salt concentration decreases the polyion mediated attractive forces holding the micelles together causing swelling of the gel. At sufficiently high salt concentration the micelle-micelle distance in the gel becomes too large for the cubic structure to be retained, and it melts into a disordered micellar structure. As most samples were above the critical micelle concentration, the bulk of the surfactant was in the form of micelles in the solution and the surfactant concentration thereby had only a minor influence on the structure. However, in the region around 150 mM NaBr, increasing the surfactant concentration, at constant NaBr concentration, was found to change the structure from disordered micellar to ordered cubic and back to disordered again. PMID:17715959

  20. Picloram and napropamide sorption as affected by polymer addition and salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianhang; Wu, Laosheng; Letey, John; Farmer, Walter J

    2002-01-01

    Polymer application to soil is a growing practice to improve soil physical properties and reduce soil erosion. Polymer addition can potentially influence herbicide and pesticide sorption in soil. The one-point distribution coefficient Kd values of two herbicides in the absence and presence of each of 10 polymers (7 polyacrylamides and 3 polysaccharides) were determined by the batch equilibrium method. The results showed that nonionic napropamide [2-(alpha-naphthoxy)-N,N-diethyl propionamide] sorption was essentially unaffected by the presence of any of the polymers. The influence of polymers on anionic picloram (4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic acid) sorption depends on the charge characteristics of polymers and salt concentrations in the solution. Electrostatic interaction and competition for sorption sites are two primary underlying mechanisms for the polymer influence. At low salt concentration, the increased picloram sorption in the presence of both cationic and anionic polymers was attributed to different electrostatic interactions and polymer partitioning between soil and solution phases. At high salt levels, the presence of polymers had either no influence or a slightly negative influence on the picloram sorption, which was attributed to competition for sorption sites. In field conditions, it is more likely that polymers have no or a slightly negative influence on herbicide sorption due to the presence of salts. PMID:12175041

  1. Conformational Variety of Polyanionic Peptides At Low Salt Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Marylène; Brack, André

    1997-12-01

    Cordially dedicated to Dr. Leslie Orgel on the occasion of his 70th birthday. Sequential oligo- and polypeptides based on glutamic acid and leucine residues have been synthesized. In pure water, they exhibit a random coil conformation. Addition of very small amounts of divalent metallic cations induces the formation of ordered structure in the peptides which remain in solution. Higher salt concentrations precipitate the peptides. Polypeptides with alternating glutamic acid and leucine residues undergo a coil to β-sheet transition in the presence of Ca^2+, Ba^2+, Mn^2+, Co^2+, Zn^2+ and Hg^2+. Addition of Cu^2+ or Fe^3+ induces the formation of an α-helix. Solid amorphous CdS generates water soluble β-sheets, as well. Sequential poly(Leu-Glu-Glu-Leu) adopts an α-helix in the presence of divalent cations. The sequence-dependent conformational diversity was extended to poly(Asp-Leu) and poly(Leu-Asp-Asp-Leu).

  2. The Surface Structure of Concentrated Aqueous salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sloutskin,E.; Baumert, J.; Ocko, B.; Kuzmenko, I.; Checco, A.; Tamam, L.; Ofer, E.; Gog, T.; Deutsch, M.

    2007-01-01

    The surface-normal electron density profile {rho}{sub s}(z) of concentrated aqueous salt solutions of RbBr, CsCl, LiBr, RbCl, and SrCl{sub 2} was determined by x-ray reflectivity (XR). For all but RbBr and SrCl{sub 2} {rho}{sub s}(z) increases monotonically with depth z from {rho}{sub s}(z)=0 in the vapor (z<0) to {rho}{sub s}(z) = {rho}{sub b} of the bulk (z>0) over a width of a few angstroms. The width is commensurate with the expected interface broadening by thermally excited capillary waves. Anomalous (resonant) XR of RbBr reveals a depletion at the surface of Br{sup -} ions to a depth of {approx}10 A. For SrCl{sub 2}, the observed {rho}{sub s}(z)>{rho}{sub b} may imply a similar surface depletion of Cl{sup -} ions to a depth of a few angstroms. However, as the deviations of the XRs of RbBr and SrCl{sub 2} from those of the other solutions are small, the evidence for a different ion composition in the surface and the bulk is not strongly conclusive. Overall, these results contrast earlier theoretical and simulational results and nonstructural measurements, where significant surface layering of alternate, oppositely charged, ions is concluded.

  3. Interactions between high salt intake and the musculoskeletal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heer, Martina; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Buehlmeier, Judith; Baecker, Natalie

    Lowering mechanical load like in microgravity is the dominant stimulus leading to muscle and bone loss. However, high dietary salt (NaCl) intake is also considered as a risk factor for osteoporosis and thereby might exacerbate the microgravity induced bone loss. We have recently shown that a very high salt intake leads to an increased bone resorption most likely because of a low-grade metabolic acidosis (Frings-Meuthen et al. JBMR, Epub Dec 2007). A decrease in pH, however, is on the one hand mandatory to activate osteoclast activity, on the other hand it might affect protein metabolism and thereby muscle mass. In head-down bed rest (HDBR) studies physiological adaptation as seen in microgravity is mimicked. In a recent short-term HDBR study of 14 days, we combined high salt intake and low mechanical loading to test if low-grade metabolic acidosis induced by high NaCl intake is an additive stimulus for increased bone resorption and muscle protein loss. The results show that high NaCl intake combined with low mechanical load exaggerates the increase in calcium excretion as well as the rise in bone resorption marker C-telopeptide (both: p ¡ 0.001). Bone alkaline phosphatase, a bone formation marker, was not different according to NaCl intake (p = 0.74). Additionally, the slightly negative nitrogen balance in HDBR ( 0.34 ± 1.2 g/d) was exacerbated 3 fold by high NaCl intake ( 1.34 ± 1.0 g/d; p ¡ 0.001). These results were accompanied by reduced bicarbonate (p = 0.018) and base excess (p = 0.009) concentrations during high salt intake. In conclusion, HDBR and high salt intake cause -like in ambulatory test subjectsa low-grade metabolic acidosis. This may exacerbate bone resorption and nitrogen loss, which may then exaggerate disuse induced bone and muscle loss.

  4. Maintaining molten salt electrolyte concentration in aluminum-producing electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Robert J.; Mezner, Michael B.; Bradford, Donald R

    2005-01-04

    A method of maintaining molten salt concentration in a low temperature electrolytic cell used for production of aluminum from alumina dissolved in a molten salt electrolyte contained in a cell free of frozen crust wherein volatile material is vented from the cell and contacted and captured on alumina being added to the cell. The captured volatile material is returned with alumina to cell to maintain the concentration of the molten salt.

  5. FEASIBILITY OF RECOVERING USEFUL SALTS FROM IRRIGATION WASTEWATER CONCENTRATES PRODUCED BY POWER PLANT COOLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the feasibility of a novel energy-conserving way to recover useful salts (sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate) from concentrated brines by evaporation/crystallization. The concentrated brines examined were cooling tower blowdown from agricultural wastewater an...

  6. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Craig; Kurup, Parthiv; Akar, Sertac; Flores, Francisco

    2015-08-26

    This study lists material composition data for two concentrating solar power (CSP) plant designs: a molten-salt power tower and a hypothetical parabolic trough plant, both of which employ a molten salt for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) and thermal storage media. The two designs have equivalent generating and thermal energy storage capacities. The material content of the saltHTF trough plant was approximately 25% lower than a comparably sized conventional oil-HTF parabolic trough plant. The significant reduction in oil, salt, metal, and insulation mass by switching to a salt-HTF design is expected to reduce the capital cost and LCOE for the parabolic trough system.

  7. Concentration and precipitation of NaCl and KCl from salt cake leach solutions by electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasarao, K; Patsiogiannis, F.; Hryn, J.N.

    1997-02-09

    Electrodialysis was investigated for cost-effective recovery of salt from salt cake leach solutions. (Salt cake is a waste stream generated by the aluminum industry during treatment of aluminum drosses and scrap.) We used a pilot-scale electrodialysis stack of 5 membrane pairs, each with an effective area of 0.02 m{sup 2}. The diluate stream contained synthetic NaCl, KCl,mixtures of NaCl and KCl, and actual salt cake leach solutions (mainly NaCl and KCl, with small amounts of MgCl{sub 2}). We concentrated and precipitated NaCl and KCl salts from the concentrate steam when the initial diluate stream concentration was 21.5 to 28.8 wt% NaCl and KCl. We found that water transferring through the membranes was a significant factor in overall efficiency of salt recovery by electrodialysis.

  8. Ionic relaxation in PEO/PVDF-HFP-LiClO4 blend polymer electrolytes: dependence on salt concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Ghosh, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we have studied the effect of LiClO4 salt concentration on the ionic conduction and relaxation in poly ethylene oxide (PEO) and poly (vinylidene fluoride hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) blend polymer electrolytes, in which the molar ratio of ethylene oxide segments to lithium ions (R  =  EO: Li) has been varied between 3 and 35. We have observed two phases in the samples containing low salt concentrations (R  >  9) and single phase in the samples containing high salt concentrations (R  ⩽  9). The scanning electron microscopic images indicate that there exists no phase separation in the blend polymer electrolytes. The temperature dependence of the ionic conductivity shows two slopes corresponding to high and low temperatures and follows Arrhenius relation for the samples containing low salt concentrations (R  >  9). The conductivity relaxation as well as the structural relaxation has been clearly observed at around 104 Hz and 106 Hz for these concentrations of the blended electrolytes. However, a single conductivity relaxation peak has been observed for the compositions with R  ⩽  9. The scaling of the conductivity spectra shows that the relaxation mechanism is independent of temperature, but depends on salt concentration.

  9. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O—D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O—D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O—D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O—D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O—D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O—D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O—D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We

  10. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O-D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O-D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O-D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O-D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O-D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O-D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We anticipate that this

  11. Concentrated dual-salt electrolytes for improving the cycling stability of lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pin, Liu; Qiang, Ma; Zheng, Fang; Jie, Ma; Yong-Sheng, Hu; Zhi-Bin, Zhou; Hong, Li; Xue-Jie, Huang; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable Li batteries, due to its high theoretical specific capacity (3860 mAh/g), low density (0.534 g/cm3), and low negative electrochemical potential (‑3.040 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, the concentrated electrolytes with dual salts, composed of Li[N(SO2F)2] (LiFSI) and Li[N(SO2CF3)2] (LiTFSI) were studied. In this dual-salt system, the capacity retention can even be maintained at 95.7% after 100 cycles in Li|LiFePO4 cells. A Li|Li cell can be cycled at 0.5 mA/cm2 for more than 600 h, and a Li|Cu cell can be cycled at 0.5 mA/cm2 for more than 200 cycles with a high average Coulombi efficiency of 99%. These results show that the concentrated dual-salt electrolytes exhibit superior electrochemical performance and would be a promising candidate for application in rechargeable Li batteries. Project supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51222210, 51472268, 51421002, and 11234013) and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010300).

  12. Effect of extreme salt concentrations on the physiology and biochemistry of Halobacteroides acetoethylicus.

    PubMed Central

    Rengpipat, S; Lowe, S E; Zeikus, J G

    1988-01-01

    Halobacteroides acetoethylicus grew in media with 6 to 20% NaCl and displayed optimal growth at 10% NaCl. When grown in medium with an [NaCl] of 1.7 M, the internal cytoplasmic [Na+] and [Cl-] were 0.92 and 1.2 M, respectively, while K+ and Mg2+ concentrations in cells were 0.24 and 0.02 M, respectively. Intracellular [Na+] was fourfold higher than intracellular [K+]. Since Na+ and Cl- ions were not excluded from the cell, the influence of high salt concentrations on key enzyme activities was investigated in crude cell extracts. Activities greater than 60% of the maximal activity of the following key catabolic enzymes occurred at the following [NaCl] ranges: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 1 to 2 M; alcohol dehydrogenase (NAD linked), 2 to 4 M; pyruvate dehydrogenase, 0.5 to 1 M; and hydrogenase (methyl viologen linked), 0.5 to 3 M. These studies support the hypothesis that obligately halophilic, anaerobic eubacteria adapt to extreme salt concentrations differently than do halophilic, aerobic eubacteria, because they do not produce osmoregulants or exclude Cl-. This study also demonstrated that these halophilic, anaerobic eubacteria have a physiological similarity to archaebacterial halophiles, since Na+ and Cl- are present in high concentrations and are required for enzymatic activity. PMID:3290195

  13. Measuring lanthanide concentrations in molten salt using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Arel; Lakis, Rollin E; Simpson, Michael F; Horowitz, Leo; Craparo, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The versatility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as an analytical method for high-temperature applications was demonstrated through measurement of the concentrations of the lanthanide elements europium (Eu) and praseodymium (Pr) in molten eutectic lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) salts at a temperature of 500 °C. Laser pulses (1064 nm, 7 ns, 120 mJ/pulse) were focused on the top surface of the molten salt samples in a laboratory furnace under an argon atmosphere, and the resulting LIBS signals were collected using a broadband Echelle-type spectrometer. Partial least squares (PLS) regression using leave-one-sample-out cross-validation was used to quantify the concentrations of Eu and Pr in the samples. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for Eu was 0.13% (absolute) over a concentration range of 0-3.01%, and for Pr was 0.13% (absolute) over a concentration range of 0-1.04%. PMID:25226247

  14. Vortex- and CO2 -gas-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction with salt addition for the high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of furanic compounds in concentrated juices and dried fruits.

    PubMed

    Abu-Bakar, Nur-Bahiyah; Makahleh, Ahmad; Saad, Bahruddin

    2016-03-01

    A novel microextraction method based on vortex- and CO2 -assisted liquid-liquid microextraction with salt addition for the isolation of furanic compounds (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, 5-methyl-2-furaldehyde, 2-furaldehyde, 3-furaldehyde, 2-furoic and 3-furoic acids) was developed. Purging the sample with CO2 was applied after vortexing to enhance the phase separation and mass transfer of the analytes. The optimum extraction conditions were: extraction solvent (volume), propyl acetate (125 μL); sample pH, 2.4; vortexing time, 45 s; salt concentration, 25% w/v and purging time, 5 min. The analytes were separated using an ODS Hypersil C18 column (250×4.6 mm i.d, 5 μm) under gradient flow. The proposed method showed good linearities (r(2) >0.999), low detection limits (0.08-1.9 μg/L) and good recoveries (80.7-122%). The validated method was successfully applied for the determination of the furanic compounds in concentrated juice (mango, date, orange, pomegranate, roselle, mangosteen and soursop) and dried fruit (prune, date and apricot paste) samples. PMID:26718308

  15. [Development of salt concentrates for mineralization of recycled water aboard the space station].

    PubMed

    Skliar, E F; Amiragov, M S; Bobe, L S; Gavrilov, L I; Kurochkin, M G; Solntseva, D P; Krasnov, M S; Skuratov, V M

    2006-01-01

    Recycled water can be brought up to the potable grade by adding minimal quantities of three soluble concentrates with the maximal content of inorganic salts. The authors present results of 3-year storage of potable water mineralized with makeup concentrates and analysis of potable water prepared with the use of the salt concentrates stored over this period of time. A water mineralization unit has been designed based on the principle of cyclic duty to produce physiologically healthy potable water with a preset salt content. PMID:17193977

  16. Cosolute effect on crystallization of two dinucleotide complexes of bovine seminal ribonuclease from concentrated salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sica, Filomena; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Vitagliano, Luigi; Zagari, Adriana; Capasso, Sante; Mazzarella, Lelio

    1996-10-01

    Two complexes of bovine seminal ribonuclease with dinucleotides, uridylyl(2'-5')adenosine (UpA) and 2'-deoxycytidylyl(3'-5')-2'-deoxyadenosine (d(CpA)), were crystallized under unusual conditions involving a liquid-liquid phase separation. This phenomenon was induced by adding small aliquots of organic cosolutes to highly concentrated ammonium sulfate solutions. The liquid-liquid interface acts as a source of nucleation centers for growth of large crystals. Among the cosolutes tested in these salt-mediated crystallizations, 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol was found to be the most efficient.

  17. High-throughput protein precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography: salt effects and thermodynamic interrelation.

    PubMed

    Nfor, Beckley K; Hylkema, Nienke N; Wiedhaup, Koenraad R; Verhaert, Peter D E M; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Ottens, Marcel

    2011-12-01

    Salt-induced protein precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) are two widely used methods for protein purification. In this study, salt effects in protein precipitation and HIC were investigated for a broad combination of proteins, salts and HIC resins. Interrelation between the critical thermodynamic salting out parameters in both techniques was equally investigated. Protein precipitation data were obtained by a high-throughput technique employing 96-well microtitre plates and robotic liquid handling technology. For the same protein-salt combinations, isocratic HIC experiments were performed using two or three different commercially available stationary phases-Phenyl Sepharose low sub, Butyl Sepharose and Resource Phenyl. In general, similar salt effects and deviations from the lyotropic series were observed in both separation methods, for example, the reverse Hofmeister effect reported for lysozyme below its isoelectric point and at low salt concentrations. The salting out constant could be expressed in terms of the preferential interaction parameter in protein precipitation, showing that the former is, in effect, the net result of preferential interaction of a protein with water molecules and salt ions in its vicinity. However, no general quantitative interrelation was found between salting out parameters or the number of released water molecules in protein precipitation and HIC. In other words, protein solubility and HIC retention factor could not be quantitatively interrelated, although for some proteins, regular trends were observed across the different resins and salt types. PMID:21868020

  18. Conformational changes of bovine plasma albumin prior to the salting-out of protein in concentrated salt solution.

    PubMed

    Sogami, M; Inouye, H; Nagaoka, S; Era, S

    1982-09-01

    By working at very low protein concentration (ca. 0.003%), it is possible to measure tryptophyl fluorescence intensity at 350 nm (F350) of bovine plasma albumin (BPA) as a function of pH under precipitating conditions (acidic concentrated salt solutions). Under such conditions, distinct changes in F350 were seen before the starting of precipitation of BPA and no further changes in F350 over the precipitating pH range. Comparison of pH-profiles monitored by F350 with those by solubility in the presence of various salts at various concentrations indicated that the change of solubility is observed after definite changes in conformation of the protein. PMID:7129758

  19. The osmolyte xylitol reduces the salt concentration of airway surface liquid and may enhance bacterial killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabner, Joseph; Seiler, Michael P.; Launspach, Janice L.; Karp, Philip H.; Kearney, William R.; Look, Dwight C.; Smith, Jeffrey J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-10-01

    The thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) contains antimicrobial substances that kill the small numbers of bacteria that are constantly being deposited in the lungs. An increase in ASL salt concentration inhibits the activity of airway antimicrobial factors and may partially explain the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that an osmolyte with a low transepithelial permeability may lower the ASL salt concentration, thereby enhancing innate immunity. We found that the five-carbon sugar xylitol has a low transepithelial permeability, is poorly metabolized by several bacteria, and can lower the ASL salt concentration in both CF and non-CF airway epithelia in vitro. Furthermore, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, xylitol sprayed for 4 days into each nostril of normal volunteers significantly decreased the number of nasal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus compared with saline control. Xylitol may be of value in decreasing ASL salt concentration and enhancing the innate antimicrobial defense at the airway surface.

  20. Effects of pretreatments and salt concentration on rohu (Labeo rohita) roes for preparation of roe pickle.

    PubMed

    Balaswamy, K; Prabhakara Rao, P G; Rao, D G; Jyothirmayi, T

    2010-03-01

    In India, fish egg (roes) is the underutilized rich source of protein and essential fatty acids. An attempt was made to utilize the roes for the preparation of pickle product. Roes of rohu (Labeo rohita) were subjected to pretreatments such as pasteurization and blanching in varying molar concentrations of salt solutions to improve the texture and sensory quality. Losses in protein content and absorption of salt by roes were assessed in both pasteurized and blanched roes for processing them into roe pickle. The pasteurized roes were very soft coupled with high fishy odour. Roes blanched in 1M NaCl solution were found to be good in taste in terms of salt, minimum loss in protein content and reduced fishy odour. The blanched roes were used to prepare fish roe pickle. The pickle was analyzed for physico-chemical parameters, microbial and sensory quality during storage. The roe pickle packed in glass bottle was shelf-stable and scored good for sensory characteristics of flavour, texture, taste and overall acceptability during a storage period of 6 months at room temperature (28 ± 2°C). PMID:23572628

  1. Chain dimensions in free and immobilized brush states of polysulfobetaine in aqueous solution at various salt concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terayama, Y.; Arita, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Kikuchi, M.; Mitamura, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Yamada, N. L.; Takahara, A.

    2011-01-01

    The chain dimensions of free and immobilized polysulfobetaine in aqueous solution at various salt concentrations were investigated by size-exclusion chromatography with multiangle light scattering and neutron reflectivity measurement, respectively. The dependence of the z-average mean square radius of gyration (z1/2) on the weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of free poly(3-(N-2-methacryloyloxyethyl-N,N-dimethyl)ammonatopropanesulfo-nate) (MAPS) in aqueous solution at salt concentrations of 74, 100, 200, and 500 mM was described by the perturbed wormlike chain model using the chain stiffness parameter λ-1 the molar mass per unit contour length ML, and the excluded volume effect B. B increased from 0 to 1.8 nm with increasing salt concentration to 500 mM due to the screening of attractive electrostatic interaction between ammonium cations and sulfonyl anions by salt ions. The swollen structure of the poly(MAPS) brush in D2O changed from a shrunken state to a relatively extended state with increasing salt concentration from 0 to 500 mM NaCl/D2O solution. The thickness of the swollen poly(MAPS) brush in 500 mM NaCl/D2O was 9.0 times greater than 2z1/2 of free poly(MAPS) due to high osmotic pressure generated by the excluded volume effect of densely grafted polymer chains.

  2. Short term effects of increasing dietary salt concentrations on urine composition in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, N; Burmeier, H; Brenten, T; Neumann, K; Zentek, J

    2014-09-01

    High dietary salt (NaCl) concentrations are assumed to be beneficial in preventing the formation of calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths in cats, since increased water intake and urine volume have been observed subsequent to intake. In human beings, dietary NaCl restriction is recommended for the prevention of CaOx urolith formation, since high NaCl intake is associated with increased urinary Ca excretion. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of dietary NaCl in the formation of CaOx uroliths in cats. Eight cats received four diets that differed in Na and Cl concentrations (0.38-1.43% Na and 0.56-2.52% Cl dry matter, DM). Each feeding period consisted of a 21 day adaptation period, followed by a 7 day sampling period for urine collection. Higher dietary NaCl concentrations were associated with increased urine volume and renal Na excretion. Urinary Ca concentration was constant, but renal Ca excretion increased from 0.62 to 1.05 mg/kg bodyweight (BW)/day with higher dietary NaCl concentrations (P ≤ 0.05). Urinary oxalate (Ox), citrate, P and K concentrations decreased when NaCl intake was high (P ≤ 0.05), and urinary pH was low in all groups (6.33-6.45; P > 0.05). Relative supersaturation of CaOx in the urine was unaffected by dietary NaCl concentrations. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated several beneficial effects of high dietary NaCl intake over a relatively short time period. In particular, urinary Ca concentration remained unchanged because of increased urine volume. Decreased urinary Ox concentrations might help to prevent the formation of CaOx uroliths, but this should be verified in future studies in diseased or predisposed cats. PMID:24881513

  3. Oviposition preference and egg eclosion in different salt concentrations in the coastal malaria vector Anopheles aquasalis Curry.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Frances R; Díaz, Sandra; Gómez, Cruz J; Moreno, Milagros; Hernández, Gilma

    2006-03-01

    Anopheles aquasalis is the main malaria vector in Sucre State, Venezuela. The larvae of this species are saltwater tolerant. The effects of different concentrations of salt on oviposition preference and egg survival were studied under laboratory conditions. Choice experiments with salt concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40% in bottled water were set up for individual adult females and the number of eggs laid in each salt concentration was noted. Egg survival, as inferred by the number of hatched larvae also was determined for each salt concentration. Females preferred to oviposit in freshwater and rejected water salt concentrations of 40%, but they were neither attracted nor repelled by water with 10-30% of salt. Eggs hatched more quickly in the lower salt concentrations, but egg survival was not affected by salt concentrations of up to 20%. Thus, female oviposition preference in An. aquasalis determines egg survival. PMID:16646320

  4. High salt meals in staff canteens of salt policy makers: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Berentzen, C A; van Montfrans, G A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the salt content of hot meals served at the institutions of salt policy makers in the Netherlands. Design Observational study. Setting 18 canteens at the Department of Health, the Health Council, the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, university hospitals, and affiliated non-university hospitals. Intervention A standard hot meal collected from the institutional staff canteens on three random days. Main outcome measure Salt content of the meals measured with an ion selective electrode assay. Results The mean salt content of the meals (7.1 g, SE 0.2 g) exceeded the total daily recommended salt intake of 6 g and was high at all locations: 6.9 g (0.4 g) at the Department of Health and National Health Council; 6.0 g (0.9 g) at the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority; 7.4 g (0.5 g) at university hospital staff canteens; and 7.0 g (0.3 g) at non-university hospital staff canteens. With data from a national food consumption survey, the estimated total mean daily salt intake in people who ate these meals was 15.4 g. This translates into a 23-36% increase in premature cardiovascular mortality compared with people who adhere to the recommended levels of salt intake. Conclusion If salt policy makers eat at their institutional canteens they might consume too much salt, which could put their health at risk. PMID:22187322

  5. Synergistic effect of temperature, protein and salt concentration on structures and interactions among lysozyme proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sarathi; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Synergistic effect of temperature, protein and salt concentration on structures and interactions among lysozyme proteins in solution has been studied using small angle neutron scattering technique. Scattering study shows that for a particular protein concentration, with increasing temperature, short-range attraction decreases but long-range repulsion becomes system specific. In absence of salt, lower value of attractive interaction is obtained, however, in presence of salt it becomes higher and decreases with increasing temperature. For specific condition, weak long range attraction and intermediate range repulsion exists. At higher temperature (90 °C), fractal structure develops and the corresponding fractal dimension depends upon the experimental conditions.

  6. Cementitious Stabilization of Mixed Wastes with High Salt Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Burgess, M.W.; Fedorov, V.V.; Downing, D.J.

    1999-04-01

    Salt loadings approaching 50 wt % were tolerated in cementitious waste forms that still met leach and strength criteria, addressing a Technology Deficiency of low salt loadings previously identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area. A statistical design quantified the effect of different stabilizing ingredients and salt loading on performance at lower loadings, allowing selection of the more effective ingredients for studying the higher salt loadings. In general, the final waste form needed to consist of 25 wt % of the dry stabilizing ingredients to meet the criteria used and 25 wt % water to form a workable paste, leaving 50 wt % for waste solids. The salt loading depends on the salt content of the waste solids but could be as high as 50 wt % if all the waste solids are salt.

  7. High salt intake negatively impacts ovarian follicle development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Yeung, Cheung-Kwan; Zhang, Jing-Li; Hu, Xi-Wen; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Yong-Xia; Li, Jiang-Chao; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Xuesong; Wang, Li-Jing

    2015-07-01

    Many human disorders induce high salinity in tissues and organs, interfering with their normal physiological functions. Using a mouse model, we demonstrated that high salt intake caused infertility. Specifically, we established that high salinity dramatically affects ovarian follicle development and the extent of follicular atresia. However, it did not significantly influence the primordial follicles. TUNEL assays revealed that high salt intake inhibited follicle development by inducing the granulosa and theca cells that surround the oocytes to undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, immunohistological staining for the proliferation markers Ki67 and PH3 showed that high salt intake also repressed granulosa cell proliferation. In vitro testing of granulosa cells also confirmed that high salt significantly repressed cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. In summary, high salt consumption negatively impacts reproductive functions in female mice by interfering with ovarian folliculogenesis. PMID:25819501

  8. Heat-induced formation of myosin oligomer-soluble filament complex in high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masato; Takai, Eisuke; Ejima, Daisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    Heat-induced aggregation of myosin into an elastic gel plays an important role in the water-holding capacity and texture of meat products. Here, we investigated thermal aggregation of porcine myosin in high-salt solution over a wide temperature range by dynamic light scattering experiments. The myosin samples were readily dissolved in 1.0 M NaCl at 25 °C followed by dilution into various salt concentrations. The diluted solutions consistently contained both myosin monomers and soluble filaments. The filament size decreased with increasing salt concentration and temperature. High temperatures above Tm led to at least partial dissociation of soluble filaments and thermal unfolding, resulting in the formation of soluble oligomers and binding to the persistently present soluble filaments. Such a complex formation between the oligomers and filaments has never been observed. Our results provide new insight into the heat-induced myosin gelation in high-salt solution. PMID:25445683

  9. Contributions of unfrozen fraction and of salt concentration to the survival of slowly frozen human erythrocytes: influence of warming rate

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Rigopoulos, N.

    1983-01-01

    The general belief is that slow freezing injury is either the result of exposure to high salt concentrations or the result of excessive cell shrinkage. Ordinarily, salt concentration and the amount of liquid in the unfrozen channels are reciprocally related; but they can be separated within limits by varying the total concentration of solutes in the suspending medium while holding the mass ratio of additive to salt constant, and by then slowly freezing samples to various subzero temperatures. The authors have recently reported that when human red cells are frozen under these conditions and thawed rapidly, survival is more dependent on the unfrozen water fraction than it is on the salt concentration in that fraction. The present work compares these results with those obtained with slow thawing. While the general conclusion remains unaltered, slowly thawed cells were able to survive the freezing of a higher fraction of extracellular water than were rapidly thawed cells. Calculations were made of the changes in cell volume during the equilibration with glycerol and the subsequent freezing involved in these experiments.

  10. Structure and ionic conductivity of block copolymer electrolytes over a wide salt concentration range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintapalli, Mahati; Le, Thao; Venkatesan, Naveen; Thelen, Jacob; Rojas, Adriana; Balsara, Nitash

    Block copolymer electrolytes are promising materials for safe, long-lasting lithium batteries because of their favorable mechanical and ion transport properties. The morphology, phase behavior, and ionic conductivity of a block copolymer electrolyte, SEO mixed with LiTFSI was studied over a wide, previously unexplored salt concentration range using small angle X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and ac impedance spectroscopy, respectively. SEO exhibits a maximum in ionic conductivity at twice the salt concentration that PEO, the homopolymer analog of the ion-containing block, does. This finding is contrary to prior studies that examined a more limited range of salt concentrations. In SEO, the phase behavior of the PEO block and LiTFSI closely resembles the phase behavior of homopolymer PEO and LiTFSI. The grain size of the block copolymer morphology was found to decrease with increasing salt concentration, and the ionic conductivity of SEO correlates with decreasing grain size. Structural effects impact the ionic conductivity-salt concentration relationship in block copolymer electrolytes. SEO: polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide); also PS-PEO LiTFSI: lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl imide

  11. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  12. Dependence of salt concentration on glycosaminoglycan-lysozyme interactions in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Moss, J M; Van Damme, M P; Murphy, W H; Preston, B N

    1997-12-01

    The cationic protein, lysozyme, has an extracellular distribution in cartilage but its precise role in this tissue has not yet been established. This study describes the dependence of salt concentration on the binding properties of lysozyme isoforms of different cationic charges, isolated from bovine cartilage, to the two major and structurally similar glycosaminoglycans of cartilage, i.e., chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan. The binding of most cartilage lysozyme isoforms and hen egg-white lysozyme (control) to chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan linked to agarose supports displayed optimal levels at approximately 20 and 5-10 mM salt, respectively, but decreased at both lower and higher salt concentrations indicating the electrostatic nature of the interactions. However, optimal binding of the most cationic lysozyme isoform to chondroitin sulfate occurred at 60 mM salt, with significant binding remaining at 150 mM. This isoform also showed binding to hyaluronan up to 60 mM salt, while for the other isoforms binding was observed only up to 150 and 40 mM salt for chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan, respectively. The low salt concentrations at which these interactions occur are likely to exist in cartilage as shown from equilibrium dialysis studies performed using solutions of chondroitin sulfate (up to 10%, a concentration likely to occur in cartilage). From Scatchard analysis, the affinity of binding of all lysozymes to chondroitin sulfate was similar (Kd = 10(-6) M) and slightly lower than their binding to hyaluronan (Kd = 10(-7) M) of similar molecular mass. PMID:9390173

  13. The ecology of Dunaliella in high-salt environments.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2014-12-01

    Halophilic representatives of the genus Dunaliella, notably D. salina and D. viridis, are found worldwide in salt lakes and saltern evaporation and crystallizer ponds at salt concentrations up to NaCl saturation. Thanks to the biotechnological exploitation of D. salina for β-carotene production we have a profound knowledge of the physiology and biochemistry of the alga. However, relatively little is known about the ecology of the members of the genus Dunaliella in hypersaline environments, in spite of the fact that Dunaliella is often the main or even the sole primary producer present, so that the entire ecosystem depends on carbon fixed by this alga. This review paper summarizes our knowledge about the occurrence and the activities of different Dunaliella species in natural salt lakes (Great Salt Lake, the Dead Sea and others), in saltern ponds and in other salty habitats where members of the genus have been found. PMID:25984505

  14. Advanced high efficiency concentrator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R. . Varian Research Center)

    1992-06-01

    This report describes research to develop the technology needed to demonstrate a monolithic, multijunction, two-terminal, concentrator solar cell with a terrestrial power conversion efficiency greater than 35%. Under three previous subcontracts, Varian developed many of the aspects of a technology needed to fabricate very high efficiency concentrator cells. The current project was aimed at exploiting the new understanding of high efficiency solar cells. Key results covered in this report are as follows. (1) A 1.93-eV AlGaAs/1.42-eV GaAs metal-interconnected cascade cell was manufactured with a one-sun efficiency at 27.6% at air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) global. (2) A 1.0eV InGaAs cell was fabricated on the reverse'' side of a low-doped GaAs substrate with a one-sun efficiency of 2.5% AM1.5 diffuse and a short-circuit current of 14.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Small-scale manufacturing of GaAs p/n concentrator cells was attempted and obtained an excellent yield of high-efficiency cells. (4) Grown-in tunnel junction cell interconnects that are transparent and thermally stable using C and Si dopants were developed. 10 refs.

  15. DC electrophoresis and viscosity of realistic salt-free concentrated suspensions: non-equilibrium dissociation-association processes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Reina, Emilio; Carrique, Félix; Lechuga, Luis

    2014-03-01

    Most of the suspensions usually found in industrial applications are concentrated, aqueous and in contact with the atmospheric CO2. The case of suspensions with a high concentration of added salt is relatively well understood and has been considered in many studies. In this work we are concerned with the case of concentrated suspensions that have no ions different than: (1) those stemming from the charged colloidal particles (the added counterions, that counterbalance their surface charge); (2) the H(+) and OH(-) ions from water dissociation, and (3) the ions generated by the atmospheric CO2 contamination. We call this kind of systems "realistic salt-free suspensions". We show some theoretical results about the electrophoretic mobility of a colloidal particle and the electroviscous effect of realistic salt-free concentrated suspensions. The theoretical framework is based on a cell model that accounts for particle-particle interactions in concentrated suspensions, which has been successfully applied to many different phenomena in concentrated suspensions. On the other hand, the water dissociation and CO2 contamination can be described following two different levels of approximation: (a) by local equilibrium mass-action equations, because it is supposed that the reactions are so fast that chemical equilibrium is attained everywhere in the suspension, or (b) by non-equilibrium dissociation-association kinetic equations, because it is considered that some reactions are not rapid enough to ensure local chemical equilibrium. Both approaches give rise to different results in the range from dilute to semidilute suspensions, causing possible discrepancies when comparing standard theories and experiments concerning transport properties of realistic salt-free suspensions. PMID:24407659

  16. Process evaluation of sea salt aerosol concentrations at remote marine locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struthers, H.; Ekman, A. M.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    Sea salt, an important natural aerosol, is generated by bubbles bursting at the surface of the ocean. Sea salt aerosol contributes significantly to the global aerosol burden and radiative budget and are a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei in remote marine areas (Monahan et al., 1986). Consequently, changes in marine aerosol abundance is expected to impact on climate forcing. Estimates of the atmospheric burden of sea salt aerosol mass derived from chemical transport and global climate models vary greatly both in the global total and the spatial distribution (Texor et al. 2006). This large uncertainty in the sea salt aerosol distribution in turn contributes to the large uncertainty in the current estimates of anthropogenic aerosol climate forcing (IPCC, 2007). To correctly attribute anthropogenic climate change and to veraciously project future climate, natural aerosols including sea salt must be understood and accurately modelled. In addition, the physical processes that determine the sea salt aerosol concentration are susceptible to modification due to climate change (Carslaw et al., 2010) which means there is the potential for feedbacks within the climate/aerosol system. Given the large uncertainties in sea salt aerosol modelling, there is an urgent need to evaluate the process description of sea salt aerosols in global models. An extremely valuable source of data for model evaluation is the long term measurements of PM10 sea salt aerosol mass available from a number of remote marine observation sites around the globe (including the GAW network). Sea salt aerosol concentrations at remote marine locations depend strongly on the surface exchange (emission and deposition) as well as entrainment or detrainment to the free troposphere. This suggests that the key parameters to consider in any analysis include the sea surface water temperature, wind speed, precipitation rate and the atmospheric stability. In this study, the sea salt aerosol observations

  17. Pancreatic functions in high salt fed female rats

    PubMed Central

    Lasheen, Noha N

    2015-01-01

    Salt consumption has been increased worldwide and the association of high salt diets with enhanced inflammation and target organ damage was reported. Little data were available about the effect of high salt diet on exocrine function of pancreas, while the relation between high salt intake and insulin sensitivity was controversial. This study was designed to investigate the effect of high salt diet on exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions, and to elucidate the possible underlying mechanism(s). Twenty adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups; control group; fed standard rodent diet containing 0.3% NaCl, and high salt fed group; fed 8% NaCl for 8 weeks. On the day of sacrifice, rats were anesthized by i.p. pentobarbitone (40 μg/kg B.W.). Nasoanal length was measured and fasting blood glucose was determined from rat tail. Blood samples were obtained from abdominal aorta for determination of plasma sodium, potassium, amylase, lipase, aldosterone, insulin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1), and interleukin 6 (IL6). Pancreata of both groups were histologically studied. Compared to control group, 8-week high salt fed group showed: significant elevation in body weight, body mass index, Lee index, plasma sodium, TGF-β1 and IL6, however, plasma aldosterone, amylase, lipase, and insulin levels were significantly decreased. A nonsignificant increase in plasma potassium and nonsignificant changes in fasting blood glucose and HOMA-IR were detected between groups. Pancreatic fibrosis was observed in test group. High salt diet for 8 weeks caused pancreatic fibrosis evidenced by decline of both exocrine and endocrine functions of pancreas in Wistar rats. PMID:26216433

  18. Concentration of Methylamine and Ethylamine Salts measured by a particle into liquid sampler and Ion Chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) and ion chromatographs (ICs) were used to detect the concentration of methylamine salts associated with atmospheric particulate matter reactions in a smog chamber. The smog chamber is located at U.C. Riverside’s College of Engineering Center for Environmental Re...

  19. The osmolyte xylitol reduces the salt concentration of airway surface liquid and may enhance bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Zabner, J; Seiler, M P; Launspach, J L; Karp, P H; Kearney, W R; Look, D C; Smith, J J; Welsh, M J

    2000-10-10

    The thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) contains antimicrobial substances that kill the small numbers of bacteria that are constantly being deposited in the lungs. An increase in ASL salt concentration inhibits the activity of airway antimicrobial factors and may partially explain the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that an osmolyte with a low transepithelial permeability may lower the ASL salt concentration, thereby enhancing innate immunity. We found that the five-carbon sugar xylitol has a low transepithelial permeability, is poorly metabolized by several bacteria, and can lower the ASL salt concentration in both CF and non-CF airway epithelia in vitro. Furthermore, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, xylitol sprayed for 4 days into each nostril of normal volunteers significantly decreased the number of nasal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus compared with saline control. Xylitol may be of value in decreasing ASL salt concentration and enhancing the innate antimicrobial defense at the airway surface. PMID:11027360

  20. The osmolyte xylitol reduces the salt concentration of airway surface liquid and may enhance bacterial killing

    PubMed Central

    Zabner, Joseph; Seiler, Michael P.; Launspach, Janice L.; Karp, Philip H.; Kearney, William R.; Look, Dwight C.; Smith, Jeffrey J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    The thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) contains antimicrobial substances that kill the small numbers of bacteria that are constantly being deposited in the lungs. An increase in ASL salt concentration inhibits the activity of airway antimicrobial factors and may partially explain the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). We tested the hypothesis that an osmolyte with a low transepithelial permeability may lower the ASL salt concentration, thereby enhancing innate immunity. We found that the five-carbon sugar xylitol has a low transepithelial permeability, is poorly metabolized by several bacteria, and can lower the ASL salt concentration in both CF and non-CF airway epithelia in vitro. Furthermore, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, xylitol sprayed for 4 days into each nostril of normal volunteers significantly decreased the number of nasal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus compared with saline control. Xylitol may be of value in decreasing ASL salt concentration and enhancing the innate antimicrobial defense at the airway surface. PMID:11027360

  1. High Salt Intake Promotes Urinary Loss of Vitamin D Metabolites by Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats in a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thierry-Palmer, M.; Cephas, S.; Sayavongsa, P.; Clark, T.; Arnaud, S. B.

    2004-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolism in the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat, a model of salt-induced hypertension, differs from that in the Dahl salt-resistant (R) rat. We have demonstrated that female S rats are more vulnerable than female R rats to decreases in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D) concentrations during hind limb unloading (a space flight model). We report here on the response of the vitamin D endocrine system of S and R rats to hind limb unloading during high salt intake. Dahl female rats (9.7-week-old) were tail-suspended (hind limb unloaded) for 28 days, while fed a diet containing twice the salt in standard rat chow (2 % sodium chloride). Control rats were fed the same diet, but were not hind limb unloaded. Vitamin D metabolites were analyzed by HPLC and radioimmunoassay kits from Diasorin.

  2. On-line Monitoring of Actinide Concentrations in Molten Salt Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis W. Johnson; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar; Shelly X. Li

    2006-11-01

    Pyroprocessing, a treatment method for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), is currently being studied at the Idaho National Laboratory. The key operation of pyroprocessing which takes place in an electrorefiner is the electrochemical separation of actinides from other constituents in spent fuel. Efficient operation of the electrorefiner requires online monitoring of actinide concentrations in the molten salt electrolyte. Square-wave voltammetry (SWV) and normal pulse voltammetry (NPV) are being investigated to assess their applicability to the measurement of actinide concentrations in the electrorefiner.

  3. Effect of Salt Concentration on the Pattern Formation of Colloidal Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenjie; Wang, Yuren

    We study the effect of salt concentration on the drying process and pattern of thin liquid layer colloidal suspension. Panasonic camera is used to capture the drying process and macroscopic pattern. Microscopic patterns are analyzed by optical microscopy. It is shown that broad-ring pattern is avoided by adding little amount of sodium chloide into colloidal suspension. with the increase of salt concentraion, convection strength and interface instability are weakened, thus the edge of film becomes smooth and more homogeneous film forms. Beautiful microscopic patterns demonstrate that the cooperative interaction between sodium chloide and silica spheres has important influence on the pattern formation.

  4. Non-tracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, Henry

    1977-01-01

    A nontracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio is provided. The concentrator includes a plurality of energy absorbers which communicate with a main header by which absorbed heat is removed. Undesired heat flow of those absorbers not being heated by radiant energy at a particular instant is impeded, improving the efficiency of the concentrator.

  5. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

    2012-03-30

    We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

  6. Non-Radiological Air Quality Modeling for the High-Level Waste Salt Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.H.

    1999-11-29

    Dispersion modeling of non-radiological airborne emissions associated with the construction and operation of three alternatives for high-level waste salt disposition at the Savannah River Site has been completed. The results will be used by Department of Energy-Savannah River in the preparation of the salt disposition supplemental environmental impact statement. Estimated maximum ground-level concentrations of applicable regulated air pollutants of the site boundary and at the distance to a hypothetical, co-located onsite worker are summarized in tables. In all cases, model estimated ambient concentrations are less than regulatory standards.

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Annealed and Cold Worked Titanium Grade 7 and Alloy 22 in 110 C Concentrated Salt Environments

    SciTech Connect

    P. Andresen

    2000-11-08

    Stress corrosion crack growth studies have been performed on annealed and cold worked Titanium Grade 7 and Alloy 22 in 110 C, aerated, concentrated, high pH salt environments characteristic of concentrated ground water. Following a very careful transition from fatigue precracking conditions to SCC conditions, the long term behavior under very stable conditions was monitored using reversing dc potential drop. Titanium Grade 7 exhibited continuous crack growth under both near-static and complete static loading conditions. Alloy 22 exhibited similar growth rates, but was less prone to maintain stable crack growth as conditions approached fully static loading.

  8. Non-sea-salt sulfate, methanesulfonate, and nitrate aerosol concentrations and size distributions at Cape Grim, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.; Elbert, Wolfgang; Cai, Yong; Andreae, Tracey W.; Gras, John

    1999-09-01

    We collected weekly aerosol samples using high-volume impactors over a period of 20 months (1988-1990) at the Cape Grim baseline station on the northwestern coast of Tasmania, Australia. The samples were analyzed for soluble ionic constituents, including sulfate, methanesulfonate (MS-), ammonium, nitrate, and the major sea-salt ions. The sea-salt component showed only a slight seasonal variation, whereas the non-sea-salt (nss) ions all had pronounced summer maxima. Significant interannual variability was seen between the nss ion concentrations measured during the two summers investigated. Nss sulfate and MS- were present both in the fine and coarse aerosol fractions, in the latter presumably associated with sea-salt particles. During the winter period, there was more nss sulfate in the coarse fraction than in the fine fraction. These observations are consistent with an important role of liquid-phase oxidation in haze and cloud droplets for the production of nss sulfate aerosol. The seasonal behavior of the sulfur and nitrogen species at Cape Grim and their mutual correlations suggest that DMS oxidation is the dominant sulfur source during summer, while nonbiogenic sulfur sources make significant contributions to nss sulfate outside of this season. Correlations of CN and CCN concentrations with nss sulfate, MS-, and wind speed suggest that DMS oxidation and, to a lesser extent, seaspray formation contributes to CN and CCN populations. The contrast between the weak seasonality of the sea-salt component and the pronounced seasonal behavior in both sulfur species and CCN supports the central role of biogenic DMS emissions as precursors of CCN in this region, at least in the biologically productive season.

  9. Effect of submicellar concentrations of conjugated and unconjugated bile salts on the lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K

    2011-11-15

    The interaction of submicellar concentrations of various physiologically important unconjugated [sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), sodium cholate (NaC)] and conjugated [sodium glycodeoxycholate (NaGDC), sodium glycocholate (NaGC), sodium taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC), sodium taurocholate (NaTC)] bile salts with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) small unilamellar vesicles in solid gel (SG) and liquid crystalline (LC) phases was investigated using the excited-state prototropism of 1-naphthol. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence of the two excited-state prototropic forms of 1-naphthol indicate that submicellar bile salt concentration induces hydration of the lipid bilayer membrane into the core region. This hydration effect is a general phenomenon of the bile salts studied. The bilayer hydration efficiency of the bile salt follows the order NaDC > NaC > NaGDC > NaTDC > NaGC > NaTC for both DPPC and DMPC vesicles in their SG and LC phases. PMID:21973323

  10. Helicobacter pylori Adaptation In Vivo in Response to a High-Salt Diet

    PubMed Central

    Loh, John T.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Gaudieri, Silvana; Mallal, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity. In this study, we investigated whether the diversification of H. pylori is influenced by the composition of the diet. Specifically, we investigated the effect of a high-salt diet (a known risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma) on H. pylori diversification within a host. We analyzed H. pylori strains isolated from Mongolian gerbils fed either a high-salt diet or a regular diet for 4 months by proteomic and whole-genome sequencing methods. Compared to the input strain and output strains from animals fed a regular diet, the output strains from animals fed a high-salt diet produced higher levels of proteins involved in iron acquisition and oxidative-stress resistance. Several of these changes were attributable to a nonsynonymous mutation in fur (fur-R88H). Further experiments indicated that this mutation conferred increased resistance to high-salt conditions and oxidative stress. We propose a model in which a high-salt diet leads to high levels of gastric inflammation and associated oxidative stress in H. pylori-infected animals and that these conditions, along with the high intraluminal concentrations of sodium chloride, lead to selection of H. pylori strains that are most fit for growth in this environment. PMID:26438795

  11. Helicobacter pylori adaptation in vivo in response to a high-salt diet.

    PubMed

    Loh, John T; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Algood, Holly M Scott; Gaudieri, Silvana; Mallal, Simon; Cover, Timothy L

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity. In this study, we investigated whether the diversification of H. pylori is influenced by the composition of the diet. Specifically, we investigated the effect of a high-salt diet (a known risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma) on H. pylori diversification within a host. We analyzed H. pylori strains isolated from Mongolian gerbils fed either a high-salt diet or a regular diet for 4 months by proteomic and whole-genome sequencing methods. Compared to the input strain and output strains from animals fed a regular diet, the output strains from animals fed a high-salt diet produced higher levels of proteins involved in iron acquisition and oxidative-stress resistance. Several of these changes were attributable to a nonsynonymous mutation in fur (fur-R88H). Further experiments indicated that this mutation conferred increased resistance to high-salt conditions and oxidative stress. We propose a model in which a high-salt diet leads to high levels of gastric inflammation and associated oxidative stress in H. pylori-infected animals and that these conditions, along with the high intraluminal concentrations of sodium chloride, lead to selection of H. pylori strains that are most fit for growth in this environment. PMID:26438795

  12. Effect of Low Salt Concentrations on Microbial Changes During Kimchi Fermentation Monitored by PCR-DGGE and Their Sensory Acceptance.

    PubMed

    Ahmadsah, Lenny S F; Min, Sung-Gi; Han, Seon-Kyeong; Hong, Yeun; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2015-12-28

    Various salt concentrations (1.0%, 1.3%, 1.6%, 1.9%, and 2.1% labeled as sample A, B, C, D, and E, respectively) were investigated for microbial diversity, identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) in salted kimchi cabbage, prepared under laboratory conditions. These samples were stored at 4°C for 5 weeks in proper aluminum-metalized pouch packaging with calcium hydroxide gas absorber. A culture-independent method known as polymerase chain reaction - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was carried out to identify LAB distributions among various salt concentration samples that had identified 2 Weissella (W. confusa and W. soli), 1 Lactobacillus (Lb. sakei), and 3 Leuconostoc (Lc. mesenteroides, Lc. lactis, and Lc. gelidum) in the overall kimchi samples. The pH, titratable acidity, viable cell counts, and coliform counts were not affected by salt variations. In order to assess sensory acceptance, the conducted sensory evaluation using a 9-point hedonic scale had revealed that samples with 1.3% salt concentration (lower than the manufacturer's regular salt concentration) was more preferred, indicating that the use of 1.3% salt concentration was acceptable in normal kimchi fermentation for its quality and safety. Despite similarities in pH, titratable acidity, viable cell counts, coliform counts, and LAB distributions among the various salt concentrations of kimchi samples, the sample with 1.3% salt concentration was shown to be the most preferred, indicating that this salt concentration was suitable in kimchi production in order to reduce salt intake through kimchi consumptions. PMID:26370801

  13. High salt intake: independent risk factor for obesity?

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuan; He, Feng J; MacGregor, Graham A

    2015-10-01

    High salt intake is the major cause of raised blood pressure and accordingly leads to cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has been shown that high salt intake is associated with an increased risk of obesity through sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Increasing evidence also suggests a direct link. Our study aimed to determine whether there was a direct association between salt intake and obesity independent of energy intake. We analyzed the data from the rolling cross-sectional study-the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey 2008/2009 to 2011/2012. We included 458 children (52% boys; age, 10±4 years) and 785 adults (47% men; age, 49±17 years) who had complete 24-hour urine collections. Energy intake was calculated from 4-day diary and misreporting was assessed by Goldberg method. The results showed that salt intake as measured by 24-hour urinary sodium was higher in overweight and obese individuals. A 1-g/d increase in salt intake was associated with an increase in the risk of obesity by 28% (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.45; P=0.0002) in children and 26% (odds ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.37; P<0.0001) in adults, after adjusting for age, sex, ethnic group, household income, physical activity, energy intake, and diet misreporting, and in adults with additional adjustment for education, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Higher salt intake was also significantly related to higher body fat mass in both children (P=0.001) and adults (P=0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, ethnic group, and energy intake. These results suggest that salt intake is a potential risk factor for obesity independent of energy intake. PMID:26238447

  14. Ionic liquids: the link to high-temperature molten salts?

    PubMed

    El Abedin, Sherif Zein; Endres, Frank

    2007-11-01

    Due to their wide thermal windows, ionic liquids can be regarded as the missing link between aqueous/organic solutions and high-temperature molten salts. They can be employed efficiently for the coating of other metals with thin layers of tantalum, aluminum, and presumably many others at reasonable temperatures by electrochemical means. The development of ionic liquids, especially air and water stable ones, has opened the door for the electrodeposition of reactive elements such as, for example, Al, Ta, and Si, which in the past were only accessible using high-temperature molten salts or, in part, organic solvents. PMID:17521159

  15. A high temperature molten salt thermal electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plichta, Edward J.; Behl, Wishvender K.

    1990-02-01

    This invention relates in general to a high temperature molten salt thermal electrochemical cell and in particular to such a cell including cobalt oxide (Co3O4) as the cathode material. High temperature molten salt thermal electrochemical cells are widely used as power sources for projectiles, rockets, bombs, mines, missiles, decoys, jammers, and torpedoes. These are also used as fuses. Thermal electrochemical cells are reserve-type cells that can be activated by heating with a pyrotechnic heat source such as zirconium and barium chromate powders or mixtures of iron powder and potassium perchlorate.

  16. Direct Grout Stabilization of High Cesium Salt Waste: Cesium Leaching Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    1999-09-19

    'The direct grout alternative is a viable option for treatment/stabilization and disposal of salt waste containing Cs-137 concentrations of 1-3 Ci/gal. The significant difference between these waste solutions is that the high cesium salt solution will contain between 1 and 3 Curies of Cs-137 per gallon compared to a negligible amount in the current salt solution. This difference will require special engineering and shielding for a direct grout processing facility and disposal units to achieve acceptable radiation exposure conditions. The higher cesium concentrations in the direct grout also require that the cesium leaching be evaluated as a function of curing temperature. ANS 16.1 leaching results and distribution ratios (approximations of distribution coefficients) as a function of temperature are presented in this report.'

  17. The role of antioxidant responses on the tolerance range of extreme halophyte Salsola crassa grown under toxic salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Yildiztugay, Evren; Ozfidan-Konakci, Ceyda; Kucukoduk, Mustafa

    2014-12-01

    Salsola crassa (Amaranthaceae) is an annual halophytic species and naturally grows in arid soils that are toxic to most plants. In order to study the effects of salinity on their antioxidant system and to determine the tolerance range against salt stress, S. crassa seeds were grown with different concentrations of NaCl (0, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250 and 1500mM) for short (15d) and long-term (30d). Results showed that growth (RGR), water content (RWC) and osmotic potential (ΨΠ) decreased and, proline content (Pro) increased at prolonged salt treatment. Unlike K(+) and Ca(2+) contents, S. crassa highly accumulated Na(+) and Cl(-) contents. Chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) only decreased in response to 1500mM NaCl at 30d. No salt stimulation of superoxide anion radical (O2(•-)) content was observed in plants treated with the range of 0-500mM NaCl during the experimental period. NaCl increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity depending on intensities of Mn-SOD and Fe-SOD isozymes except in 1500mM NaCl-treated plants at 30d. In contrast to catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POX) activity increased throughout the experiment. Also, salinity caused an increase in glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and decreased in ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) at 15d. Both total ascorbate (tAsA) and glutathione (tGlut) contents significantly increased in treated plants with 1000-1500mM NaCl at 15d. After 0-1000mM NaCl stress, H2O2 and TBARS contents were similar to control groups at 15d, which were consistent with the increased antioxidant activity (POX, GR and GPX). However, H2O2 content was more pronounced at 30d. Therefore, S. crassa exhibited inductions in lipid peroxidation (TBARS content) in response to extreme salt concentrations. These results suggest that S. crassa is tolerant to salt-induced damage at short-term treatments as well as extreme salt concentrations. PMID:25193881

  18. Non-monotonic swelling of surface grafted hydrogels induced by pH and/or salt concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Gabriel S.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Szleifer, I.

    2014-09-28

    We use a molecular theory to study the thermodynamics of a weak-polyacid hydrogel film that is chemically grafted to a solid surface. We investigate the response of the material to changes in the pH and salt concentration of the buffer solution. Our results show that the pH-triggered swelling of the hydrogel film has a non-monotonic dependence on the acidity of the bath solution. At most salt concentrations, the thickness of the hydrogel film presents a maximum when the pH of the solution is increased from acidic values. The quantitative details of such swelling behavior, which is not observed when the film is physically deposited on the surface, depend on the molecular architecture of the polymer network. This swelling-deswelling transition is the consequence of the complex interplay between the chemical free energy (acid-base equilibrium), the electrostatic repulsions between charged monomers, which are both modulated by the absorption of ions, and the ability of the polymer network to regulate charge and control its volume (molecular organization). In the absence of such competition, for example, for high salt concentrations, the film swells monotonically with increasing pH. A deswelling-swelling transition is similarly predicted as a function of the salt concentration at intermediate pH values. This reentrant behavior, which is due to the coupling between charge regulation and the two opposing effects triggered by salt concentration (screening electrostatic interactions and charging/discharging the acid groups), is similar to that found in end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers. Understanding how to control the response of the material to different stimuli, in terms of its molecular structure and local chemical composition, can help the targeted design of applications with extended functionality. We describe the response of the material to an applied pressure and an electric potential. We present profiles that outline the local chemical composition of the

  19. Non-monotonic swelling of surface grafted hydrogels induced by pH and/or salt concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Gabriel S.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Szleifer, I.

    2014-09-01

    We use a molecular theory to study the thermodynamics of a weak-polyacid hydrogel film that is chemically grafted to a solid surface. We investigate the response of the material to changes in the pH and salt concentration of the buffer solution. Our results show that the pH-triggered swelling of the hydrogel film has a non-monotonic dependence on the acidity of the bath solution. At most salt concentrations, the thickness of the hydrogel film presents a maximum when the pH of the solution is increased from acidic values. The quantitative details of such swelling behavior, which is not observed when the film is physically deposited on the surface, depend on the molecular architecture of the polymer network. This swelling-deswelling transition is the consequence of the complex interplay between the chemical free energy (acid-base equilibrium), the electrostatic repulsions between charged monomers, which are both modulated by the absorption of ions, and the ability of the polymer network to regulate charge and control its volume (molecular organization). In the absence of such competition, for example, for high salt concentrations, the film swells monotonically with increasing pH. A deswelling-swelling transition is similarly predicted as a function of the salt concentration at intermediate pH values. This reentrant behavior, which is due to the coupling between charge regulation and the two opposing effects triggered by salt concentration (screening electrostatic interactions and charging/discharging the acid groups), is similar to that found in end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers. Understanding how to control the response of the material to different stimuli, in terms of its molecular structure and local chemical composition, can help the targeted design of applications with extended functionality. We describe the response of the material to an applied pressure and an electric potential. We present profiles that outline the local chemical composition of the

  20. Characterizing the Effect of Salt and Surfactant Concentration on the Counterion Atmosphere around Surfactant Stabilized SWCNTs Using Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Lam, Stephanie; Zheng, Ming; Fagan, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-26

    Accurate characterization of dispersed-phase nanoparticle properties such as density, size, solvation, and charge is necessary for their utilization in applications such as medicine, energy, and materials. Herein, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is used to quantify bile salt surfactant adsorption on length sorted (7,6) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a function of bulk surfactant concentration and in the presence of varying quantities of a monovalent salt-sodium chloride. These measurements provide high precision adsorbed surfactant density values in the literature for only the second SWCNT structure to date and report the quantity of adsorbed surfactant across a broad range of bulk surfactant concentrations utilized in SWCNT dispersion processing. Second, the measurements presented herein unambiguously demonstrate, via AUC, a direct relation between the size of the counterion cloud around a surfactant-stabilized SWCNT and solution ionic strength. The results show that changes in the size of the counterion cloud around surfactant-stabilized SWCNT are attributable to electrostatic phenomenon and not to changes in the quantity of adsorbed surfactant with salt addition. These results provide important reference values for projecting SWCNT dispersion behavior as a function of solution conditions and extend the range of nanoparticle properties measurable via AUC. PMID:27031248

  1. Effect of Elevated Salt Concentrations on the Aerobic Granular Sludge Process: Linking Microbial Activity with Microbial Community Structure▿

    PubMed Central

    Bassin, J. P.; Pronk, M.; Muyzer, G.; Kleerebezem, R.; Dezotti, M.; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.

    2011-01-01

    The long- and short-term effects of salt on biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal processes were studied in an aerobic granular sludge reactor. The microbial community structure was investigated by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on 16S rRNA and amoA genes. PCR products obtained from genomic DNA and from rRNA after reverse transcription were compared to determine the presence of bacteria as well as the metabolically active fraction of bacteria. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to validate the PCR-based results and to quantify the dominant bacterial populations. The results demonstrated that ammonium removal efficiency was not affected by salt concentrations up to 33 g/liter NaCl. Conversely, a high accumulation of nitrite was observed above 22 g/liter NaCl, which coincided with the disappearance of Nitrospira sp. Phosphorus removal was severely affected by gradual salt increase. No P release or uptake was observed at steady-state operation at 33 g/liter NaCl, exactly when the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs), “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis” bacteria, were no longer detected by PCR-DGGE or FISH. Batch experiments confirmed that P removal still could occur at 30 g/liter NaCl, but the long exposure of the biomass to this salinity level was detrimental for PAOs, which were outcompeted by glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) in the bioreactor. GAOs became the dominant microorganisms at increasing salt concentrations, especially at 33 g/liter NaCl. In the comparative analysis of the diversity (DNA-derived pattern) and the activity (cDNA-derived pattern) of the microbial population, the highly metabolically active microorganisms were observed to be those related to ammonia (Nitrosomonas sp.) and phosphate removal (“Candidatus Accumulibacter”). PMID:21926194

  2. Inorganic Contaminant Concentrations and Body Condition in Wintering Waterfowl from Great Salt Lake, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vest, J.; Conover, M.; Perschon, C.; Luft, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake (GSL) is the fourth largest terminal lake in the world and is an important region for migratory and breeding waterbirds. Because the GSL is a closed basin, contaminants associated with industrial and urban development may accumulate in this system. Recently, water and sediment samples from the GSL revealed high concentrations of Hg and Se and methylmercury concentrations in GSL water samples were among the highest ever recorded in surface water by the USGS Mercury Laboratory. Thus, GSL waterbirds are likely exposed to these contaminants and elevated contaminant concentrations may adversely affect survival and reproduction in waterfowl. Our objectives were to 1) estimate mercury (Hg), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) concentrations in wintering waterfowl from GSL and, 2) evaluate relationships between measures of waterfowl body condition and internal organ masses (hereafter body condition) with trace metal concentrations. We collected common goldeneye (COGO), northern shoveler (NSHO), and American green-winged teal (AGWT) from the GSL during early winter. We used ICP-MS to analyze liver and muscle tissue samples for contaminant concentrations. We developed species specific regression models for each of 5 condition indices, including ingesta-free plucked body mass (IFPBM), abdominal fat mass, spleen, liver, and pancreas masses. Independent variables were comprised of Hg, Se, Cd, Cu, and Zn and we included sex and age as covariates in each regression. We used Akaike's Information Criterion adjusted for small sample size to select best and competing models. Subsequently, we used partial correlations to depict inverse relationships identified in competing models. Hg concentrations in COGO and NSHO muscle tissue generally exceeded or approached the 1 ppm wet weight (ww) threshold considered unsafe for human consumption in fish and game. Hg concentrations in liver tissue exceeded or were among the highest reported in published

  3. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na+/K+-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:27043552

  4. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: Ion network versus ion cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-28

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O–D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shift of S{sup 13}CN{sup −} in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  5. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: Ion network versus ion cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-01

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and 13C-NMR chemical shift of S13CN- in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  6. Is It Possible to Distinguish Between Dust and Salt Aerosol Over Waters with Unknown Chlorophyll Concentrations Using Spectral Remote Sensing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R. C.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol has uncertain impacts on the global climate system, as well as on atmospheric and bio-geo-chemical processes of regional and local scales. EOS-MODIS is one example of a satellite sensor designed to improve understanding of the aerosols' type, size and distribution at all temporal and spatial scales. Ocean scientists also plan to use data from EOS-MODIS to assess the temporal and spatial coverage of in-water chlorophyll. MODIS is the first sensor planned to observe the combined ocean-atmosphere system with a wide spectral range (from 410 to 2200 nm). Dust aerosol and salt aerosol have similar spectral signals for wavelengths longer than 550 nm, but because dust selectively absorbs blue light, they have divergent signals in the blue wavelength regions (412 to 490 nm). Chlorophyll also selectively absorbs blue radiation, so that varying chlorophyll concentrations produces a highly varying signal in the blue regions, but less variability in the green, and almost no signal in the red to mid-infrared regions. Thus, theoretically, it may be difficult to differentiate dust and salt in the presence of unknown chlorophyll in the ocean. This study attempts to address the cases in which aerosol and chlorophyll signals can and cannot be separated. For the aerosol spectra, we use the aerosol lookup table from the operational MODIS aerosol-over-ocean algorithm, and for chlorophyll spectra, we use the SeaBAM data set (created for SeaWiFS). We compare the signals using Principal Component Analysis and attempt to retrieve both chlorophyll and aerosol properties using a variant of the operational MODIS aerosol-over-ocean algorithm. Results show that for small optical depths, less than 0.5, it is not possible to differentiate between dust and salt and to determine the chlorophyll concentration at the same time. For larger aerosol optical depths, the chlorophyll signals are comparatively insignificant, and we can hope to distinguish between dust and salt.

  7. Thermodynamic relation between voltage-concentration dependence and salt adsorption in electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Rica, R A; Ziano, R; Salerno, D; Mantegazza, F; Brogioli, D

    2012-10-12

    Electrochemical cells containing two electrodes dipped in an ionic solution are widely used as charge accumulators, either with polarizable (supercapacitor) or nonpolarizable (battery) electrodes. Recent applications include desalination ("capacitive deionization") and energy extraction from salinity differences ("capacitive mixing"). In this Letter, we analyze a general relation between the variation of the electric potential as a function of the concentration and the salt adsorption. This relation comes from the evaluation of the electrical and mechanical energy exchange along a reversible cycle, which involves salt adsorption and release by the electrodes. The obtained relation thus describes a connection between capacitive deionization and capacitive mixing. We check this relation with experimental data already reported in the literature, and moreover by some classical physical models for electrodes, including polarizable and nonpolarizable electrodes. The generality of the relation makes it very useful in the study of the properties of the electric double layer. PMID:23102339

  8. Theory Of Salt Effects On Protein Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Yuba; Schmit, Jeremy

    Salt is one of the major factors that effects protein solubility. Often, at low salt concentration regime, protein solubility increases with the salt concentration(salting in) whereas at high salt concentration regime, solubility decreases with the increase in salt concentration(salting out). There are no quantitative theories to explain salting in and salting out. We have developed a model to describe the salting in and salting out. Our model accounts for the electrostatic Coulomb energy, salt entropy and non-electrostatic interaction between proteins. We analytically solve the linearized Poisson Boltzmann equation modelling the protein charge by a first order multipole expansion. In our model, protein charges are modulated by the anion binding. Consideration of only the zeroth order term in protein charge doesn't help to describe salting in phenomenon because of the repulsive interaction. To capture the salting in behaviour, it requires an attractive electrostatic interaction in low salt regime. Our work shows that at low salt concentration, dipole interaction is the cause for salting in and at high salt concentration a salt-dependent depletion interaction dominates and gives the salting out. Our theoretical result is consistent with the experimental result for Chymosin protein NIH Grant No R01GM107487.

  9. Elevation of Fasting Ghrelin in Healthy Human Subjects Consuming a High-Salt Diet: A Novel Mechanism of Obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Fenxia; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Chu, Chao; Wang, Yang; Wang, Dan; Guo, Tong-Shuai; Wang, Jun-Kui; Guan, Gong-Chang; Ren, Ke-Yu; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Overweight/obesity is a chronic disease that carries an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and premature death. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a clear relationship between salt intake and obesity, but the pathophysiologic mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin, which regulates appetite, food intake, and fat deposition, becomes elevated when one consumes a high-salt diet, contributing to the progression of obesity. We, therefore, investigated fasting ghrelin concentrations during a high-salt diet. Thirty-eight non-obese and normotensive subjects (aged 25 to 50 years) were selected from a rural community in Northern China. They were sequentially maintained on a normal diet for three days at baseline, a low-salt diet for seven days (3 g/day, NaCl), then a high-salt diet for seven days (18 g/day). The concentration of plasma ghrelin was measured using an immunoenzyme method (ELISA). High-salt intake significantly increased fasting ghrelin levels, which were higher during the high-salt diet (320.7 ± 30.6 pg/mL) than during the low-salt diet (172.9 ± 8.9 pg/mL). The comparison of ghrelin levels between the different salt diets was statistically-significantly different (p < 0.01). A positive correlation between 24-h urinary sodium excretion and fasting ghrelin levels was demonstrated. Our data indicate that a high-salt diet elevates fasting ghrelin in healthy human subjects, which may be a novel underlying mechanism of obesity. PMID:27240398

  10. Effect of road salt application on seasonal chloride concentrations and toxicity in south-central Indiana streams.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kristin M; Royer, Todd V

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary information on road salt runoff is needed for management of water resources in regions experiencing urbanization and increased road density. We investigated seasonal Cl(-) concentrations among five streams in south-central Indiana that drained watersheds varying in degree of urbanization and ranging in size from 9.3 to 27 km(2). We also conducted acute toxicity tests with Daphnia pulex to assess the potential effects of the observed Cl(-) concentrations on aquatic life. Periods of elevated Cl(-) concentrations were observed during the winters of 2007-08 and 2008-09 at all sites except the reference site. The highest Cl(-) concentration observed during the study was 2100 mg L(-1) and occurred at the most urbanized site. The Cl(-) concentration at the reference site never exceeded 22 mg L(-1). The application of road salt caused large increases in stream Cl(-) concentrations, but the elevated Cl(-) levels did not appear to be a significant threat to aquatic life based on our toxicity testing. Only the most urbanized site showed evidence of salt retention within the watershed, whereas the other sites exported the road salt relatively quickly after its application, suggesting storm drains and impervious surfaces minimized interaction between soils and salt-laden runoff. During winter at these sites, the response in stream Cl(-) concentrations appeared to be controlled by the timing and intensity of road salt application, the magnitude of precipitation, and the occurrence of air temperatures that caused snowmelt and generated runoff. PMID:20400599

  11. Enhanced Salt Removal by Unipolar Ion Conduction in Ion Concentration Polarization Desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Kim, Bumjoo; Chen, Lan; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-05-01

    Chloride ion, the majority salt in nature, is ∼52% faster than sodium ion (DNa+ = 1.33, DCl‑ = 2.03[10‑9m2s‑1]). Yet, current electrochemical desalination technologies (e.g. electrodialysis) rely on bipolar ion conduction, removing one pair of the cation and the anion simultaneously. Here, we demonstrate that novel ion concentration polarization desalination can enhance salt removal under a given current by implementing unipolar ion conduction: conducting only cations (or anions) with the unipolar ion exchange membrane stack. Combining theoretical analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we elucidate that this enhanced salt removal can shift current utilization (ratio between desalted ions and ions conducted through electrodes) and corresponding energy efficiency by the factor ∼(D‑ ‑ D+)/(D‑ + D+). Specifically for desalting NaCl, this enhancement of unipolar cation conduction saves power consumption by ∼50% in overlimiting regime, compared with conventional electrodialysis. Recognizing and utilizing differences between unipolar and bipolar ion conductions have significant implications not only on electromembrane desalination, but also energy harvesting applications (e.g. reverse electrodialysis).

  12. Magnesium degradation influenced by buffering salts in concentrations typical of in vitro and in vivo models.

    PubMed

    Agha, Nezha Ahmad; Feyerabend, Frank; Mihailova, Boriana; Heidrich, Stefanie; Bismayer, Ulrich; Willumeit-Römer, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have considerable potential for orthopedic applications. During the degradation process the interface between material and tissue is continuously changing. Moreover, too fast or uncontrolled degradation is detrimental for the outcome in vivo. Therefore in vitro setups utilizing physiological conditions are promising for the material/degradation analysis prior to animal experiments. The aim of this study is to elucidate the influence of inorganic salts contributing to the blood buffering capacity on degradation. Extruded pure magnesium samples were immersed under cell culture conditions for 3 and 10 days. Hank's balanced salt solution without calcium and magnesium (HBSS) plus 10% of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was used as the basic immersion medium. Additionally, different inorganic salts were added with respect to concentration in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM, in vitro model) and human plasma (in vivo model) to form 12 different immersion media. Influences on the surrounding environment were observed by measuring pH and osmolality. The degradation interface was analyzed by electron-induced X-ray emission (EIXE) spectroscopy, including chemical-element mappings and electron microprobe analysis, as well as Fourier transform infrared reflection micro-spectroscopy (FTIR). PMID:26478376

  13. Enhanced Salt Removal by Unipolar Ion Conduction in Ion Concentration Polarization Desalination

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Kim, Bumjoo; Chen, Lan; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-01-01

    Chloride ion, the majority salt in nature, is ∼52% faster than sodium ion (DNa+ = 1.33, DCl− = 2.03[10−9m2s−1]). Yet, current electrochemical desalination technologies (e.g. electrodialysis) rely on bipolar ion conduction, removing one pair of the cation and the anion simultaneously. Here, we demonstrate that novel ion concentration polarization desalination can enhance salt removal under a given current by implementing unipolar ion conduction: conducting only cations (or anions) with the unipolar ion exchange membrane stack. Combining theoretical analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we elucidate that this enhanced salt removal can shift current utilization (ratio between desalted ions and ions conducted through electrodes) and corresponding energy efficiency by the factor ∼(D− − D+)/(D− + D+). Specifically for desalting NaCl, this enhancement of unipolar cation conduction saves power consumption by ∼50% in overlimiting regime, compared with conventional electrodialysis. Recognizing and utilizing differences between unipolar and bipolar ion conductions have significant implications not only on electromembrane desalination, but also energy harvesting applications (e.g. reverse electrodialysis). PMID:27158057

  14. Enhanced Salt Removal by Unipolar Ion Conduction in Ion Concentration Polarization Desalination.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Kim, Bumjoo; Chen, Lan; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-01-01

    Chloride ion, the majority salt in nature, is ∼52% faster than sodium ion (DNa+ = 1.33, DCl- = 2.03[10(-9)m(2)s(-1)]). Yet, current electrochemical desalination technologies (e.g. electrodialysis) rely on bipolar ion conduction, removing one pair of the cation and the anion simultaneously. Here, we demonstrate that novel ion concentration polarization desalination can enhance salt removal under a given current by implementing unipolar ion conduction: conducting only cations (or anions) with the unipolar ion exchange membrane stack. Combining theoretical analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we elucidate that this enhanced salt removal can shift current utilization (ratio between desalted ions and ions conducted through electrodes) and corresponding energy efficiency by the factor ∼(D- - D+)/(D- + D+). Specifically for desalting NaCl, this enhancement of unipolar cation conduction saves power consumption by ∼50% in overlimiting regime, compared with conventional electrodialysis. Recognizing and utilizing differences between unipolar and bipolar ion conductions have significant implications not only on electromembrane desalination, but also energy harvesting applications (e.g. reverse electrodialysis). PMID:27158057

  15. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  16. Effects of lithium salt concentration on graphited carbon microbead anodes in the piperidinium-based hybrid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Kun; Li, Shu-Dan

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: “Lithium aggregates” usually cause a significant decrease in Li{sup +} mobility and transfer efficiency. Therefore, as important as the problem of SEI, the content of lithium salt and the interaction between Li{sup +} and ILs’ anions should be taken into consideration in the optimization of ILs-based electrolytes for Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • “Lithium aggregates” in piperidinium-based electrolytes are evidenced by IR and NMR. • High LiPF{sub 6} content could decrease Li{sup +} mobility due to “ionic aggregates”. • Lithium salt concentration is an important factor affecting graphite performances. - Abstract: The variations in LiPF{sub 6} concentration lead to the very different electrochemical performances of carbon microbeads anodes in the piperidinium-based hybrid electrolytes. The “two peaks” behaviors of lithium plating observed in cyclic voltammetry tests, and some detailed changes in infrared spectra and nuclear magnetic resonance indicates that the formation of “ionic aggregates” related to lithium ions”. Therefore, the excessive lithium salts in the piperidinium-based hybrid electrolytes, usually cause a significant decrease in Li{sup +} mobility and transfer efficiency. The main behaviors are that, when LiPF{sub 6} concentrations increased from 0.2 to 1.2 mol kg{sup −1}, the apparent migration energies (E{sub a}) increase largely from 8.83 to 21.16 kJ mol{sup −1}, while the lithium transference numbers (t{sub Li{sup +}}) drop markedly from 0.538 to 0.292.

  17. Estimating Concentrations of Road-Salt Constituents in Highway-Runoff from Measurements of Specific Conductance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.; Smith, Kirk P.

    1999-01-01

    Discrete or composite samples of highway runoff may not adequately represent in-storm water-quality fluctuations because continuous records of water stage, specific conductance, pH, and temperature of the runoff indicate that these properties fluctuate substantially during a storm. Continuous records of water-quality properties can be used to maximize the information obtained about the stormwater runoff system being studied and can provide the context needed to interpret analyses of water samples. Concentrations of the road-salt constituents calcium, sodium, and chloride in highway runoff were estimated from theoretical and empirical relations between specific conductance and the concentrations of these ions. These relations were examined using the analysis of 233 highwayrunoff samples collected from August 1988 through March 1995 at four highway-drainage monitoring stations along State Route 25 in southeastern Massachusetts. Theoretically, the specific conductance of a water sample is the sum of the individual conductances attributed to each ionic species in solution-the product of the concentrations of each ion in milliequivalents per liter (meq/L) multiplied by the equivalent ionic conductance at infinite dilution-thereby establishing the principle of superposition. Superposition provides an estimate of actual specific conductance that is within measurement error throughout the conductance range of many natural waters, with errors of less than ?5 percent below 1,000 microsiemens per centimeter (?S/cm) and ?10 percent between 1,000 and 4,000 ?S/cm if all major ionic constituents are accounted for. A semi-empirical method (adjusted superposition) was used to adjust for concentration effects-superposition-method prediction errors at high and low concentrations-and to relate measured specific conductance to that calculated using superposition. The adjusted superposition method, which was developed to interpret the State Route 25 highway-runoff records, accounts for

  18. Complete genome sequence of Staphylococcus equorum KS1039 isolated from Saeu-jeotgal, Korean high-salt-fermented seafood.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Do-Won; Na, Hongjun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2016-02-10

    Staphylococcus equorum KS1039 was isolated from a form of traditional Korean high-salt-fermented seafood called Saeu-jeotgal, and exhibited growth at a NaCl (w/v) concentration of 25%. Comparative genome analyses with two other strains revealed the presence of two potassium voltage-gated channel genes uniquely in KS1039, which might be involved in salt tolerance. This first complete genome sequence of the species will increase our understanding of the genetic factors allowing it to be safely consumed by humans and to inhabit high-salt environments. PMID:26718562

  19. Precursor salt assisted syntheses of high-index faceted concave hexagon and nanorod-like polyoxometalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jaya; Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into five distinctive shapes through straightforward and indirect routes. Explicit regulation of the structural arrangements of ACM and CMOH has been studied in detail with altered precursor salt concentration employing our laboratory developed modified hydrothermal (MHT) method. Morphologically different ACM 3D architectures are evolved with higher molybdate concentration, whereas 1D growth of CMOH is observed with increased copper concentration. Interesting morphological transformation of the products has been accomplished employing one precursor salt at a time without using any other foreign reagent. It has been proven that large ACMs become labile in the presence of incoming Cu(ii) and NH4+ ions of the precursor salts. A new strategy for the conversion of faceted ACMs (hexagonal plate, circular plate and hollow flower) to exclusive CMOH nanorods through a Cu(ii) assisted reaction has been adopted. According to thermodynamic consideration, the synthesis of rare concave nanostructures with high index facet is still challenging due to their higher reactivity. In this study, concave hexagonal ACM with high index facet {hkl} has been successfully prepared for the first time from hexagonal ACM through simple etching with ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM), which is another precursor salt. Hexagonal ACM corrugates to a concave hexagon because of the higher reactivity of the {001} crystal plane than that of the {010} plane. It has been shown that high index facet exposed concave hexagonal ACM serves as a better catalyst for the photodegradation of dye than the other microstructures enclosed by low index facets.This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into

  20. High-Oxygen-Balance Furazan Anions: A Good Choice for High-Performance Energetic Salts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haifeng; Shi, Yameng; Liu, Yanfang; Yang, Jun

    2016-06-01

    3,4-Diaminofurazan was conveniently converted into energetic salts of 3,4-dinitraminofurazan that were paired with nitrogen-rich cations in fewer than three steps. Seven energetic salts were prepared and fully characterized by multinuclear ((1) H, (13) C) NMR and IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and elemental analysis. In addition, the structures of the ammonium salt (2), hydrazinium salt (4), hydroxylammonium salt (5), aminoguanidinium salt (7), diaminoguanidinium salt (8) and triaminoguanidinium salt of 3,4-dinitraminofurazan (9) were further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The densities of these salts were between 1.673 (8) and 1.791 g cm(-3) (5), whilst their oxygen balances were between -48.20 % (9) and -6.25 % (5). These salts showed high thermal stabilities, with decomposition temperatures between 179 (5) and 283 °C (6). Their sensitivities towards impact and friction were measured by BAM equipment to be between <1 J (9) and >40 J (6-8) and 64 N (9) and >360 N (6), respectively. The detonation performance of these compounds, which was calculated by using the EXPLO5 program, revealed detonation pressures of between 28.0 (6) and 40.5 GPa (5) and detonation velocities of between 8404 (6) and 9407 m s(-1) (5). PMID:26956777

  1. Separation, concentration and determination of trace chloramphenicol in shrimp from different waters by using polyoxyethylene lauryl ether-salt aqueous two-phase system coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Yao, Hui; Li, Chuang; Han, Juan; Tan, Zhenjiang; Yan, Yongsheng

    2016-02-01

    Polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (POELE10)-NaH2PO4 aqueous two-phase extraction system (ATPES) is coupled with HPLC to analyze chloramphenicol (CAP) in aquatic product. Response surface methodology (RSM) was adopted in the multi-factor experiment to determine the optimized conditions. The extraction efficiency of CAP (E%) is up to 99.42% under the optimal conditions, namely, the concentration of NaH2PO4, the concentration of POELE10, pH and temperature were 0.186 g · mL(-1), 0.033 g · mL(-1), 3.8 and 25 °C respectively. The optimal value of enrichment factor of CAP (F) was 22.56 when the concentration of NaH2PO4 was 0.192 g · mL(-1), the concentration of POELE10 was 0.024 g/ml, pH was 4.2 and temperature was 30 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of this method are 0.8 μg · kg(-1) and 1 μg · kg(-1), which meet the needs of determining trace or ultratrace CAP in food. The E% and F of this technique are much better than other extraction methods. PMID:26304334

  2. Potentials and problems of sustainable irrigation with water high in salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Gal, Alon

    2015-04-01

    Water scarcity and need to expand agricultural productivity have led to ever growing utilization of poor quality water for irrigation of crops. Almost in all cases, marginal or alternative water sources for irrigation contain relatively high concentrations of dissolved salts. When salts are present, irrigation water management, especially in the dry regions where water requirements are highest, must consider leaching in addition to crop evapotranspiration requirements. Leaching requirements for agronomic success are calculable and functions of climate, soil, and very critically, of crop sensitivity and the actual salinity of the irrigation water. The more sensitive the crop and more saline the water, the higher the agronomic cost and the greater the quantitative need for leaching. Israel is a forerunner in large-scale utilization of poor quality water for irrigation and can be used as a case study looking at long term repercussions of policy alternatively encouraging irrigation with recycled water or brackish groundwater. In cases studied in desert conditions of Israel, as much of half of the water applied to crops including bell peppers in greenhouses and date palms is actually used to leach salts from the root zone. The excess water used to leach salts and maintain agronomic and economic success when irrigating with water containing salts can become an environmental hazard, especially in dry areas where natural drainage is non-existent. The leachate often contains not only salts but also agrochemicals including nutrients, and natural contaminants can be picked up and transported as well. This leachate passes beyond the root zone and eventually reaches ground or surface water resources. This, together with evidence of ongoing increases in sodium content of fresh produce and increased SAR levels of soils, suggest that the current policy and practice in Israel of utilization of high amounts of low quality irrigation water is inherently non- sustainable. Current

  3. Impacts of upwind wildfire emissions on CO, CO2, and PM2.5 concentrations in Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallia, D. V.; Lin, J. C.; Urbanski, S.; Ehleringer, J.; Nehrkorn, T.

    2015-01-01

    burning is known to contribute large quantities of CO2, CO, and PM2.5 to the atmosphere. Biomass burning not only affects the area in the vicinity of fire but may also impact the air quality far downwind from the fire. The 2007 and 2012 western U.S. wildfire seasons were characterized by significant wildfire activity across much of the Intermountain West and California. In this study, we determined the locations of wildfire-derived emissions and their aggregate impacts on Salt Lake City, a major urban center downwind of the fires. To determine the influences of biomass burning emissions, we initiated an ensemble of stochastic back trajectories at the Salt Lake City receptor within the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model, driven by wind fields from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The trajectories were combined with a new, high-resolution biomass burning emissions inventory—the Wildfire Emissions Inventory. Initial results showed that the WRF-STILT model was able to replicate many periods of enhanced wildfire activity observed in the measurements. Most of the contributions for the 2007 and 2012 wildfire seasons originated from fires located in Utah and central Idaho. The model results suggested that during intense episodes of upwind wildfires in 2007 and 2012, fires contributed as much as 250 ppb of CO during a 3 h period and 15 µg/m3 of PM2.5 averaged over 24 h at Salt Lake City. Wildfires had a much smaller impact on CO2 concentrations in Salt Lake City, with contributions rarely exceeding 2 ppm enhancements.

  4. Precursor salt assisted syntheses of high-index faceted concave hexagon and nanorod-like polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jaya; Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2015-01-14

    This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into five distinctive shapes through straightforward and indirect routes. Explicit regulation of the structural arrangements of ACM and CMOH has been studied in detail with altered precursor salt concentration employing our laboratory developed modified hydrothermal (MHT) method. Morphologically different ACM 3D architectures are evolved with higher molybdate concentration, whereas 1D growth of CMOH is observed with increased copper concentration. Interesting morphological transformation of the products has been accomplished employing one precursor salt at a time without using any other foreign reagent. It has been proven that large ACMs become labile in the presence of incoming Cu(II) and NH4(+) ions of the precursor salts. A new strategy for the conversion of faceted ACMs (hexagonal plate, circular plate and hollow flower) to exclusive CMOH nanorods through a Cu(II) assisted reaction has been adopted. According to thermodynamic consideration, the synthesis of rare concave nanostructures with high index facet is still challenging due to their higher reactivity. In this study, concave hexagonal ACM with high index facet {hkl} has been successfully prepared for the first time from hexagonal ACM through simple etching with ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM), which is another precursor salt. Hexagonal ACM corrugates to a concave hexagon because of the higher reactivity of the {001} crystal plane than that of the {010} plane. It has been shown that high index facet exposed concave hexagonal ACM serves as a better catalyst for the photodegradation of dye than the other microstructures enclosed by low index facets. PMID:25500856

  5. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed. PMID:27121926

  6. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed. PMID:27121926

  7. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed.

  8. Ion Correlation and Transport in Polymer Electrolytes at Finite Salt Concentrations; Coarse-Grained Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Umi; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    We present results from coarse-grained simulation for ion dynamics and structures in dry polymer electrolytes. To capture the thermodynamic, kinetic, and system-specific aspects of ion solvation and clustering, cation-monomer complexation is modeled via functionalized physical bonds whose functionality and lifetime vary due to local availability of binding monomers and competition with Coulombic interaction. By varying salt concentration, cation-monomer binding energy, dielectric constant, and maximal functionality of the physical bonds, we systematically study the growth of ion clustering activity as characterized by packing structures, and associated changes in electric conductivity via single-ion and collective charge mobility. Deviations from Nernst-Einstein predictions, and comparisons with existing experiments for concentration dependence of conductivity will be discussed.

  9. Capacitive deionization coupled with microbial fuel cells to desalinate low-concentration salt water.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lulu; Yang, Xufei; Liang, Peng; Wang, Lei; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Wei, Jincheng; Huang, Xia

    2012-04-01

    A new technology (CDI-MFC) that combined capacitive deionization (CDI) and microbial fuel cell (MFC) was developed to treat low-concentration salt water with NaCl concentration of 60mg/L. The water desalination rate was 35.6mg/(Lh), meanwhile the charge efficiency was 21.8%. Two desorption modes were investigated: discharging (DC) mode and short circuit (SC) mode. The desalination rate in the DC mode was 200.6±3.1mg/(Lh), 47.8% higher than that in the SC mode [135.7±15.3mg/(Lh)]. The average current in the DC mode was also much higher than that of the SC mode. The energy stored in the CDI cell has been reused to enhance the electron production of MFC by the discharging desorption mode (DC mode), which offers an approach to recover the electrostatic energy in the CDI cell. PMID:22364771

  10. Deconvoluting the effects of buffer salt concentration in hydrophilic interaction chromatography on a zwitterionic stationary phase.

    PubMed

    West, Caroline; Auroux, Emeline

    2016-08-26

    Quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRRs) furnish a detailed and reliable description of the role and extent of different molecular interactions that can be established between the analytes and the chromatographic system. Among QSRRs, the solvation parameter model using Abraham descriptors has gained acceptance as a general tool to explore the factors affecting retention in chromatographic systems. We have previously shown how a modified version of the solvation parameter model, with two extra terms to take account of interactions occurring with ionic and ionizable species (with positive and/or negative charges), could be applied to the characterization of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic (HILIC) systems. In the present study, we will show how this methodology can be used to evaluate the effects of increasing buffer salt concentration on retention and separation in a HILIC system. A commercial stationary phase possessing a sulfobetaine zwitterionic bonded ligand (Nucleodur HILIC) was used with a mobile phase composed of 80% acetonitrile and 20% pwwH4 ammonium acetate buffer, with aqueous buffer concentrations varying from 10 to 100mM, resulting in overall concentrations ranging from 2 to 20mM in the mobile phase. Retention factors were measured for a selection of 76 probe analytes. The chosen compounds are small molecules presenting a wide diversity of molecular structures and are relevant to biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. The QSRR models obtained allow for a rationalization of the interactions contributing to retention and separation in the HILIC system considered and shed some light on the effect of varying buffer salt concentration, namely the progressive transition from ion-exchange and electrostatic-repulsion mechanisms to hydrophilic partitioning. PMID:27475992

  11. MICROSTRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE CONCENTRATES AND GELS WITH RAMAN AND INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nearly half of the high level radioactive waste stored at Hanford is composed of highly alkaline concentrates referred to as either salt cakes or Double-Shell Slurry (DSS), depending on their compositions and processing histories. The major components of these concentrates are wa...

  12. Reproductive parameters and oxidative stress status of male rats fed with low and high salt diet

    PubMed Central

    Iranloye, Bolanle O.; Oludare, Gabriel O.; Morakinyo, Ayodele O.; Esume, Naomi A.; Ekeh, Lucy C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deficiency of minerals and micronutrients has been reported to impair the process of spermatogenesis. Historically, salt has been used by women on their husbands to increase their libido, however, the role of salt diet on sperm parameters are yet to be ascertained. AIM: The present study was designed to determine the effect of low and high salt diet on sperm parameters, oxidative status and reproductive hormone levels of male rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 18 rats were divided into three groups: Group I: (control) received 0.3% salt diet, Group II: low salt (received 0.14% salt diet) and Group III: high salt (received 8% salt diet). All animals were treated for 6 weeks; after which epididymal sperm parameters; oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase) in the testes and epididymal tissues, as well as follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone levels were determined. RESULTS: The results showed decreased sperm count in the low salt diet rats while increased sperm count was observed in the high salt diet treated rats. Both low salt and high salt diet fed rats exhibited increased abnormal sperm cells and increased epididymal oxidative stress when compared with their respective control. FSH and testosterone levels were increased in the high salt fed rats while LH level was decreased when compared with the control values. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that both low and high salt diet play a negative role in the fertility of male rats. PMID:24672168

  13. Measurement of Atmospheric Sea Salt Concentration in the Dry Storage Facility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Masumi Wataru; Hisashi Kato; Satoshi Kudo; Naoko Oshima; Koji Wada; Hirofumi Narutaki

    2006-07-01

    concentration on the canister. In present, the evaluation on that point is not sufficient. In this study, the concentration of the sea salt particles in the air and on the surface of the storage facility are measured inside and outside of the building. For the measurement, two sites of the dry storage facility using the metal cask are chosen. This data is applicable for the evaluation on the SCC of the canister to realize the interim storage using the concrete overpack. (authors)

  14. A novel method of non-violent dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, A. R.; Prasad, M. V. R.; Ponraju, D.; Krishnan, H.

    2004-10-01

    A new technique of non-violent and fast dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt (MgSO4.7H2O) at room temperature (RT) has been developed. The dissolution process is mildly exothermic but could be carried out even in a glass beaker in air under swift stirring condition. The reaction products consist of mixed salts of MgSO4 and Na2SO4 as well as Mg(OH)2 which are only mildly alkaline and hence are non-corrosive and non-hazardous unlike NaOH. A 50 mL solution having Epsom salt concentration of 2 M was found to give the optimal composition for disposal of 1 g of sodium. Supersaturated (>2.7 M), as well as dilute (<1.1 M) solutions, however, cause violent reactions and hence should be avoided. Repeated sodium dissolution in Epsom solution produced a solid waste of 4.7 g per g of sodium dissolved which is comparable with the waste (4 g) produced in 8 M NaOH solution. A 1.4 M Epsom solution sprayed with a high-pressure jet cleaner at RT in air easily removed the sodium blocked inside a metal pipe made of mild steel. The above jet also dissolved peacefully residual sodium collected on the metal tray after a sodium fire experiment. No sodium fire or explosion was observed during this campaign. The Epsom solution spray effectively neutralized the minor quantity of sodium aerosol produced during this campaign. This novel technique would hence be quite useful for draining sodium from fast breeder reactor components and bulk processing of sodium as well as for sodium fire fighting.

  15. Dentin is dissolved by high concentrations of L-ascorbic acid 2-[3,4-dihydro-2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-6-yl-hydrogen phosphate] potassium salt with or without hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kozuka, Masahiro; Tsujimoto, Yasuhisa

    2004-06-01

    L-Ascorbic acid 2-[3,4-dihydro-2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-6-yl-hydrogen phosphate] potassium salt (EPC-K(1)) is a conjugate of vitamin C and vitamin E that is water-soluble and stable at room temperature. EPC-K(1) has been developed as a hydroxyl radical (.OH) scavenger and antioxidant. In a previous tooth whitening experiment, it was accidentally found that tooth (dentin) blocks were dissolved by EPC-K(1) with H(2)O(2). In the current study, high concentrations of EPC-K(1) (2.5, 25 mM) with 3% H(2)O(2) dissolved and caused the collapse of dentin blocks. Similar concentrations of EPC-K(1) without 3% H(2)O(2), however, dissolved the dentin blocks without collapse over a 3-week period. In these cases, a.OH-like signal was detected using an ESR spin-trapping method. The volume of calcium in solution (including the dentin block) increased on the addition of EPC-K(1) in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the calcium : phosphorus ratio changed from 2 : 1 in sound dentin to 1 : 2 in the collapsed dentin block. High concentrations of EPC-K(1) are therefore considered to have calcium chelating and dentin dissolving activity. The dentin dissolving activity was enhanced when EPC-K(1) was used with H(2)O(2). EPC-K(1) had no protective effect when used in tooth whitening with H(2)O(2). PMID:15187428

  16. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Development Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Flanagan, George F; Mays, Gary T; Pointer, William David; Robb, Kevin R; Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics and fully passive safety. This paper provides an overview of a technology development pathway for expeditious commercial deployment of first-generation FHRs. The paper describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. First-generation FHRs do not appear to require any technology breakthroughs, but will require significant technology development and demonstration. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, the development roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant; the lack of an approved licensing framework; the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials; and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

  17. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.; Tison, R. R.; Marianowski, L. G.

    1980-01-01

    The results of comparative screening studies of candidate molten carbonate salts as phase change materials (PCM) for advanced solar thermal energy storage applications at 540 to 870 C (1004 to 1600 F) and steam Rankine electric generation at 400 to 540 C (752 to 1004 F) are presented. Alkali carbonates are attractive as latent heat storage materials because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, low corrosivity, moderate cost, and safe and simple handling requirements. Salts were tested in 0.1 kWhr lab scale modules and evaluated on the basis of discharge heat flux, solidification temperature range, thermal cycling stability, and compatibility with containment materials. The feasibility of using a distributed network of high conductivity material to increase the heat flux through the layer of solidified salt was evaluated. The thermal performance of an 8 kWhr thermal energy storage (TES) module containing LiKCO3 remained very stable throughout 5650 hours and 130 charge/discharge cycles at 480 to 535 C (896 to 995 F). A TES utilization concept of an electrical generation peaking subsystem composed of a multistage condensing steam turbine and a TES subsystem with a separate power conversion loop was defined. Conceptual designs for a 100 MW sub e TES peaking system providing steam at 316 C, 427 C, and 454 C (600 F, 800 F, and 850 F) at 3.79 million Pa (550 psia) were developed and evaluated. Areas requiring further investigation have also been identified.

  18. Design and development of a high-concentration photovoltaic concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, R C

    1982-04-01

    The design and development of a high concentration photovoltaic concentrator module is discussed. The design concept described herein incorporates a curved groove domed Fresnel lens, a high concentration etched multiple vertical junction (EMVJ) solar cell and a passively cooled direct-bonded copper cell mount all packaged in a plastic module. Two seven inch diameter 1200x domed Fresnel lenses were fabricated using single point diamond turning technology. Testing at both GE and Sandia confirmed optical transmission efficiencies of over 83%. Samples of the latest available EMVJ cells were mounted and installed, with a domed Fresnel lens, into a prototype module. Subsequent testing demonstrated net lens-cell efficiencies of 10 to 13%. As a result of this program, salient conclusions have been formulated as to this technology.

  19. Development of high temperature transport technology for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Ho; Lee, Hansoo; Kim, In Tae; Kim, Jeong-Guk

    2013-07-01

    The development of high-temperature transport technologies for molten salt is a prerequisite and a key issue in the industrialization of pyro-reprocessing for advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The solution of a molten salt centrifugal pump was discarded because of the high corrosion power of a high temperature molten salt, so the suction pump solution was selected. An apparatus for salt transport experiments by suction was designed and tested using LiC-KCl eutectic salt. The experimental results of lab-scale molten salt transport by suction showed a 99.5% transport rate (ratio of transported salt to total salt) under a vacuum range of 100 mtorr - 10 torr at 500 Celsius degrees. The suction system has been integrated to the PRIDE (pyroprocessing integrated inactive demonstration) facility that is a demonstrator using non-irradiated materials (natural uranium and surrogate materials). The performance of the suction pump for the transport of molten salts has been confirmed.

  20. Concentrating Solar Power - Molten Salt Pump Development, Final Technical Report (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael McDowell; Alan Schwartz

    2010-03-31

    The purpose of this project is to develop a long shafted pump to operate at high temperatures for the purpose of producing energy with renewable resources. In Phase I of this three phase project we developed molten salt pump requirements, evaluated existing hardware designs for necessary modifications, developed a preliminary design of the pump concept, and developed refined cost estimates for Phase II and Phase III of the project. The decision has been made not to continue the project into Phases II and III. There is an ever increasing world-wide demand for sources of energy. With only a limited supply of fossil fuels, and with the costs to obtain and produce those fuels increasing, sources of renewable energy must be found. Currently, capturing the sun's energy is expensive compared to heritage fossil fuel energy production. However, there are government requirements on Industry to increase the amount of energy generated from renewable resources. The objective of this project is to design, build and test a long-shafted, molten salt pump. This is the type of pump necessary for a molten salt thermal storage system in a commercial-scale solar trough plant. This project is under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program, managed by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. To reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and to meet the requirements of 'tomorrows' demand, technical innovations are needed. The DOE is committed to reducing the LCOE to 7-10 cents/kWh by 2015, and to 5-7 cents/kWh by 2020. To accomplish these goals, the performance envelope for commercial use of long-shafted molten salt pumps must be expanded. The intent of this project is to verify acceptable operation of pump components in the type of molten salt (thermal storage medium) used in commercial power plants today. Field testing will be necessary to verify the integrity of the pump design, and thus reduce the risk to industry. While the primary goal is to

  1. Protein-protein and protein-salt interactions in aqueous protein solutions containing concentrated electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.A.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1998-01-05

    Protein-protein and protein-salt interactions have been obtained for ovalbumin in solutions of ammonium sulfate and for lysozyme in solutions of ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, potassium isothiocyanate, and potassium chloride. The two-body interactions between ovalbumin molecules in concentrated ammonium-sulfate solutions can be described by the DLVO potentials plus a potential that accounts for the decrease in free volume available to the protein due to the presence of the salt ions. The interaction between ovalbumin and ammonium sulfate is unfavorable, reflecting the kosmotropic nature of sulfate anions. Lysozyme-lysozyme interactions cannot be described by the above potentials because anion binding to lysozyme alters these interactions. Lysozyme-isothiocyanate complexes are strongly attractive due to electrostatic interactions resulting from bridging by the isothiocyanate ion. Lysozyme-lysozyme interactions in sulfate solutions are more repulsive than expected, possibly resulting from a larger excluded volume of a lysozyme-sulfate bound complex or perhaps, hydration forces between the lysozyme-sulfate complexes.

  2. Electroviscous effect of concentrated suspensions in salt-free media: water dissociation and CO2 influence.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Reina, Emilio; Carrique, Félix

    2010-05-15

    The electroviscous effect of realistic salt-free colloidal suspensions is analyzed theoretically. We study the influence on the electroviscous coefficient of the surface charge density and the particle volume fraction. By realistic salt-free colloidal suspensions we mean aqueous suspensions which have been deionized as far as possible without any electrolyte added during the preparation, in which the only ions present can be (i) the so-called added counterions, coming from the ionization of surface groups and thus counterbalancing the surface charge, (ii) the H(+) and OH(-) ions from water dissociation, and (iii) the ions produced by the atmospheric CO(2) contamination. Our model is elaborated in the framework of a classical mean-field theory, using the spherical cell model approach and the appropriate local equilibrium reactions. It is valid for arbitrary surface charge density and particle concentrations. We have also made a new interpretation of the electroviscous coefficient: the electroviscous coefficient p of the suspension is the ratio between the electrohydrodynamic and the pure hydrodynamic contributions to the specific viscosity of the suspension. The numerical results show that it is necessary to consider the water dissociation influence for volume fractions lower than approximately 10(-3), whereas the atmospheric contamination, if the suspensions are open to the atmosphere, is important in the region of volume fractions φ<0.03. PMID:20231023

  3. Europium doped lanthanum zirconate nanoparticles with high concentration quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Alaparthi, Suresh B.; Lu, Long; Tian, Yue; Mao, Yuanbing

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Eu:La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} nanoparticles were prepared facilely by a kinetically modified molten salt method. • High color purity and concentration quenching were achieved in these La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu nanoparticles. • Concentration quenching mechanism was discussed for Eu{sup 3+} in these Eu:La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} nanoparticles. - Abstract: A series of Eu{sup 3+} doped lanthanum zirconate (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) nanoparticles (NPs, 20 ± 5 nm in diameter) with cubic fluorite structure were facilely synthesized by a kinetically modified molten salt synthetic (MSS) process and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and photoluminescence spectra (PL). Under the excitation of 405 nm, intense red emission with high color purity can be observed in the Eu{sup 3+} doped La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} NPs. Moreover, the as-prepared Eu:La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} NPs possess high concentration quenching, which is as high as ∼32.5 mol% of europium dopants in the La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} host. The corresponding concentration quenching mechanism was discussed as well. Our results confirm that the kinetically modified MSS process is a promising approach for preparing rare earth (RE) ions doped A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} nanoparticles with uniform RE doping and high concentration quenching.

  4. Infrared spectroscopy of aqueous ionic salt mixtures at low concentrations: ion pairing in water.

    PubMed

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2007-09-21

    The analysis by infrared spectroscopy of aqueous mixtures of NaI and CsCl was made in order to obtain information at the molecular level of the mixing of these two salts taken as model systems of strong electrolytes in water. In previous papers [J.-J. Max and C. Chapados, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 2664 (2001) and J.-J. Max et al., ibid. 126, 184507 (2007)] it was reported that a pure salt in water forms pairs of monoions to which are attached a fixed number of water molecules, giving solvated water species. Due to their interaction with the ion pairs, the solvated water molecules are strongly perturbed, modifying the IR water spectrum being monitored. After taking the IR spectrum of pure water, a small volume of NaI 2M was added and the IR spectrum taken. Then a small volume of CsCl 2M was added and a new IR spectrum taken. This procedure was repeated to obtain a series of 38 spectra in the 0.05M-0.83M concentration range. Factor analysis made on the series revealed the presence of three types of water: pure water and two salt solvated waters. The number of solvated water molecules on the two salts taken together is ten. Since NaI and CsCl have, respectively, 3.5 and 3.0 solvated water molecules, it was concluded that a reaction occurred in the solutions forming NaCl and CsI that have, respectively, five water molecules each for a total of ten. The analysis of the spectra of the orthogonal factors supports this attribution. These results provide additional proof of ion pairing in water. Furthermore, comparing the band displacements and intensity variations observed on the solvated water species to that of pure water indicates that the dielectric milieu surrounding the ion pairs is not constant. These results do not support the classical view of Debye-Huckel that considers that the ions are independent and the dielectric milieu constant. The present results give some in situ information on the reaction that goes on in "simple" electrolyte systems whose reactivity and

  5. The role of dietary calcium concentration in the use of anionic salts to prevent parturient paresis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gelfert, Carl-Christian; Staufenbiel, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The role of dietary calcium concentration during the feeding of anionic salts (AS) was reviewed. Hypocalcaemia is still the major cause of parturient paresis in dairy cows. Feeding AS is an established method for preventing severe hypocalcaemia by activating the calcium metabolism in the last two to three weeks before parturition by inducing a metabolic acidosis. In compensation for this acidosis, the organism increases the concentrations of ionised Ca [Ca2+] in the blood. This increase leads to an increasing excretion of calcium via the urine, which is ensued by an increased calcium absorption in the intestine. The ongoing metabolic acidosis changed the flux of Ca. The size of the Ca pool, however, remained unchanged. As the calcium metabolism is activated by AS, it seems necessary to increase the amount of calcium that is fed to the cows. Several studies examined the impact of different dietary calcium concentrations on the acid-base balance and the calcium metabolism in cows fed anionic salts. The study designs vary concerning the amounts of calcium fed and the use of pregnant or non-pregnant cows. Only one study combined the feeding of AS with a very low amount of calcium, which fell below the daily requirements of pregnant cows in the last three weeks before parturition. In this study, the calcium balance post partum was better in the cows that were administered AS and a high calcium diet. In the other studies, the amount of calcium in the different experimental groups and the difference between the amounts of calcium fed varied greatly. As far as it was monitored in the studies, the calcium concentration of the diet did not have a significant impact on the degree of acidosis induced by AS. In pregnant cows, no significant differences in the calcium concentration in serum or urine occurred before parturition. Some of the researchers found a lower incidence of parturient paresis when cows were fed a combination of AS and a higher amount of calcium, but some

  6. DNA duplex length and salt concentration dependence of enthalpy-entropy compensation parameters for DNA melting.

    PubMed

    Starikov, E B; Nordén, Bengt

    2009-08-20

    Systematical differential calorimetry experiments on DNA oligomers with different lengths and placed in water solutions with various added salt concentrations may, in principle, unravel important information about the structure and dynamics of the DNA and their water-counterion surrounding. With this in mind, to reinterpret the most recent results of calorimetric experiments on DNA oligomers of such a kind, the recent enthalpy-entropy compensation theory has been used. It is demonstrated that the application of the latter could enable direct estimation of thermodynamic parameters of the microphase transitions connected to the changes in DNA dynamical regimes versus the length of the biopolymers and the ionic strengths of their water solutions, and this calls for much more systematical experimental and theoretical studies in this field. PMID:19719257

  7. Effects of temperature, concentration, and uranium chloride mixture on zirconium electrochemical studies in LiClsbnd KCl eutectic salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Robert O.; Yoon, Dalsung; Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies were performed to provide measurement and analysis of zirconium (Zr) electrochemistry in LiClsbnd KCl eutectic salt at different temperatures and concentrations using cyclic voltammetry (CV). An additional experimental set with uranium chloride added into the system forming UCl3sbnd ZrCl4sbnd LiClsbnd KCl was performed to explore the general behavior of these two species together. Results of CV experiments with ZrCl4 show complicated cathodic and anodic peaks, which were identified along with the Zr reactions. The CV results reveal that diffusion coefficients (D) of ZrCl4 and ZrCl2 as the function of temperature can be expressed as DZr(IV) = 0.00046exp(-3716/T) and DZr(II) = 0.027exp(-5617/T), respectively. The standard rate constants and apparent standard potentials of ZrCl4 at different temperatures were calculated. Furthermore, the results from the mixture of UCl3 and ZrCl4 indicate that high concentrations of UCl3 hide the features of the smaller concentration of ZrCl4 while Zr peaks become prominent as the concentration of ZrCl4 increases.

  8. Aqueous Copper(II) Photoinduced Polymerization of Acrylates: Low Copper Concentration and the Importance of Sodium Halide Salts.

    PubMed

    Jones, Glen R; Whitfield, Richard; Anastasaki, Athina; Haddleton, David M

    2016-06-15

    Photoinduced metal-mediated radical polymerization is a rapidly developing technique which allows for the synthesis of macromolecules with defined molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distributions, although typically exhibiting significant limitations in aqueous media. Herein we demonstrate that the presence of alkali metal halide salts, in conjunction with low copper concentration and UV irradiation, allows for the controlled polymerization of water-soluble acrylates in aqueous media, yielding narrow molecular weight distributions and high conversions. Despite the aqueous environment which typically compromises polymer end group fidelity, chain extensions have also been successfully performed and different degrees of polymerization were targeted. Importantly, no conversion was observed in the absence of UV light and the polymerization could be switched "on" and "off" upon demand, as demonstrated by intermittent light and dark periods and thus allowing access to spatiotemporal control. PMID:27184213

  9. Method of preparing highly purified kiln dried solar salt

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.L.; Hass, L.M.; Rose, D.L.

    1984-12-18

    Partially purified salt containing less than about 00.4 weight percent insolubles is further purified to reduce the insolubles until the milk pad rating is 3 or better for certain industrial uses and 1 for human consumption. The entry salt is washed in clarified brine to dislodge insoluble impurities adhered to the salt surfaces. The washed salt is then scrubbed with fresh water sprays to displace the wash brine from salt surfaces. The washed salt is drained and then dried in a kiln where flowing air blows away some impurities. The dried salt is passed through a magnetic separator, doubly sifted to remove both large and small impurities, and, where food grade salt is required, passed through a color sorter that removes relatively dark impurities.

  10. Cold Flow as Versatile Approach for Stable and Highly Luminescent Quantum Dot-Salt Composites.

    PubMed

    Benad, Albrecht; Guhrenz, Chris; Bauer, Christoph; Eichler, Franziska; Adam, Marcus; Ziegler, Christoph; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-08-24

    Since the beginning of the 1980s, colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs) have been in the focus of interest due to their possible implementation for color conversion, luminescent light concentrators, and lasing. For all these applications, the QDs benefit from being embedded into a host matrix to ensure stability and usability. Many different host materials used for this purpose still have their individual shortcomings. Here, we present a universal, fast, and flexible approach for the direct incorporation of a wide range of QDs into inorganic ionic crystals using cold flow. The QD solution is mixed with a finely milled salt, followed by the removal of the solvent under vacuum. Under high pressure (GPa), the salt powder loaded with QDs transforms into transparent pellets. This effect is well-known for many inorganic salts (e.g., KCl, KBr, KI, NaCl, CsI, AgCl) from, e.g., sample preparation for IR spectroscopy. With this approach, we are able to obtain strongly luminescent QD-salt composites, have precise control over the loading, and provide a chemically robust matrix ensuring long-term stability of the embedded QDs. Furthermore, we show the photo-, chemical, and thermal stability of the composite materials and their use as color conversion layers for a white light-emitting diode (w-LED). The method presented can potentially be used for all kinds of nanoparticles synthesized in organic as well as in aqueous media. PMID:27482755

  11. Photoactive bile salts with critical micellar concentration in the micromolar range.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Mendoza, Miguel; Marin, M Luisa; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-05-14

    The aggregation behavior of bile salts is strongly dependent on the number of hydroxyl groups. Thus, cholic acid (CA), with three hydroxyls, starts forming aggregates at 15 mM, while deoxycholic, chenodeoxycholic or ursodeoxycholic acids, with two hydroxyls, start aggregating at 5-10 mM; for lithocholic acid, with only one hydroxyl group, aggregation is observed at lower concentration (2-3 mM). Here, the singular self-assembling properties of dansyl and naproxen derivatives of CA (3β-Dns-CA and 3β-NPX-CA, respectively) have been demonstrated on the basis of their photoactive properties. Thus, the emission spectra of 3β-Dns-CA registered at increasing concentrations (25-140 μM) showed a remarkable non-linear enhancement in the emission intensity accompanied by a hypsochromic shift of the maximum and up to a three-fold increase in the singlet lifetime. The inflection point at around 50-70 μM pointed to the formation of unprecedented assemblies at such low concentrations. In the case of 3β-NPX-CA, when the NPX relative triplet lifetime was plotted against concentration, a marked increase (up to two-fold) was observed at 40-70 μM, indicating the formation of new 3β-NPX-CA assemblies at ca. 50 μM. Additional evidence supporting the formation of new 3β-Dns-CA or 3β-NPX-CA assemblies at 40-70 μM was obtained from singlet excited state quenching experiments using iodide. Moreover, to address the potential formation of hybrid assemblies, 1 : 1 mixtures of 3β-Dns-CA and 3β-NPX-CA (2-60 μM, total concentration) were subjected to steady-state fluorescence experiments, and their behavior was compared to that of the pure photoactive derivatives. A lower increase in the emission was observed for 3β-NPX-CA in the mixture, while a huge increase was experienced by 3β-Dns-CA in the same concentration range (up to 60 μM total). A partial intermolecular energy transfer from NPX to Dns, consistent with their reported singlet energies, was revealed, pointing to the

  12. Highly concentrated foam formulation for blast mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-12-14

    A highly concentrated foam formulation for blast suppression and dispersion mitigation for use in responding to a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersion device. The foam formulation is more concentrated and more stable than the current blast suppression foam (AFC-380), which reduces the logistics burden on the user.

  13. Comparison of the reaction of bone-derived cells to enhanced MgCl2-salt concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Burmester, Anna; Luthringer, Bérengère; Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium-based implants exhibit various advantages such as biodegradability and potential for enhanced in vivo bone formation. However, the cellular mechanisms behind this possible osteoconductivity remain unclear. To determine whether high local magnesium concentrations can be osteoconductive and exclude other environmental factors that occur during the degradation of magnesium implants, magnesium salt (MgCl2) was used as a model system. Because cell lines are preferred targets in studies of non-degradable implant materials, we performed a comparative study of 3 osteosarcoma-derived cell lines (MG63, SaoS2 and U2OS) with primary human osteoblasts. The correlation among cell count, viability, cell size and several MgCl2 concentrations was used to examine the influence of magnesium on proliferation in vitro. Moreover, bone metabolism alterations during proliferation were investigated by analyzing the expression of genes involved in osteogenesis. It was observed that for all cell types, the cell count decreases at concentrations above 10 mM MgCl2. However, detailed analysis showed that MgCl2 has a relevant but very diverse influence on proliferation and bone metabolism, depending on the cell type. Only for primary cells was a clear stimulating effect observed. Therefore, reliable results demonstrating the osteoconductivity of magnesium implants can only be achieved with primary osteoblasts. PMID:25482335

  14. Microbial population responses to pH and salt shock during phenols degradation under high salt conditions revealed by RISA and AFDRA.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bin; Wang, Ping; Liao, Wenchao; Ye, Qian; Xu, Meilan; Zhou, Jiti

    2013-01-01

    The responses of microbial community to pH and salt shock during phenols degradation under high salt conditions were revealed by two DNA fingerprint methods, i.e. ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) and amplified functional DNA restriction analysis (AFDRA), together with 16S rDNA clone library analysis. It was shown that the phenols removal rate was improved with increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 50 mg/L, and could remain at a high level even in the presence of 100 mg/L NaCl. The degradation efficiency remained stable under neutral conditions (pH 7.0-9.0), but decreased sharply under acidic (below pH 5.0) or more alkaline conditions (above pH 10.0). The community structure was dramatically changed during salt fluctuations, with Halomonas sp. and Marinobacter sp. as the predominant salt-tolerant species. Meanwhile, Marinobacter sp. and Alcaligenes faecalis sp. were the major species which might play the key role for stabilizing the treatment systems under different pH conditions. Moreover, the changes of phenol hydroxylase genes were analyzed by AFDRA, which showed that these functional genes were substantially different under any shock conditions. PMID:23202556

  15. Acute arrhythmogenesis after myocardial infarction in normotensive rats: influence of high salt intake.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Teixeira, Anna Késia Guerrat; Rodrigues, Sérgio Lamêgo; Mill, José Geraldo

    2012-03-01

    A high salt diet is a known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases that leads to cardiac hypertrophy and creates a substrate for arrhythmias and sudden death. However, acute arrhythmogenesis after infarction has not been studied. Male Wistar rats (21 days) received drinking water (MI) or 1% NaCl solution (MI-Salt-C) for 4 weeks. Water was given to another group for 4 weeks, and on the day before surgery, animals received a 1% NaCl solution (MI-Salt-A). Non-invasive systolic blood pressure (SBP) was obtained before surgery. Myocardial infarction (MI) was produced by permanent occlusion of the left coronary artery. Electrocardiogram was monitored during the first 30 min post-occlusion to evaluate arrhythmias. Although SBP was not altered by salt intake (SHAM: 114±2, MI: 112±2, MI-Salt-C: 115±2, MI-Salt-A: 116±4 mm Hg), ventricular hypertrophy was observed in the animals receiving chronic salt diet (SHAM: 0.22±0.008, MI: 0.23±0.007, MI-Salt-C: 0.28±0.01; MI-Salt-A: 0.23±0.01 g/cm; P<0.05). Ventricular premature beats increased in both salt-loaded groups compared to MI group (MI: 805±81, MI-Salt-C: 1145±98; MI-Salt-A: 1023±77; P<0.05). Atrioventricular blockade was only observed in animals subjected to high salt intake (MI-Salt-C: 38.9%; MI-Salt-A: 42.1%). High salt intake was associated with increased post-infarct arrhythmias; however, this effect was unrelated to ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:22142697

  16. Molten Salts for High Temperature Reactors: University of Wisconsin Molten Salt Corrosion and Flow Loop Experiments -- Issues Identified and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Matt Ebner; Manohar Sohal; Phil Sharpe; Thermal Hydraulics Group

    2010-03-01

    Considerable amount of work is going on regarding the development of high temperature liquid salts technology to meet future process needs of Next Generation Nuclear Plant. This report identifies the important characteristics and concerns of high temperature molten salts (with lesson learned at University of Wisconsin-Madison, Molten Salt Program) and provides some possible recommendation for future work

  17. Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco-Martin, Laura; Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we present FY2015 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This is a combined milestone report related to milestone Salt R&D Milestone “Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures” (M3FT-15LB0818012) and the Salt Field Testing Milestone (M3FT-15LB0819022) to support the overall objectives of the salt field test planning.

  18. Characterization of immunoglobulin adsorption on dextran-grafted hydrophobic charge-induction resins: Cross-effects of ligand density and pH/salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2015-05-29

    Hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography (HCIC) is a promising technology for antibody purification. New HCIC resins MMI-B-XL with dextran-grafted agarose gel as the matrix and 2-mercapto-1-methyl-imidazole (MMI) as the functional ligand were prepared with different ligand densities. The adsorption behaviors (static adsorption equilibrium and adsorption kinetics) of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) on series of MMI-B-XL resins at varying pHs and salt concentrations were investigated. The cross-effects of solid phase property (ligand density) and liquid phase conditions (pH and salt concentration) were focused. The results showed that the new resins had typical pH-dependent and salt-tolerant characteristics for hIgG adsorption, but differences were found for the resins with different ligand densities. For MMI-B-XL resins with higher ligand density, an obvious higher saturated adsorption capacity (Qm) and effective pore diffusivity (De) could be obtained, which were less affected at pH 7.0∼8.9 but dropped drastically at pH 5.0. Salt addition had less influence on protein adsorption onto MMI-B-XL with higher ligand density. Qm and De both reached minimum values at 0.2mol/L NaCl for all MMI-B-XL resins tested. The results of dynamic binding in the column demonstrated that MMI-B-XL with higher ligand density had better performance for hIgG adsorption, especially under high linear velocities. The mechanism of the cross-effects of ligand density and pH/salt concentration on IgG adsorption was discussed, which provides new insights into protein adsorption and mass transport for dextran-grafted HCIC resins. PMID:25892639

  19. Daily salt intake estimated by overnight urine collections indicates a high cardiovascular disease risk in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Hirohide; Yuasa, Motoyuki; Nedsuwan, Supalert; Moolphate, Saiyud; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Tsutomu; Minematsu, Kazuo; Tanimura, Susumu; Marui, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study (February 2012 to March 2013) was conducted to estimate daily salt intake and basic characteristics among 793 community-dwelling participants at high risk of cardiovascular disease (Framingham risk score >15%), who had visited diabetes or hypertension clinics at health centres in the Muang district, Chiang Rai, Thailand. We performed descriptive analysis of baseline data and used an automated analyser to estimate the average of 24-hour salt intake estimated from 3 days overnight urine collection. Participants were divided into two groups based on median estimated daily salt intake. Mean age and proportion of males were 65.2 years and 37.6% in the higher salt intake group (>=10.0 g/day, n=362), and 67.5 years and 42.7% in the lower salt intake group (<10.0 g/day, n=431), respectively (p=0.01, p<0.01). The higher salt intake group comprised more patients with a family history of hypertension, antihypertensive drug use, less ideal body mass index (18.5-24.9), higher exercise frequency (>=2 times weekly) and lower awareness of high salt intake. Among higher salt intake participants, those with lower awareness of high salt intake were younger and more often had a family history of hypertension, relative to those with more awareness. Our data indicated that families often share lifestyles involving high salt intake, and discrepancies between actual salt intake and awareness of high salt intake may represent a need for salt reduction intervention aiming at family level. Awareness of actual salt intake should be improved for each family. PMID:26965760

  20. High Iodine and Salt Intakes and Obesity do not Modify the Thyroid Function in Mexican Schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Villa, Lorena; García-Solís, Pablo; Solís-S, Juan Carlos; García-Gutiérrez, David Gustavo; Pérez-Mora, Valeria Alejandra; Robles-Osorio, Ludivina; Sampson-Zaldívar, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    Mexico is considered as a nutritional transition country with a high prevalence of overweight and obesity, and recent studies have reported a high iodine intake in children. Both high iodine intake and obesity have been associated with thyroid dysfunction. Our aim was to assess iodine and salt intake and thyroid function in Mexican schoolchildren with normal weight and obesity. A cross-sectional study was performed during 2012-2013 in schoolchildren from Queretaro, Mexico. Six hundred seventy-eight schoolchildren were evaluated to obtain nutrition status, urinary iodine concentration (UIC) and thyroid volume (TVol). The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 47.3 %, the median UIC was 428 μg/L and TVol was normal in all schoolchildren; however, obese girls had a higher TVol than normal weight at the age of 8, 10 and 12 years. A subsample of schoolchildren was divided in 6-8 and 9-12-year-old groups, in order to compare thyroid function (thyrotropin, free T4, and anti-thyroid antibodies); iodine and salt intake were estimated with 24-h urinary samples. No differences in thyroid function were observed in both age groups. In the 6-8-year-old group, obese schoolchildren had higher iodine intake than normal-weight children (415.5 vs. 269.1 μg/day, p < 0.05), but no differences in salt intake. In contrast, in the 9-12-year-old group, obese schoolchildren had higher salt intake than normal-weight children (6.2 vs. 3.8 g/day, p < 0.05), but no differences in iodine intake. Dietary patterns could explain the differences between both age groups. Further studies are needed to identify the main sources of iodine intake in Mexican populations. PMID:26689929

  1. In situ spatially and temporally resolved measurements of salt concentration between charging porous electrodes for desalination by capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Suss, Matthew E; Biesheuvel, P M; Baumann, Theodore F; Stadermann, Michael; Santiago, Juan G

    2014-01-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an emerging water desalination technique. In CDI, pairs of porous electrode capacitors are electrically charged to remove salt from brackish water present between the electrodes. We here present a novel experimental technique allowing measurement of spatially and temporally resolved salt concentration between the CDI electrodes. Our technique measures the local fluorescence intensity of a neutrally charged fluorescent probe which is collisionally quenched by chloride ions. To our knowledge, our system is the first to measure in situ and spatially resolved chloride concentration in a laboratory CDI cell. We here demonstrate good agreement between our dynamic measurements of salt concentration in a charging, millimeter-scale CDI system to the results of a modified Donnan porous electrode transport model. Further, we utilize our dynamic measurements to demonstrate that salt removal between our charging CDI electrodes occurs on a longer time scale than the capacitive charging time scales of our CDI cell. Compared to typical measurements of CDI system performance (namely, measurements of outflow ionic conductivity), our technique can enable more advanced and better-controlled studies of ion transport in CDI systems, which can potentially catalyze future performance improvements. PMID:24433022

  2. SiC Schottky Diode Detectors for Measurement of Actinide Concentrations from Alpha Activities in Molten Salt Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Windl, Wolfgang; Blue, Thomas

    2013-01-28

    In this project, we have designed a 4H-SiC Schottky diode detector device in order to monitor actinide concentrations in extreme environments, such as present in pyroprocessing of spent fuel. For the first time, we have demonstrated high temperature operation of such a device up to 500 °C in successfully detecting alpha particles. We have used Am-241 as an alpha source for our laboratory experiments. Along with the experiments, we have developed a multiscale model to study the phenomena controlling the device behavior and to be able to predict the device performance. Our multiscale model consists of ab initio modeling to understand defect energetics and their effect on electronic structure and carrier mobility in the material. Further, we have developed the basis for a damage evolution model incorporating the outputs from ab initio model in order to predict respective defect concentrations in the device material. Finally, a fully equipped TCAD-based device model has been developed to study the phenomena controlling the device behavior. Using this model, we have proven our concept that the detector is capable of performing alpha detection in a salt bath with the mixtures of actinides present in a pyroprocessing environment.

  3. Virus-host interplay in high salt environments.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Nina S; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2016-08-01

    Interaction of viruses and cells has tremendous impact on cellular and viral evolution, nutrient cycling and decay of organic matter. Thus, viruses can indirectly affect complex processes such as climate change and microbial pathogenicity. During recent decades, studies on extreme environments have introduced us to archaeal viruses and viruses infecting extremophilic bacteria or eukaryotes. Hypersaline environments are known to contain strikingly high numbers of viruses (∼10(9) particles per ml). Halophilic archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes inhabiting hypersaline environments have only a few cellular predators, indicating that the role of viruses is highly important in these ecosystems. Viruses thriving in high salt are called haloviruses and to date more than 100 such viruses have been described. Virulent, temperate, and persistent halovirus life cycles have been observed among the known isolates including the recently described SNJ1-SNJ2 temperate virus pair which is the first example of an interplay between two haloviruses in one host cell. In addition to direct virus and cell isolations, metagenomics have provided a wealth of information about virus-host dynamics in hypersaline environments suggesting that halovirus populations and halophilic microorganisms are dynamic over time and spatially distributed around the highly saline environments on the Earth. PMID:26929102

  4. ZIF-8 Derived, Nitrogen-Doped Porous Electrodes of Carbon Polyhedron Particles for High-Performance Electrosorption of Salt Ions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nei-Ling; Dutta, Saikat; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hou, Chia-Hung; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) ZIF-8 derived carbon polyhedrons with high nitrogen (N) content, (denoted as NC-800) are synthesized for their application as high-performance electrodes in electrosorption of salt ions. The results showed a high specific capacitance of 160.8 F·g−1 in 1 M NaCl at a scan rate of 5 mV·s−1. Notably, integration of 3-D mesopores and micropores in NC-800 achieves an excellent capacitive deionization (CDI) performance. The electrosorption of salt ions at the electrical double layer is enhanced by N-doping at the edges of a hexagonal lattice of NC-800. As evidenced, when the initial NaCl solution concentration is 1 mM, the resultant NC-800 exhibits a remarkable CDI potential with a promising salt electrosorption capacity of 8.52 mg·g−1. PMID:27404086

  5. ZIF-8 Derived, Nitrogen-Doped Porous Electrodes of Carbon Polyhedron Particles for High-Performance Electrosorption of Salt Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nei-Ling; Dutta, Saikat; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hou, Chia-Hung; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) ZIF-8 derived carbon polyhedrons with high nitrogen (N) content, (denoted as NC-800) are synthesized for their application as high-performance electrodes in electrosorption of salt ions. The results showed a high specific capacitance of 160.8 F·g‑1 in 1 M NaCl at a scan rate of 5 mV·s‑1. Notably, integration of 3-D mesopores and micropores in NC-800 achieves an excellent capacitive deionization (CDI) performance. The electrosorption of salt ions at the electrical double layer is enhanced by N-doping at the edges of a hexagonal lattice of NC-800. As evidenced, when the initial NaCl solution concentration is 1 mM, the resultant NC-800 exhibits a remarkable CDI potential with a promising salt electrosorption capacity of 8.52 mg·g‑1.

  6. ZIF-8 Derived, Nitrogen-Doped Porous Electrodes of Carbon Polyhedron Particles for High-Performance Electrosorption of Salt Ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nei-Ling; Dutta, Saikat; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hou, Chia-Hung; Wu, Kevin C-W

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) ZIF-8 derived carbon polyhedrons with high nitrogen (N) content, (denoted as NC-800) are synthesized for their application as high-performance electrodes in electrosorption of salt ions. The results showed a high specific capacitance of 160.8 F·g(-1) in 1 M NaCl at a scan rate of 5 mV·s(-1). Notably, integration of 3-D mesopores and micropores in NC-800 achieves an excellent capacitive deionization (CDI) performance. The electrosorption of salt ions at the electrical double layer is enhanced by N-doping at the edges of a hexagonal lattice of NC-800. As evidenced, when the initial NaCl solution concentration is 1 mM, the resultant NC-800 exhibits a remarkable CDI potential with a promising salt electrosorption capacity of 8.52 mg·g(-1). PMID:27404086

  7. Variable effects of parabrachial nucleus lesions on salt appetite in rats depending upon experimental paradigm and saline concentration

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Edward M.; Grigson, Patricia S.; Norgren, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bilateral lesions of the gustatory (medial) zone of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in the pons eliminate the salt appetite induced in rats by treatment with the diuretic drug, furosemide. The present studies re-examined NaCl intake of rats with PBN lesions induced by ibotenic acid, using multiple models of salt appetite. The impairment of a conditioned taste aversion, an established consequence of PBN damage, was used as an initial screen with which to assess the effectiveness of the lesions. Rats with PBN lesions did not drink either 0.3 M NaCl or 0.5 M NaCl in response to daily treatment with desoxycorticosterone acetate. These findings suggest that the excitatory stimulus of salt appetite mediated by mineralocorticoids is abolished by PBN lesions. In contrast, rats with PBN lesions drank some 0.5 M NaCl, and more 0.3 M NaCl, in addition to water in response to hypovolemia induced by subcutaneous injection of 30% polyethylene glycol solution. Those findings suggest that an excitatory stimulus of salt appetite, presumably mediated by angiotensin II, is not abolished by PBN lesions. These and other observations indicate that lesions of the gustatory PBN in rats may or may not eliminate salt appetite, depending on which model is used and which concentration of NaCl solution is available. PMID:23398436

  8. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600%C2%B0C with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  9. Assessment of the iodine concentration in table salt at the production stage in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Jooste, Pieter L.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the iodine content of iodized salt at the production stage, to assess the perceptions and knowledge of salt producers about the prevention and control of iodine deficiency, and to examine the internal quality control procedures used during iodization in South Africa. METHOD: Salt samples were collected for iodine analysis by titration from the 12 producers iodizing salt in South Africa. Information on the producers' knowledge of iodine deficiency disorders and on internal quality control was obtained by means of questionnaires. FINDINGS: The legal requirement of 40-60 ppm iodine was met in 30.9% of salt samples; 57.9% contained more than 30 ppm iodine; 34.8% contained under 20 ppm iodine. There were shortcomings in perceptions and knowledge about iodine deficiency disorders and in the internal quality control procedures of a substantial proportion of the producers. CONCLUSION: In order to encourage and support salt producers to achieve optimal iodization there should be an information, education and communication strategy aimed at improving knowledge of iodine deficiency disorders and at raising the standard of internal quality control procedures. External monitoring should continue. PMID:12973644

  10. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4- and IL-13-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N

    2015-11-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt-induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis. PMID:26485286

  11. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung-Sui; Geng, Lin; Skotheim, Terje A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

  12. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

  13. Long-term sodium chloride retention in a rural watershed: legacy effects of road salt on streamwater concentration.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Victoria R; Lovett, Gary M; Weathers, Kathleen C; Findlay, Stuart E G; Strayer, David L; Burns, David I; Likens, Gene E

    2008-01-15

    Sodium and chloride concentrations and export increased from 1986 to 2005 in a rural stream in southeastern New York. Concentrations increased 1.5 mg/L per year (chloride) and 0.9 mg/L per year (sodium), and export increased 33,000 kg/year (chloride) and 20,000 kg/year (sodium) during this period. We estimate that salt used for deicing accounted for 91% of the sodium chloride input to the watershed, while sewage and water softeners accounted for less than 10% of the input. Road salt use in the watershed did not increase during the study, but sodium and chloride from sewage and water softeners is likely to have increased slightly due to a small increase in population. Increased input from sewage and water softeners cannot account for the increase in concentration and export from the watershed. Model results suggest that the increase in streamwater concentration and export was likely due to a lag effect of long-term road salt use and subsurface buildup. PMID:18284139

  14. Effects of liquid VOC concentration and salt content on partitioning equilibrium of hydrophilic VOC at air-sweat interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Chu, Fu-Sui; Su, Tzy-I.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) must initially be absorbed by sweat on the surface of skin for human VOC dermal exposure. The partitioning equilibrium at the air-sweat interface is given by p=Cg*/C, where pc is the partitioning coefficient, and Cg* is the gaseous concentration in equilibrium with the aqueous VOC concentration ( CL) at a constant water temperature ( Tw). A series of thermodynamic functions of Cg*(C,T) are presented, as well as the values of pc, and the heat of gaseous-liquid phase transfer (Δ Htr) for tested VOCs, including iso-propanol (IPA, CL=12-120 mg L -1) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK, CL=10-80 mg L -1) to determine the effects of liquid VOC concentration and salt contents of sweat on pc of hydrophilic VOCs. Experimental data reveal that the pc values of IPA and MEK drop as the liquid VOC concentrations increasing from 10 to 120 mg L -1. However, sodium salt content in human sweat (sodium chloride and sodium lactate) induces the effect of salt, indicating the increase in pc. Notably, neither urea nor ammonia in human sweat increase pc. Artificial sweat, consisting of sodium chloride 0.47%, urea 0.05%, ammonia 0.004% and sodium lactate 0.6%, was used to evaluate the increase in the pc values of IPA and MEK. The liquid VOC concentration effect simultaneously develops together with the salt effect on the partition at the interface of air-sweat for hydrophilic VOC solutions. The pc values of IPA for artificial sweat decrease as much as 32.5% as CL increases from 12 to 120 mg L -1 at 300 K, and those of MEK drop by as much as 70.9% as CL increases from 10 to 80 mg L -1 at 300 K. This investigation provides a basis for elucidating the assessment of human dermal exposure to hydrophilic VOCs.

  15. High efficiency compound semiconductor concentrator photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, P.; Gregory, P.; Saxena, R.; Owen, R.; Moore, O.

    1980-01-01

    Special emphasis was given to the high yield pilot production of packaged AlGaAs/GaAs concentrator solar cells, using organometallic VPE for materials growth, the demonstration of a concentrator module using 12 of these cells which achieved 16.4 percent conversion efficiency at 50 C coolant inlet temperature, and the demonstration of a spectral splitting converter module that achieved in excess of 20 percent efficiency. This converter employed ten silicon and ten AlGaAs cells with a dichroic filter functioning as the beam splitter. A monolithic array of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells is described.

  16. Archaeal Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Displays Robust Activity under High-Salt Conditions and in Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Lana J.; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPAs) that hydrolyze inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) to orthophosphate (Pi) are commonly used to accelerate and detect biosynthetic reactions that generate PPi as a by-product. Current PPAs are inactivated by high salt concentrations and organic solvents, which limits the extent of their use. Here we report a class A type PPA of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii (HvPPA) that is thermostable and displays robust PPi-hydrolyzing activity under conditions of 25% (vol/vol) organic solvent and salt concentrations from 25 mM to 3 M. HvPPA was purified to homogeneity as a homohexamer by a rapid two-step method and was found to display non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Vmax of 465 U · mg−1 for PPi hydrolysis (optimal at 42°C and pH 8.5) and Hill coefficients that indicated cooperative binding to PPi and Mg2+. Similarly to other class A type PPAs, HvPPA was inhibited by sodium fluoride; however, hierarchical clustering and three-dimensional (3D) homology modeling revealed HvPPA to be distinct in structure from characterized PPAs. In particular, HvPPA was highly negative in surface charge, which explained its extreme resistance to organic solvents. To demonstrate that HvPPA could drive thermodynamically unfavorable reactions to completion under conditions of reduced water activity, a novel coupled assay was developed; HvPPA hydrolyzed the PPi by-product generated in 2 M NaCl by UbaA (a “salt-loving” noncanonical E1 enzyme that adenylates ubiquitin-like proteins in the presence of ATP). Overall, we demonstrate HvPPA to be useful for hydrolyzing PPi under conditions of reduced water activity that are a hurdle to current PPA-based technologies. PMID:26546423

  17. Effect of energy source, salt concentration and loading force on colloidal interactions between Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans cells and mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Diao, Mengxue; Nguyen, Tuan A H; Taran, Elena; Mahler, Stephen M; Nguyen, Anh V

    2015-08-01

    The surface appendages and extracellular polymeric substances of cells play an important role in the bacterial adhesion process. In this work, colloidal forces and nanomechanical properties of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. f) interacted with silicon wafer and pyrite (FeS2) surfaces in solutions of varying salt concentrations were quantitatively examined using the bacterial probe technique with atomic force microscopy. A. f cells were cultured with either ferrous sulfate or elemental sulfur as key energy sources. Our results show that A. f cells grown with ferrous ion and elemental sulfur exhibit distinctive retraction force vs separation distance curves with stair-step and saw tooth shapes, respectively. During the approach of bacterial probes to the substrate surfaces, surface appendages and biopolymers of cells are sequentially compressed. The conformations of surface appendages and biopolymers are significantly influenced by the salt concentrations. PMID:26057245

  18. Altered potassium ATP channel signaling in mesenteric arteries of old high salt-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Whidden, Melissa A.; Basgut, Bilgen; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Erdos, Benedek; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Both aging and the consumption of a high salt diet are associated with clear changes in the vascular system that can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease; however the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined whether aging and the consumption of excess salt alters the function of potassium ATP-dependent channel signaling in mesenteric arteries [Methods] Young (7 months) and old (29 months) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were fed a control or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 12 days and mesenteric arteries were utilized for vascular reactivity measurements. [Results] Acetylcholine-induced endothelium relaxation was significantly reduced in old arteries (81 ± 4%) when compared with young arteries (92 ± 2%). Pretreatment with the potassium-ATP channel blocker glibenclamide reduced relaxation to acetylcholine in young arteries but did not alter dilation in old arteries. On a high salt diet, endothelium dilation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced in old salt arteries (60 ± 3%) when compared with old control arteries (81 ± 4%). Glibenclamide reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation in young salt arteries but had no effect on old salt arteries. Dilation to cromakalim, a potassium-ATP channel opener, was reduced in old salt arteries when compared with old control arteries. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that aging impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, a high salt diet alters the function of potassium-ATP-dependent channel signaling in old isolated mesenteric arteries and affects the mediation of relaxation stimuli. PMID:27508155

  19. High Concentration Suspensions Under Strong Tidal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kineke, G. C.; Milligan, T. G.; Heath, K. M.; Law, B. A.

    2006-12-01

    An experiment investigating the influence of high-concentration suspensions of fine sediments (fluid muds) on a quasi-steady flow was carried out in the Petitcodiac River, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada in August 2006. Concurrent measurements of fluid properties (salinity, temperature, density), suspended-sediment concentration, current velocity and shear were made throughout the water column over portions of several tidal cycles. The Petitcodiac was chosen because of consistently high suspended-sediment concentrations (0.5- >200 g/L) and large tidal range (>4 m) producing strong current velocities (> 1.5 m/s). Thus the Peticodiac serves as an ideal natural flume for examining the behavior of muddy suspensions under both accelerating and decelerating flows. Instrumentation included a profiling package with paired electromagnetic current meters mounted 0.6 m apart, a CTD, and an Optical Backscatterance Sensor with a pump system for in situ calibrations. Approximately 1.5 hours after the passage of the tidal bore and a fully mixed turbulent flow, the water column begins to stratify and a high concentration bottom layer forms persisting through the ensuing ebb. Measured suspended-sediment concentrations reached 286 g/L at the bottom and low shear rates of 0.13 s-1 in the upper water column increased to ~0.5 s-1 through the lutocline 1 m above the bed, and decreased to approximately 0 within the fluid mud. Analysis is in progress and the data set provides an excellent means to test threshold conditions regarding suppression of turbulence by sediment-induced stratification and the carrying capacity of turbulent flows.

  20. Effects of imidazolium-based ionic liquids on the stability and dynamics of gramicidin A and lipid bilayers at different salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwankyu; Kim, Sun Min; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2015-09-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) dimers with bilayers, which consist of phospholipids and ionic liquids (ILs) at different molar ratios, were simulated at different salt concentrations of 0.15 and 1M NaCl. Bilayer thickness is larger than the length of a gA dimer, and hence lipids around the gA dimer are significantly disordered to adapt to the gA dimer, yielding membrane curvature. As the IL concentration increases, the bilayer thickness decreases and becomes closer to the gA length, leading to less membrane curvature. Also, ILs significantly increase lateral diffusivities of the gA dimer and lipids at 0.15M NaCl, but not at 1M NaCl because strong electrostatic interactions between salt ions and lipid head groups suppress an increase in the lateral mobility of the bilayer at high salt concentration. These findings help explain the conflicting experimental results that showed the increased ion permeability in electrophysiological experiments at 1M NaCl, but the reduced ion permeability in fluorescent experiments at 0.15M NaCl. ILs disorder lipids and make bilayers thinner, which yields less membrane curvature around the gA dimer and thus stabilizes the gA dimer, leading to the increased ion permeability. This IL effect predominantly occurs at 1M NaCl, where ILs only slightly increase the bilayer dynamics because of the strong electrostatic interactions between salt ions and lipids. In contrast, at 0.15M NaCl, ILs do not only stabilize the curved bilayer but also significantly increase the lateral mobility of gA dimers and lipids, which can reduce gA-induced pore formation, leading to the decreased ion permeability. PMID:26188795

  1. DOE High Performance Concentrator PV Project

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.; Symko-Davies, M.

    2005-08-01

    Much in demand are next-generation photovoltaic (PV) technologies that can be used economically to make a large-scale impact on world electricity production. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV) Project to substantially increase the viability of PV for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to both our energy supply and environment. To accomplish such results, the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices with the goal of enabling progress of high-efficiency technologies toward commercial-prototype products. We will describe the details of the subcontractor and in-house progress in exploring and accelerating pathways of III-V multijunction concentrator solar cells and systems toward their long-term goals. By 2020, we anticipate that this project will have demonstrated 33% system efficiency and a system price of $1.00/Wp for concentrator PV systems using III-V multijunction solar cells with efficiencies over 41%.

  2. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4– and IL-13–stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Binger, Katrina J.; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A.; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D.; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N.

    2015-01-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt–induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis. PMID:26485286

  3. Average concentration of soluble salts in leached soils inferred from the convective-dispersive equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The convective-dispersive, or advective-dispersive, or CDE, equation has long been the model of choice for solute transport in soils. Using the total mass of soluble salts in soil profile to evaluate changes in salinity due to irrigation can be beneficial when the spatial variability of soil salini...

  4. High-efficiency silicon concentrator cell commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, R.A.; Swanson, R.M.

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a forty-one month program to develop a commercial, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell and facility for manufacturing it. The period covered is November 1, 1990 to December 31, 1991. This is a joint program between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Sandia National Laboratories. (This report is also published by EPRI as EPRI report number TR-102035.) During the first year of the program, SunPower accomplished the following major objectives: (1) a new solar cell fabrication facility, which is called the Cell Pilot Line (CPL), (2) a baseline concentrator cell process has been developed, and (3) a cell testing facility has been completed. Initial cell efficiencies are about 23% for the baseline process. The long-range goal is to improve this efficiency to 27%.

  5. Thin photovoltaic modules at ultra high concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Higueras, Pedro; Ferrer-Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Shanks, Katie; Almonacid, Florencia; Férnández, Eduardo F.

    2015-09-01

    A new design concept of high concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) module is studied both by ray-tracing simulation and by building a prototype. This set-up is based on the idea of concentrating sunlight from different optical units to a single commercial multi-junction solar cell, which is located in a different plane than that of the primary optics (e.g. Fresnel lenses). A two-optical-unit set-up, as a first approach, is built and measured with the solar simulator "Helios 3198". These results are compared to the measurement results of the single-unit of one Fresnel lens and the same solar cell. The feasibility of this new design has been confirmed theoretically and practically.

  6. Assessment of Candidate Molten Salt Coolants for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.F.

    2006-03-24

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a novel reactor design that utilizes the graphite-matrix high-temperature fuel of helium-cooled reactors, but provides cooling with a high-temperature fluoride salt. For applications at temperatures greater than 900 C the AHTR is also referred to as a Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). This report provides an assessment of candidate salts proposed as the primary coolant for the AHTR based upon a review of physical properties, nuclear properties, and chemical factors. The physical properties most relevant for coolant service were reviewed. Key chemical factors that influence material compatibility were also analyzed for the purpose of screening salt candidates. Some simple screening factors related to the nuclear properties of salts were also developed. The moderating ratio and neutron-absorption cross-section were compiled for each salt. The short-lived activation products, long-lived transmutation activity, and reactivity coefficients associated with various salt candidates were estimated using a computational model. Table A presents a summary of the properties of the candidate coolant salts. Certain factors in this table, such as melting point, vapor pressure, and nuclear properties, can be viewed as stand-alone parameters for screening candidates. Heat-transfer properties are considered as a group in Sect. 3 in order to evaluate the combined effects of various factors. In the course of this review, it became apparent that the state of the properties database was strong in some areas and weak in others. A qualitative map of the state of the database and predictive capabilities is given in Table B. It is apparent that the property of thermal conductivity has the greatest uncertainty and is the most difficult to measure. The database, with respect to heat capacity, can be improved with modern instruments and modest effort. In general, ''lighter'' (low-Z) salts tend to exhibit better heat

  7. Deviations from Electroneutrality in Membrane Barrier Layers: A Possible Mechanism Underlying High Salt Rejections.

    PubMed

    Yaroshchuk, Andriy; Zhu, Yan; Bondarenko, Mykola; Bruening, Merlin L

    2016-03-22

    Reverse osmosis and nanofiltration (NF) employ composite membranes whose ultrathin barrier layers are significantly more permeable to water than to salts. Although solution-diffusion models of salt transport through barrier layers typically assume ubiquitous electroneutrality, in the case of ultrathin selective skins and low ion partition coefficients, space-charge regions may occupy a significant fraction of the membrane barrier layer. This work investigates the implications of these deviations from electroneutrality on salt transport. Both immobile external surface charge and unequal cation and anion solvation energies in the barrier layer lead to regions with excess mobile charge, and the size of these regions increases with decreasing values of either feed concentrations or ion partition coefficients. Moreover, the low concentration of the more excluded ion in the space-charge region can greatly increase resistance to salt transport to enhance salt rejection during NF. These effects are especially pronounced for membranes with a fixed external surface charge density whose sign is the same as that of the more excluded ion in a salt. Because of the space-charge regions, the barrier-layer resistance to salt transport initially rises rapidly with increasing barrier thickness and then plateaus or even declines within a certain thickness range. This trend in resistance implies that thin, defect-free barrier layers will exhibit higher salt rejections than thicker layers during NF at a fixed transmembrane pressure. Deviations from electroneutrality are consistent with both changes in NF salt rejections that occur upon changing the sign of the membrane fixed external surface charge, and CaCl2 rejections that in some cases may first decrease, then increase and then decrease again with increasing CaCl2 concentrations in NF feed solutions. PMID:26894470

  8. Novel, electrolyte solutions comprising fully inorganic salts with high anodic stability for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, RE; Han, R; Hwang, J; Gmitter, AJ; Shterenberg, I; Yoo, HD; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2014-01-01

    Herein the first inorganic magnesium salt solution capable of highly reversible magnesium electrodeposition is presented. Synthesized by acid-base reaction of MgCl2 and Lewis acidic compounds such as AlCl3, this salt class demonstrates upwards of 99% Coulombic efficiency, deposition overpotential of <200 mV, and anodic stability of 3.1 V.

  9. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  10. Bacterial Growth at the High Concentrations of Magnesium Sulfate Found in Martian Soils

    PubMed Central

    Crisler, J.D.; Newville, T.M.; Chen, F.; Clark, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The martian surface environment exhibits extremes of salinity, temperature, desiccation, and radiation that would make it difficult for terrestrial microbes to survive. Recent evidence suggests that martian soils contain high concentrations of MgSO4 minerals. Through warming of the soils, meltwater derived from subterranean ice-rich regolith may exist for an extended period of time and thus allow the propagation of terrestrial microbes and create significant bioburden at the near surface of Mars. The current report demonstrates that halotolerant bacteria from the Great Salt Plains (GSP) of Oklahoma are capable of growing at high concentrations of MgSO4 in the form of 2 M solutions of epsomite. The epsotolerance of isolates in the GSP bacterial collection was determined, with 35% growing at 2 M MgSO4. There was a complex physiological response to mixtures of MgSO4 and NaCl coupled with other environmental stressors. Growth also was measured at 1 M concentrations of other magnesium and sulfate salts. The complex responses may be partially explained by the pattern of chaotropicity observed for high-salt solutions as measured by agar gelation temperature. Select isolates could grow at the high salt concentrations and low temperatures found on Mars. Survival during repetitive freeze-thaw or drying-rewetting cycles was used as other measures of potential success on the martian surface. Our results indicate that terrestrial microbes might survive under the high-salt, low-temperature, anaerobic conditions on Mars and present significant potential for forward contamination. Stringent planetary protection requirements are needed for future life-detection missions to Mars. Key Words: Analogue—Mars—Planetary protection—Salts—Life in extreme environments. Astrobiology 12, 98–106. PMID:22248384

  11. Bacterial growth at the high concentrations of magnesium sulfate found in martian soils.

    PubMed

    Crisler, J D; Newville, T M; Chen, F; Clark, B C; Schneegurt, M A

    2012-02-01

    The martian surface environment exhibits extremes of salinity, temperature, desiccation, and radiation that would make it difficult for terrestrial microbes to survive. Recent evidence suggests that martian soils contain high concentrations of MgSO₄ minerals. Through warming of the soils, meltwater derived from subterranean ice-rich regolith may exist for an extended period of time and thus allow the propagation of terrestrial microbes and create significant bioburden at the near surface of Mars. The current report demonstrates that halotolerant bacteria from the Great Salt Plains (GSP) of Oklahoma are capable of growing at high concentrations of MgSO₄ in the form of 2 M solutions of epsomite. The epsotolerance of isolates in the GSP bacterial collection was determined, with 35% growing at 2 M MgSO₄. There was a complex physiological response to mixtures of MgSO₄ and NaCl coupled with other environmental stressors. Growth also was measured at 1 M concentrations of other magnesium and sulfate salts. The complex responses may be partially explained by the pattern of chaotropicity observed for high-salt solutions as measured by agar gelation temperature. Select isolates could grow at the high salt concentrations and low temperatures found on Mars. Survival during repetitive freeze-thaw or drying-rewetting cycles was used as other measures of potential success on the martian surface. Our results indicate that terrestrial microbes might survive under the high-salt, low-temperature, anaerobic conditions on Mars and present significant potential for forward contamination. Stringent planetary protection requirements are needed for future life-detection missions to Mars. PMID:22248384

  12. Water ingestion by rats fed a high-salt diet may be mediated, in part, by visceral osmoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Manesh, Reza; Hoffmann, Myriam L; Stricker, Edward M

    2006-06-01

    After surgical removal of all salivary secretions ("desalivation"), rats increase their consumption of water while eating dry laboratory chow. In the present experiments, desalivated rats drank even more water while they ate "powdered" high-salt food (i.e., <15-mg food particles). The Na+ concentration of systemic plasma in these animals was not elevated during or immediately after the meal, which suggests that cerebral osmoreceptors were not involved in mediating the increased water intake. A presystemic osmoregulatory signal likely stimulated thirst because the Na+ and water contents of the gastric chyme computed to a solution approximately 150 mM NaCl. In contrast, desalivated rats drank much smaller volumes of water while eating "pulverized" high-salt food (i.e., 60-140-mg food particles), and the fluid mixture in the gastric chyme computed to approximately 280 mM NaCl solution. These and other findings suggest that the NaCl ingested in the powdered high-salt diet was dissolved in the gastric fluid and that duodenal osmoreceptors (or Na+-receptors) detected when the concentration of fluid leaving the stomach was elevated after each feeding bout, and promptly stimulated thirst, whereupon rats drank water until the gastric fluid was diluted back to isotonicity. However, when rats ate the pulverized high-salt diet, much of the NaCl ingested may have been embedded in the gastric chyme and therefore was not accessible to visceral osmoreceptors once it emptied from the stomach. Consistent with that hypothesis, fluid intakes were increased considerably when desalivated rats drank 0.10 M NaCl instead of water while eating either powdered or pulverized high-salt food. PMID:16455760

  13. Swelling and Surface Interactions of End-Grafted Poly(2-vinylpyridine) Layers in Acidic Solution: Influence of Grafting Density and Salt Concentration.

    PubMed

    Elmahdy, Mahdy M; Drechsler, Astrid; Uhlmann, Petra; Stamm, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    In previous studies, the authors found that end-grafted layers of the weak polybase poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) in aqueous solutions do not only swell and collapse if the pH value and salt concentration are varied but also exhibit a pH- and salinity-dependent adhesion to microsized silica spheres. For a better understanding of these effects, in situ force measurements using the AFM colloidal probe technique were applied to end-grafted P2VP layers of different grafting densities in NaCl solutions at pH 2.5. Although a mushroom-to-brush transition could be seen in the dry state, the layers were in the brush regime in aqueous solutions at all NaCl concentrations and grafting densities. We observed an increase of the brush height with increasing grafting density and a salinity-dependent collapse and reswelling of the brushes. The adhesion between the P2VP layer and a silica sphere depended on both grafting density and salinity. At low salt concentrations, the adhesion reached its highest value at the intermediate grafting density and disappeared with denser brushes. Maximum adhesion was obtained for high NaCl concentrations and the lowest grafting density. From a detailed analysis of the experiments, we gained insight into chain stretching and density profiles under complex ionic conditions and into the mechanism of adhesion of polyelectrolytes to solid surfaces. PMID:27172173

  14. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-Yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na). PMID:26206316

  15. Design considerations for concentrating solar power tower systems employing molten salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2010-09-01

    The Solar Two Project was a United States Department of Energy sponsored project operated from 1996 to 1999 to demonstrate the coupling of a solar power tower with a molten nitrate salt as a heat transfer media and for thermal storage. Over all, the Solar Two Project was very successful; however many operational challenges were encountered. In this work, the major problems encountered in operation of the Solar Two facility were evaluated and alternative technologies identified for use in a future solar power tower operating with a steam Rankine power cycle. Many of the major problems encountered can be addressed with new technologies that were not available a decade ago. These new technologies include better thermal insulation, analytical equipment, pumps and values specifically designed for molten nitrate salts, and gaskets resistant to thermal cycling and advanced equipment designs.

  16. Rapid evolutionary adaptation to elevated salt concentrations in pathogenic freshwater bacteria Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Ketola, Tarmo; Hiltunen, Teppo

    2014-10-01

    Rapid evolutionary adaptions to new and previously detrimental environmental conditions can increase the risk of invasion by novel pathogens. We tested this hypothesis with a 133-day-long evolutionary experiment studying the evolution of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens bacterium at salinity niche boundary and in fluctuating conditions. We found that S. marcescens evolved at harsh (80 g/L) and extreme (100 g/L) salt conditions had clearly improved salt tolerance than those evolved in the other three treatments (ancestral conditions, nonsaline conditions, and fluctuating salt conditions). Evolutionary theories suggest that fastest evolutionary changes could be observed in intermediate selection pressures. Therefore, we originally hypothesized that extreme conditions, such as our 100 g/L salinity treatment, could lead to slower adaptation due to low population sizes. However, no evolutionary differences were observed between populations evolved in harsh and extreme conditions. This suggests that in the study presented here, low population sizes did not prevent evolution in the long run. On the whole, the adaptive potential observed here could be important for the transition of pathogenic S. marcescens bacteria from human-impacted freshwater environments, such as wastewater treatment plants, to marine habitats, where they are known to infect and kill corals (e.g., through white pox disease). PMID:25505519

  17. Land Use Change Impacts on Water, Salt, and Nutrient Cycles: Case Study Semiarid Southern High Plains, Texas, USA (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Gates, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Land use change can have large scale impacts on the salt and nutrient cycles by changing partitioning of water at the land surface, applying irrigation and fertilizers to the system, and transporting salts and nutrients to underlying aquifers. The objective of this study was to evaluate impacts of land-use change on salt and nutrient cycles by quantifying water fluxes and salt and nutrient inventories under natural ecosystems (3 boreholes) and rain-fed agroecosystem (19 boreholes) and irrigated agroecosystem (13 boreholes) in the Southern High Plains, Texas. Salt and nutrient inventories were estimated by measuring water-extractable anion concentrations in sampled boreholes and water fluxes were estimated using the chloride mass balance approach. Large salt inventories accumulated under natural ecosystems from bulk precipitation since the Pleistocene (median chloride: 2,200 kg/ha/m; perchlorate: 46 g/ha/m; sulfate: 5,600 kg/ha/m). Conversion of natural ecosystems to rainfed agroecosystems flushed these pre-existing salt reservoirs towards and into the underlying Ogallala aquifer as a result of increased recharge rates (median of 19 profiles: 24 mm/yr). The flushed zone of rain-fed profiles are characterized by extremely low inventories of salts (chloride: 15 kg/ha/m; perchlorate: 6.3 g/ha/m; sulfate, 750 kg/ha/m). Cultivation also resulted in mineralization and nitrification of soil organic nitrogen, creating nitrate reservoirs at the leading edge of the front that represent 74% of profile nitrate-N and that are being mobilized into the aquifer. Irrigation has the greatest impact on nonpoint source contaminants by adding salts and nutrients to the system. Chloride inventories under irrigated agroecosystems (median 1,600 kg/ha/m) are similar to those under natural ecosystems (median 2,200 kg/ha/m) but accumulated over decades rather than millennia typical of natural ecosystems. Peak Cl concentrations in profiles represent evapoconcentration factors of 12-42 relative

  18. High Salt Diets, Bone Strength and Mineral Content of Mature Femur After Skeletal Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Michael T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It is known that high salt diets increase urinary calcium (Ca) loss, but it is not known whether this effect weakens bone during space flight. The Bone Hormone Lab has studied the effect of high salt diets on Ca balance and whole body Ca in a space flight model (2,8). Neither the strength nor mineral content of the femurs from these studies has been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of high salt diets (HiNa) and skeletal unloading on femoral bone strength and bone mineral content (BMC) in mature rats.

  19. Using an aqueous two-phase polymer-salt system to rapidly concentrate viruses for improving the detection limit of the lateral-flow immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Jue, Erik; Yamanishi, Cameron D; Chiu, Ricky Y T; Wu, Benjamin M; Kamei, Daniel T

    2014-12-01

    The development of point-of-need (PON) diagnostics for viruses has the potential to prevent pandemics and protects against biological warfare threats. Here we discuss the approach of using aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) to concentrate biomolecules prior to the lateral-flow immunoassay (LFA) for improved viral detection. In this paper, we developed a rapid PON detection assay as an extension to our previous proof-of-concept studies which used a micellar ATPS. We present our investigation of a more rapid polymer-salt ATPS that can drastically improve the assay time, and show that the phase containing the concentrated biomolecule can be extracted prior to macroscopic phase separation equilibrium without affecting the measured biomolecule concentration in that phase. We could therefore significantly decrease the time of the diagnostic assay with an early extraction time of just 30 min. Using this rapid ATPS, the model virus bacteriophage M13 was concentrated between approximately 2 and 10-fold by altering the volume ratio between the two phases. As the extracted virus-rich phase contained a high salt concentration which destabilized the colloidal gold indicator used in LFA, we decorated the gold nanoprobes with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to provide steric stabilization, and used these nanoprobes to demonstrate a 10-fold improvement in the LFA detection limit. Lastly, a MATLAB script was used to quantify the LFA results with and without the pre-concentration step. This approach of combining a rapid ATPS with LFA has great potential for PON applications, especially as greater concentration-fold improvements can be achieved by further varying the volume ratio. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 2499-2507. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24942535

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF SALT CONTENT AT DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF TERASI TO THE SENSORY CHARACTERISTICS OF SAMBAL TERASI, THE CHILI SAUCE ADDED WITH TERASI.

    PubMed

    Ambarita, N T Damanik; De Meulenaer, B

    2015-01-01

    The type of terasi (the Indonesian seafood fermented paste) and the ingredients used can give sambal terasi (ST), the chili sauce added with terasi, its identity and taste distinction. Inherit from its production, salt content differs the flavor(s) of product added with terasi. This research explored the role of terasi salt content, either from the origin of terasi or by salt adjustment, to the products acceptability and sensory characteristics perceived during subsequent sensorial evaluations. Six types of terasi were characterized based on the proximate and salt content, and prepared as STs with and without salt adjustment at several terasi concentrations. 118 panelists conducted sensory evaluations for overall acceptability at 12.5% terasi; at lower concentration specific tastes (sweet, bitter, salty, sour, umami, fishy and rebon) were characterized by 80 panelists. Results showed that the acceptance of ST is more due to its innate origin salt content and to the suitability saltiness perceived. The specific odor of terasi, combining with other taste(s), when prepared at higher terasi concentration as practiced in restaurant, home and commercial products showed masking effect(s). After saltiness adjusted, different types of terasi showed different taste characteristics. Preferred ST were different between higher and lower concentration. Better tastes characteristics and stronger spices taste were found at lower salt content (and terasi concentration). PMID:26630752

  1. Diverse microbial species survive high ammonia concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Laura C.; Cockell, Charles S.; Summers, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Planetary protection regulations are in place to control the contamination of planets and moons with terrestrial micro-organisms in order to avoid jeopardizing future scientific investigations relating to the search for life. One environmental chemical factor of relevance in extraterrestrial environments, specifically in the moons of the outer solar system, is ammonia (NH3). Ammonia is known to be highly toxic to micro-organisms and may disrupt proton motive force, interfere with cellular redox reactions or cause an increase of cell pH. To test the survival potential of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed to such cold, ammonia-rich environments, and to judge whether current planetary protection regulations are sufficient, soil samples were exposed to concentrations of NH3 from 5 to 35% (v/v) at -80°C and room temperature for periods up to 11 months. Following exposure to 35% NH3, diverse spore-forming taxa survived, including representatives of the Firmicutes (Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Viridibacillus, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus) and Actinobacteria (Streptomyces). Non-spore forming organisms also survived, including Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas) and Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) that are known to have environmentally resistant resting states. Clostridium spp. were isolated from the exposed soil under anaerobic culture. High NH3 was shown to cause a reduction in viability of spores over time, but spore morphology was not visibly altered. In addition to its implications for planetary protection, these data show that a large number of bacteria, potentially including spore-forming pathogens, but also environmentally resistant non-spore-formers, can survive high ammonia concentrations.

  2. Downregulation of vascular soluble guanylate cyclase induced by high salt intake in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Kagota, Satomi; Tamashiro, Akiko; Yamaguchi, Yu; Sugiura, Reiko; Kuno, Takayoshi; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kunitomo, Masaru

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP)-mediated mechanism plays an important role in vasodilatation and blood pressure regulation. We investigated the effects of high salt intake on the nitric oxide (NO) – cyclic GMP signal transduction pathway regulating relaxation in aortas of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR).Four-week-old SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) received a normal salt diet (0.3% NaCl) or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 4 weeks.In aortic rings from SHR, endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to acetylcholine (ACh), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and calcium ionophore A23187 were significantly impaired by the high salt intake. The endothelium-independent relaxations in response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nitroglycerin were also impaired, but that to 8-bromo-cyclic GMP remained unchanged. On the other hand, high salt diet had no significant effects on the relaxations of aortic rings from WKY.In aortas from SHR, the release of NO stimulated by ACh was significantly enhanced, whereas the production of cyclic GMP induced by either ACh or SNP was decreased by the high salt intake.Western blot analysis showed that the protein level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was slightly increased, whereas that of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) was dramatically reduced by the high salt intake.These results indicate that in SHR, excessive dietary salt can result in downregulation of sGC followed by decreased cyclic GMP production, which leads to impairment of vascular relaxation in responses to NO. It is notable that chronic high salt intake impairs the sGC/cyclic GMP pathway but not the eNOS/NO pathway. PMID:11606313

  3. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K+ and SCN- ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  4. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-28

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K(+) and SCN(-) ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions. PMID:27250298

  5. Microbiology of solar salt ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javor, B.

    1985-01-01

    Solar salt ponds are shallow ponds of brines that range in salinity from that of normal seawater (3.4 percent) through NaCl saturation. Some salterns evaporate brines to the potash stage of concentration (bitterns). All the brines (except the bitterns, which are devoid of life) harbor high concentrations of microorganisms. The high concentrations of microorganisms and their adaptation to life in the salt pond are discussed.

  6. Process Heat Exchanger Options for Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-04-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  7. An elastic rod model to evaluate effects of ionic concentration on equilibrium configuration of DNA in salt solution.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Wang, Shengnan

    2014-03-01

    As a coarse-gained model, a super-thin elastic rod subjected to interfacial interactions is used to investigate the condensation of DNA in a multivalent salt solution. The interfacial traction between the rod and the solution environment is determined in terms of the Young-Laplace equation. Kirchhoff's theory of elastic rod is used to analyze the equilibrium configuration of a DNA chain under the action of the interfacial traction. Two models are established to characterize the change of the interfacial traction and elastic modulus of DNA with the ionic concentration of the salt solution, respectively. The influences of the ionic concentration on the equilibrium configuration of DNA are discussed. The results show that the condensation of DNA is mainly determined by competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of the DNA itself, and the interfacial traction is one of forces that drive DNA condensation. With the change of concentration, the DNA segments will undergo a series of alteration from the original configuration to the condensed configuration, and the spiral-shape appearing in the condensed configuration of DNA is independent of the original configuration. PMID:24691983

  8. Prokaryotic Community Diversity Along an Increasing Salt Gradient in a Soda Ash Concentration Pond.

    PubMed

    Simachew, Addis; Lanzén, Anders; Gessesse, Amare; Øvreås, Lise

    2016-02-01

    The effect of salinity on prokaryotic community diversity in Abijata-Shalla Soda Ash Concentration Pond system was investigated by using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing. Surface water and brine samples from five sites spanning a salinity range of 3.4 % (Lake Abijata) to 32 % (SP230F, crystallizer pond) were analyzed. Overall, 33 prokaryotic phyla were detected, and the dominant prokaryotic phyla accounted for more than 95 % of the reads consisting of Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes, candidate division TM7, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Euryarchaeota. Diversity indices indicated that operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness decreases drastically with increasing salinity in the pond system. A total of 471 OTUs were found at 3.4 % salinity whereas 49 OTUs were detected in pond SP211 (25 % salinity), and only 19 OTUs in the crystallization pond at 32 % salinity (SP230F). Along the salinity gradient, archaeal community gradually replaced bacterial community. Thus, archaeal community accounted for 0.4 % in Lake Abijata while 99.0 % in pond SP230F. This study demonstrates that salinity appears to be the key environmental parameter in structuring the prokaryotic communities of haloalkaline environments. Further, it confirmed that the prokaryotic diversity in Lake Abijata is high and it harbors taxa with low or no phylogenetic similarities to existing prokaryotic taxa and thus represents novel microorganisms. PMID:26408190

  9. Liver Fibrosis Can Be Induced by High Salt Intake through Excess Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Yeung, Cheung-kwan; Wong, Wing-Yan; Zhang, Nuan; Wei, Yi-fan; Zhang, Jing-li; Yan, Yu; Wong, Ching-yee; Tang, Jun-jie; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Wang, Li-jing; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-02-24

    High salt intake has been known to cause hypertension and other side effects. However, it is still unclear whether it also affects fibrosis in the mature or developing liver. This study demonstrates that high salt exposure in mice (4% NaCl in drinking water) and chick embryo (calculated final osmolality of the egg was 300 mosm/L) could lead to derangement of the hepatic cords and liver fibrosis using H&E, PAS, Masson, and Sirius red staining. Meanwhile, Desmin immunofluorescent staining of mouse and chick embryo livers indicated that hepatic stellate cells were activated after the high salt exposure. pHIS3 and BrdU immunohistological staining of mouse and chick embryo livers indicated that cell proliferation decreased; as well, TUNEL analyses indicated that cell apoptosis increased in the presence of high salt exposure. Next, dihydroethidium staining on the cultured chick hepatocytes indicated the excess ROS was generated following high salt exposure. Furthermore, AAPH (a known inducer of ROS production) treatment also induced the liver fibrosis in chick embryo. Positive Nrf2 and Keap1 immunohistological staining on mouse liver suggested that Nrf2/Keap1 signaling was involved in high salt induced ROS production. Finally, the CCK8 assay was used to determine whether or not the growth inhibitory effect induced by high salt exposure can be rescued by antioxidant vitamin C. Meanwhile, the RT-PCR result indicated that the Nrf2/Keap1 downsteam genes including HO-1, NQO-1, and SOD2 were involved in this process. In sum, these experiments suggest that high salt intake would lead to high risk of liver damage and fibrosis in both adults and developing embryos. The pathological mechanism may be the result from an imbalance between oxidative stress and the antioxidant system. PMID:26843032

  10. High-Salt Diets May Raise Heart Risks for Kidney Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159011.html High-Salt Diets May Raise Heart Risks for Kidney Patients ... heart attack, stroke in people who consumed more sodium daily To use the sharing features on this ...

  11. High-Salt Diets May Raise Heart Risks for Kidney Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159011.html High-Salt Diets May Raise Heart Risks for Kidney Patients ... heart attack, stroke in people who consumed more sodium daily To use the sharing features on this ...

  12. High Temperature Concentrated Solar Power Using Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Asegun

    One of the most attractive ways to try and reduce the cost of concentrated solar power (CSP) is to increase the system efficiency and the biggest loss in the system occurs in the conversion of heat to electricity via heat engine. Heat engines that utilize turbomachinery currently operate near their thermodynamic limitations and thus one of the only ways to improve heat engine efficiency is to increase the turbine inlet temperature. Significant effort is being devoted to the development of supercritical CO2 heat engines, but the most efficient heat engines are combined cycles, which reach efficiencies as high as 60%. However, such heat engines require turbine inlet temperatures ~1300-1500C, which is far beyond what is currently feasible with the state of the art molten salt infrastructure. In working towards the development of a system that can operate in the 1300-1500C temperature range, the most significant challenges lie in the materials and forming functional and reliable components out of new materials. One of the most attractive options from a cost and heat transfer perspective is to use liquid metals, such as tin and aluminum-silicon alloys along with a ceramic based infrastructure. This talk will overview ongoing efforts in the Atomistic Simulation and Energy (ASE) research group at Georgia Tech to develop prototype components such as an efficient high temperature cavity receiver, pumps and valves that can make a liquid metal based CSP infrastructure realizable.

  13. Effects of Buffer Salt Concentration on the Dominated Deposition Mechanism and Optical Characteristics of Chemically Deposited Cadmium Sulfide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakhaki, Z. Makhdoumi; Youzbashi, A.; Sangpour, P.; Kazemzadeh, A.; Naderi, N.; Bazargan, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Effects of buffer salt concentration on the rate of deposition, dominated deposition mechanism and subsequently the structural, morphological, and optical properties of cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) on glass substrate were investigated. The precursors were chosen to be cadmium chloride (CdCl2) as the cadmium source, thiourea (CS(NH2)2) as the sulfur source, ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) as the buffer salt and ammonia as the complexing agent and the pH controller. The influence of the NH4NO3 concentration on the structure, morphology, film uniformity, stoichiometry and optical properties of CdS thin films was also studied by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, uv-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopes. The XRD studies revealed that all the deposited films exhibited a (002)h/(111)c preferred orientation. The crystallite size was increased from 20nm to 30nm by the increase of concentration of NH4NO3 from 0.5M to 2.5M. The morphology of CdS thin films were agglomerated spherical particles consisted of smaller particles. The surface of thin films deposited at the NH4NO3 concentration of 0.5M was compact and smooth. The increase of the concentration of NH4NO3 decreased the packing density of the films. The optical band gap was in the range of 2.25-2.4eV, which was decreased by the decrement of packing density. The PL spectra showed two peaks centered at 400nm and 500nm which are attributed to violet and band-to-band emissions, respectively.

  14. Physical chemistry of highly concentrated emulsions.

    PubMed

    Foudazi, Reza; Qavi, Sahar; Masalova, Irina; Malkin, Alexander Ya

    2015-06-01

    This review explores the physics underlying the rheology of highly concentrated emulsions (HCEs) to determine the relationship between elasticity and HCE stability, and to consider whether it is possible to describe all physicochemical properties of HCEs on the basis of a unique physical approach. We define HCEs as emulsions with a volume fraction above the maximum closest packing fraction of monodisperse spheres, φm=0.74, even if droplets are not of polyhedron shape. The solid-like rheological behavior of HCEs is characterized by yield stress and elasticity, properties which depend on droplet polydispersity and which are affected by caging at volume fractions about the jamming concentration, φj. A bimodal size distribution in HCEs diminishes caging and facilitates droplet movement, resulting in HCEs with negligible yield stress and no plateau in storage modulus. Thermodynamic forces automatically move HCEs toward the lowest free energy state, but since interdroplet forces create local minimums - points beyond which free energy temporarily increases before it reaches the global minimum of the system - the free energy of HCEs will settle at a local minimum unless additional energy is added. Several attempts have been undertaken to predict the elasticity of HCEs. In many cases, the elastic modulus of HCEs is higher than the one predicted from classical models, which only take into account spatial repulsion (or simply interfacial energy). Improved models based on free energy calculation should be developed to consider the disjoining pressure and interfacial rheology in addition to spatial repulsion. The disjoining pressure and interfacial viscoelasticity, which result in the deviation of elasticity from the classical model, can be regarded as parameters for quantifying the stability of HCEs. PMID:25869114

  15. Responses of melanin-concentrating hormone mRNA to salt water challenge in the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Francis, K; Suzuki, M; Baker, B I

    1997-09-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a structurally conserved neuropeptide, produced in the hypothalamus of all vertebrates where it probably serves as a central neurotransmitter/neuromodulator. In teleost fish it is also a neurohypophysial hormone with peripheral effects on skin colour but its central effects are less well understood. In mammals, MCH mRNA abundance changes in response to salt-loading or dehydration, suggesting an involvement in salt or water balance. The present study has used in situ hybridization to investigate the response of the MCH neurons in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to progressive changes in ambient salinity. In trout, MCH perikarya are found in two hypothalamic sites: predominantly in the nucleus lateralis tuberis (NLT) and, to a lesser extent, in neurons above the lateral ventricular recess (LVR). Immersion in 50% salt water (SW) for 24 h had no effects on MCH transcripts, plasma osmotic pressure (OP) or cortisol concentrations, but after 24 h in 80% SW, plasma OP and cortisol were raised and MCH transcripts in the NLT were significantly increased (159% of controls, p < 0.01). LVR-MCH neurons remained unaffected. However, after 24 h in 100% SW, MCH mRNA was significantly reduced in both groups of neurons (NLT -62% of controls, p < 0.001; LVR -33% of control, p < 0.001). These responses were transient and were no longer apparent after 6 days in 100% SW, despite the fact that plasma OP and cortisol levels continued to rise. The relative importance of osmotic disturbance and stress on the differential responses of the 2 groups of MCH neurons to changing salinity is discussed, together with a consideration of the potential role of MCH in osmoregulation. PMID:9380277

  16. Piriformospora indica rescues growth diminution of rice seedlings during high salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Jogawat, Abhimanyu; Saha, Shreya; Bakshi, Madhunita; Dayaman, Vikram; Kumar, Manoj; Dua, Meenakshi; Varma, Ajit; Oelmüller, Ralf; Tuteja, Narendra; Johri, Atul Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Piriformospora indica association has been reported to increase biotic as well as abiotic stress tolerance of its host plants. We analyzed the beneficial effect of P. indica association on rice seedlings during high salt stress conditions (200 and 300 mM NaCl). The growth parameters of rice seedlings such as root and shoot lengths or fresh and dry weights were found to be enhanced in P. indica-inoculated rice seedlings as compared with non-inoculated control seedlings, irrespective of whether they are exposed to salt stress or not. However, salt-stressed seedlings performed much better in the presence of the fungus compared with non-inoculated control seedlings. The photosynthetic pigment content [chlorophyll (Chl) a, Chl b, and carotenoids] was significantly higher in P. indica-inoculated rice seedlings under high salt stress conditions as compared with salt-treated non-inoculated rice seedlings, in which these pigments were found to be decreased. Proline accumulation was also observed during P. indica colonization, which may help the inoculated plants to become salt tolerant. Taken together, P. indica rescues growth diminution of rice seedlings under salt stress.

  17. Effects of high fructose and salt feeding on systematic metabonome probed via (1) H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxia; Zheng, Lingyun; Wang, Linlin; Wang, Shumei; Wang, Yaling; Han, Zhihui

    2015-04-01

    Diets rich in high fructose and salt are increasingly popular in our daily life. A combination consumption of excessive fructose and salt can induce insulin resistance (IR) and hypertension (HT), which are major public health problems around the world. However, the effects of high fructose and salt on systematic metabonome remain unknown, which is very important for revealing the molecular mechanism of IR and HT induced by this dietary pattern. The metabolic profiling in urine, plasma, and fecal extracts from high fructose and salt-fed rats was investigated by use of (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics approach in this study. Multivariate analysis of NMR data showed the effects of high fructose and salt on the global metabonome. The metabolite analysis in urine and fecal extracts showed the time-dependent metabolic changes, which displayed metabonomic progression axes from normal to IR and HT status. The changes of 2-oxoglutarate, creatine and creatinine, citrate, hippurate, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), and betaine in urine, together with gut microbiota disorder in feces, were observed at the preliminary formation stage of IR and HT (fourth week). At the severe stage (eighth week), the previously mentioned metabolic changes were aggravated, and the changes of lipid and choline metabolism in plasma suggested the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. These findings provide an overview of biochemistry consequences of high fructose and salt feeding and comprehensive insights into the progression of systematic metabonome for IR and HT induced by this dietary pattern. PMID:25641270

  18. High temperature helical tubular receiver for concentrating solar power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Nazmul

    In the field of conventional cleaner power generation technology, concentrating solar power systems have introduced remarkable opportunity. In a solar power tower, solar energy concentrated by the heliostats at a single point produces very high temperature. Falling solid particles or heat transfer fluid passing through that high temperature region absorbs heat to generate electricity. Increasing the residence time will result in more heat gain and increase efficiency. A novel design of solar receiver for both fluid and solid particle is approached in this paper which can increase residence time resulting in higher temperature gain in one cycle compared to conventional receivers. The helical tubular solar receiver placed at the focused sunlight region meets the higher outlet temperature and efficiency. A vertical tubular receiver is modeled and analyzed for single phase flow with molten salt as heat transfer fluid and alloy625 as heat transfer material. The result is compared to a journal paper of similar numerical and experimental setup for validating our modeling. New types of helical tubular solar receivers are modeled and analyzed with heat transfer fluid turbulent flow in single phase, and granular particle and air plug flow in multiphase to observe the temperature rise in one cyclic operation. The Discrete Ordinate radiation model is used for numerical analysis with simulation software Ansys Fluent 15.0. The Eulerian granular multiphase model is used for multiphase flow. Applying the same modeling parameters and boundary conditions, the results of vertical and helical receivers are compared. With a helical receiver, higher temperature gain of heat transfer fluid is achieved in one cycle for both single phase and multiphase flow compared to the vertical receiver. Performance is also observed by varying dimension of helical receiver.

  19. Bone Density and High Salt Diets in a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, S. B.; Navidi, M.; Liang, M. T. C.; Wolinsky, I.

    1999-01-01

    High salt diets accelerate bone loss with aging in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis except when calcium supplementation is provided. We have observed that the decrease in mineral content of growing femurs in juvenile rats, exposed to a space flight model which unloads the hind limbs , is substantially less in animals fed excess salt. To determine whether excess dietary salt has the same effect on the skeleton of the mature animal whose response to unloading is increased resorption and bone loss rather than impaired growth, we carried out a metabolic study in mature rats with hindlimbs unloaded by tailsuspension.

  20. The Effects of Different Concentrations of Lead Salts on a Variety of Crop Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, Liz; Gibbon, Jamie; Hofgartner, Jon; Mason, Craig; Willmetts, Helen

    2003-01-01

    An investigation is described that would be suitable for A-level or first year degree Biology or Environmental Science students. Crop plants were grown in different concentrations of lead chloride and lead nitrate. French beans, carrots and Brussels sprouts were all inhibited at concentrations over 0.01 mol dm[superscript -3] showing stunted root…

  1. High-efficiency concentrator silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, R.A.; Cuevas, A.; King, R.R.; Swanson, R.M. . Solid-State Electronics Lab.)

    1990-11-01

    This report presents results from extensive process development in high-efficiency Si solar cells. An advanced design for a 1.56-cm{sup 2} cell with front grids achieved 26% efficiency at 90 suns. This is especially significant since this cell does not require a prismatic cover glass. New designs for simplified backside-contact solar cells were advanced from a status of near-nonfunctionality to demonstrated 21--22% for one-sun cells in sizes up to 37.5 cm{sup 2}. An efficiency of 26% was achieved for similar 0.64-cm{sup 2} concentrator cells at 150 suns. More fundamental work on dopant-diffused regions is also presented here. The recombination vs. various process and physical parameters was studied in detail for boron and phosphorous diffusions. Emitter-design studies based solidly upon these new data indicate the performance vs design parameters for a variety of the cases of most interest to solar cell designers. Extractions of p-type bandgap narrowing and the surface recombination for p- and n-type regions from these studies have a generality that extends beyond solar cells into basic device modeling. 68 refs., 50 figs.

  2. An Experimental Test Facility to Support Development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Aaron, Adam M; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A; Peretz, Fred J; Robb, Kevin R; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, Dane F

    2014-01-01

    The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 C) energy exchange and delivery systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system; trace heating system; and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed similar to that used for the core of the pebble bed advanced high-temperature reactor. This document describes the details of the loop design, auxiliary systems used to support the facility, the inductive heating system, and facility capabilities.

  3. Synthesis of high-molecular-weight polymer of methyl chloride salt of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate by radiation-induced polymerization at high pressure. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, I.; Okada, T.; Sasuga, T.; Takehisa, M.; Machi, S.

    1981-02-01

    Polymer of the methyl chloride salt of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and its copolymer with acrylamide are used as cationic flocculants for the treatment of waste water containing organic suspensions. As reported, radiation-induced polymerization is one of the most convenient methods because of its temperature independence of initiation and extremely large G-value. In general, a flocculant with higher molecular weight has larger flocculation effects. The high-molecular-weight products were prepared in high monomer concentration and a low dose rate. This paper concerns the polymerization and copolymerization of methyl chloride salt of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate at high pressure, up to 7000 kg/cm/sup 2/, providing high-molecular-weight cationic flocculants.

  4. Horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongcai; Wu, Lin

    2015-07-10

    We present the design of a horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications. This solar concentrator consists of an array of telecentric primary concentrators, a horizontally staggered lightguide layer, and a vertically tapered lightguide layer. The primary concentrator is realized by two plano-aspheric lenses with lateral movement and maintains a high F-number over an angle range of ±23.5°. The results of the simulations show that the solar concentrator achieves a high concentration ratio of 500× with ±0.5° of acceptance angle by a single-axis tracker and dual lateral translation stages. PMID:26193396

  5. Molecular basis of high viscosity in concentrated antibody solutions: Strategies for high concentration drug product development.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Effective translation of breakthrough discoveries into innovative products in the clinic requires proactive mitigation or elimination of several drug development challenges. These challenges can vary depending upon the type of drug molecule. In the case of therapeutic antibody candidates, a commonly encountered challenge is high viscosity of the concentrated antibody solutions. Concentration-dependent viscosity behaviors of mAbs and other biologic entities may depend on pairwise and higher-order intermolecular interactions, non-native aggregation, and concentration-dependent fluctuations of various antibody regions. This article reviews our current understanding of molecular origins of viscosity behaviors of antibody solutions. We discuss general strategies and guidelines to select low viscosity candidates or optimize lead candidates for lower viscosity at early drug discovery stages. Moreover, strategies for formulation optimization and excipient design are also presented for candidates already in advanced product development stages. Potential future directions for research in this field are also explored. PMID:26736022

  6. Ionic liquid-based electrolyte with binary lithium salts for high performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Zhu, Qizhen; Chen, Renjie; Chen, Nan; Chen, Yan; Ye, Yusheng; Qian, Ji; Li, Li

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable Li-S batteries have suffered several technical obstacles, such as rapid capacity fading and low coulombic efficiency. To overcome these problems, we design new electrolytes containing N-methoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide (Pyr1,2O1TFSI) and tri(ethylene glycol)dimethyl ether (TEGDME) in mass ratio of 7:3. Moreover, Lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate (LiODFB) is introduced for the modification. Although the addition of LiODFB as additive lead to extremely high viscosity of electrolyte and inferior performance of the cells, the electrolyte containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI, 0.84 nm) and LiODFB (0.60 nm) mixture with a total molar concentration of 0.4 mol kg-1 as binary lithium salt shows excellent electrochemical performance. The Pyr1,2O1TFSI/TEGDME electrolyte with LiTFSI/LiODFB binary lithium salts in mole ratio of 6:4 is obtained after optimizing ratio. The Li-S cells containing this electrolyte system show excellent capacity and cycle performance, whose initial discharge capacity is 1264.4 mAh g-1, and retains 911.4 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles with the coulombic efficiency more than 95%. It can be attributed the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI)-forming ability of LiODFB which protect Li anode from suffering lithium dendrites and prevent the shuttle phenomenon. The novel electrolytes provide good cycling stability and high coulombic efficiency for the Li-S batteries, which is suggested as a promising electrolyte for Li-S batteries.

  7. Transcriptomic Analysis of Petunia hybrida in Response to Salt Stress Using High Throughput RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Gonzalo H.; Bombarely, Aureliano; Giovannoni, James J.; Scanlon, Michael J.; Mattson, Neil S.

    2014-01-01

    Salinity and drought stress are the primary cause of crop losses worldwide. In sodic saline soils sodium chloride (NaCl) disrupts normal plant growth and development. The complex interactions of plant systems with abiotic stress have made RNA sequencing a more holistic and appealing approach to study transcriptome level responses in a single cell and/or tissue. In this work, we determined the Petunia transcriptome response to NaCl stress by sequencing leaf samples and assembling 196 million Illumina reads with Trinity software. Using our reference transcriptome we identified more than 7,000 genes that were differentially expressed within 24 h of acute NaCl stress. The proposed transcriptome can also be used as an excellent tool for biological and bioinformatics in the absence of an available Petunia genome and it is available at the SOL Genomics Network (SGN) http://solgenomics.net. Genes related to regulation of reactive oxygen species, transport, and signal transductions as well as novel and undescribed transcripts were among those differentially expressed in response to salt stress. The candidate genes identified in this study can be applied as markers for breeding or to genetically engineer plants to enhance salt tolerance. Gene Ontology analyses indicated that most of the NaCl damage happened at 24 h inducing genotoxicity, affecting transport and organelles due to the high concentration of Na+ ions. Finally, we report a modification to the library preparation protocol whereby cDNA samples were bar-coded with non-HPLC purified primers, without affecting the quality and quantity of the RNA-seq data. The methodological improvement presented here could substantially reduce the cost of sample preparation for future high-throughput RNA sequencing experiments. PMID:24722556

  8. Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Chester W.; Brinkley, Frank S.

    1977-01-01

    Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

  9. Effects of temperature and salt concentration on the structural and dynamical features in aqueous solutions of charged triblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Kjøniksen, Anna-Lena; Zhu, Kaizheng; Behrens, Manja A; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Nyström, Bo

    2011-03-17

    Effects of temperature and salt addition on the association behavior in aqueous solutions of a series of charged thermosensitive methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-block-poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid sodium) triblock copolymers (MPEG(45)-b-P(NIPAAM)(n)-b-P(SSS)(22)) with different lengths of the PNIPAAM block (n=17, 48, and 66) have been studied with the aid of turbidity, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Increasing temperature and salinity as well as longer PNIPAAM blocks are all factors that promote the formation of association structures. The SAXS data show that, for the copolymers with n=48 and n=66, increasing temperature and salt concentration induce interchain associations and higher values of the aggregation number, whereas no aggregation was observed for the copolymer with the shortest PNIPAAM chain. However, DLS measurements reveal the presence of larger association clusters. The cloud point is found to decrease with raising salinity and longer PNIPAAM block. The general picture that emerges is the delicate interplay between repulsive electrostatic forces and hydrophobic interactions and that this balance can be tuned by changing the temperature, salinity, and the length of the PNIPAAM block. PMID:21338148

  10. Radiocolloids in sorption systems. XIX. Filtration concentration of iron from salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftailov, V.V.; Mitrofanova, S.A.; Betenekov, N.D.

    1987-09-01

    The filtration mechanism for the concentration of iron under dynamic conditions has been substantuated. The static and dynamic conditions has been substantiated. The static and dynamic characteristics of the filtration process for two materials, viz., a copolymer of styrene with divinylbenzene and cellulose, have been found.