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Sample records for high shear modulus

  1. Dynamic characteristics of Bridgestone low shear modulus-high damping seismic isolation bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.W.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1993-06-01

    Bridgestone Company of Japan is one of the leading seismic bearing manufacturers in the world. Their bearings have very good performance records. It appears that Bridgestone`s high damping bearings are made of a blend of filled natural and synthetic rubbers with fillers and plastizers whereas in the United States, the high damping compound is a carbon filled natural rubber. To compare the properties of the two different kinds of high damping compounds, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) purchased eight bearings from Bridgestone: four of which were made of high shear modulus-high damping rubber compound KL401; the other four were made of low shear modulus-high damping rubber compounds: two with KL301 elastomer and two with KL302 elastomer. Tests of the Bridgestone bearings were performed at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center. The dynamic characteristics of the high shear modulus Bridgestone bearings, KL401, are described in ANL/Shimizu Report ANL-003. This report describes the dynamic and failure characteristics of the low shear modulus Bridgestone bearings, KL301 and KL302.

  2. Complex shear modulus of a magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G. Y.

    2004-10-01

    In our previous study (Zhou 2003 Smart Mater. Struct. 12 139-46), a technique to extract the field-induced shear modulus through an experiment testing the responded acceleration of a system composed of a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) and a cuprous mass was introduced. In this paper, we present a different data processing method, based on the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method, to recover the complex shear modulus of an MRE in the frequency domain through the measured force excitation and responded acceleration of the mass in the above-mentioned experiment. The recovered complex shear modulus is analyzed in three ranges of the frequency domain: low-frequency range, moderate-frequency range, and high-frequency range. In the low-frequency range (<250 Hz), the shear modulus is a bell-type curve rising with the applied magnetic field. The average shear modulus over this frequency range is proportional to the applied magnetic field until magnetic saturation is reached. The maximum change of the average shear modulus over this range is found to be above 55% of the zero-field value. The above phenomenon reaffirms that the subquadratic field dependence, which arises from the saturation of the magnetization near the poles of closely spaced pairs of spheres, must be taken into account. In the moderate-frequency range and high-frequency range, the shear modulus is too complex to be analyzed completely by the proposed method. However, some interesting phenomena are also revealed by the proposed method. For instance, the shear modulus increases with frequency at least with the order of a quadratic polynomial, and the shear modulus is not significantly affected by the applied magnetic field.

  3. Shear Modulus and Dislocations in bcc Solid ^3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhi Gang; Souris, Fabien; Beamish, John

    2016-05-01

    The shear modulus of hcp ^4He decreases significantly above ˜ 200 mK, as ^3He impurities unbind from dislocations, unpinning them, and softening the crystal. Here we report shear modulus measurements on a fermi quantum solid: bcc ^3He. In contrast to previous low-frequency measurements, which did not show dislocation softening in this system, we have observed a drop in shear modulus, accompanied by a dissipation peak, which we attribute to the unpinning of dislocations as ^4He impurities unbind. For large stresses, impurities cannot pin the dislocations and the low temperature stiffening is suppressed. At high frequencies, the modulus changes and dissipation peaks shift to higher temperature, indicating that the unbinding is thermally activated. For a 58 bar bcc ^3He crystal, we find an activation energy of 0.27 K, smaller than the 0.7 K binding energy for ^3He impurities in hcp ^4He.

  4. Shear modulus of structured electrorheological fluid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Kyohei; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Some immiscible blends under a strong electric field often exhibit periodic structures, bridging the gap between two electrodes. Upon shear, the structures tilt, and exhibit an elastic response which is mostly governed by the electric energy. Assuming a two-dimensional stripe structure, we calculate the Maxwell stress, and derive an expression for the shear modulus, demonstrating how it depends on the external electric field, the composition, and the dielectric properties of the blend. We also suggest the notion of effective interfacial tension, which renormalizes the effect of the electric field. This leads to a simple derivation of the scaling law for the selection of the wavelength of the structure formed under an electric field. PMID:27300947

  5. Shear modulus of structured electrorheological fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitara, Kyohei; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Some immiscible blends under a strong electric field often exhibit periodic structures, bridging the gap between two electrodes. Upon shear, the structures tilt, and exhibit an elastic response which is mostly governed by the electric energy. Assuming a two-dimensional stripe structure, we calculate the Maxwell stress, and derive an expression for the shear modulus, demonstrating how it depends on the external electric field, the composition, and the dielectric properties of the blend. We also suggest the notion of effective interfacial tension, which renormalizes the effect of the electric field. This leads to a simple derivation of the scaling law for the selection of the wavelength of the structure formed under an electric field.

  6. Dynamic Shear Modulus of Polymers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byutner, Oleksiy; Smith, Grant

    2001-03-01

    In this work we describe the methodology for using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (MD) simulations to obtain the viscoelastic properties of polymers in the glassy regime. Specifically we show how the time dependent shear stress modulus and frequency dependent complex shear modulus in the high-frequency regime can be determined from the off-diagonal terms of the stress-tensor autocorrelation function obtained from MD trajectories using the Green-Kubo method and appropriate Fourier transforms. In order to test the methodology we have performed MD simulations of a low-molecular-weight polybutadiene system using quantum chemistry based potential functions. Values of the glassy modulus and the maximum loss frequency were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for polybutadiene at 298 K.

  7. Analyses of Failure Mechanisms in Woven Graphite/Polyimide Composites with Medium and High Modulus Graphite Fibers Subjected to In-Plane Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumosa, M.; Armentrout, D.; Rupnowski, P.; Kumosa, L.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The application of the Iosipescu shear test for the room and high temperature failure analyses of the woven graphite/polyimide composites with the medium (T-650) and igh (M40J and M60J) modulus graphite fibers is discussed. The M40J/PMR-II-50 and M60J/PMR-II-50 composites were tested as supplied and after thermal conditioning. The effect of temperature and conditioning on the initiation of intralaminar damage and the shear strength of the composites was established.

  8. Avalanche contribution to shear modulus of granular materials.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Michio; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2014-10-01

    Shear modulus of frictionless granular materials near the jamming transition under oscillatory shear is numerically investigated. It is found that the shear modulus G satisfies a scaling law to interpolate between G∼(ϕ-ϕJ)(1/2) and G∼γ0(-1/2)(ϕ-ϕJ) for a linear spring model of the elastic interaction between contacting grains, where ϕ, ϕJ, and γ0 are, respectively, the volume fraction of grains, the fraction at the jamming point, and the amplitude of the oscillatory shear. The linear relation between the shear modulus and ϕ-ϕJ can be understood by slip avalanches. PMID:25375484

  9. In-Plane Shear Testing of Medium and High Modulus Woven Graphite Fiber Reinforced/Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentz, M.; Armentrout, D.; Rupnowski, P.; Kumosa, L.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J. K.; Kumosa, M.

    2004-01-01

    Iosipescu shear tests were performed at room temperature and at 316 C (600 F) o woven composites with either M40J or M60J graphite fibers and PMR-II-50 polyimide resin matrix. The composites were tested as supplied and after thermo-cycling, with the thermo-cycled composites being tested under dry and wet conditions. Acoustic emission (AE) was monitored during the room and high temperature Iosipescu experiments. The shear stresses at the maximum loads and the shear stresses at the significant onset of AE were determined for the composites as function of temperature and conditioning. The combined effects of thermo-cycling and moisture on the strength and stiffness properties of the composites were evaluated. It was determined that the room and high temperature shear stresses at the maximum loads were unaffected by conditioning. However, at room temperature the significant onset of AE was affected by conditioning; the thermal conditioned wet specimens showed the highest shear stress at the onset of AE followed by thermal-conditioned and then as received specimens. Also, at igh temperature the significant onset of AE occurred in some specimens after the maximum load due to the viscoelastoplastic nature of the matrix material.

  10. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein-Didier, C; Andrade, R J; Brum, J; Hug, F; Tanter, M; Nordez, A; Gennisson, J-L

    2016-03-21

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear. PMID:26948399

  11. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  12. Mechanical Behaviour of Woven Graphite/Polyimide Composites with Medium and High Modulus Graphite Fibers Subjected to Biaxial Shear Dominated Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumose, M.; Gentz, M.; Rupnowski, P.; Armentrout, D.; Kumosa, L.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    A major limitation of woven fiber/polymer matrix composite systems is the inability of these materials to resist intralaminar and interlaminar damage initiation and propagation under shear-dominated biaxial loading conditions. There are numerous shear test methods for woven fabric composites, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Two techniques, which show much potential, are the Iosipescu shear and +/- 45 deg tensile tests. In this paper, the application of these two tests for the room and high temperature failure analyses of woven graphite/polyimide composites is briefly evaluated. In particular, visco-elastic micro, meso, and macro-stress distributions in a woven eight harness satin (8HS) T650/PMR-15 composite subjected to these two tests are presented and their effect on the failure process of the composite is evaluated. Subsequently, the application of the Iosipescu tests to the failure analysis of woven composites with medium (T650) and high (M40J and M60J) modulus graphite fibers and PMR-15 and PMR-II-50 polyimide resins is discussed. The composites were tested as-supplied and after thermal conditioning. The effect of temperature and thermal conditioning on the initiation of intralaminar damage and the shear strength of the composites was established.

  13. Factors that influence muscle shear modulus during passive stretch.

    PubMed

    Koo, Terry K; Hug, François

    2015-09-18

    Although elastography has been increasingly used for evaluating muscle shear modulus associated with age, sex, musculoskeletal, and neurological conditions, its physiological meaning is largely unknown. This knowledge gap may hinder data interpretation, limiting the potential of using elastography to gain insights into muscle biomechanics in health and disease. We derived a mathematical model from a widely-accepted Hill-type passive force-length relationship to gain insight about the physiological meaning of resting shear modulus of skeletal muscles under passive stretching, and validated the model by comparing against the ex-vivo animal data reported in our recent work (Koo et al. 2013). The model suggested that resting shear modulus of a slack muscle is a function of specific tension and parameters that govern the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship as well as the degree of muscle anisotropy. The model also suggested that although the slope of the linear shear modulus-passive force relationship is primarily related to muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (i.e. the smaller the muscle cross-sectional area, the more the increase in shear modulus to result in the same passive muscle force), it is also governed by the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship and the degree of muscle anisotropy. Taken together, although muscle shear modulus under passive stretching has a strong linear relationship with passive muscle force, its actual value appears to be affected by muscle's mechanical, material, and architectural properties. This should be taken into consideration when interpreting the muscle shear modulus values. PMID:26113291

  14. High modulus high temperature glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The search for a new high-modulus, high-temperature glass fiber involved the preparation of 500 glass compositions lying in 12 glass fields. These systems consisted primarily of low atomic number oxides and rare-earth oxides. Direct optical measurements of the kinetics of crystallization of the cordierite-rare earth system, for example, showed that the addition of rare-earth oxides decreased the rate of formation of cordierite crystals. Glass samples prepared from these systems proved that the rare-earth oxides made large specific contributions to the Young's modulus of the glasses. The best glasses have moduli greater than 21 million psi, the best glass fibers have moduli greater than 18 million psi, and the best glass fiber-epoxy resin composites have tensile strengths of 298,000 psi, compressive strengths of at least 220,000 psi, flexural strengths of 290,000 psi, and short-beam shear strengths of almost 17,000 psi.

  15. Inference of dynamic shear modulus from Lotung downhole data

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.Y.; Mok, C.M.; Tang, H.T.

    1996-08-01

    Downhole ground motions recorded at the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST) site were used in this paper to infer in-situ dynamic soil properties. The purposes were (1) to provide field evidence of nonlinear soil behavior during earthquake excitation; and (2) to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic properties obtained from geophysical measurements and laboratory tests. For each horizontal component and event analyzed, representative shear-wave velocity and effective shear strain (defined as 65% of peak strain) between consecutive recording stations were estimated. The representative shear-wave velocities were estimated from fundamental resonant frequencies identifiable from the Fourier spectral ratios. The effective shear strains were estimated by linear ground response deconvolution analyses based on the inferred shear-wave velocity profiles. The inferred reduction in shear modulus with increasing effective shear strain was compared with laboratory test data. The degree of agreement between the inferred shear modulus reduction curves and the laboratory test data varied with different testing programs. The inferred low-strain shear-wave velocity profile agreed with geophysical measurements. These observations not only provide field evidence of nonlinear dynamic soil behavior during earthquakes, but also confirm the reasonableness of data provided by geophysical measurements and laboratory tests.

  16. Estimation of shear modulus in media with power law characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Holm, Sverre

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave propagation in tissue generated by the radiation force is usually modeled by either a lossless or a classical viscoelastic equation. However, experimental data shows power law behavior which is not consistent with those approaches. It is well known that fractional derivatives results in power laws, therefore a time fractional wave equation, the Caputo equation, which can be derived from the fractional Kelvin-Voigt stress and strain relation is tested. This equation is solved using the finite difference method with experimental parameters obtained from the existing literature. The equation is characterized by a fractional order which is also the power law exponent of the frequency dependent shear modulus. It is shown that for fractional order between 0 and 1, the equation gives smaller shear modulus than the classical model. The opposite situation applies for fractional order greater than 1. The numerical simulation also shows that the shear wave velocity method is only reliable for small losses. In our case, this is only for a small fractional order. Based on the published values of fractional order from other studies, there is therefore a chance for biased estimation of the shear modulus. PMID:26385841

  17. Simple average expression for shear-stress relaxation modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Xu, H.; Baschnagel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on isotropic elastic networks we propose a simple-average expression G (t ) =μA-h (t ) for the computational determination of the shear-stress relaxation modulus G (t ) of a classical elastic solid or fluid. Here, μA=G (0 ) characterizes the shear transformation of the system at t =0 and h (t ) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress τ ̂(t ) as a function of time t . We discuss sampling time and ensemble effects and emphasize possible pitfalls of alternative expressions using the shear-stress autocorrelation function. We argue finally that our key relation may be readily adapted for more general linear response functions.

  18. Simple average expression for shear-stress relaxation modulus.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on isotropic elastic networks we propose a simple-average expression G(t)=μ_{A}-h(t) for the computational determination of the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t) of a classical elastic solid or fluid. Here, μ_{A}=G(0) characterizes the shear transformation of the system at t=0 and h(t) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress τ[over ̂](t) as a function of time t. We discuss sampling time and ensemble effects and emphasize possible pitfalls of alternative expressions using the shear-stress autocorrelation function. We argue finally that our key relation may be readily adapted for more general linear response functions. PMID:26871020

  19. Shear modulus and dilatancy softening in granular packings above jamming.

    PubMed

    Coulais, C; Seguin, A; Dauchot, O

    2014-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the mechanical response to shear of a monolayer of bidisperse frictional grains across the jamming transition. We inflate an intruder inside the packing and use photoelasticity and tracking techniques to measure the induced shear strain and stresses at the grain scale. We quantify experimentally the constitutive relations for strain amplitudes as low as 10(-3) and for a range of packing fractions within 2% variation around the jamming transition. At the transition strong nonlinear effects set in: both the shear modulus and the dilatancy shear soften at small strain until a critical strain is reached where effective linearity is recovered. The scaling of the critical strain and the associated critical stresses on the distance to jamming are extracted. We check that the constitutive laws, together with mechanical equilibrium, correctly predict to the observed stress and strain profiles. These profiles exhibit a spatial crossover between an effective linear regime close to the inflater and the truly nonlinear regime away from it. The crossover length diverges at the jamming transition. PMID:25415925

  20. Muscle shear elastic modulus is linearly related to muscle torque over the entire range of isometric contraction intensity.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Filiz; Hug, François; Bouillard, Killian; Jubeau, Marc; Frappart, Thomas; Couade, Mathieu; Bercoff, Jeremy; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-08-01

    Muscle shear elastic modulus is linearly related to muscle torque during low-level contractions (<60% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction, MVC). This measurement can therefore be used to estimate changes in individual muscle force. However, it is not known if this relationship remains valid for higher intensities. The aim of this study was to determine: (i) the relationship between muscle shear elastic modulus and muscle torque over the entire range of isometric contraction and (ii) the influence of the size of the region of interest (ROI) used to average the shear modulus value. Ten healthy males performed two incremental isometric little finger abductions. The joint torque produced by Abductor Digiti Minimi was considered as an index of muscle torque and elastic modulus. A high coefficient of determination (R(2)) (range: 0.86-0.98) indicated that the relationship between elastic modulus and torque can be accurately modeled by a linear regression over the entire range (0% to 100% of MVC). The changes in shear elastic modulus as a function of torque were highly repeatable. Lower R(2) values (0.89±0.13 for 1/16 of ROI) and significantly increased absolute errors were observed when the shear elastic modulus was averaged over smaller ROI, half, 1/4 and 1/16 of the full ROI) than the full ROI (mean size: 1.18±0.24cm(2)). It suggests that the ROI should be as large as possible for accurate measurement of muscle shear modulus. PMID:25956546

  1. Mapping tissue shear modulus on Thiel soft-embalmed mouse skin with shear wave optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Joy, Joyce; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative measurement of the mechanical properties of biological tissue is a useful assessment of its physiologic conditions, which may aid medical diagnosis and treatment of, e.g., scleroderma and skin cancer. Traditional elastography techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound elastography have limited scope of application on skin due to insufficient spatial resolution. Recently, dynamic / transient elastography are attracting more applications with the advantage of non-destructive measurements, and revealing the absolute moduli values of tissue mechanical properties. Shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) is a novel transient elastography method, which lays emphasis on the propagation of dynamic mechanical waves. In this study, high speed shear wave imaging technique was applied to a range of soft-embalmed mouse skin, where 3 kHz shear waves were launched with a piezoelectric actuator as an external excitation. The shear wave velocity was estimated from the shear wave images, and used to recover a shear modulus map in the same OCT imaging range. Results revealed significant difference in shear modulus and structure in compliance with gender, and images on fresh mouse skin are also compared. Thiel embalming technique is also proven to present the ability to furthest preserve the mechanical property of biological tissue. The experiment results suggest that SW-OCE is an effective technique for quantitative estimation of skin tissue biomechanical status.

  2. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2013-10-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics.

  3. Repeated Rapid Shear-Responsiveness of Peptide Hydrogels with Tunable Shear Modulus

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sivakumar; Tseng, Yiider; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2006-01-01

    A pair of mutually-attractive but self-repulsive decapeptides, with alternating charged/neutral amino acid sequence patterns, was found to co-assemble into a viscoelastic material upon mixing at a low total peptide concentration of 0.25 wt%. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of individual decapeptide solutions revealed their random coil conformation. Transmission electron microscopy images showed the nanofibrillar network structure of the hydrogel. Dynamic rheological characterization revealed its high elasticity and shear-thinning nature. Furthermore, the co-assembled hydrogel was capable of rapid recoveries from repeated shear-induced breakdowns (compliance), a property desirable for designing injectable biomaterials for controlled drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. A systematic variation of the neutral amino acids in the sequence revealed some of the critical design principles involved in this novel class of biomaterials. Lowering the hydrophobicity of the neutral amino acids lowered the elastic modulus and the resilience of the assembled hydrogel, thereby providing a means to fine-tune material property. Replacement of neutral amino acids in the sequence with proline (a β-sheet breaker) impaired the ability of the peptides to co-assemble into a hydrogel. PMID:15877347

  4. Shear Modulus for Nonisotropic, Open-Celled Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    An equation for the shear modulus for nonisotropic, open-celled foams in the plane transverse to the elongation (rise) direction is derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model with the most general geometric description. The shear modulus was found to be a function of the unit cell dimensions, the solid material properties, and the cell edge cross-section properties. The shear modulus equation reduces to the relation derived by others for isotropic foams when the unit cell is equiaxed.

  5. High strength high modulus ceramic fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterolf, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost method was developed for producing high strength, high modulus, continuous ceramic oxide fibers. Process transforms inexpensive metallic salts into syrup-like liquids that can be fiberized at room temperatures. Resulting salt fibers are then converted to oxides by calcination at relatively low temperatures.

  6. Shear Modulus of the Lower Leg Muscles in Patients with Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kei; Akagi, Ryota; Hirayama, Kuniaki; Hirose, Norikazu; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fukubayshi, Toru

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the in vivo kinematics of shear modulus of the lower leg muscles in patients with medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). The study population included 46 limbs with MTSS and 40 healthy limbs. The shear modulus of the medial head of the gastrocnemius, lateral head of the gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus and tibialis anterior muscles were measured using shear wave ultrasound elastography. As a result, the shear modulus of the lower leg muscles was significantly greater in patients with MTSS than in healthy patients (p < 0.01). Based on the differences in shear modulus of lower leg muscles between the patients with MTSS and healthy patients, the measurements obtained via shear wave ultrasound elastography could be used to evaluate risk factors of MTSS. PMID:27129903

  7. A comparison of three popular test methods for determining the shear modulus of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Morton, John; Farley, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Three popular shear tests (the 10 degree off-axis, the plus or minus 45 degree tensile, and the Iosipescu specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture) for shear modulus measurement are evaluated for a graphite-epoxy composite material system. A comparison of the shear stress-strain response for each test method is made using conventional strain gage instrumentation and moire interferometry. The uniformity and purity of the strain fields in the test sections of the specimens are discussed, and the shear responses obtained from each test technique are presented and compared. For accurate measurement of shear modulus, the 90 degree Iosipescu specimen is recommended.

  8. The Experiment and Simulation Method to Calibrate the Shear Modulus of Individual ZnO Nanorod.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guangbin; Jiang, Chengming; Dai, Bing; Song, Jinhui

    2016-04-01

    A general method is presented to directly measure the shear modulus of an individual nanorod using atomic force microscope (AFM). To obtain shear modulus with less experiment error, finite element simulation is employed to simulate the twisting process of a ZnO nanorod. Based on the experimental measurements, the shear modulus of ZnO nanorod with 4 µm in length and 166 nm in radius is characterized to be 9.1 ± 0.2 GPa, which is obviously more accurate than the simple averaged experimental result. PMID:27451763

  9. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  10. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  11. Shear elastic modulus is a reproducible index reflecting the passive mechanical properties of medial gastrocnemius muscle belly

    PubMed Central

    Ikezoe, Tome; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Nishisita, Satoru; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Passive mechanical properties are important in muscle function because they are related to the muscle extensibility. Recently, the assessment of muscle shear elastic modulus using shear-wave elastographic (SWE) imaging was developed. However, reliability and validity of shear elastic modulus measurements during passive stretching remain undefined. Purpose To investigate the reproducibility and validity of the shear elastic modulus measured by SWE imaging during passive stretching. Material and Methods Ten healthy men volunteered for this study. The shear elastic modulus of medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle belly was measured using ultrasonic SWE imaging during passive dorsiflexion. To assess the intra-session and inter-day reliabilities, the protocol was performed twice by the same investigator with a 5-min rest period between measurement sessions and twice on two different days by the same investigator with a 1–2-week interval between the two sessions. To assess the inter-investigator reliability, the protocol was performed on the same day by two investigators with a 5-min rest between measurement sessions. In addition, B-mode ultrasonography was used to determine the displacement of myotendinous junction (MTJ) of MG during passive ankle dorsiflexion. Results The intra-session, inter-day, and inter-investigator reliabilities of the method was confirmed on the basis of acceptably low coefficient of variations and substantially high intraclass correlation coefficients. In addition, a significant correlation was found between MTJ displacement and shear elastic modulus. Conclusion These results suggested that shear elastic modulus measured using SWE imaging is a reproducible index reflecting the passive mechanical properties. PMID:27170845

  12. Effect of depth-dependent shear modulus on tsunami generation along subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Bilek, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Estimates of the initial size of tsunamis generated by subduction zone earthquakes are significantly affected by the choice of shear modulus at shallow depths. Analysis of over 360 circum-Pacific subduction zone earthquakes indicates that for a given seismic moment, source duration increases significantly with decreasing depth (Bilek and Lay, 1998; 1999). Under the assumption that stress drop is constant, the increase of source duration is explained by a 5-fold reduction of shear modulus from depths of 20 km to 5 km. This much lower value of shear modulus at shallow depths in comparison to standard earth models has the effect of increasing the amount of slip estimated from seismic moment determinations, thereby increasing tsunami amplitude. The effect of using depth dependent shear modulus values is tested by modeling the tsunami from the 1992 Nicaraguan tsunami earthquake using a previously determined moment distribution (lhmle??, 1996a). We find that the tide gauge record of this tsunami is well matched by synthetics created using the depth dependent shear modulus and moment distribution. Because excitation of seismic waves also depends on elastic heterogeneity, it is important, particularly for the inversion of short period waves, that a consistent seismic/tsunami shear modulus model be used for calculating slip distributions.

  13. The relation between the limiting shear modulus and degree of hydrogen bonding in alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Ryusuke

    1981-09-01

    Existing data of the limiting shear modulus at high frequency on associated liquids are found to obey the modified Hirai-Eyring equation G∞ = (2HRT/V0)exp(Eh/RT) above the glass transition temperature, where Eh is the energy required to create 1 mole of holes, V0 is the molar volume of alcohol, and H is the degree of hydrogen bonding. This semiemperical equation, deduced by considering the local interaction between molecules, should serve as a useful extrapolation formula for associated liquids and mixtures.

  14. 3-D FDTD simulation of shear waves for evaluation of complex modulus imaging.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Wang, Yue; Insana, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The Navier equation describing shear wave propagation in 3-D viscoelastic media is solved numerically with a finite differences time domain (FDTD) method. Solutions are formed in terms of transverse scatterer velocity waves and then verified via comparison to measured wave fields in heterogeneous hydrogel phantoms. The numerical algorithm is used as a tool to study the effects on complex shear modulus estimation from wave propagation in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. We used an algebraic Helmholtz inversion (AHI) technique to solve for the complex shear modulus from simulated and experimental velocity data acquired in 2-D and 3-D. Although 3-D velocity estimates are required in general, there are object geometries for which 2-D inversions provide accurate estimations of the material properties. Through simulations and experiments, we explored artifacts generated in elastic and dynamic-viscous shear modulus images related to the shear wavelength and average viscosity. PMID:21342824

  15. Why is the bulk modulus of jammed solids and granular packings much larger than the shear modulus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Weaire, Denis

    2013-03-01

    In granular packings and metallic glasses, the rigidity to compression is much more pronounced than with respect to shear, resulting in the bulk modulus being much larger than the shear modulus. This state of affairs becomes dramatic in marginal jammed solids which are solid-like to compression but not to shear (Ellenbroek, Zeravcic, van Saarloos, van Hecke, EPL 87, 34004 (2009)). For metallic glasses, it was argued by Weaire et al. some time ago (Acta Metall. 19, 779 (1971)) that this effect might be due to the nonaffinity of the particle displacements. These arise because the force acting on a particle upon strain as a result of the strain-induced motion of its neighbors is not balanced in the absence of local order. Hence the particles undergo nonaffine displacements to relax these forces to the expense of the elastic storage energy, leading to lower values of the elastic moduli. Using the nonaffine theory of Zaccone and Scossa-Romano (PRB, 83, 184205 (2011)) we found a conclusive solution to this long standing problem. We show that in packings and related materials the excluded volume between neighbors induces geometric correlations which significantly reduce the nonaffinity under compression but leave the nonaffinity in shear substantially unaltered.

  16. Shear elastic modulus estimation from indentation and SDUV on gelatin phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties such as elasticity are linked to tissue pathology state. Several groups have proposed shear wave propagation speed to quantify tissue mechanical properties. It is well known that biological tissues are viscoelastic materials; therefore velocity dispersion resulting from material viscoelasticity is expected. A method called Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) can be used to quantify tissue viscoelasticity by measuring dispersion of shear wave propagation speed. However, there is not a gold standard method for validation. In this study we present an independent validation method of shear elastic modulus estimation by SDUV in 3 gelatin phantoms of differing stiffness. In addition, the indentation measurements are compared to estimates of elasticity derived from shear wave group velocities. The shear elastic moduli from indentation were 1.16, 3.40 and 5.6 kPa for a 7, 10 and 15% gelatin phantom respectively. SDUV measurements were 1.61, 3.57 and 5.37 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. Shear elastic moduli derived from shear wave group velocities were 1.78, 5.2 and 7.18 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. The shear elastic modulus estimated from the SDUV, matched the elastic modulus measured by indentation. On the other hand, shear elastic modulus estimated by group velocity did not agree with indentation test estimations. These results suggest that shear elastic modulus estimation by group velocity will be bias when the medium being investigated is dispersive. Therefore a rheological model should be used in order to estimate mechanical properties of viscoelastic materials. PMID:21317078

  17. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: I. shear wave thermometry.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-02-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is today hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to the 2-D mapping of temperature changes during HIFU treatments. This new concept of shear wave thermometry is experimentally implemented here using conventional ultrasonic imaging probes. HIFU treatment and monitoring were, respectively, performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single-element transducer focused at 30 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Thermocouple measurements and ultrasound-based thermometry were used as a gold standard technique and were combined with SWI on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created using 100-μs pushing beams at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Elasticity and temperature mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to realtime monitoring of the treatment. Tissue stiffness was found to decrease in the focal zone for temperatures up to 43°C. Ultrasound-based temperature estimation was highly correlated to stiffness variation maps (r² = 0.91 to 0.97). A reversible calibration phase of the changes of elasticity with temperature can be made locally using sighting shots. This calibration process allows for the derivation of temperature maps from shear wave imaging. Compared with conventional ultrasound-based approaches, shear wave thermometry is found to be much more robust to motion artifacts. PMID:21342822

  18. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: II. Shear wave imaging of thermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-08-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is currently hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to a precise mapping of the lesion. HIFU treatment and monitoring were respectively performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single element transducer focused at 34 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Ultrasound-based strain imaging was combined with shear wave imaging on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created with pushing beams of 100 μs at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Thus, elasticity and strain mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to real-time monitoring of the treatment. When thermal damage occurs, tissue stiffness was found to increase up to 4-fold and strain imaging showed strong shrinkages that blur the temperature information. We show that strain imaging elastograms are not easy to interpret for accurate lesion characterization, but SWI provides a quantitative mapping of the thermal lesion. Moreover, the concept of shear wave thermometry (SWT) developed in the companion paper allows mapping temperature with the same method. Combined SWT and shear wave imaging can map the lesion stiffening and temperature outside the lesion, which could be used to predict the eventual lesion growth by thermal dose calculation. Finally, SWI is shown to be robust to motion and reliable in vivo on sheep muscle. PMID:21859579

  19. On the measurement of human osteosarcoma cell elastic modulus using shear assay experiments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yifang; Bly, Randy; Moore, Will; Gao, Zhan; Cuitino, Alberto M; Soboyejo, Wole

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for determining the elastic modulus of human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells. The method involves a combination of shear assay experiments and finite element analysis. Following in-situ observations of cell deformation during shear assay experiments, a digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to determine the local displacement and strain fields. Finite element analysis was then used to determine the Young's moduli of HOS cells. This involved a match of the maximum shear stresses estimated from the experimental shear assay measurements and those calculated from finite element simulations. PMID:17200819

  20. Effects of pressure on the shear modulus, mass and thickness of the perfused porcine kidney.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein, C; Gennisson, J-L; Tanter, M; Beillas, P

    2015-01-01

    Eleven fresh ex vivo porcine kidneys were perfused in the artery, vein and ureter with degassed Dulbecco׳s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). The effect of perfusion pressure was evaluated using ten different pressures combinations. The shear modulus of the tissues was estimated during perfusion using shear wave elastography. The organ weight change was measured by a digital scale and cameras were used to follow the changes of the dimensions after each pressure combination. The effect of perfusion on the weight and the thickness was non-reversible, whereas the effect on the shear modulus was reversible. Pressure was found to increase the average shear modulus in the cortex by as much as 73%. A pressure of 80 mmHg was needed to observe tissues shear modulus in the same range as in vivo tests (Gcortex=9.1 kPa, Gmedulla=8.5 kPa ex vivo versus Gcortex=9.1 kPa, Gmedulla=8.7 kPa in vivo in Gennisson et al., 2012). PMID:25435383

  1. Concurrent constant modulus algorithm and multi-modulus algorithm scheme for high-order QAM signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Wei

    2011-10-01

    In order to overcome the slow convergence rate and large steady-state mean square error of constant modulus algorithm (CMA), a concurrent constant modulus algorithm and multi-modulus algorithm scheme for high-order QAM signals is proposed, which makes full use of the character which is that the high-order QAM signals locate in the different modulus. This algorithm uses the CMA as the basal mode. And in the second mode it uses the multi-modulus algorithm. Furthermore, the two modes operate concurrently. The efficiency of the method is proved by computer simulations in underwater acoustic channels.

  2. Dynamic transverse shear modulus for a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.; Duan, Yunda

    2016-09-01

    An exact analytical solution is presented for the effective dynamic transverse shear modulus in a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions. The complex and frequency-dependent properties of the dynamic shear modulus are caused by the physical mechanism of mesoscopic-scale wave-induced fluid flow whose scale is smaller than wavelength but larger than the size of pores. Our model consists of three phases: a long cylindrical inclusion, a cylindrical shell of poroelastic matrix material with different mechanical and/or hydraulic properties than the inclusion and an outer region of effective homogeneous medium of laterally infinite extent. The behavior of both the inclusion and the matrix is described by Biot's consolidation equations, whereas the surrounding effective medium which is used to describe the effective transverse shear properties of the inner poroelastic composite is assumed to be a viscoelastic solid whose complex transverse shear modulus needs to be determined. The determined effective transverse shear modulus is used to quantify the S-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in heterogeneous fluid-filled poroelastic rocks. The calculation shows the relaxation frequency and relative position of various fluid saturation dispersion curves predicted by this study exhibit very good agreement with those of a previous 2-D finite-element simulation. For the double-porosity model (inclusions having a different solid frame than the matrix but the same pore fluid as the matrix) the effective shear modulus also exhibits a size-dependent characteristic that the relaxation frequency moves to lower frequencies by two orders of magnitude if the radius of the cylindrical poroelastic composite increases by one order of magnitude. For the patchy-saturation model (inclusions having the same solid frame as the matrix but with a different pore fluid from the matrix), the heterogeneity in pore fluid cannot cause any attenuation in the

  3. Dynamic transverse shear modulus for a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.; Duan, Yunda

    2016-06-01

    An exact analytical solution is presented for the effective dynamic transverse shear modulus in a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions. The complex and frequency-dependent properties of the dynamic shear modulus are caused by the physical mechanism of mesoscopic-scale wave-induced fluid flow whose scale is smaller than wavelength but larger than the size of pores. Our model consists of three phases: a long cylindrical inclusion, a cylindrical shell of poroelastic matrix material with different mechanical and/or hydraulic properties than the inclusion and an outer region of effective homogeneous medium of laterally infinite extent. The behavior of both the inclusion and the matrix is described by Biot's consolidation equations, whereas the surrounding effective medium which is used to describe the effective transverse shear properties of the inner poroelastic composite is assumed to be a viscoelastic solid whose complex transverse shear modulus needs to be determined. The determined effective transverse shear modulus is used to quantify the S-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in heterogeneous fluid-filled poroelastic rocks. The calculation shows the relaxation frequency and relative position of various fluid saturation dispersion curves predicted by this study exhibit very good agreement with those of a previous two-dimensional finite-element simulation. For the double-porosity model (inclusions having a different solid frame than the matrix but the same pore fluid as the matrix) the effective shear modulus also exhibits a size-dependent characteristic that the relaxation frequency moves to lower frequencies by two orders of magnitude if the radius of the cylindrical poroelastic composite increases by one order of magnitude. For the patchy-saturation model (inclusions having the same solid frame as the matrix but with a different pore fluid from the matrix), the heterogeneity in pore fluid cannot cause any attenuation in

  4. Dynamic shear modulus of glycerol: Corrections due to instrument compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, K.; Hutcheson, S. A.; Shi, X.; Mandanici, A.; McKenna, G. B.

    2006-12-01

    A recent article by Shi et al. [J. Chem. Phys.123, 174507 (2005)] reports results from mechanical measurements on three simple inorganic glass formers: glycerol, m-toluidine, and sucrose benzoate. The experiments carried out were stress relaxation, aging, and dynamic (all in shear) using a torsional rheometer, an advanced rheometric expansion system (TA Instruments). The original force rebalance transducer (2KFRT) supplied with the system was replaced with a custom-made load cell (Sensotec) that had a capacity of 20000gcm in torque and 5000g in normal force. The replacement of the load cell was done due to the belief that the main source of compliance in this instrument was from the 2KFRT. With this assumption, the authors published their results for the three materials of interest and compared their results with the techniques of Schröter and Donth [J. Chem. Phys.113, 9101 (2000)] for the measurements on glycerol and reported important differences. These differences were disputed by one of the present authors (Schröter), and the present report shows that the results from Schröter and Donth are correct. We show that the reasons have to do with the instrument compliance being greater than originally thought by Shi et al. Here we examine the effects of platen diameter/geometry on the glycerol dynamic moduli, describe a means to correct dynamic data, present a revised comparison of the corrected data with that of Schröter and Donth, and provide a discussion of future work and conclusions.

  5. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5wt% NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5 MPa to 10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  6. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4-D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5 wt per cent NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5-10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  7. Microstructure, shear modulus and attenuation in igneous rocks approaching melting at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, S.; Redfern, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Melt-related attenuation mechanisms, such as viscous flow and squirt processes, are of paramount importance in understanding high seismic wave attenuation in partially molten regions of the deep Earth. Strong temperature dependence of the anelastic quality factor, Q, is one obvious consequence of such mechanisms. Mineralogical composition, grain size, melt viscosity and microstructure (morphology and size of the inter-granular pores/micro-cracks), are important parameters for modeling attenuation mechanisms, and are control rock properties, particularly in the partially molten rocks. There have been many theoretical studies linking creep or viscosity models and laboratory experiments for partially molten rocks. However, experimental data on the relationship between temperature and attenuation remains. In this study, the shear modulus (G) and inverse quality factor (1/Q) of two igneous rocks (gabbro and basalt) were measured in the laboratory at temperatures approaching the melting point using the inverted forced torsion pendulum. Attenuation increases exponentially when shear modulus drops rapidly towards to melting temperature in both gabbro (1400 K) and basalt (1250 K). For measurements conducted using cyclic shear stresses at 1Hz, two attenuation relaxation peaks are found in gabbro at 1214 K and 1410 K, while only one attenuation relaxation peak occurs in basalt at 1151 K. These attenuation peaks may result from grain boundary sliding, diffusion creep and/or melt squirt. In addition to the relaxation peaks, there is a rising exponential increase in attenuation approaching the melting point from below. A power law model has been used to determine the effective activation energy associated with this high-temperature attenuation background. An activation energy of 68 kJ/mole in basalt and 882 kJ/mole in gabbro is found. The result for gabbro is in a good agreement with the study of Fontaine et al. in 2005 (873 kJ/mol), and the very different behaviour of basalt

  8. Shear modulus of solid helium-4 confined in a 10 μm gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yuki; Iwasa, Izumi; Miura, Takeru; Yamaguchi, Akira; Okuda, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the elastic properties of solid 4He at low temperatures, the shear modulus of solid 4He confined in a narrow gap, comparable to the length of the dislocation network of solid 4He was measured. Two sets of parallel plate transducers were prepared. One set has a narrow gap of 11 μm and the other has a 290 μm gap as a reference of the bulk solid measurement. The temperature and strain dependences of the shear modulus were measured for solid 4He in both cases. The increase of the shear modulus from 200 mK down to 14 mK was found to be smaller by 0.3 in the narrow-gap solid compared with the case of the bulk solid. By measuring the strain dependence of the shear modulus, the stress required to unbind 3He in the narrow-gap solid was an order of magnitude larger than that in the bulk solid. These gap dependences can be related to the dislocation-network difference between two solids. The maximum length of the dislocation segment in the narrow-gap solid 4He was found to be shorter than 6 μm, which was one order of magnitude smaller than that in the bulk. The difference of the network distribution is considered to originate in the difference of the crystal quality which is caused by the confinement effect in the slab geometry.

  9. Simultaneous Measurement of Non-Classical Rotational Inertia and Shear Modulus of Solid ^4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonsuk; Shin, Jaeho; Kim, Hyoung Chan; Shirahama, Keiya; Kim, Eunseong

    2012-02-01

    A failure to rotate or oscillate is the essential nature of low temperature superfluid helium, and more technically known as non-classical rotational inertia (NCRI). It is counter-intuitive, but NCRI is also found in solid helium-4 below ˜200 mK [1,2]. Recently, shear modulus showed unusual increase with striking resemblance to those of NCRI [3]. Extended measurements show the NCRI occurs only in a stiffened Bose solid, but it is not understood how they are related. Here we report the first simultaneous measurement of shear modulus and NCRI in solid helium to elucidate the fundamental connection between them. Both emerge at remarkably similar temperatures, whereas no quantitative agreement between the increase of the shear modulus and the magnitude of NCRI is found. The increase of shear modulus seems to be the necessary condition for the onset of NCRI.[4pt] [1] E. Kim and M. H. W. Chan Nature 427, 225-227 (2004)[0pt] [2] E. Kim and M. H. W. Chan Science 305, 1942 (2004)[0pt] [3] J. Day and J. Beamish Nature 450, 853-856 (2007)

  10. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g. Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements.

  11. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion.

    PubMed

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-03-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g. Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements. PMID:22345425

  12. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-01-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g., Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep (RFIC) method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements. PMID:22345425

  13. Modification of shear modulus and creep compliance of fibrin clots by fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Kamykowski, G W; Mosher, D F; Lorand, L; Ferry, J D

    1981-02-01

    Shear moduli and creep compliances have been measured for four types of clots of human fibrin (about 7 mg/ml) clotted with and without human plasma fibronectin (usually 1.2 mg/ml). Fine clots (with little lateral aggregation of the fibrin protofibrils) were found at pH 8.5, ionic strength 0.45; coarse clots (with substantial lateral aggregation) were formed at pH 7.5, ionic strength 0.15; in both cases with and without ligation by fibrinoligase. In fine clots, the addition of fibronectin without ligation scarcely affected the shear modulus; with ligation, the modulus was decreased by a factor of 0.48. In coarse clots, the shear modulus was increased by addition of fibronectin. The increase was by a factor of 2.0 without ligation and by a factor of 2.4 with ligation. Creep and creep recovery in clots formed with and without fibronectin were similar except for the scale factor represented by the change in modulus. PMID:7260326

  14. Peeling off an adhesive layer with spatially varying topography and shear modulus.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Animangsu

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by recent experiments on hierarchically structured adhesives, we analyze here the effect of spatial variation in surface topography and shear modulus of an elastomeric adhesive on its ability to adhere strongly to a flexible contactor. The undulation of surface and modulus both were assumed to be periodic with periodicity, which is either identical or different for the two parameters; for identical periodicity, the phase lag between the respective undulations is also systematically varied. Calculations show that during continuous lifting of the flexible contactor from complete initial contact, the interfacial crack between the two adherents does not propagate continuously but intermittently, with crack arrest and initiation at the vicinity of minimum thickness and modulus of the layer; the torque required to initiate an arrested crack increases significantly over that required to propagate it on a smooth adhesive surface. The adhesion strength estimated from the corresponding force vs displacement plot is calculated to be higher than that achieved on a smooth and featureless adhesive surface. For in-phase variation in topography and shear modulus of the layer, the adhesive strength is found to be higher than for nonzero phase lag between the two parameters. The adhesion strength is found to diminish also for nonidentical periodicity between modulus and surface undulation. We have derived a scaling law for relating adhesion strength to several of these parameters. PMID:24730852

  15. Non-free gas of dipoles of non-singular screw dislocations and the shear modulus near the melting

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, Cyril

    2014-12-15

    The behavior of the shear modulus caused by proliferation of dipoles of non-singular screw dislocations with finite-sized core is considered. The representation of two-dimensional Coulomb gas with smoothed-out coupling is used, and the stress–stress correlation function is calculated. A convolution integral expressed in terms of the modified Bessel function K{sub 0} is derived in order to obtain the shear modulus in approximation of interacting dipoles. Implications are demonstrated for the shear modulus near the melting transition which are due to the singularityless character of the dislocations. - Highlights: • Thermodynamics of dipoles of non-singular screw dislocations is studied below the melting. • The renormalization of the shear modulus is obtained for interacting dipoles. • Dependence of the shear modulus on the system scales is presented near the melting.

  16. Study of Supersolidity and Shear Modulus Anomaly of 4He in a Triple Compound Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Xiao; Mueller, Erich J.; Reppy, John D.

    2012-12-01

    The recently discovered shear modulus anomaly in solid 4He bears a strong similarity to the phenomenon of supersolidity in solid 4He and can lead to the period shift and dissipative signals in torsional oscillator experiments that are nearly identical to the classic NCRI signals observed by Kim and Chan. In the experiments described here, we attempt to isolate the effects of these two phenomena on the resonance periods of torsion oscillators. We have constructed a triple compound oscillator with distinct normal modes. We are able to demonstrate that, for this oscillator, the period shifts observed below 200 mK have their primary origin in the temperature dependence of the shear modulus of the solid 4He sample rather than the formation of a supersolid state.

  17. Numerical simulation of seismic response of a base isolated building with low shear modulus rubber isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes seismic-response simulations of a base-isolated building subjected to actual earthquakes using the 3-D computer program, SISEC, developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The isolation system consists of six medium shape factor, high damping, and low shear modulus rubber bearings. To ensure the accuracy of analytical simulation, recorded data of full-size reinforced concrete structures located in Sendai, Japan are used as the benchmarks for comparisons of numerical simulations with observations. Results obtained from both analytical simulations and earthquake observations indicate that the advantage of base isolation in mitigating the acceleration of superstructure is very pronounced. For the two representative earthquakes, one had the strongest ground motion and the other one had similar magnitudes as the rest of the earthquakes recorded at the test site, the simulated accelerations at the roof level of the isolated building are about 20% to 30% of the ordinary building accelerations. Also, results reveal that for both ordinary and base-isolated buildings the computed accelerations agree reasonably well with those recorded.

  18. Numerical simulation of seismic response of a base isolated building with low shear modulus rubber isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes seismic-response simulations of a base-isolated building subjected to actual earthquakes using the 3-D computer program, SISEC, developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The isolation system consists of six medium shape factor, high damping, and low shear modulus rubber bearings. To ensure the accuracy of analytical simulation, recorded data of full-size reinforced concrete structures located in Sendai, Japan are used as the benchmarks for comparisons of numerical simulations with observations. Results obtained from both analytical simulations and earthquake observations indicate that the advantage of base isolation in mitigating the acceleration of superstructure is very pronounced. For the two representative earthquakes, one had the strongest ground motion and the other one had similar magnitudes as the rest of the earthquakes recorded at the test site, the simulated accelerations at the roof level of the isolated building are about 20% to 30% of the ordinary building accelerations. Also, results reveal that for both ordinary and base-isolated buildings the computed accelerations agree reasonably well with those recorded.

  19. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus in a Model of Heterogeneous Rocks, Reservoirs, and Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2005-03-23

    To provide quantitative measures of the importance of fluid effects on shear waves in heterogeneous reservoirs, a model material called a ''random polycrystal of porous laminates'' is introduced. This model poroelastic material has constituent grains that are layered (or laminated), and each layer is an isotropic, microhomogeneous porous medium. All grains are composed of exactly the same porous constituents, and have the same relative volume fractions. The order of lamination is not important because the up-scaling method used to determine the transversely isotropic (hexagonal) properties of the grains is Backus averaging, which--for quasi-static or long-wavelength behavior--depends only on the volume fractions and layer properties. Grains are then jumbled together totally at random, filling all space, and producing an overall isotropic poroelastic medium. The poroelastic behavior of this medium is then analyzed using the Peselnick-Meister-Watt bounds (of Hashin-Shtrikman type). We study the dependence of the shear modulus on pore fluid properties and determine the range of behavior to be expected. In particular we compare and contrast these results to those anticipated from Gassmann's fluid substitution formulas, and to the predictions of Mavko and Jizba for very low porosity rocks with flat cracks. This approach also permits the study of arbitrary numbers of constituents, but for simplicity the numerical examples are restricted here to just two constituents. This restriction also permits the use of some special exact results available for computing the overall effective stress coefficient in any two-component porous medium. The bounds making use of polycrystalline microstructure are very tight. Results for the shear modulus demonstrate that the ratio of compliance differences R (i.e., shear compliance changes over bulk compliance changes when going from drained to undrained behavior, or vice versa) is usually nonzero and can take a wide range of values, both

  20. Effect of normal compression on the shear modulus of soft tissue in rheological measurements.

    PubMed

    Ayyildiz, Mehmet; Cinoglu, Soner; Basdogan, Cagatay

    2015-09-01

    While the effect of normal compression on the measured shear material properties of viscoelastic solids has been already acknowledged in rheological studies in the literature, to our knowledge, no systematic study has been conducted to investigate this effect in detail to date. In this study, we perform two sets of experiments to investigate the effect of normal strain and strain rate on the dynamic shear moduli of bovine liver. First, we apply normal compressive strain to the cylindrical bovine samples up to 20% at loading rates of v=0.000625, 0.00625, 0.0625, 0.315, 0.625 mm/s. Second, we perform torsional shear loading experiments, in the frequency range of ω=0.1-10 Hz, under varying amounts of compressive pre-strain (ε=1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, 12.5%, 15%, 17.5% and 20%) applied at the quasi-static loading rate of v=0.000625 mm/s. The results of the experiments show that the shear moduli of bovine liver increase with compressive pre-strain. A hyper-viscoelastic constitutive model is developed and fit to the experimental data to estimate the true shear moduli of bovine liver for zero pre-compression. With respect to this reference value, the mean relative error in the measurement of shear moduli of bovine liver varies between 0.2% and 243.1% for the compressive pre-strain varying from ε=1% to 20%. The dynamic shear modulus of bovine liver for compressive pre-strain values higher than ε>2.5% are found to be statistically different than the true shear moduli estimated for zero compressive strain (p<0.05). PMID:26042768

  1. Possible contribution of low shear modulus C{sub 44} to the low Young's modulus of Ti-36Nb-5Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingkun; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing; Guo, Shun; Ren, Xiaobing

    2014-09-29

    Despite the importance of single-crystal elastic constants of β-phase titanium alloys in understanding their low Young's modulus—a property crucial for many applications, such data are often difficult to obtain when the alloy composition is close to the instability limit of the β phase, where the presence of α' martensite precludes the fabrication of β-phase single crystal. In the present study, we extracted the single-crystal elastic constants of such a β-phase titanium alloy with low Young's modulus, Ti-36Nb-5Zr (wt. %), from polycrystalline specimens by using an in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique. It is indicated that the low Young's modulus of the alloy originates from the anomalously low shear modulus C{sub 44} as well as the low shear modulus C′, which is different from a common viewpoint that the Young's modulus of β-phase titanium alloys is dominantly controlled by the C′. This suggests that low C{sub 44} is an important contributor to low Young's modulus for instable β-phase titanium alloys.

  2. Possible contribution of low shear modulus C₄₄ to the low Young’s modulus of Ti-36Nb-5Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingkun; Guo, Shun; Ren, Xiaobing; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing

    2014-09-29

    Despite the importance of single-crystal elastic constants of β-phase titanium alloys in understanding their low Young's modulus—a property crucial for many applications, such data are often difficult to obtain when the alloy composition is close to the instability limit of the β phase, where the presence of α" martensite precludes the fabrication of β-phase single crystal. In the present study, we extracted the single-crystal elastic constants of such a β-phase titanium alloy with low Young's modulus, Ti-36Nb-5Zr (wt. %), from polycrystalline specimens by using an in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique. It is indicated that the low Young's modulus of the alloy originates from the anomalously low shear modulus C₄₄ as well as the low shear modulus C', which is different from a common viewpoint that the Young's modulus of β-phase titanium alloys is dominantly controlled by the C'. This suggests that low C₄₄ is an important contributor to low Young's modulus for instable β-phase titanium alloys.

  3. Calculating tissue shear modulus and pressure by 2D Log-Elastographic methods.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Joyce R; Zhang, Ning; Manduca, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Shear modulus imaging, often called elastography, enables detection and characterization of tissue abnormalities. In this paper the data is two displacement components obtained from successive MR or ultrasound data sets acquired while the tissue is excited mechanically. A 2D plane strain elastic model is assumed to govern the 2D displacement, u. The shear modulus, μ, is unknown and whether or not the first Lamé parameter, λ, is known the pressure p = λ∇ · u which is present in the plane strain model cannot be measured and is unreliably computed from measured data and can be shown to be an order one quantity in the units kPa. So here we present a 2D Log-Elastographic inverse algorithm that: (1) simultaneously reconstructs the shear modulus, μ, and p, which together satisfy a first order partial differential equation system, with the goal of imaging μ; (2) controls potential exponential growth in the numerical error; and (3) reliably reconstructs the quantity p in the inverse algorithm as compared to the same quantity computed with a forward algorithm. This work generalizes the Log-Elastographic algorithm in [20] which uses one displacement component, is derived assuming the component satisfies the wave equation, and is tested on synthetic data computed with the wave equation model. The 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm is tested on 2D synthetic data and 2Din-vivo data from Mayo Clinic. We also exhibit examples to show that the 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm improves the quality of the recovered images as compared to the Log-Elastographic and Direct Inversion algorithms. PMID:21822349

  4. Calculating tissue shear modulus and pressure by 2D Log-Elastographic methods

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Joyce R; Zhang, Ning; Manduca, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Shear modulus imaging, often called elastography, enables detection and characterization of tissue abnormalities. In this paper the data is two displacement components obtained from successive MR or ultrasound data sets acquired while the tissue is excited mechanically. A 2D plane strain elastic model is assumed to govern the 2D displacement, u. The shear modulus, μ, is unknown and whether or not the first Lamé parameter, λ, is known the pressure p = λ∇ · u which is present in the plane strain model cannot be measured and is unreliably computed from measured data and can be shown to be an order one quantity in the units kPa. So here we present a 2D Log-Elastographic inverse algorithm that: (1) simultaneously reconstructs the shear modulus, μ, and p, which together satisfy a first order partial differential equation system, with the goal of imaging μ; (2) controls potential exponential growth in the numerical error; and (3) reliably reconstructs the quantity p in the inverse algorithm as compared to the same quantity computed with a forward algorithm. This work generalizes the Log-Elastographic algorithm in [20] which uses one displacement component, is derived assuming the component satisfies the wave equation, and is tested on synthetic data computed with the wave equation model. The 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm is tested on 2D synthetic data and 2D in-vivo data from Mayo Clinic. We also exhibit examples to show that the 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm improves the quality of the recovered images as compared to the Log-Elastographic and Direct Inversion algorithms. PMID:21822349

  5. Lateral Earth Pressure at Rest and Shear Modulus Measurements on Hanford Sludge Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bauman, Nathan N.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Arduino, P.; Keller, P. J.

    2010-09-30

    This report describes the equipment, techniques, and results of lateral earth pressure at rest and shear modulus measurements on kaolin clay as well as two chemical sludge simulants. The testing was performed in support of the problem of hydrogen gas retention and release encountered in the double- shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) are being transferred to double-shell tanks (DSTs) for safety reasons (some SSTs are leaking or are in danger of leaking), but the available DST space is limited.

  6. Nondestructive measurements of implant-bone interface shear modulus and effects of implant geometry in pull-out tests.

    PubMed

    Berzins, A; Shah, B; Weinans, H; Sumner, D R

    1997-03-01

    Push-out and pull-out tests are used for destructive evaluation of implant-bone interface strength. Because nondestructive mechanical tests would allow maintenance of an intact interface for subsequent morphological study, we developed such a test to determine the shear modulus of the interface by measuring the shear deformation of a thin layer adjacent to the implant. A polyurethane foam model was used to test the experimental setup on a group of nine cylindrical implants with three different lengths (15-48 mm) and three different diameters (5-9.7 mm). The shear modulus of the interface, as calculated from the pull-out test, was validated against the shear modulus of the foam derived from tensile tests. The two values of shear modulus were well correlated (R2 = 0.8, p < 0.001), thus encouraging further application of the setup for tests of implant-bone interface mechanics. In addition, we also examined the effects of implant length and diameter. The length of the implants had a significant influence on the interface shear modulus (p < 0.05), indicating that comparisons of the variable should only be made of implants with the same length. The length and diameter of the implants were not critical parameters for the ultimate fixation strength. PMID:9086403

  7. The effect of treatments on the shear modulus of human hair measured by the single fiber torsion pendulum.

    PubMed

    Harper, D L; Kamath, Y K

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies with the single fiber torsion pendulum have alluded to the ability of this device to selectively measure different regions of a fiber, namely, the core and the sheath. This selective ability of the torsion pendulum was explored further as a means of better understanding treatments effects. First, a substantial reduction in shear modulus was caused by simply abrading the hair fiber surface to remove the cuticle layer. In another experiment, bleaching was found to have a softening effect on the cuticle layer since the shear modulus was reduced significantly. Next, the fibers were subsequently treated with either Polyquaternium-10 or cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CETAB) and measured again. The CETAB treatment resulted in an increase in the shear modulus indicating fortification of the cuticle layer. Polyquaternium-10 treatment increased the shear modulus slightly. These different effects are explained by the molecular sizes of these compounds-CETAB is a small molecule which can penetrate into the cuticle layer while Polyquaternium-10 is too large to do so. Lastly, the effect of moisture was evaluated by varying the humidity inside a chamber surrounding the sample mounted in the torsion pendulum. This showed a substantial inverse relationship between humidity level and shear modulus that was much more pronounced for bleached hair fibers than for untreated. PMID:17728933

  8. Method and apparatus for measuring shear modulus and viscosity of a monomolecular film

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Bernard M.; Miyano, Kenjiro; Ketterson, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Instrument for measuring the shear modulus of a monomolecular film comprises a circular trough having inwardly sloping sides containing a liquid for supporting the monolayer on the surface thereof; a circular rotor suspended above the trough such that the lower surface of the rotor contacts the surface of the liquid, positioned such that the axis of the rotor is concentric with the axis of the trough and freely rotable about its axis; apparatus for hydrostatically compressing the monolayer in the annular region formed between the rotor and the sides of the trough; and apparatus for rotating the trough about its axis. Preferably, hydrostatic compression of the monolayer is achieved by removing liquid from the bottom of the trough (decreasing the surface area) while raising the trough vertically along its axis to maintain the monolayer at a constant elevation (and maintain rotor contact). In order to measure viscosity, a apparatus for rotating the rotor about its axis is added to the apparatus.

  9. Method and apparatus for measuring shear modulus and viscosity of a monomolecular film

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, B.M.; Miyano, K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-10-18

    Apparatus for measuring the shear modulus of a monomolecular film comprises a circular trough having inwardly sloping sides containing a liquid for supporting the monolayer on the surface thereof; a circular rotor suspended above the trough such that the lower surface of the rotor contacts the surface of the liquid, positioned such that the axis of the rotor is concentric with the axis of the trough and freely rotable about its axis; means for hydrostatically compressing the monolayer in the annular region formed between the rotor and the sides of the trough; and means for rotating the trough about its axis. Preferably, hydrostatic compression of the monolayer is achieved by removing liquid from the bottom of the trough (decreasing the surface area) while raising the trough vertically along its axis to maintain the monolayer at a constant elevation (and maintain rotor contact). In order to measure viscosity, a means for rotating the rotor about its axis is added to the apparatus.

  10. Reconstruction of the shear modulus of viscoelastic systems in a thin cylinder: an inversion scheme and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Junyong; Kang, Hyeonbae; Nakamura, Gen; Wang, Yun-Che

    2016-09-01

    We consider a problem of reconstructing the shear modulus of an viscoelastic system in a thin cylinder from the measurements of displacements induced by torques applied at the bottom of the cylinder. The viscoelastic system is a mathematical model of a pendulum-type viscoelastic spectrometer (PVS). We first compute in an explicit form the solution of the viscoelastic system, and then derive with an error estimate the leading order term of the average of the solution. This leading order term yields a nonlinear inversion scheme to determine the shear modulus from the measurements of displacements. We apply the inversion scheme to determine the shear modulus using experimental data acquired from a PVS system.

  11. Determining an Effective Shear Modulus in Tubular Organs for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisena, Robert; Brasseur, James; Costanzo, Francesco; Gregersen, Hans; Zhao, Jingbo

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is central to the mechanics of fluid-filled tubular organs such as the intestine and esophagus. The motions of fluid chyme are driven by a muscularis wall layer of circular and longitudinal muscle fibers. The coupled motions of the fluid and elastic solid phases result from a local balance between active and passive muscle stress components, fluid pressure, and fluid viscous stresses. Model predictions depend on the passive elastic response of the muscularis layer, which is typically parameterized with an average isotropic elastic modulus (EM), currently measured in vivo and in vitro with estimates for total hoop stress within a distension experiment. We have shown that this approach contains serious error due to the overwhelming influence of incompressibility on the hydrostatic component. We present a new approach in which an effective shear modulus, containing only deviatoric contributions, is measured to overcome this serious error. Using in vitro measurements from pig intestines, we compare our new approach to the current method, showing vastly different predictions. We will also report on our current analysis which aims to determine the influence of residual stress on the EM measurements and comment on it use in FSI simulations.

  12. Shear modulus and thermal properties of gutta percha for root canal filling.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, G; Tanaka, T; Torii, M; Inoue, K

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the rheological properties of four commercially available gutta perchas for root canal filling. The relaxation modulus [Gr(0): instantaneous shear modulus] and specific volume of their materials were examined. In addition, the quantity of heat was also studied by differential scanning calorimeter. In a lower temperature range than the first-order transition temperature (melting point), the Gr(0) values of each material were almost identical. A marked decrease of Gr(0) was observed at the melting point, and the range of the first-order transition temperature at heating was from 42.0 to 60.0 degrees C. At higher temperatures than the first-order transition temperature of each material, a considerable difference in Gr(0) values was observed. The transition temperatures obtained by the results of the Gr(0), specific volume and quantity of heat agreed with one another. A marked specific volume change was observed at the first-order transition temperature. The technique using melted gutta percha may not be favourable compared with the conventional lateral condensation technique because melted gutta percha undergoes a large amount of shrinkage during setting. PMID:15525394

  13. The effect of three-dimensional postural change on shear elastic modulus of the iliotibial band.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Shiratori, Sakiko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-06-01

    To understand and treat iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome, caused by excessive compression between the ITB and lateral femoral condyle, it is important to identify factors contributing to an increase in ITB stiffness. The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors that contribute to an increase in ITB stiffness by examining the relationship between three-dimensional postural changes and ITB stiffness. Fourteen healthy individuals performed one-leg standing under 7 conditions (including normal one-leg standing as a control condition) in which the pelvic position was changed in three planes. The shear elastic modulus in the ITB was measured using shear-wave elastography, as a measure of ITB stiffness. The three-dimensional joint angles and external joint moments in the hip and knee joints were also measured to confirm the changes in joint angles and external load. Compared to the normal one-leg standing condition, ITB stiffness was significantly increased in the pelvic posterior tilted position (i.e. hip extension), contralateral pelvic dropped position (i.e. hip adduction), and contralateral pelvic posterior rotated position (i.e. hip external rotation). The findings suggest that interventions to reduce hip extension, adduction, and external rotation might be useful if these excessive positional changes are detected in patients with ITB syndrome. PMID:27151824

  14. Study to determine and analyze the strength of high modulus glass in epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Glass composition research was conducted to produce a high modulus, high strength beryllium-free glass fiber. This program was built on the previous research for developing high modulus, high strength glass fibers which had a 5 weight percent beryllia content. The fibers resulting from the composition program were then used to produce fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composites which were compared with composites reinforced by commercial high modulus glass fibers, Thornel S graphite fiber, and hybrids where the external quarters were reinforced with Thornel S graphite fiber and the interior half with glass fiber as well as the reverse hybrid. The composites were given tensile strength, compressive strength, short-beam shear strength, creep and fatigue tests. Comments are included on the significance of the test data.

  15. Ultra-high modulus organic fiber hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champion, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental organic fiber, designated Fiber D, was characterized, and its performance as a reinforcement for composites was investigated. The fiber has a modulus of 172 GPa, tensile strength of 3.14 GPa, and density of 1.46 gm/cu cm. Unidirectional Fiber D/epoxy laminates containing 60 percent fiber by volume were evaluated in flexure, shear, and compression, at room temperature and 121 C in both the as fabricated condition and after humidity aging for 14 days at 95 percent RH and 82 C. A modulus of 94.1 GPa, flexure strength of 700 MPa, shear strength of 54 MPa, and compressive strength of 232 MPa were observed at room temperature. The as-fabricated composites at elevated temperature and humidity aged material at room temperature had properties 1 to 20 percent below these values. Combined humidity aging plus evaluated temperature testing resulted in even lower mechanical properties. Hybrid composite laminates of Fiber D with Fiber FP alumina or Thornel 300 graphite fiber were also evaluated and significant increases in modulus, flexure, and compressive strengths were observed.

  16. Consideration of shear modulus in biomechanical analysis of peri-implant jaw bone: accuracy verification using image-based multi-scale simulation.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Satoru; Naito, Hiroyoshi; Tamatsu, Yuichi; Takano, Naoki; Abe, Shinichi; Ide, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of shear modulus on the analytical accuracy in peri-implant jaw bone simulation. A 3D finite element (FE) model was prepared based on micro-CT data obtained from images of a jawbone containing implants. A precise model that closely reproduced the trabecular architecture, and equivalent models that gave shear modulus values taking the trabecular architecture into account, were prepared. Displacement norms during loading were calculated, and the displacement error was evaluated. The model that gave shear modulus values taking the trabecular architecture into account showed an analytical error of around 10-20% in the cancellous bone region, while in the model that used incorrect shear modulus, the analytical error exceeded 40% in certain regions. The shear modulus should be evaluated precisely in addition to the Young modulus when considering the mechanics of peri-implant trabecular bone structure. PMID:23719004

  17. Shear modulus and attenuation Qs of olivine from forced-oscillation measurements under mantle conditions and seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrillat, J. P.; Le Godec, Y.; Philippe, J.; Bergame, F.; Chambat, F.; Mezouar, N.; Tauzin, B.

    2015-12-01

    Interpretation of seismic profiles and tomographic models of the Earth's mantle requires exploring the viscoelastic behaviour of rocks / minerals at low strains and seismic frequencies. These physical properties can be investigated by cyclic loading experiments that measure the dynamic response of materials to an applied stress. To date, these data were only accessible by torsional forced-oscillation tests performed in gas vessel apparatus and limited to ~ 0.3 GPa. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of forced-oscillations tests up to the Earth's upper mantle conditions thanks to the development of a torsion module in the Paris-Edinburgh press and the use of X-ray radiation. The experimental device is based on the frame of a V7 Paris-Edinburgh press where both of the two opposed anvils can rotate through two sets of gear reducer and thrust bearings located at the end of each anvil. The accurate rotation of the anvils is monitored by stepper motors and encoders, and enables to apply a low-frequency sinusoidal torque on the cell assembly. The sample and an elastic standard of known modulus and negligible dissipation are loaded in series in a boron-epoxy gasket. The measurement of the relative amplitudes and phases of the torsional mode displacements in standard and sample provides for the determination of the shear modulus and of the strain energy dissipation for the sample. The main challenge in applying the forced-oscillation method at high pressure is the need of a technique for measuring stress and strain with sufficient precision, and with sufficiently short measurement time, while the sample is embedded in the high-pressure vessel. These technical difficulties can be overcome through the use of synchrotron radiation. The strain of the sample is measured in situ and in real-time through X-ray radiography, while the stress is estimated from the strain of the elastic standard (a corundum sample in our case). Hence, coupling the new RoToPEc device with synchrotron

  18. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  19. High Modulus Asphalt Concrete with Dolomite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Smirnovs, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dolomite is one of the most widely available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1,000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality, mainly, its LA index (The Los Angeles abrasion test). Therefore, mostly the imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used, which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue, and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance with EN 13108-1 standard.

  20. Characterizing the Effect of Temperature and Magnetic Field Strengths on the Complex Shear Modulus Properties of Magnetorheological (mr) Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chooi, W. W.; Oyadiji, S. O.

    When a magnetic field is applied across MR fluids, a yield stress is developed, and their rheological properties can then be categorized into two distinct regimes; pre-yield and post-yield. This paper concerns the viscoelastic behaviour of MR fluids in the pre-yield region. Oscillatory tests were carried out to determine the complex shear modulus properties of MR fluids between the temperature range of -20°C and +50°C. The test results show that the storage modulus and loss modulus increased in value as the excitation frequency was increased from 5Hz to 50Hz. The complex modulus was also found to be influenced by changes in temperature; the higher the temperature, the lower the complex modulus. This is consistent with the behaviour of viscoelastic polymers. The sets of temperature-dependent and frequency-dependent data were subsequently condensed using the method of reduced variables into master curves of complex modulus which effectively extended the frequency coverage of the data at the reference temperature.

  1. A Methodology for the Indirect Determination and Spatial Resolution of Shear Modulus of PDMS-Silica Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, B; Reimer, J; Maxwell, R

    2007-08-29

    A methodology is described that allows for the spatial resolution of shear modulus in silica-filled PDMS elastomers via {sup 1}H relaxation measurements and stray-field imaging (STRAFI) techniques. Traditional Hahn echoes provide a simple, robust route to the extraction of a proton residual dipolar coupling constant (RDC), a direct measure of chain mobility and a parameter that can be corollated to numerous mechanical properties. Defining a dimensionless RDC eliminates any artifacts associated with low-field measurement and allows the RDC to become independent of field strength. A direct correlation between the NMR determined dimensionless RDC and results from dynamic mechanical analysis is presented, then employed via STRAFI to determine spatial variations in moduli associated with irradiated elastomeric materials. Reliable performance, despite poorly optimized STRAFI conditions, is demonstrated with an error of no more than 22% between the calculated shear modulus and the measured value via DMA.

  2. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with

  3. Simultaneous investigation of shear modulus and torsional resonance of solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeho; Choi, Jaewon; Shirahama, Keiya; Kim, Eunseong

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the origin of a resonant period drop of a torsional oscillator (TO) containing solid 4He by inspecting its relation to a change in elastic modulus. To understand this relationship directly, we measure both phenomena simultaneously using a TO with a pair of concentric piezoelectric transducers inserted in its annulus. We confirm experimentally that both anomalies are directly related. Although the temperature, 3He concentration, and frequency dependence are essentially the same, a marked discrepancy in the drive amplitude dependence is observed. We find that this discrepancy originates from the anisotropic response of polycrystalline solid 4He connected with low-angle grain boundaries by studying the shear modulus parallel to and perpendicular to the driving direction.

  4. The Effect of Deformation Defect of the Shear Modulus of a Lubricant on the Boundary Friction Phase Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyashenko, I. A.; Manko, N. N.

    2015-09-01

    An analysis of an ultrathin lubricant layer squeezed between two atomically-smooth solid surfaces during their reciprocal motion is performed. Considering the deformation defect of the shear modulus, the effect of additive fluctuations of stress, strain, and temperature on melting of the lubricating material is investigated. The influence of the system parameters of the phase diagram is investigated for the case where the temperature intensity noise and the friction surface temperature control the regions of dry, liquid and stick-slip friction. The plots of effective potential and probability distribution are constructed as a function of stress, whose form controls the mode of friction.

  5. Mechanical Components from Highly Recoverable, Low Apparent Modulus Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Stanford, Malcolm K. (Inventor); DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A material for use as a mechanical component is formed of a superelastic intermetallic material having a low apparent modulus and a high hardness. The superelastic intermetallic material is conditioned to be dimensionally stable, devoid of any shape memory effect and have a stable superelastic response without irrecoverable deformation while exhibiting strains of at least 3%. The method of conditioning the superelastic intermetallic material is described. Another embodiment relates to lightweight materials known as ordered intermetallics that perform well in sliding wear applications using conventional liquid lubricants and are therefore suitable for resilient, high performance mechanical components such as gears and bearings.

  6. Simultaneous measurements of the torsional oscillator and shear modulus of solid 4He diluted with various 3He concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeho; Choi, Wonsuk; Choi, Jaewon; Jang, Seong; Shirahama, Keiya; Kim, Eunseong

    2013-03-01

    In 2004, Kim and Chan observed the non-classical rotational inertia (NCRI) of solid helium-4 by using a torsional oscillator (TO). Below 200mK, the resonance period of solid helium dropped, which was originally interpreted as the mass decoupling of the fraction of solid helium. Recently, anomalous increase in the shear modulus of solid helium was found and showed striking similarity in temperature, frequency, 3He concentration, and drive dependence to those of the NCRI. To understand the connection between the NCRI and the shear modulus anomaly, we simultaneously measure the change in the resonance frequency and the stiffness of solid helium below 200mK. The torsion cell contains a pair of the concentric piezoelectric transducers (PZT) which defines an annular channel for the simultaneous measurements. We will report the interference between the motion of the TO at resonance and AC motion of the PZT in solid 4He with different 3He concentration. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the National Research Foundation of Korea through the Creative Research Initiatives.

  7. High modulus filament wound vessels for cryogenic containers in spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, R. A.; Lark, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Compared to metallic vessels, filament-wound vessels for containment of cryogens and high pressure gases offer high potential weight savings for NASA spacecraft applications. Since carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites exhibit high strength-to-density ratios, high-cycle fatigue life, and excellent strain compatibility with internal metallic liners, filament-wound carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were evaluated for application to cryogenic internal pressure vessels. Compared to room temperature values, the cryogenic strengths of the composites were reduced by about 15% at -423 F (with the exception of one composite) while moduli increased as much as 25%. Filament-wound carbon fiber/epoxy resin vessel specimens, made by three fabricators, defined and solved problems in the processing of these friable high-modulus fibers into structurally efficient vessel specimens.

  8. Analysis of the variation in the determination of the shear modulus of the erythrocyte membrane: Effects of the constitutive law and membrane modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakopoulos, P.

    2012-04-01

    Despite research spanning several decades, the exact value of the shear modulus Gs of the erythrocyte membrane is still ambiguous, and a wealth of studies, using measurements based on micropipette aspirations, ektacytometry systems and other flow chambers, and optical tweezers, as well as application of several models, have found different average values in the range 2-10μN/m. Our study shows that different methodologies have predicted the correct shear modulus for the specific membrane modeling employed, i.e., the variation in the shear modulus determination results from the specific membrane modeling. Available experimental findings from ektacytometry systems and optical tweezers suggest that the dynamics of the erythrocyte membrane is strain hardening at both moderate and large deformations. Thus the erythrocyte shear modulus cannot be determined accurately using strain-softening models (such as the neo-Hookean and Evans laws) or strain-softening/strain-hardening models (such as the Yeoh law), which overestimate the erythrocyte shear modulus. According to our analysis, the only available strain-hardening constitutive law, the Skalak law, is able to match well both deformation-shear rate data from ektacytometry and force-extension data from optical tweezers at moderate and large strains, using an average value of the shear modulus of Gs=2.4-2.75μN/m, i.e., very close to that found in the linear regime of deformations via force-extension data from optical tweezers, Gs=2.5±0.4μN/m. In addition, our analysis suggests that a standard deviation in Gs of 0.4-0.5μN/m (owing to the inherent differences between erythrocytes within a large population) describes well the findings from optical tweezers at small and large strains as well as from micropipette aspirations.

  9. A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus for potential application in seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Mi

    2015-09-01

    A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus is developed. This MRE was synthesized by filling NdFeB particles into polyurethane (PU)/ epoxy (EP) interpenetrating network (IPN) structure. The anisotropic samples were prepared in a permanent magnetic field and magnetized in an electromagnetic field of 1 T. Dynamic mechanical responses of the MRE to applied magnetic fields are investigated through magneto-rheometer, and morphology of MREs is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). Test result indicates that when the test field orientation is parallel to that of the sample's magnetization, the shear modulus of sample increases. On the other hand, when the orientation is opposite to that of the sample's magnetization, shear modulus decreases. In addition, this PU/EP IPN matrix based MRE has a high-damping property, with high loss factor and can be controlled by applying magnetic field. It is expected that the high damping property and the ability of bi-directional magnetic-control modulus of this MRE offer promising advantages in seismologic application.

  10. A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus for potential application in seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Miao Qi, Song; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Mi

    2015-09-14

    A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus is developed. This MRE was synthesized by filling NdFeB particles into polyurethane (PU)/ epoxy (EP) interpenetrating network (IPN) structure. The anisotropic samples were prepared in a permanent magnetic field and magnetized in an electromagnetic field of 1 T. Dynamic mechanical responses of the MRE to applied magnetic fields are investigated through magneto-rheometer, and morphology of MREs is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). Test result indicates that when the test field orientation is parallel to that of the sample's magnetization, the shear modulus of sample increases. On the other hand, when the orientation is opposite to that of the sample's magnetization, shear modulus decreases. In addition, this PU/EP IPN matrix based MRE has a high-damping property, with high loss factor and can be controlled by applying magnetic field. It is expected that the high damping property and the ability of bi-directional magnetic-control modulus of this MRE offer promising advantages in seismologic application.

  11. Application of diffusion barriers to high modulus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veltri, R. D.; Douglas, F. C.; Paradis, E. L.; Galasso, F. S.

    1977-01-01

    Barrier layers were coated onto high-modulus fibers, and nickel and titanium layers were overcoated as simulated matrix materials. The objective was to coat the high-strength fibers with unreactive selected materials without degrading the fibers. The fibers were tungsten, niobium, and single-crystal sapphire, while the materials used as barrier coating layers were Al2O3, Y2O3, TiC, ZrC, WC with 14% Co, and HfO2. An ion-plating technique was used to coat the fibers. The fibers were subjected to high-temperature heat treatments to evaluate the effectiveness of the barrier layer in preventing fiber-metal interactions. Results indicate that Al2O3, Y2O3, and HfO2 can be used as barrier layers to minimize the nickel-tungsten interaction. Further investigation, including thermal cycling tests at 1090 C, revealed that HfO2 is probably the best of the three.

  12. Ideal glass transitions, shear modulus, activated dynamics, and yielding in fluids of nonspherical objects.

    PubMed

    Yatsenko, Galina; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01

    An extension of naive ideal mode coupling theory (MCT) and its generalization to treat activated barrier hopping and glassy dynamics in fluids and suspensions composed of nonspherical hard core objects is proposed. An effective center-of-mass description is adopted. It corresponds to a specific type of pre-averaging of the dynamical consequences of orientational degrees of freedom. The simplest case of particles composed of symmetry-equivalent interaction sites is considered. The theory is implemented for a homonuclear diatomic shape of variable bond length. The naive MCT glass transition boundary is predicted to be a nonmonotonic function of the length-to-width or aspect ratio and occurs at a nearly unique value of the dimensionless compressibility. The latter quantifies the amplitude of long wavelength thermal density fluctuations, thereby (empirically) suggesting a tight connection between the onset of localization and thermodynamics. Localization lengths and elastic shear moduli for different aspect ratio and volume fraction systems approximately collapse onto master curves based on a reduced volume fraction variable that quantifies the distance from the ideal glass transition. Calculations of the entropic barrier height and hopping time, maximum restoring force, and absolute yield stress and strain as a function of diatomic aspect ratio and volume fraction have been performed. Strong correlations of these properties with the dimensionless compressibility are also found, and nearly universal dependences have been numerically identified based on property-specific nondimensionalizations. Generalization of the approach to rigid rods, disks, and variable shaped molecules is possible, including oriented liquid crystalline phases. PMID:17212498

  13. Evaluation of high-modulus pitch/cyanate material systems for dimensionally stable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Richard A.; Derby, Eddy A.

    1992-09-01

    Dimensional stability in composite structures has mainly focused on near-zero CTE, high- modulus fiber/epoxy resin systems. However, hygrothermal stability has been demonstrated to be a serious concern for structures moisturized on earth and dried in orbit. Composite sealing techniques have been developed to prevent this moisture absorption and desorption with the concomitant dimensional changes. New resin system are being developed which absorb significantly less moisture and show promise as optional systems in dimensionally stable structures. These resin systems have not been evaluated for their physical and mechanical properties. This paper describes the testing of various high-modulus, cyanate ester resin systems for evaluation in dimensionally stable composite applications. Physical testing included moisture absorption testing, coefficient of thermal expansion, and hygrothermal strain change. Mechanical testing included tensile, compression, Iosipescu shear, and bonded joint allowables. A comparison of the thermomechanical properties for the cyanate ester resin systems is made with a P75S/ERL1962 baseline epoxy resin systems.

  14. Experimental development of low-frequency shear modulus measurements during flow-through CO2 induced dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, S.; Bonner, B. P.; Voltolini, M.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    -100 Hz) shear modulus and attenuation while CO2 saturated water dissolves a carbonate sample. An equivalent flow experiment was conducted utilizing x-ray micro tomography (Beamline 8.3.2, Advanced Light Source, LBNL) to image the evolution of grain morphology and geometry under similar injection conditions. These methods and results will be incorporated into analysis of planned field scale seismic monitoring experiments with the eventual goal of refining reactive transport models at GCS sites through dynamic seismic imaging of zones with measurable matrix dissolution.

  15. High modulus invert analog glass compositions containing beryllia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of, in mols, 10-45% SiO2, 2-15% Li2O, 3-34% BeO, 12-36% of at least one bivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of CaO, ZnO, MgO and CuO, 10-39% of at least one trivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, B2O3, La2O3, Y2O3 and the mixed rare earth oxides, the total number of said bivalent and trivalent oxides being at least three, and up to 10% of a tetravalent oxide selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2.

  16. Low Modulus Biomimetic Microgel Particles with High Loading of Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Merkel, Timothy J.; Pandya, Ashish; Napier, Mary E.; Luft, J. Christopher; Daniel, Will; Sheiko, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    We synthesized extremely deformable red blood cell-like microgel particles and loaded them with bovine hemoglobin (Hb) to potentiate oxygen transport. With similar shape and size as red blood cells (RBCs), the particles were fabricated using the PRINT® (Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates) technique. Low crosslinking of the hydrogel resulted in very low mesh density for these particles, allowing passive diffusion of hemoglobin throughout the particles. Hb was secured in the particles through covalent conjugation of the lysine groups of Hb to carboxyl groups in the particles via EDC/NHS coupling. Confocal microscopy of particles bound to fluorescent dye-labeled Hb confirmed the uniform distribution of Hb throughout the particle interior, as opposed to the surface conjugation only. High loading ratios, up to 5 times the amount of Hb to polymer by weight, were obtained, without a significant effect on particle stability, shape, though particle diameter decreased slightly with Hb conjugation. Analysis of the protein by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of Hb was unperturbed by conjugation to the particles. Methemoglobin in the particles could be maintained at a low level and the loaded Hb could still bind oxygen as studied by UV-vis spectroscopy. Hb-loaded particles with moderate loading ratios demonstrated excellent deformability in microfluidic devices, easily deforming to pass through restricted pores half as wide as the diameter of the particles. The suspension of concentrated particles with Hb concentration of 5.2 g/dL showed comparable viscosity to that of mouse blood, and the particles remained intact even after being sheared at a constant high rate (1,000 1/s) for 10 min. Armed with the ability to control size, shape, deformability, and loading of Hb into RBC mimics, we will discuss the implications for artificial blood. PMID:22852860

  17. Low modulus biomimetic microgel particles with high loading of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Merkel, Timothy J; Pandya, Ashish; Napier, Mary E; Luft, J Christopher; Daniel, Will; Sheiko, Sergei; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2012-09-10

    We synthesized extremely deformable red blood cell-like microgel particles and loaded them with bovine hemoglobin (Hb) to potentiate oxygen transport. With similar shape and size as red blood cells (RBCs), the particles were fabricated using the PRINT (particle replication in nonwetting templates) technique. Low cross-linking of the hydrogel resulted in very low mesh density for these particles, allowing passive diffusion of hemoglobin throughout the particles. Hb was secured in the particles through covalent conjugation of the lysine groups of Hb to carboxyl groups in the particles via EDC/NHS coupling. Confocal microscopy of particles bound to fluorescent dye-labeled Hb confirmed the uniform distribution of Hb throughout the particle interior, as opposed to the surface conjugation only. High loading ratios, up to 5 times the amount of Hb to polymer by weight, were obtained without a significant effect on particle stability and shape, though particle diameter decreased slightly with Hb conjugation. Analysis of the protein by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of Hb was unperturbed by conjugation to the particles. Methemoglobin in the particles could be maintained at a low level and the loaded Hb could still bind oxygen, as studied by UV-vis spectroscopy. Hb-loaded particles with moderate loading ratios demonstrated excellent deformability in microfluidic devices, easily deforming to pass through restricted pores half as wide as the diameter of the particles. The suspension of concentrated particles with a Hb concentration of 5.2 g/dL showed comparable viscosity to that of mouse blood, and the particles remained intact even after being sheared at a constant high rate (1000 1/s) for 10 min. Armed with the ability to control size, shape, deformability, and loading of Hb into RBC mimics, we will discuss the implications for artificial blood. PMID:22852860

  18. Shear Modulus Estimation on Vastus Intermedius of Elderly and Young Females over the Entire Range of Isometric Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Li, Tian-Jie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Elderly people often suffer from sarcopenia in their lower extremities, which gives rise to the increased susceptibility of fall. Comparing the mechanical properties of the knee extensor/flexors on elderly and young subjects is helpful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the muscle aging process. However, although the stiffness of skeletal muscle has been proved to be positively correlated to its non-fatiguing contraction intensity by some existing methods, this conclusion has not been verified above 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) due to the limitation of their measurement range. In this study, a vibro-ultrasound system was set up to achieve a considerably larger measurement range on muscle stiffness estimation. Its feasibility was verified on self-made silicone phantoms by comparing with the mechanical indentation method. The system was then used to assess the stiffness of vastus intermedius (VI), one of the knee extensors, on 10 healthy elderly female subjects (56.7±4.9 yr) and 10 healthy young female subjects (27.6±5.0 yr). The VI stiffness in its action direction was confirmed to be positively correlated to the % MVC level (R2 = 0.999) over the entire range of isometric contraction, i.e. from 0% MVC (relaxed state) to 100% MVC. Furthermore, it was shown that there was no significant difference between the mean VI shear modulus of the elderly and young subjects in a relaxed state (p>0.1). However, when performing step isometric contraction, the VI stiffness of young female subjects was found to be larger than that of elderly participants (p<0.001), especially at the relatively higher contraction levels. The results expanded our knowledge on the mechanical property of the elderly’s skeletal muscle and its relationship with intensity of active contraction. Furthermore, the vibro-ultrasound system has a potential to become a powerful tool for investigating the elderly’s muscle diseases. PMID:24991890

  19. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  20. Shear Load Transfer in High and Low Stress Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Background Tendon is an integral part of joint movement and stability, as it functions to transmit load from muscle to bone. It has an anisotropic, fibrous hierarchical structure that is generally loaded in the direction of its fibers/fascicles. Internal load distributions are altered when joint motion rotates an insertion site or when local damage disrupts fibers/fascicles, potentially causing inter-fiber (or inter-fascicular) shear. Tendons with different microstructure (helical versus linear) may redistribute loads differently. Method of Approach This study explored how shear redistributes axial loads in rat tail tendon (low stress tendons with linear microstructure) and porcine flexor tendon (high stress with helical microstructure) by creating lacerations on opposite sides of the tendon, ranging from about 20-60% of the tendon width, to create various magnitudes of shear. Differences in fascicular orientation were quantified using polarized light microscopy. Results and Conclusions Unexpectedly, both tendon types maintained about 20% of pre-laceration stress values after overlapping cuts of 60% of tendon width (no intact fibers end to end) suggesting that shear stress transfer can contribute more to overall tendon strength and stiffness than previously reported. All structural parameters for both tendon types decreased linearly with increasing laceration depth. The tail tendon had a more rapid decline in post-laceration elastic stress and modulus parameters as well as a more linear and less tightly packed fascicular structure, suggesting that positional tendons may be less well suited to redistribute loads via a shear mechanism. PMID:25700261

  1. A highly aromatic and sulfonated ionomer for high elastic modulus ionic polymer membrane micro-actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatipoglu, Gokhan; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Ran; Yoonessi, Mitra; Tigelaar, Dean M.; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zhang, Q. M.

    2012-05-01

    A high modulus, sulfonated ionomer synthesized from 4,6-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N,N-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-amine and 4,4‧-biphenol with bis(4-fluorophenyl)sulfone (DPA-PS:BP) is investigated for ionic polymer actuators. The uniqueness of DPA-PS:BP is that it can have a high ionic liquid (IL) uptake and consequently generates a high intrinsic strain response, which is >1.1% under 1.6 V while maintaining a high elastic modulus (i.e. 600 MPa for 65 vol% IL uptake). Moreover, such a high modulus of the active ionomer, originating from the highly aromatic backbone and side-chain-free structure, allows for the fabrication of free-standing thin film micro-actuators (down to 5 µm thickness) via the solution cast method and focused-ion-beam milling, which exhibits a much higher bending actuation, i.e. 43 µm tip displacement and 180 kPa blocking stress for a 200 µm long and 5 µm thick cantilever actuator, compared with the ionic actuators based on traditional ionomers such as Nafion, which has a much lower elastic modulus (50 MPa) and actuation strain.

  2. Performance evaluation of high modulus asphalt concrete mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Zaumanis, M.

    2016-04-01

    Dolomite is one of the most available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality (mainly, LA index). Therefore, mostly imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance to EN 13108-1 standard.

  3. In Vitro Engineering of High Modulus Cartilage-Like Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Seedhom, Bahaa B.; Carey, Duane O.; Bulpitt, Andy J.; Treanor, Darren E.; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    To date, the outcomes of cartilage repair have been inconsistent and have frequently yielded mechanically inferior fibrocartilage, thereby increasing the chances of damage recurrence. Implantation of constructs with biochemical composition and mechanical properties comparable to natural cartilage could be advantageous for long-term repair. This study attempted to create such constructs, in vitro, using tissue engineering principles. Bovine synoviocytes were seeded on nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate fiber scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks, after which uniaxial compressive loading was applied using an in-house bioreactor for 1 h per day, at a frequency of 1 Hz, for a further 84 days. The initial loading conditions, determined from the mechanical properties of the immature constructs after 4 weeks in chondrogenic culture, were strains ranging between 13% and 23%. After 56 days (sustained at 84 days) of loading, the constructs were stained homogenously with Alcian blue and for type-II collagen. Dynamic compressive moduli were comparable to the high end values for native cartilage and proportional to Alcian blue staining intensity. We suggest that these high moduli values were attributable to the bioreactor setup, which caused the loading regime to change as the constructs developed, that is, the applied stress and strain increased with construct thickness and stiffness, providing continued sufficient cell stimulation as further matrix was deposited. Constructs containing cartilage-like matrix with response to load similar to that of native cartilage could produce long-term effective cartilage repair when implanted. PMID:26850081

  4. In Vitro Engineering of High Modulus Cartilage-Like Constructs.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Scott; Seedhom, Bahaa B; Carey, Duane O; Bulpitt, Andy J; Treanor, Darren E; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    To date, the outcomes of cartilage repair have been inconsistent and have frequently yielded mechanically inferior fibrocartilage, thereby increasing the chances of damage recurrence. Implantation of constructs with biochemical composition and mechanical properties comparable to natural cartilage could be advantageous for long-term repair. This study attempted to create such constructs, in vitro, using tissue engineering principles. Bovine synoviocytes were seeded on nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate fiber scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks, after which uniaxial compressive loading was applied using an in-house bioreactor for 1 h per day, at a frequency of 1 Hz, for a further 84 days. The initial loading conditions, determined from the mechanical properties of the immature constructs after 4 weeks in chondrogenic culture, were strains ranging between 13% and 23%. After 56 days (sustained at 84 days) of loading, the constructs were stained homogenously with Alcian blue and for type-II collagen. Dynamic compressive moduli were comparable to the high end values for native cartilage and proportional to Alcian blue staining intensity. We suggest that these high moduli values were attributable to the bioreactor setup, which caused the loading regime to change as the constructs developed, that is, the applied stress and strain increased with construct thickness and stiffness, providing continued sufficient cell stimulation as further matrix was deposited. Constructs containing cartilage-like matrix with response to load similar to that of native cartilage could produce long-term effective cartilage repair when implanted. PMID:26850081

  5. High Modulus, High Conductivity Nanostructured Polymer Electrolyte Membranes via Polymerization-Induced Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Lucas; Schulze, Morgan; Hillmyer, Marc; Lodge, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Solvent-free, solid-state polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) will play a vital role in next-generation electrochemical devices such as Li-metal batteries and high- T fuel cells. The primary challenge is that these applications require PEMs with substantial mechanical robustness, as well as high ionic conductivity. The key to optimizing orthogonal macroscopic properties is to use a heterogeneous composite with well-defined nanoscopic morphology--specifically, long-range co-continuity of high modulus and ion transport domains, which has proven difficult to achieve in commonly-studied diblock copolymer-based electrolytes. We report a simple synthetic strategy to generate PEMs via polymerization-induced phase separation, where the delicate balance between controlled addition of styrene onto a poly(ethylene oxide) macro-chain transfer agent and simultaneous chemical crosslinking by divinylbenzene results in a disordered structure with domain size of order 10 nm. Crucially, both domains exhibit long-range continuity, which results in PEMs that are glassy solids (modulus ~ 1 GPa) owing to the isotropic network of stiff, crosslinked polystyrene, and are highly conductive (> 1 mS/cm at 70 °C) because ions migrate in channels of low Tg poly(ethylene oxide).

  6. Internal friction and dynamic modulus in Ru-50Nb ultra-high temperature shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirand, L.; Nó, M. L.; Chastaing, K.; Denquin, A.; San Juan, J.

    2012-10-01

    The martensitic transformations in ultra-high temperature Ru-50Nb shape memory alloys have been studied by internal friction and dynamic modulus measurements. Two successive transformations from the high temperature cubic β phase to a tetragonal β' martensite and then to another monoclinic β″ martensite have been found. Both transformations exhibit a sharp internal friction peak and a clear softening of the dynamic modulus, being a signature of the thermo-elastic martensitic transformations. In addition, a pseudo relaxation peak strongly dependent on time has been found and analyzed, concluding that it is linked to a pinning effect of martensite interfaces by point defects.

  7. Friction and wear of TPS fibers: A study of the adhesion and friction of high modulus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Lee, Ilzoo

    1990-01-01

    The adhesional and frictional forces between filaments in a woven fabric or felt, strongly influenced the processability of the fiber and the mechanical durability of the final product. Even though the contact loads between fibers are low, the area of contact is extremely small giving rise to very high stresses; principally shear stresses. One consequence of these strong adhesional and frictional forces is the resistance of fibers to slide past each other during weaving or when processed into nonwoven mats or felts. Furthermore, the interfiber frictional forces may cause surface damage and thereby reduce the fiber strength. Once formed into fabrics, flexural handling and manipulation of the material again causes individual filaments to rub against each other resulting in modulus, brittle fibers such as those used in thermal protection systems (TPS). The adhesion and friction of organic fibers, notably polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers, have been extensively studied, but there has been very little work reported on high modulus inorganic fibers. An extensive study was made of the adhesion and friction of flame drawn silica fibers in order to develop experimental techniques and a scientific basis for data interpretation. Subsequently, these methods were applied to fibers of interest in TPS materials.

  8. Linear Response Theory for Shear Modulus C66 and Raman Quadrupole Susceptibility: Evidence for Nematic Orbital Fluctuations in Fe-based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontani, Hiroshi; Yamakawa, Youichi

    2014-07-01

    The emergence of the nematic order and fluctuations has been discussed as a central issue in Fe-based superconductors. To clarify the origin of the nematicity, we focus on the shear modulus C66 and the Raman quadrupole susceptibility χx2-y2Raman. Because of the Aslamazov-Larkin vertex correction, the nematic-type orbital fluctuations are induced, and they enhance both 1/C66 and χx2-y2Raman strongly. However, χx2-y2Raman remains finite even at the structure transition temperature TS, because of the absence of the band Jahn-Teller effect and the Pauli (intraband) contribution, as proved in terms of the linear response theory. The present study clarifies that the origin of the nematicity in Fe-based superconductors is the nematic orbital order and fluctuations.

  9. Linear Response Theory for Shear Modulus C66 and Raman Quadrupole Susceptibility: Evidence for Orbital Fluctuations in Fe-Based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontani, Hiroshi; Yamakawa, Youichi; Onari, Seiichiro

    2014-03-01

    Existence of strong nematic fluctuations in various Fe-based superconductors has been discussed as a central issue. To clarify the origin, we discuss both the softening of shear modulus C66 and the enhancement of the charge quadrupole susceptibility observed by Raman spectroscopy χx2-y2 Raman. Due to the Aslamazov-Larkin vertex correction (AL-VC), strong orbital nematic fluctuations are induced by spin fluctuations. The strong development of 1 /C66 is given by the summation of the Pauli and Van-Vleck orbital susceptibilities due to AL-VC, whereas moderate enhancement of χx2-y2 Raman is induced by the Van-Vleck term only. Therefore, a consistent explanation for the difference behavior between two measurements is achieved based on the orbital fluctuation theory.

  10. Linear response theory for shear modulus C66 and Raman quadrupole susceptibility: evidence for nematic orbital fluctuations in Fe-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Kontani, Hiroshi; Yamakawa, Youichi

    2014-07-25

    The emergence of the nematic order and fluctuations has been discussed as a central issue in Fe-based superconductors. To clarify the origin of the nematicity, we focus on the shear modulus C(66) and the Raman quadrupole susceptibility χ(x)(2)-y(2))(Raman). Because of the Aslamazov-Larkin vertex correction, the nematic-type orbital fluctuations are induced, and they enhance both 1/C(66) and χ(x(2)-y(2))(Raman) strongly. However, χ(x)(2)-y(2))(Raman) remains finite even at the structure transition temperature T(S), because of the absence of the band Jahn-Teller effect and the Pauli (intraband) contribution, as proved in terms of the linear response theory. The present study clarifies that the origin of the nematicity in Fe-based superconductors is the nematic orbital order and fluctuations. PMID:25105647

  11. Magnetic resonance characterization of tissue engineered cartilage via changes in relaxation times, diffusion coefficient, and shear modulus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziying

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to describe a combined MR relaxation (T(2) and T(1ρ)), diffusion (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]), and elastography (shear stiffness) method of fully characterizing the development of tissue-engineered cartilage in terms of the changes in its composition, structure, and mechanical properties during tissue growth. Then, we may better use MR-based methodologies to noninvasively monitor and optimize the cartilage tissue engineering process without sacrificing the constructs. This process begins by demonstrating the potential capability of T(2), T(1ρ), ADC, and shear stiffness in characterizing a scaffold-free engineered cartilage. The results show that, in addition to the conventional T(2) and ADC, T(1ρ) and MRE can be used as potential biomarkers to assess the specific changes in proteoglycan content and mechanical properties of engineered cartilage during culture. Moreover, to increase the efficiency of MR characterization, two new methodologies for simultaneous acquisition of diffusion and MRE (dMRE), and T(1ρ) and MRE (T(1ρ)-MRE) are introduced that allow the simultaneous characterization of both biochemical and mechanical properties of engineered cartilage tissue. The feasibilities of dMRE and T(1ρ)-MRE approaches are validated on tissue-mimicking phantoms. The results show good correspondence between simultaneous acquisitions and conventional separate acquisition methods. PMID:25403876

  12. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  13. Application of an elastic 2D tube-waveform tomography to estimate the shear modulus in the vicinity of the FINO3 offshore platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, D.; Wilken, D.; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    The FINO3 project is aimed at the construction of an offshore research platform in the north-sea, hosting research projects dealing with offshore wind energy topics. As part of FINO3 our sub-project deals with the development of new seismic acquisition and inversion concepts for offshore-building foundation soil analysis. We are focussed on the determination of seismic parameters and structural information of the building plot of the platform. Possible changes of the shear modulus of the sediments in the vicinity of the FINO3 monopile due to mechanic loads on the platform are estimated by a tube-waveform tomography. The tube-waves are excited by a hammer blow at the internal wall of the FINO3 monopile above the water line. The tube-waves are propagating through the water column and the sediments and are measured in situ by hydrophones at the external wall of the monopile. Homogenous long wavelength starting models for the waveform tomography are estimated using simple 2D finite difference models. Possible shear-wave velocity starting models range from 150-300 m/s. The resolution of the tube-waveform tomography is estimated by simple chequerboard and random media models. Additionally first results of the data application in the vicinity of the monopile are presented.

  14. High-shear-rate capillary viscometer for inkjet inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Carr, Wallace W.; Bucknall, David G.; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2010-06-01

    A capillary viscometer developed to measure the apparent shear viscosity of inkjet inks at high apparent shear rates encountered during inkjet printing is described. By using the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch equation, true shear viscosity versus true shear rate is obtained. The device is comprised of a constant-flow generator, a static pressure monitoring device, a high precision submillimeter capillary die, and a high stiffness flow path. The system, which is calibrated using standard Newtonian low-viscosity silicone oil, can be easily operated and maintained. Results for measurement of the shear-rate-dependent viscosity of carbon-black pigmented water-based inkjet inks at shear rates up to 2×105 s-1 are discussed. The Cross model was found to closely fit the experimental data. Inkjet ink samples with similar low-shear-rate viscosities exhibited significantly different shear viscosities at high shear rates depending on particle loading.

  15. High-shear-rate capillary viscometer for inkjet inks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xi; Carr, Wallace W.; Bucknall, David G.; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2010-06-15

    A capillary viscometer developed to measure the apparent shear viscosity of inkjet inks at high apparent shear rates encountered during inkjet printing is described. By using the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch equation, true shear viscosity versus true shear rate is obtained. The device is comprised of a constant-flow generator, a static pressure monitoring device, a high precision submillimeter capillary die, and a high stiffness flow path. The system, which is calibrated using standard Newtonian low-viscosity silicone oil, can be easily operated and maintained. Results for measurement of the shear-rate-dependent viscosity of carbon-black pigmented water-based inkjet inks at shear rates up to 2x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} are discussed. The Cross model was found to closely fit the experimental data. Inkjet ink samples with similar low-shear-rate viscosities exhibited significantly different shear viscosities at high shear rates depending on particle loading.

  16. High-Shear Stress Sensitizes Platelets to Subsequent Low-Shear Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Bluestein, Danny; Girdhar, Gaurav; Jesty, Jolyon

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with mechanical heart valve implants are plagued by flow-induced thromboembolic complications, which are undoubtedly caused by platelet activation. Flow fields in or around the affected regions involve brief exposure to pathologically high-shear stresses on the order of 100 to 1000 dyne/cm2. Although high shear is known to activate platelets directly, their subsequent behavior is not known. We hypothesize that the post-high-shear activation behavior of platelets is particularly relevant in understanding the increased thrombotic risk associated with blood-recirculating prosthetic cardiovascular devices. Purified platelets were exposed to brief (5–40 s) periods of high-shear stress, and then exposed to longer periods (15–60 min) of low shear. Their activation state was measured using a prothrombinase-based assay. Platelets briefly exposed to an initial high-shear stress (e.g., 60 dyne/cm2 for 40 s) activate a little, but this study shows that they are now sensitized, and when exposed to subsequent low shear stress, they activate at least 20-fold faster than platelets not initially exposed to high shear. The results show that platelets in vitro exposed beyond a threshold of high-shear stress are primed for subsequent activation under normal cardiovascular circulation conditions, and they do not recover from the initial high-shear insult. PMID:20135353

  17. High strength semi-active energy absorbers using shear- and mixedmode operation at high shear rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becnel, Andrew C.

    This body of research expands the design space of semi-active energy absorbers for shock isolation and crash safety by investigating and characterizing magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) at high shear rates ( > 25,000 1/s) under shear and mixed-mode operation. Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) work well as adaptive isolators due to their ability to quickly and controllably adjust to changes in system mass or impact speed while providing fail-safe operation. However, typical linear stroking MREAs using pressure-driven flows have been shown to exhibit reduced controllability as impact speed (shear rate) increases. The objective of this work is to develop MREAs that improve controllability at high shear rates by using pure shear and mixed shear-squeeze modes of operation, and to present the fundamental theory and models of MR fluids under these conditions. A proof of concept instrument verified that the MR effect persists in shear mode devices at shear rates corresponding to low speed impacts. This instrument, a concentric cylinder Searle cell magnetorheometer, was then used to characterize three commercially available MRFs across a wide range of shear rates, applied magnetic fields, and temperatures. Characterization results are presented both as flow curves according to established practice, and as an alternate nondimensionalized analysis based on Mason number. The Mason number plots show that, with appropriate correction coefficients for operating temperature, the varied flow curve data can be collapsed to a single master curve. This work represents the first shear mode characterization of MRFs at shear rates over 10 times greater than available with commercial rheometers, as well as the first validation of Mason number analysis to high shear rate flows in MRFs. Using the results from the magnetorheometer, a full scale rotary vane MREA was developed as part of the Lightweight Magnetorheological Energy Absorber System (LMEAS) for an SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

  18. Strength and Young's modulus of silicon carbide layers of HTGR fuel particles at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1991-06-01

    Strength and Young's modulus of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide layers of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) were measured from room temperature up to 1480°C (1753 K) in helium atmosphere. The diametrical compression test was applied to micro-specimens of ring shaped SiC. Young's modulus decreased slightly from room temperature up to around 1200 °C (1473 K) and decreased rapidly above this temperature. The strength remained almost unchanged from room temperature up to around 1300°C (1573 K) and decreased rapidly above this temperature. The fracture surfaces indicated that fracture mechanisms changed from transgranular to intergranular, which corresponded with the rapid decrease in strength.

  19. The thermal conductivity of high modulus Zylon fibers between 400 mK and 4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikus, Patrick; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectalí; Hertel, Scott A.; Leman, Steven W.; McCarthy, Kevin A.; Rutherford, John M.

    2008-11-01

    Zylon is a synthetic polyurethane polymer fiber featuring very high mechanical strength. Measurements of the thermal conductivity λZ(T) of high modulus Zylon fibers at temperatures between 400 mK and 4 K were performed to assess if they can be successfully employed in the design of high performance suspension systems for cold stages of adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. The linear mass density of the yarn used in these measurements amounts to 3270 dtex, which is also a measure for the yarn's cross section. The experimental data for the thermal conductivity was fitted to a function of the form λZ=(1010±30)·TpWmmdtexK. This result was normalized to the breaking strength of the fibers and compared with Kevlar. It shows that Kevlar outperforms Zylon in the investigated temperature range. At 1.5 K, the thermal conductivity integral of Zylon yarn is twice as high as the thermal conductivity integral of Kevlar yarn with the same breaking strength. A linear mass density of 1 tex is equivalent to a yarn mass of 1 g/km. High modulus Zylon has a density of 1.56 g/cm 3.

  20. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  1. Thermal conductivity and elastic modulus evolution of thermal barrier coatings under high heat flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-06-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may be encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser-simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8% Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m K to 1.15, 1.19, and 1.5 W/m K after 30 h of testing at surface temperatures of 990, 1100, and 1320 °C, respectively, Hardness and elastic modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and microindentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 h of testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced microporosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various TBC applications.

  2. Control of Ostwald ripening by using surfactants with high surface modulus.

    PubMed

    Tcholakova, Slavka; Mitrinova, Zlatina; Golemanov, Konstantin; Denkov, Nikolai D; Vethamuthu, Martin; Ananthapadmanabhan, K P

    2011-12-20

    We describe results from systematic measurements of the rate of bubble Ostwald ripening in foams with air volume fraction of 90%. Several surfactant systems, with high and low surface modulus, were used to clarify the effect of the surfactant adsorption layer on the gas permeability across the foam films. In one series of experiments, glycerol was added to the foaming solutions to clarify how changes in the composition of the aqueous phase affect the rate of bubble coarsening. The experimental results are interpreted by a new theoretical model, which allowed us to determine the overall gas permeability of the foam films in the systems studied, and to decompose the film permeability into contributions coming from the surfactant adsorption layers and from the aqueous core of the films. For verification of the theoretical model, the gas permeability determined from the experiments with bulk foams are compared with values, determined in an independent set of measurements with the diminishing bubble method (single bubble attached at large air-water interface) and reasonably good agreement between the results obtained by the two methods is found. The analysis of the experimental data showed that the rate of bubble Ostwald ripening in the studied foams depends on (1) type of used surfactant-surfactants with high surface modulus lead to much slower rate of Ostwald ripening, which is explained by the reduced gas permeability of the adsorption layers in these systems; (2) presence of glycerol which reduces the gas solubility and diffusivity in the aqueous core of the foam film (without affecting the permeability of the adsorption layers), thus also leading to slower Ostwald ripening. Direct measurements showed that the foam films in the studied systems had very similar thicknesses, thus ruling out the possible explanation that the observed differences in the Ostwald ripening are due to different film thicknesses. Experiments with the Langmuir trough were used to demonstrate

  3. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal runaway in lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mullin, Scott; Panday, Ashoutosh; Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2014-04-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics. In another aspect, the electrolyte exhibits a conductivity drop when the temperature of electrolyte increases over a threshold temperature, thereby providing a shutoff mechanism for preventing thermal runaway in lithium battery cells.

  4. High Bulk Modulus of Ionic Liquid and Effects on Performance of Hydraulic System

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Roland; Tasner, Tadej

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years ionic liquids have gained in importance, causing a growing number of scientists and engineers to investigate possible applications for these liquids because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Their outstanding advantages such as nonflammable liquid within a broad liquid range, high thermal, mechanical, and chemical stabilities, low solubility for gases, attractive tribological properties (lubrication), and very low compressibility, and so forth, make them more interesting for applications in mechanical engineering, offering great potential for new innovative processes, and also as a novel hydraulic fluid. This paper focuses on the outstanding compressibility properties of ionic liquid EMIM-EtSO4, a very important physical chemically property when IL is used as a hydraulic fluid. This very low compressibility (respectively, very high Bulk modulus), compared to the classical hydraulic mineral oils or the non-flammable HFDU type of hydraulic fluids, opens up new possibilities regarding its usage within hydraulic systems with increased dynamics, respectively, systems' dynamic responses. PMID:24526900

  5. Design and fabrication of a metastable β-type titanium alloy with ultralow elastic modulus and high strength.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing; Wei, Qiuming; Xu, Huibin

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become the most attractive implant materials due to their high corrosion resistance, excellent biocompatibility and relatively low elastic modulus. However, the current Ti materials used for implant applications exhibit much higher Young's modulus (50 ~ 120 GPa) than human bone (~30 GPa). This large mismatch in the elastic modulus between implant and human bone can lead to so-called "stress shielding effect" and eventual implant failure. Therefore, the development of β-type Ti alloys with modulus comparable to that of human bone has become an ever more pressing subject in the area of advanced biomedical materials. In this study, an attempt was made to produce a bone-compatible metastable β-type Ti alloy. By alloying and thermo-mechanical treatment, a metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn (wt. %) alloy with ultralow Young's modulus (36 GPa, versus ~30 GPa for human bone) and high ultimate strength (853 MPa) was fabricated. We believe that this method can be applied to developing advanced metastable β-type titanium alloys for implant applications. Also, this approach can shed light on design and development of novel β-type titanium alloys with large elastic limit due to their high strength and low elastic modulus. PMID:26434766

  6. Design and fabrication of a metastable β-type titanium alloy with ultralow elastic modulus and high strength

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing; Wei, Qiuming; Xu, Huibin

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become the most attractive implant materials due to their high corrosion resistance, excellent biocompatibility and relatively low elastic modulus. However, the current Ti materials used for implant applications exhibit much higher Young’s modulus (50 ~ 120 GPa) than human bone (~30 GPa). This large mismatch in the elastic modulus between implant and human bone can lead to so-called “stress shielding effect” and eventual implant failure. Therefore, the development of β-type Ti alloys with modulus comparable to that of human bone has become an ever more pressing subject in the area of advanced biomedical materials. In this study, an attempt was made to produce a bone-compatible metastable β-type Ti alloy. By alloying and thermo-mechanical treatment, a metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn (wt. %) alloy with ultralow Young’s modulus (36 GPa, versus ~30 GPa for human bone) and high ultimate strength (853 MPa) was fabricated. We believe that this method can be applied to developing advanced metastable β-type titanium alloys for implant applications. Also, this approach can shed light on design and development of novel β-type titanium alloys with large elastic limit due to their high strength and low elastic modulus. PMID:26434766

  7. Design and fabrication of a metastable β-type titanium alloy with ultralow elastic modulus and high strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shun; Meng, Qingkun; Zhao, Xinqing; Wei, Qiuming; Xu, Huibin

    2015-10-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become the most attractive implant materials due to their high corrosion resistance, excellent biocompatibility and relatively low elastic modulus. However, the current Ti materials used for implant applications exhibit much higher Young’s modulus (50 ~ 120 GPa) than human bone (~30 GPa). This large mismatch in the elastic modulus between implant and human bone can lead to so-called “stress shielding effect” and eventual implant failure. Therefore, the development of β-type Ti alloys with modulus comparable to that of human bone has become an ever more pressing subject in the area of advanced biomedical materials. In this study, an attempt was made to produce a bone-compatible metastable β-type Ti alloy. By alloying and thermo-mechanical treatment, a metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn (wt. %) alloy with ultralow Young’s modulus (36 GPa, versus ~30 GPa for human bone) and high ultimate strength (853 MPa) was fabricated. We believe that this method can be applied to developing advanced metastable β-type titanium alloys for implant applications. Also, this approach can shed light on design and development of novel β-type titanium alloys with large elastic limit due to their high strength and low elastic modulus.

  8. Static and Dynamic Behavior of High Modulus Hybrid Boron/Glass/Aluminum Fiber Metal Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Ching

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation presents the investigation of a newly developed hybrid fiber metal laminates (FMLs) which contains commingled boron fibers, glass fibers, and 2024-T3 aluminum sheets. Two types of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs are developed. The first, type I hybrid FMLs, contained a layer of boron fiber prepreg in between two layers of S2-glass fiber prepreg, sandwiched by two aluminum alloy 2024-T3 sheets. The second, type II hybrid FMLs, contained three layer of commingled hybrid boron/glass fiber prepreg layers, sandwiched by two aluminum alloy 2024-T3 sheets. The mechanical behavior and deformation characteristics including blunt notch strength, bearing strength and fatigue behavior of these two types of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs were investigated. Compared to traditional S2-glass fiber reinforced aluminum laminates (GLARE), the newly developed hybrid boron/glass/aluminum fiber metal laminates possess high modulus, high yielding stress, and good blunt notch properties. From the bearing test result, the hybrid boron/glass/aluminum fiber metal laminates showed outstanding bearing strength. The high fiber volume fraction of boron fibers in type II laminates lead to a higher bearing strength compared to both type I laminates and traditional GLARE. Both types of hybrid FMLs have improved fatigue crack initiation lives and excellent fatigue crack propagation resistance compared to traditional GLARE. The incorporation of the boron fibers improved the Young's modulus of the composite layer in FMLs, which in turn, improved the fatigue crack initiation life and crack propagation rates of the aluminum sheets. Moreover, a finite element model was established to predict and verify the properties of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs. The simulated results showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Shear modeling: thermoelasticity at high temperature and pressure for tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Soderlind, P; Moriarty, J A

    2004-12-06

    For large-scale constitutive strength models the shear modulus is typically assumed to be linearly dependent on temperature. However, for materials compressed beyond the Hugoniot or in regimes where there is very little experimental data, accurate and validated models must be used. To this end, we present here a new methodology that fully accounts for electron- and ion-thermal contributions to the elastic moduli over broad ranges of temperature (<20,000 K) and pressure (<10 Mbar). In this approach, the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method for the cold and electron-thermal contributions is closely coupled with ion-thermal contributions. For the latter two separate approaches are used. In one approach, the quasi-harmonic, ion-thermal contribution is obtained through a Brillouin zone sum of strain derivatives of the phonons, and in the other a full anharmonic ion-thermal contribution is obtained directly through Monte Carlo (MC) canonical distribution averages of strain derivatives on the multi-ion potential itself. Both approaches use quantum-based interatomic potentials derived from model generalized pseudopotential theory (MGPT). For tantalum, the resulting elastic moduli are compared to available ultrasonic measurements and diamond-anvil-cell compression experiments. Over the range of temperature and pressure considered, the results are then used in a polycrystalline averaging for the shear modulus to assess the linear temperature dependence for Ta.

  10. Force measurements on natural membrane nanovesicles reveal a composition-independent, high Young's modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Annalisa; Reguera, David; Oncins, Gerard; Persuy, Marie-Annick; Sanz, Guenhaël; Lobasso, Simona; Corcelli, Angela; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Gomila, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of nano-sized vesicles made up of natural membranes are crucial to the development of stable, biocompatible nanocontainers with enhanced functional, recognition and sensing capabilities. Here we measure and compare the mechanical properties of plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles ~80 nm in diameter obtained from disrupted yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We provide evidence of a highly deformable behaviour for these vesicles, able to support repeated wall-to-wall compressions without irreversible deformations, accompanied by a noticeably high Young's modulus (~300 MPa) compared to that obtained for reconstituted artificial liposomes of similar size and approaching that of some virus particles. Surprisingly enough, the results are approximately similar for plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles, in spite of their different lipid compositions, especially on what concerns the ergosterol content. These results point towards an important structural role of membrane proteins in the mechanical response of natural membrane vesicles and open the perspective to their potential use as robust nanocontainers for bioapplications.Mechanical properties of nano-sized vesicles made up of natural membranes are crucial to the development of stable, biocompatible nanocontainers with enhanced functional, recognition and sensing capabilities. Here we measure and compare the mechanical properties of plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles ~80 nm in diameter obtained from disrupted yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We provide evidence of a highly deformable behaviour for these vesicles, able to support repeated wall-to-wall compressions without irreversible deformations, accompanied by a noticeably high Young's modulus (~300 MPa) compared to that obtained for reconstituted artificial liposomes of similar size and approaching that of some virus particles. Surprisingly enough, the results are approximately similar for plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles, in

  11. Proton conducting, high modulus polymer electrolyte membranes by polymerization-induced microphase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopade, Sujay; Hillmyer, Marc; Lodge, Timothy

    Robust solid-state polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) are vital for designing next-generation lithium-ion batteries and high-temperature fuel cells. However, the performance of diblock polymer electrolytes is generally limited by poor mechanical stability and network defects in the conducting pathways. We present the in-situ preparation of robust cross-linked PEMs via polymerization-induced microphase separation, and incorporation of protic ionic liquid (IL) into one of the microphase separated domains. The facile design strategy involves a delicate balance between the controlled growth of polystyrene from a poly(ethylene oxide) macro-chain transfer agent (PEO-CTA) and simultaneous chemical cross-linking by divinylbenzene in the presence of IL. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation of a disordered structure with bicontinuous morphology and a characteristic domain size of order 20 nm. The long-range continuity of the PEO/protic IL conducting nanochannels and cross-linked polystyrene domains imparts high thermal and mechanical stability to the PEMs, with elastic modulus approaching 10 MPa and a high ionic conductivity of 15 mS/cm at 180 °C.

  12. Composite wall concept for high temperature turbine shrouds: Survey of low modulus strain isolator materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Allen, G. P.; Wisander, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconium oxide turbine seal specimens, incorporating various low modulus porous metal strain isolator pads between the zirconium oxide and a dense metal substrate, were subjected to cyclic thermal shock testing. Specimens that had a low modulus pad composed of sintered FeNiCrAlY fibermetal survived 1000 thermal shock cycles without spalling of the ceramic. A figure of merit for the low modulus pad materials taking into consideration the elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, strength, and oxidation resistance of the pad was proposed, and showed reasonable agreement with the thermal shock results. A potential surface distress problem on the zirconium oxide, associated with nonuniform temperature distribution and rapid stress relaxation was identified. One approach to solving the surface distress problem through application of laser surface fusion of the zirconium oxide layer showed some promise, but improvements in the laser surface fusion process are necessary to prevent process associated damage to the ceramic.

  13. Reduction of the bulk modulus at high pressure in CrN.

    PubMed

    Rivadulla, Francisco; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Quintela, Camilo X; Piñeiro, Alberto; Pardo, Victor; Baldomir, Daniel; López-Quintela, Manuel Arturo; Rivas, José; Ramos, Carlos A; Salva, Horacio; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John B

    2009-12-01

    Nitride coatings are increasingly demanded in the cutting- and machining-tool industry owing to their hardness, thermal stability and resistance to corrosion. These properties derive from strongly covalent bonds; understanding the bonding is a requirement for the design of superhard materials with improved capabilities. Here, we report a pressure-induced cubic-to-orthorhombic transition at approximately 1 GPa in CrN. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and ab initio calculations show an unexpected reduction of the bulk modulus, K0, of about 25% in the high-pressure (lower volume) phase. Our combined theoretical and experimental approach shows that this effect is the result of a large exchange striction due to the approach of the localized Cr:t3 electrons to becoming molecular-orbital electrons in Cr-Cr bonds. The softening of CrN under pressure is a manifestation of a strong competition between different types of chemical bond that are found at a crossover from a localized to a molecular-orbital electronic transition. PMID:19855384

  14. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, Markéta; Fousová, Michaela; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Fojt, Jaroslav; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Recently, porous metallic materials have been extensively studied as candidates for use in the fabrication of scaffolds and augmentations to repair trabecular bone defects, e.g. in surroundings of joint replacements. Fabricating these complex structures by using common approaches (e.g., casting and machining) is very challenging. Therefore, rapid prototyping techniques, such as selective laser melting (SLM), have been investigated for these applications. In this study, we characterized a highly porous (87 vol.%) 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by SLM. 316L steel was chosen because it presents a biomaterial still widely used for fabrication of joint replacements and, from the practical point of view, use of the same material for fabrication of an augmentation and a joint replacement is beneficial for corrosion prevention. The results are compared to the reported properties of two representative nonporous 316L stainless steels prepared either by SLM or casting and subsequent hot forging. The microstructural and mechanical properties and the surface chemical composition and interaction with the cells were investigated. The studied material exhibited mechanical properties that were similar to those of trabecular bone (compressive modulus of elasticity ~0.15GPa, compressive yield strength ~3MPa) and cytocompatibility after one day that was similar to that of wrought 316L stainless steel, which is a commonly used biomaterial. Based on the obtained results, SLM is a suitable method for the fabrication of porous 316L stainless steel scaffolds with highly porous structures. PMID:27612756

  15. Controlling the shear profile of highly strained granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Bob

    2015-11-01

    Bi et al. (Nature 2011) have shown that, if sheared, a granular material can jam even if its packing fraction (ϕ) is lower than the critical isotropic jamming point ϕJ. They have introduced a new critical packing fraction value ϕS such that for ϕS< ϕ<ϕJ the system jams if sheared. Nevertheless, the value of ϕS as a function of the shear profile or the strain necessary to observe jamming remain poorly understood because of the experimental complexity to access high strain without the formation of shear bands. We present a novel 2D periodic shear apparatus made of 21 independent, aligned and mirrored glass rings. Each of ring can be moved independently which permits us to impose any desired shear profile. The circular geometry allows access to any strain value. The forces between grains are measured using reflective photoelasticity. This talk will present this novel apparatus and discuss the effect of the shear profile and shear amplitude on the jamming transition.

  16. Injectable, high modulus, and fatigue resistant composite scaffold for load-bearing soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayami, James W S; Waldman, Stephen D; Amsden, Brian G

    2013-12-01

    High modulus, two-phase, bicontinuous scaffolds were prepared by photocross-linking an aqueous suspension of chondrocytes and N-methacrylate glycol chitosan with a hydrolyzable, hydrophobic, acrylated star-copolymer. Two acrylated star-copolymers were examined: poly(ε-caprolactone-co-d,l-lactide) (5446DLLACL) and poly(ε-caprolactone-co-trimethylene carbonate) (7030TMCCL). The scaffolds were assessed for injectability, two-phase interconnectivity, fatigue resistance, and long-term static culture behavior. The 7030TMCCL scaffolds demonstrated decreased moduli of 17% after 1 × 10(6) cycles at 30% strain and 5% after 56 days in culture, compared to the 5446DLLACL scaffolds, which exhibited decreases of 58 and 68%, respectively. The 7030TMCCL scaffolds accumulated more extracellular matrix after 56 days of culture (GAG: 20.1 ± 1, collagen: 35.5 ± 1.8 μg) compared to 5446DLLACL scaffolds (GAG: 13.2 ± 0.6, collagen: 6.2 ± 3.4 μg). Overall, the 7030TMCCL-based scaffolds were shown to be better suited for use as a load bearing soft tissue scaffold. PMID:24147621

  17. Improving the Transparency of Ultra-Drawn Melt-Crystallized Polyethylenes: Toward High-Modulus/High-Strength Window Application.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lihua; Nickmans, Koen; Severn, John; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-13

    Highly transparent, ultradrawn high-density polyethylene (HDPE) films were successfully prepared using compression molding and solid-state drawing techniques. The low optical transmittance (<50%) of the pure drawn HDPE films can be drastically improved (>90%) by incorporating a small amount (>1 wt %/wt) of specific additives to HDPE materials prior to drawing. It is shown that additives with relatively high refractive index result in an increased optical transmittance in the visible light wavelength which illustrates that the improvement in optical characteristics probably originates from refractive index matching between the crystalline and noncrystalline regions in the drawn films. Moreover, the optically transparent drawn HDPE films containing additives maintain their physical and mechanical properties, especially their high modulus and high strength, which make these films potentially useful in a variety of applications, such as high-impact windows. PMID:27314927

  18. High-Frequency Shear Viscosity of Low-Viscosity Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatze, U.; Behrends, R.

    2014-11-01

    A thickness shear quartz resonator technique is described to measure the shear viscosity of low-viscosity liquids in the frequency range from 6 MHz to 130 MHz. Examples of shear-viscosity spectra in that frequency range are presented to show that various molecular processes are accompanied by shear-viscosity relaxation. Among these processes are conformational variations of alkyl chains, with relaxation times of about 0.3 ns for -pentadecane and -hexadecane at 25 C. These variations can be well represented in terms of a torsional oscillator model. Also featured briefly are shear-viscosity relaxations associated with fluctuations of hydrogen-bonded clusters in alcohols, for which values between 0.3 ns (-hexanol) and 1.5 ns (-dodecanol) have been found at 25 C. In addition, the special suitability of high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy to the study of critically demixing mixtures is demonstrated by some illustrative examples. Due to slowing, critical fluctuations do not contribute to the shear viscosity at sufficiently high frequencies of measurements so that the non-critical background viscosity of critical systems can be directly determined from high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy. Relaxations in appear also in the shear-viscosity spectra with, for example, 2 ns for the critical triethylamine-water binary mixture at temperatures between 10 C and 18 C. Such relaxations noticeably influence the relaxation rate of order parameter fluctuations. They may be also the reason for the need of a special mesoscopic viscosity when mutual diffusion coefficients of critical polymer solutions are discussed in terms of mode-coupling theory.

  19. A new instrument for high-resolution in situ assessment of Young's modulus in shallow cohesive sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Mark A.; Johnson, Bruce D.; Boudreau, Bernard P.

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a new, miniature, instrumented flat dilatometer (mIDMT) designed to assess variations in nearly continuous compressive stress-strain behaviour with depth in shallow cohesive sediments. The instrument was tested both in situ in the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada, and in cored samples from Willapa Bay, Washington, USA. Comparisons between probe and laboratory uniaxial assessments for other elastic materials—gelatine and foam rubber specifically—show strong agreement over the range of strains induced in the experiments. Observed values of Young's modulus ( E) for the gelatine and ethylene-vinyl acetate foam ranged from 6-343 kPa. Sediment stress-strain curves were distinctly linear for the overconsolidated fine-grained sediments of the Minas Basin, and values of E were found to increase with depth from near zero to 500-1,300 kPa at 20 cm depth. At the Willapa site, the sandy tidal flat sediments also behave elastically but E tended to increase more strongly with depth than for sediments from the Minas Basin. Young's modulus was inversely correlated to porosity at all sites tested, and linearly related to shear strength in the Minas Basin. The newly designed instrument has much finer resolution than for other, similar methods of determining E in situ, and it provides data at a resolution sufficient to assess small-scale processes such as gas bubble growth and infaunal locomotion, for which elastic constants are needed for modelling and prediction.

  20. Effects of cavitation-enhanced heating in high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment on shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Nagaoka, Ryo; Takagi, Ryo; Goto, Kota; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is a less invasive method of cancer treatment, in which ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused at the tumor tissue to be thermally coagulated. To enhance the safety, accuracy, and efficiency of HIFU therapy, “multiple-triggered HIFU” has been proposed as a method of cavitation-enhanced heating to shorten treatment time. In this study, we also propose shear wave elastography (SWE) to noninvasively monitor the cavitation-enhanced heating. Results show that the increase in shear wave velocity was observed in the coagulation area, but it was significantly slower when cavitation occurred. This suggests that the cavitation-enhanced heating requires a significantly longer cooling time before the accurate measurement of shear modulus than heating without generating bubbles.

  1. High-resolution spatial mapping of shear properties in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Mark R; Bergou, Attila J; Fouchard, Jonathan; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Cohen, Itai

    2010-03-01

    Structural properties of articular cartilage such as proteoglycan content, collagen content and collagen alignment are known to vary over length scales as small as a few microns (Bullough and Goodfellow, 1968; Bi et al., 2006). Characterizing the resulting variation in mechanical properties is critical for understanding how the inhomogeneous architecture of this tissue gives rise to its function. Previous studies have measured the depth-dependent shear modulus of articular cartilage using methods such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) that rely on cells and cell nuclei as fiducial markers to track tissue deformation (Buckley et al., 2008; Wong et al., 2008a). However, such techniques are limited by the density of trackable markers, which may be too low to take full advantage of optical microscopy. This limitation leads to noise in the acquired data, which is often exacerbated when the data is manipulated. In this study, we report on two techniques for increasing the accuracy of tissue deformation measurements. In the first technique, deformations were tracked in a grid that was photobleached on each tissue sample (Bruehlmann et al., 2004). In the second, a numerical technique was implemented that allowed for accurate differentiation of optical displacement measurements by minimizing the propagated experimental error while ensuring that truncation error associated with local averaging of the data remained small. To test their efficacy, we employed these techniques to compare the depth-dependent shear moduli of neonatal bovine and adult human articular cartilage. Using a photobleached grid and numerical optimization to gather and analyze data led to results consistent with those reported previously (Buckley et al., 2008; Wong et al., 2008a), but with increased spatial resolution and characteristic coefficients of variation that were reduced up to a factor of 3. This increased resolution allowed us to determine that the shear modulus of neonatal bovine and adult

  2. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  3. Nanocrystalline β-Ti alloy with high hardness, low Young's modulus and excellent in vitro biocompatibility for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kelvin Y; Wang, Yanbo; Zhao, Yonghao; Chang, Li; Wang, Guocheng; Chen, Zibin; Cao, Yang; Liao, Xiaozhou; Lavernia, Enrique J; Valiev, Ruslan Z; Sarrafpour, Babak; Zoellner, Hans; Ringer, Simon P

    2013-08-01

    High strength, low Young's modulus and good biocompatibility are desirable but difficult to simultaneously achieve in metallic implant materials for load bearing applications, and these impose significant challenges in material design. Here we report that a nano-grained β-Ti alloy prepared by high-pressure torsion exhibits remarkable mechanical and biological properties. The hardness and modulus of the nano-grained Ti alloy were respectively 23% higher and 34% lower than those of its coarse-grained counterpart. Fibroblast cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced, demonstrating good in vitro biocompatibility of the nano-grained Ti alloy, consistent with demonstrated increased nano-roughness on the nano-grained Ti alloy. Results suggest that the nano-grained β-Ti alloy may have significant application as an implant material in dental and orthopedic applications. PMID:23706243

  4. Hardness and Young's modulus of high-quality cubic boron nitride films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Philip, J.; Zhang, W. J.; Hess, P.; Matsumoto, S.

    2003-02-01

    The elastic and mechanical properties of high-quality cubic boron nitride (cBN) films with a few microns thickness and submicron grain size grown on silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition were determined by measuring the dispersion of surface acoustic waves propagating along the surface of the layered system. The values are compared with those obtained with an ultralow load indenter (Triboscope). Specifically, the hardness, Young's modulus and density of the film were measured.

  5. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  6. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-12-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  7. Analyzing cements and completion gels using dynamic modulus

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, L.L.; Rickards, A.

    1996-12-31

    The measurement and control of the physical properties of completion fluids are important problems to the oil and gas industry. A new laboratory instrument, a dynamic modulus analyzer (DMA), has been developed that analyses the physical and mechanical properties of fluids and cement slurries under downhole conditions by using high resolution ultrasonics. A dynamic modulus analyzer can measure compressive strength, dynamic Young`s modulus, and the shrinkage or expansion of cements. The DMA can also be used to determine viscosity changes and changes in the density of fracturing and completion gels under static (10{sup -4} s{sup -1}) or zero shear conditions. Test data indicate the DMA is 20 to 100 times more sensitive than current laboratory instruments in evaluating changes in cements or gel properties. Cement shrinkage was measured simultaneously with compressive strength and dynamic modulus. The times required to achieve maximum gel strength and gel breaking were also determined for Fracturing gels and a temporary blocking gel.

  8. High resolution weak lensing mass mapping combining shear and flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Leonard, A.; Pires, S.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We propose a new mass mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. Methods: To preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, which is regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. Results: We tested our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion, which are otherwise lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures on the 15'' scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse

  9. The Young's modulus of high-aspect-ratio carbon/carbon nanotube composite microcantilevers by experimental and modeling validation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Peng; Yang, Xiao; He, Liang E-mail: mlq518@whut.edu.cn; Hao, Zhimeng; Luo, Wen; Xiong, Biao; Xu, Xu; Niu, Chaojiang; Yan, Mengyu; Mai, Liqiang E-mail: mlq518@whut.edu.cn

    2015-03-16

    This paper reports the Young's modulus of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced carbon/CNT (C/CNT) composite microcantilevers measured by laser Doppler vibrometer and validated by finite element method. Also, the microfabrication process of the high-aspect-ratio C/CNT microcantilever arrays based on silicon micromolding and pyrolysis is presented in detail. With the in-plane natural resonant frequencies of the microcantilevers measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer, a single degree of freedom (SDoF) model based on Euler-Bernoulli (E-B) beam theory is used to calculate the Young's modulus of this composite. To figure out whether this SDoF model can be applied to these composite microcantilevers, the finite element (FE) simulation of these microcantilevers was performed. The Young's modulus of C/CNT composite microcantilevers fabricated by the pyrolysis process at 600 °C is 9391 MPa, and a good agreement between the results from experiments and FE simulation is obtained.

  10. Development of a Highly Portable Plate Loading Device and In Situ Modulus Measurements in Weak Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallu, Raj R.; Keffeler, Evan R.; Watters, Robert J.; Warren, Sean N.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, underground mines in Nevada are increasingly exploiting in weak mineralized zones at greater depths that are intensely fractured and highly altered. The mechanical behavior of these rock masses ranges between weak rock and very stiff soil. A common limitation for design of underground mining excavations in these types of rock masses is absence of in situ geotechnical data. This limitation is generally overcome by estimating in situ mechanical behavior from empirical relationships so that the continuum-based numerical methods can be used to evaluate ground support designs. Because of the cost, time, and specialized equipment involved, historically in situ tests have not been performed in these underground mines. Predictive rock mass modulus relationships that are currently available in the literature are derived from field testing of predominantly good-quality rock masses. Consequently, there is limited confidence in using these models for rock masses with Rock Mass Ratings less than 45. In order to overcome some of these limitations, a portable plate loading device (PPLD) was designed and fabricated. The PPLD allows one to perform low cost and relatively quick in situ deformability tests to be performed on weak rock masses in underground mines. Test procedures and data reduction methods were developed to limit potential sources of error associated with the PPLD test. A total of fourteen plate loading tests were performed in weak rock masses at two different active underground mines in Nevada, USA. The resulting the test data were compared to eight published empirical rock mass modulus relationships to determine which, if any, of these relationships are sufficiently accurate for estimating modulus in similar geotechnical conditions. Only two of these relationships were found to be sufficient for first-order estimations of in situ modulus.

  11. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, Curtis L.; Morris, John S.; Agnew, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  12. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  13. Effect of Shear Strain on the High-Pressure Behavior of Nitromethane: Raman Spectroscopy in a Shear Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, P.; Isambert, A.; Petitet, J. P.; Zerr, A.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of shear strain on the high-pressure behavior of nitromethane has been studied by Raman spectroscopy in a shear diamond anvil cell (SDAC). Two major effects of shear strain have been observed. The first one is a lowering of the pressures at which the different spectral transformations occur. The second effect is observed at 28 GPa. At this pressure, a sudden decomposition of the sample occurs due to the shear deformation. Observation of the sample after decomposition shows the presence of a black residue, which is mainly composed of carbon soot.

  14. High shear strain of olivine aggregates: rheological and seismic consequences.

    PubMed

    Bystricky, M; Kunze, K; Burlini, L; Burg, J

    2000-11-24

    High-pressure and high-temperature torsion experiments on olivine aggregates in dislocation creep show about 15 to 20% strain weakening before steady-state behavior, characterized by subgrain-rotation recrystallization and a strong lattice preferred orientation. Such weakening may provide a way to focus flow in the upper mantle without a change in deformation mechanism. Flow laws derived from low strain data may not be appropriate for use in modeling high strain regions. In such areas, seismic wave propagation will be anisotropic with an axis of approximate rotational symmetry about the shear direction. In contrast to current thinking, the anisotropy will not indicate the orientation of the shear plane in highly strained, recrystallized olivine-rich rocks. PMID:11090352

  15. A Predictive Model of High Shear Thrombus Growth.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Casa, Lauren D C; Aidun, Cyrus K; Ku, David N

    2016-08-01

    The ability to predict the timescale of thrombotic occlusion in stenotic vessels may improve patient risk assessment for thrombotic events. In blood contacting devices, thrombosis predictions can lead to improved designs to minimize thrombotic risks. We have developed and validated a model of high shear thrombosis based on empirical correlations between thrombus growth and shear rate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the growth of thrombus based on the hemodynamic shear rate. The model predicts thrombus deposition based on initial geometric and fluid mechanic conditions, which are updated throughout the simulation to reflect the changing lumen dimensions. The model was validated by comparing predictions against actual thrombus growth in six separate in vitro experiments: stenotic glass capillary tubes (diameter = 345 µm) at three shear rates, the PFA-100(®) system, two microfluidic channel dimensions (heights = 300 and 82 µm), and a stenotic aortic graft (diameter = 5.5 mm). Comparison of the predicted occlusion times to experimental results shows excellent agreement. The model is also applied to a clinical angiography image to illustrate the time course of thrombosis in a stenotic carotid artery after plaque cap rupture. Our model can accurately predict thrombotic occlusion time over a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. PMID:26795978

  16. High temperature dynamic modulus and damping of aluminum and titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Maisel, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic modulus and damping capacity property data were measured from 20 to over 500 C for unidirectional B/Al (1100), B/Al (6061), B/SiC/Al (6061), Al2O3/Al, SiC/Ti-6Al-4V, and SiC/Ti composites. The measurements were made under vacuum by the forced vibration of composite bars at free-free flexural resonance near 2000 Hz and at amplitudes below 0.000001. Whereas little variation was observed in the dynamic moduli of specimens with approximately the same fiber content (50 percent), the damping of B/Al composites was found at all temperatures to be significantly greater than the damping of the Al2O3/Al and SiC/Ti composites. For those few situations where slight deviations from theory were observed, the dynamic data were examined for information concerning microstructural changes induced by composite fabrication and thermal treatment. The 270 C damping peak observed in B/Al (6061) composites after heat treatment above 460 C appears to be the result of a change in the 6061 aluminum alloy microstructure induced by interaction with the boron fibers. The growth characteristics of the damping peak suggest its possible value for monitoring fiber strength degration caused by excess thermal treatment during B/Al (6061) fabrication and use.

  17. Silorane- and high filled-based "low-shrinkage" resin composites: shrinkage, flexural strength and modulus.

    PubMed

    Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares de; Mettenburg, Donald; Rueggeberg, Frederick Allen; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the volumetric shrinkage (VS), flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (FM) properties of the low-shrinkage resin composite Aelite LS (Bisco) to those of Filtek LS (3M ESPE) and two regular dimethacrylate-based resin composites, the microfilled Heliomolar (Ivoclar Vivadent) and the microhybrid Aelite Universal (Bisco). The composites (n = 5) were placed on the Teflon pedestal of a video-imaging device, and VS was recorded every minute for 5 min after 40 s of light exposure. For the FS and FM tests, resin discs (0.6 mm in thickness and 6.0 mm in diameter) were obtained (n = 12) and submitted to a piston-ring biaxial test in a universal testing machine. VS, FS, and FM data were submitted to two-way repeated measures and one-way ANOVA, respectively, followed by Tukey's post-hoc test (a = 5%). Filtek LS showed lower VS than did Aelite LS, which in turn showed lower shrinkage than did the other composites. Aelite Universal and Filtek LS exhibited higher FS than did Heliomolar and Aelite LS, both of which exhibited the highest FM. No significant difference in FM was noted between Filtek LS and Aelite Universal, while Heliomolar exhibited the lowest values. Aelite LS was not as effective as Filtek LS regarding shrinkage, although both low-shrinkage composites showed lower VS than did the other composites. Only Filtek LS exhibited FS and FM comparable to those of the regular microhybrid dimethacrylate-based resin composite. PMID:23459774

  18. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Li, X.; Qi, X; Welch, D.; Zhu, P.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Li, B.

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.

  19. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions. PMID:26028439

  20. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Li, X.; Qi, X; Welch, D.; Zhu, P.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Li, B.

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂Pmore » = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.« less

  1. Hydrodynamics of CNT dispersion in high shear dispersion mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Hwang, Wook Ryol; Lee, Sang Bok; Jung, Seung-Il

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the carbon nanotube (CNT) fragmentation mechanism and dispersion in high shear homogenizers as a plausible dispersion technique, correlating with device geometries and processing conditions, for mass production of CNT-aluminum composites for automobile industries. A CNT dispersion model has been established in a turbulent flow regime and an experimental method in characterizing the critical yield stress of CNT flocs are presented. Considering CNT dispersion in ethanol as a model system, we tested two different geometries of high shear mixers — blade-stirrer type and rotor-stator type homogenizers — and reported the particle size distributions in time and the comparison has been made with the modeling approach and partly with the computational results.

  2. Local shear texture formation in adiabatic shear bands by high rate compression of high manganese TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Yang, P.; Mao, W. M.; Cui, F. E.

    2015-04-01

    Local shear textures in ASBs of high manganese TRIP steels under high rate straining are determined and the influences of initial microstructure is analyzed using EBSD technique. It is seen that even at the presence of majority of two types of martensite before deformation, ASB is preferred to evolve in austenite, rather than in martenite, due to reverse transformation. Ultrafine grains of thress phases due to dynamic recrystallization are formed and all show shear textures. The less ε-martensite in ASB is distributed as islands and its preferred orientation can be found to originate from the variants in matrix. The grain orientation rotation around ASB in multi-phase alloy reveals significant influence of α'- martensite on texture in ASB. The mechanism of local texture formation in ASB of high manganese TRIP steel is proposed in terms of the interaction of early TRIP and later reverse transformation.

  3. Design and Validation of a Compressive Tissue Stimulator with High-Throughput Capacity and Real-Time Modulus Measurement Capability

    PubMed Central

    Salvetti, David J.; Pino, Christopher J.; Manuel, Steven G.; Dallmeyer, Ian; Rangarajan, Sanjeet V.; Meyer, Tobias; Kotov, Misha

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to impact the properties of engineered hyaline cartilage constructs and is relevant for engineering of cartilage and osteochondral tissues. Most mechanical stimulators developed to date emphasize precision over adaptability to standard tissue culture equipment and protocols. The realization of mechanical characteristics in engineered constructs approaching native cartilage requires the optimization of complex variables (type of stimulus, regimen, and bimolecular signals). We have proposed and validated a stimulator design that focuses on high construct capacity, compatibility with tissue culture plastic ware, and regimen adaptability to maximize throughput. This design utilizes thin force sensors in lieu of a load cell and a linear encoder to verify position. The implementation of an individual force sensor for each sample enables the measurement of Young's modulus while stimulating the sample. Removable and interchangeable Teflon plungers mounted using neodymium magnets contact each sample. Variations in plunger height and design can vary the strain and force type on individual samples. This allows for the evaluation of a myriad of culture conditions and regimens simultaneously. The system was validated using contact accuracy, and Young's modulus measurements range as key parameters. Contact accuracy for the system was excellent within 1.16% error of the construct height in comparison to measurements made with a micrometer. Biomaterials ranging from bioceramics (cancellous bone, 123 MPa) to soft gels (1% agarose, 20 KPa) can be measured without any modification to the device. The accuracy of measurements in conjunction with the wide range of moduli tested demonstrate the unique characteristics of the device and the feasibility of using this device in mapping real-time changes to Young's modulus of tissue constructs (cartilage, bone) through the developmental phases in ex vivo culture conditions. PMID:21988089

  4. Design and validation of a compressive tissue stimulator with high-throughput capacity and real-time modulus measurement capability.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, David J; Pino, Christopher J; Manuel, Steven G; Dallmeyer, Ian; Rangarajan, Sanjeet V; Meyer, Tobias; Kotov, Misha; Shastri, V Prasad

    2012-03-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to impact the properties of engineered hyaline cartilage constructs and is relevant for engineering of cartilage and osteochondral tissues. Most mechanical stimulators developed to date emphasize precision over adaptability to standard tissue culture equipment and protocols. The realization of mechanical characteristics in engineered constructs approaching native cartilage requires the optimization of complex variables (type of stimulus, regimen, and bimolecular signals). We have proposed and validated a stimulator design that focuses on high construct capacity, compatibility with tissue culture plastic ware, and regimen adaptability to maximize throughput. This design utilizes thin force sensors in lieu of a load cell and a linear encoder to verify position. The implementation of an individual force sensor for each sample enables the measurement of Young's modulus while stimulating the sample. Removable and interchangeable Teflon plungers mounted using neodymium magnets contact each sample. Variations in plunger height and design can vary the strain and force type on individual samples. This allows for the evaluation of a myriad of culture conditions and regimens simultaneously. The system was validated using contact accuracy, and Young's modulus measurements range as key parameters. Contact accuracy for the system was excellent within 1.16% error of the construct height in comparison to measurements made with a micrometer. Biomaterials ranging from bioceramics (cancellous bone, 123 MPa) to soft gels (1% agarose, 20 KPa) can be measured without any modification to the device. The accuracy of measurements in conjunction with the wide range of moduli tested demonstrate the unique characteristics of the device and the feasibility of using this device in mapping real-time changes to Young's modulus of tissue constructs (cartilage, bone) through the developmental phases in ex vivo culture conditions. PMID:21988089

  5. Experimental determination of bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite using high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jae Eun; Clark, Simon M.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2012-02-15

    Using a diamond anvil cell, 14 A tobermorite, a structural analogue of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), was examined by high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction up to 4.8 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite was calculated, K{sub o} = 47 GPa. Comparison of the current results with previous high pressure studies on C-S-H(I) indicates that: (1) the compression behavior of the lattice parameters a and b of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are very similar, implying that both materials may have very similar Ca-O layers, and also implying that an introduction of structural defects into the Ca-O layers may not substantially change in-plane incompressibility of the ab plane of 14 A tobermorite; and (2) the bulk modulus values of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are dominated by the incompressibility of the lattice parameter c, which is directly related to the interlayer spacing composed of dreierketten silicate chains, interlayer Ca, and water molecules.

  6. Effect of a High Density of Stacking Faults on the Young's Modulus of GaAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujie; Burgess, Tim; An, Xianghai; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Tan, H Hoe; Zou, Jin; Ringer, Simon P; Jagadish, Chennupati; Liao, Xiaozhou

    2016-03-01

    Stacking faults (SFs) are commonly observed crystalline defects in III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) that affect a variety of physical properties. Understanding the effect of SFs on NW mechanical properties is critical to NW applications in nanodevices. In this study, the Young's moduli of GaAs NWs with two distinct structures, defect-free single crystalline wurtzite (WZ) and highly defective wurtzite containing a high density of SFs (WZ-SF), are investigated using combined in situ compression transmission electron microscopy and finite element analysis. The Young's moduli of both WZ and WZ-SF GaAs NWs were found to increase with decreasing diameter due to the increasing volume fraction of the native oxide shell. The presence of a high density of SFs was further found to increase the Young's modulus by 13%. This stiffening effect of SFs is attributed to the change in the interatomic bonding configuration at the SFs. PMID:26885570

  7. β-Type Zr-Nb-Ti biomedical materials with high plasticity and low modulus for hard tissue replacements.

    PubMed

    Nie, Li; Zhan, Yongzhong; Hu, Tong; Chen, Xiaoxian; Wang, Chenghui

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop new biomedical materials for hard tissue replacements, Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3, 7, 11 and 15) alloys with required properties were designed and prepared by using the vacuum arc melting method for the first time. Phase analysis and microstructural observation showed that all the as cast samples consisted of equiaxed β-Zr phase. The mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the Zr-20Nb-xTi alloys have been analyzed. It is found that these alloys exhibit high plasticity, moderate compressive strength (1044-1325MPa) and yield stress (854-1080MPa), high elastic energy (12-20MJ/m(3)) and low Young's modulus (28-31GPa). This good combination of mechanical properties makes them potential biomedical materials for hard tissue replacement. PMID:24036526

  8. Behavior of Fiber Glass Bolts, Rock Bolts and Cable Bolts in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuwei; Aziz, Naj; Mirzaghorbanali, Ali; Nemcik, Jan

    2016-07-01

    This paper experimentally compares the shear behavior of fiber glass (FG) bolt, rock bolt (steel rebar bolt) and cable bolt for the bolt contribution to bolted concrete surface shear strength, and bolt failure mode. Two double shear apparatuses of different size were used for the study. The tensile strength, the shear strength and the deformation modulus of bolt control the shear behavior of a sheared bolted joint. Since the strength and deformation modulus of FG bolt, rock bolt and cable bolt obtained from uniaxial tensile tests are different, their shear behavior in reinforcing joints is accordingly different. Test results showed that the shear stiffness of FG bolted joints decreased gradually from the beginning to end, while the shear stiffness of joints reinforced by rock bolt and cable bolt decreased bi-linearly, which is clearly consistent with their tensile deformation modulus. The bolted joint shear stiffness was highly influenced by bolt pretension in the high stiffness stage for both rock bolt and cable bolt, but not in the low stiffness stage. The rock bolt contribution to joint shear strength standardised by the bolt tensile strength was the largest, followed by cable bolts, then FG bolts. Both the rock bolts and cable bolts tended to fail in tension, while FG bolts in shear due to their low shear strength and constant deformation modulus.

  9. High-efficiency matrix modulus-induced cardiac differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells inside a thermosensitive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenqing; Guo, Xiaolei; Palmer, Andre F; Das, Hiranmoy; Guan, Jianjun

    2012-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) experience an extremely low rate of cardiac differentiation after transplantation into infarcted hearts, in part due to the inability of stiff scar tissue to support differentiation. We hypothesized that delivering MSCs in a hydrogel with a modulus matched to that of native heart tissue should stimulate MSC differentiation into cardiac cells. We have developed a thermosensitive and injectable hydrogel suitable for the delivery of cells into the heart, and found that the appropriate gel modulus can differentiate MSCs into cardiac cells with high efficiency. The hydrogel was based on N-isopropylacrylamide, N-acryloxysuccinimide, acrylic acid and poly(trimethylene carbonate)-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The hydrogel solution can be readily injected through needles commonly used for heart injection, and is capable of gelling within 7s at 37°C. The formed gels were highly flexible, with breaking strains (>300%) higher than that of native heart tissue and moduli within the range of native heart tissue (1-140 kPa). Controlling the concentration of the hydrogel solution resulted in hydrogels with three different moduli: 16, 45 and 65 kPa. The moduli were decoupled from the gel water content and oxygen diffusion, parameters that can also influence cell differentiation. MSCs survived in the hydrogels throughout the entire culture period, and it was observed that gel stiffness did not affect cell survival. After 14 days of culture, more than 76% of MSCs had differentiated into cardiac cells in the 45 and 65 kPa gels, as confirmed by the expression of cardiac markers at both the gene and protein levels. MSCs in the hydrogel with the 65 kPa modulus had the highest differentiation efficiency. The differentiated cells also developed calcium channels that imparted an electrophysiological property, and gap junctions for cell-cell communication. The efficiency of differentiation reported in this study was much higher than for the differentiation

  10. Moisture absorption and mechanical properties for high-modulus Pitch 75 graphite-fiber-modified cyanate ester resin laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Christopher; Zakrzewski, Jerry

    1992-09-01

    Structural epoxy resins used in the fabrication of composite structures for spacecraft applications absorb significant amounts of water. This moisture absorption results in swelling of the structures during fabrication and assembly and subsequent desorption shrinkage in space. Reduction of this effect will be required for development of dimensionally stable large advanced space structures. In the last several years modified epoxy resins, cyanate esters and cyanate esters/epoxy resins have been developed with lower moisture absorption structures to address this issue. Work has continued for several years on the evaluation of high modulus Pitch 75 laminates made using modified low moisture absorption epoxy and cyanate systems to developed structural and thermophysical data for use in the design of stable structures. This paper describes the evaluation of moisture absorption and mechanical properties of unidirectional and quasi-isotropic Pitch 75 laminates made from selected cyanate esters and cyanate ester-epoxy resins.

  11. Fracture modes of high modulus graphite/epoxy angleplied laminates subjected to off-axis tensile loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Angleplied laminates of high modulus graphite fiber/epoxy were examined in several ply configurations at various tensile loading angles to the zero ply direction to determine the effects of ply orientations on tensile properties, fracture modes, and fracture surface characteristics of the various plies. Experimental results consist of stress-strain data, selected plots, fracture stresses and strains, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs of fracture surfaces. It was found that the stress-strain curves were linear to fracture, and that although fracture surface characteristics for a given fracture mode are similar to those for the same fracture mode in uniaxial specimens, no simple load angle range can be associated with a given fracture mode. It was also concluded that SEM results must be supplemented with ply stress calculations in order to identify ranges of fracture modes occurring as a function of ply orientation with respect to the load direction.

  12. Lateral shearing interferometry of high-harmonic wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Austin, Dane R; Witting, Tobias; Arrell, Christopher A; Frank, Felix; Wyatt, Adam S; Marangos, Jon P; Tisch, John W G; Walmsley, Ian A

    2011-05-15

    We present a technique for frequency-resolved wavefront characterization of high harmonics based on lateral shearing interferometry. Tilted replicas of the driving laser pulse are produced by a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, producing separate focii in the target. The interference of the resulting harmonics on a flat-field extreme ultraviolet spectrometer yields the spatial phase derivative. A comprehensive set of spatial profiles, resolved by harmonic order, validate the technique and reveal the interplay of single-atom and macroscopic effects. PMID:21593877

  13. Local isotropy in high Reynolds number turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a report on the continuation of experiments, which Dr. Srinivas Veeravalli and the present author started in 1991, to investigate the hypothesis of local isotropy in shear flows. This hypothesis, which states that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the small-scale structures of turbulent motions are independent of large-scale structures and mean deformations, has been used in theoretical studies of turbulence and computational methods like large-eddy simulation. The importance of Kolmogorov's ideas arises from the fact that they create a foundation for turbulence theory.

  14. Deformation-induced changeable Young's modulus with high strength in β-type Ti-Cr-O alloys for spinal fixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihong; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Hieda, Junko; Cho, Ken

    2014-02-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the patients and surgeons simultaneously for spinal fixation applications, a novel biomedical alloy with a changeable Young's modulus, that is, with a low Young's modulus to prevent the stress-shielding effect for patients and a high Young's modulus to suppress springback for surgeons, was developed. In this study, the chromium and oxygen contents in ternary Ti(11, 12 mass%)Cr-(0.2, 0.4, 0.6 mass%)O alloys were optimized in order to achieve a changeable Young's modulus via deformation-induced ω-phase transformation with good mechanical properties. The Young's moduli of all the examined alloys increase after cold rolling, which is attributed to the deformation-induced ω-phase transformation. This transformation is suppressed by oxygen but enhanced with lower chromium content, which is related to the β(bcc)-lattice stability. Among the examined alloys, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy shows a low Young's modulus of less than 80GPa in the solution-treated (ST) condition and a high Young's modulus of more than 90GPa in the cold rolled (CR) condition. The Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy also exhibits a high tensile strength, above 1000MPa, with an acceptable elongation of ~12% in the ST condition. Furthermore, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy exhibits minimal springback. This value of springback is the closest to that of Ti64 ELI alloy among the compared alloys. Therefore, the Ti-11Cr-0.2O alloy, which has a good balance between large changeable Young's modulus, high tensile strength, good plasticity, and minimal springback, is considered to be a potential candidate for spinal fixation applications. PMID:24317494

  15. Observations of shear flows in high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Eric C.

    The research discussed in this thesis represents work toward the demonstration of experimental designs for creating a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable shear layer in a high-energy-density (HED) plasma. Such plasmas are formed by irradiating materials with several kilo-Joules of laser light over a few nanoseconds, and are defined as having an internal pressure greater than one-million atmospheres. Similar plasmas exist in laboratory fusion experiments and in the astrophysical environment. The KH instability is a fundamental fluid instability that arises when strong velocity gradients exist at the interface between two fluids. The KH instability is important because it drives the mixing of fluids and initiates the transition to turbulence in the flow. Until now, the evolution of the KH instability has remained relatively unexplored in the HED regime This thesis presents the observations and analysis of two novel experiments carried out using two separate laser facilities. The first experiment used 1.4 kJ from the Nike laser to generate a supersonic flow of Al plasma over a low-density, rippled foam surface. The Al flow interacted with the foam and created distinct features that resulted from compressible effects. In this experiment there is little evidence of the KH instability. Nevertheless, this experimental design has perhaps pioneered a new method for generating a supersonic shear flow that has the potential to produce the KH instability if more laser energy is applied. The second experiment was performed on the Omega laser. In this case 4.3 kJ of laser energy drove a blast wave along a rippled foam/plastic interface. In response to the vorticity deposited and the shear flow established by the blast wave, the interface rolls up into large vorticies characteristic of the KH instability. The Omega experiment was the first HED experiment to capture the evolution of the KH instability.

  16. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  17. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  18. An investigation of process for preparing high-strength, high-modulus bone repairing material that is biodegradable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shih-Po

    We report an investigation of modified pultrusion process for making a fully biodegradable/bioabsorbable composite mimicking the natural bone tissue. Metallic implants widely used today cause unwanted bone resorption due to its mismatch of stiffness when compared to natural bone. The hydroxyapatite / polylactic acid composite in our study is comprised of unidirectional polylactic acid fibers and partially oriented hydroxyapatite nano-needle reinforcements. Fundamental theological studies about anisotropic hydroxyapatite suspension under shear flow are discussed. The practical rheological information was gathered in designing the pultrusion process. An X-ray diffraction method was used to quantify the spatial orientation distribution of hydroxyapatite. It was found that the alignment of hydroxyapatite could be induced through the shear flow in this process. The alignment was also important to the increase of composite stiffness through the structure / property relationship study.

  19. Analysis of fluid film lubrication in artificial hip joint replacements with surfaces of high elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M; Dowson, D; Fisher, J

    1997-01-01

    Lubrication mechanisms and contact mechanics have been analysed for total hip joint replacements made from hard bearing surfaces such as metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic. A similar analysis for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against a hard bearing surface has also been carried out and used as a reference. The most important factor influencing the predicted lubrication film thickness has been found to be the radial clearance between the ball and the socket. Full fluid film lubrication may be achieved in these hard/hard bearings provided that the surface finish of the bearing surface and the radial clearance are chosen correctly and maintained. Furthermore, there is a close relation between the predicted contact half width and the predicted lubrication film thickness. Therefore, it is important to analyse the contact mechanics in artificial hip joint replacements. Practical considerations of manufacturing these bearing surfaces have also been discussed. PMID:9256001

  20. Comminution of Ceramic Materials Under High-Shear Dynamic Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homel, Michael; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Herbold, Eric; Hogan, Jamie

    The post-failure ``granular flow'' response of high-strength lightweight ceramics has important implications on the materials' effectiveness for ballistic protection. We study the dynamic compaction and shear flow of ceramic fragments and powders using computational and experimental analysis of a collapsing thick-walled cylinder geometry. Using newly developed tools for mesoscale simulation of brittle materials, we study the effect of fracture, comminution, shear-enhanced dilatation, and frictional contact on the continuum compaction response. Simulations are directly validated through particle Doppler velocimetry measurements at the inner surface of the cylindrical powder bed. We characterize the size distribution and morphologies of the initial and compacted material fragments to both validate the computational model and to elucidate the dominant failure processes. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-678862.

  1. Bioinspired polydimethylsiloxane-based composites with high shear resistance against wet tissue.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sarah C L; Levy, Oren; Kroner, Elmar; Hensel, René; Karp, Jeffrey M; Arzt, Eduard

    2016-08-01

    Patterned microstructures represent a potential approach for improving current wound closure strategies. Microstructures can be fabricated by multiple techniques including replica molding of soft polymer-based materials. However, polymeric microstructures often lack the required shear resistance with tissue needed for wound closure. In this work, scalable microstructures made from composites based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were explored to enhance the shear resistance with wet tissue. To achieve suitable mechanical properties, PDMS was reinforced by incorporation of polyethylene (PE) particles into the pre-polymer and by coating PE particle reinforced substrates with parylene. The reinforced microstructures showed a 6-fold enhancement, the coated structures even a 13-fold enhancement in Young׳s modulus over pure PDMS. Shear tests of mushroom-shaped microstructures (diameter 450µm, length 1mm) against chicken muscle tissue demonstrate first correlations that will be useful for future design of wound closure or stabilization implants. PMID:26849031

  2. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-15

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shock-driven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure, and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  3. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-06

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shockdriven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  4. Rearrangements in Sheared Disordered Solids: Low and High Pressure Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijtmans, Sven; van Deen, Merlijn; van Hecke, Martin; Manning, M. Lisa

    We study contact changes and rearrangements in quasistatic shear of disordered jammed packings at a range of pressures. We distinguish rearrangements where particle positions are discontinuous, leading to energy and stress discontinuities, from more frequent network events where contacts change but particle positions remain continuous. Moreover, we introduce two distinct protocols to unambiguously distinguish line reversible, loop reversible and irreversible events. The prevalence and spatial extension of five distinct event types (there are no loop reversible network events) evidence two distinct regimes: a low pressure regime dominated by irreversible extended events and a high pressure regime dominated by reversible localized ones. These trends indicate a crossover in the qualitative nature of plastic behavior in disordered solids near and far from jamming.

  5. Effect of shear stress on the high-pressure behaviour of nitromethane: Raman spectroscopy in a shear diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Philippe; Isambert, Aude; Petitet, Jean-Pierre; Zerr, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    A detailed description of the reaction mechanisms occurring in shock-induced decomposition of condensed energetic materials is very important for a comprehensive understanding of detonation. Besides pressure and temperature effects, shear stress has also been proposed to play an important role in the initiation and decomposition mechanisms. In order to study this effect, a Shear Diamond Anvil Cell (SDAC) has been developed. It is actually a classical DAC with the upper diamond anvil rotating about the compression axis relative to the opposite anvil. In this paper, we present a Raman spectroscopy study of the effect of shear stress on the high-pressure behaviour of nitromethane. Two major effects of shear stress are observed in our experiments. The first one is a lowering of the pressures at which the different structural modifications that nitromethane undergoes are observed. The second effect is observed at 28 GPa where sudden decomposition of the sample occurs just after shear application. Observation of the sample after decomposition shows the presence of a black residue which is composed of carbon as indicated by the Raman spectrum. [1] Manaa, M. R., Fried, L. E., and Reed, E. J., Journal of Computer-Aided Materials Design, 10, pp 75-97, 2003.

  6. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions. PMID:26028439

  7. High-T Detachment Shear Zone in Mirdita Ophiolite (albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousselin, D.; Nicolas, A. A.; Boudier, F. I.; Meshi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Two oceanic core complex (OCC) extending over 50km have been mapped in the northern part of the Mirdita ophiolite. Despite the fact that the ophiolite is encased between major Dinaric thrusts, a late Jurassic marine topography is still preserved, as demonstrated by the nearly horizontal sedimentary cover. The study area exposes two peridotite domes, aligned on a N-S trend, separated by a talweg 1km wide, occupied by gabbros. This alignment is parallel to the paleoridge indicated by the sheeted dike complex, exposed at the eastern margin, and trending N-S. The two mantle domes composed of clinopyroxene bearing harzburgite with high-T porphyroclastic textures are roofed by a ~1km thick mylonitic shell, particularly well exposed at the limit with the gabbros, and interpreted as an oceanic high-T detachment shear zone. Six mylonite samples are studied for textures and crystal preferred orientation (CPO) aiming to improve the kinematics of the oceanic detachment. The mylonitic peridotite are exceptionally fresh, serpentine minerals being restricted to the bordering porphyroclastic harzburgites. They exhibit a tight millimetric layering formed by olivine / olivine+orthopyroxene / olivine+clinopyroxene or pargasitic amphibole, with grain-size 100-200μm in olivine bands vs 20-50μm in polyphase bands; plagioclase is ubiquitous. Orthopyroxene porphyroclasts show both body rotation and slip with boudinage in the flowing matrix. Electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) maps provide precise modal composition and phase distribution. Although olivine CPO is not strong, it consistently records solid state flow on the [100](0kl)(010) slip system; the slight obliquity of [100] slip line on the mineral lineation marks the sense of shear. Pargasitic amphibole having grown in the mylonitic development has a strong CPO with [001]pg parallel to [100]ol. The most surprising result is a weak but constant orientation of [001]opx, known as the unique slip direction in orthopyroxene, at

  8. Area Expansivity Moduli of Regenerating Plant Protoplast Cell Walls Exposed to Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki; Watanabe, Ugai

    2005-05-01

    To control the elasticity of the plant cell wall, protoplasts isolated from cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were regenerated in shear flows of 115 s-1 (high shear) and 19.2 s-1 (low shear, as a control). The surface area expansivity modulus and the surface breaking strength of these regenerating protoplasts were measured by a micropipette aspiration technique. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye. High shear exposure for 3 h doubled both the surface area modulus and breaking strength observed under low shear, significantly decreased cell wall synthesis, and roughly quadrupled the moduli of the cell wall. Based on the cell wall synthesis data, we estimated the three-dimensional modulus of the cell wall to be 4.1± 1.2 GPa for the high shear, and 0.35± 0.2 GPa for the low shear condition, using the surface area expansivity modulus divided by the cell wall thickness, which is identical with the Young’s modulus divided by 2(1-σ), where σ is Poisson's ratio. We concluded that high shear exposure considerably strengthens the newly synthesized cell wall.

  9. Visualizing ultrasonically-induced shear wave propagation using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography for dynamic elastography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Huang, Zhihong; O’Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the use of phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) to detect and track temporally and spatially shear wave propagation within tissue induced by ultrasound radiation force. Kilohertz-range shear waves are remotely generated in sample using focused ultrasound emission and their propagation is tracked using PhS-OCT. Cross-sectional maps of the local shear modulus are reconstructed from local estimates of shear wave speed in tissue-mimicking phantoms. We demonstrate the feasibility of combining ultrasound radiation force and PhS-OCT to perform high-resolution mapping of the shear modulus. PMID:24562220

  10. Response of a Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulation to High Shear

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Jared S.; Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Mehta, Bhavya; Svitel, Juraj; Pollastrini, Joey; Platz, Robert; Freund, Erwin; Carpenter, John F.

    2009-01-01

    There is concern that shear could cause protein unfolding or aggregation during commercial biopharmaceutical production. In this work we exposed two concentrated immunoglobulin-G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody (mAb, at >100 mg/mL) formulations to shear rates of between 20,000 and 250,000 s-1 for between 5 minutes and 30 ms using a parallel-plate and capillary rheometer respectively. The maximum shear and force exposures were far in excess of those expected during normal processing operations (20,000 s-1 and 0.06 pN respectively). We used multiple characterization techniques to determine if there was any detectable aggregation. We found that shear alone did not cause aggregation, but that prolonged exposure to shear in the stainless steel parallel-plate rheometer caused a very minor reversible aggregation (<0.3%). Additionally, shear did not alter aggregate populations in formulations containing 17% preformed heat-induced aggregates of a mAb. We calculate that that the forces applied to a protein by production shear exposures (<0.06 pN) are small when compared with the 140 pN force expected at the air-water interface or the 20 to 150 pN forces required to mechanically unfold proteins described in the atomic force microscope (AFM) literature. Therefore, we suggest that in many cases air-bubble entrainment, adsorption to solid surfaces (with possible shear synergy), contamination by particulates, or pump cavitation stresses could be much more important causes of aggregation than shear exposure during production. PMID:19370772

  11. Review on Joint Shear Strength of Nano-Silver Paste and Its Long-Term High Temperature Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaka, R.; Mendizabal, L.; Henry, D.

    2014-07-01

    Soldering has been the main die attach technology for several decades. Recently, in order to meet the high temperature electronic requirements (high temperature-operating SiC and GaN devices) as well as the health recommendations (replacing the toxic lead present in common solder alloys with lead-free alternatives), several new attach technologies have been developed. Among others, the sintering of nano-silver particles seems to be one of the most interesting choices, and has been extensively investigated during recent years. The emergence of this technology is mainly due to the desired high electrical and high thermal conductivities of the sintered joint, its low elastic modulus offering a good thermo-mechanical reliability, its low process temperature, and its high operating temperature. In this paper, a review of parameters affecting the initial shear strength of the sintered silver joint will be summarized as well as the high temperature long-term reliability issues. The sintering cycle (bonding pressure, bonding temperature, sintering dwell time, heating rate, and the sintering atmosphere), the joint size, and the attached materials properties (nature, roughness), are found to closely affect the initially measured shear strength of the joint. The long-term reliability of the joint has been shown to suffer initially from three phenomena: the silver electro-migration, the decrease of shear strength under harsh thermo-mechanical stresses, and the swelling of the sintered layer. While the latter phenomenon is observed during the storage at temperatures above 350°C, the electro-migration and thermo-mechanical stresses can influence the package reliability at temperatures as low as 250°C. However, some suggested precautions during the module fabrication can lead to the minimizing of the effects of these phenomena and the achievem a more reliable joint.

  12. Vacuum Shear Force Microscopy Application to High Resolution Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonski, Vitali; Yamamoto, Yoh; White, Jonathon; Kourogi, Motonobu; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    1999-07-01

    A new technique—Vacuum Shear Force Microscopy (VSFM)—is introduced as a reliable method for maintaining a constant separation between a probe and sample. Elimination of many of the instabilities observed when applying the shear force mechanism to imaging under ambient conditions, allows for routine nanometer lateral and sub-nanometer normal resolution. In this paper this technique is applied, firstly, to the imaging of microtubules (biology) and, secondly, to the patterning and subsequent imaging of nanoscale metal lines (nanofabrication).

  13. Effect of orientation and targeted extracellular matrix degradation on the shear mechanical properties of the annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Smith, Lachlan J; Han, Woojin M; Morelli, Jeffrey; Yoder, Jonathon H; Elliott, Dawn M

    2011-11-01

    The intervertebral disc experiences combinations of compression, torsion, and bending that subject the disc substructures, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF), to multidirectional loads and deformations. Combined tensile and shear loading is a particularly important loading paradigm, as compressive loads place the AF in circumferential hoop tension, and spine torsion or bending induces AF shear. Yet the anisotropy of AF mechanical properties in shear, as well as important structure-function mechanisms governing this response, are not well-understood. The objective of this study, therefore, was to investigate the effects of tissue orientation and enzymatic degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and elastin on AF shear mechanical properties. Significant anisotropy was found: the circumferential shear modulus, Gθz, was an order of magnitude greater than the radial shear modulus, Grθ. In the circumferential direction, prestrain significantly increased the shear modulus, suggesting an important role for collagen fiber stretch in shear properties for this orientation. While not significant and highly variable, ChABC treatment to remove GAG increased the circumferential shear modulus compared to PBS control (p=0.15). Together with the established literature for tensile loading of fiber-reinforced GAG-rich tissues, the trends for changes in shear modulus with ChABC treatment reflect complex, structure-function relationships between GAG and collagen that potentially occur over several hierarchical scales. Elastase digestion did not significantly affect shear modulus with respect to PBS control; further contributing to the notion that circumferential shear modulus is dominated by collagen fiber stretch. The results of this study highlight the complexity of the structure-function relationships that govern the mechanical response of the AF in radial and circumferential shear, and provide new and more accurate data for the validation of material models and tissue

  14. In vivo non-invasive high resolution MR-based method for the determination of the elastic modulus of arterial vessels.

    PubMed

    Taviani, Valentina; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Wong, Pauline; Li, Zhi-Yong; Young, Victoria; Graves, Martin J; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of arterial walls have long been recognized to play an essential role in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Early detection of variations in the elastic modulus of arteries would help in monitoring patients at high cardiovascular risk stratifying them according to risk. An in vivo, non-invasive, high resolution MR-phase-contrast based method for the estimation of the time-dependent elastic modulus of healthy arteries was developed, validated in vitro by means of a thin walled silicon rubber tube integrated into an existing MR-compatible flow simulator and used on healthy volunteers. A comparison of the elastic modulus of the silicon tube measured from the MRI-based technique with direct measurements confirmed the method's capability. The repeatability of the method was assessed. Viscoelastic and inertial effects characterizing the dynamic response of arteries in vivo emerged from the comparison of the pressure waveform and the area variation curve over a period. For all the volunteers who took part in the study the elastic modulus was found to be in the range 50-250 kPa, to increase during the rising part of the cycle, and to decrease with decreasing pressure during the downstroke of systole and subsequent diastole. PMID:19163979

  15. Numerical Modeling for Springback Predictions by Considering the Variations of Elastic Modulus in Stamping Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting springback by considering the variations of elastic modulus on springback in stamping AHSS. Various stamping tests and finite-element method (FEM) simulation codes were used in this study. The cyclic loading-unloading tensile tests were conducted to determine the variations of elastic modulus for dual-phase (DP) 780 sheet steel. The biaxial bulge test was used to obtain plastic flow stress data. The non-linear reduction of elastic modulus for increasing the plastic strain was formulated by using the Yoshida model that was implemented in FEM simulations for springback. To understand the effects of material properties on springback, experiments were conducted with a simple geometry such as U-shape bending and the more complex geometry such as the curved flanging and S-rail stamping. Different measurement methods were used to confirm the final part geometry. Two different commercial FEM codes, LS-DYNA and DEFORM, were used to compare the experiments. The variable elastic modulus improved springback predictions in U-shape bending and curved flanging tests compared to FEM with the constant elastic modulus. However, in S-rail stamping tests, both FEM models with the isotropic hardening model showed limitations in predicting the sidewall curl of the S-rail part after springback. To consider the kinematic hardening and Bauschinger effects that result from material bending-unbending in S-rail stamping, the Yoshida model was used for FEM simulation of S-rail stamping and springback. The FEM predictions showed good improvement in correlating with experiments.

  16. The kinetics of crystallization of molten binary and ternary oxide systems and their application to the origination of high modulus glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Emphasis on the consideration of glass formation on a kinetic process made it possible to think of glass compositions different from those normally employed in the manufacture of glass fibers. Approximately 450 new glass compositions were prepared and three dozen of these compositions have values for Young's modulus measured on bulk specimens greater than nineteen million pounds per square inch. Of the new glasses about a hundred could be drawn into fibers by mechanical methods at high speeds. The fiber which has a Young's modulus measured on the fiber of 18.6 million pounds per square inch and has been prepared in quantity as a monofilament (to date more than 150 million lineal feet of 0.2 to 0.4 mil fiber have been produced). This fiber has also been successfully incorporated both in epoxy and polyimide matrices. The epoxy resin composite has shown a modulus forty percent better than that achievable using the most common grade of competitive glass fiber, and twenty percent better than that obtainable with the best available grade of competitive glass fiber. Other glass fibers of even higher modulus have been developed.

  17. Structural analysis of high-pressure shear zones (Bacariza Formation, Cabo Ortegal, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puelles, P.; Mulchrone, K. F.; Ábalos, B.; Ibarguchi, J. I. Gil

    2005-06-01

    High-pressure granulites of the Bacariza Formation (Cabo Ortegal Complex, NW Spain) exhibit spectacular examples of ductile shear zones developed at different scales in rocks containing pre-existing foliations. A detailed structural analysis was carried out on these shear zones in order to unravel and compare the role of various parameters controlling the deformation process (i.e. heterogeneous simple shear, components of homogeneous deformation, heterogeneous volume change and degree of non-coaxiality). Although heterogeneous simple shear largely dominated, negligible deviations from the ideal simple shear model were detected involving shortening along the structural directions perpendicular to the stretching axis (within the foliation plane) of the finite strain ellipsoid. The relationship between displacement parallel to a half-shear zone and the normal distance from its boundary provided the basis for the estimation of the stress exponent in the power-law constitutive flow equation associated with each shear zone, which is interpreted as a rheological indicator. These geometric and rheological results, and the thermobaric conditions of high-pressure shear zone deformation, indicate that these shear zones accommodated dominant plastic rock flow coeval with high-pressure and high-temperature deformations under moderate stress levels concomitant with elevated strain rates.

  18. Compositional evolution of high-temperature sheared lherzolite PHN 1611

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. ); Griffin, W.L.; Ryan, C.G. )

    1993-02-01

    The evolution of fertile' mantle has been studied by proton microprobe (PIXE) analysis of minerals of a high-temperature sheared xenolith from the Thaba Putsoa kimerlite in Lesotho, southern Africa. Analyzed elements include Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Sr, Y, and Zr. Garnets are homogeneous in Ni and Zn but have rims enriched relative to cores in Zr and Y. Compositions of olivine neoblasts define intergranular gradients of Fe, Zn, and Ni; Fe-rich olivine is relatively Zn-rich but Ni-poore. Although individual clinopyroxene grains are nearly homogeneous, clinopyroxene associated with Fe-rich olivine is relatively Fe- and Zn-rich but Sr- and Cr-poor. The trace-element abundances and compositional gradients constrain the processes of periodotite enrichment and the thermal history. Enrichment of Zr, Y, and Fe in garnet rims documents infiltration of a silica-undersaturated melt. The Fe-rich olivine compositions and the Zn and Fe gradients establish that the xenolith was sampled from near a melt conduit. Mechanical mixing of inhomogeneous peridotite and melt infiltration may have been concurrent. Because garnets appear homogeneous in Ni, mantle temperature changes affecting PHN 1611 occurred before or over a longer period than the melt infiltration. Measured and calculated abundances of many incompatible trace elements in the rock are similar to those proposed for primitive mantle. Calculated chondrite-normalized abundances of Sr, Ti, Zr, and Y are like those of appropriate REE. Enrichment processes in PHN 1611 proceeded at unusually high recorded temperature and in the apparent absence of minor phases common in lower-temperature metasomatized rocks, but similar processes may be common. In particular, mechanical mixing near mantle dikes may frequently occur. These enrichment mechanisms may produce xenolith compositions that resemble some proposed for primitive mantle but that have different implications for mantle evolution. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Fluid Effects on Shear for Seismic Waves in Finely Layered Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-07-22

    Although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus of the layered system (namely the uniaxial shear) contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves. Pore fluids can increase the magnitude the shear energy stored in this modulus by an amount that ranges from the smallest to the largest effective shear moduli of the VTI system. But, since there are five shear moduli in play, the overall increase in shear energy due to fluids is reduced by a factor of about 5 in general. We can therefore give definite bounds on the maximum increase of overall shear modulus, being about 20% of the allowed range as liquid is fully substituted for gas. An attendant increase of density (depending on porosity and fluid density) by approximately 5 to 10% decreases the shear wave speed and, thereby, partially offsets the effect of this shear modulus increase. The final result is an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 5 to 10%. This increase is shown to be possible under most favorable circumstances - i.e. when the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy) and the medium behaves in an undrained fashion due to fluid trapping. At frequencies higher than seismic (such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments), resulting short response times also produce the requisite undrained behavior and, therefore, fluids also affect shear waves at high frequencies by increasing rigidity.

  20. Geckolike high shear strength by carbon nanotube fiber adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Y.; Nakayama, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube adhesives can adhere strongly to surfaces as a gecko does. The number of carbon nanotube layers is an important determinant of the contact area for adhesion. Balancing the catalyst ratio and buffer layer used for chemical vapor deposition processing controls the number of carbon nanotube layers and their distribution. The features of carbon nanotubes determine the shear strength of adhesion. Carbon nanotubes with a broad distribution of layers exhibit enhanced shear strength with equivalent adhesive capability to that of a natural Tokay Gecko (Gekko gecko)

  1. Onset of sliding in amorphous films triggered by high-frequency oscillatory shear.

    PubMed

    Léopoldès, J; Conrad, G; Jia, X

    2013-06-14

    We investigate the change of the static friction threshold of weakly adhesive amorphous interfaces in the presence of the shear ultrasonic oscillation. Prior to sliding, a softening of the shear interfacial stiffness is observed under either static or high-amplitude oscillatory shear. We find that the nonlinear shear ultrasound, regardless of its polarization, triggers the macroscopic sliding at these interfaces far below the static threshold. Such unjamming transition is due to the vibration-induced decrease of the apparent coefficient of static friction, which provides a mechanism for understanding the reduction of the yielding threshold of granular media by the acoustic fluidization. PMID:25165969

  2. Mechanoradical-induced degradation in a pharmaceutical blend during high-shear processing.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Mark A; Singhal, Dharmendra; Colvin, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    Mechanically generated radicals were shown to affect short-term stability of a model pharmaceutical formulation during high-shear processing. A formulation containing an oxidatively sensitive drug, either amorphous or crystalline, and a polymeric excipient was high-shear mixed and the resulting short-term degradation was determined with HPLC. High-shear mixing of the excipients was also carried out before drug addition to isolate effects on excipients versus those directly on the drug. Short-term drug stability was found to be strongly dependent on the amount of shear added to excipients prior to drug addition, regardless of morphology. A mechanism for the observed degradation based on mechanically generated radicals from microcrystalline cellulose is proposed. These results indicate that excipient high-shear exposure needs to be considered in regards to drug stability. PMID:18720240

  3. Exact two-dimensional zonal wavefront reconstruction with high spatial resolution in lateral shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fengzhao; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangzhao; Bu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A novel zonal method is proposed for exact discrete reconstruction of a two-dimensional wavefront with high spatial resolution for lateral shearing interferometry. Four difference wavefronts measured in the x and y shear directions are required. Each of the two shear directions is measured twice with different shear amounts. The shear amounts of the second measurements of the x and y directions are Sx+1 pixels and Sy+1 pixels, where Sx pixels and Sy pixels are the shear amounts of the first measurements in the x and y directions, respectively. The shear amount in each direction can be chosen freely, provided that it is below a maximum value determined by the pupil shape and the number of samples N in that direction; thus, the choices are not limited by the more stringent condition required by previous methods, namely, that the shear amounts must be divisors of N. This method can exactly reconstruct any wavefront at evaluation points up to an arbitrary constant if the data is noiseless, and high spatial resolution can be achieved even with large shear amounts. The method is applicable not only to square pupils, but also to general pupil shapes if a sufficient number of Gerchberg iterations are employed. In this study, the validity and capability of the method were confirmed by numerical experiments. In addition, the experiments demonstrated that the method is stable with respect to noise in the difference wavefronts.

  4. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability. PMID:25955055

  5. High-pressure reactions and shear strength of serpentinized dunite.

    PubMed

    Sclar, C B; Carrison, L C; Rooney, T P; Riecker, R E

    1966-09-01

    The recently reported Pronounced decrease in shear strength of serpentine-bearing rocks at 30 to 40 kilobars in the temperature range 300 degrees to 520 degrees C may be attributed to the transformation of serpentine to a Pressure-dependent, 10-angstrom,2: 1 layer silicate plus brucite and periclase. This reaction increases density by about 8.5 percent. PMID:17754251

  6. Molecular cloud formation in high-shear, magnetized colliding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, E.; Frank, A.; Heitsch, F.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Haig, C.; Adams, M.

    2016-08-01

    The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.

  7. High speed all optical shear wave imaging optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Wei, Wei; Shen, Tueng; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) is a non-invasive testing modality that maps the mechanical property of soft tissues with high sensitivity and spatial resolution using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT). Shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) is a leading technique that relies on the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative elastography. Previous shear wave imaging OCT techniques are based on repeated M-B scans, which have several drawbacks such as long acquisition time and repeated wave stimulations. Recent developments of Fourier domain mode-locked high-speed swept-source OCT system has enabled enough speed to perform KHz B-scan rate OCT imaging. Here we propose ultra-high speed, single shot shear wave imaging to capture single-shot transient shear wave propagation to perform SW-OCE. The frame rate of shear wave imaging is 16 kHz, at A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, which allows the detection of high-frequency shear wave of up to 8 kHz. The shear wave is generated photothermal-acoustically, by ultra-violet pulsed laser, which requires no contact to OCE subjects, while launching high frequency shear waves that carries rich localized elasticity information. The image acquisition and processing can be performed at video-rate, which enables real-time 3D elastography. SW-OCE measurements are demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine ocular tissue. This approach opens up the feasibility to perform real-time 3D SW-OCE in clinical applications, to obtain high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  8. Subsonic and Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Bono, M. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-05-01

    Shear flows arise in many high-energy-density (HED) and astrophysical systems, yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their evolution in these extreme environments. Fundamentally, shear flows can initiate mixing via the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and may eventually drive a transition to turbulence. We present two dedicated shear flow experiments that created subsonic and supersonic shear layers in HED plasmas. In the subsonic case the Omega laser was used to drive a shock wave along a rippled plastic interface, which subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices. In the supersonic shear experiment the Nike laser was used to drive Al plasma across a low-density foam surface also seeded with a ripple. Unlike the subsonic case, detached shocks developed around the ripples in response to the supersonic Al flow.

  9. High-Sensitivity Optical Pulse Characterization Using Sagnac Electro-Optic Spectral Shearing Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrer, C.; Bromage, J.

    2010-05-04

    An electro-optic spectral shearing interferometer for high-sensitivity optical pulse characterization is described. Two replicas of the test pulse counterpropagate in a Sagnac interferometer with orthogonal polarization states, resulting in two relatively sheared copolarized replicas after temporal phase modulation. The polarization interferometer is intrinsically stable, and its birefringence sets the delay between interfering replicas to reduce the spectrometer resolution requirement. Experimental implementations demonstrate real-time pulse characterization at average powers as low as 1 nWwith spectral shears as high as 280 GHz.

  10. High performance shear thickening fluid based on calcinated colloidal silica microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng-Biao; Xuan, Shou-Hu; Jiang, Wan-Quan; Gong, Xing-Long

    2015-08-01

    Here, a novel method to prepare high performance shear thickening fluids (STFs) by dispersing calcinated silica microspheres into ethylene glycol is reported. The silica particles were prepared by hydrolyzing tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), and then they were treated under high temperature to remove the physically adsorbed water and the -OH groups on the surfaces. The influence of the temperature on the rheological properties of the final STFs was investigated and the STF prepared under the optimum temperature exhibited the best ST effects. A possible mechanism was proposed and it was found that a proper solvation layer adsorbed on the silica surface resulted in lower critical shear rate and higher shear thickening viscosity.

  11. High temperature and deformation field measurements at the vicinity of dynamically growing shear bands

    SciTech Connect

    Rosakis, A.J.; Ravichandran, G.; Zhou, M.

    1995-12-31

    The phenomenon of dynamic initiation and propagation of adiabatic shear bands is experimentally and numerically investigated. Pre-notched metal plates are subjected to asymmetric impact load histories (dynamic mode-II loading). Dynamic shear bands emanate from the notch tip and propagate rapidly in a direction nearly parallel to the direction of the impact. Real time temperature histories along a line intersecting and perpendicular to the shear band paths are recorded by means of a high-speed infrared detector system. The materials studied are C-300 (a maraging steel) and Ti - 6 Al - 4 V alloy. Experiments show that the peak temperatures inside the propagating shear bands are approaching 90% of the melting point for C-300 and are significantly lower for the titanium alloy (up to 600{degrees}C). Additionally, measured distances of shear band propagation indicate stronger resistance to shear banding by the Ti - 6Al - 4V alloy. Deformation fields around the propagating shear bands are recorded using high-speed photography. Shear band speeds are found to strongly depend on impact velocities, and are as high as 1200 m/s for C-300 steels. Finite Element simulations of the experiments are carried out under the context of plane strain, considering finite deformations, inertia, heat conduction, thermal softening, strain hardening and strain-rate hardening. In the simulations, the shear band propagation is assumed to be governed by a critical plastic strain criterion. The results are compared with experimental measurements obtained using the high-speed infrared detectors and high-speed photography.

  12. Nozzle Spray Delivery Studies for High-Viscosity Shear-Thinning Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Smita; Cloeter, Mike; Zhang, Yuxi; Rajan, Jana; Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Deo, Puspendu; Smith, Billy

    2015-03-01

    Experiments were performed to explore the spray of shear-thinning polymer solutions through various nozzles. High speed images near the nozzle exit, drop size distributions, and spatial mass flux distributions were analyzed with the shear-thinning fluids and deionized water for comparison for seven different nozzles with pressure drops up to 40 psi. The nozzles tested include full cone, hollow cone, and flat fan nozzles. The aim was to identify suitable nozzles that would give droplet sizes in the range of 100-2000 μm for the shear thinning fluids. It was found in general that the shear-thinning fluids led to formation of ligament like structures whereas sheet perforation was more predominant with deionized water. The spray break up was delayed with the shear-thinning fluids. The spray of the shear-thinning fluids also led to an increase in the median drop size with the extent of increase being dependent on the nozzle type. The spray angle was found to be reduced by around 20° at a distance of 12'' when compared to that of distilled water. This study lends fundamental insights into spray characteristics for a wide range of spray nozzles with high viscosity shear-thinning solution as compared to spraying deionized water with the same nozzles.

  13. Prediction of the Viscoelastic Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiaxi; Simon, Sindee

    2010-03-01

    The bulk and shear viscoelastic responses for several materials appear to arise from the same molecular mechanisms at short times, i.e., Andrade creep where the KWW beta parameter is approximately 0.3. If this is indeed the case, prediction and placement of the bulk viscoelastic response can be made simply by knowing the limiting elastic and rubbery bulk moduli and the viscoelastic shear response. The proposed methodology, which uses only easily measured functions, is considerably less time- and labor-intensive than direct measurement of the viscoelastic bulk modulus. Here we investigate this hypothesis and compare the calculated viscoelastic bulk responses for several materials to existing data in the literature.

  14. Turbulence Decorrelation via Controlled Ex B Shear in High-Performance Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    Multi-scale spatiotemporal turbulence properties are significantly altered as toroidal rotation and resulting ExB shearing rate profile are systematically varied in advanced-inductive H-mode plasmas on DIII-D (βN ~ 2.7, q95=5.1). Density, electron and ion temperature profiles and dimensionless parameters (βN, q95, ν*, ρ*, and Te/Ti) are maintained nearly fixed during the rotation scan. Low-wavenumber turbulence (k⊥ρS < 1), measured with Beam Emission Spectroscopy, exhibits increased decorrelation rates (reduced eddy lifetime) as the ExB shear rises across the radial zone of maximum shearing rate (0.55 < ρ < 0 . 75), while the fluctuation amplitude undergoes little change. The poloidal wavenumber is reduced at higher shear, indicating a change in the wavenumber spectrum: eddies elongate in the direction orthogonal to shear and field. At both low and high shear, the 2D turbulence correlation function exhibits a tilted structure, consistent with flow shear. At mid-radius (ρ ~ 0.5), low-k density fluctuations show localized amplitude reduction, consistent with linear GYRO growth rates and ωExB shearing rates. Intermediate and high wavenumber fluctuations measured with Doppler Back-Scattering (k⊥ρS ~ 2.5-3.5) at ρ=0.7 and Phase Contrast Imaging (k⊥ρS > 5) exhibit decreasing amplitude at higher rotation. The energy confinement time increases from 105 ms to 150 ms as the toroidal Mach number (M=vTOR / vth , i) increases to Mo ~ 0.5, while transport decreases. TGLF calculations match the Ti profile with modest discrepancies in the Te and ne profiles. These results clarify the complex mechanisms by which ExB shear affects turbulence. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54999, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. Shear veins observed within anisotropic fabric at high angles to the maximum compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Remitti, Francesca; Sibson, Richard H.

    2010-07-01

    Some faults seem to slip at unusually high angles (>45°) relative to the orientation of the greatest principal compressive stress. This implies that these faults are extremely weak compared with the surrounding rock. Laboratory friction experiments and theoretical models suggest that the weakness may result from slip on a pre-existing frictionally weak surface, weakening from chemical reactions, elevated fluid pressure or dissolution-precipitation creep. Here we describe shear veins within the Chrystalls Beach accretionary mélange, New Zealand. The mélange is a highly sheared assemblage of relatively competent rock within a cleaved, anisotropic mudstone matrix. The orientation of the shear veins-compared with the direction of hydrothermal extension veins that formed contemporaneously-indicates that they were active at an angle of 80°+/-5° to the greatest principal compressive stress. We show that the shear veins developed incrementally along the cleavage planes of the matrix. Thus, we suggest that episodic slip was facilitated by the anisotropic internal fabric, in a fluid-overpressured, heterogeneous shear zone. A similar mechanism may accommodate shear at high angles to the greatest principal compressive stress in a range of tectonic settings. We therefore conclude that incremental slip along a pre-existing planar fabric, coupled to high fluid pressure and dissolution-precipitation creep, may explain active slip on severely misoriented faults.

  16. Experimental Reacting Hydrogen Shear Layer Data at High Subsonic Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Wey, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a planar shear layer of hydrogen reacting with hot air was measured with a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system, a schlieren system, and OH fluorescence imaging. It was compared with a similar air-to-air case without combustion. The high-speed stream's flow speed was about 390 m/s, or Mach 0.71, and the flow speed ratio was 0.34. The results showed that a shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without; both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established data base. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layers was low, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, the shear layer shifted laterally into the lower speed fuel stream, and a more organized pattern of Reynolds stress was present in the reaction shear layer, likely as a result of the formation of a larger scale structure associated with shear layer corrugation from heat release. Dynamic pressure measurements suggest that coherent flow perturbations existed inside the shear layer and that this flow became more chaotic as the flow advected downstream. Velocity and thermal variable values are listed in this report for a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) benchmark.

  17. Soft-materials elastic and shear moduli measurement using piezoelectric cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markidou, Anna; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a soft-material elastic modulus and shear modulus sensor using piezoelectric cantilevers. A piezoelectric cantilever is consisted of a highly piezoelectric layer, e.g., lead-zirconate-titanate bonded to a nonpiezoelectric layer, e.g., stainless steel. Applying an electric field in the thickness direction causes a piezoelectric cantilever to bend, generating an axial displacement or force. When a piezoelectric cantilever is in contact with an object, this electric field-generated axial displacement is reduced due to the resistance by the object. With a proper design of the piezoelectric cantilever's geometry, its axial displacements with and without contacting the object could be accurately measured. From these measurements the elastic modulus of the object can be deduced. In this study, we tailored the piezoelectric cantilevers for measuring the elastic and shear moduli of tissue-like soft materials with forces in the submilli Newton to milliNewton range. Elastic moduli and shear moduli of soft materials were measured using piezoelectric cantilevers with a straight tip and an L-shaped tip, respectively. Using gelatin and commercial rubber material as model soft tissues, we showed that a piezoelectric cantilever 1.5-2cm long could measure the elastic modulus and the shear modulus of a small soft material sample (1-3mm wide) in the small strain range (<1%). For samples 5mm high, the resultant compressive (shear) strains were less than 0.5% (1%). The measurements were validated by (1) comparing the measured Young's modulus of the commercial rubber sample with its known value and (2) by measuring both the Young's modulus and shear modulus on the samples and confirming the thus deduced Poisson's ratios with the separately measured Poisson's ratios.

  18. Decreased platelet function in aortic valve stenosis: high shear platelet activation then inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J. R.; Etherington, M. D.; Brant, J.; Watkins, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To elucidate the mechanism of the bleeding tendency observed in patients with aortic valve stenosis. DESIGN--A prospective study of high and low shear platelet function tests in vitro in normal controls compared with that in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis with a mean (SD) systolic gradient by Doppler of 75 (18) mm Hg before and at least 4 months after aortic valve replacement. SETTING--District general hospital. RESULTS--The patients showed reduced retention in the high shear platelet function tests. (a) Platelet retention in the filter test was 53.6 (12.6)% in patients with aortic valve stenosis and 84.8 (9.6)% in the controls (P < 0.001). (b) Retention in the glass bead column test was 49.8 (19.2) in the patients and 87.4 (8.7) in the controls (P < 0.001). (c) The standard bleeding time was longer in the patients (P < 0.06). Results of the high shear tests (a, b, and c) after aortic valve replacement were within the normal range. The platelet count was low but within the normal range before surgery and increased postoperatively (P < 0.01). There were no differences in the results of standard clotting tests, plasma and intraplatelet von Willebrand's factor, or in 15 platelet aggregation tests using five agonists between patients with aortic valve stenosis and controls. CONCLUSIONS--The high shear haemodynamics of aortic valve stenosis modify platelet function in vivo predisposing to a bleeding tendency. This abnormality of platelet function is detectable only in vitro using high shear tests. The abnormal function is reversed by aortic valve replacement. High shear forces in vitro activate and then inactivate platelets. By the same mechanisms aortic valve stenosis seems to lead to high shear damage in vivo, resulting in a clinically important bleeding tendency in some patients. PMID:8541170

  19. Turbulence modeling of free shear layers for high performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    In many flowfield computations, accuracy of the turbulence model employed is frequently a limiting factor in the overall accuracy of the computation. This is particularly true for complex flowfields such as those around full aircraft configurations. Free shear layers such as wakes, impinging jets (in V/STOL applications), and mixing layers over cavities are often part of these flowfields. Although flowfields have been computed for full aircraft, the memory and CPU requirements for these computations are often excessive. Additional computer power is required for multidisciplinary computations such as coupled fluid dynamics and conduction heat transfer analysis. Massively parallel computers show promise in alleviating this situation, and the purpose of this effort was to adapt and optimize CFD codes to these new machines. The objective of this research effort was to compute the flowfield and heat transfer for a two-dimensional jet impinging normally on a cool plate. The results of this research effort were summarized in an AIAA paper titled 'Parallel Implementation of the k-epsilon Turbulence Model'. Appendix A contains the full paper.

  20. Dynamic fluid loss in hydraulic fracturing under realistic shear conditions in high-permeability rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Navarrete, R.C.; Cawiezel, K.E.; Constien, V.G.

    1996-08-01

    A study of the dynamic fluid loss of hydraulic fracturing fluids under realistic shear conditions is presented. During a hydraulic fracturing treatment, a polymeric solution is pumped under pressure down the well to create and propagate a fracture. Part of the fluid leaks into the rock formation, leaving a skin layer of polymer or polymer filter cake, at the rock surface or in the pore space. This study focuses on the effects of shear rate and permeability on dynamic fluid-loss behavior of crosslinked and linear fracturing gels. Previous studies of dynamic fluid loss have mainly been with low-permeability cores and constant shear rates. Here, the effect of shear history and fluid-loss additive on the dynamic leakoff of high-permeability cores is examined.

  1. Suppression of endothelial t-PA expression by prolonged high laminar shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Carlstroem, Maria; Bergh, Niklas; Larsson, Pia; Karlsson, Lena; Jern, Sverker

    2009-02-06

    Primary hypertension is associated with an impaired capacity for acute release of endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which is an important local protective response to prevent thrombus extension. As hypertensive vascular remodeling potentially results in increased vascular wall shear stress, we investigated the impact of shear on regulation of t-PA. Cultured human endothelial cells were exposed to low ({<=}1.5 dyn/cm{sup 2}) or high (25 dyn/cm{sup 2}) laminar shear stress for up to 48 h in two different experimental models. Using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, shear stress was observed to time and magnitude-dependently suppress t-PA transcript and protein secretion to approximately 30% of basal levels. Mechanistic experiments revealed reduced nuclear protein binding to the t-PA specific CRE element (EMSA) and an almost completely abrogated shear response with pharmacologic JNK inhibition. We conclude that prolonged high laminar shear stress suppresses endothelial t-PA expression and may therefore contribute to the enhanced risk of arterial thrombosis in hypertensive disease.

  2. Elastic Properties in Tension and Shear of High Strength Nonferrous Metals and Stainless Steel - Effect of Previous Deformation and Heat Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebs, R W; Mcadam, D J

    1947-01-01

    A resume is given of an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation and of annealing temperature on the tensile and shear elastic properties of high strength nonferrous metals and stainless steels in the form of rods and tubes. The data were obtained from earlier technical reports and notes, and from unpublished work in this investigation. There are also included data obtained from published and unpublished work performed on an independent investigation. The rod materials, namely, nickel, monel, inconel, copper, 13:2 Cr-Ni steel, and 18:8 Cr-Ni steel, were tested in tension; 18:8 Cr-Ni steel tubes were tested in shear, and nickel, monel, aluminum-monel, and Inconel tubes were tested in both tension and shear. There are first described experiments on the relationship between hysteresis and creep, as obtained with repeated cyclic stressing of annealed stainless steel specimens over a constant load range. These tests, which preceded the measurements of elastic properties, assisted in devising the loading time schedule used in such measurements. From corrected stress-set curves are derived the five proof stresses used as indices of elastic or yield strength. From corrected stress-strain curves are derived the secant modulus and its variation with stress. The relationship between the forms of the stress-set and stress-strain curves and the values of the properties derived is discussed. Curves of variation of proof stress and modulus with prior extension, as obtained with single rod specimens, consist in wavelike basic curves with superposed oscillations due to differences of rest interval and extension spacing; the effects of these differences are studied. Oscillations of proof stress and modulus are generally opposite in manner. The use of a series of tubular specimens corresponding to different amounts of prior extension of cold reduction gave curves almost devoid of oscillation since the effects of variation of rest interval and extension spacing were

  3. Neutrophil rolling at high shear: flattening, catch bond behavior, tethers and slings.

    PubMed

    Sundd, Prithu; Pospieszalska, Maria K; Ley, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophil recruitment to sites of inflammation involves neutrophil rolling along the inflamed endothelium in the presence of shear stress imposed by blood flow. Neutrophil rolling in post-capillary venules in vivo is primarily mediated by P-selectin on the endothelium binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) constitutively expressed on neutrophils. Blood flow exerts a hydrodynamic drag on the rolling neutrophil which is partially or fully balanced by the adhesive forces generated in the P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds. Rolling is the result of rapid formation and dissociation of P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds at the center and rear of the rolling cell, respectively. Neutrophils roll stably on P-selectin in post-capillary venules in vivo and flow chambers in vitro at wall shear stresses greater than 6 dyn cm(-2). However, the mechanisms that enable neutrophils to roll at such high shear stress are not completely understood. In vitro and in vivo studies have led to the discovery of four potential mechanisms, viz. cell flattening, catch bond behavior, membrane tethers, and slings. Rolling neutrophils undergo flattening at high shear stress, which not only increases the size of the cell footprint but also reduces the hydrodynamic drag experienced by the rolling cell. P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds behave as catch bonds at small detachment forces and thus become stronger with increasing force. Neutrophils rolling at high shear stress form membrane tethers which can be longer than the cell diameter and promote the survival of P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds. Finally, neutrophils rolling at high shear stress form 'slings', which act as cell autonomous adhesive substrates and support step-wise peeling. Tethers and slings act together and contribute to the forces balancing the hydrodynamic drag. How the synergy between the four mechanisms leads to stable rolling at high shear stress is an area that needs further investigation. PMID:23141302

  4. Neutrophil rolling at high shear: flattening, catch bond behavior, tethers and slings

    PubMed Central

    Sundd, Prithu; Pospieszalska, Maria K.; Ley, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment to sites of inflammation involves neutrophil rolling along the inflamed endothelium in the presence of shear stress imposed by blood flow. Neutrophil rolling in post-capillary venules in vivo is primarily mediated by P-selectin on the endothelium binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) constitutively expressed on neutrophils. Blood flow exerts a hydrodynamic drag on the rolling neutrophil which is partially or fully balanced by the adhesive forces generated in the P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds. Rolling is the result of rapid formation and dissociation of P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds at the center and rear of the rolling cell, respectively. Neutrophils roll stably on P-selectin in post-capillary venules in vivo and flow chambers in vitro at wall shear stresses greater than 6 dyn cm−2. However, the mechanisms that enable neutrophils to roll at such high shear stress are not completely understood. In vitro and in vivo studies have led to the discovery of four potential mechanisms, viz. cell flattening, catch bond behavior, membrane tethers, and slings. Rolling neutrophils undergo flattening at high shear stress, which not only increases the size of the cell footprint but also reduces the hydrodynamic drag experienced by the rolling cell. P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds behave as catch bonds at small detachment forces and thus become stronger with increasing force. Neutrophils rolling at high shear stress form membrane tethers which can be longer than the cell diameter and promote the survival of P-selectin-PSGL-1 bonds. Finally, neutrophils rolling at high shear stress form slings, which act as cell autonomous adhesive substrates and support step-wise peeling. Tethers and slings act together and contribute to the forces balancing the hydrodynamic drag. How the synergy between the four mechanisms leads to stable rolling at high shear stress is an area that needs further investigation. PMID:23141302

  5. Measurements in the annular shear layer of high subsonic and under-expanded round jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tong; McGuirk, James J.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study has been undertaken to document compressibility effects in the annular shear layers of axisymmetric jets. Comparison is made of the measured flow development with the well-documented influence of compressibility in planar mixing layers. High Reynolds number (~106) and high Mach number jets issuing from a convergent nozzle at nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) from 1.28 to 3.0 were measured using laser Doppler anemometry instrumentation. Detailed radial profile data are reported, particularly within the potential core region, for mean velocity, turbulence rms, and turbulence shear stress. For supercritical NPRs the presence of the pressure waves in the inviscid shock cell region as the jet expanded back to ambient pressure was found to exert a noticeable effect on shear layer location, causing this to shift radially outwards at high supercritical NPR conditions. After a boundary layer to free shear layer transition zone, the turbulence development displayed a short region of similarity before adjustment to near-field merged jet behaviour. Peak turbulence rms reduction due to compressibility was similar to that observed in planar layers with radial rms suppression much stronger than axial. Comparison of the compressibility-modified annular shear layer growth rate with planar shear layer data on the basis of the convective Mach number ( M C) showed notable differences; in the annular shear layer, compressibility effects began at lower M C and displayed a stronger reduction in growth. For high Mach number aerospace propulsion applications involving round jets, the current measurements represent a new data set for the calibration/validation of compressibility-affected turbulence models.

  6. Evaluation of Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in composite wires for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Michinaka; Ballarino, Amalia; Bartova, Barbora; Bjoerstad, Roger; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian

    2016-02-01

    MgB2 wire is a promising superconductor for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity upgrade of the large Hadron collider at CERN. The mechanical properties of MgB2 must be fully quantified for the cable design, and in this study, we evaluate the Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in wires with a practical level of critical current. The Young’s moduli of MgB2 filaments by two different processes, in situ and ex situ, were compared. Two different evaluation methods were applied to an in situ MgB2 wire, a single-fiber tensile test and a tensile test after removing Monel. In addition, the Young’s modulus of the few-micron-thick Nb-Ni reaction layer in an ex situ processed wire was evaluated using a nanoindentation testing technique to improve the accuracy of analysis based on the rule of mixtures. The Young’s moduli of the in situ and ex situ MgB2 wires were in the range of 76-97 GPa and no distinct difference depending on the fabrication process was found.

  7. Prolonged Application of High Fluid Shear to Chondrocytes Recapitulates Gene Expression Profiles Associated with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Wang, Pu; Lee, Norman H.; Goldring, Mary B.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    Background Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA) disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm2) for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. Conclusions/Significance Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis/progression of OA

  8. Platelet PI3Kβ and GSK3 regulate thrombus stability at a high shear rate.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Pierre-Alexandre; Séverin, Sonia; Hechler, Béatrice; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Payrastre, Bernard; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-29

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase β (PI3Kβ) is considered a potential drug target in arterial thrombosis, which is a major cause of death worldwide. Here we show that a striking phenotype of mice with selective p110β deletion in the megakaryocyte lineage is thrombus instability at a high shear rate, which is an effect that is not detected in the absence of p110α in platelets. The high shear rate-dependent thrombus instability in the absence of p110β is observed both ex vivo and in vivo with the formation of platelet emboli. Moreover, PI3Kβ is required for the recruitment of new platelets to a growing thrombus when a pathological high shear is applied. Treatment of human blood with AZD6482, a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor, phenocopies p110β deletion in mouse platelets, which highlights the role of the kinase activity of p110β. Within the growing platelet thrombus, p110β inactivation impairs the activating phosphorylations of Akt and the inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3. In accord with these data, pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3 restores thrombus stability. Thus, platelet PI3Kβ is not essential for thrombus growth and stability at normal arterial shear but has a specific and critical role in maintaining the integrity of the formed thrombus on elevation of shear rate, suggesting a potential risk of embolization on treatment with PI3Kβ inhibitors. PMID:25398937

  9. Texture Development in High-Silicon Iron Sheet Produced by Simple Shear Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, Andrew B.; Sagapuram, Dinakar; Trumble, Kevin P.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-01

    Sheet processing of high Si-Fe alloys (up to 6.5 wt pct Si) is demonstrated by application of highly confined shear deformation in cutting-extrusion. This alloy system, of major interest to electromagnetic applications, is characterized by poor workability. By a suitable interactive combination of simple shear, high strain rates, near-adiabatic heating, and large hydrostatic pressure in the deformation zone, flow localization, and cracking inherent to this alloy system are suppressed. This enables creation of sheet and foil forms from bulk ingots, cast or wrought, in a single deformation step, unlike rolling. The sheet is characterized by strong shear textures, described by partial {110} and <111> fibers, and fine-grained microstructures ( 20 µm grain size). The orientation (inclination) of these fibers, with respect to the sheet surface, can be varied over a range of 35 deg through selection of the deformation path. In contrast to rolling textures, the current shear deformation textures are negligibly influenced by recrystallization annealing. A recovery-based continuous recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the texture retention. Some general implications for shear-based processing of alloys of limited workability are discussed.

  10. High Shear Deformation to Produce High Strength and Energy Absorption in Mg Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Li, Dongsheng; Garmestani, Hamid; Nyberg, Eric A.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2014-02-01

    Magnesium alloys have the potential to reduce the mass of transportation systems however to fully realize the benefits it must be usable in more applications including those that require higher strength and ductility. It has been known that fine grain size in Mg alloys leads to high strength and ductility. However, the challenge is how to achieve this optimal microstructure in a cost effective way. This work has shown that by using optimized high shear deformation and second phase particles of Mg2Si and MgxZnZry the energy absorption of the extrusions can exceed that of AA6061. The extrusion process under development described in this presentation appears to be scalable and cost effective. In addition to process development a novel modeling approach to understand the roles of strain and state-of-strain on particle fracture and grain size control has been developed

  11. Room temperature shear properties of the strain isolator pad for the shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Tests were conducted at room temperature to determine the shear properties of the strain isolator pad (SIP) material used in the thermal protection system of the space shuttle. Tests were conducted on both the .23 cm and .41 cm thick SIP material in the virgin state and after fifty fully reversed shear cycles. The shear stress displacement relationships are highly nonlinear, exhibit large hysteresis effects, are dependent on material orientation, and have a large low modulus region near the zero stress level where small changes in stress can result in large displacements. The values at the higher stress levels generally increase with normal and shear force load conditioning. Normal forces applied during the shear tests reduces the low modulus region for the material. Shear test techniques which restrict the normal movement of the material give erroneous stress displacement results. However, small normal forces do not significantly effect the shear modulus for a given shear stress. Poisson's ratio values for the material are within the range of values for many common materials. The values are not constant but vary as a function of the stress level and the previous stress history of the material. Ultimate shear strengths of the .23 cm thick SIP are significantly higher than those obtained for the .41 cm thick SIP.

  12. Microturbulence and Flow Shear in High-performance JET ITB Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny; A. Andre; A. Bicoulet; C. Challis; G.D. Conway; W. Dorland; D.R. Ernst; T.S. Hahm; T.C. Hender; D. McCune; G. Rewoldt; S.E. Sharapov

    2001-12-05

    The transport, flow shear, and linear growth rates of microturbulence are studied for a Joint European Torus (JET) plasma with high central q in which an internal transport barrier (ITB) forms and grows to a large radius. The linear microturbulence growth rates of the fastest growing (most unstable) toroidal modes with high toroidal mode number are calculated using the GS2 and FULL gyrokinetic codes. These linear growth rates, gamma (subscript lin) are large, but the flow-shearing rates, gamma (subscript ExB) (dominated by the toroidal rotation contribution) are also comparably large when and where the ITB exists.

  13. High-frequency viscoelastic shear properties of vocal fold tissues: implications for vocal fold tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Teller, Sean S; Farran, Alexandra J E; Xiao, Longxi; Jiao, Tong; Duncan, Randall L; Clifton, Rodney J; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanical function of the vocal folds (VFs) depends on their viscoelastic properties. Many conditions can lead to VF scarring that compromises voice function and quality. To identify candidate replacement materials, the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of native tissues need to be understood at phonation frequencies. Previously, the authors developed the torsional wave experiment (TWE), a stress-wave-based experiment to determine the linear viscoelastic shear properties of small, soft samples. Here, the viscoelastic properties of porcine and human VFs were measured over a frequency range of 10-200 Hz. The TWE utilizes resonance phenomena to determine viscoelastic properties; therefore, the specimen test frequency is determined by the sample size and material properties. Viscoelastic moduli are reported at resonance frequencies. Structure and composition of the tissues were determined by histology and immunochemistry. Porcine data from the TWE are separated into two groups: a young group, consisting of fetal and newborn pigs, and an adult group, consisting of 6-9-month olds and 2+-year olds. Adult tissues had an average storage modulus of 2309±1394 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.38±0.10 at frequencies of 36-200 Hz. The VFs of young pigs were significantly more compliant, with a storage modulus of 394±142 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.40±0.14 between 14 and 30 Hz. No gender dependence was observed. Histological staining showed that adult porcine tissues had a more organized, layered structure than the fetal tissues, with a thicker epithelium and a more structured lamina propria. Elastin fibers in fetal VF tissues were immature compared to those in adult tissues. Together, these structural changes in the tissues most likely contributed to the change in viscoelastic properties. Adult human VF tissues, recovered postmortem from adult patients with a history of smoking or disease, had an average storage modulus of 756±439 Pa and a loss tangent of 0

  14. High-wavenumber shear and temperature structure during the Patches Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorino, G. O.; Trump, C. L.

    1992-02-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements made during the Patches Experiment (PATCHEX) in the Pacific Ocean are examined for the occurrence of high-wavenumber shear (vertical scales of >2 m) which is presumed to lead to patches of small-scale waves and turbulent mixing. Shear is found to be dominated by near-inertial waves having upward energy propagation and ˜30-m vertical wavelengths over the depth range ˜80-180 m. The predominance of upgoing waves is unexpected and supports the RiNo float measurements made by Kunze et al. (1990a) at 180 to 200-m depth. Profiles of rms shear are qualitatively similar to those measured by Gregg and Sanford (1988) with the multi-scale profiler (MSP); and the fraction of time shear exceeds a threshold based on Gregg's (1989) scaling is about 10%, similar to the fraction of active turbulence seen in MSP profiles of dissipation rate. Towed thermistor chain data show infrequent patches of short (˜15 m) waveforms which may be Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instabilities (as assumed by Kunze et al.). The data support previous suggestions that near-inertial waves are important sources of turbulent mixing in the thermocline.

  15. Measurements of continuous mix evolution in a high energy density shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, E. Doss, F.; Flippo, K.; Fincke, J.

    2014-04-15

    We report on the novel integration of streaked radiography into a counter-flowing High Energy Density (HED) shear environment that continually measures a growing mix layer of Al separating two low-density CH foams. Measurements of the mix width allow us to validate compressible turbulence models and with streaked imaging, make this possible with a minimal number of experiments on large laser facilities. In this paper, we describe how the HED counter-flowing shear layer is created and diagnosed with streaked radiography. We then compare the streaked data to previous two-dimensional, single frame radiography and radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment with inline compressible turbulent mix models.

  16. The effect of mineralogy and grain breakage on shear-induced noise and auto-acoustic compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of granular flows is strongly dependent on shear rate. At relatively slow shear velocities, a granular flow will support stresses elastically through force chains in the quasi-static regime. At relatively high shear velocities, it will support stresses by transferring momentum in higher velocity grain collisions in the grain-inertial regime, which results in dilation of the flow. Experiments conducted using a commercial torsional rheometer (TA AR-2000ex) found that at intermediate shear velocities, force chain collapse in angular sand samples produces sound waves capable of vibrating the shear zone enough to cause compaction. Sound produced by spherical glass beads during shearing was of lower amplitude and no compaction effect was observed. In order to characterize both the source of acoustic energy produced during shearing of angular grains and its associated compaction effect, we used the same experimental set up to observe how volumetric and acoustic response to shear stress changes with mineralogy, specifically varying grain hardness and shear modulus. A comparison of angular quartz beach sand (Mohs hardness of 7 and shear modulus of 31.14 GPa) with angular aluminum oxide grit of the same size (Mohs hardness of 9 and shear modulus of 124 GPa) shows markedly different behavior, with the aluminum oxide mixture producing lower noise amplitudes during shearing and showing no compaction at intermediate shear rates. Combined with grain size and shape analysis, the implication is that shear-induced noise is the result of grain fracture rather than shear interactions and is dependent on the relative strength of individual grains. Combined with recent and ongoing work characterizing the effect of mean grain size and polydispersity on shear-induced volumetric and acoustic response, we are moving towards a more complete incorporation of field-observable variables into predictions of natural granular mixtures.

  17. Experimental investigation of the effects of high-frequency electroactive morphing on the shear-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Johannes; Rizzo, Karl-Joseph; Jodin, Gurvan; Duhayon, Eric; Rouchon, Jean-François; Hunt, Julian; Braza, Marianna

    2015-11-01

    Time-resolved PIV measurements are conducted at a Reynolds number of 270 . 000 downstream of the trailing edge of a NACA4412 airfoil equipped with trailing-edge piezoelectric tab actuators to investigate the high-frequency low-amplitude actuation's effect on the shear-layer. A comparison of the time-averaged Reynolds stress tensor components at different actuation frequency reveals a significant impact of the actuation on the shear-layer dynamics. A proper orthogonal decomposition analysis is conducted in order to investigate the actuation's impact on the vortex breakdown. It will be shown that a specific low-amplitude actuation frequency enables a reduction of the predominant shear-layer frequencies.

  18. Impact of triacylglycerol composition on shear-induced textural changes in highly saturated fats.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Sandra B; Andersen, Morten D; Hammershøj, Marianne; Wiking, Lars

    2017-01-15

    This study demonstrates a strong interaction between triacylglycerol (TAG) composition and effects of shear rate on the microstructure and texture of fats. Cocoa butter alternatives with similar saturated fat content, but different major TAGs (PPO-, PSO-, SSO-, POP- and SOS-rich blends) were evaluated. Results show how shear can create a harder texture in fat blends based on symmetric monounsaturated TAGs (up to ∼200%), primarily due to reduction in crystal size, whereas shear has little effect on hardness of asymmetric monounsaturated TAGs. Such differences could not be ascribed to differences in the degree of supercooling, but was found to be a consequence of differences in the crystallisation behaviour of different TAGs. The fractal dimension was evaluated by dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis and Fourier transformation of microscopy images. However, the concept of fractal patterns was found to be insufficient to describe microstructural changes of fat blends with high solid fat content. PMID:27542496

  19. Dissipative heating effects and end corrections for viscous Newtonian flow in high shear capillary tube viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Winer, W. O.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of dissipation heating on the apparent viscosity measured in capillary tube viscometry is described in this paper. Conditions of low Reynolds number and high shear are assumed. End corrections to the tube flow are incorporated. The flow curves show decreasing apparent viscosity when the shear stress increases. The configuration of the flow curves plotted in logarithmic presentation are found to be identical for fluids with Newtonian behavior. Convection is the predominant mechanism in removal of the heat in short capillary tube. The estimated upper bound for the shear stress obtainable in short length capillary tubes appears to be of the order of magnitude of 10 MPa limited primarily by the pressure drop associated with the constant end correction from the flat ended inlet and exit of the tube.

  20. A kinetic study of the polymorphic transformation of nimodipine and indomethacin during high shear granulation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Ma, Mingxin; Wang, Tianyi; Chang, Di; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism, kinetics, and factors affecting the polymorphic transformation of nimodipine (NMD) and indomethacin (IMC) during high shear granulation. Granules containing active pharmaceutical ingredient, microcrystalline cellulose, and low-substituted hydroxypropylcellulose were prepared with ethanolic hydroxypropylcellulose solution, and the effects of independent process variables including impeller speed and granulating temperature were taken into consideration. Two polymorphs of the model drugs and granules were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis and quantitatively determined by differential scanning calorimetry. A theoretical kinetic method of ten kinetic models was applied to analyze the polymorphic transformation of model drugs. The results obtained revealed that both the transformation of modification I to modification II of NMD and the transformation of the α form to the γ form of IMC followed a two-dimensional nuclei growth mechanism. The activation energy of transformation was calculated to be 7.933 and 56.09 kJ·mol(-1) from Arrhenius plot, respectively. Both the granulating temperature and the impeller speed affected the transformation rate of the drugs and, in particular, the high shear stress significantly accelerated the transformation process. By analyzing the growth mechanisms of granules in high-shear mixer, it was concluded that the polymorphic transformation of NMD and IMC took place in accordance with granule growth in a high-shear mixer. PMID:21553164

  1. High Modulus and High T(sub g) Thermally Stable Polymers from p-Ethynyl-Terminated Rigid-Rod Monomers. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melissaris, Anastasios P.; Sutter, James K.; Litt, Morton H.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Schuerman, Marla A.

    1995-01-01

    Novel p-ethynyl-substituted rigid rod monomers were studied by pressure Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), ThermoGravimetric Analysis (TGA), IsothermoGravimetric Analysis (IGA), and TGA-IR. These monomers, 4,4'-bis(((4-ethynylphenyl)carbonyl)oxy)biphenyl, designated 1, 1,5-bis-(((4-ethynylphenyl)carbonyl)oxy)naphthalene, designated 2, and bis(4-ethynylphenyl)pyromellitimide, designated 3, were polymerized in the solid state. Thermal polymerization in N2 or air produced highly cross-linked resins with polymerization exotherms centered between 212 and 276 C. The (delta)H's of polymerization of these resins in air were found to be double those in N2. When monomers 1 and 2 were heated in air from 23 to 750 C at 10 C/min, the main decomposition product was carbon dioxide, evolving at a maximum rate between 500 and 600 C; water was also detected as a decomposition product. Void-free neat resin moldings, designated lp to 3p, were made by compression molding the monomers and then heating them. The resulting polymers were highly cross-linked, and their glass transition temperatures (T(sub g)) were much higher than their polymerization temperatures. Using ThermoMechanical Analysis (TMA), we found that polymers lp to 3p had T(sub g)'s of 422, 329, and 380 C, respectively. The thermal and thermooxidative stabilities improved when lp to 3p were postcured in N2 (the postcured polymers were designated 1pp to 3pp). The Linear Thermal Expansions (LTE) for lp and 3p were 1% between 23 and 420 C. Using rheological analysis, we could not clearly detect the T(sub g)'s of lp to 3p because their moduli dropped only slightly between 23 and 490 C and the changes in tan beta were very low. Because of high cross-link density, their moduli changed little as the resins went from a glassy to a rubbery state. Their shear storage moduli in air ranged from 0.82 (3p, 3pp) to 1.6 GPa (lpp) at 23 C, from 0.16 (2p) to 0.7GPa(lpp) at 380 C, and from 0.18(lpp)to 0.6GPa(2p) at 490 C. Finally, these

  2. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-16

    The “shear fracture” which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of “shear fracture” phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a “shear fracture” in the component.

  3. Characterization of Electro-Rheologcial Fluids Under High Shear Rate in Parallel Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.; Zhang, C. B.; Yu, T. X.; Wen, W. J.

    Electro-rheological (ER) fluid is a smart suspension which can be changed promptly from Newtonian to Bingham plastic material when subjected to a high-intensity electric field. This property of ER fluid makes it possible to be applied in adaptive energy absorbers. As the impact velocity encountered in applications could be very large, it is necessary to characterize the ERF under high shear rate. In this study, a capillary rheo-meter with parallel duct was designed and manufactured which is capable of producing a shear rate as high as 5000(1/s). Two giant ER fluids with mass concentration C = 51% and 44.5% and a commercial density-matched ER fluid with C = 37.5% were characterized. The experimental results show that when the ER fluids are free of electric field (E = 0kV/mm), they are Newtonian. However, for the former two ER fluids, the deposition effect is very remarkable and stirring has to be made continuously to keep the suspension stable. With the increase of the electric field intensity, the yield shear stresses of ER fluids increase exponentially but their viscosities do not change much. It is also found that within the parallel duct, the flow of ER fluids exhibits notable fluctuations, whose period increases with the increase of electric field intensity and is independent of the shear rate.

  4. Traction and nonequilibrium phase behavior of confined sheared liquids at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattinoni, Chiara; Heyes, David M.; Lorenz, Christian D.; Dini, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined model liquids under pressure and sheared by the relative sliding of the boundary walls have been carried out. The relationship between the time-dependent traction coefficient, μ(t), and the state of internal structure of the film is followed from commencement of shear for various control parameters, such as applied load, global shear rate, and solid-liquid atom interaction parameters. Phase diagrams, velocity and temperature profiles, and traction coefficient diagrams are analyzed for pure Lennard-Jones (LJ) liquids and a binary LJ mixture. A single component LJ liquid is found to form semicrystalline arrangements with high-traction coefficients, and stick-slip behavior is observed for high pressures and low-shear velocities, which is shown to involve periodic deformation and stress release of the wall atoms and slip in the solid-liquid boundary region. A binary mixture, which discourages crystallization, gives a more classical tribological response with the larger atoms preferentially adsorbing commensurate with the wall. The results obtained are analyzed in the context of tribology: the binary mixture behaves like a typical lubricant, whereas the monatomic system behaves like a traction fluid. It is discussed how this type of simulation can give insights on the tribological behavior of realistic systems.

  5. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Epoxy Molding Compound with Low Storage Modulus at High Temperature and Low Glass-Transition Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui-wang; Li, Dong-sheng; Fan, Qiong

    2012-09-01

    Epoxy molding compound (EMC) has been widely used as a main material for encapsulation and protection of semiconductor packages because of its low cost, high moisture resistance, high heat resistance, and good mechanical performance. Due to the extensive application of lead-free solder in place of Sn-Pb, soldering temperature is higher than before; this demands that EMC, which is usually used for lead-free solder, should have extremely low thermal stress and excellent stability at elevated temperatures. In this work, 1,3-propanediol bis(4-aminobenzoate) (PBA) was added to an EMC product to form a novel epoxy molding compound (FEMC). PBA had very limited effect on the process feasibility of EMC, and caused reduction of the storage modulus by 40% to 50% at high temperatures and reduction of the glass-transition temperature by more than 10°C, which are very helpful to reduce thermal stress buildup during high-temperature soldering processes. The increases of the tab pull force of copper- and silver-plated lead frames within EMC due to PBA were up to 58% and 117%, respectively. With increasing PBA content in the EMC, water absorption increased in a linear fashion, so the amount of PBA added to the EMC should be limited, preferably to not more than 1%.

  6. Analytical and experimental results of the coefficient of thermal expansion of high-modulus graphite-epoxy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Romeo, G.; Frulla, G.

    1995-09-01

    The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) as determined by the Classical Laminate Theory is very sensitive to some orthotropic elastic constants and to the laminate layup. In particular, the non-Hookean behavior of a unidirectional lamina in the fiber direction have to be taken into account to exactly predict the CTE. To verify the theoretical analysis, a new test facility has been designed to carefully measure the CTE in advanced composite materials having a quasi zero value of CTE. Measurement error in the CTE was minimized by a careful choice of displacement sensors and the high control of their thermal stability. The results show that a variation of +/- 1 deg in the lamina orientation can change the CTE of the quasi-isotropic laminate up to -/+ 50.5% of the theoretical value. A variation of +/- 5% in the physical and mechanical properties can change the CTE up to -/+ 48%. 14 refs.

  7. Graphite/Ultra-High Modulus Polyethylene Hybrid Fiber Composites with Epoxy and Polyethylene Matrices for Cosmic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the most significant technical challenges in long-duration space missions is that of protecting the crew from harmful radiation. Protection against such radiation on a manned Mars mission will be of vital importance both during transit and while on the surface of the planet. The development of multifunctional materials that serve as integral structural members of the space vehicle and provide the necessary radiation shielding for the crew would be both mission enabling and cost effective. Additionally, combining shielding and structure could reduce total vehicle mass. Hybrid laminated composite materials having both ultramodulus polyethylene (PE) and graphite fibers in epoxy and PE matrices could meet such mission requirements. PE fibers have excellent physical properties, including the highest specific strength of any known fiber. Moreover, the high hydrogen (H) content of polyethylene makes the material an excellent shielding material for cosmic radiation. When such materials are incorporated into an epoxy or PE matrix a very effective shielding material is expected. Boron (B) may be added to the matrix resin or used as a coating to further increase the shielding effectiveness due to B s ability to slow thermal neutrons. These materials may also serve as micrometeorites shields due to PE s high impact energy absorption properties. It should be noted that such materials can be fabricated by existing equipment and methods. It is the objective of this work therefore to: (a) perform preliminary analysis of the radiation transport within these materials; (b) fabricate panels for mechanical property testing before and after radiation exposure. Preliminary determination on the effectiveness of the combinations of material components on both shielding and structural efficiency will be made.

  8. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard) tumor and surrounding tissue (soft). The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression. PMID:27293476

  9. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard) tumor and surrounding tissue (soft). The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression. PMID:27293476

  10. Electrorheological fluid under elongation, compression, and shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Meng, Y.; Mao, H.; Wen, S.

    2002-03-01

    Electrorheological (ER) fluid based on zeolite and silicone oil under elongation, compression, and shearing was investigated at room temperature. Dc electric fields were applied on the ER fluid when elongation and compression were carried out on a self-constructed test system. The shear yield stress, presenting the macroscopic interactions of particles in the ER fluid along the direction of shearing and perpendicular to the direction of the electric field, was also obtained by a HAAKE RV20 rheometer. The tensile yield stress, presenting the macroscopic interactions of particles in the ER fluid along the direction of the electric field, was achieved as the peak value in the elongating curve with an elongating yield strain of 0.15-0.20. A shear yield angle of about 15°-18.5° reasonably connected tensile yield stress with shear yield stress, agreeing with the shear yield angle tested well by other researchers. The compressing tests showed that the ER fluid has a high compressive modulus under a small compressive strain lower than 0.1. The compressive stress has an exponential relationship with the compressive strain when it is higher than 0.1, and it is much higher than shear yield stress.

  11. Analysing calcium signalling of cells under high shear flows using discontinuous dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Soffe, Rebecca; Baratchi, Sara; Tang, Shi-Yang; Nasabi, Mahyar; McIntyre, Peter; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-01-01

    Immobilisation of cells is an important feature of many cellular assays, as it enables the physical/chemical stimulation of cells; whilst, monitoring cellular processes using microscopic techniques. Current approaches for immobilising cells, however, are hampered by time-consuming processes, the need for specific antibodies or coatings, and adverse effects on cell integrity. Here, we present a dielectrophoresis-based approach for the robust immobilisation of cells, and analysis of their responses under high shear flows. This approach is quick and label-free, and more importantly, minimises the adverse effects of electric field on the cell integrity, by activating the field for a short duration of 120 s, just long enough to immobilise the cells, after which cell culture media (such as HEPES) is flushed through the platform. In optimal conditions, at least 90% of the cells remained stably immobilised, when exposed to a shear stress of 63 dyn/cm(2). This approach was used to examine the shear-induced calcium signalling of HEK-293 cells expressing a mechanosensitive ion channel, transient receptor potential vaniloid type 4 (TRPV4), when exposed to the full physiological range of shear stress. PMID:26202725

  12. Effect of pressure on viscosity at high shear rates by using an injection molding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Valentina; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The difficulties in performing accurate measurements of the effect of pressure on the viscosity of the polymeric materials results in a shortage of relevant experimental data in the literature. In this work, an atactic polystyrene has been characterized to determine the effect of pressure on viscosity during the injection molding process. In particular, the nozzle of the injection molding machine has been modified to host a slit rheometer that allows obtaining in-line rheological measurements by means of two pressure transducers. Slits with two different geometries have been adopted, in order to obtain a wide range of shear rates (102-105 s-1). Experiments have been conducted at increasing injection flow rates, corresponding to different shear rates. By analyzing the measured pressures it has been possible to determine the coefficient β, which describes the effect of pressure on viscosity. Results show that the effect of pressure on viscosity decreases on increasing the shear rate until a plateau is reached at very high shear rates.

  13. Analysing calcium signalling of cells under high shear flows using discontinuous dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffe, Rebecca; Baratchi, Sara; Tang, Shi-Yang; Nasabi, Mahyar; McIntyre, Peter; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-07-01

    Immobilisation of cells is an important feature of many cellular assays, as it enables the physical/chemical stimulation of cells; whilst, monitoring cellular processes using microscopic techniques. Current approaches for immobilising cells, however, are hampered by time-consuming processes, the need for specific antibodies or coatings, and adverse effects on cell integrity. Here, we present a dielectrophoresis-based approach for the robust immobilisation of cells, and analysis of their responses under high shear flows. This approach is quick and label-free, and more importantly, minimises the adverse effects of electric field on the cell integrity, by activating the field for a short duration of 120 s, just long enough to immobilise the cells, after which cell culture media (such as HEPES) is flushed through the platform. In optimal conditions, at least 90% of the cells remained stably immobilised, when exposed to a shear stress of 63 dyn/cm2. This approach was used to examine the shear-induced calcium signalling of HEK-293 cells expressing a mechanosensitive ion channel, transient receptor potential vaniloid type 4 (TRPV4), when exposed to the full physiological range of shear stress.

  14. Analysing calcium signalling of cells under high shear flows using discontinuous dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Soffe, Rebecca; Baratchi, Sara; Tang, Shi-Yang; Nasabi, Mahyar; McIntyre, Peter; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-01-01

    Immobilisation of cells is an important feature of many cellular assays, as it enables the physical/chemical stimulation of cells; whilst, monitoring cellular processes using microscopic techniques. Current approaches for immobilising cells, however, are hampered by time-consuming processes, the need for specific antibodies or coatings, and adverse effects on cell integrity. Here, we present a dielectrophoresis-based approach for the robust immobilisation of cells, and analysis of their responses under high shear flows. This approach is quick and label-free, and more importantly, minimises the adverse effects of electric field on the cell integrity, by activating the field for a short duration of 120 s, just long enough to immobilise the cells, after which cell culture media (such as HEPES) is flushed through the platform. In optimal conditions, at least 90% of the cells remained stably immobilised, when exposed to a shear stress of 63 dyn/cm2. This approach was used to examine the shear-induced calcium signalling of HEK-293 cells expressing a mechanosensitive ion channel, transient receptor potential vaniloid type 4 (TRPV4), when exposed to the full physiological range of shear stress. PMID:26202725

  15. Temperature-Dependent Young's modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio of p-type Ce0.9Fe3.5Co0.5Sb12 and n-type Co0.95Pd0.05Te0.05Sb3 Skutterudite Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Robert; Case, Eldon D; Ni, Jennifer E.; Trejo, Rosa M; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    Effective models of the mechanical behavior of thermoelectric materials under device conditions require knowledge of the temperature-dependent elastic properties.Between room temperature and 600 K, Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) measurements of the Young s and shear moduli of three skutterudite thermoelectric materials, n-type Co0.95Pd0.05Te0.05Sb3(both with and without 0.1 atomic % cerium dopant) and p-type Ce0.9Fe3.5Co0.5Sb12, decreased linearly with temperature at a rate between -0.011 GPa/K and -0.013 GPa/K. In contrast the Poisson s ratio was approximately 0.22 for the three materials and was relatively insensitive to temperature.For temperatures > 600 K, the elastic moduli decreased more rapidly and resonance peaks broadened indicating the onset of viscoelastic behavior.The viscoelastic relaxation of the moduli was least for Ce-doped n-type material, for which grain boundary precipitates may inhibit grain boundary sliding which in turn has important implications concerning creep resistance. In addition, powder processing of the n- and p-type materials should be done cautiously since submicron-sized powders of both the n- and p-type powders were pyrophoric

  16. Novel ultrasound based time averaged flow mapping method for die entry visualization in flow of highly concentrated shear-thinning and shear-thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouriev (Ur'ev), Boris; Windhab, Erich

    2003-01-01

    In this work a methodology for high-resolution time averaged two-dimensional flow mapping of converging flows was explored. Flow of non-transparent, highly concentrated shear-thinning and shear-thickening suspensions was circulating through the entrance flow adapter with adjustable position of the die entry. The entrance region was scanned with the distance resolution of 2.7 mm × 1 mm, radial to axial displacement respectively. The time averaged flow map was composed from one-dimensional flow profiles measured along the ultrasonic sensor beam using the ultrasonic pulsed echo Doppler technique. Priory to die entry visualization an investigation of flow properties was performed using a novel in-line non-invasive measuring technique. The method is based on combination of the ultrasound velocity profiler velocity monitoring and pressure difference method. The rheological flow properties were derived from simultaneous recording and on-line analysis of the velocity profiles across the tube channel and related radial shear stress profiles calculated from the pressure loss along the flow channel. For the first time the entrance flow of shear-thickening suspension could be visualized. A comparison between the flow of the investigated model suspensions was qualitatively analysed. This method gives an opportunity for time averaged flow mapping of viscoelastic and viscous, non-transparent, multiphase and highly concentrated fluids.

  17. Observations of subsonic and supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.

    2009-11-01

    Shear layers containing strong velocity gradients appear in many high-energy-density (HED) systems and play important roles in mixing and the transition to turbulence. Yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their detailed evolution in this extreme environment where plasmas are compressible, actively ionizing, often involve strong shock waves and have complex material properties. Many shear flows produce the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which initiates the mixing at a fluid interface. We present results from two dedicated shear flow experiments that produced overall subsonic and supersonic flows using novel target designs. In the subsonic case, the Omega laser was used to drive a blast wave along a rippled interface between plastic and foam, shocking both the materials to produce two fluids separated by a sharp shear layer. The interface subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices that were accompanied by bubble-like structures of unknown origin. This was the first time the evolution of a well-resolved KH instability was observed in a HED plasma in the laboratory. We have analyzed the properties and dynamics of the plasma based on the data and fundamental models, without resorting to simulated values. In the second, supersonic experiment the Nike laser was used to drive a supersonic flow of Al plasma along a rippled, low-density foam surface. Here again the flowing plasma drove a shock into the second material, so that two fluids were separated by a shear layer. In contrast to the subsonic case, the flow developed shocks around the ripples in response to the supersonic flow of Al. Collaborators: R.P. Drake, O.A. Hurricane, J.F. Hansen, Y. Aglitskiy, T. Plewa, B.A. Remington, H.F. Robey, J.L. Weaver, A.L. Velikovich, R.S. Gillespie, M.J. Bono, M.J. Grosskopf, C.C. Kuranz, A. Visco.

  18. Experimental design to generate strong shear layers in a high-energy-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.

    2010-06-01

    The development of a new experimental system for generating a strong shear flow in a high-energy-density plasma is described in detail. The targets were designed with the goal of producing a diagnosable Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which plays an important role in the transition turbulence but remains relatively unexplored in the high-energy-density regime. To generate the shear flow the Nike laser was used to drive a flow of Al plasma over a low-density foam surface with an initial perturbation. The interaction of the Al and foam was captured with a spherical crystal imager using 1.86 keV X-rays. The selection of the individual targets components is discussed and results are presented.

  19. The influence of an adhesive system on shear bond strength of repaired high-copper amalgams.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; elBadrawy, H E

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strengths of intact high-copper spherical and admixed amalgams were compared with repaired high-copper spherical and admixed amalgam specimens with and without the use of an adhesive system (Amalgambond). In the spherical group the shear bond strength of the repaired specimens was found to be 55 and 53.2% of the intact specimens without and with the use of the adhesive system. After thermocycling those percentages were 48.5 and 43. In the admixed groups those percentages were 39, 36.5, 34.5, and 35.2 respectively. It was found that the application of Amalgambond did not significantly increase the strength of the repaired amalgam. Thermocycling only had a significantly adverse effect on the repair strength in the admixed group repaired without an adhesive system. PMID:1813872

  20. Experimental and numerical study of plastic shear instability under high-speed loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Chudinov, Vasiliy E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Bilalov, Dmitry E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Uvarov, Sergey E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Plekhov, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Terekhina, Alena E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Naimark, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infra-red camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  1. Opposing shear-induced forces dominate inertial focusing in curved channels and high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keinan, Eliezer; Ezra, Elishai; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2015-11-01

    Inertial focusing is the migration of particles in fluid toward equilibrium, where current theory predicts that shear-induced and wall-induced lift forces are balanced. First reported in 1961, this Segre-Silberberg effect is particularly useful for microfluidic isolation of cells and particles. Interestingly, recent work demonstrated particle focusing at high Reynolds numbers that cannot be explained by current theory. In this work, we show that non-monotonous velocity profiles, such as those developed in curved channels, create peripheral velocity maxima in which opposing shear-induced forces dominate over wall effects. Similarly, entry effects amplified in high Reynolds flow produce an equivalent trapping mechanism in short, straight channels. This focusing mechanism in the developing flow regime enables a 10-fold miniaturization of inertial focusing devices, while our model corrects long-standing misconceptions about the nature of mechanical forces governing inertial focusing in curved channels.

  2. Enhanced Actuation Performance and Reduced Heat Generation in Shear-Bending Mode Actuator at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Guoxi; Cheng, Jinrong; Dong, Shuxiang

    2016-08-01

    The actuation performance, strain hysteresis, and heat generation of the shear-bending mode actuators based on soft and hard BiScO3-PbTiO3 (BS-PT) ceramics were investigated under different thermal (from room temperature to 300 °C) and electrical loadings (from 2 to 10 kV/cm and from 1 to 1000 Hz). The actuator based on both soft and hard BS-PT ceramics worked stably at the temperature as high as 300 °C. The maximum working temperature of this shear-bending actuators is 150 °C higher than those of the traditional piezoelectric actuators based on commercial Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 materials. Furthermore, although the piezoelectric properties of soft-type ceramics based on BS-PT ceramics were superior to those of hard ceramics, the maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was larger than that fabricated by soft ceramics at high temperature. The maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was [Formula: see text] under an applied electric field of 10 kV/cm at 300 °C. The strain hysteresis and heat generation of the actuator based on hard ceramics was smaller than those of the actuator based on soft ceramics in the wide temperature range. These results indicated that the shear-bending actuator based on hard piezoelectric ceramics was more suitable for high-temperature piezoelectric applications. PMID:27214895

  3. Vortex Dynamics and Shear-Layer Instability in High-Intensity Cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerfon, Antoine J.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the space-charge dynamics of high-intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam breakup behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. Specifically, we demonstrate that beam breakup is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps.

  4. Vortex Dynamics and Shear-Layer Instability in High-Intensity Cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Cerfon, Antoine J

    2016-04-29

    We show that the space-charge dynamics of high-intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam breakup behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. Specifically, we demonstrate that beam breakup is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps. PMID:27176525

  5. The change in orientation of subsidiary shears near faults containing pore fluid under high pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1992-01-01

    Byerlee, J., 1992. The change in orientation of subsidiary shears near faults containing pore fluid under high pressure. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 295-303. The mechanical effects of a fault containing near-lithostatic fluid pressure in which fluid pressure decreases monotonically from the core of the fault zone to the adjacent country rock is considered. This fluid pressure distribution has mechanical implications for the orientation of subsidiary shears around a fault. Analysis shows that the maximum principal stress is oriented at a high angle to the fault in the country rock where the pore pressure is hydrostatic, and rotates to 45?? to the fault within the fault zone where the pore pressure is much higher. This analysis suggests that on the San Andreas fault, where heat flow constraints require that the coefficient of friction for slip on the fault be less than 0.1, the pore fluid pressure on the main fault is 85% of the lithostatic pressure. The observed geometry of the subsidiary shears in the creeping section of the San Andreas are broadly consistent with this model, with differences that may be due to the heterogeneous nature of the fault. ?? 1992.

  6. Design and simulation of high-energy-density shear experiments on OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Devolder, B.; di Stefano, C.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; Merritt, E. C.; Perry, T. S.; MacLaren, S. A.; Wang, P.; Zhou, Y. K.

    2015-11-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid density, 20 micron thick Al plate, variations of the experiment have been performed and are studied. These variations have included increasing the fluid density (by modifying the metal plate material from Al to Ti), imposing sinusoidal perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. In addition to examining the shear-induced mixing, the simulations reveal other physics, such as how the interaction of our indirect-drive halfraums with a mated shock tube's ablator impedes a stagnation-driven shock. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, and NIF facility operations by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. A novel high-speed shear test for lead-free flip chip packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Kang-Dong; Kim, Keun-Soo; Jang, Joong-Soon

    2012-02-01

    Despite the importance of lead-free solders in modern environmentally friendly packaging, few studies have been conducted on their mechanical reliability at the wafer level. In the present study, high-speed die shear tests were conducted to investigate the effects of strain rate on the shearing resistance and fracture mode of Sn-3wt%Ag-0.5wt%Cu solder joints on electroless Ni-P/immersion Au surface finish pads. The results indicated that the solder joints underwent ductile and mixed ductile-brittle fracture at low (<855 s-1) and high (>25,385 s-1) strain rates, respectively. Thus, the overall shear stress-strain curve can be divided into three areas according to Hollomon's law, starting from low strain rates: area I, 100% ductile fracture of the solder itself; area II, mixed ductile-brittle fracture resulting in a ductile-brittle transition region; and area III, 100% brittle fracture at the interface between the intermetallic compound and the Ni-P layer.

  8. The effect of particle shape on mixing in a high shear mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, Matthew D.; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-09-01

    Discrete element method modelling is used to study the effect of particle shape on the flow dynamics and mixing in a high shear mixer. The blade generates strong flow over its top surface while compacting and pushing forward particles that are directly in front of the blade. A complex three dimensional flow is established with vertical and radial flow components that are shape dependent and which control the nature of the mixing. Mixing was found to be fast in the azimuthal direction, of intermediate speed in the vertical direction and comparatively slow in the radial mixing. Diffusive mixing is characterised using the granular temperature which shows that the regions of higher granular temperature are larger for round particles than non-round ones leading to stronger diffusive mixing. The spatial distribution of the convective component of mixing is identified using novel calculation of shear strain rate. This size and shape of the high shear region is found to be only slightly sensitive to the particle shape indicating that the convective mixing is relatively independent of shape, except in the middle of the mixer. The blockiness of the particles has the strongest impact on flow and mixing while the mixing has only a weak dependence on the particle aspect ratio.

  9. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms. PMID:27557169

  10. Preliminary modulus calculations for cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Young's modulus is a measure of the inherent stiffness of an elastic material. In the case of cellulose, it quantifies the ability of the material to undergo changes in length as tension or compression forces are applied. The modulus can be calculated by performing tensile tests on cotton fiber...

  11. Documentation of programs that compute 1) quasi-static tilts produced by an expanding dislocation loop in an elastic and viscoelastic material, and 2) surface shear stresses, strains, and shear displacements produced by screw dislocations in a vertical slab with modulus contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, Stuart

    1976-01-01

    The material in this report can be grouped into two categories: 1) programs that compute tilts produced by a vertically oriented expanding rectangular dislocation loop in an elastic or viscoelastic material and 2) programs that compute the shear stresses, strains, and shear displacements in a three-phase half-space (i.e. a half-space containing a vertical slab). Each section describes the relevant theory, and provides a detailed guide to the operation of the programs. A series of examples is provided at the end of each section.

  12. A Study of the Unstable Modes in High Mach Number Gaseous Jets and Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Gene Marcel

    1993-01-01

    Instabilities affecting the propagation of supersonic gaseous jets have been studied using high resolution computer simulations with the Piecewise-Parabolic-Method (PPM). These results are discussed in relation to jets from galactic nuclei. These studies involve a detailed treatment of a single section of a very long jet, approximating the dynamics by using periodic boundary conditions. Shear layer simulations have explored the effects of shear layers on the growth of nonlinear instabilities. Convergence of the numerical approximations has been tested by comparing jet simulations with different grid resolutions. The effects of initial conditions and geometry on the dominant disruptive instabilities have also been explored. Simulations of shear layers with a variety of thicknesses, Mach numbers and densities perturbed by incident sound waves imply that the time for the excited kink modes to grow large in amplitude and disrupt the shear layer is taug = (546 +/- 24) (M/4)^{1.7 } (Apert/0.02) ^{-0.4} delta/c, where M is the jet Mach number, delta is the half-width of the shear layer, and A_ {pert} is the perturbation amplitude. For simulations of periodic jets, the initial velocity perturbations set up zig-zag shock patterns inside the jet. In each case a single zig-zag shock pattern (an odd mode) or a double zig-zag shock pattern (an even mode) grows to dominate the flow. The dominant kink instability responsible for these shock patterns moves approximately at the linear resonance velocity, nu_ {mode} = cextnu_ {relative}/(cjet + c_ {ext}). For high resolution simulations (those with 150 or more computational zones across the jet width), the even mode dominates if the even penetration is higher in amplitude initially than the odd perturbation. For low resolution simulations, the odd mode dominates even for a stronger even mode perturbation. In high resolution simulations the jet boundary rolls up and large amounts of external gas are entrained into the jet. In low

  13. Understanding High Recession Rates of Carbon Ablators Seen in Shear Tests in an Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Olson, Michael W.; Barnhardt, Michael D.; MacLean, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    High rates of recession in arc jet shear tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) inspired a series of tests and analysis on FiberForm (a carbon preform used in the fabrication of PICA). Arc jet tests were performed on FiberForm in both air and pure nitrogen for stagnation and shear configurations. The nitrogen tests showed little or no recession, while the air tests of FiberForm showed recession rates similar to that of PICA (when adjusted for the difference in density). While mechanical erosion can not be ruled out, this is the first step in doing so. Analysis using a carbon oxidation boundary condition within DPLR was used to predict the recession rate of FiberForm. The analysis indicates that much of the anomalous recession behavior seen in shear tests may simply be an artifact of the non-flight like test configuration (copper upstream of the test article) a result of dissimilar enthalpy and oxygen concentration profiles on the copper. Shape change effects were also investigated and shown to be relatively small.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Lead-Free Solder Joints Under High-Speed Shear Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Luong; Kim, Ho-Kyung

    2014-09-01

    In this study we expanded on recently reported research by using a modified miniature Charpy impact-testing system to investigate the shear deformation behavior of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu lead-free solder joints at high strain rates ranging from 1.1 × 103 s-1 to 5.5 × 103 s-1. The experimental results revealed that the maximum shear strength of the solder joint decreased with increasing load speed in the ranges tested in this study. For solder joints tested at a shear speed exceeding 1 m/s, corresponding to an approximate strain rate that exceeds 1950 s-1, the brittle fracture mode is the main failure mode, whereas lower strain rates result in a ductile-to-brittle transition in the fracture surfaces of solder joints. In addition, the mode II stress intensity factor (K II) used to evaluate the fracture toughness (K C) of an interfacial intermetallic compound layer between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder and the toughness of copper substrate was found to decrease from 1.63 MPa m0.5 to 0.97 MPa m0.5 in the speed range tested here.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Lead-Free Solder Joints Under High-Speed Shear Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Luong; Kim, Ho-Kyung

    2014-11-01

    In this study we expanded on recently reported research by using a modified miniature Charpy impact-testing system to investigate the shear deformation behavior of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu lead-free solder joints at high strain rates ranging from 1.1 × 103 s-1 to 5.5 × 103 s-1. The experimental results revealed that the maximum shear strength of the solder joint decreased with increasing load speed in the ranges tested in this study. For solder joints tested at a shear speed exceeding 1 m/s, corresponding to an approximate strain rate that exceeds 1950 s-1, the brittle fracture mode is the main failure mode, whereas lower strain rates result in a ductile-to-brittle transition in the fracture surfaces of solder joints. In addition, the mode II stress intensity factor ( K II) used to evaluate the fracture toughness ( K C) of an interfacial intermetallic compound layer between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder and the toughness of copper substrate was found to decrease from 1.63 MPa m0.5 to 0.97 MPa m0.5 in the speed range tested here.

  16. High-n ideal and resistive shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chen, L.; Chance, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    Ideal and resistive MHD equations for the shear Alfven waves are studied in a low-..beta.. toroidal model by employing the high-n ballooning formalism. The ion sound effects are neglected. For an infinite shear slab, the ideal MHD model gives rise to a continuous spectrum of real frequencies and discrete eigenmodes (Alfven-Landau modes) with complex frequencies. With toroidal coupling effects due to nonuniform toroidal magnetic field, the continuum is broken up into small continuum bands and new discrete toroidal eigenmodes can exist inside the continuum gaps. Unstable ballooning eigenmodes are also introduced by the bad curvature when ..beta.. > ..beta../sub c/. The resistivity (n) can be considered perturbatively for the ideal modes. In addition, four branches of resistive modes are induced by the resistivity: (1) Resistive entropy modes which are stable (..delta..' < 0) with frequencies approaching zero as n/sup 3/5/, (3) Resistive periodic shear Alfven waves which approach the finite frequency end points of the continuum bands and n/sup 1/2, and (4) Resistive ballooning modes which are purely growing with growth rate proportional to eta/sup 1/3/..beta../sup 2/3/ as eta ..-->.. O and ..beta.. ..-->.. O.

  17. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  18. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  19. High resolution DNS of shear-convective turbulence and its implications to second-order parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, K. L.; Mahalov, A.; Nicolaenko, B.; Joseph, B.

    2004-09-01

    Shear-convective turbulence is studied using a high resolution 3D direct numerical simulation (DNS). Flow configuration consisting of a modeled jet capping a thermally unstable layer is simulated and the results are compared with the reference situation where only the convective layer is present. Quasi-equilibrium turbulent datasets, in which the turbulent energy budgets are nearly balanced, are obtained. A ‘mechanical’ barrier is identified near the jet centerline in the shear-convective case. Intense and elongated vorticity regions are created in a narrow layer above the barrier in a way similar to the shear-sheltering effect. Vertical profiles of turbulence statistics and budgets are presented. We have unambiguously identified layers of counter-gradient momentum and heat fluxes which occur near regions of penetrative convection. Using quasi-equilibrium DNS datasets, we evaluate the performance of some popular second-order closure models of turbulence. The models satisfactorily predict the triple moments and dissipation, except in the counter-gradient region. The models, however, fail to predict the pressure correlation terms.

  20. Simulation of three-dimensional shear flow around a nozzle-afterbody at high speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Baysal, O.; Hoffman, W.B. )

    1992-06-01

    In this paper, turbulent shear flows at supersonic and hypersonic speeds around a nozzle-afterbody are simulated. The three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a finite-volume and implicit method. The convective and the pressure terms are differenced by an upwind-biased algorithm. The effect of turbulence is incorporated by a modified Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model. The success of the standard Baldwin-Lomax model for this flow type is shown by comparing it to a laminar case. These modifications made to the model are also shown to improve flow prediction when compared to the standard Baldwin-Lomax model. These modifications to the model reflect the effects of high compressibility, multiple walls, vortices near walls, and turbulent memory effects in the shear layer. This numerically simulated complex flowfield includes a supersonic duct flow, a hypersonic flow over an external double corner, a flow through a non-axisymmetric, internal-external nozzle, and a three-dimensional shear layer. The specific application is for the flow around the nozzle-afterbody of a generic hypersonic vehicle powered by a scramjet engine. The computed pressure distributions compared favorably with the experimentally obtained surface and off-surface flow surveys.

  1. Stability of LAPONITE®-stabilized high internal phase Pickering emulsions under shear.

    PubMed

    Dinkgreve, M; Velikov, K P; Bonn, D

    2016-08-17

    Colloidal particles are often used to make Pickering emulsions that are reported to be very stable. Commonly the stabilization is a combined effect of particle adsorbing at the fluid interface and a particle network in the continuous phase; the contribution of each to the overall stability is difficult to assess. We investigate the role of LAPONITE® particles on high internal phase emulsion stability by considering three different situations: emulsion stabilization by surfactant only, by surfactant plus clay particles, and finally clay particles only. To clarify the structure of the emulsion and the role of the clay particles, we have succeeded in fluorescently labelling the clay particles by adsorbing the dye onto the particle surfaces. This allows us to show directly using confocal microscopy, that the clay particles are not only located at the interface but also aggregate and form a gel in the continuous aqueous phase. We show that the emulsions in the presence of surfactant (with or without clay) are stable to coalescence and shear. Without surfactant (with only LAPONITE® as stabilizer) the emulsions are stable to coalescence for several weeks, however they destabilize rapidly under shear. Our results suggest that the formation of the emulsions is mostly due to gel formation of the clay particles in the continuous phase, rather than that the clay is an emulsifier. This gel formation also accounts for the instability of the emulsions to shear that we observe caused by shear thinning of the continuous gel and inability of the adsorbed particles to rearrange effectively around the droplets due to their attractive nature. PMID:27485394

  2. Shearing instabilities accompanying high-pressure phase transformations and the mechanics of deep earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Green, Harry W.

    2007-01-01

    Deep earthquakes have been a paradox since their discovery in the 1920s. The combined increase of pressure and temperature with depth precludes brittle failure or frictional sliding beyond a few tens of kilometers, yet earthquakes occur continually in subduction zones to ≈700 km. The expected healing effects of pressure and temperature and growing amounts of seismic and experimental data suggest that earthquakes at depth probably represent self-organized failure analogous to, but different from, brittle failure. The only high-pressure shearing instabilities identified by experiment require generation in situ of a small fraction of very weak material differing significantly in density from the parent material. This “fluid” spontaneously forms mode I microcracks or microanticracks that self-organize via the elastic strain fields at their tips, leading to shear failure. Growing evidence suggests that the great majority of subduction zone earthquakes shallower than 400 km are initiated by breakdown of hydrous phases and that deeper ones probably initiate as a shearing instability associated with breakdown of metastable olivine to its higher-pressure polymorphs. In either case, fault propagation could be enhanced by shear heating, just as is sometimes the case with frictional sliding in the crust. Extensive seismological interrogation of the region of the Tonga subduction zone in the southwest Pacific Ocean provides evidence suggesting significant metastable olivine, with implication for its presence in other regions of deep seismicity. If metastable olivine is confirmed, either current thermal models of subducting slabs are too warm or published kinetics of olivine breakdown reactions are too fast. PMID:17468397

  3. Effects of annealing on texture evolution of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Song, X.; He, J.; Zuo, L.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of annealing on recrystallization texture of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foil were investigated by orientation distribution functions (ODFs) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The results show that the intermediate annealing is beneficial to the development of the cube texture. The cube texture can be promoted by annealing, and the critical annealing temperature is about 280 °C. The cubic orientation grains firstly nucleate, and then expand into other grains with a high growth speed, and large angle grain boundary ratio increases, finally can swallow up most of the original grains, which results in the cube texture

  4. Monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment by shear wave elastography induced by two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Nagaoka, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is expected to be a noninvasive monitoring method of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, conventional SWE techniques encounter difficulty in inducing shear waves with adequate displacements in deep tissue. To observe tissue coagulation at the HIFU focal depth via SWE, in this study, we propose using a two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer for not only HIFU exposure but also creating shear sources. The results show that the reconstructed shear wave velocity maps detected the coagulated regions as the area of increased propagation velocity even in deep tissue. This suggests that “HIFU-push” shear elastography is a promising solution for the purpose of coagulation monitoring in deep tissue, because push beams irradiated by the HIFU transducer can naturally reach as deep as the tissue to be coagulated by the same transducer.

  5. A high-order numerical study of reactive dissolution in an upwelling heterogeneous mantle: 2. Effect of shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzell, Conroy; Parmentier, E. M.; Liang, Yan; Tirupathi, Seshu

    2015-11-01

    High-porosity dunite channels produced by orthopyroxene dissolution may provide pathways for orthopyroxene-undersaturated melt generated in the deep mantle to reach shallower depth without extensive chemical reequilibration with surrounding mantle. Previous studies have considered these high-porosity channels and melt localization in the presence of a uniform upwelling mantle flow through the process of melt-rock reaction as well as shear deformation, but not both simultaneously. In this Part 2 of a numerical study of high-porosity melt and dunite channel formation during reactive dissolution, we considered the effect of shear deformation on channel distribution and channel geometry in an upwelling and viscously compacting mantle column. We formulated a high-order numerical experiment using conditions similar to those in Part 1, but with an additional prescribed horizontal shearing component in the solid matrix, as could be present in flowing mantle beneath spreading centers. Our focus was to examine orthopyroxene dissolution to determine the behavior of dunite formation and its interaction with melt flow field, by varying the upwelling and shear rate, orthopyroxene solubility gradient, and domain height. Introduction of shearing tilts the developing dunite, causing asymmetry in the orthopyroxene gradient between the dunite channels and the surrounding harzburgite. The downwind gradient is sharp, nearly discontinuous, whereas the upwind gradient is more gradual. For higher shear rates, a wave-like pattern of alternating high and low-porosity bands form on the downwind side of the channel. The band spacing increases with increasing shear rate, relative melt flow rate, and orthopyroxene solubility gradient, whereas the band angle is independent of solubility gradient and increases with increasing shear rate and decreasing relative melt flow rate. Such features could be observable in the field and provide evidence for mantle shearing. Standing wave-like patterns of

  6. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.

    1996-08-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak high performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear with emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped- electron-{eta}{sub i}mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub i} mode suggests that the large core {bold E x B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport . Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {Beta}{sub N} {lt} 2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS) is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher values than the NCS discharges together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity.

  7. [Quality by design based high shear wet granulation process development for the microcrystalline cellulose].

    PubMed

    Luo, Gan; Xu, Bing; Sun, Fei; Cui, Xiang-long; Shi, Xin-yuan; Qiao, Yan-jiang

    2015-03-01

    The design space of the high shear wet granulation process was established and validated within the framework of quality by design (QbD). The system of microcrystalline cellulose-de-ioned water was used in this study. The median granule size and bulk density of granules were identified as critical quality attributes. Plackeet-Burmann experimental design was used to screen these factors as follows: dry mixing time, the impeller and chopper speed of dry mixing, water amount, water addition time, wet massing time, the impeller and chopper speed of wet massing and drying time. And the optimization was implemented with the central composite experimental design based on screened critical process parameters. The design space of the high shear wet granulation process was established based on the quadratic polynomial regression model. Since the P-values of both models were less than 0.05 and values of lack of fit were more than 0.1, the relationship between critical quality attributes and critical process parameters could be well described by the two models. The reliability of design space, illustrated by overlay plot, was improved with the addition of 95% confidence interval. For those granules whose process parameters were in the design space, the granule size could be controlled within 250 to 355 μm, and the bulk density could be controlled within a range of 0.4 to 0.6 g x cm(-3). The robustness and flexibility of the high shear wet granulation process have been enhanced via the establishment of the design space based on the QbD concept. PMID:26118117

  8. High performance reversed shear plasmas with a large radius transport barrier in JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Hatae, T.; Oikawa, T.; Takeji, S.; Shirai, H.; Koide, Y.; Ishida, S.; Ide, S.; Ishii, Y.; Ozeki, T.; Higashijima, S.; Yoshino, R.; Kamada, Y.; Neyatani, Y.

    1998-02-01

    The operation of reversed shear plasmas in JT-60U has been extended to the low-q, high-Ip region keeping a large radius transport barrier, and a high fusion performance has been achieved. Record values of deuterium-tritium (DT)-equivalent power gain in JT-60U have been obtained: QDTeq = 1.05, τE = 0.97 s, nD(0) = 4.9 × 1019 m-3 and Ti(0) = 16.5 keV. A large improvement in confinement resulted from the formation of an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a large radius, which was characterized by steep gradients in electron density, electron temperature and ion temperature just inside the position of qmin. Large negative shear regions, up to 80% of the plasma minor radius in the low-qmin regime (qmin~2), were obtained by plasma current ramp-up after the formation of the ITB with the pressure and current profiles being controlled by adjustment of plasma volume and beam power. The ITB was established by on-axis beam heating into a low density target plasma with reversed shear that was formed by current ramp-up without beam heating. The confinement time increased with the radius of the ITB and the decrease of qmin at a fixed toroidal field. High H factors, up to 3.3, were achieved with an L mode edge. The effective one fluid thermal diffusivity χeff had its minimum in the ITB. The values of H/q95 and βt increased with the decrease of q95, and the highest performance was achieved at q95 ~3.1 (2.8 MA). The performance was limited by disruptive beta collapses with βN~2 at qmin~2.

  9. Demonstration of high performance negative central magnetic shear discharges on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, B.W.; Burrell, K.H.; Lao, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    Reliable operation of discharges with negative central magnetic shear has led to significant increases in plasma performance and reactivity in both low confinement, L-mode, and high confinement, H-mode, regimes in the DIII-D tokamak. Using neutral beam injection early in the initial current ramp, a large range of negative shear discharges have been produced with durations lasting up to 3.2 s. The total non- inductive current (beam plus bootstrap) ranges from 50% to 80% in these discharges. In the region of shear reversal, significant peaking of the toroidal rotation [f{sub {phi}} {approx} 30-60 kHz] and ion temperature [T{sub i}(0) {approx} 15-22 keV] profiles are observed. In high power discharges with an L-mode edge, peaked density profiles are also observed. Confinement enhancement factors up to H {equivalent_to} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub ITER-89P} {approx} 2.5 with an L-mode edge, and H {approx} 3.3 in an Edge Localized Mode (ELM)-free H-mode, are obtained. Transport analysis shows both ion thermal diffusivity and particle diffusivity to be near or below standard neoclassical values in the core. Large pressure peaking in L- mode leads to high disruptivity with {Beta}{sub N} {equivalent_to} {Beta}{sub T}/(I/aB) {<=} 2.3, while broader pressure profiles in H- mode gives low disruptivity with {Beta}{sub N} {<=} 4.2.

  10. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-16

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  11. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  12. Momentum Transport Studies in High E x B Shear Plasmas in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W M; Bell, R E; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J E; Rewoldt, G; Wang, W; Levinton, F M; Yuh, H

    2008-06-26

    Experiments have been conducted on NSTX to study both steady state and perturbative mo mentum transport. These studies are unique in their parameter space under investigation, where the low aspect ratio of NSTX results in rapid plasma rotation with E x B shearing rates high enough to suppress low-k turbulence. In some cases, the ratio of momentum to energy confinement time is found to exceed five. Momentum pinch velocities of order 10-40 m/s are inferred from the measured angular momentum flux evolution after non-resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to brake the plasma.

  13. Small-amplitude oscillatory shear magnetorheology of inverse ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jose; de Vicente, Juan; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2010-06-15

    A comprehensive investigation is performed on highly monodisperse silica-based inverse ferrofluids under small-amplitude oscillatory shear in the presence of external magnetic fields up to 1 T. The effect of particle volume fraction and continuous medium Newtonian viscosity is thoroughly investigated. Experimental results for storage modulus are used to validate existing micromechanical magnetorheological models assuming different particle-level field-induced structures. PMID:20345105

  14. Dissolution and reconstitution of casein micelle containing dairy powders by high shear using ultrasonic and physical methods.

    PubMed

    Chandrapala, Jayani; Martin, Gregory J O; Kentish, Sandra E; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-09-01

    The effect of shear on the solubilization of a range of dairy powders was investigated. The rate of solubilization of low solubility milk protein concentrate and micellar casein powders was examined during ultrasonication, high pressure homogenization and high-shear rotor-stator mixing and compared to low-shear overhead stirring. The high shear techniques were able to greatly accelerate the solubilization of these powders by physically breaking apart the powder agglomerates and accelerating the release of individual casein micelles into solution. This was achieved without affecting the structure of the solubilized proteins. The effect of high shear on the re-establishment of the mineral balance between the casein micelles and the serum was examined by monitoring the pH of the reconstituted skim milk powder after prior exposure to ultrasonication. Only minor differences in the re-equilibration of the pH were observed after sonication for up to 3 min, suggesting that the localized high shear forces exerted by sonication did not significantly affect the mass transfer of minerals from within the casein micelles. PMID:24798226

  15. Unusually large shear wave anisotropy for chlorite in subduction zone settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, Mainak; Mainprice, David

    2014-03-01

    Using first principle simulations we calculated the elasticity of chlorite. At a density ρ~ 2.60 g cm-3, the elastic constant tensor reveals significant elastic anisotropy: VP ~27%, VS1 ~56%, and VS2 ~43%. The shear anisotropy is exceptionally large for chlorite and enhances upon compression. Upon compression, the shear elastic constant component C44 and C55 decreases, whereas C66 shear component stiffens. The softening in C44 and C55 is reflected in shear modulus, G, and the shear wave velocity, VS. Our results on elastic anisotropy at conditions relevant to the mantle wedge indicates that a 10-20 km layer of hydrated peridotite with serpentine and chlorite could account for the observed shear polarization anisotropy and associated large delay times of 1-2 s observed in some subduction zone settings. In addition, chlorite could also explain the low VP/VS ratios that have been observed in recent high-resolution seismological studies.

  16. Turbulent mixing due to Holmboe wave instability in stratified shear flows at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehipour, Hesam; Caulfield, Colm-Cille; Peltier, W. Richard

    2015-11-01

    We consider numerically the transition to turbulence and associated mixing in parallel stratified shear flows with hyperbolic tangent initial velocity and density distributions. When the characteristic length scale of density variation is sufficiently sharper than that of the velocity variation, this flow is primarily susceptible to Holmboe wave instability (HWI) which perturbs the interface to exhibit characteristic cusped interfacial waves. Unlike previous low- Re experimental and numerical studies, in the high- Re regime in which our DNS analyses are performed, the primary HWI triggers a vigorous yet markedly more long-lived turbulent event compared to its better known relative, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). HWI `scours' the primary density interface, leading to substantial irreversible mixing and vertical transport of density displaced above and below the (robust) primary density interface which is comparable in both absolute terms and relative efficiency to the mixing associated with an equivalent KHI. Our results establish categorically that, provided the Reynolds number is high enough, shear layers with sharp density interfaces and associated locally high values of the gradient Richardson number are sites of substantial and efficient irreversible mixing. H.S. is grateful to the David Crighton Fellowship from DAMTP, University of Cambridge.

  17. Turbulence modeling of free shear layers for high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas L.

    1993-01-01

    The High Performance Aircraft (HPA) Grand Challenge of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) program involves the computation of the flow over a high performance aircraft. A variety of free shear layers, including mixing layers over cavities, impinging jets, blown flaps, and exhaust plumes, may be encountered in such flowfields. Since these free shear layers are usually turbulent, appropriate turbulence models must be utilized in computations in order to accurately simulate these flow features. The HPCC program is relying heavily on parallel computers. A Navier-Stokes solver (POVERFLOW) utilizing the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model was developed and tested on a 128-node Intel iPSC/860. Algebraic turbulence models run very fast, and give good results for many flowfields. For complex flowfields such as those mentioned above, however, they are often inadequate. It was therefore deemed that a two-equation turbulence model will be required for the HPA computations. The k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model was implemented on the Intel iPSC/860. Both the Chien low-Reynolds-number model and a generalized wall-function formulation were included.

  18. Manufacture of concentrated, lipid-based oxygen microbubble emulsions by high shear homogenization and serial concentration.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Lindsay M; Polizzotti, Brian D; McGowan, Frances X; Kheir, John N

    2014-01-01

    Gas-filled microbubbles have been developed as ultrasound contrast and drug delivery agents. Microbubbles can be produced by processing surfactants using sonication, mechanical agitation, microfluidic devices, or homogenization. Recently, lipid-based oxygen microbubbles (LOMs) have been designed to deliver oxygen intravenously during medical emergencies, reversing life-threatening hypoxemia, and preventing subsequent organ injury, cardiac arrest, and death. We present methods for scaled-up production of highly oxygenated microbubbles using a closed-loop high-shear homogenizer. The process can produce 2 L of concentrated LOMs (90% by volume) in 90 min. Resulting bubbles have a mean diameter of ~2 μm, and a rheologic profile consistent with that of blood when diluted to 60 volume %. This technique produces LOMs in high capacity and with high oxygen purity, suggesting that this technique may be useful for translational research labs. PMID:24894333

  19. Manufacture of Concentrated, Lipid-based Oxygen Microbubble Emulsions by High Shear Homogenization and Serial Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Lindsay M.; Polizzotti, Brian D.; McGowan, Frances X.; Kheir, John N.

    2014-01-01

    Gas-filled microbubbles have been developed as ultrasound contrast and drug delivery agents. Microbubbles can be produced by processing surfactants using sonication, mechanical agitation, microfluidic devices, or homogenization. Recently, lipid-based oxygen microbubbles (LOMs) have been designed to deliver oxygen intravenously during medical emergencies, reversing life-threatening hypoxemia, and preventing subsequent organ injury, cardiac arrest, and death. We present methods for scaled-up production of highly oxygenated microbubbles using a closed-loop high-shear homogenizer. The process can produce 2 L of concentrated LOMs (90% by volume) in 90 min. Resulting bubbles have a mean diameter of ~2 μm, and a rheologic profile consistent with that of blood when diluted to 60 volume %. This technique produces LOMs in high capacity and with high oxygen purity, suggesting that this technique may be useful for translational research labs. PMID:24894333

  20. Dynamic measurement of bulk modulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowler, W. L.; Strand, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Technique based on measuring phase difference between microwave reference and test signals and has been used to determine change in bulk modulus of solid-fuel rocket propellants should be useful in studying other dielectric materials.

  1. An Evaluation of the Iosipescu Specimen for Composite Materials Shear Property Measurement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen

    1991-01-01

    accuracy of the shear modulus values are made, and the implications for shear strength measurement discussed. Further application of the Iosipescu shear test to woven fabric composites is presented. The limitations of the traditional strain gage instrumentation on the satin weave and high tow plain weave fabrics is discussed. Test results of a epoxy based aluminum particulate composite is also presented. A modification of the Iosipescu specimen is proposed and investigated experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the proposed new specimen design provides a more uniform shear stress field in the test section and greatly reduces the normal and shear stress concentrations in the vicinity of the notches. While the fabrication and the material cost of the proposed specimen is tremendously reduced, it is shown the accuracy of the shear modulus measurement is not sacrificed.

  2. High-order face-shear modes of relaxor-PbTiO3 crystals for piezoelectric motor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ci, Penghong; Liu, Guoxi; Chen, Zhijiang; Zhang, Shujun; Dong, Shuxiang

    2014-06-01

    The face-shear vibration modes of [011] poled Zt ± 45° cut relaxor-PT crystals and their applications for linear piezoelectric motors were investigated. Unlike piezoelectric ceramics, the rotated crystal was found to exhibit asymmetric face-shear deformations, and its two high-order face-shear modes degraded into two non-isomorphic modes. As an application example, a standing wave ultrasonic linear motor (10 × 10 × 2 mm3) operating in high-order face-shear vibration modes was developed. The motor exhibits a large driving force (1.5 N) under a low driving voltage (22 Vpp). These findings could provide guidance for design of crystal resonance devices.

  3. Hitherto unknown shear rupture mechanism as a source of instability in intact hard rocks at highly confined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris G.

    2014-05-01

    Today, frictional shear resistance along pre-existing faults is considered to be the lower limit on rock shear strength for confined conditions corresponding to the seismogenic layer. This paper introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. In the new mechanism, the rock failure associated with consecutive creation of small slabs (known as ‘domino-blocks') from the intact rock in the rupture tip is driven by a fan-shaped domino structure representing the rupture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance, self-sustaining stress intensification, and self-unbalancing conditions. Due to this the failure process caused by the mechanism is very dynamic and violent. This makes it impossible to directly observe and study the mechanism and can explain why the mechanism has not been detected before. This paper provides physical motivation for the mechanism, based upon side effects accompanying the failure process. Physical and mathematical models of the mechanism presented in the paper explain unique and paradoxical features of the mechanism. The new shear rupture mechanism allows a novel point of view for understanding the nature of spontaneous failure processes in hard rocks including earthquakes.

  4. Microstructural characteristics of adiabatic shear localization in a metastable beta titanium alloy deformed at high strain rate and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Hongyi; Zeng, Weidong; Wang, Gui; Kent, Damon; Dargusch, Matthew

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural evolution and grain refinement within adiabatic shear bands in the Ti6554 alloy deformed at high strain rates and elevated temperatures have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve, indicating that the initiation of adiabatic shear bands does not lead to the loss of load capacity for the Ti6554 alloy. The outer region of the shear bands mainly consists of cell structures bounded by dislocation clusters. Equiaxed subgrains in the core area of the shear band can be evolved from the subdivision of cell structures or reconstruction and transverse segmentation of dislocation clusters. It is proposed that dislocation activity dominates the grain refinement process. The rotational recrystallization mechanism may operate as the kinetic requirements for it are fulfilled. The coexistence of different substructures across the shear bands implies that the microstructural evolution inside the shear bands is not homogeneous and different grain refinement mechanisms may operate simultaneously to refine the structure. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The microstructure within the adiabatic shear band was characterized by TEM. • No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve. • Dislocation activity dominated the grain refinement process. • The kinetic requirements for rotational recrystallization mechanism were fulfilled. • Different grain refinement mechanisms operated simultaneously to refine the structure.

  5. A quality by design approach to scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Badawy, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    High-shear wet granulation is a complex process that in turn makes scale-up a challenging task. Scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process has been studied extensively in the past with various different methodologies being proposed in the literature. This review article discusses existing scale-up principles and categorizes the various approaches into two main scale-up strategies - parameter-based and attribute-based. With the advent of quality by design (QbD) principle in drug product development process, an increased emphasis toward the latter approach may be needed to ensure product robustness. In practice, a combination of both scale-up strategies is often utilized. In a QbD paradigm, there is also a need for an increased fundamental and mechanistic understanding of the process. This can be achieved either by increased experimentation that comes at higher costs, or by using modeling techniques, that are also discussed as part of this review. PMID:26489403

  6. Structure of the Highly Sheared Tropical Storm Chantal During CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Halverson, J.; Ritchie, E.; Simpson, Joanne; Molinari, J.; Tian, L.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's 4th Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4) focused on Atlantic hurricanes during the 2001 hurricane season and it involved both NASA and NOAA participation. The NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft were instrumented with unique remote sensing instruments to help increase the overall understanding of hurricanes. This paper is concerned about one of the storms studied, Tropical Storm Chantal, that was a weak storm which failed to intense into a hurricane. One of the practical questions of high importance is why some tropical stoins intensify into hurricanes, and others remain weak or die altogether. The magnitude of the difference between the horizontal winds at lower levels and upper altitudes in a tropical storm, i.e., the wind shear, is one important quantity that can affect the intensification of a tropical storm. Strong shear as was present during Tropical Storm Chantal s lifetime and it was detrimental to its intensification. The paper presents an analysis of unique aircraft observations collected from Chantal including an on-board radar, radiometers, dropsondes, and flight level measurements. These measurements have enabled us to examine the internal structure of the winds and thermal structure of Chantal. Most of the previous studies have involved intense hurricanes that overcame the effects of shear and this work has provided new insights into what prevents a weaker storm from intensifying. The storm had extremely intense thunderstorms and rainfall, yet its main circulation was confined to low levels of the atmosphere. Chantal's thermal structure was not configured properly for the storm to intensify. It is most typical that huricanes have a warm core structure where warm temperatures in upper levels of a storm s circulation help intensify surface winds and lower its central pressure. Chantal had two weaker warm layers instead of a well-defined warm core. These layers have been related to the horizontal and vertical winds and precipitation structure and

  7. Gum tragacanth dispersions: Particle size and rheological properties affected by high-shear homogenization.

    PubMed

    Farzi, Mina; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeed; Safari, Mohammad; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2015-08-01

    The effect of high-shear homogenization on the rheological and particle size characteristics of three species of gum tragacanth (GT) was detected. Dispersions were subjected to 0-20 min treatment. Static light scattering techniques and rheological tests were used to study the effect of treatment. The results showed that the process caused a decrease in particle size parameters for all three species, but interestingly, the apparent viscosities increased. The highest increase of apparent viscosity was found for solutions containing Astragalus gossypinus, which possessed the highest insoluble fraction. The viscoelastic behaviors of dispersions were also significantly influenced by the process. Homogenization caused an increase in both G' and G″, in all three species. The alterations seem to be highly dependent on GT species and structure. The results could be of high importance in the industry, since the process will lead to textural modifications of food products containing GT. PMID:25987462

  8. Identification of High Shears and Compressive Discontinuities in the Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, A.; Perri, S.

    2014-04-01

    Two techniques, the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) and the Local Intermittency Measure (LIM), have been applied and compared using MESSENGER magnetic field data in the solar wind at a heliocentric distance of about 0.3 AU. The spatial properties of the turbulent field at different scales, spanning the whole inertial range of magnetic turbulence down toward the proton scales have been studied. LIM and PVI methodologies allow us to identify portions of an entire time series where magnetic energy is mostly accumulated, and regions of intermittent bursts in the magnetic field vector increments, respectively. A statistical analysis has revealed that at small time scales and for high level of the threshold, the bursts present in the PVI and the LIM series correspond to regions of high shear stress and high magnetic field compressibility.

  9. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection

    PubMed Central

    Kogia, Maria; Gan, Tat-Hean; Balachandran, Wamadeva; Livadas, Makis; Kappatos, Vassilios; Szabo, Istvan; Mohimi, Abbas; Round, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Guided Wave Testing (GWT) using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH0) waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C) has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C. PMID:27110792

  10. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection.

    PubMed

    Kogia, Maria; Gan, Tat-Hean; Balachandran, Wamadeva; Livadas, Makis; Kappatos, Vassilios; Szabo, Istvan; Mohimi, Abbas; Round, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Guided Wave Testing (GWT) using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH₀) waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C) has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C. PMID:27110792

  11. Identification of high shears and compressive discontinuities in the inner heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, A.; Perri, S.

    2014-04-01

    Two techniques, the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) and the Local Intermittency Measure (LIM), have been applied and compared using MESSENGER magnetic field data in the solar wind at a heliocentric distance of about 0.3 AU. The spatial properties of the turbulent field at different scales, spanning the whole inertial range of magnetic turbulence down toward the proton scales have been studied. LIM and PVI methodologies allow us to identify portions of an entire time series where magnetic energy is mostly accumulated, and regions of intermittent bursts in the magnetic field vector increments, respectively. A statistical analysis has revealed that at small time scales and for high level of the threshold, the bursts present in the PVI and the LIM series correspond to regions of high shear stress and high magnetic field compressibility.

  12. Developments in dynamic MR elastography for in vitro biomechanical assessment of hyaline cartilage under high-frequency cyclical shear.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Orlando; Amrami, Kimberly K; Manduca, Armando; Rossman, Phillip J; Ehman, Richard L

    2007-02-01

    The design, construction, and evaluation of a customized dynamic magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) technique for biomechanical assessment of hyaline cartilage in vitro are described. For quantification of the dynamic shear properties of hyaline cartilage by dynamic MRE, mechanical excitation and motion sensitization were performed at frequencies in the kilohertz range. A custom electromechanical actuator and a z-axis gradient coil were used to generate and image shear waves throughout cartilage at 1000-10,000 Hz. A radiofrequency (RF) coil was also constructed for high-resolution imaging. The technique was validated at 4000 and 6000 Hz by quantifying differences in shear stiffness between soft ( approximately 200 kPa) and stiff ( approximately 300 kPa) layers of 5-mm-thick bilayered phantoms. The technique was then used to quantify the dynamic shear properties of bovine and shark hyaline cartilage samples at frequencies up to 9000 Hz. The results demonstrate that one can obtain high-resolution shear stiffness measurements of hyaline cartilage and small, stiff, multilayered phantoms at high frequencies by generating robust mechanical excitations and using large magnetic field gradients. Dynamic MRE can potentially be used to directly quantify the dynamic shear properties of hyaline and articular cartilage, as well as other cartilaginous materials and engineered constructs. PMID:17260392

  13. Modulus enhancement of natural rubber through the dispersion size reduction of protein/fiber aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved mechanical properties of natural rubber are required for various rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced aggregates ...

  14. Interpreting Torsional Oscillator Measurements: Effect of Shear Modulus and Supersolidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppy, John D.; Mi, Xiao; Justin, Alexander; Mueller, Erich J.

    2012-08-01

    The torsional oscillator is the chief instrument for investigating supersolidity in solid 4He. These oscillators can be sensitive to the elastic properties of the solid helium, which show anomalies over the same range of temperature in which the supersolid phenomenon appears. In this report we present a detailed study of the influence of the elastic properties of the solid on the periods of torsional oscillators for the various designs that have been commonly employed in supersolid measurements. We show how to design an oscillator which measures supersolidity, and how to design one which predominantly measures elasticity. We describe the use of multiple frequency TOs for the separation of the elastic and supersolid phenomena.

  15. Development of K-Basin High-Strength Homogeneous Sludge Simulants and Correlations Between Unconfined Compressive Strength and Shear Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Baer, Ellen BK; Chun, Jaehun; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sande, Susan; Buchmiller, William C.

    2011-02-20

    K-Basin sludge will be stored in the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) at an interim storage location on Central Plateau before being treated and packaged for disposal. During the storage period, sludge in the STSCs may consolidate/agglomerate, potentially resulting in high-shear-strength material. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) plans to use water jets to retrieve K-Basin sludge after the interim storage. STP has identified shear strength to be a key parameter that should be bounded to verify the operability and performance of sludge retrieval systems. Determining the range of sludge shear strength is important to gain high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from the STSCs. The shear strength measurements will provide a basis for bounding sludge properties for mobilization and erosion. Thus, it is also important to develop potential simulants to investigate these phenomena. Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) show that high-uranium-content K-Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has 'paste' and 'chunks' with shear strengths of approximately 3-5 kPa and 380-770 kPa, respectively. High-uranium-content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185 C, 10 hours) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. These high values were estimated by measured unconfined compressive strength (UCS) obtained with a pocket penetrometer. Due to its ease of use, it is anticipated that a pocket penetrometer will be used to acquire additional shear strength data from archived K-Basin sludge samples stored at the PNNL Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) hot cells. It is uncertain whether the pocket penetrometer provides accurate shear strength measurements of the material. To assess the bounding material strength and potential for erosion, it

  16. Frictional strength of wet- and dry- talc gouge in high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Reches, Z.; Elwood Madden, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the creeping segment of the San Andres fault may be controlled by the distinct weakness and stability of talc (Moore & Rymer, 2007). We analyze talc frictional strength at high slip-velocity of 0.002 - 0.66 m/s, long slip-distances of 0.01 m to 33 m, and normal stresses up to 4.1 MPa. This analysis bridges the gap between nucleation stage of low velocity/distance, and the frictional behavior during large earthquakes. We tested wet and dry samples of pure talc gouge in a confined rotary cell, and continuously monitored the slip-velocity, stresses, dilation and temperature. We run 29 experiments of single and stepped velocities to obtain 243 values of quasi-static frictional coefficients. Dry talc gouge showed distinct slip-strengthening: friction coefficient of µ ~0.4 at short slip-distances of D < 0.1 m, and it increased systematically to µ ~0.8 at slip-distances of D = 0.1- 1 m; at D > 1 m, the frictional strength saturated at µ= 0.8 - 1 level. Wet talc gouge (16-20% water) displayed low frictional strength of µ= 0.1-0.3, in agreement with published triaxial tests. The stepped-velocity runs revealed a consistent velocity-strengthening trend. For a velocity jump from V1 to V2, we used VD = (µ2 -µ1)/ln (V2/V1), and found that on average VD = 0.06 and 0.03 for dry and wet talc, respectively, and for slip distances shorter than 1 m. Microstructural analysis of post-shearing wet talc gouge revealed extreme slip localization to a principal-slip-zone of a few microns, and significant shear compaction of 10-30%. In contrast, dry talc gouge exhibited distributed shear in a wide zone and systematic shear dilation (10-50%). We propose slip along weak interlayer talc plates and thermal-pressurization as the possible weakening mechanisms for wet talc. The development of distributed secondary fault network along with substantial grain crushing is responsible for slip-strengthening in dry condition. Fig. 1. Friction maps of talc gouge as function of slip

  17. Experimental and Computational Study of the Shearing Resistance of Polyurea at High Pressures and High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, Mica; Yavari, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Jiao, T.; Clifton, R. J.

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical response of polyurea, a nanophase segregated elastomeric co-polymer, is investigated using all-atom, equilibrium, molecular-dynamics methods and tools. Specifically, the effects of high pressure (1-30 GPa) and high strain rate (105-106 s-1) on the shearing resistance of polyurea are examined. Such loading conditions are encountered by polyurea coatings subjected to impact by high-velocity projectiles, shell shrapnel, and improvised explosive device fragments. Computed results are compared with their experimental counterparts obtained using the so-called pressure-shear plate impact experiments. Computed results have also been rationalized in terms of the nanosegregated polyurea microstructure consisting of rod-shaped, discrete, the so-called hard domains embedded in a highly compliant, the so-called soft matrix. By analyzing molecular-level microstructure and its evolution during high-rate deformation and under high imposed pressures, an attempt is made to identify and quantify main phenomena in viscous/inelastic deformation and microstructure-reorganization processes that are most likely responsible for the observed mechanical response of polyurea.

  18. Shear Veins Under High Pore Pressure Condition Along Subduction Interface: Yokonami Mélange, Cretaceous Shimanto Belt, Shikoku, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Eida, M.

    2013-12-01

    Fluid pressure along subdcution interface is a key parameter to understand the fault strength, wedge geometry and seismogenic behavior. In this study, we focused on shear veins pervasively observed in exhumed accretionary complex, Yokonami mélange, Cretaceous Shiamanto Belt, Southwest Japan to examine paleo-stress, effective friction coefficient, fluid pressure ratio and fluid pressure along subduction interface. Lithology of the Yokonami mélange is mainly sandstones surrounded by foliated black shales with minor components of basalts, cherts, tuffs, and limestones, representing tectonic mélange textures. Shear veins cutting mélange foliations are pervasively observed. Shear veins are composed of quartz and calcite. Slicken lines and slicken steps are always observed on the surfaces of shear veins. Pressure-temperature conditions for shear veins are about 180MPa and about 200 degree C on the basis of fluid inclusion analysis. Since the distribution of shear veins are related to packages of ocean floor stratigraphy, formation of shear vein can be before underplating and after mélange formation along subduction interface. We conducted multiple inversion method using slip data of shear veins to examine paleo-stress. In the result, we obtained maximum shear stress horizontal to foliations with 0.3 of stress ratio that is defined as (sigma2-sigma3)/(sigma1-sigma3). Effective friction coefficient was estimated as about 0.10-0.22 by the lowest value of ratio of normal and shear stresses in the normalized Mohr's circle on each plane of shear vein. If we put friction coefficient under dry condition as 0.7 because shear veins cut lithified mélange through out, fluid pressure ratio is equivalent to 0.68-0.86. This is very high fluid pressure ratio along subduction plate interface. On the basis of this fluid pressure ratio and P-T conditions of shear veins from fluid inclusion analysis, 7-12km of depth and 20-30 degree C of geothermal gradient were estimated. The age of

  19. Incrementally Developed `Dilational Hydro-Shears' Forming at High Angles to σ1 in Foliated Mélange Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Remitti, F.; Sibson, R. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Chrystalls Beach accretionary mélange, New Zealand, contains an extensive fault-fracture mesh, in which mutually cross-cutting, incrementally developed, subhorizontal slickenfibre shear veins and subvertical extension veins intersect at an oblique angle of ~80° (Fig. 1). Slickenfibre shear veins commonly have multiple internal stylolitic slip surfaces subparallel to ubiquitous cleavage in pelitic mélange matrix, macroscopic `crack-seal' textures, and dissolution selvages along the vein margins. Stylolites, internal slip surfaces, and the long axes of elongate crystals within slickenfibre shear veins are inclined at a low angle (<15°) to the vein margin. Where shear and extension veins intersect, crystal fibres within the extension vein are parallel to elongate crystals within slickenfibres. The two kinematic vein types therefore had the same crystal-growth direction and are inferred to have formed contemporaneously in the same stress field. Thus field and microstructural observations suggest that slickenfibre-coated shear surfaces in the Chrystalls Beach mélange were active at ~80° to σ1, despite the constraint from Coulomb mechanics that new-forming faults, in cohesive, low porosity rocks, should lie at an angle θi = 45° - φ/2 to σ1. The slickenfibres appear to have formed by reactivation of subhorizontal weak planes (e.g. stylolites parallel to cleavage) which act as micro-transforms linking subvertical extension fractures opening parallel to σ3. This requires Pf > σ3 and low differential stress depending on the frictional resistance on the stylolites, and allows for shear failure at high angle to σ1 in fluid overpressured heterogeneous shear zones. The reshear conditions are similar to the extensional hydrofracture criterion, but low tensile strength, low intrinsic cohesion, and localised elevated shear strain controlled by material heterogeneities and anisotropy, create a situation where shear occurs essentially by extension under local

  20. Evaluating scale-up rules of a high-shear wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jing; Pandey, Preetanshu; Bindra, Dilbir S; Gao, Julia Z; Narang, Ajit S

    2015-07-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the commonly used scale-up rules for high-shear wet granulation process using a microcrystalline cellulose-lactose-based low drug loading formulation. Granule properties such as particle size, porosity, flow, and tabletability, and tablet dissolution were compared across scales using scale-up rules based on different impeller speed calculations or extended wet massing time. Constant tip speed rule was observed to produce slightly less granulated material at the larger scales. Longer wet massing time can be used to compensate for the lower shear experienced by the granules at the larger scales. Constant Froude number and constant empirical stress rules yielded granules that were more comparable across different scales in terms of compaction performance and tablet dissolution. Granule porosity was shown to correlate well with blend tabletability and tablet dissolution, indicating the importance of monitoring granule densification (porosity) during scale-up. It was shown that different routes can be chosen during scale-up to achieve comparable granule growth and densification by altering one of the three parameters: water amount, impeller speed, and wet massing time. PMID:26010137

  1. Mechanism of platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and microparticle formation under high shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Reininger, Armin J.; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Schumann, Hannah; Specht, Hanno M.; Schramm, Wolfgang; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe here the mechanism of platelet adhesion to immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF) and subsequent formation of platelet-derived microparticles mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) under high shear stress. As visualized in whole blood perfused in a flow chamber, platelet attachment to VWF involved one or few membrane areas of 0.05 to 0.1 μm2 that formed discrete adhesion points (DAPs) capable of resisting force in excess of 160 pN. Under the influence of hydrodynamic drag, membrane tethers developed between the moving platelet body and DAPs firmly adherent to immobilized VWF. Continued stretching eventually caused the separation of many such tethers, leaving on the surface tube-shaped or spherical microparticles with a diameter as low as 50 to 100 nm. Adhesion receptors (GPIbα, αIIbβ3) and phosphatidylserine were expressed on the surface of these microparticles, which were procoagulant. Shearing platelet-rich plasma at the rate of 10 000 s–1 in a cone-and-plate viscosimeter increased microparticle counts up to 55-fold above baseline. Blocking the GPIb-VWF interaction abolished microparticle generation in both experimental conditions. Thus, a biomechanical process mediated by GPIbα-VWF bonds in rapidly flowing blood may not only initiate platelet arrest onto reactive vascular surfaces but also generate procoagulant microparticles that further enhance thrombus formation. PMID:16449527

  2. First observation of mesospheric wind shear as high as 330 m s-1 km-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong-Fu; Widdel, H.-U.; Offermann, D.

    1995-09-01

    Mesospheric wind profiles with an altitude resolution of 25 m have been obtained by means of radar tracking of foil chaff clouds. Such experiments were performed during winter 1990 at Biscarrosse, France (44°N, 1°W). On one flight, a wind shear as high as 330 m s-1 km-1 at 87.4 km and a region of dynamical instability between 86 and 88 km was measured. This wind shear is believed to be the largest value ever measured in the mesosphere. The region of dynamical instability results from a superposition of two wave motions, and is found to link well with enhanced turbulence and small-scale wave activity. Acknowledgements. I thank D. R. McDiarmid of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, Canada, for important ideas and discussions during the development of this work. I thank the referees for useful comments which have improved the paper. I also thank E.M. Poulter of NIWA for helpful suggestions, and for reading the manuscript and making useful comments. The work was supported by contract CO1309 of the New Zealand Foundation for Research, Science and Technology. Topical Editor C.-G. Fälthammar thanks K. Mursula and W. J. Hughes for their help in evaluating this paper.--> Correspondence to: W. Allan-->

  3. Highly Permeable Silicon Membranes for Shear Free Chemotaxis and Rapid Cell Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Henry H.; Chan, Charles K.; Khire, Tejas S.; Marsh, Graham A.; Clark, Alfred; Waugh, Richard E.; McGrath, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic systems are powerful tools for cell biology studies because they enable the precise addition and removal of solutes in small volumes. However, the fluid forces inherent in the use of microfluidics for cell cultures are sometimes undesirable. An important example is chemotaxis systems where fluid flow creates well-defined and steady chemotactic gradients but also pushes cells downstream. Here we demonstrate a chemotaxis system in which two chambers are separated by a molecularly thin (15 nm), transparent, and nanoporous silicon membrane. One chamber is a microfluidic channel that carries a flow-generated gradient while the other chamber is a shear-free environment for cell observation. The molecularly thin membranes provide effectively no resistance to molecular diffusion between the two chambers, making them ideal elements for creating flow-free chambers in microfluidic systems. Analytical and computational flow models that account for membrane and chamber geometry, predict shear reduction of more than five orders of magnitude. This prediction is confirmed by observing the pure diffusion of nanoparticles in the cell-hosting chamber despite high input flow (Q = 10 µL min−1; vavg ~45 mm min−1) in the flow chamber only 15 nm away. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we show that a flow-generated molecular gradient will pass through the membrane into the quiescent cell chamber. Finally we demonstrate that our device allows us to expose migrating neutrophils to a chemotactic gradient or fluorescent label without any influence from flow. PMID:24850320

  4. Evolution of the Reynolds shear stresses in highly accelerated turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano; Hussain, Fazle

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layers subjected to severe acceleration or strong Favorable Pressure Gradients (FPG) are of great fundamental and technological importance; examples of the latter include nozzle design, underwater bodies and drag reduction applications. Scientifically, they pose great interest from the point of view of scaling laws, the complex interaction between the outer and inner regions, and relaminarization phenomena. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of highly accelerated turbulent boundary layers are performed by means of the Dynamic Multi-scale Approach (DMA) recently developed by [Araya et al. JFM 670, 581 (2011)]. It is shown that the Reynolds shear stress monotonically decreases and exhibits a logarithmic layer in the meso-layer region during the laminarization process. In addition, the local maxima of streamwise velocity fluctuations in wall units remain almost constant in the very strong FPG region, which prevents the flow to become completely laminar. Furthermore, the re-distribution of Reynolds shear stresses due to sweeps and ejections in the FPG region is performed and a physical mechanism is proposed.

  5. Young's modulus of a solid two-dimensional Langmuir monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, H.; Meunier, J.

    1992-03-01

    LANGMUIR monolayers-films of amphiphilic molecules at the surface of water-exhibit many phases1,2. Some of these behave like two-dimensional solids on experimental timescales, but previous measurements of the shear modulus of these 'solid' monolayers3-5 have yielded a value too small to be compatible with a two-dimensional crystal. The interpretation of these is complicated, however, by the likelihood of inhomogeneities in the films, which are probably assemblies of microscopic crystalline domains. Here we describe measurements of the Young's modulus of an isolated "solid' domain of NBD-stearic acid monolayers. We obtain a value large enough to be compatible with the modulus of a two-dimensional crystal6-8. This suggests that Langmuir monolayers should provide model systems for studies of melting in two dimensions6-8.

  6. Open and closed shear-walls in high-rise structural systems: Static and dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Nitti, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a General Algorithm is applied to the analysis of high-rise structures. This algorithm is to be used as a calculation tool in preliminary design; it allows to define the interaction between closed and open, straight or curved shear-walls, and the forces exchanged in structures subject to mainly horizontal loads. The analysis can be performed in both static and dynamic regimes, the mode shapes and the natural frequencies being assessed. This general formulation allows analyses of high-rise structures by taking into account the torsional rigidity and the warping deformations of the elements composing the building without gross simplifications. In thisway it is possible to model the structure as a single equivalent cantilever, thus minimising the degrees of freedom of the system, and consequently the calculation time. Finally, potentials of the method proposed are demonstrated by a numerical example which emphasizes the link between global displacements and stresses in the elements composing the structure.

  7. Extending shearing interferometry to high-NA for EUV optical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan; Naulleau, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Characterizing and removing optical aberrations remains a key part of achieving ultimate resolution in EUV exposure tools. Common-path approaches such as lateral shearing interferometry (LSI) have had success at moderate numerical apertures (NA ≍ 0:3); however, these techniques run into several obstacles when applied at higher NA (NA > 0:4). Chief among these obstacles are systematic aberrations due to high incident angles on the diffraction grating and non-planar Talbot surfaces that create regions of low fringe contrast across the pupil. In this paper, we present strategies for addressing these obstacles to extend LSI to high numerical apertures. These strategies will be employed in the installation and alignment of the 0.5-NA SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (MET5).

  8. A simple model to understand the role of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Abkarian, Manouk; Dupire, Jules

    2015-11-01

    The analytical model presented by Keller and Skalak on the dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow described the cell as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. It was extended to introduce shear elasticity of the cell membrane. We further extend the model when the cell discoid physiological shape is not a stress-free shape. We show that spheroid stress-free shapes enables fitting experimental data with values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipettes and optical tweezers. For moderate shear rates (when RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables to quantitatively determine an effective cell viscosity, that combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines shear modulus and stress-free shape. This model allows determining RBC mechanical parameters both in the tanktreading regime for cells suspended in a high viscosity medium, and in the tumbling regime for cells suspended in a low viscosity medium. In this regime,a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. A*MIDEX (n ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the ''Investissements d'Avenir'', Region Languedoc-Roussillon, Labex NUMEV (ANR-10-LABX-20), BPI France project DataDiag.

  9. A simple model to understand the effect of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Abkarian, Manouk; Viallat, Annie

    2015-11-14

    An analytical model was proposed by Keller and Skalak in 1982 to understand the motion of red blood cells in shear flow. The cell was described as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. This model was extended in 2007 to introduce shear elasticity of the red blood cell membrane. Here, this model is further extended to take into account that the cell discoid shape physiologically observed is not a stress-free shape. The model shows that spheroid stress-free shapes allow us to fit the experimental data with the values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipette and optical tweezer experiments. In the range of moderate shear rates (for which RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables us to quantitatively determine (i) an effective cell viscosity, which combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and (ii) an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines the shear modulus and the stress-free shape. This model can also be used to determine RBC mechanical parameters not only in the tanktreading regime when cells are suspended in medium of high viscosity but also in the tumbling regime characteristic of cells suspended in media of low viscosity. In this regime, a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. PMID:26352875

  10. Fiber angle and aspect ratio influence the shear mechanics of oriented electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Tristan P; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Jacobs, Nathan T; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L

    2011-11-01

    Fibrocartilages, including the knee meniscus and the annulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disc, play critical mechanical roles in load transmission across joints and their function is dependent upon well-defined structural hierarchies, organization, and composition. All, however, are compromised in the pathologic transformations associated with tissue degeneration. Tissue engineering strategies that address these key features, for example, aligned nanofibrous scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), represent a promising approach for the regeneration of these fibrous structures. While such engineered constructs can replicate native tissue structure and uniaxial tensile properties, the multidirectional loading encountered by these tissues in vivo necessitates that they function adequately in other loading modalities as well, including shear. As previous findings have shown that native tissue tensile and shear properties are dependent on fiber angle and sample aspect ratio, respectively, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a changing fiber angle and sample aspect ratio on the shear properties of aligned electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds, and to determine how extracellular matrix deposition by resident MSCs modulates the measured shear response. Results show that fiber orientation and sample aspect ratio significantly influence the response of scaffolds in shear, and that measured shear strains can be predicted by finite element models. Furthermore, acellular PCL scaffolds possessed a relatively high shear modulus, 2-4 fold greater than native tissue, independent of fiber angle and aspect ratio. It was further noted that under testing conditions that engendered significant fiber stretch, the aggregate resistance to shear was higher, indicating a role for fiber stretch in the overall shear response. Finally, with time in culture, the shear modulus of MSC laden constructs increased, suggesting that

  11. Young's modulus of nanoconfined liquids?

    PubMed

    Khan, Shah Haidar; Hoffmann, Peter Manfred

    2016-07-01

    In material science, bioengineering, and biology, thin liquid films and soft matter membranes play an important role in micro-lubrication, ion transport, and fundamental biological processes. Various attempts have been made to characterize the elastic properties, such as Young's modulus, of such films using Hertz theory by incorporating convoluted mathematical corrections. We propose a simple way to extract tip-size independent elastic properties based on stiffness and force measurement through a spherical tip on a flat surface. Using our model, the Young's modulus of nanoconfined, molecularly-thin, layers of a model liquid TEHOS (tetrakis 2-ethylhexoxy silane) and water were determined using a small-amplitude AFM. This AFM can simultaneously measure the stiffness and forces of nanoscale films. While the stiffness scales linearly with the tip radius, the measured Young's modulus essentially remains constant over an order of magnitude variation in the tip radius. The values obtained for the elastic modulus of TEHOS and water films on the basis of our method are significantly lower than the confining surfaces' elastic moduli, in contrast with the uncorrected Hertz model, suggesting that our method can serve as a simple way to compare elastic properties of nanoscale thin films as well as to characterize a variety of soft films. In addition, our results show that the elastic properties (elastic modulus) of nanoconfined liquid films remain fairly independent of increasing confinement. PMID:27060229

  12. Controlled high-rate-strain shear bands in inert and reactant porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. F.

    1998-07-01

    Shear localization is considered as one of the main reasons for initiation of chemical reaction in energetic materials under dynamic loading. However despite of widely spread recognition of the importance of rapid shear flow the shear bands in porous heterogeneous materials did not become an object of research. The primary reason for this was a lack of appropriate experimental method. The "Thick-Walled Cylinder" method, which allows to reproduce shear bands in strain controlled conditions, was initially proposed by Nesterenko et al., 1989 for solid inert materials and then modified by Nesterenko, Meyers et al., 1994 to fit porous inert and energetic materials. The method allows to reproduce the array of shear bands with shear strains 10-100 and strain rate 107s-1. Experimental results are presented for inert materials (granular, fractured ceramics) and for reactant porous mixtures (Nb-Si, Ti-Si, Ti-graphite and Ti-ultrafine diamond).

  13. Interlaminar shear properties of graphite fiber, high-performance resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.; Kourtides, D. A.; Fish, R. H.; Varma, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Short beam testing was used to determine the shear properties of laminates consisting of T-300 and Celion 3000 and 6000 graphite fibers, in epoxy, hot melt and solvent bismaleimide, polyimide and polystyrylpyridine (PSP). Epoxy, composites showed the highest interlaminar shear strength, with values for all other resins being substantially lower. The dependence of interlaminar shear properties on the fiber-resin interfacial bond and on resin wetting characteristics and mechanical properties is investigated, and it is determined that the lower shear strength of the tested composites, by comparison with epoxy resin matrix composites, is due to their correspondingly lower interfacial bond strengths. An investigation of the effect of the wettability of carbon fiber tow on shear strength shows wetting variations among resins that are too small to account for the large shear strength property differences observed.

  14. Vortex Formation in a High Speed Dust Flow with Large Velocity Shear in RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Satoru; Gohda, Takuma

    2008-09-07

    We have investigated a rotation of a dust cloud disc with strong velocity shear in a radio frequency (RF) plasma. The flow pattern of the dusts was evaluated by the Navier Stokes Equation with shear viscosity due to the Coulomb interactions. We have clarified dynamic behaviors of the dusts and observed generation of micro-vortices around rotational center, when the velocity shear is enhanced.

  15. Controlled High-Rate-Strain Shear Bands in Inert and Reactant Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Vitali

    1997-07-01

    Shear localization was considered as one of the main reasons for initiation of chemical reaction in energetic materials under dynamic loading (Dremin and Breusov 1968, Winter and Field 1975, Frey 1981, Kipp 1985, Iyer, Bennet et al., 1994) and for particles bonding during shock compaction (Nesterenko 1985). However despite of wide spread recognition of the importance of rapid shear flow the shear bands in porous heterogeneous materials did not become an object of research. The primary reason for this was a lack of appropriate experimental method. The "Thick-Walled Cylinder" method, which allows to reproduce shear bands in controlled conditions, was initially proposed by Nesterenko et al., 1989 for solid inert materials and then modified by Nesterenko, Meyers et al., 1994 to fit porous inert and energetic materials. The method allows to reproduce the array of shear bands with shear strains 10 - 100 and strain rate 107 s-1. Experimental results will be presented for inert materials (granular, fractured ceramics) and for reactant porous mixtures (Nb-Si, Ti-Si, Ti-C). Mechanisms of material deformation and shear induced chemical reactions inside shear localization zone as well as conditions for the initiation of the chemical reaction in the bulk of energetic material by array of shear bands will be considered.

  16. Roles of granule size in over-granulation during high shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Limin; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2010-08-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the over-granulation problem during high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process can guide efficient development of robust formulation and manufacturing process. Using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as a model compound, we demonstrate that size enlargement is an important mechanism for over-granulation in HSWG. A higher granulation water level results in larger granules and lower tabletability. With increasing water, granules enlarge sharply when water level is higher than 65%. Granule tabletability deteriorates with increasing granule size and becomes over-granulated when more than 70% water is used. For a batch of over-granulated granule that is ground and sieved, tabletability of the sieved fractions decreases with increasing granule size. The tabletability of the finest fraction (45-90 microm) is nearly four times that of the largest fraction (300-425 microm). These results show that size reduction can be an effective strategy to address the problem of over-granulation. PMID:20232456

  17. Influence of process parameters on pellets elaborated in a Mi-pro high-shear granulator.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, E; Viana, M; Pouget, C; Chulia, D

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare porous pellets several hundred micrometers in diameter into or onto which drug substances could be embedded. Wet granulation was carried out on a powder mix of alpha-lactose and polyvinylpyrrolidone in a Mi-Pro high-shear granulator. The process parameters were investigated to point out their influence on pellet physical properties. The reference conditions of granulation that gave the most satisfactory pellets in size and shape were determined by adjusting the volume and the distribution rate of water. Increasing impeller speed resulted in an increase in granule size and granulation yield and in a decrease in proportion of fines. The granules showed easy flowing for all granulation conditions. Adjusting process parameters enabled control of size, shape, surface area, and porosity of the granules and thus the design of ready to use granules to which drug substances could be associated by deposition or inclusion. PMID:17510884

  18. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    SciTech Connect

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M.; Oliveira, L.; Serkiz, S. M.

    2014-09-15

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar{sup ®} 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  19. Enhancement of USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for High-Speed High-Temperature Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    2009-01-01

    Large temperature and pressure fluctuations have a profound effect on turbulence development in transonic and supersonic jets. For high-speed, high-temperature jet flows, standard turbulence models lack the ability to predict the observed mixing rate of a shear layer. Several proposals to address this deficiency have been advanced in the literature to modify the turbulence transport equations in a variety of ways. In the present study, some of the most proven and simple modifications to two-equation turbulence models have been selected and implemented in NASA's USM3D tetrahedral Navier-Stokes flow solver. The modifications include the addition of compressibility correction and pressure dilatation terms in the turbulence transport equations for high-speed flows, and the addition of a simple modification to the Boussinesq's closure model coefficient for high-temperature jets. The efficacy of the extended models is demonstrated by comparison with experimental data for two supersonic axisymmetric jet test cases at design pressure ratio.

  20. Universality relationships in condensed matter - Bulk modulus and sound velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1988-01-01

    New forms for the bulk modulus and sound velocity of solids under compression, based on the universal equation of state of Vinet, Ferrante, Smith, and Rose (1987) are presented. These expressions are compared with a number of bulk modulus formulas previously utilized in high-pressure studies. It is demonstrated that this form yields a superior fit to experimental data to very high compressions, for a very wide range of solids. These solids cover the entire range of values of the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus which has been observed in high-pressure measurements.

  1. Mechanical properties of graphynes under shearing and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Lijun; Zhang, Yingyan; Feng, Xiqiao; Chang, Tienchong; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Zhou, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    Graphynes are the allotrope of graphene. In this work, extensive molecular dynamics simulations are performed on four different graphynes ( α - , β - , γ - , and 6,6,12-graphynes) to explore their mechanical properties (shear modulus, shear strength, and bending rigidity) under shearing and bending. While the shearing properties are anisotropic, the bending rigidity is almost independent of the chirality of graphynes. We also find that the shear modulus and shear fracture strength of graphynes decrease with increasing temperature. The effect of the percentage of the acetylenic linkages on the shear mechanical properties and bending rigidity is investigated. It is shown that the fracture shear strengths and bending rigidities of the four types of graphynes decrease, while the fracture shear strain increases, with increasing percentages of the acetylenic linkages. Significant wrinkling is observed in graphyne under shear strain. The influence of the temperatures and percentages of the acetylenic linkages on the ratio of amplitude-to-wavelength in the wrinkles are examined.

  2. Shear Mechanics of the TMJ Disc

    PubMed Central

    Juran, C.M.; Dolwick, M.F.; McFetridge, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a complex hinge and gliding joint that induces significant shear loads onto the fibrocartilage TMJ disc during jaw motion. The purpose of this study was to assess regional variation in the disc’s shear loading characteristics under physiologically relevant loads and to associate those mechanical findings with common clinical observations of disc fatigue and damage. Porcine TMJ discs were compressed between an axially translating bottom platen and a 2.5-cm-diameter indenter within a hydrated testing chamber. Discs were cyclically sheared at 0.5, 1, or 5 Hz to 1, 3, or 5% shear strain. Within the anterior and intermediate regions of the disc when sheared in the anteroposterior direction, both shear and compressive moduli experienced a significant decrease from instantaneous to steady state, while the posterior region’s compressive modulus decreased approximately 5%, and no significant loss of shear modulus was noted. All regions retained their shear modulus within 0.5% of instantaneous values when shear was applied in the mediolateral direction. The results of the disc’s regional shear mechanics suggest an observable and predictable link with the common clinical observation that the posterior region of the disc is most often the zone in which fatigue occurs, which may lead to disc damage and perforation. PMID:23166043

  3. Linear and nonlinear modulus surfaces in stress space, from stress-strain measurements on Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, M.; Santos, I. B.; McCall, K. R.; Guyer, R. A.; Boitnott, G. N.

    The elastic response of many rocks to quasistatic stress changes is highly nonlinear and hysteretic, displaying discrete memory. Rocks also display unusual nonlinear response to dynamic stress changes. A model to describe the elastic behavior of rocks and other consolidated materials is called the Preisach-Mayergoyz (PM) space model. In contrast to the traditional analytic approach to stress-strain, the PM space picture establishes a relationship between the quasistatic data and a number density of hysteretic mesoscopic elastic elements in the rock. The number density allows us to make quantitative predictions of dynamic elastic properties. Using the PM space model, we analyze a complex suite of quasistatic stress-strain data taken on Berea sandstone. We predict a dynamic bulk modulus and a dynamic shear modulus surface as a function of mean stress and shear stress. Our predictions for the dynamic moduli compare favorably to moduli derived from time of flight measurements. We derive a set of nonlinear elastic constants and a set of constants that describe the hysteretic behavior of the sandstone.

  4. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  5. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, Rebecca L. Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-15

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence is absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. The underlying mechanisms are explained.

  6. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, Rebecca L.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-30

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence is absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. As a result, the underlying mechanisms are explained.

  7. Rapid distortion analysis of high speed homogeneous turbulence subject to periodic shear

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bertsch, Rebecca L.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-12-30

    The effect of unsteady shear forcing on small perturbation growth in compressible flow is investigated. In particular, flow-thermodynamic field interaction and the resulting effect on the phase-lag between applied shear and Reynolds stress are examined. Simplified linear analysis of the perturbation pressure equation reveals crucial differences between steady and unsteady shear effects. The analytical findings are validated with numerical simulations of inviscid rapid distortion theory (RDT) equations. In contrast to steadily sheared compressible flows, perturbations in the unsteady (periodic) forcing case do not experience an asymptotic growth phase. Further, the resonance growth phenomenon found in incompressible unsteady shear turbulence ismore » absent in the compressible case. Overall, the stabilizing influence of both unsteadiness and compressibility is compounded leading to suppression of all small perturbations. As a result, the underlying mechanisms are explained.« less

  8. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  9. Microscopic origin of volume modulus inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Cicoli, Michele; Muia, Francesco; Pedro, Francisco Gil

    2015-12-21

    High-scale string inflationary models are in well-known tension with low-energy supersymmetry. A promising solution involves models where the inflaton is the volume of the extra dimensions so that the gravitino mass relaxes from large values during inflation to smaller values today. We describe a possible microscopic origin of the scalar potential of volume modulus inflation by exploiting non-perturbative effects, string loop and higher derivative perturbative corrections to the supergravity effective action together with contributions from anti-branes and charged hidden matter fields. We also analyse the relation between the size of the flux superpotential and the position of the late-time minimum and the inflection point around which inflation takes place. We perform a detailed study of the inflationary dynamics for a single modulus and a two moduli case where we also analyse the sensitivity of the cosmological observables on the choice of initial conditions.

  10. Microscopic origin of volume modulus inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Muia, Francesco; Gil Pedro, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    High-scale string inflationary models are in well-known tension with low-energy supersymmetry. A promising solution involves models where the inflaton is the volume of the extra dimensions so that the gravitino mass relaxes from large values during inflation to smaller values today. We describe a possible microscopic origin of the scalar potential of volume modulus inflation by exploiting non-perturbative effects, string loop and higher derivative perturbative corrections to the supergravity effective action together with contributions from anti-branes and charged hidden matter fields. We also analyse the relation between the size of the flux superpotential and the position of the late-time minimum and the inflection point around which inflation takes place. We perform a detailed study of the inflationary dynamics for a single modulus and a two moduli case where we also analyse the sensitivity of the cosmological observables on the choice of initial conditions.

  11. Frictional properties of DFDP-1 Alpine Fault rocks under hydrothermal conditions and high shear strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, André R.; Boulton, Carolyn; Toy, Virginia; Townend, John; Sutherland, Rupert

    2015-04-01

    The Alpine Fault, New Zealand, is a major plate-bounding fault that accommodates 65-75% of the total relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. Paleoseismic evidence of large-displacement surface-rupturing events, as well as an absence of measurable contemporary surface deformation, indicates that the fault slips mostly in quasi-periodic large-magnitude earthquakes (< Mw 8.0). To understand the mechanics of earthquakes, it is important to study the evolution of frictional properties of the fault rocks under conditions representative of the potential hypocentral depth. Here, we present data obtained on drill core samples of rocks that surround the principal slip zone(s) (PSZ) of the Alpine Fault and the PSZ itself. The drill core samples were obtained during phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) in 2011 at relatively shallow depths (down to ~150 m). Simulated fault gouges were sheared under elevated pressure and temperature conditions in a hydrothermal ring shear apparatus. We performed experiments at temperatures of 25, 150, 300, 450 ° C, and 600 oC. Using the shallow geothermal gradient of 63 ° C/km determined in DFDP-1, our highest temperature corresponds to a depth of ~7 km (Sutherland et al. 2012); it would correspond to 10 km depth using a more moderate geotherm of 45 oC/km (Toy et al. 2010). All samples show a transition from velocity-strengthening behavior, i.e. a positive value of (a-b), to velocity-weakening behavior, i.e. a negative value of (a-b) at a temperature of 150 ° C. The transition depends on the absolute value of sliding velocity, with velocity-weakening dominating at lower sliding velocities. At 600 oC, velocity-strengthening dominates at low sliding velocity, whereas the high-velocity steps are all velocity-weakening. Moreover, shear stress depends linearly on effective normal stress at 600 oC, indicating that shearing is essentially frictional and that no transition to ductile (normal stress independent) flow

  12. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W. H.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  13. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms.

    PubMed

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W H; Yang, Victor X D; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  14. Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas created by the Nike laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Plewa, T.

    2008-11-01

    In high-energy-density (HED) plasmas the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability plays an important role in the evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable interfaces, as well as material interfaces that experience the passage one or multiple oblique shocks. Despite the potentially important role of the KH instability few experiments have been carried out to explore its behavior in the high-energy-density regime. We report on the evolution of a supersonic shear flow that is generated by the release of a high velocity (>100 km/s) aluminum plasma onto a CRF foam (ρ = 0.1 g/cc) surface. In order to seed the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability various two-dimensional sinusoidal perturbations (λ = 100, 200, and 300 μm with peak-to-valley amplitudes of 10, 20, and 30 μm respectively) have been machined into the foam surface. This experiment was performed using the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  15. High temperature pseudotachylytes and ductile shear zones in dry rocks from the continental lower crust (Lofoten, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, Luca; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Harris, Katherine; Wood, Elliot

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of initiation and growth of shear zones under lower crustal conditions is of fundamental importance when assessing lithosphere rheology and strength. In this study we investigate brittle-ductile shear zones developed under lower crustal conditions in anorthosites from Nusfjord, Lofoten (northern Norway). Steep ductile shear zones trend E-W to ESE-WSW and have a stretching lineation plunging steeply to the SSW or SSE. The shear sense is normal (south block down to the south) as indicated by SC and SC' fabrics and sigmoidal foliations. The shear zone show a mylonitic to ultramylonitic fabric, sharp boundaries to the host anorthosites, and abundant anastomosing dark fine-grained layers along the main foliation. The fine-grained layers localized much of the strain. Relatively lower strain domains within or adjacent to shear zones indicate that the fine dark bands of mylonites represent transposed pseudotachylyte which still locally preserve the pristine structures such as chilled margins, breccia textures with angular clasts of the host rock and injection veins; intersecting veins of pseudotachylyte record multiple stages of seismic slip. The orientation of injection veins and marker offset along the most preserved pseudotachylyte fault veins indicate approximately a sinistral strike slip kinematic during faulting event responsible for the friction-induced melting. These observations indicate that ductile shear zones exploited pre-existing brittle fault zones including a network of pseudotachylytes, and that the fine-grained "ultramylonites" derive from former fine-grained pseudotachylytes. The pseudotachylyte microstructure is dominated by plagioclase microlites dispersed in a groundmass of fine-grained clinopyroxene. Clinopyroxene recrystallizes in the damage zone flanking the pseudotachylytes, indicating high metamorphic grade during pseudotachylyte formation. Small idioblastic or cauliflower garnet are scattered through the matrix and

  16. Frictional processes in smectite-rich gouges sheared at slow to high slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretusini, Stefano; Mittempergher, Silvia; Gualtieri, Alessandro; Di Toro, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    The slipping zones of shallow sections of megathrusts and of large landslides are often smectite-rich (e.g., montmorillonite type). Consequently, similar "frictional" processes operating at high slip rates (> 1 m/s) might be responsible of the large slips estimated in megathrust (50 m for the 2011 Tohoku Mw 9.1 earthquake) and measured in large landslides (500 m for the 1963 Vajont slide, Italy). At present, only rotary shear apparatuses can reproduce simultaneously the large slips and slip rates of these events. Noteworthy, the frictional processes proposed so far (thermal and thermochemical pressurization, etc.) remain rather obscure. Here we present preliminary results obtained with the ROtary Shear Apparatus (ROSA) installed at Padua University. Thirty-one experiments were performed at ambient conditions on pure end-members of (1) smectite-rich standard powders (STx-1b: ~68 wt% Ca-montmorillonite, ~30 wt% opal-CT and ~2 wt% quartz), (2) quartz powders (qtz) and (3) on 80:20 = Stx-1b:qtz mixtures. The gouges were sandwiched between two (1) hollow (25/15 mm external/internal diameter) or (2) solid (25 mm in diameter) stainless-steel made cylinders and confined by inner and outer Teflon rings (only outer for solid cylinders). Gouges were sheared at a normal stress of 5 MPa, slip rates V from 300 μm/s to 1.5 m/s and total slip of 3 m. The deformed gouges were investigated with quantitative (Rietveld method with internal standard) X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). In the smectite-rich standard endmember, (1) for 300 μm/s ≤ V ≤ 0.1 m/s, initial friction coefficient (μi) was 0.6±0.05 whereas the steady-state friction coefficient (μss) was velocity and slip strengthening (μss 0.85±0.05), (2) for 0.1 m/s < V < 0.3 m/s, velocity and slip neutral (μi = μss = 0.62±0.08) and (3) for V > 0.8 m/s, velocity and slip weakening (μi = 0.7±0.1 and μss = 0.25±0.05). In the 80:20 Stx-1b:qtz mixtures, (1) for 300 μm/s ≤ V

  17. Effect of Li level, artificial aging, and TiB2 reinforcement on the modulus of Weldalite (tm) 049

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic Young's Modulus (E) was determined for (1) alloys 049(1.3)(heat 072), (2) 049(1.9), and (3) 049(1.3) TiB2 in the T3 temper and after aging at 160 C were made on a single 0.953 cm (0.375 in) cube to reduce scatter from microstructural inhomogeneities. Both shear and transverse wave velocities were measured for the L, LT, and ST directions by a pulse echo technique. These velocities were then used to calculate modulus. The change is shown in E with aging time at 160 C (320 F) for the three alloys. It is clear from the plots that aging has a minor, but measurable, influence on the E of alloys 049(1.3) and 049(1.9): E decreases by -2.5 pct. for 2 and 3 during the initial stages of artificial aging. This decrease in E generally follows the strength reversion. On further aging beyond the reversion well, E increases and then decreases again as the alloy overage. The slightly higher modulus in the T8 than in the T3 temper is consistent with the presence of the high modulus T sub 1 phase in the T8 temper. A similar change in E was observed on aging for the TiB2 reinforced variant that also follows the aging curve.

  18. Influence of loading-rate and steel fibers on the shear strength of ultra high performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratislav, Lukic; Pascal, Forquin

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes quasi-static and dynamic experimental methods used to examine the confined shear strength of an Ultra High Performance Concrete, with and without the presence of steel fibers in the concrete composition. An experimental setup was created to investigate the concrete shear strength under quasi-static loading regime using a hydraulic press Schenk while dynamic shear strength was characterized by subjecting concrete samples to dynamic loading through a modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Both methods are based on a Punch Through Shear (PTS) test with a well-instrumented aluminum passive confinement ring that allows measuring the change of radial stress in the shear ligament throughout the test. Firstly, four equally distributed radial notches have been performed in order to deduce the radial stress by suppressing a self-confinement of the sample peripheral part. However, by analyzing the strain gauge data from the confinement ring, it has been noticed that these were apparently insufficient, especially for fiber-reinforced samples, resulting in subsequently practicing eight radial notches through the sample peripheral part. The results obtained from both procedures are reported and discussed.

  19. Impact Fragmentation and Crushing of Concrete and Other Solids Due to Kinetic Energy of High Shear Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazant, Zdenek; Kirane, Kedar

    While numerous studies have dealt with dynamic crack propagation, they have not led to a macroscopic continuum model usable in FE analysis. Recent work on such a model is reviewed. The key idea is that comminution under high-rate shear is driven by the release local kinetic (rather than strain) energy of the shear strain rate field in forming finite-size fragments. At strain rates >103/s, this energy exceeds the maximum possible elastic strain energy by orders of magnitude. It is found that the particle size scales as the -2/3 power of the shear strain rate and as the 2/3 power of interface fracture energy, and the released and dissipated kinetic energy as the 2/3 power of the shear strain rate. These results explain the long debated phenomenon of ``dynamic overstress''. In FE simulations, this kinetic energy of strain rate field can be dissipated either by equivalent viscosity or by the work of increased strength limits. In simulating the impact of missiles into concrete walls, both approaches give nearly equivalent results. A dimensionless indicator of the comminution intensity is also formulated. The theory was inspired by noting that the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate plays a role analogous to the local kinetic energy of eddies in turbulent flow.

  20. Comminution of solids caused by kinetic energy of high shear strain rate, with implications for impact, shock, and shale fracturing

    PubMed Central

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Caner, Ferhun C.

    2013-01-01

    Although there exists a vast literature on the dynamic comminution or fragmentation of rocks, concrete, metals, and ceramics, none of the known models suffices for macroscopic dynamic finite element analysis. This paper outlines the basic idea of the macroscopic model. Unlike static fracture, in which the driving force is the release of strain energy, here the essential idea is that the driving force of comminution under high-rate compression is the release of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate. The density of this energy at strain rates >1,000/s is found to exceed the maximum possible strain energy density by orders of magnitude, making the strain energy irrelevant. It is shown that particle size is proportional to the −2/3 power of the shear strain rate and the 2/3 power of the interface fracture energy or interface shear stress, and that the comminution process is macroscopically equivalent to an apparent shear viscosity that is proportional (at constant interface stress) to the −1/3 power of this rate. A dimensionless indicator of the comminution intensity is formulated. The theory was inspired by noting that the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate plays a role analogous to the local kinetic energy of eddies in turbulent flow. PMID:24218624

  1. Investigation of high-speed free shear flows using improved pressure-strain correlated Reynolds stress turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Lakshmanan, B.

    1993-01-01

    A high-speed shear layer is studied using compressibility corrected Reynolds stress turbulence model which employs newly developed model for pressure-strain correlation. MacCormack explicit prediction-corrector method is used for solving the governing equations and the turbulence transport equations. The stiffness arising due to source terms in the turbulence equations is handled by a semi-implicit numerical technique. Results obtained using the new model show a sharper reduction in growth rate with increasing convective Mach number. Some improvements were also noted in the prediction of the normalized streamwise stress and Reynolds shear stress. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Von Willlebrand Adhesion to Surfaces at High Shear Rates Is Controlled by Long-Lived Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Sing, Charles E.; Selvidge, Jennifer G.; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (vWF) adsorbs and immobilizes platelets at sites of injury under high-shear-rate conditions. It has been recently demonstrated that single vWF molecules only adsorb significantly to collagen above a threshold shear, and here we explain such counterintuitive behavior using a coarse-grained simulation and a phenomenological theory. We find that shear-induced adsorption only occurs if the vWF-surface bonds are slip-resistant such that force-induced unbinding is suppressed, which occurs in many biological bonds (i.e., catch bonds). Our results quantitatively match experimental observations and may be important to understand the activation and mechanical regulation of vWF activity during blood clotting. PMID:24047999

  3. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-07-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions.

  4. Low-shear Viscosity and Diffusion of Hard-sphere Dispersion at High Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengdong; Chaikin, P. M.; Phan, See-Eng; Zhu, Jixiang; Russel, W. B.

    1997-03-01

    We are interested in the rheology of hard-sphere dispersion at high concentration, especially the asymptotic behavior near the glass transition, which is the ideal place to test various theories.(J.F. Brady, J. Chem. phys. 99(1993)567) (M. Tokuyama and I. Oppenheim, Phys. Rev. E. 50(1994)R16) The dispersion studied is silica in Ethylene glycol/Glycerol/NaCl. Low-shear viscosity is measured by a Zimm viscometer. The data are consistent with recent PMMA measurement at low concentration(P.N. Segreet. al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 75(1995)958; 76(1996)585 (See-eng Phan et. al.), Phys. rev. E., to be published., and at high concentration (metastable state) are better described by the Doolittle equation as in earlier experiments (L. Marshall, C.F. Zukoski IV, J. Phys. Chem. 94(1990)1164) (L.V. Woodcock, C.A. Angell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 47(1981)1129)). No theory yet gives a complete interpretion of the data. Dynamic light scattering (ensemble averaged) is used to measure self diffusion.

  5. Remotely-Controlled Shear for Dismantling Highly Radioactive Tools In Rokkasho Vitrification Facility - 12204

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsui, Takashi; Sawa, Shusuke; Sadaki, Akira; Awano, Toshihiko; Cole, Matt; Miura, Yasuhiko; Ino, Tooru

    2012-07-01

    A high-level liquid waste vitrification facility in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is right in the middle of hot commissioning tests toward starting operation in fall of 2012. In these tests, various tools were applied to address issues occurring in the vitrification cell. Because of these tools' unplanned placement in the cell it has been necessary to dismantle and dispose of them promptly. One of the tools requiring removal is a rod used in the glass melter to improve glass pouring. It is composed of a long rod made of Inconel 601 or 625 and has been highly contaminated. In order to dismantle these tools and to remotely put them in a designated waste basket, a custom electric shear machine was developed. It was installed in a dismantling area of the vitrification cell by remote cranes and manipulators and has been successfully operated. It can be remotely dismantled and placed in a waste basket for interim storage. This is a very good example of a successful deployment of a specialty remote tool in a hot cell environment. This paper also highlights how commissioning and operations are done in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. (authors)

  6. ZaP-HD: High Energy Density Z-Pinch Plasmas using Sheared Flow Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Hughes, M. C.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP-HD flow Z-pinch project investigates scaling the flow Z-pinch to High Energy Density Plasma, HEDP, conditions by using sheared flow stabilization. ZaP used a single power supply to produce 100 cm long Z-pinches that were quiescent for many radial Alfven times and axial flow-through times. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve HED plasmas, which are dimensionally large and persist for extended durations. The ZaP-HD device replaces the single power supply from ZaP with two separate power supplies to independently control the plasma flow and current in the Z-pinch. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements of the density with interferometry and digital holography, the plasma flow and temperature with passive spectroscopy, the magnetic field with surface magnetic probes, and plasma emission with optical imaging. The diagnostics fully characterize the plasma from its initiation in the coaxial accelerator, through the pinch, and exhaust from the assembly region. The plasma evolution is modeled with high resolution codes: Mach2, WARPX, and NIMROD. Experimental results and scaling analyses are presented. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  7. Elastic modulus of viral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ge, Zhibin; Fang, Jiyu

    2008-09-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the radial elasticity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanotubes. An atomic force microscope tip is used to apply small radial indentations to deform TMV nanotubes. The initial elastic response of TMV nanotubes can be described by finite-element analysis in 5nm indentation depths and Hertz theory in 1.5nm indentation depths. The derived radial Young’s modulus of TMV nanotubes is 0.92±0.15GPa from finite-element analysis and 1.0±0.2GPa from the Hertz model, which are comparable with the reported axial Young’s modulus of 1.1GPa [Falvo , Biophys. J. 72, 1396 (1997)].

  8. Comparison of reacting and non-reacting shear layers at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The flow field in a hydrogen-fueled planar reacting shear layer was measured with an LDV system and is compared with a similar air to air case without combustion. Measurements were made with a speed ratio of 0.34 with the highspeed stream at Mach 0.71. They show that the shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without, and both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established database. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layer is slow, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, a more organized pattern of the Reynolds stress is present in the reacting shear layer, possibly as a result of larger scale structure formation in the layer associated with heat release.

  9. Coating modulus and barnacle bioadhesion.

    PubMed

    Berglin, Mattias; Lönn, Nina; Gatenholm, Paul

    2003-04-01

    The effect of coating modulus on the strength of pseudobarnacle adhesive bonding was investigated. A radical polymerized poly(butylmethacrylate) coating cross-linked with allylmethacrylate was used as a model coating. The coating Tg was determined to be 18 degrees C by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Dynamic contact angle measurements (DCA) at different temperatures indicated that the surface chemistry was not significantly affected in the range investigated (5-50 degrees C). However, an increased noise level in the force vs. displacement curves indicated an increased molecular mobility with a fast reorganization of hydrophilic ester groups during the measurement. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) as a function of temperature revealed a large drop in storage modulus (G') from 20 degrees C to 70 degrees C, as expected. A good correlation between the coating storage modulus and the detachment stress of pseudobarnacles was observed even though energy dissipation during the analysis was observed. The decreased adhesion might be a result of the increased molecular flexibility as determined by DCA and DMA at increased temperature. The increased molecular mobility might increase the tendency for interfacial slip, which ultimately results in decreased adhesion strength. PMID:14618706

  10. Deformation and Shear Band Development in an Ultrahigh Carbon Steel During High Strain Rate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R; Syn, C K; Sherby, O D

    2004-07-06

    The mechanical response of a pearlitic UHCS-1.3C steel deformed at approximately 4000 s{sup -1} to large strains ({var_epsilon} = -0.9) has been studied. Failure, at both the macroscopic and the microscopic levels has been evaluated, and the ability of the material to absorb energy in compression has been examined. Failure occurred by the development of a shear band. However before failure, extensive buckling of the carbide plates was observed and the UHCS-1.3C material exhibited significant potential for compressive ductility and energy absorption due to the distributed buckling of these plates. Strain localization during adiabatic shear band development resulted in the formation of austenite. Subsequent cooling produced a divorced-eutectoid transformation with associated deformation, which resulted in a microstructure consisting of 50 to 100 nm sized grains. The stress-strain behavior within the shear band has also been determined. The results are used to critically evaluate the maximum shear stress criterion of shear band development. New criteria for the development of shear bands are developed based on a strain energy concept.

  11. A formulation strategy for solving the overgranulation problem in high shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Zhang, Minglun; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-08-01

    Granules prepared by the high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process commonly exhibit the problem of overgranulation, a phenomenon characterized by a severe loss of the ability to form adequately strong tablet. We hypothesize that the incorporation of brittle excipients promotes brittle fracture of granules during compaction, thereby improving tablet mechanical strength by increasing bonding area. On this basis, we have examined the effectiveness of incorporating a brittle excipient into a plastic matrix in addressing the overgranulation problem. A complete loss of tabletability is observed for plastic microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) when ≥ 55% of granulating water was used. The incorporation of a brittle excipient, either lactose or dibasic calcium phosphate (Dical) into the MCC matrix leads to improved tabletability in a concentration-dependent manner, with higher amount of brittle excipient being more effective. For each mixture, tablet tensile strength goes through a minimum as the granulating water increases, for example, 1.4 MPa for the mixture containing 80% of lactose and 2.1 MPa for the mixture containing 80% Dical. These results, along with scanning electron microscope evidence, show that the addition of brittle excipients to an otherwise plastic powder is an effective formulation strategy to address the overgranulation problem in HSWG. PMID:24985120

  12. Initial moisture content in raw material can profoundly influence high shear wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Limin; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate that uncontrolled initial moisture content in microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) can profoundly affect high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process. We show that granule tabletability is reduced by approximately 50% when initial moisture content in MCC increases from 0.9% to 10.5% while all other processing parameters remain unchanged. An important observation is that granule tableting performance deteriorates significantly when initial moisture content increases from 2.6% to 4.9%, which is considered normal variation in moisture content for typical MCC (3-5%). The deteriorated tabletability is largely caused by increased granule size. On the other hand, granule flowability improves continuously with increasing initial moisture content in MCC. The improved flowability is mainly a result of granule size enlargement. Clearly, moisture content of raw materials for a HSWG process must be carefully monitored and controlled to ensure a robust manufacturing process as required by the quality-by-design principle. PMID:21718767

  13. Crackle noise from high-speed free-shear-flow turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchta, David; Freund, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    High-thrust jet engines radiate a particularly intense and distinct sound that has become known as `crackle'. Its root mechanisms are not fully understood, though they are thought to involve nonlinear acoustics because the sound waves appear steepened. They also have a positive skewness, pressure maxima are stronger than minima, for unknown reasons. We use direct numerical simulations of free-shear-flow turbulence with Mach numbers ranging from M = 0 . 9 to 3 . 5 to study the very near acoustic field and the turbulence interactions. Results indicate that crackle is insensitive to Reynolds number for the range considered, though DNS is restricted to modest Reynolds numbers. The very near field is teeming with weak, nonlinearly interacting Mach-like waves. Locally, these waves generate intense pressure fluctuations, especially as they merge. We observe that skewness changes are small over the propagation distances simulated, though more significant changes are to be expected over larger propagation distances. The source of the peculiar skewness is thus near or within the turbulence. Simulations modulating the underlying unstable linear modes reveal a sensitivity to crackle and are used to assess the role of large-scale structures in its source.

  14. Elastic modulus of phases in Ti–Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-dong; Liu, Yong; Wu, Hong; Song, Min; Zhang, Tuo-yang; Lan, Xiao-dong; Yao, Tian-hang

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a series of binary Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were prepared using non-consumable arc melting. The microstructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, and the elastic modulus was evaluated by nanoindentation testing technique. The evolution of the volume fractions of ω phase was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the phase constitution and elastic modulus of the Ti–Mo alloys are sensitive to the Mo content. Ti–3.2Mo and Ti–8Mo alloys containing only α and β phases, respectively, have a low elastic modulus. In contrast, Ti–4.5Mo, Ti–6Mo, Ti–7Mo alloys, with different contents of ω phase, have a high elastic modulus. A simple micromechanical model was used to calculate the elastic modulus of ω phase (E{sub ω}), which was determined to be 174.354 GPa. - Highlights: • Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were investigated. • XPS was used to investigate the volume fractions of ω phase. • The elastic modulus of Ti–Mo alloys is sensitive to the Mo content. • The elastic modulus of ω phase was determined to be 174.354 GPa.

  15. Impact comminution of solids due to local kinetic energy of high shear strain rate: I. Continuum theory and turbulence analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Caner, Ferhun C.

    2014-03-01

    The modeling of high velocity impact into brittle or quasibrittle solids is hampered by the unavailability of a constitutive model capturing the effects of material comminution into very fine particles. The present objective is to develop such a model, usable in finite element programs. The comminution at very high strain rates can dissipate a large portion of the kinetic energy of an impacting missile. The spatial derivative of the energy dissipated by comminution gives a force resisting the penetration, which is superposed on the nodal forces obtained from the static constitutive model in a finite element program. The present theory is inspired partly by Grady's model for expansive comminution due to explosion inside a hollow sphere, and partly by analogy with turbulence. In high velocity turbulent flow, the energy dissipation rate gets enhanced by the formation of micro-vortices (eddies) which dissipate energy by viscous shear stress. Similarly, here it is assumed that the energy dissipation at fast deformation of a confined solid gets enhanced by the release of kinetic energy of the motion associated with a high-rate shear strain of forming particles. For simplicity, the shape of these particles in the plane of maximum shear rate is considered to be regular hexagons. The particle sizes are assumed to be distributed according to the Schuhmann power law. The condition that the rate of release of the local kinetic energy must be equal to the interface fracture energy yields a relation between the particle size, the shear strain rate, the fracture energy and the mass density. As one experimental justification, the present theory agrees with Grady's empirical observation that, in impact events, the average particle size is proportional to the (-2/3) power of the shear strain rate. The main characteristic of the comminution process is a dimensionless number Ba (Eq. (37)) representing the ratio of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate to the maximum possible

  16. Influence of metronidazole particle properties on granules prepared in a high-shear mixer-granulator.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Censi, Roberta; Malaj, Ledjan; Martelli, Sante; Joiris, Etienne; Barthélémy, Christine

    2007-02-01

    Metronidazole is a good example of high-dose drug substance with poor granulating and tableting properties. Tablets are generally produced by liquid granulation; however, the technological process failure is quite frequent. In order to verify how the metronidazole particle characteristics can influence granule properties, three metronidazole batches differing for crystal habit, mean particle size, BET surface area and wettability were selected, primarily designed according to their different elongation ratio: needle-shaped, stick-shaped, and isodimensional. In the presence of lactose monohydrate and pregelatinized maize starch, respectively as diluent and binder, they were included in a formula for wet granulation in a high-shear mixer-granulator. In order to render the process comparable as far as possible, all parameters and experimental conditions were maintained constant. Four granule batches were obtained: granules from placebo (G-placebo), granules from needle-shaped crystals (G-needle-shaped), granules from stick-shaped crystals (G-stick-shaped), and granules from isodimensional crystals (G-isodimensional). Different granule properties were considered, in particular concerning porosity, friability, loss on drying (LOD), and flowability. In order to study their tabletability and compressibility, the different granules obtained were then compressed in a rotary press. The best tabletability was obtained with the isodimensional batch, while the poorest was exhibited by the stick-shaped one. Differences in tabletability are in good accordance with compressibility results: to a better tabletability corresponds an important granule ability to undergo a volume reduction as a result of an applied pressure. In particular, it was proposed that the greatest compressibility of the G-isodimensional must be related to the greatest granule porosity percentage. PMID:17454043

  17. Visualization of ultrasonically induced shear wave propagation using phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-02-01

    Shear wave elastography measures the stiffness of soft tissues from the speed of propagating shear waves induced in tissue. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising detection modality given its high sensitivity and spatial resolution, making it suitable for elastic characterization of skin, peripheral vasculature or ocular tissues. For clinical applications, it would be valuable to use a non-contact shear source. Thus, we propose acoustic radiation force as a remote shear source combined with OCT for visualization. A single-element focused transducer (central frequency 7.5 MHz) was used to apply a maximal pressure of ~3 MPa for 100 μs in agar phantoms. It induced shear waves with an amplitude of several hundreds of nanometers and a broadband spectrum in the kilohertz range. Phasesensitive OCT was used to track shear waves at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz. We reconstructed shear modulus maps in a heterogeneous phantom. In addition, we use 3-ms long coded excitation to increase the displacement signal-to-noise ratio. We applied digital pulse compression to the resulting displacement field to obtain a gain of ~15 dB compared to standard pulse excitation while maintaining the US pressure level and the shear wave spatial and temporal resolution. This is a promising result for shear wave generation at low US pressures (~ 1 MPa).

  18. Climatological characteristics of high altitude wind shear and lapse rate layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehernberger, L. J.; Guttman, N. B.

    1981-01-01

    Indications of the climatological distribution of wind shear and temperature lapse and inversion rates as observed by rawinsonde measurements over the western United States are recorded. Frequencies of the strongest shear, lapse rates, and inversion layer strengths were observed for a 1 year period of record and were tabulated for the lower troposphere, the upper troposphere, and five altitude intervals in the lower stratosphere. Selected bivariate frequencies were also tabulated. Strong wind shears, lapse rates, and inversion are observed less frequently as altitude increases from 175 millibars to 20 millibars. On a seasonal basis the frequencies were higher in winter than in summer except for minor influences due to increased tropopause altitude in summer and the stratospheric wind reversal in the spring and fall.

  19. Degradation of homogeneous polymer solutions in high shear turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbing, B. R.; Winkel, E. S.; Solomon, M. J.; Ceccio, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    This study quantifies degradation of polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyacrylamide (PAM) polymer solutions in large diameter (2.72 cm) turbulent pipe flow at Reynolds numbers to 3 × 105 and shear rates greater than 105 1/s. The present results support a universal scaling law for polymer chain scission reported by Vanapalli et al. (2006) that predicts the maximum chain drag force to be proportional to Re 3/2, validating this scaling law at higher Reynolds numbers than prior studies. Use of this scaling gives estimated backbone bond strengths from PEO and PAM of 3.2 and 3.8 nN, respectively. Additionally, with the use of synthetic seawater as a solvent the onset of drag reduction occurred at higher shear rates relative to the pure water solvent solutions, but had little influence on the extent of degradation at higher shear rates. These results are significant for large diameter pipe flow applications that use polymers to reduce drag.

  20. EXTREMELY RAPID STAR CLUSTER DISRUPTION IN HIGH-SHEAR CIRCUMNUCLEAR STARBURST RINGS: THE UNUSUAL CASE OF NGC 7742

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Anders, Peter E-mail: anders@pku.edu.cn

    2012-10-10

    All known mass distributions of recently formed star cluster populations resemble a 'universal' power-law function. Here we assess the impact of the extremely disruptive environment in NGC 7742's circumnuclear starburst ring on the early evolution of the galaxy's high-mass ({approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }) star cluster population. Surprisingly, and contrary to expectations, at all ages-including the youngest, {approx}< 15 Myr-the cluster mass functions are robustly and verifiably represented by lognormal distributions that resemble those commonly found only for old, evolved globular cluster systems in the local universe. This suggests that the high-shear conditions in the NGC 7742 starburst ring may significantly speed up dynamical star cluster destruction. This enhanced mass-dependent disruption rate at very young ages might be caused by a combination of the starburst ring's high density and the shear caused by the counterrotating gas disk.

  1. Study of the strength of molybdenum under high pressure using electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jow; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James

    2015-06-01

    MAPS (Magnetically Applied Pressure Shear) is a new technique that has the potential to study material strength under mega-bar pressures. By applying a mixed-mode pressure-shear loading and measuring the resultant material responses, the technique provides explicit and direct information on material strength under high pressure. In order to apply sufficient shear traction to the test sample, the driver must have substantial strength. Molybdenum was selected for this reason along with its good electrical conductivity. In this work, the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under MAPS loading was studied. To understand the experimental data, a viscoplasticity model with tension-compression asymmetry was also developed. Through a combination of experimental characterization, model development, and numerical simulation, many unique insights were gained on the inelastic behavior of molybdenum such as the effects of strength on the interplay between longitudinal and shear stresses, potential interaction between the magnetic field and molybdenum strength, and the possible tension-compression asymmetry of the inelastic material response. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in high-energy-density, blast-wave-driven shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, C. A. Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Malamud, G.; Henry de Frahan, M. T.; Johnsen, E.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Martinez, D.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we examine the hydrodynamics of high-energy-density (HED) shear flows. Experiments, consisting of two materials of differing density, use the OMEGA-60 laser to drive a blast wave at a pressure of ∼50 Mbar into one of the media, creating a shear flow in the resulting shocked system. The interface between the two materials is Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable, and a mixing layer of growing width develops due to the shear. To theoretically analyze the instability's behavior, we rely on two sources of information. First, the interface spectrum is well-characterized, which allows us to identify how the shock front and the subsequent shear in the post-shock flow interact with the interface. These observations provide direct evidence that vortex merger dominates the evolution of the interface structure. Second, simulations calibrated to the experiment allow us to estimate the time-dependent evolution of the deposition of vorticity at the interface. The overall result is that we are able to choose a hydrodynamic model for the system, and consequently examine how well the flow in this HED system corresponds to a classical hydrodynamic description.

  3. The elastic modulus correction term in creep activation energies Applied to oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malu, M.; Tien, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of elastic modulus and the temperature dependence of elastic modulus on creep activation energies for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base superalloy are investigated. This superalloy is commercially known as Inconel Alloy MA 753, strengthened both by gamma-prime precipitates and by yttria particles. It is shown that at intermediate temperatures, say below 1500 F, where elastic modulus is weakly dependent on temperature, the modulus correction term to creep activation energy is small. Accordingly, modulus corrections are insignificant for the superalloy considered, which shows high apparent creep activation energies at this temperature. On the contrary, at very high temperatures, the elastic modulus correction term can be significant, thus reducing the creep activation energy to that of vacancy self-diffusion. In order to obtain high-temperature creep resistance, a high-value elastic modulus with a weak dependence on temperature is required.

  4. CD44 sensitivity of platelet activation, membrane scrambling and adhesion under high arterial shear rates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guilai; Liu, Guoxing; Alzoubi, Kousi; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Walker, Britta; Münzer, Patrick; Luo, Dong; Umbach, Anja T; Elvira, Bernat; Chen, Hong; Voelkl, Jakob; Föller, Michael; Mak, Tak W; Borst, Oliver; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    CD44 is required for signalling of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an anti-apoptotic pro-inflammatory cytokine. MIF is expressed and released from blood platelets, key players in the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Nothing is known about a role of CD44 in the regulation of platelet function. The present study thus explored whether CD44 modifies degranulation (P-selectin exposure), integrin activation, caspase activity, phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface, platelet volume, Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca(2+)-activity ([Ca2+]i). Platelets from mice lacking CD44 (cd44(-/-)) were compared to platelets from corresponding wild-type mice (cd44(+/+)). In resting platelets, P-selectin abundance, α(IIb)β3 integrin activation, caspase-3 activity and phosphatidylserine exposure were negligible in both genotypes and Orai1 protein abundance, [Ca2+]i, and volume were similar in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet degranulation and α(IIb)β3 integrin activation were significantly increased by thrombin (0.02 U/ml), collagen related peptide (CRP, 2 µg/ml and Ca(2+)-store depletion with thapsigargin (1 µM), effects more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml) increased platelet [Ca2+]i, caspase-3 activity, phosphatidylserine exposure and Orai1 surface abundance, effects again significantly stronger in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin further decreased forward scatter in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets, an effect which tended to be again more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet adhesion and in vitro thrombus formation under high arterial shear rates (1,700 s(-1)) were significantly augmented in cd44(-/-) mice. In conclusion, genetic deficiency of CD44 augments activation, apoptosis and pro-thrombotic potential of platelets. PMID:26355696

  5. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  6. Urban shear-wave reflection seismics enables high-resolution imaging of fault structures in the city of Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Polom, U.; Trabs, S.; Dahm, T.

    2011-12-01

    The investigated roof region of a salt diapir in Hamburg, northern Germany, suffers sinkhole activity that was accompanied lately by microseismic events in the Gross Flottbek quarter. Thus, a high geohazard potential is present which can only be evaluated if highly resolved structural data are available to characterize the presumably fault- and dissolution-driven subsurface processes. The urban environment and high building density required adapted and new, non-invasive geophysical methods for shallow applications. Our shear-wave seismic system, under development at LIAG, consists of a small, horizontal vibrator source (ELVIS, v. 5.0) and a 120 m long, mobile land streamer equipped with 120 SH-geophones. Thereby, a cost-effective, complete shear-wave seismic survey is possible, which is dedicated to urban applications and accounts for sealed surfaces. This high-resolution system is especially useful on sealed terrain because of the absence of surface waves, and it provides a higher resolution than a compressional-wave survey. Across the Wobbe See sinkhole in Gross Flottbek we acquired 500 profile m of high-resolution shear-wave seismics that enabled urban subsurface imaging with 1 m vertical and 5-10 m horizontal resolution. Small-scale structures in the sediments and salt are resolved down to 100 m depth. We show that it is possible (1) to classify a sinkhole type structurally -collapse depth is found here at ca. 60-80 m depth below surface- and (2) to map subrosion areas by the physical property of lowered shear-wave velocities and a chaotic reflection character. The fault structures found coincide well with the focal depth and mechanism of the 2009 microseismic events. Aditionally, the diapir model is confirmed locally in terms of rock salt depth suggested here lying ca. 150 m below surface.

  7. Dynamic thermal field-induced gradient soft-shear for highly oriented block copolymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Yager, Kevin G; Berry, Brian; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Karim, Alamgir

    2012-11-27

    As demand for smaller, more powerful, and energy-efficient devices continues, conventional patterning technologies are pushing up against fundamental limits. Block copolymers (BCPs) are considered prime candidates for a potential solution via directed self-assembly of nanostructures. We introduce here a facile directed self-assembly method to rapidly fabricate unidirectionally aligned BCP nanopatterns at large scale, on rigid or flexible template-free substrates via a thermally induced dynamic gradient soft-shear field. A localized differential thermal expansion at the interface between a BCP film and a confining polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer due to a dynamic thermal field imposes the gradient soft-shear field. PDMS undergoes directional expansion (along the annealing direction) in the heating zone and contracts back in the cooling zone, thus setting up a single cycle of oscillatory shear (maximum lateral shear stress ∼12 × 10(4) Pa) in the system. We successfully apply this process to create unidirectional alignment of BCP thin films over a wide range of thicknesses (nm to μm) and processing speeds (μm/s to mm/s) using both a flat and patterned PDMS layer. Grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering measurements show absolutely no sign of isotropic population and reveal ≥99% aligned orientational order with an angular spread Δθ(fwhm) ≤ 5° (full width at half-maximum). This method may pave the way to practical industrial use of hierarchically patterned BCP nanostructures. PMID:23106286

  8. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Jui; Finn, John; Pariev, Vladimir; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Zeb; Klein, Brianna

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  9. Doubly anchored nematic polymer brushes: Shear, field effects, and quasipiezoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.; Williams, D. R. M.

    1994-02-01

    The shear behavior of a doubly anchored brush of liquid-crystalline polymers immersed in a nematic solvent is investigated. In such a brush the grafted polymers bridge two plates. Remarkably, the Franck nematic elasticity in this system can dominate the shear modulus. In the presence of a field the system undergoes a Fréedericksz transition modified by the bridging polymers. In particular: (i) the polymeric elasticity affects the critical field Ec; (ii) the shear modulus vanishes as the field approaches Ec; and (iii) the nematic distortion couples to a shear strain. The system exhibits quasipiezoelectricity, which is nonlinear and is not associated with any inverse effect.

  10. High-shear effects on the nano-dispersed structure of the PVDF/PA11 blends.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Li, Yongjin; Kaito, Akira; Sano, Hironari

    2006-12-01

    The fabrication of miscible or nanostructured polymer blends or alloys raises much hope, but poses significant scientific and industrial challenges over the past several decades. Here, we propose a novel strategy using high-shear processing and demonstrate the high-shear effects on the nanodispersed structure formed in the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/polyamide 11 (PAll) blends, in which PA11 domains with a size of several tens of nanometers are dispersed in the PVDF phase. For the blend of PVDF/PA11 = 65/35, the TEM image shows that many nanometer-sized PAl1 particles are dispersed in the PVDF domain to form a special type of domain-in-domain morphology. In contrast, no PVDF nano-dispersion was observed in the PA11 phase. The effects of both the screw rotation speed and the mixing time on the blend structure were systematically studied. It shows that the extruder screw rotation speed and the mixing time are two critical factors to prepare the nanostructured blends. In addition, the investigations on the thermal behavior of the obtained blends indicate the improved miscibility between PVDF and PAl1 by the high shear processing. PMID:17256354

  11. Quantitative sparse array vascular elastography: the impact of tissue attenuation and modulus contrast on performance

    PubMed Central

    Huntzicker, Steven; Nayak, Rohit; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Quantitative sparse array vascular elastography visualizes the shear modulus distribution within vascular tissues, information that clinicans could use to reduce the number of strokes each year. However, the low transmit power sparse array (SA) imaging could hamper the clinical usefulness of the resulting elastograms. In this study, we evaluated the performance of modulus elastograms recovered from simulated and physical vessel phantoms with varying attenuation coefficients (0.6, 1.5, and 3.5  cm−1) and modulus contrasts (−12.04, −6.02, and −2.5  dB) using SA imaging relative to those obtained with conventional linear array (CLA) and plane-wave (PW) imaging techniques. Plaques were visible in all modulus elastograms, but those produced using SA and PW contained less artifacts. The modulus contrast-to-noise ratio decreased rapidly with increasing modulus contrast and attenuation coefficient, but more quickly when SA imaging was performed than for CLA or PW. The errors incurred varied from 10.9% to 24% (CLA), 1.8% to 12% (SA), and ≈4% (PW). Modulus elastograms produced with SA and PW imagings were not significantly different (p>0.05). Despite the low transmit power, SA imaging can produce useful modulus elastograms in superficial organs, such as the carotid artery. PMID:26158040

  12. Shrinkage, stress, and modulus of dimethacrylate, ormocer, and silorane composites

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Atais; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; da Silva Fonseca, Andrea Soares Quirino; Cavalcante, Larissa Maria Assad; Silikas, Nikolaos; Schneider, Luis Felipe Jochins

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the shrinkage, polymerization stress, elastic and bulk modulus resulting from composites formulated by siloranes, 2nd generation ormocers, and dimethacrylates. Materials and Methods: The bonded disc method was used to evaluate volumetric shrinkage. The polymerization stress was evaluated by mean of the Bioman. Cylindrical specimens (5 mm thickness and 6 mm diameter) were submitted to gradual loading. Young's and bulk modulus were obtained from the slope of the stress/strain curve. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). Results: Grandio and ormocer showed significant higher elastic and bulk modulus. Silorane presented significant lowest bulk modulus and maximum shrinkage. Ormocer and silorane presented lower values for the maximum rate of shrinkage. Extra-low shrinkage (ELS) composite presented the greatest maximum shrinkage. The higher maximum rate of shrinkage was attained by Grandio and ELS, statistically similar from each other. The silorane showed lower values of maximum stress and maximum rate of stress. The higher values of maximum stress were presented by ELS and Grandio, statistical similar between them. Grandio showed the significantly greatest maximum rate of stress. Conclusion: Silorane showed to promote lower shrinkage/stress among the composites, with the lowest elastic modulus. Ormocer showed lower shrinkage/stress than methacrylates despite of its high modulus. PMID:26430302

  13. Entropy production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and the correlation of shear viscosity and thermalization time

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, A.; Molnar, E.; Nara, Y.

    2007-08-15

    We study entropy production in the early stage of high-energy heavy-ion collisions due to shear viscosity. We employ the second-order theory of Israel-Stewart with two different stress relaxation times, as appropriate for strong coupling or for a Boltzmann gas, respectively, and compare the hydrodynamic evolution. Based on the present knowledge of initial particle production, we argue that entropy production is tightly constrained. We derive new limits on the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio {eta}/s, independent from elliptic flow effects, and determine the corresponding Reynolds number. Furthermore, we show that for a given entropy production bound, the initial time {tau}{sub 0} for hydrodynamics is correlated to the viscosity. The conjectured lower bound for {eta}/s provides a lower limit for {tau}{sub 0}.

  14. Scalable shear-exfoliation of high-quality phosphorene nanoflakes with reliable electrochemical cycleability in nano batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Ge, Binghui; Chen, Jing; Nathan, Arokia; Xin, Linhuo L.; Ma, Hongyu; Min, Huihua; Zhu, Chongyang; Xia, Weiwei; Li, Zhengrui; Li, Shengli; Yu, Kaihao; Wu, Lijun; Cui, Yiping; Sun, Litao; Zhu, Yimei

    2016-06-01

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise as an alternative to graphene and other two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, bulk black phosphorus (BP) suffers from rapid capacity fading and poor rechargeable performance. This work reports for the first time the use of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to construct nanoscale phosphorene LIBs. This enables direct visualization of the mechanisms underlying capacity fading in thick multilayer phosphorene through real-time capture of delithiation-induced structural decomposition, which serves to reduce electrical conductivity thus causing irreversibility of the lithiated phases. We further demonstrate that few-layer-thick phosphorene successfully circumvents the structural decomposition and holds superior structural restorability, even when subject to multi-cycle lithiation/delithiation processes and concomitant huge volume expansion. This finding provides breakthrough insights into thickness-dependent lithium diffusion kinetics in phosphorene. More importantly, a scalable liquid-phase shear exfoliation route has been developed to produce high-quality ultrathin phosphorene using simple means such as a high-speed shear mixer or even a household kitchen blender with the shear rate threshold of ˜1.25 × 104 s-1. The results reported here will pave the way for industrial-scale applications of rechargeable phosphorene LIBs.

  15. Steel Plate Shear Walls: Efficient Structural Solution for Slender High-Rise in China

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, Neville; Long, Eric; Sarkisian, Mark; Huang Zhihui

    2008-07-08

    The 329.6 meter tall 74-story Jinta Tower in Tianjin, China, is expected, when complete, to be the tallest building in the world with slender steel plate shear walls used as the primary lateral load resisting system. The tower has an overall aspect ratio close to 1:8, and the main design challenge was to develop an efficient lateral system capable of resisting significant wind and seismic lateral loads, while simultaneously keeping wind induced oscillations under acceptable perception limits. This paper describes the process of selection of steel plate shear walls as the structural system, and presents the design philosophy, criteria and procedures that were arrived at by integrating the relevant requirements and recommendations of US and Chinese codes and standards, and current on-going research.

  16. Shockwave determination of the shear velocity at very high pressures. [for determining properties of planetary interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1972-01-01

    A shock wave experiment is described for confirming changes in density, from seismic interpretation, for determining the properties of planet interiors. The experiment focuses on the problem of measurements in a pressure region, where the shear velocity tends to vanish, or become very small. Pressure-sensitive lattice stability, and the equations for an atomic model of the NaCl lattice are discussed along with the particle velocity shock technique.

  17. Platelet Transport Rates and Binding Kinetics at High Shear over a Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Bark, David L.; Ku, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombus formation over a ruptured atherosclerotic plaque cap can occlude an artery with fatal consequences. We describe a computational model of platelet transport and binding to interpret rate-limiting steps seen in experimental thrombus formation over a collagen-coated stenosis. The model is used to compute shear rates in stenoses with growing boundaries. In the model, moving erythrocytes influence platelet transport based on shear-dependent enhanced diffusivity and a nonuniform platelet distribution. Adhesion is modeled as platelet-platelet binding kinetics. The results indicate that observed thrombus growth rates are limited by platelet transport to the wall for shear rates up to 6000 s−1. Above 7000 s−1, the thrombus growth rate is likely limited by binding kinetics (10−4 m/s). Thrombus growth computed from these rate-limiting steps match the thrombus location and occlusion times for experimental conditions if a lag time for platelet activation is included. Using fitted parameters, the model is then used to predict thrombus size and shape at a higher Reynolds number flow consistent with coronary artery disease. PMID:23870271

  18. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  19. Measurement of dynamic strength at high pressures using magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) on the Sandia Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C.; Haill, T.; Dalton, D.; Rovang, D.; Lamppa, D.

    2013-06-01

    The recently developed magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) technique used to measure dynamic material strength at high pressures on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms has been implemented on the Sandia Z accelerator. MAPS relies on an external magnetic field normal to the plane of the MHD drive current to directly induce a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. This shear wave is used to directly probe the strength of a sample. By implementing this technique on Z, far greater pressures can be attained than were previously available using other MHD facilities. In addition, the use of isentropic compression will limit sample heating allowing the measurement to be made at a much lower temperature than under shock compression. Details of the experimental approach, including design considerations and analysis of the results, will be presented along with the results of Z experiments measuring the strength of tantalum at pressures up to 50 GPa, a five-fold increase in pressure over previous results using this technique. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming.

    PubMed

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  1. A novel all-elastomer MEMS tactile sensor for high dynamic range shear and normal force sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambides, Alexi; Bergbreiter, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    A novel all-elastomer MEMS tactile sensor with high dynamic force range is presented in this work. Conductive elastomeric capacitors formed from electrodes of varying heights enable robust sensing in both shear and normal directions without the need for multi-layered assembly. Sensor geometry has been tailored to maximize shear force sensitivity using multi-physics finite element simulations. A simple molding microfabrication process is presented to rapidly create the sensing skins with electrode gaps of 20 μ m and sensor spacing of 3 mm. Shear force resolution was found to be as small as 50 mN and tested up to a range of 2 N (dynamic range of 40:1 ). Normal force resolution was found to be 190 mN with a tested range of 8 N (dynamic range of 42:1 ). Single load and multiload tests were conducted and the sensor exhibited intended behavior with low deviations between trials. Spatial tests were conducted on a 2× 2 sensor array and a spatial resolution of 1.5 mm was found.

  2. Effect of strain isolator pad modulus on inplane strain in Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal protection system used on the Space Shuttle orbiter to determine strains in the reusable surface insulation tiles under simulated flight loads was investigated. The effects of changes in the strain isolator pad (SIP) moduli on the strains in the tile were evaluated. To analyze the SIP/tile system, it was necessary to conduct tests to determine inplane tension and compression modulus and inplane failure strain for the densified layer of the tiles. It is shown that densification of the LI-900 tile material increases the modulus by a factor of 6 to 10 and reduces the failure strain by about 50%. It is indicated that the inplane strain levels in the Shuttle tiles in the highly loaded regions are approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than the failure strain of the material. It is concluded that most of the LI-900 tiles on the Shuttle could be mounted on a SIP with tensile and shear stiffnesses 10 times those of the present SIP without inplane strain failure in the tile.

  3. Shear wave elastography using phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Wong, Emily Y.; Arnal, Bastien; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high spatial resolution and sensitivity that are ideal for imaging the cornea and lens. Quantifying the biomechanical properties of these tissues could add clinically valuable information. Thus, we propose a dynamic elastography method combining OCT detection and a mechanical actuator to map the shear modulus of soft tissues. We used a piezoelectric actuator driven in the kHz range and we used phase-sensitive OCT (PhS-OCT) to track the resulting shear waves at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz. We mapped the shear wave speed of anesthetized mice cornea using monochromatic excitations. We found a significant difference between a group of knock-out (3.92 +/- 0.35 m/s, N=4) and wild-type mice (5.04 +/- 0.51 m/s, N=3). These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of using PhS-OCT to perform in vivo shear wave elastography of the cornea. We then implemented a shear pulse compression approach on ex vivo human cornea. For that purpose, frequency- modulated excitations were used and the resulting displacement field was digitally compressed in a short broadband pulse with a 7 dB gain in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  4. Human Annulus Fibrosus Dynamic Tensile Modulus Increases with Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sounok; Jacobs, Nathan T; Boxberger, John I; Elliott, Dawn M

    2012-01-01

    The annulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disc experiences cyclic tensile loading in vivo at various states of mechanical equilibrium. Disc degeneration is associated with alterations in the biochemical composition of the AF including decreased water content, decreased proteoglycan concentration, and increased collagen deposition that affect mechanical function of the AF in compression and shear. Such changes may also affect the dynamic viscoelastic properties of the AF and thus alter the disc's ability to dissipate energy under physiologic loading. The objectives of this study were to quantify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of human AF in circumferential tension and to determine the effect of degeneration on these properties. Nondegenerated and degenerated human AF tensile samples were tested in uniaxial tension over a spectrum of loading frequencies spanning 0.01Hz to 2Hz at several states of equilibrium strain to determine the dynamic viscoelastic properties (dynamic modulus, phase angle) using a linear viscoelastic model. The AF dynamic modulus increased at higher equilibrium strain levels. The AF behaved more elastically at higher frequencies with a decreased phase angle. Degeneration resulted in a higher dynamic modulus at all strain levels but had no effect on phase angle. The findings from this study elucidate the effect of degeneration on the dynamic viscoelastic properties of human AF and lend insight into the mechanical role of the AF in cyclic loading conditions. PMID:22247579

  5. Imaging shear wave propagation for elastic measurement using OCT Doppler variance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Miao, Yusi; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have developed an acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) method for the visualization of the shear wave and the calculation of the shear modulus based on the OCT Doppler variance method. The vibration perpendicular to the OCT detection direction is induced by the remote acoustic radiation force (ARF) and the shear wave propagating along the OCT beam is visualized by the OCT M-scan. The homogeneous agar phantom and two-layer agar phantom are measured using the ARFOE-OCE system. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to measure the shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth. The OCT Doppler variance method, instead of the OCT Doppler phase method, is used for vibration detection without the need of high phase stability and phase wrapping correction. An M-scan instead of the B-scan for the visualization of the shear wave also simplifies the data processing.

  6. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  7. Frictional properties of Alpine Fault rocks of DFDP-1 under hydrothermal conditions and high shear strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, A. R.; Boulton, C. J.; Toy, V. G.; Townend, J.; Sutherland, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Alpine Fault, New Zealand, is a major plate-bounding fault that accommodates 65-75% of the total relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. The absence of measurable contemporary surface deformation has been interpreted to indicate that the fault slips mostly in quasi-periodic large earthquakes (< Mw 8.0). In order to understand the mechanics of earthquakes, it is important to study the evolution of frictional properties of the fault rocks under conditions representative of the potential hypocentral depth. Here, we present preliminary data obtained on drill core samples of rocks that surround the principal slip zone(s) (PSZ) of the Alpine Fault and the PSZ itself. The drill core samples were obtained during phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) in 2011 at relatively shallow depths (down to ~150 m). Simulated fault gouges were sheared under elevated pressure and temperature conditions in a hydrothermal ring shear apparatus. We performed experiments at temperatures of 25, 150, 300 and 450 °C. Using the shallow geothermal gradient of 63 °C/km determined in phase 1 of DFDP, our highest temperature corresponds to a depth of ~7 km or 10 km using a more moderate geotherm of 45 ºC/km as suggested by Toy et al. (2010). To explore temperature constraints on the limit of the brittle faulting processes, additional experiments at 600 ˚C (or ~10-15 km depth) are planned. Preliminary results on two hanging wall (foliated) cataclasite samples show a transition from velocity-strengthening behavior, i.e. a positive value of (a-b), to velocity-weakening behavior, i.e. a negative value of (a-b) at a temperature of 150 °C. The transition depends on the absolute value of sliding velocity, with velocity-weakening being more dominant at lower sliding velocities. Moreover, shear stress depends linearly on effective normal stress, indicating that shearing is essentially frictional and no transition to ductile (normal stress independent) flow has been

  8. The bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio of “incompressible” materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, P. H.; Dorgan, J. R.; Roland, C. M.

    2008-05-01

    Poisson's ratio, ν, is a fundamental parameter characterizing the mechanical behavior of a material. Because the ratio of the bulk to the shear modulus, B/G, becomes infinite when ν=1/2, it is often assumed that the bulk modulus becomes very large as a material approaches “incompressibility.” This is incorrect; experimental results for viscoelastic materials show that changes in the bulk modulus are actually negligible as ν approaches 1/2. An analysis is performed to clarify the apparent conflict between the classic elastic equations and the experiments. At ν=1/2, the bulk modulus is shown to exhibit a singularity, but this is irrelevant to real materials.

  9. Study of shear-stiffened elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Tongfei; Li, Weihua; Ding, Jie; Alici, Gursel; Du, Haiping

    2013-06-01

    Shear thickening fluids, which are usually concentrated colloidal suspensions composed of non-aggregating solid particles suspended in fluids, exhibit a marked increase in viscosity beyond a critical shear rate. This increased viscosity is seen as being both 'field-activated', due to the dependence on shearing rate, as well as reversible. Shear thickening fluids have found good applications as protection materials, such as in liquid body armor, vibration absorber or dampers. This research aims to expand the protection material family by developing a novel solid status shear thickening material, called shear-stiffened elastomers. These new shear-stiffened elastomers were fabricated with the mixture of silicone rubber and silicone oil. A total of four SSE samples were fabricated in this study. Their mechanical and rheological properties under both steady-state and dynamic loading conditions were tested with a parallel-plate. The effects of silicone oil composition and angular frequency were summarized. When raising the angular frequency in dynamic shear test, the storage modulus of conventional silicone rubber shows a small increasing trend with the frequency. However, if silicone oil is selected to be mixed with silicone rubber, the storage modulus increases dramatically when the frequency and strain are both beyond the critical values.

  10. An Experimental Exploration of Chemical Bond Characteristic Bulk Modulus and Phase Stability in ZnO: Cu Nanocrystals under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Y Jin; W Gao; J Zhang; J Hao; Q Wang; S Wang; S Yu; Q Cui

    2011-12-31

    The high pressure induced phase transitions in Zn{sub 1-x} Cu{sub x} O (x = 0.005 and 0.011) are investigated by angle-dispersive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction. As the pressure increases, phase transformations from the wurtzite structure to the rocksalt structure are observed in both samples, with the transition pressures at 9.8 GPa and 7.9 GPa, respectively. With the increasing of the Cu-doping concentration in ZnO, crystalline parameters, the bulk moduli, and the Zn-O bond lengths all increased, meanwhile, the transition pressures decreased. The results could be explained in terms of the reduction of phase transformation barriers and the lowering of bond energy.

  11. A comparative study of several compressibility corrections to turbulence models applied to high-speed shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, John R.; Rubesin, Morris W.

    1991-01-01

    Several recently published compressibility corrections to the standard k-epsilon turbulence model are used with the Navier-Stokes equations to compute the mixing region of a large variety of high speed flows. These corrections, specifically developed to address the weakness of higher order turbulence models to accurately predict the spread rate of compressible free shear flows, are applied to two stream flows of the same gas mixing under a large variety of free stream conditions. Results are presented for two types of flows: unconfined streams with either (1) matched total temperatures and static pressures, or (2) matched static temperatures and pressures, and a confined stream.

  12. High-sensitivity piezoelectric tube sensor for shear-force detection in scanning near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindfors, K.; Kapulainen, M.; Ryytty, P.; Kaivola, M.

    2004-11-01

    An easy-to-implement non-optical shear-force detection setup for tip-sample distance regulation in scanning near-field optical microscopy is demonstrated. The detection method is based on attaching the near-field probe to a piezoelectric tube resulting in excellent mechanical contact between tip and detector. The main advantages of the method are good signal-to-background contrast and thus potential for high sensitivity. The method is demonstrated by obtaining approach curves of silicon surfaces. The suitability for optical experiments is further shown by measuring the near-field intensity distribution of the emission of a semiconductor laser.

  13. Shear degradation in fiber reinforced laminates due to matrix damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavatian, Mohammedmahdi

    The objective of this study was to develop and implement a shear modulus degradation model to improve the failure analysis of the fiber reinforced composite structures. Matrix damage, involving transverse and shear cracks, is a common failure mode for composite structures, yet little is known concerning their interaction. To understand the material behavior after matrix failure, the nonlinear response of the composite laminate was studied using pressure vessels made from a [+/-o] bias orientation, which tend to exhibit a matrix dominated failure. The result of this work showed laminate matrix hardening in shear and softening in the transverse direction. A modified Iosipescu coupon was proposed to study the evolution of shear and transverse damage and their mutual effects. The proposed method showed good agreement with tubular results and has advantages of simplified specimen fabrication using standard test fixtures. The proposed method was extended by introducing a novel experimental technique to study the shear degradation model under biaxial loading. Experimental results of the transverse modulus reduction were in good agreement with material degradation models, while the predicted shear modulus reduction was higher than experiment. The discrepancy between available models and observations was due to the presence of a traction between the crack surfaces. Accordingly, a closed form solution was proposed for the shear stress-strain field of a cracked laminate by replacing the cracks with cohesive zones. The constitutive equations of the crack laminate were derived including the effects of internal tractions and transverse stress on the shear modulus. The proposed analytical model was shown to be the most comprehensive model for shear modulus degradation reduction of the fiber reinforced laminates. A numerical implementation of the shear degradation model was done using continuum damage mechanics. Through this work it was shown the common assumption of a linear

  14. The anisotropy of the small scale structure in high Reynolds number (Rλ˜1000) turbulent shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Warhaft, Z.

    2000-11-01

    The postulate of local isotropy (PLI) is tested in a wind tunnel uniform shear flow in which the Reynolds number is varied over the range 100⩽Rλ⩽1, 100(6.7×102⩽Rl⩽6.3×104). The high Rλ is achieved by using an active grid [Mydlarski and Warhaft, J. Fluid Mech. 320, 331 (1996)] in conjunction with a shear generator. We focus on the increments of the longitudinal velocity fluctuations in the direction of the mean shear. PLI requires that odd order moments of these quantities approach zero as Rλ→∞. Confirming the lower Reynolds number measurements of Garg and Warhaft [Phys. Fluids 10, 662 (1998)], we show that the skewness of ∂u/∂y decreases as Rλ-0.5 (with a value of 0.2 at Rλ˜1000). Although the decrease is slower than classical scaling arguments suggest, the result is consistent with PLI, indicating a negligible value at high Rλ. However, the normalized fifth moment, <(∂u/∂y)5>/<(∂u/∂y)2>5/2, is of order 10, and shows no diminution with Reynolds number, while the normalized seventh moment increases with Rλ. These dissipation range results are inconsistent with PLI. Within the inertial subrange we show that all the odd order moments of the increments of Δu(y) are nonzero, exhibiting scaling ranges. Here, the skewness structure function has a value ˜0.5 indicating that in the inertial subrange significant anisotropy is evident even at the third moment level. Fifth- and seventh-order inertial subrange skewness structure functions are of order 10 and 100, respectively. The results show that PLI is untenable, both at dissipation and inertial scales, at least to Rλ˜1000, and suggest it is unlikely to be so even at higher Reynolds numbers.

  15. On the Derivation of a High-Velocity Tail from the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck Equation for Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.; Santos, A.; Bobylev, A. V.

    2002-12-01

    Uniform shear flow is a paradigmatic example of a nonequilibrium fluid state exhibiting non-Newtonian behavior. It is characterized by uniform density and temperature and a linear velocity profile U x ( y)= ay, where a is the constant shear rate. In the case of a rarefied gas, all the relevant physical information is represented by the one-particle velocity distribution function f( r, v)= f( V), with V≡ v- U( r), which satisfies the standard nonlinear integro-differential Boltzmann equation. We have studied this state for a two-dimensional gas of Maxwell molecules with a collision rate K( θ)∝lim ∈→0 ∈ -2 δ( θ- ∈), where θ is the scattering angle, in which case the nonlinear Boltzmann collision operator reduces to a Fokker-Planck operator. We have found analytically that for shear rates larger than a certain threshold value a th≃0.3520 ν (where ν is an average collision frequency and a th/ ν is the real root of the cubic equation 64 x 3+16 x 2+12 x-9=0) the velocity distribution function exhibits an algebraic high-velocity tail of the form f( V; a)˜| V|-4- σ( a) Φ( ϕ; a), where ϕ≡tan V y / V x and the angular distribution function Φ( ϕ; a) is the solution of a modified Mathieu equation. The enforcement of the periodicity condition Φ( ϕ; a)= Φ( ϕ+ π; a) allows one to obtain the exponent σ( a) as a function of the shear rate. It diverges when a→ a th and tends to a minimum value σ min≃1.252 in the limit a→∞. As a consequence of this power-law decay for a> a th, all the velocity moments of a degree equal to or larger than 2+ σ( a) are divergent. In the high-velocity domain the velocity distribution is highly anisotropic, with the angular distribution sharply concentrated around a preferred orientation angle ~ϕ( a), which rotates from ~ϕ=- π/4,3 π/4 when a→ a th to ~ϕ=0, π in the limit a→∞.

  16. The effect of plasma beta on high-n ballooning stability at low magnetic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Ham, C. J.; Hastie, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    An explanation of the observed improvement in H-mode pedestal characteristics with increasing core plasma pressure or poloidal beta, {β\\text{pol}} , as observed in MAST and JET, is sought in terms of the impact of the Shafranov shift, {{Δ }\\prime} , on ideal ballooning MHD stability. To illustrate this succinctly, a self-consistent treatment of the low magnetic shear region of the ‘s-α ’ stability diagram is presented using the large aspect ratio Shafranov equilibrium, but enhancing both α and {{Δ }\\prime} so that they compete with each other. The method of averaging, valid at low s, is used to simplify the calculation and demonstrates how α , {{Δ }\\prime} , plasma shaping and ‘average favourable curvature’ all contribute to stability.

  17. Determination of Young's Modulus of Graphene by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Ung; Yoon, Duhee; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene are interesting research subjects because its Young's modulus and strength are extremely high. Values of ˜1 TPa for the Young's modulus have been reported [Lee et al. Science, 321, 385 (2008), Koenig et al. Nat. Nanotech. 6, 543 (2011)]. We made a graphene sample on a SiO2/Si substrate with closed-bottom holes by mechanical exfoliation. A pressure difference across the graphene membrane was applied by putting the sample in a vacuum chamber. This pressure difference makes the graphene membrane bulge upward like a balloon. By measuring the shifts of the Raman G and 2D bands, we estimated the amount of strain on the graphene membrane. By comparing the strain estimated from the Raman measurements with numerical simulations based on the finite element method, we obtained the Young's modulus of graphene.

  18. Modulus-dependent macrophage adhesion and behavior.

    PubMed

    Irwin, E F; Saha, K; Rosenbluth, M; Gamble, L J; Castner, D G; Healy, K E

    2008-01-01

    Macrophage attachment and activation to implanted materials is crucial in determining the extent of acute and chronic inflammation, and biomaterials degradation. In an effort to improve implant performance, considerable attention has centered on altering material surface chemistry to modulate macrophage behavior. In this work, the influence of the modulus of a material on the behavior of model macrophages (i.e., human promonocytic THP-1 cells) was investigated. We synthesized interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) coatings with varying moduli to test the hypothesis that lower moduli surfaces attenuate THP-1 cell attachment and activation. The surface chemistry and moduli of the IPN coatings were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. THP-1 cells preferentially attached to stiffer coatings of identical surface chemistry, confirming that fewer macrophages attach to lower moduli surfaces. The secretion of human TNF-alpha, IL-10, IL-8 and IL-1beta from THP-1 cells attached to the IPNs was measured to assess the concentration of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The global amount of TNF-alpha released did not vary for IPN surfaces of different moduli; however, the amount of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 released demonstrated a biphasic response, where lower (approx. 1.4 kPa) and very high (approx. 348 kPa) moduli IPN surfaces attenuated IL-8 secretion. The different trends for TNF-alpha and IL-8 secretion highlight the complexity of the wound healing response, suggesting that there may not be a unique surface chemistry and substratum modulus combination that minimizes the pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by activated macrophages. PMID:18854128

  19. Multidirectional direct simple shear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, D.J.; Germaine, J.T.; Ladd, C.C.

    1993-09-01

    The paper describes a new simple shear testing device, the multidirectional direct simple shear (MDSS) apparatus, for testing soil specimens under conditions that simulate, at the element level, the state of stress acting within the foundation soil of an offshore Arctic gravity structure. The MDSS uses a circular specimen that is consolidated under both a vertical effective stress ({sigma}{sub vc}{prime}) and a horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 1}). The specimen is subsequently sheared undrained by applying a second independent horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 2}) at an angle {theta} relative to the horizontal consolidation shear stress {tau}{sub 1}. Evaluation of the MDSS first compares conventional K{sub D}-consolidated undrained direct simple shear (CK{sub 0}UDSS) test data ({tau}{sub 1} = 0) on normally consolidated Boston blue clay (BBC) with results obtained in the Geonor DSS device. The MDSS gives lower secant Young`s modulus values and on average 8% lower strengths, but produces remarkably less scatter in the test results than the Geonor DSS. Kinematic proof tests with an elastic material (rubber) confirm that the setup procedure, application of forces, and strain measurement systems in the MDSS work properly and produce repeatable results. Results from a MDSS test program on BBC wherein specimens were first normally consolidated with {sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and {tau}{sub 1} = 0.2{sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and then sheared undrained at {theta} varing in 30{degree} increments from zero (shear in same direction) to 150{degree} show dramatic differences in the response of the soil as a function of {theta}. The peak undrained strength varies almost twofold from 0 = 0 to 120{degree}, while the deformation behavior varies from very brittle at low {theta} angles to becoming ductile at higher angles. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  20. Scale-up studies on high shear wet granulation process from mini-scale to commercial scale.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shouhei; Fujita, Naomi; Myojo, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Takashi; Tanino, Tadatsugu

    2008-10-01

    A newly developed mini-scale high shear granulator was used for scale-up study of wet granulation process from 0.2 to 200 L scales. Under various operation conditions and granulation bowl sizes, powder mixture composed of anhydrous caffeine, D-mannitol, dibasic calcium phosphate, pregelatinized starch and corn starch was granulated by adding water. The granules were tabletted, and disintegration time and hardness of the tablets were evaluated to seek correlations of granulation conditions and tablet properties. As the granulation proceeded, disintegration time was prolonged and hardness decreased. When granulation processes were operated under the condition that agitator tip speed was the same, similar relationship between granulation time and tablet properties, such as disintegration time and hardness, between 0.2 L and 11 L scales were observed. Likewise, between 11 L and 200 L scales similar relationship was observed when operated under the condition that the force to the granulation mass was the same. From the above results, the mini-scale high shear granulator should be useful tool to predict operation conditions of large-scale granulation from its mini-scale operation conditions, where similar tablet properties should be obtained. PMID:18827384

  1. Physico-chemical and technological properties of sodium naproxen granules prepared in a high-shear mixer-granulator.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Malaj, Ledjan; Censi, Roberta; Martelli, Sante

    2008-12-01

    In the present work, authors produced tablets of anhydrous sodium naproxen by wet granulation using a high-shear mixer-granulator. Drug hydrated to the tetrahydrated form, as observed by X-ray powder diffractometry. After wet granulation, authors then performed two different drying procedures, obtaining granules of different water content and crystallographic characteristics. The first procedure dried granules in the high-shear mixer-granulator by applying vacuum at room temperature (batch A), while the second employed the same apparatus and time, under vacuum at 40 degrees C (batch B). X-ray powder diffractometry revealed that the sodium naproxen (SN) contained in batch A granules was a mixture of dihydrated and tetrahydrated forms (as demonstrated by the coexistence of peaks typical of both hydrated forms), while that of batch B granules was a mixture of monohydrated and tetrahydrated forms. This means that differences in drying procedures could lead to products of different crystallographic properties. The behavior under compression was evaluated, revealing that batch A offered the best tabletability and compressibility. These results make it possible to conclude that differences in the crystallographic properties and water content of SN are such that different hydration/drying processes can alter the drug crystal form and thus the tabletability of the resulting granules. PMID:18398910

  2. Crack problems for bonded nonhomogeneous materials under antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1984-01-01

    The singular nature of the crack tip stress field in a nonhomogeneous medium with a shear modulus with a discontinuous derivative was investigated. The simplest possible loading and geometry, the antiplane shear loading of two bonded half spaces in which the crack is perpendicular to the interface is considered. It is shown that the square root singularity of the crack tip stress field is unaffected by the discontinuity in the derivative of the shear modulus. The problem is solved for a finite crack and results for the stress intensity factors are presented.

  3. Crack problems for bonded nonhomogeneous materials under antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    The singular nature of the crack tip stress field in a nonhomogeneous medium having a shear modulus with a discontinuous derivative was investigated. The problem is considered for the simplest possible loading and geometry, namely the antiplane shear loading of two bonded half spaces in which the crack is perpendicular to the interface. It is shown that the square-root singularity of the crack tip stress field is unaffected by the discontinuity in the derivative of the shear modulus. The problem is solved for a finite crack and extensive results are given for the stress intensity factors.

  4. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like: velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves and hence Young modulus, rigidity modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Elastic moduli values are typical of cellular solids and both, shear and longitudinal waves exhibit classical viscoelastic losses. Influence of leaf water content is also analyzed.

  5. Shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave phononic device with high density filling material for ultra-low power sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.; Bhethanabotla, V. R.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.

    2014-06-23

    Finite element simulations of a phononic shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor based on ST 90°-X Quartz reveal a dramatic reduction in power consumption. The phononic sensor is realized by artificially structuring the delay path to form an acoustic meta-material comprised of a periodic microcavity array incorporating high-density materials such as tantalum or tungsten. Constructive interference of the scattered and secondary reflected waves at every microcavity interface leads to acoustic energy confinement in the high-density regions translating into reduced power loss. Tantalum filled cavities show the best performance while tungsten inclusions create a phononic bandgap. Based on our simulation results, SAW devices with tantalum filled microcavities were fabricated and shown to significantly decrease insertion loss. Our findings offer encouraging prospects for designing low power, highly sensitive portable biosensors.

  6. Double Sided Irradiation for Laser-assisted Shearing of Ultra High Strength Steels with Process Integrated Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus; Weinbach, Matthias

    Most small or medium sized parts produced in mass production are made by shearing and forming of sheet metal. This technology is cost effective, but the achievable quality and geometrical complexity are limited when working high and highest strength steel. Based on the requirements for widening the process limits of conventional sheet metal working the Fraunhofer IPT has developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working technology. With this enhancement it is possible to produce parts made of high and highest strength steel with outstanding quality, high complexity and low tool wear. Additionally laser hardening has been implemented to adjust the mechanical properties of metal parts within the process. Currently the process is limited to lower sheet thicknesses (<2 mm) to maintain short cycle times. To enable this process for larger geometries and higher sheet thicknesses the Fraunhofer IPT developed a system for double sided laser-assisted sheet metal working within progressive dies.

  7. Slip-localization within confined gouge powder sheared at moderate to high slip-velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Zeev; Chen, Xiaofeng; Morgan, Chance; Madden, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Slip along faults in the upper crust is always associated with comminution and formation of non-cohesive gouge powder that can be lithified to cataclasite. Typically, the fine-grained powders (grain-size < 1 micron) build a 1-10 cm thick inner-core of a fault-zone. The ubiquitous occurrence of gouge powder implies that gouge properties may control the dynamic weakening of faults. Testing these properties is the present objective. We built a Confined ROtary Cell, CROC, with a ring-shape, ~3 mm thick gouge chamber, with 62.5 and 81.2 mm of inner and outer diameters. The sheared powder is sealed by two sets of seals pressurized by nitrogen. In CROC, we can control the pore-pressure and to inject fluids, and to monitor CO2 and H2O concentration; in addition, we monitor the standard mechanical parameters (slip velocity, stresses, dilation, and temperature). We tested six types of granular materials (starting grain-size in microns): Talc (<250), Kasota dolomite (125-250), ooides grains (125-250), San Andreas fault zone powder (< 840), montmorillonite powder (1-2), kaolinite powder and gypsum. The experimental slip-velocity ranged 0.001-1 m/s, slip distances from a few tens of cm to tens of m, effective normal stress up to 6.1 MPa. The central ultra-microscopic (SEM) observation is that almost invariably the slip was localized along principal-slip-zone (PSZ) within the granular layer. Even though the starting material was loose, coarse granular material, the developed PSZ was cohesive, hard, smooth and shining. The PSZ is about 1 micron thick, and built of agglomerated, ultra-fine grains (20-50 nm) that were pulverized from the original granular material. We noted that PSZs of the different tested compositions display similar characteristics in terms of structure, grain size, and roughness. Further, we found striking similarities between PSZ in the granular samples and the PZS that developed along experimental faults made of solid rock that were sheared at similar

  8. Fault rupture as a series of nano-seismic events during high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, X.; Reches, Z.; Chen, X.; Chang, J. C.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The rupture process of experimental faults is investigated here by monitoring nano-seismic events (NSE) during slip in a rotary shear apparatus. Our experimental faults are made of two rock blocks with one to four miniature 3D accelerometers that are glued to the stationary block at distance of ~ 2 cm from the fault surface. Accelerations in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 200 kHz are recorded in slip-parallel (x), slip-transverse (y), and slip-vertical (z) directions. We conducted a series of 45 experiments on diorite and dolomite samples in two loading styles: classical velocity controlled loading, and power-density loading, in which the power-density (shear stress times slip velocity) is selected, and stick-slip events develop spontaneously according to the experimental fault response. The 3D accelerometer data were recorded at 106 samples/s, with acceleration resolution of 10 mV/g in recoding range of +/- 5 V. The experiments were conducted at slip-velocity of 0.001-0.8 m/s and slip distance up to 1.38 m. The accelerometer observations revealed tens to hundreds of NSEs per slip in both loading styles; peak acceleration ranged from 1g to over 500g. A typical stick-slip with tens of NSEs in Fig. 1, shows: (1) An initial NSE at ~59.72 s (green) that coincides with a small stress drop (~10%, red); (2) Simultaneous macroscopic slip initiation (blue); (3) A swarm of NSEs occur as the fault slips, each NSE lasts 1-2 milliseconds; and (4) Details of the initial NSE are shown in Fig. 2. Based on waveform cross-correlation between frequency band from 20 kHz to 70kHz, we identify several groups of NSE clusters, and apply empirical Green's function method to analyze event source spectra based on Brune-type source model. These NSEs are indicators of rupture propagation during the experimental fault slip.

  9. Modulus stabilization in higher curvature dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Mitra, Joydip; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2014-08-01

    We propose a framework of modulus stabilization in two brane warped geometry scenario in presence of higher curvature gravity and dilaton in bulk space-time. In the prescribed setup we study various features of the stabilized potential for the modulus field, generated by a bulk scalar degrees of freedom with quartic interactions localized on the two 3-branes placed at the orbifold fixed points. We determine the parameter space for the gravidilaton and Gauss-Bonnet couplings required to stabilize the modulus in such higher curvature dilaton gravity setup.

  10. The magnetic configuration of the high-latitude cusp and dayside magnetopause under strong magnetic shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Dunlop, M.; Ma, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Q.; Yan, G. Q.; Liu, Z. X.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Carr, C. M.; Zhang, Q. H.; Lucek, E.

    2011-09-01

    This paper investigates the structure of the magnetic field near the magnetopause (MP) by analyzing the multiple-point magnetic measurements from the Cluster mission. In this paper, the spatial distribution of the curvature radius of the MP surface at the noon-midnight meridian and for situations with moderate dynamical pressure of solar wind is implied from direct measurements of magnetic field curvature for the first time. The investigation focused on conditions of strong magnetic shear and in which a clear boundary layer is present at the MP. It has been confirmed that the magnetic field lines surrounding the cusp bend sunward at the precusp region and tailward at the postcusp region, implying the existence of a cusp field indentation. The minimum curvature radius of the near-MP field at both precusp and postcusp regions is about 2 RE. As the latitude decreases, the curvature radius at the MP increases gradually, so that, as the subsolar point is approached, the curvature radius of the MP is nearly equal to the geocentric distance. These results compare well with existing MP models but reveal the limitations inherent in such statistical estimates of local MP curvature, particularly surrounding the cusp regions. The analysis of the magnetic measurements has also verified the existence of the magnetic bottles at both precusp and postcusp regions, which may play a role for the trapping of the charged particles of magnetosphere.

  11. Effective Elastic Modulus as a Function of Angular Leaf Span for Curved Leaves of Pyrolytic Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaforey, M. L.; Deeb, C. W.; Matthiesen, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical equation was derived to predict the spring constant (load/deflection) for a simply supported cylindrical section with a line force applied at the center. Curved leaves of PBN were mechanically deformed and the force versus deflection data was recorded and compared to the derived theoretical equation to yield an effective modulus for each leaf. The effective modulus was found to vary from the pure shear modulus for a flat plate to a mixed mode for a half cylinder as a function of the sine of one half the angular leaf span. The spring constants of individual PBN leaves were usually predicted to within 30%.

  12. Very High Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction of Wind Shear Event in the Complex Terrain Around Juneau Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D.; Arnold, D.; Schicker, I.; Dierking, C.; Harrison, K.

    2011-12-01

    Juneau International Airport is surrounded by complex terrain, often presenting challenging conditions to departing aircraft. General aviation departure procedures for Runway 08 include a 180-degree right turn "as soon as practical" in order to avoid steeply rising terrain. Under strong wind conditions characterized by post-frontal topographically enhanced wind shear, aircraft following these procedures may encounter turbulence or wind shear classified as severe. In January 1993, a Boeing 727 aircraft at a 30-degree bank encountered extreme crosswinds resulting in departure from controlled flight, with successful recovery occurring within only 50 meters of the ground. In this work, we focus on a similar event at Juneau from December 2009. This case has been modeled with WRF at very high resolutions down to 111 m horizontal, with mixed results. The focus of this work is to investigate in more detail the problems, costs and benefits of using very high resolution topography and model runs in a high-wind event in complex terrain. Several model runs will be performed, and results will be compared with each other and station observations available through the Juneau Airport Wind System (JAWS). Two high resolution topographies - the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) - will be compared with the USGS 30s topography in their ability to match the real topography and their influence on forecast winds. Additionally, an attempt will be made to push the model into the realm of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with a 50 m horizontal resolution in a limited region.

  13. Stretchable Polyurethane Sponge Scaffold Strengthened Shear Stiffening Polymer and Its Enhanced Safeguarding Performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Xuan, Shouhu; Wang, Yunpeng; Xu, Chenhui; Mao, Ya; Liu, Mei; Bai, Linfeng; Jiang, Wanquan; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-02-01

    A simple and scalable "dip and dry" method was developed for fabricating stretchable polyurethane sponge-based polymer composite with excellent shear stiffening effect, creep resisting and adhesion property. The stiffness of the composite was tunable, the storage modulus (G') could automatically increase 3 orders of magnitude with the increasing of shear frequency, and the G'max could reach to as high as 1.55 MPa. Importantly, the composite with ideal damping capacity reduced the impact force by 2 orders of magnitude even under 26 cycles of consecutive dynamic impact loading with no obvious mechanical degradation. Moreover, an enhancing mechanism was proposed and it was found the "B-O cross bond" and the entanglement of polymer chains were attributed to the shear stiffening characteristic. Finally, the excellent adhesion ability and hydrophobicity guarantee the composite with reliable mechanical performance and longer lifespan. PMID:26835703

  14. Determination of Young's Modulus of Ultrathin Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujie; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Yanbo; An, Xianghai; Liao, Xiaozhou; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Tan, H Hoe; Zou, Jin; Ringer, Simon P; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-08-12

    Determination of the elastic modulus of nanostructures with sizes at several nm range is a challenge. In this study, we designed an experiment to measure the elastic modulus of amorphous Al2O3 films with thicknesses varying between 2 and 25 nm. The amorphous Al2O3 was in the form of a shell, wrapped around GaAs nanowires, thereby forming an effective core/shell structure. The GaAs core comprised a single crystal structure with a diameter of 100 nm. Combined in situ compression transmission electron microscopy and finite element analysis were used to evaluate the elastic modulus of the overall core/shell nanowires. A core/shell model was applied to deconvolute the elastic modulus of the Al2O3 shell from the core. The results indicate that the elastic modulus of amorphous Al2O3 increases significantly when the thickness of the layer is smaller than 5 nm. This novel nanoscale material can be attributed to the reconstruction of the bonding at the surface of the material, coupled with the increase of the surface-to-volume ratio with nanoscale dimensions. Moreover, the experimental technique and analysis methods presented in this study may be extended to measure the elastic modulus of other materials with dimensions of just several nanometers. PMID:26189461

  15. A High shear stress segment along the San Andreas Fault: Inferences based on near-field stress direction and stress magnitude observations in the Carrizo Plain Area

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, D. A.,; Younker, L.W.

    1997-01-30

    Nearly 200 new in-situ determinations of stress directions and stress magnitudes near the Carrizo plain segment of the San Andreas fault indicate a marked change in stress state occurring within 20 km of this principal transform plate boundary. A natural consequence of this stress transition is that if the observed near-field ``fault-oblique`` stress directions are representative of the fault stress state, the Mohr-Coulomb shear stresses resolved on San Andreas sub-parallel planes are substantially greater than previously inferred based on fault-normal compression. Although the directional stress data and near-hydrostatic pore pressures, which exist within 15 km of the fault, support a high shear stress environment near the fault, appealing to elevated pore pressures in the fault zone (Byerlee-Rice Model) merely enhances the likelihood of shear failure. These near-field stress observations raise important questions regarding what previous stress observations have actually been measuring. The ``fault-normal`` stress direction measured out to 70 km from the fault can be interpreted as representing a comparable depth average shear strength of the principal plate boundary. Stress measurements closer to the fault reflect a shallower depth-average representation of the fault zone shear strength. If this is true, only stress observations at fault distances comparable to the seismogenic depth will be representative of the fault zone shear strength. This is consistent with results from dislocation monitoring where there is pronounced shear stress accumulation out to 20 km of the fault as a result of aseismic slip within the lower crust loading the upper locked section. Beyond about 20 km, the shear stress resolved on San Andreas fault-parallel planes becomes negligible. 65 refs., 15 figs.

  16. Ultra Low Velocity Zone existence in the high shear velocity region beneath Cocos Plate, Central America, and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Garnero, E.; Shim, S. H. D.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The lowermost mantle beneath subduction is typically characterized by higher than average shear wave speeds, often with the presence of one or more D" discontinuities. These regions are considered the cooler parts of the convective cycle, in contrast to warmer zones of convective return flow, namely, the vicinity of large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). Ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) have been long characterized as related to elevated temperature (and/or chemistry) of LLSVP regions. However, some past work has suggested evidence for ULVZ in the presumed cooler regions. In this study we investigate the region beneath the Cocos Plate, Central America, and the Carribbean for ULVZ using high quality broadband Transportable Array data from EarthScope's USArray for the presence of ULVZs. We utilize an ScS-stripping technique that combines a precursor and postcursor to ScS that arise from ULVZ structure, if present. The precursor is a reflection off the top of the ULVZ, while the postcursor is a core-reflection with an added reverberation between the ULVZ top and the core-mantle boundary (CMB). We collected data from deep South American earthquakes recorded in North America and stack data in geographic bins. We find clear evidence for a ULVZ beneath the Gulf of Mexico, but the rest of the study area appears to lack any significant structure. The structure we find is of the order of 100 km wide. The ULVZ properties will be constrained by comparison to predictions from synthetic seismograms. We explore hypotheses for the origin of a ULVZ in a high shear velocity region. These include mineralogical heterogeneities that convective currents have collected; notable possibilities are accumulated melts from subducted materials, such as ocean crust basalts and banded-iron formation. If water can be transported by subducted slabs to the deep mantle, it can significantly decrease the melting temperature of mantle materials and cause such anomalies. A ULVZ a relatively cold

  17. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2015-04-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone is located in the N-S striking Höllviken Graben and traverses the city of Copenhagen. The fault zone is a NNW-SSE striking structure in direct vicinity to the transition zone of the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent small earthquakes indicate activity in the area, although none of the mapped earthquakes appear to have occurred on the Carlsberg Fault. We examined the fault evolution by a combination of very high resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The chalk stratigraphy and the localization of the fault zone at depth was inferred from previous studies by other authors. We extrapolated the Jurassic and Triassic stratigraphy from the Pomeranian Bay to the area of investigation. The fault zone shows a flower structure in the Triassic as well as in Cretaceous sediments. The faulting geometry indicates strong influence of Triassic processes when subsidence and rifting prevailed in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. This finding contrasts the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighbouring structures, as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image structures in Quaternary layers in the Carlsberg Fault zone. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise

  18. Understanding the implications of the data from recent high-energy-density Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A; Hansen, J F; Harding, E C; Drake, R P; Robey, H F; Remington, B A; Kuranz, C C; Grosskopf, M J; Gillespie, R S; Park, H

    2009-10-26

    The first successful high energy density Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) shear layer experiments (O.A. Hurricane, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 16, 056305, 2009; E.C. Harding, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 103, 045005, 2009) demonstrated the ability to design and field a target that produces an array of large diagnosable KH vortices in a controlled fashion. Data from these experiments vividly showed the complete evolution of large distinct eddies, from formation to apparent turbulent break-up. Unexpectedly, low-density bubbles/cavities comparable to the vortex size ({approx} 300 - 400 {micro}m) appeared to grow up in the free-stream flow above the unstable material interface. In this paper, the basic principles of the experiment will be discussed, the data reviewed, and the progress on understanding the origin of the above bubble structures through theory and simulation will be reported on.

  19. Model-Independent Determination of the Shear Viscosity of a Trapped Unitary Fermi gas: Application to High-Temperature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, M.; Schäfer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Determinations of the shear viscosity of trapped ultracold gases suffer from systematic, uncontrolled uncertainties related to the treatment of the dilute part of the gas cloud. In this work we present an analysis of expansion experiments based on a new method, anisotropic fluid dynamics, that interpolates between Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics at the center of the cloud and ballistic behavior in the dilute corona. We validate the method using a comparison between anisotropic fluid dynamics and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation. We then apply anisotropic fluid dynamics to the expansion data reported by Cao et al. In the high-temperature limit we find η =0.282 (m T )3 /2 , which agrees within about 5% with the theoretical prediction η =0.269 (m T )3/2.

  20. Massing in high shear wet granulation can simultaneously improve powder flow and deteriorate powder compaction: a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Shi, Limin; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2011-05-18

    The influence of massing during high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process on granule properties and performance was investigated using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). Massing time varied from 0 to 40 min while other factors were fixed. Granule physical properties, including morphology, size, porosity, and specific surface area (SSA), were characterized. Changes in powder properties were profound in the first 10 min of massing but negligible beyond 10 min. With 10 min of massing, granule tabletability decreased by 75% while flowability increased by 75%. The significantly deteriorated tabletability and improved flowability resulted from dramatic changes in granule morphology, porosity, and SSA. The results confirm that massing time is a key process parameter in HSWG, and it must be carefully evaluated and controlled during process development, scale up, and manufacturing. PMID:21443948

  1. High Magnetic Shear Gain in a Liquid Sodium Stable Couette Flow Experiment: A Prelude to an {alpha}-{Omega} Dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Cebastian; Klein, Brianna; Schendel, Paul; Scharle, Cletus; McKinney, Travis; Ginanni, Rocky; Bentley, Ian; Mickey, Timothy; Ferrel, Regnar; Li, Hui; Pariev, Vladimir; Finn, John

    2011-04-29

    The {Omega} phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated a high toroidal field B{sub {phi}} that is {approx_equal}8xB{sub r}, where B{sub r} is the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by the rotational shear in stable Couette flow within liquid sodium at a magnetic Reynolds number Rm{approx_equal}120. Small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette flow is caused by Ekman flow at the end walls, which causes an estimated turbulence energy fraction of ({delta}v/v){sup 2{approx}}10{sup -3}.

  2. The elastic modulus, percolation, and disaggregation of strongly interacting, intersecting antiplane cracks

    PubMed Central

    Davis, P. M.; Knopoff, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study the modulus of a medium containing a varying density of nonintersecting and intersecting antiplane cracks. The modulus of nonintersecting, strongly interacting, 2D antiplane cracks obeys a mean-field theory for which the mean field on a crack inserted in a random ensemble is the applied stress. The result of a self-consistent calculation in the nonintersecting case predicts zero modulus at finite packing, which is physically impossible. Differential self-consistent theories avoid the zero modulus problem, but give results that are more compliant than those of both mean-field theory and computer simulations. For problems in which antiplane cracks are allowed to intersect and form crack clusters or larger effective cracks, percolation at finite packing is expected when the shear modulus vanishes. At low packing factor, the modulus follows the dilute, mean-field curve, but with increased packing, mutual interactions cause the modulus to be less than the mean-field result and to vanish at the percolation threshold. The “nodes-links-blobs” model predicts a power-law approach to the percolation threshold at a critical packing factor of p c = 4.426. We conclude that a power-law variation of modulus with packing, with exponent 1.3 drawn tangentially to the mean-field nonintersecting relation and passing through the percolation threshold, can be expected to be a good approximation. The approximation is shown to be consistent with simulations of intersecting rectangular cracks at all packing densities through to the percolation value for this geometry, p c = 0.4072. PMID:19443684

  3. Shear Wave Velocity Imaging Using Transient Electrode Perturbation: Phantom and ex vivo Validation

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Tomy; Madsen, Ernest L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new shear wave velocity imaging technique to monitor radio-frequency and microwave ablation procedures, coined electrode vibration elastography. A piezoelectric actuator attached to an ablation needle is transiently vibrated to generate shear waves that are tracked at high frame rates. The time-to-peak algorithm is used to reconstruct the shear wave velocity and thereby the shear modulus variations. The feasibility of electrode vibration elastography is demonstrated using finite element models and ultrasound simulations, tissue-mimicking phantoms simulating fully (phantom 1) and partially ablated (phantom 2) regions, and an ex vivo bovine liver ablation experiment. In phantom experiments, good boundary delineation was observed. Shear wave velocity estimates were within 7% of mechanical measurements in phantom 1 and within 17% in phantom 2. Good boundary delineation was also demonstrated in the ex vivo experiment. The shear wave velocity estimates inside the ablated region were higher than mechanical testing estimates, but estimates in the untreated tissue were within 20% of mechanical measurements. A comparison of electrode vibration elastography and electrode displacement elastography showed the complementary information that they can provide. Electrode vibration elastography shows promise as an imaging modality that provides ablation boundary delineation and quantitative information during ablation procedures. PMID:21075719

  4. Effective Young's modulus estimation of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Zhao, Y.; Pang, S.S.; Li, Y.

    1999-09-01

    A two-step analytical procedure is proposed to evaluate the quantitative influence of the maximum aggregate size and aggregate gradation on the effective Young's modulus of concrete. In the first step, the effective Young's modulus of a specified basic element, which is composed of an aggregate coated with interfacial transition zone and again covered with cement paste, is obtained based on a proposed four-phase sphere model. The theory of elasticity and Eshelby's equivalent medium theory are used to achieve the goal. In the second step, the rule of mixture method is used to estimate the effective Young's modulus of concrete. Following the two-step procedure, the maximum aggregate size and aggregate gradation are included in the formulations for the effective Young's modulus of concrete. The calculated results are compared with experimental results from the literature. The comparison results show a reasonable agreement when isostrain is assumed for every basic element in the second step. Parameters influencing the effective Young's modulus of concrete are discussed via calculated results.

  5. Seismic-frequency laboratory measurements of shear mode viscoelasticity in crustal rocks I: competition between cracking and plastic flow in thermally cycled Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cao; Jackson, Ian

    1996-03-01

    In the first phase of a seismic-frequency study of the viscoelasticity of cracked and fluid-saturated crustal rocks, forced torsional oscillation experiments have been conducted on specimens of Carrara marble subjected to multiple thermal cycles up to 560°C, under confining pressure of 50 MPa. The experimental results showed distinctly different behaviour of both the shear modulus and internal friction between the first and subsequent thermal cycles. A pronounced reduction in shear modulus ( G) observed during the first series of thermal cycles at temperature T < 300°C is attributed to thermal cracking. This large modulus deficit is recovered at higher temperatures, presumably through crack closure by plastic deformation processes that are also reflected in time dependence (over hours) of the shear modulus at temperatures above 300°C. Following the first excursion to 500°C, the shear modulus varies reproducibly with thermal cycling with a monotonic temperature dependence dominated by intrinsic (anharmonic) effects. It is inferred that thermal cracking in Carrara marble is suppressed by plastic flow following the first cycle to 500°C. The experimental results suggest that thermal history has strong effects on mechanical properties of calcite rock (Carrara marble) measured at relatively low temperatures. Internal friction or attenuation of Carrara marble is generally low and temperature-insensitive at low temperatures (< 400°C), but increases dramatically at 400-500°C. The frequency-dependence of internal friction at high temperatures (> 400°C), presumably due to dislocation relaxation, contrasts with frequency-independent Q-1 at lower temperatures. The relatively sudden onset of markedly frequency-dependence seismic wave attenuation might prove to be a useful diagnostic of temperature under crustal conditions.

  6. Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE) for Evaluation of Thyroid Nodules: Preliminary In vivo Results

    PubMed Central

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D.; Fazzio, Robert T.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2014-01-01

    In clinical practice, an overwhelming majority of biopsied thyroid nodules are benign. Therefore, there is a need for a complementary and noninvasive imaging tool to provide clinically relevant diagnostic information about thyroid nodules to reduce the rate of unnecessary biopsies. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE) to measure the mechanical properties (i.e., stiffness) of thyroid nodules and use this information to help classify nodules as benign or malignant. CUSE is a fast and robust 2D shear elastography technique in which multiple laterally distributed acoustic radiation force beams are utilized simultaneously to produce shear waves. Unlike other shear elasticity imaging modalities, CUSE does not suffer from limited field of view (FOV) due to shear wave attenuation and can provide a large FOV at high frame rates. To evaluate the utility of CUSE in thyroid imaging, a preliminary study was performed on a group of 5 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with ultrasound (US)-detected thyroid nodules prior to fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). The measured shear wave speeds in normal thyroid tissue and thyroid nodules were converted to Young's modulus (E), indicating a measure of tissue stiffness. Our results indicate an increase in E for thyroid nodules compared to normal thyroid tissue. This increase was significantly higher in malignant nodules compared to benign. The Young's modulus in normal thyroid tissue, benign and malignant nodules were found to be 23.2±8.29 kPa, 91.2±34.8 kPa, and 173.0±17.1 kPa, respectively. Results of this study suggest the utility of CUSE in differentiating between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. PMID:25122532

  7. Origin of ultralow Young׳s modulus in a metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn alloy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Y P; Guo, S; Qiao, X L; Tian, T; Meng, Q K; Cheng, X N; Zhao, X Q

    2016-06-01

    Although there is difficulty in growing a Ti-33Nb-4Sn single crystal due to its ultralow β-phase stability, the single-crystal elastic constants of metastable β-type Ti-33Nb-4Sn (wt%) alloy were extracted successfully from its polycrystal by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique, to clarify the origin of the ultralow Young's modulus in its polycrystal. It is indicated that compared to binary TiCr, TiV and TiNb alloys, the Ti-33Nb-4Sn alloy possesses slightly lower β-phase stability with respect to {110}<110>(-)shear (i.e., C׳) but much lower β-phase stability regarding to {001}〈100〉 shear (i.e., C44). An analysis by the Hill approximation suggests that the ultralow isotropic polycrystalline Young׳s modulus (EH) of Ti-33Nb-4Sn alloy originates from the extremely low shear modulus C44 as well as the relatively low C׳. This indicates that in addition to C׳, C44 has a significant contribution to the Young's modulus of polycrystal, which challenges a conventional understanding that the Young's modulus of β-type Ti alloys is predominantly determined by C׳. PMID:26774619

  8. Shear-stress relaxation and ensemble transformation of shear-stress autocorrelation functions.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the relation between the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t), computed at finite shear strain 0<γ≪1, and the shear-stress autocorrelation functions C(t)|(γ) and C(t)|(τ) computed, respectively, at imposed strain γ and mean stress τ. Focusing on permanent isotropic spring networks it is shown theoretically and computationally that in general G(t)=C(t)|(τ)=C(t)|(γ)+G(eq) for t>0 with G(eq) being the static equilibrium shear modulus. G(t) and C(t)|(γ) thus must become different for solids and it is impossible to obtain G(eq) alone from C(t)|(γ) as often assumed. We comment briefly on self-assembled transient networks where G(eq)(f) must vanish for a finite scission-recombination frequency f. We argue that G(t)=C(t)|(τ)=C(t)|(γ) should reveal an intermediate plateau set by the shear modulus G(eq)(f=0) of the quenched network. PMID:25768458

  9. Elastic modulus of polypyrrole nanotubes: AFM measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenot, Stéphane; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie; Nysten, Bernard

    2001-03-01

    Polypyrrole nanotubes were electrochemically synthesized within the pores of nanoporous track-etched membranes. After dissolution of the template membrane, they were dispersed on PET membranes. Their tensile elastic modulus was measured by probing them in three points bending using an atomic force microscope. The elastic modulus was deduced from force-curve measurements. In this communication, the effect of the synthesis temperature and of the nanotube diameter will be presented. Especially it will be shown that the elastic modulus strongly increases when the nanotube outer diameter is reduced from 160 nm down to 35 nm. These results are in good agreement with previous results showing that the electrical conductivity of polypyrrole nanotubes increases by more than one order of magnitude when the diameter decreases in the same range. These behaviors could be explained by a larger ratio of well-oriented defect-free polymer chains in smaller tubes.

  10. Hydrodynamic function of polyurethane prosthetic heart valves: influences of Young's modulus and leaflet thickness.

    PubMed

    Bernacca, Gillian M; O'Connor, Bernard; Williams, David F; Wheatley, David J

    2002-01-01

    The development of flexible polyurethane heart valves has been hindered by material degradation in vivo. Low modulus polyurethane leaflets are regarded as desirable to achieve good hydrodynamic function. However, low modulus materials may suffer high strain accumulation, hence poor durability. Higher modulus materials may improve durability, but may have poor hydrodynamic function. This study examines the hydrodynamic behaviour of biostable polyurethane valves, varying Young's modulus from 5 to 63.6 MPa and mean leaflet thickness from 48-238 microm. Parameters studied included mean pressure gradient, energy losses and regurgitation over 5 equivalent cardiac outputs (3.6, 4.9, 6.4, 8.0 and 9.61 min(-1)) At low cardiac output, modulus was not significantly correlated with any parameter of valve opening. At 9.61 min(-1), modulus significantly influenced mean pressure gradient (p = 0.033). Mean leaflet thickness significantly correlated with mean pressure gradient and energy losses during forward flow at all cardiac outputs (p<0.001). This study demonstrates that, over a wide range of moduli, valve hydrodynamic function is not affected significantly by the material modulus. Leaflet thickness is a highly significant factor. Higher modulus elastomers in a range up to 32.5 MPa may be useful in prosthetic heart valve leaflet manufacture, retaining good hydrodynamic function while potentially extending the lifetime of the valve. PMID:11762853

  11. Self assembly and shear induced morphologies of asymmetric block copolymers with spherical domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandare, Prashant N.

    2007-12-01

    Microphase separated block copolymers have been subject of investigation for past two decades. While most of the work is focused on classical phases of lamellae or cylinders, spherical phases have received less attention. The present study deals with the self-assembly in spherical phases of block copolymers that results into formation of a three-dimensional cubic lattice. A model triblock copolymer with several transition temperatures is chosen. Solidification in this model system results from either the arrangement of nanospheres of minor block on a BCC lattice or by formation of physical network where the nanospheres act as crosslinks. The solid-like behavior is characterized by extremely slow relaxation modes. Long time stress relaxation of the model material was examined to distinguish between the solid and liquid behavior. Stress relaxation data from a conventional rheometer was extended to very long times by using a newly built instrument, Relaxometer. The BCC lattice structure of the material behaves as liquid over long time except at low temperatures where an equilibrium modulus is observed. This long time behavior was extended to low shear rate behavior using steady shear rheology. The zero shear viscosity observed at extremely low shear rates has a very high value that is close to the viscosity calculated from stress relaxation experiments. The steady shear viscosity decreases by several orders of magnitude over a small range of shear rates. SAXS experiments on samples sheared even at very low rates indicated loss of the BCC order that was present in the annealed samples before shearing. In the second part, response of the BCC microstructure to large stress was explored. Shearing at constant rate and with LAOS at low frequencies lead to destruction of BCC lattice. The structure recovers upon cessation of the shear with kinetics similar to the one following thermal quench. Under certain conditions, LAOS leads to formation of monodomain textures. At low

  12. High-resolution compact shear stress sensor for direct measurement of skin friction in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Muchen; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''

    2015-11-01

    The high-resolution measurement of skin friction in complex flows has long been of great interest but also a challenge in fluid mechanics. Compared with indirect measurement methods (e.g., laser Doppler velocimetry), direct measurement methods (e.g., floating element) do not involve any analogy and assumption but tend to suffer from instrumentation challenges, such as low sensing resolution or misalignments. Recently, silicon micromachined floating plates showed good resolution and perfect alignment but were too small for general purposes and too fragile to attach other surface samples repeatedly. In this work, we report a skin friction sensor consisting of a monolithic floating plate and a high-resolution optical encoder to measure its displacement. The key for the high resolution is in the suspension beams, which are very narrow (e.g., 0.25 mm) to sense small frictions along the flow direction but thick (e.g., 5 mm) to be robust along all other directions. This compact, low profile, and complete sensor is easy to use and allows repeated attachment and detachment of surface samples. The sheer-stress sensor has been tested in water tunnel and towing tank at different flow conditions, showing high sensing resolution for skin friction measurement. Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) (No. 1336966) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) (No. HR0011-15-2-0021).

  13. Turbulence measurements of high shear flow fields in a turbomachine seal configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Deotte, Robert E., Jr.; Thames, H. Davis, III.

    1992-01-01

    The mean velocity and Reynolds stress tensor throughout a whirling annular seal are presented. The data was collected with a three dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter using phase averaging. Two axial flow conditions (Re = 12,000 and 24,000) were studied at one shaft speed (Ta = 6,600). The eccentricity and whirl ratios were 50 and 100 percent, respectively. There is a region of high axial momentum in this region is higher in the low Reynolds number case due to an axial recirculation zone that occurs on the suction side of the rotor at the inlet. The recirculation zone does not occur in the high Reynolds number case. At both Reynolds numbers, there is a recirculation zone on the rotor surface in the pressure side of the inlet. This recirculation zone extends from 20 to 200 degrees rotor zenith in the tangential direction, and is one third of a clearance wide radially. The high Reynolds number recirculation zone is 1.5 mean clearances long, while the low Reynolds number zone extends 2 mean clearances downstream. When compared to previous studies, it is apparent that the tangential momentum is no greater for a seal with whirl than for one without if other parameters are constant. Areas of high tangential momentum occur in the clearance where the axial momentum is low. Average exit plane tangential velocities in the high Reynolds number case are 1.5 times greater than those in the other flow case. These results are in general agreement with predictions made by other investigators.

  14. Bulk modulus for polar covalent crystals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Qianqian; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    A microscopic empirical model of bulk modulus based on atomic-scale parameters is proposed. These parameters include the bond length, the effective bonded valence electron (EBVE) number, and the coordination number product of two bonded atoms, etc. The estimated bulk moduli from our model are in good agreement with experimental values for various polar covalent crystals including ionic crystals. Our current work sheds lights on the nature of bulk modulus, provides useful clues for design of crystals with low compressibility, and is applicable to complex crystals such as minerals of geophysical importance. PMID:24166098

  15. Measuring the Weibull modulus of microscope slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are that students will understand why a three-point bending test is used for ceramic specimens, learn how Weibull statistics are used to measure the strength of brittle materials, and appreciate the amount of variation in the strength of brittle materials with low Weibull modulus. They will understand how the modulus of rupture is used to represent the strength of specimens in a three-point bend test. In addition, students will learn that a logarithmic transformation can be used to convert an exponent into the slope of a straight line. The experimental procedures are explained.

  16. Correlation of tensile and shear strengths of metals with their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The relation between the theoretical tensile and the shear strengths and the friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. The relationship between the actual shear strength and the friction properties of the metal was also investigated. An estimate of the theoretical uniaxial tensile strength was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. An estimate of the theoretical shear strength for metals was obtained from the shear modulus, the repeat distance of atoms in the direction of shear of the metal and the interplanar spacing of the shear planes. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the theoretical tensile, theoretical shear, and actual shear strengths of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  17. Shear rigidity of spread stearic acid monolayers on water

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Miyano, K.; Kueny, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of Al/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and of pH on the two-dimensional shear modulus of stearic acid spread on a water substrate was determined. A large shear modulus was displayed by the films when the subphase contained Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions at the self buffered pH. With Fe/sup 3 +/ dissolved in the subphase, the film displayed a viscous relaxation when strained but no residual stress was observed. No effect was observed with the Ca/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. Reducing the pH value in the subphase with the trivalent ions caused the shear modulus to disappear. The observations are interpreted in terms of hydrogen bonding.

  18. High shear rate flow in a linear stroke magnetorheological energy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Wereley, N. M.; Hiemenz, G. J.; Ngatu, G. T.

    2014-05-01

    To provide adaptive stroking load in the crew seats of ground vehicles to protect crew from blast or impact loads, a magnetorheological energy absorber (MREA) or shock absorber was developed. The MREA provides appropriate levels of controllable stroking load for different occupant weights and peak acceleration because the viscous stroking load generated by the MREA force increases with velocity squared, thereby reducing its controllable range at high piston velocity. Therefore, MREA behavior at high piston velocity is analyzed and validated experimentally in order to investigate the effects of velocity and magnetic field on MREA performance. The analysis used to predict the MREA force as a function of piston velocity squared and applied field is presented. A conical fairing is mounted to the piston head of the MREA in order reduce predicted inlet flow loss by 9% at nominal velocity of 8 m/s, which resulted in a viscous force reduction of nominally 4%. The MREA behavior is experimentally measured using a high speed servo-hydraulic testing system for speeds up to 8 m/s. The measured MREA force is used to validate the analysis, which captures the transient force quite accurately, although the peak force is under-predicted at the peak speed of 8 m/s.

  19. Evaluation of High Temperature Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Resistance Spot Welded Steel Lap Shear Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Panicker, Paul G.

    2016-02-01

    Joining of thin sheets (0.5 mm) of stainless steel 304 and 17-4PH through resistance spot welding is highly challenging especially when joint is used for high temperature applications. Various combinations of stainless steel sheets of thickness 0.5 mm are spot welded and tested at room temperature as well as at high temperatures (800 K, 1,000 K, 1,200 K). Parent metal as well as spot welded joints are tested and characterized. It is observed that joint strength of 17-4PH steel is highest and then dissimilar steel joint of 17-4PH with SS-304 is moderate and of SS-304 is lowest at all the temperatures. Joint strength of 17-4PH steel is found to be >80% of parent metal properties up to 1,000 K then drastic reduction in strength is noted at 1,200 K. Gradual reduction in strength of SS-304 joint with increase in temperature from 800 to 1,200 K is noted. At 1,200 K, joint strength of all combinations of joints is found to be nearly same. Microstructural evaluation of weld nugget after testing at different temperatures shows presence of tempered martensite in 17-4PH containing welds and homogenized structure in stainless steel 304 weld.

  20. Converging shear rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyung M.; Mix, Adam W.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    For highly viscous fluids that slip in parallel sliding plate rheometers, we want to use a slightly converging flow to suppress this wall slip. In this work, we first attack the steady shear flow of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid between two gently converging plates with no slip boundaries using the equation of motion in cylindrical coordinates, which yields no analytical solution. Then we treat the same problem using the lubrication approximation in Cartesian coordinates to yield exact, explicit solutions for dimensionless velocity, pressure and shear stress. This work deepens our understanding of a drag flow through a gently converging slit of arbitrary convergence angle. We also employ the corotational Maxwell model to explore the role of viscoelasticity in this converging shear flow. We then compare these analytical solutions to finite element calculations for both Newtonian and corotational Maxwell cases. A worked example for determining the Newtonian viscosity using a converging shear rheometer is also included. With this work, we provide the framework for exploring other constitutive equations or other boundary conditions in future work. Our results can also be used to design the linear bearings used for the parallel sliding plate rheometer (SPR). This work can also be used to evaluate the error in the shear stress that is caused by bearing misalignment and specify the parallelism tolerance for the linear bearings incorporated into a SPR.

  1. Clarithromycin highly-loaded gastro-floating fine granules prepared by high-shear melt granulation can enhance the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hajime; Iwao, Yasunori; Mizoguchi, Midori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2015-05-01

    In an effort to develop a new gastro-retentive drug delivery system (GRDDS) without a large amount of additives, 75% clarithromycin (CAM) loaded fine granules were prepared with three different hydrophobic binders by high-shear melt granulation and their properties were evaluated. Granules containing the higher hydrophobic binder showed sustained drug release and were able to float over 24h. The synchrotron X-ray CT measurement indicated that both the high hydrophobicity of the binder and the void space inside the granules might be involved in their buoyancy. In an in vivo experiment, the floating granules more effectively eradicated Helicobacter pylori than a CAM suspension by remaining in the stomach for a longer period. In short, CAM highly-loaded gastro-floating fine granules can enhance the eradication efficiency of H. pylori compared with CAM alone. PMID:25703356

  2. Multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW of models with high shear-wave velocity contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Peterie, S.; Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Schwenk, T.

    2011-01-01

    We use the multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW method to analyze synthetic seismic data calculated using models with high shear-wave velocity Vs contrast. The MASW dispersion-curve images of the Rayleigh wave are obtained using various sets of source-offset and spread-size configurations from the synthetic seismic data and compared with the theoretically calculated fundamental- and higher-mode dispersion-curves. Such tests showed that most of the dispersion-curve images are dominated by higher-mode energy at the low frequencies, especially when analyzing data from long receiver offsets and thus significantly divert from numerically expected dispersion-curve trends, which can lead to significant Vs overestimation. Further analysis showed that using data with relatively short spread lengths and source offsets can image the desired fundamental-mode of the Rayleigh wave that matches the numerically expected dispersion-curve pattern. As a result, it was concluded that it might be possible to avoid higher-mode contamination at low frequencies at sites with high Vs contrast by appropriate selection of spread size and seismic source offset. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  3. Validation of a Turbulent Kelvin-Helmholtz Shear Layer Model Using a High-Energy-Density OMEGA Laser Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Raman, K.; Schilling, O.; Hansen, J. F.; Langstaff, G.; Martinez, D.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Greenough, J. A.; Wallace, R.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Drake, R. P.; Marion, D.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2012-10-01

    Following the successful demonstration of an OMEGA laser-driven platform for generating and studying nearly two-dimensional unstable plasma shear layers [Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056305 (2009)PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.3096790; Harding et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045005 (2009)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.045005], this Letter reports on the first quantitative measurement of turbulent mixing in a high-energy-density plasma. As a blast wave moves parallel to an unperturbed interface between a low-density foam and a high-density plastic, baroclinic vorticity is deposited at the interface and a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability-driven turbulent mixing layer is created in the postshock flow due to surface roughness. The spatial scale and density profile of the turbulent layer are diagnosed using x-ray radiography with sufficiently small uncertainty so that the data can be used to constrain turbulent mixing models. The estimated Reynolds number (˜106), Liepmann-Taylor scale (˜0.5μm), and inner viscous scale (˜0.17μm) in the postshock plasma flow are consistent with an “inertial subrange,” within which a Kolmogorov turbulent energy cascade can be active. An illustration of comparing the data set with the predictions of a two-equation turbulence model in the ares radiation hydrodynamics code is also presented.

  4. Bimodal sintered silver nanoparticle paste with ultrahigh thermal conductivity and shear strength for high temperature thermal interface material applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyu; Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Zhihao; Yu, Jie

    2015-05-01

    A bimodal silver nanoparticle (AgNP) paste has been synthesized via the simple ultrasonic mixing of two types of unimodal AgNPs (10 and 50 nm in diameter). By sintering this paste at 250 °C for 30 min, we obtained an ultrahigh thermal conductivity of 278.5 W m(-1) K(-1), approximately 65% of the theoretical value for bulk Ag. The shear strength before and after thermal cycling at 50-200 °C for 1000 cycles was approximately 41.80 and 28.75 MPa, respectively. The results show that this excellent performance is attributable to the unique sintered structures inside the bimodal AgNP paste, including its low but stable porosity and the high density coherent twins. In addition, we systematically discuss the sintering behavior of this paste, including the decomposition of the organic layers and the formation of the coherent twins. On the basis of these results, we confirm that our bimodal AgNP paste has excellent potential as a thermal interface material for high temperature power device applications. PMID:25890996

  5. Validation of a turbulent Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer model using a high-energy-density OMEGA laser experiment.

    PubMed

    Hurricane, O A; Smalyuk, V A; Raman, K; Schilling, O; Hansen, J F; Langstaff, G; Martinez, D; Park, H-S; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Greenough, J A; Wallace, R; Di Stefano, C A; Drake, R P; Marion, D; Krauland, C M; Kuranz, C C

    2012-10-12

    Following the successful demonstration of an OMEGA laser-driven platform for generating and studying nearly two-dimensional unstable plasma shear layers [Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056305 (2009); Harding et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045005 (2009)], this Letter reports on the first quantitative measurement of turbulent mixing in a high-energy-density plasma. As a blast wave moves parallel to an unperturbed interface between a low-density foam and a high-density plastic, baroclinic vorticity is deposited at the interface and a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability-driven turbulent mixing layer is created in the postshock flow due to surface roughness. The spatial scale and density profile of the turbulent layer are diagnosed using x-ray radiography with sufficiently small uncertainty so that the data can be used to ~0.17 μm) in the postshock plasma flow are consistent with an "inertial subrange," within which a Kolmogorov turbulent energy cascade can be active. An illustration of comparing the data set with the predictions of a two-equation turbulence model in the ares radiation hydrodynamics code is also presented. PMID:23102319

  6. Methanogenic population dynamics and performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating swine manure under high shear conditions.

    PubMed

    Padmasiri, Sudini I; Zhang, Jiangzhao; Fitch, Mark; Norddahl, Birgir; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2007-01-01

    A 6-L, completely mixed anaerobic bioreactor with an external ultrafiltration membrane module was operated for 300 days to evaluate the startup and performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating swine manure. The reactor had a successful startup at the initial loading rate of 1g volatile solids (VS)/L/day. After a two-fold increase in loading rate followed by a sudden, two-fold increase in flow velocity through the membrane module on day 75, the performance of the AnMBR deteriorated as measured by volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation, decrease in pH, and decrease in biogas production. The methanogenic population dynamics in the reactor were monitored with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Changes in the relative levels of Methanosarcinaceae and Methanosaetaceae were consistent with changes in VFA concentrations, i.e., high and low levels of acetate corresponded to a high abundance of Methanosarcinaceae and Methanosaetaceae, respectively. The levels of hydrogenotrophic methanogens of the order of Methanomicrobiales increased during decreased reactor performance suggesting that syntrophic interactions involving hydrogenotrophic methanogens remained intact regardless of the degree of shear in the AnMBR. PMID:17109913

  7. Destabilization of the shear Alfven mode by alpha particles and other high energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, V. S.; Kolesnichenko, Ya. I.; Silivra, O. A.

    1992-08-01

    Toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) and elliptical Alfven eigenmode (EAE) instabilities in plasmas with high energy ions are considered in the context of local theory. The instability growth rate is found for cases when waves are excited by alpha particles or by ions produced as a result of neutral injection or RF heating. Electron and ion Landau damping due to the toroidal sideband wave-particle interaction is also calculated. The electron damping rate is shown to be much lower than the generally accepted value. The TAE instability observed in the experiment with neutral beam injection on TFTR is analysed and the principal experimental features of TAE instability are explained

  8. Changes in elastic modulus of adhesive and adhesive-infiltrated dentin during storage in water.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Genta; Inage, Hirohiko; Kawamoto, Ryo; Shimamura, Yutaka; Takubo, Chikako; Tamura, Yukie; Koga, Kensaku; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elastic modulus of components at the resin-dentin interface with the use of an ultrasound device. Dentin slabs were obtained from freshly extracted bovine incisors shaped into a rectangular form. After demineralization, the dentin specimens were immersed in adhesives and polymerized. Adhesives were also polymerized and trimmed into the same shape as the dentin slabs. The specimens were then immersed in distilled water at 37 degrees C for up to one year. The ultrasound equipment employed in this study was a Pulser-Receiver, transducers and an oscilloscope. By measuring the longitudinal and shear wave sound velocities, the elastic modulus was determined. When the elastic modulus of adhesive resin-infiltrated demineralized dentin was compared with that of adhesives, slightly but significantly lower values were found for adhesives used in a self-etching primer system. On the other hand, a higher elastic modulus was observed for resin-infiltrated dentin than for an adhesive used in an etch and rinse system. The elastic modulus of the resin-infiltrated dentin prepared with the etch and rinse system was affected by long-term storage in distilled water. PMID:19106478

  9. High-shear, Jet-cooking, and Alkali Treatment of Corn Distillers' Dried Grains to Obtain Products with Enhanced Protein, Oil, and Phenolic Antioxidants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distillers dried grains (DDG) have potential to be a nutritionally important source of protein, oil, and phenolic antioxidants. DDG was subjected to high-shear and jet-cooking, with or without alkaline pH adjustment and autoclaving. Soluble and insoluble fractions were analyzed for protein, oil, a...

  10. Differential gene expression by endothelial cells under positive and negative streamwise gradients of high wall shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Sim, Fraser J.; Kolega, John

    2013-01-01

    Flow impingement at arterial bifurcations causes high frictional force [or wall shear stress (WSS)], and flow acceleration and deceleration in the branches create positive and negative streamwise gradients in WSS (WSSG), respectively. Intracranial aneurysms tend to form in regions with high WSS and positive WSSG. However, little is known about the responses of endothelial cells (ECs) to either positive or negative WSSG under high WSS conditions. We used cDNA microarrays to profile gene expression in cultured ECs exposed to positive or negative WSSG for 24 h in a flow chamber where WSS varied between 3.5 and 28.4 Pa. Gene ontology and biological pathway analysis indicated that positive WSSG favored proliferation, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix processing while decreasing expression of proinflammatory genes. To determine if similar responses occur in vivo, we examined EC proliferation and expression of the matrix metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 under high WSS and WSSG created at the basilar terminus of rabbits after bilateral carotid ligation. Precise hemodynamic conditions were determined by computational fluid dynamic simulations from three-dimensional angiography and mapped on immunofluorescence staining for the proliferation marker Ki-67 and ADAMTS1. Both proliferation and ADAMTS1 were significantly higher in ECs under positive WSSG than in adjacent regions of negative WSSG. Our results indicate that WSSG elicits distinct EC gene expression profiles and particular biological pathways including increased cell proliferation and matrix processing. Such EC responses may be important in understanding the mechanisms of intracranial aneurysm initiation at regions of high WSS and positive WSSG. PMID:23885059

  11. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range. PMID:24491527

  12. Shear Relaxations of Confined Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, George Amos, Jr.

    Ultrathin (<40 A) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s^{-1} were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celsius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes (~80 nm ^3) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long -time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7nm^3) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10^4 Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  13. Shear relaxations of confined liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, G.A. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrathin (<40 [angstrom]) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s[sup [minus]1] were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celcius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes ([approximately]80 nm[sup 3]) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long-time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7 nm[sup 3]) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10[sup 4] Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  14. The effect of shearing strain-rate on the ultimate shearing resistance of clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for investigating the shearing resistance of cohesive soils subjected to a high rate of shearing strain is described. A fast step-loading torque apparatus was used to induce a state of pure shear in a hollow cylindrical soil specimen. The relationship between shearing resistance and rate of shear deformation was established for various soil densities expressed in terms of initial void ratio or water content. For rate of shearing deformation studies, the shearing resistance increases initially with shearing velocity, but subsequently reaches a terminal value as the shearing velocity increases. The terminal shearing resistance is also found to increase as the density of the soil increases. The results of this investigation are useful in the rheological study of clay. It is particularly important for mobility problems of soil runways, since the soil resistance is found to be sensitive to the rate of shearing.

  15. Steady and Dynamic Shear Rheological Properties of Buckwheat Starch-galactomannan Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong Won; Chang, Yoon Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of galacomannans (guar gum, tara gum, and locust bean gum) on the rheological properties of buckwheat starch pastes under steady and dynamic shear conditions. The power law and Casson models were applied to describe the flow behavior of the buckwheat starch and galactomannan mixtures. The values of the apparent viscosity (ηa,100), consistency index (K), and yield stress (σoc) for buckwheat starch-galactomannan mixtures were significantly greater than those for the control, indicating that there was a high synergism of the starch with galactomannans. The magnitudes of storage modulus (G′) and loss modulus (G″) for the starch-galactomannan mixtures increased with increasing frequency (ω). The dynamic moduli (G′, G″), and complex viscosity (η*) for the buckwheat starch-galactomannan mixtures were significantly higher than those for the control. PMID:24471083

  16. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  17. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  18. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much_gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  19. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  20. Influence of Intensive Melt Shearing on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Al-Mg Alloy with High Added Impurity Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Hari Babu, N.; Scamans, G. M.; Fan, Z.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the influence of melt conditioning by intensive shearing on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of Al-Mg-Mn-Fe-Cu-Si alloy sheet produced from a small book mold ingot with high added impurity content. The melt conditioned ingot has fine grains throughout its cross section, whereas a conventionally cast ingot, without melt shearing, has coarser grains and shows a wider variation of grain size. Both needle-shaped and coarse Chinese script iron bearing intermetallic particles are found in the microstructure at the center of the conventionally processed ingot, but for the melt conditioned ingot, only fine Chinese script intermetallic particles are observed. In addition to the iron bearing intermetallics, Mg2Si particles are also observed. The ingots were rolled to thin sheet and solution heat treated (SHT). During rolling, the iron-based intermetallics and Mg2Si particles are broken and aligned along the rolling direction. Yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and elongation of the intensively melt sheared and processed sheet are all improved compared to the conventionally cast and processed sheet. Fractographic analysis of the tensile fracture surfaces shows that the clustered and coarse iron bearing intermetallic particles are responsible for the observed reduction in mechanical properties of the conventionally cast sheet. We have shown that by refining the initial microstructure of the ingot by intensive shear melt conditioning, it is possible to achieve improved mechanical properties at the final sheet gage of an AlMgMn alloy with a high content of impurities.

  1. Space charge relaxation in polyetherimides by the electric modulus formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudarra, M.; Belana, J.; Cañadas, J. C.; Diego, J. A.; Sellarès, J.; Díaz-Calleja, R.; Sanchís, M. J.

    2000-10-01

    Dynamic electrical analysis shows that at high temperatures (above the glass transition temperature), the electrical properties of polyetherimide are strongly influenced by space charge. In this article we have studied the relaxation of space charge in two commercial varieties of polyetherimide: Ultem 1000 and Ultem 5000. Their conductive properties were determined by dynamic electrical analysis, using the electric modulus formalism. The complex part of the electric modulus was fitted to Coelho's model which considers ohmic conductivity and diffusion as the prevailing charge transport mechanisms. The complex part of the electric modulus exhibits a peak in the low frequency range that can be associated with space charge. A good agreement between experimental and calculated data is observed after the fitting process to Coelho's model. Differences in the electrode behavior were required: blocking electrode conditions in the case of Ultem 5000 and partially blocking electrode for Ultem 1000. In both cases the conductivity determined is thermally activated and it increases with the temperature due to an increasing mobility, as their carrier densities do not vary significantly in the temperature range studied.

  2. Mapping the functional properties of soft biological tissues under shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Mark Raymond

    The structure and composition of articular cartilage and other load-bearing biological tissues are highly complex and heterogeneous. As a result, their functional mechanical properties exhibit clear spatial variations. Unlocking the structure-function relationship in these materials is critical for devising strategies to restore tissue impaired by injury or disease and can provide a template for successful implant design. Here, we describe a tissue deformation imaging stage (TDIS) allowing for simultaneous force measurement and visualization of microscale deformation in soft biological tissues under controlled shear strain. In combination with a fast confocal microscope, the TDIS is used to test the microscale response of articular cartilage to shear loading. To obtain the location-specific shear modulus of this tissue, we employ a high-resolution technique that involves tracking the deformation of a line photobleached into a fluorescently stained sample loaded in the TDIS. We find that the quasi-static and dynamic shear moduli are lowest roughly 100 mum below the articular surface. Here, articular cartilage is highly nonlinear, stiffening under increased shear strain and becoming more compliant under increased compressive strain. Using a simple thought model, we relate these results to structural features of the collagen network in articular cartilage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the region of maximum compliance is also the primary site of shear energy dissipation in articular cartilage. Our findings suggest that damage to or surgical removal of the surface of this tissue will increase the joint's susceptibility to shear-induced damage. Finally, similar experiments are performed on intervertebral disc and growth plate, demonstrating the versatility of our in-situ strain mapping techniques.

  3. Correlation of ideal and actual shear strengths of metals with their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The relation between the ideal and actual shear strengths and friction properties of clean metals in contact with clean diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum is discussed. An estimate of the ideal shear strength for metals is obtained from the shear modulus, the repeat distance of atoms in the direction of shear of the metal, and the interplanar spacing of the shearing planes. The coefficient of friction for metals is shown to be correlated with both the ideal and actual shear strength of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction occurs.

  4. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.; Bagheri, Reza

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  5. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  6. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1995-01-17

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

  7. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Scharff, Robert P.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  8. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  9. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  10. Modulus-tunable magnetorheological elastomer microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Lee, Moonchan; Jung, Namchul; Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Jungchul; Thundat, Thomas; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-05-01

    Modulus-tunable microcantilevers are fabricated from magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) consisting of polydimethylsiloxane and carbonyl iron particles by using a simple sandwich molding method. Depending on the presence or absence of an external magnetic field during curing, isotropic or anisotropic MRE cantilevers are obtained. Randomly distributed particles are present in the polymer matrix of the isotropic microcantilevers, whereas the particles in the anisotropic microcantilevers are aligned in the direction of the magnetic field. The fractional changes in the resonance frequencies of the MRE cantilevers are measured as functions of the magnetic field intensity and the quantity of particles in the matrix. The anisotropic microcantilevers undergo greater changes in frequency than the isotropic microcantilevers when exposed to external magnetic fields, which indicates that larger changes in modulus are induced in the anisotropic microcantilevers. In addition, the dissipation and damping ratios of the MRE microcantilevers are determined by fitting the exponential decays of their deflection amplitudes with time.

  11. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  12. In vivo performance of a reduced-modulus bone cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forehand, Brett Ramsey

    Total joint replacement has become one of the most common procedures in the area of orthopedics and is often the solution in patients with diseased or injured hip joints. Component loosening is a significant problem and is primarily caused by bone resorption at the bone-cement interface in cemented implants. It is our hypothesis that localized shear stresses are responsible for the resorption. It was previously shown analytically that local stresses at the interface could be reduced by using a cement of lower modulus. A new reduced modulus cement, polybutyl methylmethacrylate (PBMMA), was developed to test the hypothesis. PBMMA was formulated to exist as polybutyl methacrylate filler in a polymethyl methacrylate matrix. The success of PBMMA cement is based largely on the fact that the polybutyl component of the cement will be in the rubbery state at body temperature. In vitro characterization of the cement was undertaken previously and demonstrated a modulus of approximately one-eighth that of conventional bone cement, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and increased fracture toughness. The purpose of this experiment was to perform an in vivo comparison of the two cements. A sheep model was selected. Total hip arthroplasty was performed on 50 ewes using either PBMMA or PMMA. Radiographs were taken at 6 month intervals. At one year, the contralateral femur of each sheep was implanted so that each animal served as its own control, and the animals were sacrificed. The stiffness of the bone-cement interface of the femoral component within the femur was assessed by applying a torque to the femoral component and demonstrated a significant difference in loosening between the cements when the specimens were tested in external rotation (p < 0.007). Evaluation of the mechanical data also suggests that the PBMMA sheep had a greater amount of loosening for each subject, 59% versus 4% for standard PMMA. A radiographic analysis demonstrated more signs of loosening in the PMMA series

  13. An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of a Biaxial Test for Determining Shear Properties of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.; Barnett, Terry R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical investigation of a biaxial tension/compression test for determining shear properties of composite materials are reported. Using finite element models of isotropic and orthotropic laminates, a specimen geometry was optimized. A kinematic fixture was designed to introduce an equal and opposite pair of forces into a specimen with a one inch square test section. Aluminum and several composite laminates with the optimized geometry and a configuration with large stress gradients were tested in the fixture. The specimens were instrumented with strain gages in the center of the test section for shear stiffness measurements. Pure shear strain was measured. The results from the experiments correlated well with finite element results. Failure of the specimens occurred through the center of the test section and appeared to have initiated at the high stress points. The results lead to the conclusion that the optimized specimen is suitable for determining shear modulus for composite materials. Further revisions to the specimen geometry are necessary if the method is to give shear strength data.

  14. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  15. On the common modulus attack into the LUC4,6 cryptosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tze Jin; Said, Mohd Rushdan Md; Othman, Mohamed; Koo, Lee Feng

    2015-05-01

    The LUC4,6 cryptosystem is a system analogy with RSA cryptosystem and extended from LUC and LUC3 cryptosystems. The process of encryption and decryption are derived from the fourth order linear recurrence sequence and based on Lucas function. This paper reports an investigation into the common modulus attack on the LUC4,6 cryptosystem. In general, the common modulus attack will be succeeded if the sender sends the plaintext to two users used same RSA-modulus and both of encryption keys of them are relatively prime to each other. However, based on the characteristics of high order Lucas sequence, the LUC4,6 cryptosystem is unattackable

  16. Temperature Coefficient of the Modulus of Rigidity of Aircraft Instrument Diaphragm and Spring Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G; Melton, E R

    1931-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the variation of the modulus of rigidity in the temperature range -20 to +50 degrees C. of a number of metals which are of possible use for elastic elements for aircraft and other instruments. The methods of the torsional pendulum was used to determine the modulus of rigidity and its temperature coefficient for aluminum, duralumin, monel metal, brass, phosphor bronze, coin silver, nickel silver, three high carbon steels, and three alloy steels. It was observed that tensile stress affected the values of the modulus by amounts of 1 per cent or less.

  17. Shear history effect of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Lei; Chen, Kaikai; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Tian, Yu

    2015-10-01

    The rheological properties of magnetorheological (MR) fluids are usually determined by particle structures and polarized particle interactions. However, the particle structures may undergo various evolutions at different shear states and history; this evolution leads to shear stress hysteresis. Therefore, the shear history effect of MR fluids was experimentally investigated in this study. In a shear rate ramp test, the shear stress at low shear rate was higher in the shear rate ramp-down process than in the shear rate ramp-up process. If the next shear test started after a rest time, the start shear stress decayed slowly and approached the original value of the first test when the interval was long enough. The MR fluids also displayed obvious hysteresis loops during the current ramp test. A high shear rate and magnetic field could reduce the shear history effect by accelerating particle structure evolutions, and then hysteresis decreased. This effect was ascribed to the evolution of particle structures during different test modes and durations, and the evolution is governed by interparticle interactions, viscous forces, and the Brownian motions of particles. These results indicated that the accuracy of the force control of MR fluids could be enhanced under high magnetic fields and high shear rates. Thus, these factors should be considered in MR actuator designs.

  18. Miniature specimen shear punch test for UHMWPE used in total joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Kurt, S M; Jewett, C W; Bergström, J S; Foulds, J R; Edidin, A A

    2002-05-01

    Despite the critical role that shear is hypothesized to play in the damage modes that limit the performance of total hip and knee replacements, the shear behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains poorly understood, especially after oxidative degradation or radiation crosslinking. In the present study, we developed the miniature specimen (0.5 mm thickness x 6.4mm diameter) shear punch test to evaluate the shear behavior of UHMWPE used in total joint replacement components. We investigated the shear punch behavior of virgin and crosslinked stock materials, as well as of UHMWPE from tibial implants that were gamma-irradiated in air and shelf aged for up to 8.5 years. Finite element analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and interrupted testing were conducted to aid in the interpretation of the shear punch load-displacement curves. The shear punch load-displacement curves exhibited similar distinctive features. Following toe-in, the load-displacement curves were typically bilinear, and characterized by an initial stiffness, a transition load, a hardening stiffness, and a peak load. The finite element analysis established that the initial stiffness was proportional to the elastic modulus of the UHMWPE, and the transition load of the bilinear curve reflected the development of a plastically deforming zone traversing through the thickness of the sample. Based on our observations, we propose two interpretations of the peak load during the shear punch test: one theory is based on the initiation of crystalline plasticity, the other based on the transition from shear to tension during the tests. Due to the miniature specimen size, the shear punch test offers several potential advantages over bulk test methods, including the capability to directly measure shear behavior, and quite possibly infer ultimate uniaxial behavior as well, from shelf aged and retrieved UHMWPE components. Thus, the shear punch test represents an effective and complementary

  19. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 2: Wall shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the flow in the two inner layers, the Reynolds stress sublayer and the wall layer. Included is the calculation of the shear stress at the wall in the interaction region. The limit processes considered are those used for an inviscid flow.

  20. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a