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Sample records for high temperature hydrogenated

  1. High Temperature Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydropemxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  2. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  3. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  4. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  5. High temperature inorganic membranes for separating hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.

    1995-08-01

    Effort has continued to accumulate data on the transport of gases over the temperature range from room temperature to 275{degrees}C with inorganic membranes having a range of pore radii from approximately 0.25 nm to 3 mn. An experimental alumina membrane having an estimated mean pore radius of 0.25 nm has been fabricated and tested. Extensive testing of this membrane indicated that the separation factor for helium and carbon tetrafluoride at 250{degrees}C was 59 and the extrapolated high temperature separation factor was 1,193. For safety reasons, earlier flow measurements concentrated on helium, carbon dioxide, and carbon tetrafluoride. New data have been acquired with hydrogen to verify the agreement with the other gases. During the measurements with hydrogen, it was noted that a considerable amount of moisture was present in the test gas. The source of this moisture and its effect on permeance was examined. Improvements were implemented to the flow test system to minimize the water content of the hydrogen test gas, and subsequent flow measurements have shown excellent results with hydrogen. The extrapolation of separation factors as a function of temperature continues to show promise as a means of using the hard sphere model to determine the pore size of membranes. The temperature dependence of helium transport through membranes appears to be considerably greater than other gases for the smallest pore sizes. The effort to extend temperature dependence to the hard sphere model continues to be delayed, primarily because of a lack of adequate adsorption data.

  6. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production.

  7. High temperature regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal agents

    DOEpatents

    Copeland, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A system for high temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases using regenerable sorbents. One sorbent is stannic oxide (tin oxide, SnO.sub.2), the other sorbent is a metal oxide or mixed metal oxide such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe.sub.2 O.sub.4). Certain otherwise undesirable by-products, including hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) and sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) are reused by the system, and elemental sulfur is produced in the regeneration reaction. A system for refabricating the sorbent pellets is also described.

  8. Ceramic membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation

    SciTech Connect

    Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.

    1996-08-01

    Ceramic gas separation membranes can provide very high separation factors if the pore size is sufficiently small to separate gas molecules by molecular sieving and if oversized pores are adequately limited. Ceramic membranes typically have some pores that are substantially larger than the mean pore size and that should be regarded as defects. To assess the effects of such defects on the performance of ceramic membranes, a simple mathematical model has been developed to describe flow through a gas separation membrane that has a primary mode of flow through very small pores but that has a secondary mode of flow through undesirably large pores. This model permits separation factors to be calculated for a specified gas pair as a function of the molecular weights and molecular diameters of the gases, the membrane pore diameter, and the diameter and number of defects. This model will be described, and key results from the model will be presented. The separation factors of the authors membranes continue to be determined using a permeance test system that measures flows of pure gases through a membrane at temperatures up to 275{degrees}C. A primary goal of this project for FY 1996 is to develop a mixed gas separation system for measuring the separation efficiency of membranes at higher temperatures. Performance criteria have been established for the planned mixed gas separation system and design of the system has been completed. The test system is designed to measure the separation efficiency of membranes at temperatures up to 600{degrees}C and pressures up to 100 psi by separating the constituents of a gas mixture containing hydrogen. The system will accommodate the authors typical experimental membrane that is tubular and has a diameter of about 9 mm and a length of about 23 cm. The design of the new test system and its expected performance will be discussed.

  9. Ceramic membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation

    SciTech Connect

    Adcock, K.D.; Fain, D.E.; James, D.L.; Powell, L.E.; Raj, T.; Roettger, G.E.; Sutton, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    The separative performance of the authors` ceramic membranes has been determined in the past using a permeance test system that measured flows of pure gases through a membrane at temperatures up to 275 C. From these data, the separation factor was determined for a particular gas pair from the ratio of the pure gas specific flows. An important project goal this year has been to build a Mixed Gas Separation System (MGSS) for measuring the separation efficiencies of membranes at higher temperatures and using mixed gases. The MGSS test system has been built, and initial operation has been achieved. The MGSS is capable of measuring the separation efficiency of membranes at temperatures up to 600 C and pressures up to 100 psi using a binary gas mixture such as hydrogen/methane. The mixed gas is fed into a tubular membrane at pressures up to 100 psi, and the membrane separates the feed gas mixture into a permeate stream and a raffinate stream. The test membrane is sealed in a stainless steel holder that is mounted in a split tube furnace to permit membrane separations to be evaluated at temperatures up to 600 C. The compositions of the three gas streams are measured by a gas chromatograph equipped with thermal conductivity detectors. The test system also measures the temperatures and pressures of all three gas streams as well as the flow rate of the feed stream. These data taken over a range of flows and pressures permit the separation efficiency to be determined as a function of the operating conditions. A mathematical model of the separation has been developed that permits the data to be reduced and the separation factor for the membrane to be determined.

  10. Reduced hydrogen permeability at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Klopp, W. D.; Misencik, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    CO and CO2 reduce hydrogen loss through iron, nickel, and cobalt based alloy tubes. Method is based on concept that oxide film on metal surface reduces hydrogen permeability through metal; adding CO or CO2 forms oxide films continuously during operation, and hydrogen containment is improved. Innovation enhances prospects for Stirling engine system utilization.

  11. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Phillip, Bradley L.

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100.degree. C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  12. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Phillip, Bradley L.

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compostions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  13. High temperature equation of state of metallic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, V. T.

    2007-04-15

    The equation of state of liquid metallic hydrogen is solved numerically. Investigations are carried out at temperatures from 3000 to 20 000 K and densities from 0.2 to 3 mol/cm{sup 3}, which correspond both to the experimental conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth and the conditions in the cores of giant planets of the solar system such as Jupiter and Saturn. It is assumed that hydrogen is in an atomic state and all its electrons are collectivized. Perturbation theory in the electron-proton interaction is applied to determine the thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen. The electron subsystem is considered in the randomphase approximation with regard to the exchange interaction and the correlation of electrons in the local-field approximation. The proton-proton interaction is taken into account in the hard-spheres approximation. The thermodynamic characteristics of metallic hydrogen are calculated with regard to the zero-, second-, and third-order perturbation theory terms. The third-order term proves to be rather essential at moderately high temperatures and densities, although it is much smaller than the second-order term. The thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen are monotonically increasing functions of density and temperature. The values of pressure for the temperatures and pressures that are characteristic of the conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth coincide with the corresponding values reported by the discoverers of metallic hydrogen to a high degree of accuracy. The temperature and density ranges are found in which there exists a liquid phase of metallic hydrogen.

  14. High temperature ceramic composition for hydrogen retention

    DOEpatents

    Webb, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    A ceramic coating for H retention in fuel elements is described. The coating has relatively low thermal neutron cross section, is not readily reduced by H at 1500 deg F, is adherent to the fuel element base metal, and is stable at reactor operating temperatures. (JRD)

  15. Materials for the scavenging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Phillip, B.L.

    1997-04-29

    A hydrogen getter composition is described comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluoropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases. 7 figs.

  16. Materials for the scavenging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Phillip, B.L.

    1997-12-30

    A hydrogen getter composition is described comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100 C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluoropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases. 7 figs.

  17. ANALYSIS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR POWERED HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS HYDROGEN PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; A. M. Gandrik

    2010-11-01

    An updated reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The reactor heat is used to produce heat and electric power to the HTE plant. A Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 44.4% was used to provide the electric power. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 1.1 million cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 42.8% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.85 kg/s (66 million SCFD) and an oxygen production rate of 14.6 kg/s (33 million SCFD). An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.03/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20% for a reactor cost of $2000/kWt and $2.41/kg of hydrogen for a reactor cost of $1400/kWt.

  18. Hydrogen diffusion in high temperature proton conducting ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorieul, S.; Miro, S.; Taillades-Jacquin, M.; Dailly, J.; Mauvy, F.; Berger, M.-H.; Berger, P.

    2008-04-01

    BaCeO3 or SrCeO3-based perovskites doped with a rare earth are high temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) envisioned as electrolytes for fuel cells working at intermediate temperature (400-600 °C). In these ceramics, the proton conductance is hampered by microstructural defects that act as barriers for hydrogen diffusion. Respective contributions of bulk and grain boundaries to overall conductivity is usually evidenced via impedance measurements but further information on hydrogen transport relevant for improvement of microstructure design can be obtained with nuclear microanalysis, based on the use of MeV light ions microbeam. We report here a contribution of ion beam microanalysis to the study of hydrogen transport in BaCe0.9Y0.1O3. ERDA hydrogen profiling performed on partially hydrated samples at 200 and 500 °C reveals concentration gradients from which diffusion coefficients have been derived with the help of a simple Fickian diffusion model.

  19. Overview of High-Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J. S.; O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Hartvigsen, J. J.; Petri, M. C.; Carter, J. D.; Bischoff, B. L.

    2007-06-01

    Over the last five years there has been a growing interest in the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, particularly to augment transportation fuels and thus reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Hydrogen is now produced primarily via steam reforming of methane. However, in the long term, methane reforming is not a viable process for the large-scale hydrogen production since such fossil fuel conversion processes consume non-renewable resources and emit greenhouse gases. Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen without consuming fossil fuels and without emitting greenhouse gases through the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy is developing three general categories of high temperature processes for hydrogen production: thermochemical, electrolytic and hybrid thermo-electrolytic. This paper introduces the work being done in the development of high temperature electrolysis of steam. High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) is built on the technology of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which were invented over a century ago, but which have been most vigorously developed during the last twenty years. SOFCs consume hydrogen and oxygen and produce steam and electricity. Solid Oxide Electrolytic Cells (SOECs) consume electricity and steam and produce hydrogen and oxygen. The purpose of the HTE research is to solve those problems unique to the electrolytic mode of operation, while building further on continuing fuel cell development. ORGANIZATION Experiments have been conducted for the last three years at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Ceramatec, Inc. on the operation of button cells and of progressively larger stacks of planar cells. In addition, the INL has been performing analyses of the cell-scale fluid dynamics and plant-scale flowsheets in order to determine optimum operating conditions and plant configurations. Argonne National Laboratory has been performing experiments for the

  20. High-temperature study of superconducting hydrogen and deuterium sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durajski, A. P.; Szczȩśniak, R.; Pietronero, L.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds are extensively explored as candidates for a high-temperature superconductors. Currently, the measured critical temperature of $203$ K in hydrogen sulfide (H$_3$S) is among the highest over all-known superconductors. In present paper, using the strong-coupling Eliashberg theory of superconductivity, we compared in detail the thermodynamic properties of two samples containing different hydrogen isotopes H$_3$S and D$_3$S at $150$ GPa. Our research indicates that it is possible to reproduce the measured values of critical temperature $203$ K and $147$ K for H$_3$S and D$_3$S by using a Coulomb pseudopotential of $0.123$ and $0.131$, respectively. However, we also discuss a scenario in which the isotope effect is independent of pressure and the Coulomb pseudopotential for D$_3$S is smaller than for H$_3$S. For both scenarios, the energy gap, specific heat, thermodynamic critical field and related dimensionless ratios are calculated and compared with other conventional superconductors. We shown that the existence of the strong-coupling and retardation effects in the systems analysed result in significant differences between values obtained within the framework of the Eliashberg formalism and the prediction of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.

  1. Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, K

    2013-09-30

    At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 °C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys

  2. High-temperature Hydrogen Permeation in Nickel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    P. Calderoni; M. Ebner; R. Pawelko

    2010-10-01

    In gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor concepts, tritium is produced as a tertiary fission product and by activation of graphite core contaminants, such as lithium; of the helium isotope, He-3, that is naturally present in the He gas coolant; and the boron in the B4C burnable poison. Because of its high mobility at the reactor outlet temperatures, tritium poses a risk of permeating through the walls of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) or steam generator (SG) systems, potentially contaminating the environment and in particular the hydrogen product when the reactor heat is utilized in connection with a hydrogen generation plant. An experiment to measure tritium permeation in structural materials at temperatures up to 1000 C has been constructed at the Idaho National Laboratory Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. The design is based on two counter flowing helium loops to represent heat exchanger conditions and was optimized to allow control of the materials surface condition and the investigation of the effects of thermal fatigue. In the ongoing campaign three nickel alloys are being considered because of their high-temperature creep properties, alloy 617, 800H and 230. This paper introduces the general issues related to tritium in the on-going assessment of gas cooled VHTR systems fission product transport and outlines the planned research activities in this area; outlines the features and capabilities of the experimental facility being operated at INL; presents and discusses the initial results of hydrogen permeability measurements in two of the selected alloys and compares them with the available database from previous studies.

  3. Hydrogen Production:. Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Water Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammou, A.

    2006-06-01

    Hydogen, H2 is regarded as the main energy vector for the future. Today, the world production of hydrogen rises to 550 billion Nm3 (44 Mt) corresponding to 1,5% of the primary energy production. Contrary to fossil fuels, H2 does not exist in a native form and its use obviously requires its fabrication and storage. The future status of H2 as a fuel for electricity production (fuel cells) and for automobile transportation makes necessary a considerable increase of its production. Some H2 manufactoring processes are briefly described in the first part of this article : (i) steam methane reforming, (ii) water decomposition by thermochemical cycles, (iii) water decomposition by photoelectrochemistry, (iv) water or organic compounds decomposition in using bacteria or alguae. The second part concerns the H2 production by water electrolysis. This manufactoring process does not exceed 1% of the total production of hydrogen. It is expected that the electrolysers working at high temperature (700-900°C) using ceramic oxides based electrolytes are the more promising. Two groups are considered: electrolysers with proton conductors or oxide ion conductors as electrolytes. Proton conductors belong to the perovskite oxides family MCe1-xLnxO3 with M = Ba, Sr and Ln = Lanthanide. For these conductors, few results on water electrolysis at high temperature are available in the litterature and will be shown here. Electrolysers using oxide ion conductors are more promising. The selected materials are those developped for SOFCs : YSZ for the electrolyte, Ni based cermets for the cathode materials and La1-xSrxMO3±δ with M = Mn, Co, Ni, Fe ... The electrochemical characteristics of the anodic and cathodic interfaces as well as the perfomances of electrolysers working at high temperature are presented.

  4. Superalloy for high-temperature hydrogen environmental applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKannan, Eugene C. (Inventor); McPherson, William B. (Inventor); Ahmed, Shaffiq (Inventor); Chandler, Shirley S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy is provided which is resistant to deterioration in hydrogen at high operating temperatures and pressures, and which thus can be used in hydrogen-fueled spacecraft such as the Space Shuttle. The superalloy is characterized by a two-phase microstructure and consists of a gamma-prime precipitated phase in a gamma matrix. The gamma matrix phase is a primary solid solution and the gamma precipitated phase will be an intermetallic compound of the type A.sub.3 B, such as nickel aluminide or titanide. Both phases are coherent, ordered, and compatible, and thus will retain most of their strength at elevated temperatures. The alloy consists essentially of (by weight): Ni 50-60%, Cr 10-20%, Al 2-6%, Co 2-5%, Ti 3-8%, W 5-12%, Mo 5-10%, Nb 1-3%, wherein the ratio W/MO is approximately equal to 1, and Ti/Al ranges from about 1 to about 2.

  5. Hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, S.; Katayama, K.; Shimozori, M.; Fukada, S.; Ushida, H.; Nishikawa, M.

    2015-03-15

    F82H is a primary candidate of structural material and coolant pipe material in a blanket of a fusion reactor. Understanding tritium permeation behavior through F82H is important. In a normal operation of a fusion reactor, the temperature of F82H will be controlled below 550 C. degrees because it is considered that F82H can be used up to 30,000 hours at 550 C. degrees. However, it is necessary to assume the situation where F82H is heated over 550 C. degrees in a severe accident. In this study, hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H was investigated in the temperature range from 500 to 800 C. degrees. In some cases, water vapor was added in a sample gas to investigate an effect of water vapor on hydrogen permeation. The permeability of hydrogen in the temperature range from 500 to 700 C. degrees agreed well with the permeability reported by E. Serra et al. The degradation of the permeability by water vapor was not observed. After the hydrogen permeation reached in a steady state at 700 C. degrees, the F82H sample was heated to 800 C. degrees. The permeability of hydrogen through F82H sample which was once heated up to 800 C. degrees was lower than that of the original one. (authors)

  6. GFOC Project results: High Temperature / High Pressure, Hydrogen Tolerant Optical Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    E. Burov; A. Pastouret; E. Aldea; B. Overton; F. Gooijer; A. Bergonzo

    2012-02-12

    Tests results are given for exposure of multimode optical fiber to high temperatures (300 deg. C) and high partial pressure (15 bar) hydrogen. These results demonstrate that fluorine down doped optical fibers are much more hydrogen tolerant than traditional germanium doped multimode optical fibers. Also demonstrated is the similar hydrogen tolerance of carbon coated and non-carbon coated fibers. Model for reversible H2 impact in fiber versus T{sup o}C and H2 pressure is given. These results have significant impact for the longevity of use for distributed temperature sensing applications in harsh environments such as geothermal wells.

  7. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2005-10-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

  8. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures. PMID:24113685

  9. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures. PMID:24113685

  10. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a “hydrogen economy.” The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  11. High temperature hydrogen sulfide removal with tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Karpuk, M.E.; Copeland, R.J.; Feinberg, D.; Wickham, D.; Windecker, B.; Yu, J.

    1993-09-01

    The system is based on the absorption of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) by stannic (tin) oxide. Two sorbents are required, the first sorbent is tin oxide and the second sorbent is a zinc oxide based material (i.e., zinc ferrite or zinc titanate) which is regenerated by air producing SO{sub 2}. TDA`s process carries out a modified Claus reaction to reduce the SO{sub 2} from the second sorbent generation to elemental sulfur. In this case the sulfided stannic oxide forms stannous sulfide (SnS) which reduces the SO{sub 2}. The absorption by SnO{sub 2} could remove over 90% of the H{sub 2}S from typical coal gas streams, but we use zinc ferrite (or zinc titanate), (a) to reduce H{sub 2}S to less than 20 ppM and (b) as a source of SO{sub 2} in regeneration. Due to stoichiometry of regeneration we want to remove half of the H{sub 2}S by SnO{sub 2} and the remainder by the second sorbent. The reactions with stannic oxide minimize the heat released during H{sub 2}S removal and regeneration. The absorption by SnO{sub 2} is slightly endothermic and cools the gas stream by less that 5{degrees}F (2.8{degrees}C) during absorption. Regeneration with SO{sub 2} is exothermic but releases only 11% of the heat that is liberated in regenerating the ZnO. For a nominal 6.5:1 steam to air the regeneration of ZnO increases the temperature by {approx_equal}400{degrees}F. The regeneration of SnO{sub 2} increases the temperature by less than 50{degrees}F (28{degrees}C) in the same gas flow.

  12. Hydrogen absorption in solid aluminum during high-temperature steam oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, L. A.; Gelman, B. G.; Zhukhovitskiy, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen is emitted by aluminum heated in a vacuum after high-temperature steam treatment. Wire samples are tested for this effect, showing dependence on surface area. Two different mechanisms of absorption are inferred, and reactions deduced.

  13. High performance nickel-palladium nanocatalyst for hydrogen generation from alkaline hydrous hydrazine at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Debaleena; Mandal, Kaustab; Dasgupta, Subrata

    2015-08-01

    Room temperature synthesized highly active bimetallic Ni60Pd40 nanocatalyst with large surface area (150 m2g-1) exerts 100% selectivity towards hydrogen generation (3 equivalents of gas in 60 min) from hydrous hydrazine under alkaline and ambient reaction conditions. This low noble metal content catalyst offers a new prospect for on-board hydrogen production system.

  14. High-temperature effect of hydrogen on sintered alpha-silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallum, G. W.; Herbell, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    Sintered alpha-silicon carbide was exposed to pure, dry hydrogen at high temperatures for times up to 500 hr. Weight loss and corrosion were seen after 50 hr at temperatures as low as 1000 C. Corrosion of SiC by hydrogen produced grain boundary deterioration at 1100 C and a mixture of grain and grain boundary deterioration at 1300 C. Statistically significant strength reductions were seen in samples exposed to hydrogen for times greater than 50 hr and temperatures above 1100 C. Critical fracture origins were identified by fractography as either general grain boundary corrision at 1100 C or as corrosion pits at 1300 C. A maximum strength decrease of approximately 33 percent was seen at 1100 and 1300 C after 500 hr exposure to hydrogen. A computer assisted thermodynamic program was also used to predict possible reaction species of SiC and hydrogen.

  15. Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-08-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  16. Highly mobile and reactive state of hydrogen in metal oxide semiconductors at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wan Ping; He, Ke Feng; Wang, Yu; Chan, Helen Lai Wah; Yan, Zijie

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen in metal oxides usually strongly associates with a neighboring oxygen ion through an O-H bond and thus displays a high stability. Here we report a novel state of hydrogen with unusually high mobility and reactivity in metal oxides at room temperature. We show that freshly doped hydrogen in Nb2O5 and WO3 polycrystals via electrochemical hydrogenation can reduce Cu2+ ions into Cu0 if the polycrystals are immersed in a CuSO4 solution, while this would not happen if the hydrogenated polycrystals have been placed in air for several hours before the immersion. Time-dependent studies of electrochemically hydrogenated rutile single crystals reveal two distinct states of hydrogen: one as protons covalently bonded to oxygen ions, while the other one is highly unstable with a lifetime of just a few hours. Observation of this mobile and reactive state of hydrogen will provide new insight into numerous moderate and low temperature interactions between metal oxides and hydrogen.

  17. Phase transformation of oxide film in zirconium alloy in high temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jongjin; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-07-23

    The effect of the variation of the dissolved hydrogen concentration on the oxide phase transformation under high-temperature hydrogenated water conditions was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum in 50 cm(3)/kg of dissolved hydrogen concentration indicated the formation of monoclinic and tetragonal zirconium oxide at the water-substrate interface. As the dissolved hydrogen concentration decreased to 30 cm(3)/kg, the Raman peaks corresponding to the zirconium oxide phase changed, indicating an oxide phase transformation. And, the results of SEM and TEM analyses were compared with those of in situ analyses obtained for the oxide structure formed on the zirconium alloy.

  18. Hydrogen production by high-temperature steam gasification of biomass and coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kriengsak, S.N.; Buczynski, R.; Gmurczyk, J.; Gupta, A.K.

    2009-04-15

    High-temperature steam gasification of paper, yellow pine woodchips, and Pittsburgh bituminous coal was investigated in a batch-type flow reactor at temperatures in the range of 700 to 1,200{sup o}C at two different ratios of steam to feedstock molar ratios. Hydrogen yield of 54.7% for paper, 60.2% for woodchips, and 57.8% for coal was achieved on a dry basis, with a steam flow rate of 6.3 g/min at steam temperature of 1,200{sup o}C. Yield of both the hydrogen and carbon monoxide increased while carbon dioxide and methane decreased with the increase in gasification temperature. A 10-fold reduction in tar residue was obtained at high-temperature steam gasification, compared to low temperatures. Steam and gasification temperature affects the composition of the syngas produced. Higher steam-to-feedstock molar ratio had negligible effect on the amount of hydrogen produced in the syngas in the fixed-batch type of reactor. Gasification temperature can be used to control the amounts of hydrogen or methane produced from the gasification process. This also provides mean to control the ratio of hydrogen to CO in the syngas, which can then be processed to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel since the liquid fuel production requires an optimum ratio between hydrogen and CO. The syngas produced can be further processed to produce pure hydrogen. Biomass fuels are good source of renewable fuels to produce hydrogen or liquid fuels using controlled steam gasification.

  19. A Process Model for the Production of Hydrogen Using High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Mc Kellar; E. A. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy

    2006-07-01

    High temperature electrolysis (HTE) involves the splitting of stream into hydrogen and oxygen at high temperatures. The primary advantage of HTE over conventional low temperature electrolysis is that considerably higher hydrogen production efficiencies can be achieved. Performing the electrolysis process at high temperatures results in more favorable thermodynamics for electrolysis, more efficient production of electricity, and allows direct use of process heat to generate steam. This paper presents the results of process analyses performed to evaluate the hydrogen production efficiencies of an HTE plant coupled to a 600 MWt Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) that supplies both the electricity and process heat needed to drive the process. The MHR operates with a coolant outlet temperature of 950 C. Approximately 87% of the high-temperature heat is used to generate electricity at high efficiency using a direct, Brayton-cycle power conversion system. The remaining high-temperature heat is used to generate a superheated steam / hydrogen mixture that is supplied to the electrolyzers. The analyses were performed using the HYSYS process modeling software. The model used to perform the analyses consisted of three loops; a primary high temperature helium loop, a secondary helium loop and the HTE process loop. The detailed model included realistic representations of all major components in the system, including pumps, compressors, heat exchange equipment, and the electrolysis stack. The design of the hydrogen production process loop also included a steam-sweep gas system to remove oxygen from the electrolysis stack so that it can be recovered and used for other applications. Results of the process analyses showed that hydrogen production efficiencies in the range of 45% to 50% are achievable with this system.

  20. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  1. Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2010-06-01

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents

  2. Phase transitions and hydrogen bonding in deuterated calcium hydroxide: High-pressure and high-temperature neutron diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Riko; Komatsu, Kazuki; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Takaya; Sano-Furukawa, Asami; Hattori, Takanori; Gotou, Hirotada; Yagi, Takehiko

    2014-10-15

    In situ neutron diffraction measurements combined with the pulsed neutron source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) were conducted on high-pressure polymorphs of deuterated portlandite (Ca(OD){sub 2}) using a Paris–Edinburgh cell and a multi-anvil press. The atomic positions including hydrogen for the unquenchable high-pressure phase at room temperature (phase II′) were first clarified. The bent hydrogen bonds under high pressure were consistent with results from Raman spectroscopy. The structure of the high-pressure and high-temperature phase (Phase II) was concordant with that observed previously by another group for a recovered sample. The observations elucidate the phase transition mechanism among the polymorphs, which involves the sliding of CaO polyhedral layers, position modulations of Ca atoms, and recombination of Ca–O bonds accompanied by the reorientation of hydrogen to form more stable hydrogen bonds. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structures of high-pressure polymorphs of Ca(OD){sub 2}, (a) at room temperature (phase II′) and (b) at high temperature (phase II), were obtained from in situ neutron diffraction measurements. - Highlights: • We measured in situ neutron diffraction of high-pressure polymorphs of Ca(OD){sub 2}. • Hydrogen positions of the high-pressure phase are first determined. • The obtained hydrogen bonds reasonably explain Raman peaks of OH stretching modes. • A phase transition mechanism among the polymorphs is proposed.

  3. High temperature hydrogen sulfide removal with tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R.J.; Feinberg, D.; Wickham, D.; Windecker, B.; Yu, J.

    1993-06-01

    This Phase II SBIR contract is developing a sorbent and process which removes H{sub 2}S from hot gasified coal and generates sulfur during regeneration of the sorbent. The process can be used with any type of reactor (e.g., fixed or moving bed) and any gasifier (e.g., KRW or Texaco) and shows lower costs that competing H{sub 2}S removal processes. TDA Research`s (TDA) process uses a regenerable stannic oxide-based (SnO{sub 2}) sorbent as the first sorbent and zinc ferrite (or zinc titanate) as a second sorbent to remove H{sub 2}S to very low concentrations. The process converts the sulfides from both sorbents to elemental sulfur, a commercial product which is easy to store and transport. The object of this phase is to develop chemically active, high sulfur loadings, and durable stannic oxide sorbents and to demonstrate the process at the bench scale.

  4. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Seshan, V; Ullien, D; Castellanos-Gomez, A; Sachdeva, S; Murthy, D H K; Savenije, T J; Ahmad, H A; Nunney, T S; Janssens, S D; Haenen, K; Nesládek, M; van der Zant, H S J; Sudhölter, E J R; de Smet, L C P M

    2013-06-21

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ~50 ml∕min (STP) at ~850 °C. The films were extensively evaluated by surface wettability, electron affinity, elemental composition, photoconductivity, and redox studies. In addition, electrografting experiments were performed. The surface characteristics as well as the optoelectronic and redox properties of the annealed films were found to be very similar to hydrogen plasma-treated films. Moreover, the presented method is compatible with atmospheric pressure and provides a low-cost solution to hydrogenate CVD diamond, which makes it interesting for industrial applications. The plausible mechanism for the hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films is based on the formation of surface carbon dangling bonds and carbon-carbon unsaturated bonds at the applied tempera-ture, which react with molecular hydrogen to produce a hydrogen-terminated surface. PMID:23802976

  5. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshan, V.; Ullien, D.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Sachdeva, S.; Murthy, D. H. K.; Savenije, T. J.; Ahmad, H. A.; Nunney, T. S.; Janssens, S. D.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; van der Zant, H. S. J.; Sudhölter, E. J. R.; de Smet, L. C. P. M.

    2013-06-01

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ˜50 ml/min (STP) at ˜850 °C. The films were extensively evaluated by surface wettability, electron affinity, elemental composition, photoconductivity, and redox studies. In addition, electrografting experiments were performed. The surface characteristics as well as the optoelectronic and redox properties of the annealed films were found to be very similar to hydrogen plasma-treated films. Moreover, the presented method is compatible with atmospheric pressure and provides a low-cost solution to hydrogenate CVD diamond, which makes it interesting for industrial applications. The plausible mechanism for the hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films is based on the formation of surface carbon dangling bonds and carbon-carbon unsaturated bonds at the applied tempera-ture, which react with molecular hydrogen to produce a hydrogen-terminated surface.

  6. Studies of the use of high-temperature nuclear heat from an HTGR for hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterman, D. D.; Fontaine, R. W.; Quade, R. N.; Halvers, L. J.; Jahromi, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study which surveyed various methods of hydrogen production using nuclear and fossil energy are presented. A description of these methods is provided, and efficiencies are calculated for each case. The process designs of systems that utilize the heat from a general atomic high temperature gas cooled reactor with a steam methane reformer and feed the reformer with substitute natural gas manufactured from coal, using reforming temperatures, are presented. The capital costs for these systems and the resultant hydrogen production price for these cases are discussed along with a research and development program.

  7. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

    2010-10-01

    A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

  8. Design of an Integrated Laboratory Scale Test for Hydrogen Production via High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    G.K. Housley; K.G. Condie; J.E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

    2007-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is researching the feasibility of high-temperature steam electrolysis for high-efficiency carbon-free hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Typical temperatures for high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) are between 800º-900ºC, consistent with anticipated coolant outlet temperatures of advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors. An Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test is underway to study issues such as thermal management, multiple-stack electrical configuration, pre-heating of process gases, and heat recuperation that will be crucial in any large-scale implementation of HTE. The current ILS design includes three electrolysis modules in a single hot zone. Of special design significance is preheating of the inlet streams by superheaters to 830°C before entering the hot zone. The ILS system is assembled on a 10’ x 16’ skid that includes electronics, power supplies, air compressor, pumps, superheaters, , hot zone, condensers, and dew-point sensor vessels. The ILS support system consists of three independent, parallel supplies of electrical power, sweep gas streams, and feedstock gas mixtures of hydrogen and steam to the electrolysis modules. Each electrolysis module has its own support and instrumentation system, allowing for independent testing under different operating conditions. The hot zone is an insulated enclosure utilizing electrical heating panels to maintain operating conditions. The target hydrogen production rate for the ILS is 5000 Nl/hr.

  9. Fractography of the high temperature hydrogen attack of a medium carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, H. G.; Moorhead, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    Microscopic fracture processes were studied which are associated with hydrogen attack of a medium carbon steel in a well-controlled, high-temperature, high-purity hydrogen environment. Exposure to a hydrogen pressure and temperature of 3.5 MN/m2 and 575 C was found to degrade room temperature tensile properties with increasing exposure time. After 408 hr, yield and ultimate strengths were reduced by more than 40 percent and elongation was reduced to less than 2 percent. Initial fissure formation was found to be associated with manganese rich particles, most probably manganese oxide, aligned in the microstructure during the rolling operation. Fissure growth was found to be associated with a reduction in carbide content of the microstructure and was inhibited by the depletion of carbon. The interior surfaces of sectioned fissures or bubbles exhibit both primary and secondary cracking by intergranular separation. The grain surfaces were rough and rounded, suggesting a diffusion-associated separation process. Specimens that failed at room temperature after exposure to hydrogen were found to exhibit mixed mode fracture having varying amounts of intergranular separation, dimple formation, and cleavage, depending on exposure time.

  10. High temperature catalytic hydrogenation of acetone over Raney Ni for chemical heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yanjun; Xu, Min; Huai, Xiulan

    2014-02-01

    Exothermic hydrogenation reaction of acetone is an important part of an IAH-CHP, and the performance of IAH-CHP is affected directly by this reaction. This paper studies the influence of space velocity, temperature, hydrogen flow rate and pressure on conversion and selectivity experimentally. The byproducts are analyzed and classified into three types: hydrogenation product, cracking products and condensation products. Both the conversion and selectivity of this reaction have the same trend with the change of space velocity, temperature and hydrogen flow rate, and has the opposite trend with the change of pressure. As the space velocity increases, the conversion curve is a gradual decline parabola but the selectivity curve is close to a straight line. Hydrogen flow rate has a more obvious influence on conversion than temperature, whereas on selectivity the situation is opposite. High pressure increases the conversion of acetone to all products, but the increment of byproducts is more than that of isopropanol, so the selectivity decreases as pressure increases.

  11. Hydrogen atom recombination on tungsten at high temperature: Experiment and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutigliano, M.; Santoro, D.; Balat-Pichelin, M.

    2014-10-01

    Atom recombination at wall is a phenomenon involved in many plasma experiments and also in present tokamaks and future fusion plasma reactors like ITER. This exothermic surface reaction is catalyzed by the material and depends on its composition and temperature. In the MESOX experimental set-up, several methods were developed for the measurement of the recombination parameters. In this paper, a method developed for the experimental evaluation of the recombination coefficient of atomic hydrogen γH on tungsten at high temperature is presented using two series of atomic lines (Hα and He or Hβ and H2) and the results obtained for surface temperature up to 1350 K are given. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation has been done for the recombination of hydrogen atoms on tungsten in conditions close to the experimental ones using a semi-classical collisional method. Modeling results are compared to the experimental data for two surface temperature values and a fairly good agreement was obtained.

  12. The high-temperature sodium coolant technology in nuclear power installations for hydrogen power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Sorokin, A. P.; Alekseev, V. V.; Konovalov, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    In the case of using high-temperature sodium-cooled nuclear power installations for obtaining hydrogen and for other innovative applications (gasification and fluidization of coal, deep petroleum refining, conversion of biomass into liquid fuel, in the chemical industry, metallurgy, food industry, etc.), the sources of hydrogen that enters from the reactor plant tertiary coolant circuit into its secondary coolant circuit have intensity two or three orders of magnitude higher than that of hydrogen sources at a nuclear power plant (NPP) equipped with a BN-600 reactor. Fundamentally new process solutions are proposed for such conditions. The main prerequisite for implementing them is that the hydrogen concentration in sodium coolant is a factor of 100-1000 higher than it is in modern NPPs taken in combination with removal of hydrogen from sodium by subjecting it to vacuum through membranes made of vanadium or niobium. Numerical investigations carried out using a diffusion model showed that, by varying such parameters as fuel rod cladding material, its thickness, and time of operation in developing the fuel rods for high-temperature nuclear power installations (HT NPIs) it is possible to exclude ingress of cesium into sodium through the sealed fuel rod cladding. However, if the fuel rod cladding loses its tightness, operation of the HT NPI with cesium in the sodium will be unavoidable. Under such conditions, measures must be taken for deeply purifying sodium from cesium in order to minimize the diffusion of cesium into the structural materials.

  13. Improvement of Electron Field Emission in Patterned Carbon Nanotubes by High Temperature Hydrogen Plasma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sigen; Sellin, Paul. J.; Lian, Jun; Özsan, Ersin; Chang, Sha

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a significant improvement of electron field emission property in patterned carbon nanotubes films by using a high temperature (650 °C) hydrogen plasma treatment. This treatment was found to greatly increase the emission current, emission uniformity and stability. The mechanism study showed that these enhanced properties are attributed to the lowering of the potential barrier and the creation of geometrical features through the removal of amorphous carbon, catalyst particles and the saturation of dangling bonds after such a hydrogen plasma treatment. PMID:19946566

  14. High-rate/high-temperature capability of a single-layer zicar-separator nickel-hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1995-01-01

    A 50 Ampere-hour nickel-hydrogen cell with a single-layer Zircar separator stack design was fully charged and then discharged at a 2C current rate to an end voltage of 1 volt. This extreme test resulted in high temperatures which were recorded at three locations on the cell, i.e., the cell wall, the boss (barrel of the compression seal), and a terminal. The results provide new information about the high-temperature and high-discharge-rate capabilities of nickel-hydrogen cells. This information also adds to the growing data base for single-layer zirconium-oxide-cloth (Zircar) separator cell designs.

  15. Materials for high-temperature hydrogen fluorine environments. Final report, June 1976-December 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.

    1981-03-01

    A determination has been made of the stability of 35 materials under high-temperature, fluorine rich, hydrogen fluoride torch testing. Refractory materials tested included 4 borides, 3 carbides, 3 nitrides, 12 oxides, 1 oxynitride, 1 sulfide, 10 metals, and carbon (10 types). Three materials distinctly performed better than nickel: lanthanum hexaboride, calcium hexaboride, and lanthanum silicon oxynitride. Of these, lanthanum hexaboride is the best candidate tested since it has an estimated upper use temperature > 1726 K, which is above the melting point and more than 300 K above the upper use temperature of nickel.

  16. Initial hydrogen detonation data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, T.; Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.

    1994-12-31

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is described and data from initial hydrogen detonation experiments are presented. Initial phase of the inherent detonability experimental program is described. Test gases thus far tested are hydrogen-air mixtures at one atmosphere initial pressure and temperatures 300K-650K. Detonation pressure, wave speed, and detonation cell size were measured. Data were consistent with earlier SSDA (small-scale development apparatus) test results. HTCF results confirm the conclusion from the SSDA program that the gas temperature decreases the cell size and, therefore, increases the sensitivity of mixtures to detonation. Data from the larger HTCF test vessel, however, also demonstrates that the effect of increased scale is to extend the range of detonable mixtures to lower concentration.

  17. Fractography of the high temperature hydrogen attack of a medium carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Moorhead, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for an experimental study of the microscopic fracture processes associated with hydrogen attack of a commercially produced plain carbon steel in a well-controlled high-temperature hydrogen environment of high purity. In the experiments, sheet samples were exposed to laboratory-grade hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m and a temperature of 575 C. The fractography of gas-filled fissures and failed tension specimens is analyzed in an effort to identify any predominant microstructural defect associated with fissure formation, the prevalent modes of fracture, and the contribution of gas-filled fissures to the overall failure process. It is found that the tensile properties of the examined steel were significantly degraded after as few as 136 hr of exposure to a high-purity hydrogen atmosphere at 575 C; that the yield strength, ultimate strength, and elongation at fracture were all reduced progressively with increasing exposure time; and that the yield and ultimate strengths were reduced more than 40% after 408 hr while elongation was reduced to less than 2%.

  18. Materials for high-temperature and high-pressure hydrogen peroxide bleaching equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.J.; Clarke, P.H.

    1999-07-01

    To determine the suitability of grade 705 zirconium (UNS R60705) as a candidate material of construction for high-temperature and pressure hydrogen peroxide (P{sub HT}) pulp-bleaching reactors, a series of electrochemical experiments were carried out in simulated P{sub HT} environments. Because the P{sub HT} process may be incorporated into a closed cycle mill or a mill that also uses chlorine-based chemicals to bleach pulp, the effect of chloride ion concentration on the corrosion of zirconium in P{sub HT} environments was studied. It was found that at the potential measured in P{sub HT} environments, zirconium was passive ({minus}100 mV vs. saturated calomel electrode [SCE]). Breakdown potentials of {approximately}500 mV{sub SCE} were measured in chloride-containing solutions. However, when the chloride ion concentration was increased >50 ppm, the repassivation potential of the zirconium was reduced significantly. Based on these results, grade 705 zirconium was determined to be suitable for a wide range of P{sub HT} process conditions.

  19. Integrated High Temperature Coal-to-Hydrogen System with CO2 Separation

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Ruud; Anthony Ku; Vidya Ramaswamy; Wei Wei; Patrick Willson

    2007-05-31

    A significant barrier to the commercialization of coal-to-hydrogen technologies is high capital cost. The purity requirements for H{sub 2} fuels are generally met by using a series of unit clean-up operations for residual CO removal, sulfur removal, CO{sub 2} removal and final gas polishing to achieve pure H{sub 2}. A substantial reduction in cost can be attained by reducing the number of process operations for H{sub 2} cleanup, and process efficiency can be increased by conducting syngas cleanup at higher temperatures. The objective of this program was to develop the scientific basis for a single high-temperature syngas-cleanup module to produce a pure stream of H{sub 2} from a coal-based system. The approach was to evaluate the feasibility of a 'one box' process that combines a shift reactor with a high-temperature CO{sub 2}-selective membrane to convert CO to CO{sub 2}, remove sulfur compounds, and remove CO{sub 2} in a simple, compact, fully integrated system. A system-level design was produced for a shift reactor that incorporates a high-temperature membrane. The membrane performance targets were determined. System level benefits were evaluated for a coal-to-hydrogen system that would incorporate membranes with properties that would meet the performance targets. The scientific basis for high temperature CO{sub 2}-selective membranes was evaluated by developing and validating a model for high temperature surface flow membranes. Synthesis approaches were pursued for producing membranes that integrated control of pore size with materials adsorption properties. Room temperature reverse-selectivity for CO{sub 2} was observed and performance at higher temperatures was evaluated. Implications for future membrane development are discussed.

  20. Large-scale preparation of graphene by high temperature insertion of hydrogen into graphite.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Fray, Derek J

    2015-07-14

    Experimental evidence for high temperature diffusion of hydrogen into the interlayer space of graphite is provided. This process is discussed as a possible method for the rapid production of high-quality, inexpensive graphene in large quantities, which could lead to the widespread application of graphene. It was found that hydrogen cations, dissolved in molten LiCl, can be discharged on cathodically polarized graphite rods, which then intercalate into the graphite structure, leading to the peeling of graphite to produce graphene. The graphene nanosheets produced displayed a single-crystalline structure with a lateral size of several hundred nanometers and a high degree of crystallinity and thermal stability. The method introduced could be scaled up to produce industrial quantities of high-quality graphene. PMID:26053881

  1. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy – TechnologySummary

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

    2010-02-01

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  2. Red soil as a regenerable sorbent for high temperature removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas.

    PubMed

    Ko, Tzu-Hsing; Chu, Hsin; Lin, Hsiao-Ping; Peng, Ching-Yu

    2006-08-25

    In this study, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) was removed from coal gas by red soil under high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor. Red soil powders were collected from the northern, center and southern of Taiwan. They were characterized by XRPD, porosity analysis and DCB chemical analysis. Results show that the greater sulfur content of LP red soils is attributed to the higher free iron oxides and suitable sulfidation temperature is around 773K. High temperature has a negative effect for use red soil as a desulfurization sorbent due to thermodynamic limitation in a reduction atmosphere. During 10 cycles of regeneration, after the first cycle the red soil remained stable with a breakthrough time between 31 and 36 min. Hydrogen adversely affects sulfidation reaction, whereas CO exhibits a positive effect due to a water-shift reaction. COS was formed during the sulfidation stage and this was attributed to the reaction of H(2)S and CO. Results of XRPD indicated that, hematite is the dominant active species in fresh red soil and iron sulfide (FeS) is a product of the reaction between hematite and hydrogen sulfide in red soils. The spinel phase FeAl(2)O(4) was found during regeneration, moreover, the amount of free iron oxides decreased after regeneration indicating the some of the free iron oxide formed a spinel phase, further reducting the overall desulfurization efficiency. PMID:16469434

  3. Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Way, J.; Wolden, Colin

    2013-09-30

    Colorado School of Mines (CSM) developed high temperature, hydrogen permeable membranes that contain no platinum group metals with the goal of separating hydrogen from gas mixtures representative of gasification of carbon feedstocks such as coal or biomass in order to meet DOE NETL 2015 hydrogen membrane performance targets. We employed a dual synthesis strategy centered on transition metal carbides. In the first approach, novel, high temperature, surface diffusion membranes based on nanoporous Mo{sub 2}C were fabricated on ceramic supports. These were produced in a two step process that consisted of molybdenum oxide deposition followed by thermal carburization. Our best Mo{sub 2}C surface diffusion membrane achieved a pure hydrogen flux of 367 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at a feed pressure of only 20 psig. The highest H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity obtained with this approach was 4.9. A transport model using “dusty gas” theory was derived to describe the hydrogen transport in the Mo{sub 2}C coated, surface diffusion membranes. The second class of membranes developed were dense metal foils of BCC metals such as vanadium coated with thin (< 60 nm) Mo{sub 2}C catalyst layers. We have fabricated a Mo{sub 2}C/V composite membrane that in pure gas testing delivered a H{sub 2} flux of 238 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at 600 °C and 100 psig, with no detectable He permeance. This exceeds the 2010 DOE Target flux. This flux is 2.8 times that of pure Pd at the same membrane thickness and test conditions and over 79% of the 2015 flux target. In mixed gas testing we achieved a permeate purity of ≥99.99%, satisfying the permeate purity milestone, but the hydrogen permeance was low, ~0.2 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.psi. However, during testing of a Mo{sub 2}C coated Pd alloy membrane with DOE 1 feed gas mixture a hydrogen permeance of >2 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.psi was obtained which was stable during the entire test, meeting the permeance associated with the 2010 DOE target flux. Lastly, the Mo{sub 2}C/V composite

  4. System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-05-01

    This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the

  5. Spectroscopic Studies of the Vibrational and Electronic Properties of Hydrogen at High Pressure-Temperature Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Gregoryanz, E; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    2003-02-04

    The behavior of hydrogen at high densities has been widely explored in recent years both experimentally and theoretically, yielding a wealth of information on the material (e.g., Ref. 1). Detailed information has been obtained from static compression experiments generally limited to low-temperature studies (<300 K) and maximum pressures of {approx}300 GPa (e.g., Refs. [2,3]). However, there are now numerous questions regarding the behavior of hydrogen at high pressures and temperatures, results that have important implications for both fundamental physics and planetary science. We report here [2] Raman scattering and visible to near-infrared absorption spectra of solid hydrogen under static pressure up to 285 GPa at 85-140 K. We obtain pressure dependences of vibron and phonon modes in agreement with previously determined to lower pressures. The results indicate the stability of the ordered molecular phase III to the highest pressure reached and provide constraints on the insulator-to-metal transition pressure. Extrapolations of the vibron and phonon frequencies suggest transformation to a monoatomic state below 495 GPa. On the other hand, considerations of the absorption edge indicate the pressure of metallization at 325-385 GPa on the basis of tentative extrapolation of the direct band gap energy. Although complicated by affects of stressed-induced diamond absorption and possible differences between the behavior of the direct and indirect gap, there appears to be an emerging consistence between various experimental and theoretical results, with a predicted transition at 325-495 GPa. We also report high P-T Raman measurements of solid and fluid hydrogen to above 1100 K and to 155 GPa [4]. These conditions, which were previously inaccessible by static compression experiments, provide new insight into the behavior of the material under extreme conditions. The data give a direct measure of the melting curve (Fig. 1) that extends previous optical investigations by up

  6. Feasibility study on high-temperature sorption of hydrogen sulfide by natural soils.

    PubMed

    Ko, Tzu-Hsing; Chu, Hsin; Tseng, Jeou-Jen

    2006-08-01

    In this study, seven natural soils were tested for the sorption of hydrogen sulfide from coal gasification gas at high temperature. Results indicate that the LP natural soil has the best performance and the highest sulfur sorption capacity. After extracting free iron oxides, most natural soils have no sorption efficiency. The free iron oxides, therefore, proved to be the major components that react with hydrogen sulfide to form iron sulfides. The sulfur sorption capacity, either determined by EA or breakthrough time, is very close to the theoretical value based on the stoichiometric calculation with the content of free iron oxides. Moreover, the presence of CO is a positive effect while H2 is a negative effect. This can be explained via the water-shift reaction. On the basis of the results of temperature-programmed sulfidation (TPS), the starting temperature for the sorption of hydrogen sulfide is between 623-673 K. From the analyses of temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) and XPS, the iron polysulfides are the major products and approximately 90% regeneration efficiency can be theoretically achieved while the temperature is controlled higher than 813 K. In the regeneration tests, the results show that the LP natural soil can be regenerated and thus reused after the oxidation process. No significant degeneration occurs on the LP natural soil after five sorption/regeneration cycles. The sulfur sorption capacity of the tenth regenerated soil can be achieved at least 80% compared to the fresh one. The experimental analyzed SO2 concentration from the regeneration process is almost identical to the theoretical calculated equilibrium concentration of the process. Maghemite is the main product after the regeneration process. PMID:16527331

  7. Thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at high pressure and finite temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is reviewed for calculating thermodynamic quantities for mixtures of light elements at high pressure, in the metallic state. Ensemble averages are calculated with Monte Carlo techniques and periodic boundary conditions. Interparticle potentials are assumed to be coulombic, screened by the electrons in dielectric function theory. This method is quantitatively accurate for alloys at pressures above about 10 Mbar. An alloy of equal parts hydrogen and helium by mass appears to remain liquid and mixed for temperatures above about 3000 K, at pressures of about 15 Mbar. The additive volume law is satisfied to within about 10%, but the Gruneisen equation of state gives poor results. A calculation at 1300 K shows evidence of a hydrogen-helium phase separation.

  8. High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL small-scale development apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsburg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Sato, K.; Kinoshita, M.

    1994-08-01

    The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is a 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperatures between 300K and 650K at a fixed initial pressure of 0.1 MPa. Hydrogen-air mixtures with hydrogen composition from 9 to 60 percent by volume and steam fractions up to 35 percent by volume were studied for stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K-650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside diameter SSDA test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent hydrogen at 300K down to between 9 and 10 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments.

  9. Permeation of hydrogen in hastelloy C-276 alloy at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Liu, W.; Qian, Y.; Que, J.

    2015-03-15

    Tritium is generated by the interaction of neutrons with the lithium and beryllium in the molten salt reactors (MSRs), which use FLiBe as one of solvents of fluoride fuel. Tritium as by-product in the MSRs is an important safety issue because it could easily diffuse into environment through high temperature heat exchangers. The experimental technique of gas driven permeation has been used to investigate the transport parameter of hydrogen in Hastelloy C-276 which is considered as one of the candidate for structure materials. The measurements were carried out at the temperature range of 400-800 Celsius degrees with hydrogen loading pressures ranging from 5*10{sup 3} to 4*10{sup 4} Pa. The H diffusive transport parameters for Hastelloy C-276 follow an Arrhenius law in this temperature range. Regarding diffusivity and Sieverts' constant, Hastelloy C-276 has lower values compared with Ni201 alloy. The possible reason may be the trapping effects, which were formed by the alloying elements of Mo and Cr in the matrix. At the same time, the thin oxidation layer formed by the high Cr content could lead to a slower dissociation process of H{sub 2} at the surface. (authors)

  10. Separation Requirements for a Hydrogen Production Plant and High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; Scott Beck; William Galyean

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the engineering methods, models, and results used in an evaluation for locating a hydrogen production facility near a proposed next-generation nuclear power plant. Standard probabilistic safety assessment methodologies were used to answer the risk-related questions for a combined nuclear and chemical facility: what can go wrong? how likely is it to happen? and what are the consequences of it happening? As part of answering these questions, a model was developed suitable for determining the distances separating a hydrogen-production process and nuclear plant structures. The objective of the model-development and analysis is to answer key safety questions relating to the placement of one or more hydrogen production plants in the vicinity of a high-temperature nuclear reactor. From a thermal-hydraulic efficiency standpoint, close proximity of the two facilities is beneficial. Safety and regulatory implications, however, force the separation to be increased, perhaps substantially. The likelihood of obtaining a permit to construct and build such as facility in the United States without answering these safety questions is uncertain. The quantitative analysis performed and described in this paper offers a scoping mechanism to determine key parameters relating to the development of a nuclear-based hydrogen production facility. The calculations indicate that when the facilities are less than 100 m apart, the core damage frequency is large enough (greater than 1E-6/yr) to become problematic in a risk-informed environment. However, a variety of design modifications (blast-deflection barriers, for example) could significantly reduce risk and should be further explored as design of the hydrogen production facility evolves.

  11. Separation Requirements for a Hydrogen Production Plant and High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; Scott Beck; Bill Galyean

    2005-09-01

    This report provides the methods, models, and results of an evaluation for locating a hydrogen production facility near a nuclear power plant. In order to answer the risk-related questions for this combined nuclear and chemical facility, we utilized standard probabilistic safety assessment methodologies to answer three questions: what can happen, how likely is it, and what are the consequences? As part of answering these questions, we developed a model suitable to determine separation distances for hydrogen process structures and the nuclear plant structures. Our objective of the model-development and analysis is to answer key safety questions related to the placement of one or more hydrogen production plants in the vicinity of a high-temperature nuclear reactor. From a thermal-hydraulic standpoint we would like the two facilities to be quite close. However, safety and regulatory implications force the separation distance to be increased, perhaps substantially. Without answering these safety questions, the likelihood for obtaining a permit to construct and build such as facility in the U.S. would be questionable. The quantitative analysis performed for this report provides us with a scoping mechanism to determine key parameters related to the development of a nuclear-based hydrogen production facility. From our calculations, we estimate that when the separation distance is less than 100m, the core damage frequency is large enough (greater than 1E-6/yr) to become problematic in a risk-informed environment. However, a variety of design modifications, for example blast-deflection barriers, were explored to determine the impact of potential mitigating strategies. We found that these mitigating cases may significantly reduce risk and should be explored as the design for the hydrogen production facility evolves.

  12. System Analyses of High and Low-Temperature Interface Designs for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; J. E. O'Brien

    2009-07-01

    As part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, an evaluation of a low-temperature heat-pump interface design for a nuclear-driven high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production plant was performed using the UniSim process analysis software. The lowtemperature interface design is intended to reduce the interface temperature between the reactor power conversion system and the hydrogen production plant by extracting process heat from the low temperature portion of the power cycle rather than from the high-temperature portion of the cycle as is done with the current Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reference design. The intent of this design change is to mitigate the potential for tritium migration from the reactor core to the hydrogen plant, and reduce the potential for high temperature creep in the interface structures. The UniSim model assumed a 600 MWt Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) operating at a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa and a reactor outlet temperature of 900°C. The lowtemperature heat-pump loop is a water/steam loop that operates between 2.6 MPa and 5.0 MPa. The HTE hydrogen production loop operated at 5 MPa, with plant conditions optimized to maximize plant performance (i.e., 800°C electrolysis operating temperature, area specific resistance (ASR) = 0.4 ohm-cm2, and a current density of 0.25 amps/cm2). An air sweep gas system was used to remove oxygen from the anode side of the electrolyzer. Heat was also recovered from the hydrogen and oxygen product streams to maximize hydrogen production efficiencies. The results of the UniSim analysis showed that the low-temperature interface design was an effective heat-pump concept, transferring 31.5 MWt from the low-temperature leg of the gas turbine power cycle to the HTE process boiler, while consuming 16.0 MWe of compressor power. However, when this concept was compared with the current INL reference direct Brayton cycle design and with a modification of the reference design to

  13. Nanocomposite thin films for high temperature optical gas sensing of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2013-04-02

    The disclosure relates to a plasmon resonance-based method for H.sub.2 sensing in a gas stream at temperatures greater than about 500.degree. C. utilizing a hydrogen sensing material. The hydrogen sensing material is comprised of gold nanoparticles having an average nanoparticle diameter of less than about 100 nanometers dispersed in an inert matrix having a bandgap greater than or equal to 5 eV, and an oxygen ion conductivity less than approximately 10.sup.-7 S/cm at a temperature of 700.degree. C. Exemplary inert matrix materials include SiO.sub.2, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3N.sub.4 as well as modifications to modify the effective refractive indices through combinations and/or doping of such materials. At high temperatures, blue shift of the plasmon resonance optical absorption peak indicates the presence of H.sub.2. The method disclosed offers significant advantage over active and reducible matrix materials typically utilized, such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or TiO.sub.2.

  14. High temperature oxidation of UO 2 in steam-hydrogen mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrefah, J.; Aguiar Braid, A. de; Wang, W.; Khalil, Y.; Olander, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study of UO 2 oxidation in pure steam and in H 2O/Ar/H 2 mixtures was conducted in a continuously recording thermogravimetric apparatus in the temperature range 1273-1623 K at one atmosphere system pressure. Two surface reaction models were utilized in the analysis of the data: the phenomenological model assumes the reaction rate to be proportional to the deviation of the oxygen concentration in the solid from the equilibrium value established by the ambient gas. Analysis of the results show that the phenomenological model does not fit the experimental data for pure steam, but the fit is good for H 2O/Ar/H 2 mixtures. The mechanistic model is based on the rate-controlling step of water dissociation at the solid surface. It provides a very good fit to all of the data. As long as the pressure is 1 atm, either of the models can be used to predict fuel oxidation in severe accidents because the ambient gas invariably contains hydrogen produced by Zircaloy corrosion. However, the kinetics of oxidation in high-pressure steam-hydrogen mixtures is still uncertain. Evidence of uranium volatilization and preferential etching at the grain boundaries at high temperatures were observed.

  15. Hydrogen production by high-temperature water splitting using electron-conducting membranes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Tae H.; Wang, Shuangyan; Dorris, Stephen E.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2004-04-27

    A device and method for separating water into hydrogen and oxygen is disclosed. A first substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing hydrogen is provided and spaced from a second substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing oxygen. When steam is passed between the two membranes at disassociation temperatures the hydrogen from the disassociation of steam selectively and continuously passes through the first membrane and oxygen selectively and continuously passes through the second membrane, thereby continuously driving the disassociation of steam producing hydrogen and oxygen.

  16. High-pressure, ambient temperature hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks and porous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckner, Matthew; Dailly, Anne

    2014-03-01

    We investigated hydrogen storage in micro-porous adsorbents at ambient temperature and pressures up to 320 bar. We measured three benchmark adsorbents: two metal-organic frameworks, Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2 [Cu3(btc)2; HKUST-1] and Zn4O(1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate)2 [Zn4O(btb)2; MOF-177], and the activated carbon MSC-30. In this talk, we focus on adsorption enthalpy calculations using a single adsorption isotherm. We use the differential form of the Claussius-Clapeyron equation applied to the Dubinin-Astakhov adsorption model to calculate adsorption enthalpies. Calculation of the adsorption enthalpy in this way gives a temperature independent enthalpy of 5-7 kJ/mol at the lowest coverage for the three materials investigated. Additionally, we discuss the assumptions and corrections that must be made when calculating adsorption isotherms at high-pressure and adsorption enthalpies.

  17. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen-Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2010-06-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  18. Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) for Hydrogen Profiling in High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Pascal; Sayir, Ali; Berger, Marie-Helene

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between hydrogen and various high temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) has not been clearly understood due to poor densification and unreacted secondary phases. the melt-processing technique is used in producing fully dense simple SrCe(0.9)Y (0.10) O(3-delta) and complex Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskites that can not be achieved by solid-state sintering. the possibilities of ion beam analysis have been investigated to quantify hydrogen distribution in HTPC perovskites subjected to water heat treatment. Nuclear microprobe technique is based on the interactions of a focused ion beam of MeV light ions (H-1, H-2, He-3, He-4,.) with the sample to be analyzed to determine local elemental concentrations at the cubic micrometer scale, the elastic recoil detection analysis technique (ERDA) has been carried out using He-4(+) microbeams and detecting the resulting recoil protons. Mappings of longitudinal sections of water treated SrCeO3 and Sr(Ca(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3 perovskites have been achieved, the water treatment strongly alters the surface of simple SrCe(0.9)Y(0.10)O(3-delta) perovskite. From Rutherford Back Scattering measurements (RBS), both Ce depletion and surface re-deposition is evidenced. the ERDA investigations on water treated Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskite did not exhibit any spatial difference for the hydrogen incorporation from the surface to the centre. the amount of hydrogen incorporation for Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) was low and required further development of two less conventional techniques, ERDA in forward geometry and forward elastic diffusion H-1(p,p) H-1 with coincidence detection.

  19. Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Tagawa, H.; Malliakos, A.

    1995-12-31

    The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant product,s and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below.

  20. Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.

    1996-03-01

    The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant products, and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below.

  1. Detonation cell size measurements in high-temperature hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at the BNL high-temperature combustion facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.L.

    1997-11-01

    The High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was designed and constructed with the objective of studying detonation phenomena in mixtures of hydrogen-air-steam at initially high temperatures. The central element of the HTCF is a 27-cm inner-diameter, 21.3-m long cylindrical test vessel capable of being heating to 700K {+-} 14K. A unique feature of the HTCF is the {open_quotes}diaphragmless{close_quotes} acetylene-oxygen gas driver which is used to initiate the detonation in the test gas. Cell size measurements have shown that for any hydrogen-air-steam mixture, increasing the initial mixture temperature, in the range of 300K to 650K, while maintaining the initial pressure of 0.1 MPa, decreases the cell size and thus makes the mixture more detonable. The effect of steam dilution on cell size was tested in stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric (e.g., equivalence ratio of 0.5) hydrogen-air mixtures. Increasing the steam dilution in hydrogen-air mixtures at 0.1 MPa initial pressure increases the cell size, irrespective of initial temperature. It is also observed that the desensitizing effect of steam diminished with increased initial temperature. A 1-dimensional, steady-state Zel`dovich, von Neumann, Doring (ZND) model, with full chemical kinetics, has been used to predict cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at different initial conditions. Qualitatively the model predicts the overall trends observed in the measured cell size versus mixture composition and initial temperature and pressure. It was found that the proportionality constant used to predict detonation cell size from the calculated ZND model reaction zone varies between 10 and 100 depending on the mixture composition and initial temperature. 32 refs., 35 figs.

  2. Demonstration and System Analysis of High Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Using SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01

    At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, an integrated laboratory scale (ILS), 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) facility has been developed under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other “integral” issues. Additionally, a reference process model of a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The reference plant design is driven by a 600 megawatt thermal high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.01×106 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.36 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation. The paper will also present the optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant which may be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

  3. NanoCapillary Network Proton Conducting Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pintauro, Peter

    2012-07-09

    The objective of this proposal is to fabricate and characterize a new class of NanoCapillary Network (NCN) proton conducting membranes for hydrogen/air fuel cells that operate under high temperature, low humidity conditions. The membranes will be intelligently designed, where a high density interconnecting 3-D network of nm-diameter electrospun proton conducting polymer fibers is embedded in an inert (uncharged) water/gas impermeable polymer matrix. The high density of fibers in the resulting mat and the high ion-exchange capacity of the fiber polymer will ensure high proton conductivity. To further enhance water retention, molecular silica will be added to the sulfonated polymer fibers. The uncharged matrix material will control water swelling of the high ion-exchange capacity proton conducting polymer fibers and will impart toughness to the final nanocapillary composite membrane. Thus, unlike other fuel cell membranes, the role of the polymer support matrix will be decoupled from that of the proton-conducting channels. The expected final outcome of this 5-year project is the fabrication of fuel cell membranes with properties that exceed the DOE’s technical targets, in particular a proton conductivity of 0.1 S/cm at a temperature less than or equal to120°C and 25-50% relative humidity.

  4. PROGRESS IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING PLANAR SOFC TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, J. E.; Herring, J. S.; Stoots, C. M.; Hawkes, G. L.; Hartvigsen, J., J.; Mehrdad Shahnam

    2005-04-01

    A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. The research program includes both experimental and modeling activities. Selected results from both activities are presented in this paper. Experimental results were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, fabricated by Ceramatec , Inc. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was also created to model high-temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell as it would exist in the experimental electrolysis stack. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT1. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with

  5. Properties of materials in high pressure hydrogen at cryogenic, room, and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. A., Jr.; Vanwanderham, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    Various tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of 12 alloys that are commonly used or proposed for use in pressurized gaseous hydrogen or hydrogen containing environments. Properties determined in the hydrogen environments were compared to properties determined in a pure helium environment at the same conditions to establish environmental degradation. The specific mechanical properties tested include: high-cycle fatigue, low-cycle fatigue, fracture mechanics, creep-rupture, and tensile.

  6. Retention of Hydrogen in FCC Metals Irradiated at Temperatures Leading to High Densities of Bubbles or Voids

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Francis A.; Simonen, Edward P.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Grossbeck, M L.; Wolfer, W. G.; Scott, P M.

    2006-09-15

    Large amounts of hydrogen and helium are generated in structural metals in accelerator-driven systems. It is shown that under certain conditions, hydrogen can be stored in irradiated nickel and stainless steels at levels strongly in excess of that predicted by Sieverts Law. These conditions are first, the availability of hydrogen from various radiolytic and environmental sources and second, the formation of radiation-induced cavities to store hydrogen. These cavities can be highly pressurized bubbles or under-pressurized voids, with concurrent helium in the cavities at either low or very high levels. Transmutant sources of hydrogen are often insufficient to pressurize these cavities, and therefore environmental sources are required. The stored hydrogen appears to be stable for many years at room temperature. A conceptual model to describe such behavior requires the continuous generation of hydrogen from (n, p) reactions and possibly other radiolytic sources which can create a supersaturation of hydrogen in the metal, leading to the pressurization of voids and helium bubbles. Once captured in a bubble, the hydrogen is assumed to be in molecular form. Dissolution back into the metal requires chemisorption and dissociation on the bubble surface. Both of these processes have large activation barriers, particularly when oxygen, carbohydrates, and other impurities poison the bubble surface. However, these chemisorbed poisons may reduce but not entirely restrict the ingress or egress of atomic hydrogen.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide mediates nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under high temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Ruijing; Jia, Yujie; Ef, Abd Allah; Jia, Aiqun; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a signal to induce many physiological processes in plants, but its role in controlling the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites is not well established. In this study, we found that high temperature (HT) treatment induced nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and promoted the rapid accumulation of H2S. Furthermore, HT triggered the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA), a plant hormone that promotes nicotine biosynthesis. Suppression of the H2S signal using chemical inhibitors or via RNAi suppression of l-cysteine desulphydrase (L-CD) in transgenic plants, compromised JA production and nicotine biosynthesis under HT treatments, and these inhibitory effects could be reversed by applying exogenous H2S. Based on these data, we propose that H2S is an important trigger of nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco under HT conditions, and that H2S acts upstream of JA signaling by modulating the transcription of genes associated with JA biosynthesis. PMID:27035256

  8. The Effects of Water Vapor and Hydrogen on the High-Temperature Oxidation of Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, N; Jung, K; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Holcomb, G R; Howard, B H; Meier, G H

    2013-06-01

    Essentially all alloys and coatings that are resistant to corrosion at high temperature require the formation of a protective (slowly-growing and adherent) oxide layer by a process known as selective oxidation. The fundamental understanding of this process has been developed over the years for exposure in pure oxygen or air. However, the atmospheres in most applications contain significant amounts of water vapor which can greatly modify the behavior of protective oxides. The development of oxy-fuel combustion systems in which fossil fuels are burned in a mixture of recirculated flue gas and oxygen, rather than in air, has caused renewed interest in the effects of water vapor and steam on alloy oxidation. The focus of this paper is on the ways the presence of water vapor can directly alter the selective oxidation process. The paper begins with a brief review of the fundamentals of selective oxidation followed by a description of recent experimental results regarding the effect of water vapor on the oxidation of a variety of chromia-forming alloys (Fe- and Ni-base) in the temperature range 600 to 700 °C. The atmospheres include air, air-H{sub 2}O, Ar-H{sub 2}O and Ar-H{sub 2}O-O{sub 2}. Then the behavior of alumina-forming alloys in H{sub 2}O-containing atmospheres is briefly described. As hydrogen is produced during oxidation of alloys in H{sub 2}O, it can be released back into the gas phase or injected into the metal (where it can diffuse through to the other side). Experiments in which hydrogen concentrations have been measured on both sides of thin specimens during oxidation by H{sub 2}O on only one side are described. Finally, it is attempted to catalogue the various experimental observations under a few general principles.

  9. Hydrogen production by high temperature water splitting using electron conducting membranes

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Wang, Shuangyan; Dorris, Stephen E.; Lee, Tae H.

    2006-08-08

    A device and method for separating water into hydrogen and oxygen is disclosed. A first substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing protons or hydrogen is provided and spaced from a second substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing oxygen. When steam is passed between the two membranes at dissociation temperatures the hydrogen from the dissociation of steam selectively and continuously passes through the first membrane and oxygen selectively and continuously passes through the second membrane, thereby continuously driving the dissociation of steam producing hydrogen and oxygen. The oxygen is thereafter reacted with methane to produce syngas which optimally may be reacted in a water gas shift reaction to produce CO2 and H2.

  10. Low Temperature and High Pressure Evaluation of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Garcia-Villazana, O.

    2000-06-25

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures.

  11. Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-01-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated

  12. Butterfly valve with metal seals controls flow of hydrogen from cryogenic through high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. D.

    1967-01-01

    Butterfly valve with metal seals operates over a temperature range of minus 423 degrees to plus 440 degrees F with hydrogen as a medium and in a radiation environment. Media flow is controlled by an internal butterfly disk which is rotated by an actuation shaft.

  13. Crack growth behavior of warm-rolled 316L austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Jin, Hyung-Ha; Kwon, Junhyun; Choi, Min-Jae; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of warm rolling on the crack growth of 316L austenitic stainless steel, the crack growth rate was measured and the oxide structure was characterized in high-temperature hydrogenated water. The warm-rolled specimens showed a higher crack growth rate compared to the as-received specimens because the slip bands and dislocations produced during warm rolling served as paths for corrosion and cracking. The crack growth rate increased with the dissolved hydrogen concentration. This may be attributed to the decrease in performance and stability of the protective oxide layer formed on the surface of stainless steel in high-temperature water.

  14. Optimized Flow Sheet for a Reference Commercial-Scale Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; E. A. Harvego; J. S. Herring

    2007-11-01

    This report presents results from the development and optimization of a reference commercialscale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540° C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.176 × 10 6 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 49.07% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.45 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. The information presented in this report is intended to establish an optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant so that parameters can be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2008-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

  16. Hydrogen Production via a High-Efficiency Low-Temperature Reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Paul KT Liu; Theo T. Tsotsis

    2006-05-31

    Fuel cells are promoted by the US government as a viable alternative for clean and efficient energy generation. It is anticipated that the fuel cell market will rise if the key technical barriers can be overcome. One of them is certainly fuel processing and purification. Existing fuel reforming processes are energy intensive, extremely complicated and capital intensive; these disadvantages handicap the scale-down of existing reforming process, targeting distributed or on-board/stationary hydrogen production applications. Our project involves the bench-scale demonstration of a high-efficiency low-temperature steam reforming process. Hydrogen production can be operated at 350 to 400ºC with our invention, as opposed to >800ºC of existing reforming. In addition, our proposed process improves the start-up deficiency of conventional reforming due to its low temperature operation. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the invented process concept via a bench scale unit and verify mathematical simulation for future process optimization study. Under this project, we have performed the experimental work to determine the adsorption isotherm, reaction kinetics, and membrane permeances required to perform the process simulation based upon the mathematical model developed by us. A ceramic membrane coated with palladium thin film fabricated by us was employed in this study. The adsorption isotherm for a selected hydrotalcite adsorbent was determined experimentally. Further, the capacity loss under cyclic adsorption/desorption was confirmed to be negligible. Finally a commercial steam reforming catalyst was used to produce the reaction kinetic parameters required for the proposed operating condition. With these input parameters, a mathematical simulation was performed to predict the performance of the invented process. According to our simulation, our invented hybrid process can deliver 35 to 55% methane conversion, in comparison with the 12 and 18-21% conversion of

  17. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way

    2004-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the first year of research funding from DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2004. Composite membranes, consisting of a thin Pd alloy film supported on a porous substrate have been investigated as a means of reducing the membrane cost and improving H{sub 2} flux. An electroless plating technique was utilized to deposit subsequent layers of palladium and copper over zirconia and alumina-based microfilters. The composite membranes thus made were annealed and tested at temperatures ranging from 250 to 500 C, under very high feed pressures (up to 450 psig) using pure gases and gaseous mixtures containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S, with the purpose of determining the effects these variables had on the H{sub 2} permeation rate, selectivity and percent recovery. The inhibition caused by CO/CO{sub 2} gases on a 7 {micro}m thick Pd-Cu composite membrane was less than 17% over a wide range of compositions at 350 C. H{sub 2}S caused a strong inhibition of the H{sub 2} flux of the same Pd-Cu composite membrane, which is accentuated at levels of 100 ppm or higher. The membrane was exposed to 50 ppm three times without permanent damage. At higher H{sub 2}S levels, above 100 ppm the membrane suffered some physical degradation and its performances was severely affected. The use of sweep gases improved the hydrogen flux and recovery of a Pd-Cu composite membrane. Recently, we have been able to dramatically reduce the thickness of these Pd alloy membranes to approximately one micron. This is significant because at this thickness, it is the cost of the porous support that controls the materials cost of a composite Pd alloy membrane, not the palladium inventory. Very recent results show that the productivity of our membranes is very high, essentially meeting the DOE pure hydrogen flux target value set by the DOE Hydrogen

  18. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

    2009-05-01

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

  19. Durable Cu composite catalyst for hydrogen production by high temperature methanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Yasuyuki

    2014-12-01

    Durable catalysts are necessitated for the high temperature methanol steam reforming in compact hydrogen processors. The high durability at 400 °C can be obtained with a composite Cu catalyst where a small amount of Cu-ZnO-ZrO2-Y2O3-In2O3 is coprecipitated on a zirconia support. The lifetime of the composite catalyst containing 3 wt.% Cu is estimated to be as long as 53 × 102 h at 400 °C to produce the full conversion at a contact time of 250 g h m-3. The deactivation rate empirically relates to the cube of the activity. The gradual deactivation is caused by the gradual reduction of the Cu surface amount and also by the reduction of the surface activity which is believed to decrease with an increase in the Cu particle size. The interaction between the thin layer of the coprecipitate and the support surface probably suppresses the aggregation of the coprecipitate leading to Cu sintering.

  20. Reasons for high-temperature superconductivity in the electron–phonon system of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Mazur, E. A.

    2015-08-15

    We have calculated the electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of the electron and phonon states, of the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH{sub 2} in the pressure interval 100–180 GPa. It is found that at a pressure of 175 GPa, a set of parallel planes of hydrogen atoms is formed due to a structural modification of the unit cell under pressure with complete accumulation of all hydrogen atoms in these planes. As a result, the electronic properties of the system become quasi-two-dimensional. We have also analyzed the collective synphase and antiphase vibrations of hydrogen atoms in these planes, leading to the occurrence of two high-energy peaks in the phonon density of states.

  1. First principles simulation of a superionic phase of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Fried, L E

    2006-04-10

    The authors have conducted Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at pressures of 5-66 GPa along the 900 K isotherm. They predict a superionic phase at 33 GPa, where the fluorine atoms are fixed in a bcc lattice while the hydrogen atoms diffuse rapidly with a diffusion constant of between 2 x 10{sup -5} and 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s. They find that a transformation from asymmetric to symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs in HF at 66 GPa and 900 K. With superionic HF they have discovered a model system where symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs at experimentally achievable conditions. Given previous results on superionic H{sub 2}O[1,2,3] and NH{sub 3}[1], they conclude that high P,T superionic phases of electronegative element hydrides could be common.

  2. Effect of high temperature hydrogen exposure on the strength and microstructure of mullite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Hull, David; Hallum, Garry M.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of near stoichiometric mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) by pure dry hydrogen gas was studied at 1050 and 1250 C for times up to 500 hr. The hydrogen preferentially attacked the grain boundaries of the mullite where an aluminosilicate glass was present. Corrosion of the mullite grains was observed after 125 hr at 1250 C. The hydrogen reaction removed SiO2 from the glassy grain boundaries and the mullite grains resulting in a porous alumina rich surface. At 1250 C the strength increased after short exposure times (at least up to 125 hr) and decreased by 53 percent after 500 hr. At 1050 C, all exposure times (25 to 500 hr) decreased the strength. At 500 hr room temperature strength of mullite exposed to 1050 C was reduced by 22 percent. The strength reduction after short exposure times at 1050 C is attributed to crystallization of the grain boundary glass phase.

  3. Prediction of a superionic phase of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at high temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Laurence; Goldman, Nir

    2006-03-01

    We report first principles simulations of hydrogen fluoride. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF were conducted at densities of 1.8 -- 4.0 g/cc along the 900 K isotherm. At experimentally observable conditions, we find a transition to a superionic phase, in which the fluorine ions exhibit a stable lattice and the hydrogen ions exhibit rapid diffusion. This phase is similar to the recently reported superionic phase in water, in that there is a symmetrization of the hydrogen bond, and we observe a transient partially covalent network at pressures greater than 66 GPa. In addition, we describe a mechanism for hydrogen diffusion through the fluorine sub- lattice. Our results provide evidence that superionic solids are prevalent in solids that manifest low temperature symmetric hydrogen bonding. The pressures needed to induce superionic diffusion in HF are significantly lower than what is required for other known superionic hydrides, and thus will permit much more extensive experimental studies of this exotic phase.

  4. Increased Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yaun-Min; Bennett, Murray S.; Yang, Liyou

    1997-07-08

    High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

  5. Increasing Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yaun-Min; Bennett, Murray S.; Yang, Liyou

    1999-08-24

    High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

  6. Parametric Evaluation of Large-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Using Different Advanced Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2009-09-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

  7. High methane formation during the temperature-programmed decomposition in flowing hydrogen of supported mononuclear and polynuclear carbonyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hucul, D.A.; Brenner, A.

    1981-01-14

    This paper presents the first detailed study of the temperature-programmed decomposition (TPDE) in flowing hydrogen of every element which forms a stable carbonyl. The investigation shows that these systems have an unexpectedly high propensity to form methane. The parameters affecting the yield of methane are described and this stoichiometric reaction is compared to catalytic methanation. (AT)

  8. Development of High Temperature SiC Based Hydrogen/Hydrocarbon Sensors with Bond Pads for Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liangyu; Biagi-Labiosa, Azlin M.; Ward, Benjamin J.; Lukco, Dorothy; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Lampard, Peter S.; Artale, Michael A.; Hampton, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes efforts towards the transition of existing high temperature hydrogen and hydrocarbon Schottky diode sensor elements to packaged sensor structures that can be integrated into a testing system. Sensor modifications and the technical challenges involved are discussed. Testing of the sensors at 500 C or above is also presented along with plans for future development.

  9. Composition for use in high-temperature hydrogen-fluorine environments and method for making the composition

    DOEpatents

    Kovach, L.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1980-08-22

    The present invention relates to a composition particularly suitable for use as structural components subject to high-temperature environments containing gaseous hydrogen and fluorine. The composition of the present invention consists essentially of lanthanum hexaboride-molybdenum diboride with dispersed silicon. The composition is formed by hot pressing a powder mixture of lanthanum hexaboride as the major constituent and molybdenum disilicide. This composition exhibits substantial resistance to thermal shock and corrosion in environments containing hydrogen and fluorine gases at material surface temperatures up to about 1850/sup 0/K. Upon exposure of the hot-pressed composition to high-temperature environments containing fluorine gases, a highly protective layer of lanthanum trifluoride containing dispersed molybdenum is formed on exposed surfaces of the composition.

  10. Composition for use in high-temperature hydrogen-fluorine environments and method for making the composition

    DOEpatents

    Kovach, Louis; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition particularly suitable for as structural components subject to high-temperature environments containing gaseous hydrogen and fluorine. The composition of the present invention consists essentially of lanthanum hexaboride-molybdenum diboride with dispersed silicon. The composition is formed by hot pressing a powder mixture of lanthanum hexaboride as the major constituent and molybdenum disilicide. This composition exhibits substantial resistance to thermal shock and corrosion in environments containing hydrogen and fluorine gases at material surface temperatures up to about 1850.degree. K. Upon exposure of the hot-pressed composition to high-temperature environments containing fluorine gases, a highly protective layer of lanthanum trifluoride containing dispersed molybdenum is formed on exposed surfaces of the composition.

  11. Influence of oxide layer morphology on hydrogen concentration in tin and niobium containing zirconium alloys after high temperature steam oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große, Mirco; Lehmann, Eberhard; Steinbrück, Martin; Kühne, Guido; Stuckert, Juri

    2009-03-01

    The influence of the oxide layer morphology on the hydrogen uptake during steam oxidation of (Zr,Sn) and Zr-Nb nuclear fuel rod cladding alloys was investigated in isothermal separate-effect tests and large-scale fuel rod bundle simulation experiments. From both it can be concluded that the concentration of hydrogen in the remaining metal strongly depends on the existence of tangential cracks in the oxide layers formed by the tetragonal - monoclinic phase transition in the oxide, known as breakaway effect. In these cracks hydrogen is strongly enriched. It results in very local high hydrogen partial pressure at the oxide/metal interface and in an increase of the hydrogen concentration in the metal at local regions where such cracks in the oxide layer exist. Due to this effect the hydrogen uptake of the remaining zirconium alloy does not depend monotonically on temperature. Differences between (Zr,Sn) and Zr-Nb alloys are caused by differences in the hydrogen production due to different oxidation kinetics and in the crack forming phase transformation in the oxides as well as in the mechanical stability of the oxides.

  12. Hydrogen Selective Inorganic membranes for Gas Separations under High Pressure Intermediate Temperature Hydrocarbonic Envrionment

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Ciora; Paul KT Liu

    2012-06-27

    In this project, we have successfully developed a full scale commercially ready carbon molecular sieve (CMS) based membrane for applications in H{sub 2} recovery from refinery waste and other aggressive gas streams. Field tests at a refinery pilot plant and a coal gasification facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to recovery hydrogen from hydrotreating and raw syngas respectively. High purity H{sub 2} and excellent stability of the membrane permeance and selectivity were obtained in testing conducted over >500 hours at each site. The results from these field tests as well as laboratory testing conclude that the membranes can be operated at high pressures (up to 1,000 psig) and temperatures (up to 300 C) in presence of aggressive contaminants, such as sulfur and nitrogen containing species (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, etc), condensable hydrocarbons, tar-like species, heavy metals, etc. with no observable effect on membrane performance. By comparison, similar operating conditions and/or environments would rapidly destroy competing membranes, such as polymeric, palladium, zeolitic, etc. Significant cost savings can be achieved through recovering H{sub 2} from refinery waste gas using this newly developed CMS membrane. Annual savings of $2 to 4MM/year (per 20,000 scfd of waste gas) can be realized by recovering the H{sub 2} for reuse (versus fuel). Projecting these values over the entire US market, potential H{sub 2} savings from refinery waste gases on the order of 750 to 1,000MM scfd and $750 to $1,000MM per year are possible. In addition to the cost savings, potential energy savings are projected to be ca. 150 to 220 tBTU/yr and CO{sub 2} gas emission reductions are projected to be ca. 5,000 to 6,500MMtons/year. The full scale membrane bundle developed as part of this project, i.e., 85 x 30 inch ceramic membrane tubes packaged into a full ceramic potting, is an important accomplishment. No comparable commercial scale product exists in the

  13. Influence of gaseous hydrogen on the mechanical properties of high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Tensile tests of six nickel-base and one cobalt-base alloy were conducted in 34.5 MN/sq m helium and hydrogen environments at temperatures from 297 K to 1,088 K. Mechanical properties tests of the nickel-base alloy MAR M-246 (Hf modified), in two cast conditions, were conducted in gaseous environments at temperatures from 297 K to 1,144 K and pressures from one atmosphere to 34.5 MN/sq m. The objective of this program was to obtain the mechanical properties of the various alloys proposed for use in space propulsion systems in a pure hydrogen environment at different temperatures and to compare with the mechanical properties in helium at the same conditions. All testing was conducted on solid specimens exposed to external gaseous pressure. Smooth and notched tensile properties were determined using ASTM tensile testing techniques, and creep-rupture life was determined using ASTM creep-rupture techniques. Low-cycle fatigue life was established by constant total strain and constant stress testing using smooth specimens and a closed-loop test machine.

  14. The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature water is studied by in situ monitoring corrosion potential (Ecorr), contact electric resistance (CER) and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS), and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The Ecorr and film resistance show large change when the environment is changed from hydrogenated water to oxygenated water and changeable with changing environment while the morphology and composition only show obvious distinction in the first cycle. The main factor controlling the electric/electrochemical properties of the oxide film is Ecorr.

  15. Development Program of IS Process Pilot Test Plant for Hydrogen Production With High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Iwatsuki; Atsuhiko Terada; Hiroyuki Noguchi; Yoshiyuki Imai; Masanori Ijichi; Akihiro Kanagawa; Hiroyuki Ota; Shinji Kubo; Kaoru Onuki; Ryutaro Hino

    2006-07-01

    At the present time, we are alarmed by depletion of fossil energy and effects on global environment such as acid rain and global warming, because our lives depend still heavily on fossil energy. So, it is universally recognized that hydrogen is one of the best energy media and its demand will be increased greatly in the near future. In Japan, the Basic Plan for Energy Supply and Demand based on the Basic Law on Energy Policy Making was decided upon by the Cabinet on 6 October, 2003. In the plan, efforts for hydrogen energy utilization were expressed as follows; hydrogen is a clean energy carrier without carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission, and commercialization of hydrogen production system using nuclear, solar and biomass, not fossil fuels, is desired. However, it is necessary to develop suitable technology to produce hydrogen without CO{sub 2} emission from a view point of global environmental protection, since little hydrogen exists naturally. Hydrogen production from water using nuclear energy, especially the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is one of the most attractive solutions for the environmental issue, because HTGR hydrogen production by water splitting methods such as a thermochemical iodine-sulfur (IS) process has a high possibility to produce hydrogen effectively and economically. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been conducting the HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) project from the view to establishing technology base on HTGR and also on the IS process. In the IS process, raw material, water, is to be reacted with iodine (I{sub 2}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) to produce hydrogen iodide (HI) and sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), the so-called Bunsen reaction, which are then decomposed endo-thermically to produce hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}), respectively. Iodine and sulfur dioxide produced in the decomposition reactions can be used again as the reactants in the Bunsen reaction. In JAEA, continuous

  16. System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-11-01

    Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

  17. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2006-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the a three year University Coal Research grant (DEFG26-03NT41792) at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2006. We made excellent progress toward our goal of contributing to the development of high productivity, sulfur tolerant composite metal membranes for hydrogen production and membrane reactors. Composite Pd and Pd alloy metal membranes with thin metal films (1-7 {micro}m) were prepared on porous stainless steel and ceramic supports that meet or exceed the DOE 2010 and 2015 pure hydrogen flux targets at differential pressure of only 20 psi. For example, a 2 {micro}m pure Pd membrane on a Pall AccuSep{reg_sign} substrate achieved an ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation factor of over 6000, with a pure hydrogen flux of 210 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at only 20 psig feed pressure. Similar performance was achieved with a Pd{sub 80}Au{sub 20} composite membrane on a similar stainless steel substrate. Extrapolating the pure hydrogen flux of this PdAu membrane to the DOE Fossil Energy target conditions of 150 psia feed pressure and 50 psia permeate pressure gives a value of 508 SCFH/ft{sup 2}, exceeding the 2015 target. At these thicknesses, it is the support cost that will dominate the cost of a large scale module. In a direct comparison of FCC phase PdCu and PdAu alloys on identical supports, we showed that a Pd{sub 85}Au{sub 15} (mass %) alloy membrane is not inhibited by CO, CO{sub 2}, or steam present in a water-gas shift feed mixture at 400 C, has better resistance to sulfur than a Pd{sub 94}Cu{sub 6} membrane, and has over twice the hydrogen permeance.

  18. Structural changes of filled ice Ic hydrogen hydrate under low temperatures and high pressures from 5 to 50 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hisako; Kagawa, Shingo; Tanaka, Takehiko; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Yagi, Takehiko; Ohishi, Yasuo; Nakano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed on the filled ice Ic structure of hydrogen hydrate at previously unexplored conditions of 5-50 GPa and 30-300 K using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. In situ x-ray diffractometry revealed that the cubic filled ice Ic structure transformed to tetragonal at low temperatures and high pressures; the axis ratio of the tetragonal phase changed depending on the pressure and temperature. These results were consistent with theoretical predictions performed via first principle calculations. The tetragonal phase was determined to be stable above 20 GPa at 300 K, above 15 GPa at 200 K, and above 10 GPa at 100 K. Further changes in the lattice parameters were observed from about 45-50 GPa throughout the temperature region examined, which suggests the transformation to another high-pressure phase above 50 GPa. In our previous x-ray study that was performed up to 80 GPa at room temperature, a similar transformation was observed above 50 GPa. In this study, the observed change in the lattice parameters corresponds to the beginning of that transformation. The reasons for the transformation to the tetragonal structure are briefly discussed: the tetragonal structure might be induced due to changes in the vibrational or rotational modes of the hydrogen molecules under low temperature and high pressure.

  19. Structural changes of filled ice Ic hydrogen hydrate under low temperatures and high pressures from 5 to 50 GPa.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hisako; Kagawa, Shingo; Tanaka, Takehiko; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Yagi, Takehiko; Ohishi, Yasuo; Nakano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2012-08-21

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed on the filled ice Ic structure of hydrogen hydrate at previously unexplored conditions of 5-50 GPa and 30-300 K using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. In situ x-ray diffractometry revealed that the cubic filled ice Ic structure transformed to tetragonal at low temperatures and high pressures; the axis ratio of the tetragonal phase changed depending on the pressure and temperature. These results were consistent with theoretical predictions performed via first principle calculations. The tetragonal phase was determined to be stable above 20 GPa at 300 K, above 15 GPa at 200 K, and above 10 GPa at 100 K. Further changes in the lattice parameters were observed from about 45-50 GPa throughout the temperature region examined, which suggests the transformation to another high-pressure phase above 50 GPa. In our previous x-ray study that was performed up to 80 GPa at room temperature, a similar transformation was observed above 50 GPa. In this study, the observed change in the lattice parameters corresponds to the beginning of that transformation. The reasons for the transformation to the tetragonal structure are briefly discussed: the tetragonal structure might be induced due to changes in the vibrational or rotational modes of the hydrogen molecules under low temperature and high pressure. PMID:22920129

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical stability of ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing atmospheres at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical stability of several ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing environments was analyzed with thermodynamic considerations in mind. Equilibrium calculations were made as a function of temperature, moisture content, and total system pressure. The following ceramic materials were considered in this study: SiC, Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, mullite, ZrO2, Y2O3, CaO, MgO, BeO, TiB2, TiC, HfC, and ZrC. On the basis of purely thermodynamic arguments, upper temperature limits are suggested for each material for long-term use in H2-containing atmospheres.

  1. Oxidation of Inconel 625 superalloy upon treatment with oxygen or hydrogen plasma at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesel, Alenka; Drenik, Aleksander; Elersic, Kristina; Mozetic, Miran; Kovac, Janez; Gyergyek, Tomaz; Stockel, Jan; Varju, Jozef; Panek, Radomir; Balat-Pichelin, Marianne

    2014-06-01

    Initial stages of Inconel 625 superalloy (Ni60Cr30Mo10Ni4Nb1) oxidation upon short treatment with gaseous plasma at different temperatures up to about 1600 K were studied. Samples were treated for different periods up to a minute by oxygen or hydrogen plasma created with a microwave discharge in the standing-wave mode at a pressure of 40 Pa and a power 500 W. Simultaneous heating of the samples was realized by focusing concentrated solar radiation from a 5 kW solar furnace directly onto the samples. The morphological changes upon treatment were monitored using scanning electron microscopy, compositional depth profiling was performed using Auger electron spectroscopy, while structural changes were determined by X-ray diffraction. The treatment in oxygen plasma caused formation of metal oxide clusters of three dimensional crystallites initially rich in nickel oxide with the increasing chromium oxide content as the temperature was increasing. At about 1100 K iron and niobium oxides prevailed on the surface causing a drop of the material emissivity at 5 μm. Simultaneously the NiCr2O4 compound started growing at the interface between the oxide film and bulk alloy and the compound persisted up to temperatures close to the Inconel melting point. Intensive migration of minority alloying elements such as Fe and Ti was observed at 1600 K forming mixed surface oxides of sub-micrometer dimensions. The treatment in hydrogen plasma with small admixture of water vapor did not cause much modification unless the temperature was close to the melting point. At such conditions aluminum segregated on the surface and formed well-defined Al2O3 crystals.

  2. Stabilities of filled ice II structure of hydrogen and helium hydrates at low temperatures and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, H.; Umeda, A.; Fujii, T.; Machida, S.; Shinozaki, A.; Kawamura, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yagi, T.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen hydrate is expected to be a hydrogen storage material, because it can contain relatively high hydrogen and its synthetic condition is mild comparable to industrial production. Three phases of hydrogen hydrate have been known so for. One is a clathrate hydrate sII [1], and others are filled ice II structure and filled ice Ic structure [2]. The ratio of water to hydrogen molecules for these phases are1:3, 1:6, 1:1, respectively. The clathrate sII containing only hydrogen molecules is stable only in a lower temperature region. At room temperature, above about 0.8 GPa filled ice II and above 2.5 GPa filled ice Ic are formed. The latter one survives at least up to 90 GPa [3]. However, investigations in low temperature and high pressure region have been limited. In this study, low temperature and high pressure experiments were performed by using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat in a region of 0.2 to 4.5 GPa and 130 to 300 K. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed a series of phase change from sII to filled ice Ic via filled ice II. For example, at 220K, sII transformed to filled ice II at approximately 0.7 GPa and further transformed to filled ice Ic structure at about 2.0 GPa. The present results experimentally confirmed the previously predicted phase boundaries. For filled ice II structure, Raman spectroscopy revealed that pressure dependency of vibration mode of guest hydrogen molecules and OH stretching mode of host water molecules changed at approximately 2.5 GPa. The XRD also showed change in axial ratio at the same pressure. These result suggested that state of filled ice II structure changed at about 2.5 GPa. Helium hydrate is known to form filled ice II structure [4], but high pressure study has not been yet fully performed. Similar experiments were carried out in a region of 0.2 to 5.0 GPa and 200 to 300 K. The results showed that the filled ice II structure did not transformed to filled ice Ic structure, but decomposed into helium

  3. Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Phase Diamond at High Temperature and Its Release

    SciTech Connect

    Tushar K Ghosh

    2008-10-13

    The objectives of this proposed research were: 91) Separation and storage of hydrogen on nanophase diamonds. It is expected that the produced hydrogen, which will be in a mixture, can be directed to a nanophase diamond system directly, which will not only store the hydrogen, but also separate it from the gas mixture, and (2) release of the stored hydrogen from the nanophase diamond.

  4. Studies of the use of heat from high temperature nuclear sources for hydrogen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    Future uses of hydrogen and hydrogen production processes that can meet the demand for hydrogen in the coming decades were considered. To do this, a projection was made of the market for hydrogen through the year 2000. Four hydrogen production processes were selected, from among water electrolysis, fossil based and thermochemical water decomposition systems, and evaluated, using a consistent set of ground rules, in terms of relative performance, economics, resource requirements, and technology status.

  5. Theory of radical-induced ignition of counterflowing hydrogen versus oxygen at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Helenbrook, B.T.; Im, H.G.; Law, C.K.

    1998-01-01

    Ignition of hydrogen and oxygen in counterflow was studied using asymptotic methods for temperatures above that of crossover. Starting with seven elementary reaction steps, a reduced mechanism was derived using chemical steady-state approximations for the O and OH radicals. An algebraic ignition criterion was derived using this mechanism which predicts the ignition state as a function of the parameters defining the system. This criterion successfully explains the behavior analogous to the first and second explosion limits observed in homogeneous hydrogen-oxygen mixtures. A bifurcation analysis was then performed to clarify the ignition behavior. This analysis demonstrated that an ignition turning point can occur solely through the interaction of radical species with no contribution from heat release. The source of this turning was found to be the reaction H + HO{sub 2} {yields} 20H, confirming results from numerical calculations. Finally, the regimes in which abrupt or monotonic transition to an ignited state were recalculated including the effect of this reaction.

  6. High Temperature Separation of Carbon Dioxide/Hydrogen Mixtures Using Facilitated Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Dixon, J.K.; Maginn, E.J.; Brennecke, J.F.

    2008-09-01

    Efficiently separating CO2 from H2 is one of the key steps in the environmentally responsible uses of fossil fuel for energy production. A wide variety of resources, including petroleum coke, coal, and even biomass, can be gasified to produce syngas (a mixture of COand H2). This gas stream can be further reacted with water to produce CO2 and more H2. Once separated, the CO2 can be stored in a variety of geological formations or sequestered by other means. The H2 can be combusted to operate a turbine, producing electricity, or used to power hydrogen fuel cells. In both cases, onlywater is produced as waste. An amine functionalized ionic liquid encapsulated in a supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) can separate CO2 from H2 with a higher permeability and selectivity than any known membrane system. This separation is accomplished at elevated temperatures using facilitated transport supported ionic liquid membranes.

  7. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  8. Ternary MgTiX-alloys: a promising route towards low-temperature, high-capacity, hydrogen-storage materials.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Paul; van Thiel, Emile F M J; Notten, Peter H L

    2007-01-01

    In the search for hydrogen-storage materials with a high gravimetric capacity, Mg(y)Ti((1-y)) alloys, which exhibit excellent kinetic properties, form the basis for more advanced compounds. The plateau pressure of the Mg--Ti--H system is very low (approximately 10(-6) bar at room temperature). A way to increase this pressure is by destabilizing the metal hydride. The foremost effect of incorporating an additional element in the binary Mg--Ti system is, therefore, to decrease the stability of the metal hydride. A model to calculate the effect on the thermodynamic stability of alloying metals was developed by Miedema and co-workers. Adopting this model offers the possibility to select promising elements beforehand. Thin films consisting of Mg and Ti with Al or Si were prepared by means of e-beam deposition. The electrochemical galvanostatic intermittent titration technique was used to obtain pressure-composition isotherms for these ternary materials and these isotherms reveal a reversible hydrogen-storage capacity of more than 6 wt. %. In line with the calculations, substitution of Mg and Ti by Al or Si indeed shifts the plateau pressure of a significant part of the isotherms to higher pressures, while remaining at room temperature. It has been proven that, by controlling the chemistry of the metal alloy, the thermodynamic properties of Mg-based hydrides can be regulated over a wide range. Hence, the possibility to increase the partial hydrogen pressure, while maintaining a high gravimetric capacity creates promising opportunities in the field of hydrogen-storage materials, which are essential for the future of the hydrogen economy. PMID:17879246

  9. Low-temperature embrittlement of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel-718 by high pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Notched specimens of titanium alloy and Inconel-718 exhibit little reduction of notch strength at certain low temperatures under 2000 lb/sq in. hydrogen, unnotched specimens are not embrittled at these temperatures. The degree of Inconel-718 embrittlement is lower than earlier observations under 1000 lb/sq in. hydrogen.

  10. High speed hydrogen/graphite interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Hamman, R.; Sharma, O. P.; Harrje, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Various aspects of a research program on high speed hydrogen/graphite interaction are presented. Major areas discussed are: (1) theoretical predictions of hydrogen/graphite erosion rates; (2) high temperature, nonequilibrium hydrogen flow in a nozzle; and (3) molecular beam studies of hydrogen/graphite erosion.

  11. Diffusion of hydrogen through platinum membranes at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, I.-M.; Eugster, H. P.; Berens, P.; Weare, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen through platinum membranes has been measured at 450, 500, 550 and 600 C at 2000 bar pressure, using the hydrogen sensor technique. Ag + AgCl + 3M HCl was the starting solution inside the platinum tube. Hydrogen diffuses out of the platinum tube into a system containing Fe2O3 + Fe3O4 + H2O; that is, a solution with a fixed hydrogen fugacity. After quench, the drop in hydrogen fugacity inside the platinum tube was calculated from measurements of pH and chloride molality. The hydrogen fugacity is initially roughly proportional to the square root of time. Diffusion constants were calculated from these data by numerical integration.

  12. Properties of materials in high pressure hydrogen at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental efforts in this program for this period. Mechanical property tests of wrought and cast nickel-base alloys and one wrought cobalt-base alloy were conducted in 34.5 MN/sq m (5000-psig) helium and hydrogen or hydrogen mixtures. Comparison of test results was made to determine degradation of properties due to the hydrogen environments. All testing was conducted on solid specimens exposed to external gaseous pressure. Specific mechanical properties determined and the testing methods used are summarized.

  13. Solubility of, and hydrogen ion adsorption on, some metal oxides in aqueous solutions to high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Benezeth, P.; Wesolowski, D.J.; Anovitz, L.M.; Machesky, M.L.; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Hyde, K.E.

    1997-08-01

    Solubility of boehmite (AlOOH), ferrous hydroxide (Fe(OH)2)/magnetite (Fe3O4), zincite (ZnO), and brucite (Mg(OH)2) were measured over a range of temperatures (AlOOH, 100-290 C; Fe(OH)2/Fe3O4, 100-250 C; ZnO, 50-290 C; Mg(OH)2, 60-200 C) using in situ pH measurements. A hydrogen-electrode concentration cell was used; the pH range depended on the oxide. The solubility results for boehmite mainly demonstrate the method viability, while those for zincite are mainly restricted to mildly acidic to neutral pH where Zn{sup 2+} predominates in solution. The magnetite (presumably coated with Fe(OH)2) solubilities extend from pHs > 5 and, because of relevance to water/steam cycles of power plants, are compared in detail with previous studies. The same cell was used to investigate the surface adsorption-desorption thermodynamics of H ions on rutile (TiO2) and zincite to 290 C. Behavior of pH at zero-point-of-charge as function of temperature and application of the Stern-3-layer model were determined for this solid. The zincite study is still incomplete; preliminary results show trends that can be rationalized only qualitatively now with the zero- point-of-charge being apparently affected by hydration of the surface in basic solutions and specific adsorption of Na ions under the same conditions.

  14. Hydrogen Ingress in Steels During High-Temperature Oxidation in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Fayek, Mostafa; Keiser, James R; Meyer III, Harry M; More, Karren Leslie; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that hydrogen derived from water vapour can penetrate oxidizing alloys with detrimental effect. However, the complexities of tracking hydrogen in these materials have prevented the direct profiling of hydrogen ingress needed to understand these phenomena. Here we report hydrogen profiles in industrially-relevant alumina- and chromia- forming steels correlated with the local oxide-metal nano/microstructure by use of SIMS D2O tracer studies and experimental protocols to optimize D retention. The D profiles unexpectedly varied markedly among the alloys examined, which indicates mechanistic complexity but also the potential to mitigate detrimental water vapour effects by manipulation of alloy chemistry.

  15. Understanding microstructure-induced limitations of hydrogen transport in high temperature proton conductors: can nuclear microanalysis give an answer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Pascal

    2007-03-01

    High temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) are envisioned as electrolytes for fuel cells working at intermediate temperature (400 C -- 600 C) to complement Y:ZrO2 electrolytes operating at 800 C -- 1000 C. The most mature HTPC are doped perovskites (ABO3) where tetravalent cation B is partially substituted by a trivalent one. Protons can be introduced in the lattice as point defects corresponding to hydroxyl groups on oxygen ion sites. In the temperature region of interest for technological applications, lattice vibrations allow the diffusion of protons by jumping and reorientation of O-H bonds (hoping mechanism). BaCeO3 or SrCeO3-based perovskites doped with a rare earth are the most widely studied compounds. However the proton conductance of these ceramics and their chemical stability are lower than the calculated values on single crystals and not sufficient to fulfill technological requirements. In most cases, the reasons for these discrepancies lie in uncontrolled microstructures with inter- and intra-granular defects that act as barriers for hydrogen diffusion but are preferential paths for chemical degradation by hydrolysis or carbonatation. Despite this crucial point, very few efforts are devoted to the optimization of microstructure of HTPC. Microstructure induced limitations are usually evidenced via impedance measurements which enable determination of respective contributions of bulk and grain boundaries to overall conductivity. Further information on hydrogen transport relevant for improvement of microstructure design requires local methods for hydrogen concentration measurement. Nuclear microanalysis, based on the use of MeV light ions microbeam, meets this demand. According to the chosen technique, nuclear reaction, elastic recoil or forward coincident scattering, the nuclear microprobe gives 2D-3D quantitative information on hydrogen distribution and diffusion within microstructure and enables to identify barriers and short-circuits.

  16. Ultra high vacuum high precision low background setup with temperature control for thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDA-MS) of hydrogen in metals.

    PubMed

    Merzlikin, Sergiy V; Borodin, S; Vogel, D; Rohwerder, M

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly developed UHV-based high precision low background setup for hydrogen thermal desorption analysis (TDA) of metallic samples is presented. Using an infrared heating with a low thermal capacity enables a precise control of the temperature and rapid cool down of the measurement chamber. This novel TDA-set up is superior in sensitivity to almost every standard hydrogen analyzer available commercially due to the special design of the measurement chamber, resulting in a very low hydrogen background. No effects of background drift characteristic as for carrier gas based TDA instruments were observed, ensuring linearity and reproducibility of the analysis. This setup will prove to be valuable for detailed investigations of hydrogen trapping sites in steels and other alloys. With a determined limit of detection of 5.9×10(-3)µg g(-1) hydrogen the developed instrument is able to determine extremely low hydrogen amounts even at very low hydrogen desorption rates. This work clearly demonstrates the great potential of ultra-high vacuum thermal desorption mass spectroscopy instrumentation. PMID:25702992

  17. Integrated High Temperature Coal to Hydrogen System with CO2 Separation: Semi-Annual Progress Report 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, J A; Ku, A; Ramaswamy, V; Wei, W

    2005-12-21

    This is the first semi-annual progress report for the program "Integrated High Temperature Coal to Hydrogen System with CO2 Separation." The objective of the program is to develop a detailed design for a single high-temperature syngas-cleanup module to produce a pure stream of H2 from a coal-based system and to develop the new high-temperature membrane materials at the core of that design. The novel one-box process combines a shift reactor with a high-temperature CO2-selective membrane to convert CO to CO2, remove sulfur compounds, and remove CO2 in a simple, compact, fully integrated system. In the first six months of the program, a conceptual design for the one-box system was developed in Task 1 and the performance targets for the system and the membrane were evaluated. In Task 2.1 processes were developed for creating pore architectures in ceramics that are applicable to membrane structures. In Task 2.2, candidate materials were identified that have the potential for separation of CO2 and H2S at high temperatures.

  18. Effect of temperature on layer separation by plasma-hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Zengfeng; Michael, Nastasi A; Wang, Yongqiang

    2008-01-01

    We have studied hydrogen diffusion in plasma hydrogenated Si/SiGe/Si heterostructure at different temperatures. At low temperature, intrinsic point defects in the molecular beam epitaxy grown Si capping layer are found to compete with the buried strain SiGe layer for hydrogen trapping. The interaction of hydrogen with point defects affects the hydrogen long-range diffusion, and restricts the amount of hydrogen available for trapping by the SiGe layer. However, hydrogen trapping by the capping layer is attenuated with increasing hydrogenation temperature allowing more hydrogen to be trapped in the strain SiGe layer with subsequent surface blister formation. A potential temperature window for plasma hydrogenation induced layer separation is identified based on the combined considerations of trap-limited diffusion at low temperature and outdiffusion of H{sub 2} molecule together with the dissociation of Si-H bonds inside of H platelet at high temperature.

  19. Effect of temperature on layer separation by plasma hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Z. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Nastasi, M.; Rossi, F.; Shao, L.; Thompson, P. E.

    2008-12-22

    We have studied hydrogen diffusion in plasma hydrogenated Si/SiGe/Si heterostructure at different temperatures. At low temperature, intrinsic point defects in the molecular beam epitaxy grown Si capping layer are found to compete with the buried strain SiGe layer for hydrogen trapping. The interaction of hydrogen with point defects affects the hydrogen long-range diffusion, and restricts the amount of hydrogen available for trapping by the SiGe layer. However, hydrogen trapping by the capping layer is attenuated with increasing hydrogenation temperature allowing more hydrogen to be trapped in the strain SiGe layer with subsequent surface blister formation. A potential temperature window for plasma hydrogenation induced layer separation is identified based on the combined considerations of trap-limited diffusion at low temperature and outdiffusion of H{sub 2} molecule together with the dissociation of Si-H bonds inside of H platelet at high temperature.

  20. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  1. Proton-Conducting Nanocrystalline Ceramics for High-Temperature Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiling; Xu, Zhi; Trontz, Adam; Jing, Wenheng; Dong, Junhang

    2014-01-01

    The proton-conductive doped ceramic materials, including SrCe0.95Tb0.05O3-δ (SCTb), SrCe0.8Zr0.1Y0.1O3-δ (SCZY), and SrZr0.95Y0.05O3-δ (SZY), are synthesized in the forms of nanoparticles and nanocrystalline thin films on sapphire wafers and long-period grating (LPG) fibers. The H2 chemisorption and electrical conductivity of the nanocrystalline SCTb, SCZY, and SZY materials are measured at high temperature with and without the presence of CO2 gas. The resonant wavelength shifts ( Updelta λ_{{{{R,H}}_{ 2} }} ) of the SCTb, SCZY, and SZY thin-film coated LPGs in response to H2 concentration changes are studied in gas mixtures relevant to coal gasification syngas to evaluate their potential for high-temperature H2 detection. The results show that, at around 773.15 K (500 °C), SCTb has the highest H2 sensitivity but the most severe interferences from impurities such as CO2 and H2S; SZY has the best chemical resistance to impurities but the lowest H2 sensitivity; and SCZY exhibits high H2 sensitivity with reasonable chemical resistance.

  2. High temperature reactions of bibenzyl with elemental sulfur and hydrogen sulfide in the presence and absence of hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hei, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    High temperature reactions were done with bibenzyl and related compounds to study C-C bond cleavage under coal liquefaction conditions. Reactions were run in 12-ml stainless steel, 3.7-ml glass and 8.0-ml aluminum autoclaves. The range of temperatures studied was 250-515/sup 0/C and that of pressure was 0-1800 psi (initial). Mechanisms for the cleavage of the aromatic-aliphatic C-C bonds (..cap alpha..-cleavage) and the aliphatic-aliphatic C-C bond (..beta..-cleavage) have been postulated. The two sets of conditions studied were: (1) those which included some form of sulfur, and those which excluded sulfur. With H/sub 2/S present, the ..beta..-cleavage to toluene was extensively promoted. The rate of this reaction was dependent on the parameters of temperature, time, H/sub 2/D concentration, and reaction surface. This ..beta..-cleavage is postulated to occur by the decomposition of the ..cap alpha..-sulfenyl bibenzyl radical. Thermal decomposition of the ..cap alpha..-sulfenyl bibenzyl radical by a known ..beta..-scission reaction yields thiobenzaldehyde and a benzyl radical which are reduced to toluene or polymerized to high molecular weight products. With molecular hydrogen present, the ..cap alpha..-cleavage to benzene and ethylbenzene is promoted. The presence of H/sub 2/S in the bibenzyl-H/sub 2/ reaction was shown to decrease the yield of ..cap alpha..-products while enhancing the conversion to 1,1-diphenylethane. The rate of ..cap alpha..-cleavage was low under essentially non-reducing conditions in this study; i.e., argon, CO-H/sub 2/O, CO-H/sub 2/O-H/sub 2/S. In this study, the mixture of carbon monoxide and water with and without hydrogen sulfide was found to be essentially non-reducing.

  3. Kinetics of the reaction between hydrogen and sulfur under high-temperature Claus furnace conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, N.I.; Hyne, J.B. ); Brown, D.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The reaction H{sub 2} + (1/2)S{sub 2} {r equilibrium}H{sub 2}S has been studied as a function of temperature and residence time over the ranges 602--1290{degrees}C and 0.03--1.5 s in the absence of a catalyst. This paper shows that the combination of H{sub 2} and elemental sulfur vapor under the high-temperature conditions typical of a Claus sulfur recovery unit proceeds via a reversible homogeneous gas-phase reaction that is first order in both H{sub 2} and sulfur concentration and follows the rate law {minus}d(H{sub 2})/dt = k{sub 1}(H{sub 2})(S{sub 2}) {minus} k{sub 2}(H{sub 2}S) with a second-order recombination rate constant k{sub 1} = 1 {minus} 1 {times} 10{sup 3} atm{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} (A{sub 1} = (4.3 {plus minus} 0.2) {times} 10{sup 6} atm{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}H{sub 1} = 26 {plus minus} 1 kcal/mol) and first-order decomposition rate constant k{sub 2} = 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} {minus} 70 s{sup {minus}1} (A{sub 2} = (3.6 {plus minus} 1) {times} 10{sup 8} s{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}H{sub 2} = 48 {plus minus} 1 kcal/mol) over the temperature range studied. These findings can be used to exploit opportunities in acid gas processing, such as effecting improved efficiencies for O{sub 2} usage in oxygen- blown Claus units and maximizing H{sub 2} content in the tail gas.

  4. High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Dioxide Capture from Synthesis Gas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Rajinder P.; Dahe, Ganpat J.; Dudeck, Kevin W.; Welch, Cynthia F.; Berchtold, Kathryn A.

    2014-12-31

    Sustainable reliance on hydrocarbon feedstocks for energy generation requires CO₂ separation technology development for energy efficient carbon capture from industrial mixed gas streams. High temperature H₂ selective glassy polymer membranes are an attractive option for energy efficient H₂/CO₂ separations in advanced power production schemes with integrated carbon capture. They enable high overall process efficiencies by providing energy efficient CO₂ separations at process relevant operating conditions and correspondingly, minimized parasitic energy losses. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based materials have demonstrated commercially attractive H₂/CO₂ separation characteristics and exceptional tolerance to hydrocarbon fuel derived synthesis (syngas) gas operating conditions and chemical environments. To realize a commerciallymore » attractive carbon capture technology based on these PBI materials, development of high performance, robust PBI hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) is required. In this work, we discuss outcomes of our recent efforts to demonstrate and optimize the fabrication and performance of PBI HFMs for use in pre-combustion carbon capture schemes. These efforts have resulted in PBI HFMs with commercially attractive fabrication protocols, defect minimized structures, and commercially attractive permselectivity characteristics at IGCC syngas process relevant conditions. The H₂/CO₂ separation performance of these PBI HFMs presented in this document regarding realistic process conditions is greater than that of any other polymeric system reported to-date.« less

  5. High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Dioxide Capture from Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajinder P.; Dahe, Ganpat J.; Dudeck, Kevin W.; Welch, Cynthia F.; Berchtold, Kathryn A.

    2014-12-31

    Sustainable reliance on hydrocarbon feedstocks for energy generation requires CO₂ separation technology development for energy efficient carbon capture from industrial mixed gas streams. High temperature H₂ selective glassy polymer membranes are an attractive option for energy efficient H₂/CO₂ separations in advanced power production schemes with integrated carbon capture. They enable high overall process efficiencies by providing energy efficient CO₂ separations at process relevant operating conditions and correspondingly, minimized parasitic energy losses. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based materials have demonstrated commercially attractive H₂/CO₂ separation characteristics and exceptional tolerance to hydrocarbon fuel derived synthesis (syngas) gas operating conditions and chemical environments. To realize a commercially attractive carbon capture technology based on these PBI materials, development of high performance, robust PBI hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) is required. In this work, we discuss outcomes of our recent efforts to demonstrate and optimize the fabrication and performance of PBI HFMs for use in pre-combustion carbon capture schemes. These efforts have resulted in PBI HFMs with commercially attractive fabrication protocols, defect minimized structures, and commercially attractive permselectivity characteristics at IGCC syngas process relevant conditions. The H₂/CO₂ separation performance of these PBI HFMs presented in this document regarding realistic process conditions is greater than that of any other polymeric system reported to-date.

  6. Corrosion characteristics of Ni-base superalloys in high temperature steam with and without hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Daejong; Lee, Ho Jung; Jang, Changheui; Yoon, Duk Joo

    2013-10-01

    The hot steam corrosion behavior of Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 were evaluated in corrosion tests performed at 900 °C in steam and steam + 20 vol.% H2 environments. Corrosion rates of Alloy 617 was faster than that of Haynes 230 at 900 °C in steam and steam + 20 vol.% H2 environments. When hydrogen was added to steam, the corrosion rate was accelerated because added hydrogen increased the concentration of Cr interstitial defects in the oxide layer. Isolated nodular MnTiO3 oxides were formed on the MnCr2O4/Cr2O3 oxide layer and sub-layer Cr2O3 was formed in steam and steam + 20 vol.% H2 for Alloy 617. On the other hand, a MnCr2O4 layer was formed on top of the Cr2O3 oxide layer for Haynes 230. The extensive sub-layer Cr2O3 formation resulted from the oxygen or hydroxide inward diffusion in such environments. When hydrogen was added, the initial surface oxide morphology was changed from a convex shape to platelets because of the accelerated diffusion of cations under the oxide layer.

  7. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION FROM COAL-DERIVED GAS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way

    2001-07-31

    Recent advances have shown that Pd-Cu composite membranes are not susceptible to the mechanical, embrittlement, and poisoning problems that have prevented widespread industrial use of Pd for high temperature H2 separation. These membranes consist of a thin ({approx}1 mm) film of metal deposited on the inner surface of a porous metal or ceramic tube. Based on preliminary results, thin Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} films are expected to exhibit hydrogen flux up to ten times larger than commercial polymer membranes for H2 separation, and resist poisoning by H{sub 2}S and other sulfur compounds typical of coal gas. Similar Pd-membranes have been operated at temperatures as high as 750 C. The overall objective of the proposed project is to demonstrate the feasibility of using sequential electroless plating to fabricate Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 4}0 alloy membranes on porous supports for H{sub 2} separation. These following advantages of these membranes for processing of coal-derived gas will be demonstrated: High H{sub 2} flux; Sulfur tolerant, even at very high total sulfur levels (1000 ppm); Operation at temperatures well above 500 C; and Resistance to embrittlement and degradation by thermal cycling. The proposed research plan is designed to providing a fundamental understanding of: Factors important in membrane fabrication; Optimization of membrane structure and composition; Effect of temperature, pressure, and gas composition on H{sub 2} flux and membrane selectivity; and How this membrane technology can be integrated in coal gasification-fuel cell systems.

  8. High Temperature Oxidation of Silicon Carbide and Advanced Iron-Based Alloys in Steam-Hydrogen Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Keiser, James R; Brady, Michael P; Cheng, Ting; Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Pint, Bruce A; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    A side by side comparison of the oxidation behavior of zirconium alloys with SiC materials and advanced iron-based alloys is provided. Oxidation tests were conducted in steam and steam-hydrogen environments at 800-1350 C and 0.34-2MPa for durations up to 48 hours. Monolithic SiC specimens as well as SiC/SiC composites were examined during the study where the material recession mechanism appeared to be governed by silica layer volatilization at the surface for CVD SiC. A wide set of austenitic and ferritic steels were also examined where a critical Cr content (>20 wt.%) was shown to be necessary to achieve oxidation resistance at high temperatures. SiC materials and alumina-forming ferritic steels exhibited slowest oxidation kinetics; roughly two orders of magnitude lower than zirconium alloys.

  9. Semi-Coke–Supported Mixed Metal Oxides for Hydrogen Sulfide Removal at High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Mi; Yongyan, Zhang; Yongsheng, Zhu; Ting, Guo; Huiling, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To improve the desulfurization efficiency of sorbents at low cost, modified semi-coke was used as the substrate for mixed metal oxides (ZFM; oxides of zinc [Zn], iron [Fe], and manganese [Mn]) in hot gas desulfurization. Performance of the prepared ZFM/modified semi-coke (MS) sorbents were evaluated in a fixed-bed reactor in the temperature range 400–550°C. Results showed that the molar ratio of Mn to Zn, effect of the substrate, the calcination temperature, and the sulfidation temperature influenced the performance of the sorbents. Optimum conditions for the preparation of the ZFM/MS sorbents were molar ratio of Mn(NO3)2·6H2O, Zn(NO3)2, and Fe(NO3)3, 0.6:1:2; mass ratio of ZFM0.6 to modified semi-coke support, 1:1; and calcination temperature, 600°C. The ZFM0.6/MS sorbent thus prepared exhibited the best sorption sulfur capacity of 27.46% at 450°C. PMID:22783061

  10. Behavior of hydrogen in alpha-iron at lower temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the low temperature anomalies in the hydrogen occlusive behavior of alpha iron can be explained by means of a molecular occlusion theory. This theory proposes that the stable state of the absorbed hydrogen changes from atomic at high temperatures to molecular as the temperature is lowered below a critical value. Theories proposing to explain the anomalous behavior as being due to the capture, at lower temperatures, of hydrogen in traps are shown to be unacceptable.

  11. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2005-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the second year of research funding from DOE Grant DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2004 through August of 2005. We have reformulated our Pd plating process to minimize the presence of carbon contamination in our membranes. This has improved durability and increased permeability. We have developed techniques for plating the outside diameter of ceramic and metal substrate tubes. This configuration has numerous advantages including a 40% increase in specific surface area, the ability to assay the alloy composition non-destructively, the ability to potentially repair defects in the plated surface, and the ability to visually examine the plated surfaces. These improvements have allowed us to already meet the 2007 DOE Fossil Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target of 100 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a hydrogen partial pressure difference of 100 psi with several Pd-Cu alloy membranes on ceramic microfilter supports. Our highest pure H{sub 2} flux on inexpensive, porous alumina support tubes at the DOE target conditions is 215 SCFH/ft{sup 2}. Progress toward meeting the other DOE Fossil Energy performance targets is also summarized. Additionally, we have adapted our membrane fabrication procedure to apply Pd and Pd alloy films to commercially available porous stainless steel substrates. Stable performance of Pd-Cu films on stainless steel substrates was demonstrated over a three week period at 400 C. Finally, we have fabricated and tested Pd-Au alloy membranes. These membranes also exceed both the 2007 and 2010 DOE pure H{sub 2} flux targets and exhibit ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities of over 1000 at partial pressure difference of 100 psi.

  12. Corrosion Behavior of NiCrFe Alloy 600 in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; ME Hanson

    2004-11-02

    The corrosion behavior of Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) is investigated in hydrogenated water at 260 C. The corrosion kinetics are observed to be parabolic, the parabolic rate constant being determined by chemical descaling to be 0.055 mg dm{sup -2} hr{sup -1/2}. A combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, are used to identify the oxide phases present (i.e., spinel) and to characterize their morphology and thickness. Two oxide layers are identified: an outer, ferrite-rich layer and an inner, chromite-rich layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with argon ion milling and target factor analysis is applied to determine spinel stoichiometry; the inner layer is (Ni{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, while the outer layer is (Ni{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})(Fe{sub 0.85}Cr{sub 0.15}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. The distribution of trivalent iron and chromium cations in the inner and outer oxide layers is essentially the same as that found previously in stainless steel corrosion oxides, thus confirming their invariant nature as solvi in the immiscible spinel binary Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} (or NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Although oxidation occurred non-selectively, excess quantities of nickel(II) oxide were not found. Instead, the excess nickel was accounted for as recrystallized nickel metal in the inner layer, as additional nickel ferrite in the outer layer, formed by pickup of iron ions from the aqueous phase, and by selective release to the aqueous phase.

  13. Corrosion Behavior of 304 Stainless Steel in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; M. Hanson

    2001-05-04

    The corrosion behavior of an austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400) has been characterized in a 10,000 hour test conducted in hydrogenated, ammoniated water at 260 C. The corrosion kinetics were observed to follow a parabolic rate dependency, the parabolic rate constant being determined by chemical descaling to be 1.16 mg dm{sup -2} hr{sup -1/2}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with argon ion milling and target factor analysis, was applied to provide an independent estimate of the rate constant that agreed with the gravimetric result. Based on the distribution of the three oxidized alloying constituents (Fe, Cr, Ni) with respect to depth and elemental state, it was found that: (a) corrosion occurs in a non-selective manner, and (b) the corrosion film consists of two spinel oxide layers--a ferrite-based outer layer (Ni{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})(Fe{sub 0.95}Cr{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 4} on top of a chromite-based inner layer (Ni{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})(Cr{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. These compositions agree closely with the solvi phases created by immiscibility in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} binary, implying that immiscibility plays an important role in the phase separation process.

  14. Zinc Treatment Effects on Corrosion Behavior of 304 Stainless Steel in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; M. Hanson

    2001-03-20

    Trace levels of soluble zinc(II) ions (30 ppb) maintained in mildly alkaline, hydrogenated water at 260 C were found to lower the corrosion rate of austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400) by about a factor of five, relative to a non-zinc baseline test after 10,000 hr. Characterizations of the corrosion oxide layer via grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with argon ion milling and target factor analysis, confirmed the presence of two spinel oxide phases and minor amounts of recrystallized nickel. Based on the distribution of the three oxidized alloying constituents (Fe, Cr, Ni) with respect to depth and oxidation state, it was concluded that: (a) corrosion occurs in a non-selective manner, but approximately 30% of the oxidized iron is released to the water, and (b) the two spinel oxides exist as a ferrite-based outer layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.95}Cr{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 4} on top of a chromite-based inner layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.7})(Fe{sub 0.4}Cr{sub 0.6}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. These results suggest that immiscibility in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} binary may play a role in controlling the zinc content of the outer layer. On the other hand, the lower corrosion rate caused by zinc additions is believed to be a consequence of corrosion oxide film stabilization due to the substitution reaction equilibrium: z Zn{sup 2+}(aq) + FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) {approx} z Fe{sup 2+}(aq) + (Zn{sub z}Fe{sub 1-z})Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s). The liquid-solid distribution coefficient for the reaction, defined by the ratio of total zinc to iron ion concentrations in solution divided by the Zn(II)/Fe(II) ratio in the solid, z/(1-z), was found to be 0.184. This interpretation is consistent with the benefits of zinc treatment being concentration dependent.

  15. Zinc Treatment Effects on Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 600 in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; ME Hanson

    2004-11-16

    Trace levels of soluble zinc(II) ions (30 ppb) maintained in mildly alkaline, hydrogenated water at 260 C were found to reduce the corrosion rate of Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) by about 40% relative to a non-zinc baseline test [2]. Characterizations of the corrosion oxide layer via SEM/TEM and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of a chromite-rich oxide phase and recrystallized nickel. The oxide crystals had an approximate surface density of 3500 {micro}m{sup -2} and an average size of 11 {+-} 5 nm. Application of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with argon ion milling, followed by target factor analyses, permitted speciated composition vs. depth profiles to be obtained. Numerical integration of the profiles revealed that: (1) alloy oxidation occurred non-selectively and (2) zinc(II) ions were incorporated into the chromite-rich spinel: (Zn{sub 0.55}Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.15})(Fe{sub 0.25}Cr{sub 0.75}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. Spinel stoichiometry places the trivalent ion composition in the single phase oxide region, consistent with the absence of the usual outer, ferrite-rich solvus layer. By comparison with compositions of the chromite-rich spinel obtained in the non-zinc baseline test, it is hypothesized that zinc(II) ion incorporation was controlled by the equilibrium for 0.55 Zn{sup 2+}(aq) + (Ni{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) {r_equilibrium} 0.40 Ni{sup 2+}(aq) + 0.15 Fe{sup 2+}(aq) + (Zn{sub 0.55}Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.15})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}(s). It is estimated that only 8% of the Ni(II) ions generated during non-selective oxidation of the alloy were retained as Ni(II) in the corrosion layer; the remainder either recrystallized to Ni(0) (38%) or were released to the aqueous phase (54%).

  16. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  17. Cyclic-load crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade II steel in high-pressure hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    ASME SA-105 Grade II steel, which is used in high-pressure hydrogen compressor systems, is similar to steels used or considered for use in high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels and pipelines. This paper summarizes the results of a program conducted to provide cyclic-load crack growth rate (da/dN) data for a fracture mechanics analysis of a 15,000 psi hydrogen compressor facility which contains pulse quieter and after-cooler separator vessels constructed of the ASME SA-105 Grade II steel. Included in the program were tests performed to assist in establishing operating procedures that could minimize the effect of hydrogen on crack growth rates during operation.

  18. Recent Progress At The Idaho National Laboratory In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production

    SciTech Connect

    C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Herring; J. Hartvigsen

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying electrolysis of steam and coelectrolysis of steam / carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Single button cell tests as well as multi-cell stack testing have been conducted. Multi-cell stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec, Inc (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA) and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to 15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

  19. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  20. Enhanced performance and stability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell by incorporating zirconium hydrogen phosphate in catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Olivia; Su, Huaneng; Linkov, Vladimir; Pollet, Bruno G.; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2015-03-01

    Zirconium hydrogen phosphate (ZHP) together with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) polymer binder is incorporated into the catalyst layers (CLs) of ABPBI (poly(2,5-benzimidazole))-based high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFCs) to improve its performance and durability. The influence of ZHP content (normalised with respect to dry PTFE) on the CL properties are structurally characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Electrochemical analyses of the resultant membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) are performed by recording polarisation curves and impedance spectra at 160 °C, ambient pressure and humidity. The result show that a 30 wt.% ZHP/PTFE content in the CL is optimum for improving fuel cell performance, the resultant MEA delivers a peak power of 592 mW cm-2 at a cell voltage of 380 mV. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) indicate that 30% ZHP in the CL can increase the proton conductivity compared to the pristine PTFE-gas diffusion electrode (GDE). A short term stability test (∼500 h) on the 30 wt.% ZHP/PTFE-GDE shows a remarkable high durability with a degradation rate as low as ∼19 μV h-1 at 0.2 A cm-2, while 195 μV h-1 was obtained for the pristine GDE.

  1. Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175°C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115°C and 145°C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175°C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145°C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H(2)O(2) modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H(2)O(2) displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated. PMID:21945550

  2. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S.

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  3. Emergence of a High-Temperature Superconductivity in Hydrogen Cycled pd Compounds as AN Evidence for Superstoihiometric H/d Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, Andrei; Castano, Carlos; Miley, George; Lipson, Andrei; Lyakhov, Boris; Mitin, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    Transport and magnetic properties of hydrogen cycled PdHx and Pd/PdO:Hx (x ~ (4/6) × 10-4) nano-composite consisting of a Pd matrix with hydrogen trapped inside dislocation cores have been studied. The results suggest emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity state of a condensed hydrogen phase confined inside deep dislocation cores in the Pd matrix. The possible role of hydrogen/deuterium filled dislocation nano-tubes is discussed. These dislocation cores could be considered as active centers of LENR triggering due to (i) short D-D separation distance (~Bohr radius); (ii) high-local D-loading in the Pd and the corresponding effective lattice compression; (iii) a large optic phonon energy resulting in a most effective lattice-nuclei energy transfer.

  4. Development of Tritium Permeation Analysis Code and Tritium Transport in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Coupled with Hydrogen Production System

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

    2010-06-01

    Abstract – A tritium permeation analyses code (TPAC) was developed by Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of analyzing tritium distributions in very high temperature reactor (VHTR) systems, including integrated hydrogen production systems. A MATLAB SIMULINK software package was used in developing the code. The TPAC is based on the mass balance equations of tritium-containing species and various forms of hydrogen coupled with a variety of tritium sources, sinks, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and neutron reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, and 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of tritium and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems, including high temperature electrolysis and sulfur-iodine processes.

  5. Evidence for Dominant Role of Tunneling in Condensed Phases and at High Temperatures: Double Hydrogen Transfer in Porphycenes.

    PubMed

    Ciąćka, Piotr; Fita, Piotr; Listkowski, Arkadiusz; Radzewicz, Czesław; Waluk, Jacek

    2016-01-21

    Investigation of the double hydrogen transfer in porphycene, its 2,7,12,17-tetra-tert-butyl derivative, and their N-deuterated isotopologues revealed the dominant role of tunneling, even at room temperature in condensed phase. Ultrafast optical spectroscopy with polarized light employed in a wide range of temperatures allowed the identification and evaluation of contributions of two tunneling modes: vibrational ground-state tunneling, occurring from the zero vibrational level, and vibrationally activated, via a large amplitude, low-frequency mode. Good correspondence was found between the rates of incoherent tunneling occurring in condensed phase and the values estimated on the basis of tunneling splittings observed in molecules isolated in supersonic jets or helium nanodroplets. The results provide solid experimental insight into widely proposed quantum facets of ubiquitous hydrogen-transfer phenomena. PMID:26727277

  6. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The

  7. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2-5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen.

  8. Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jr., C. E.

    1981-03-01

    The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics (Thomson scattering, microwave/far-infrared interferometer, pyroelectric radiometer, hard x-ray detector).

  9. Low-temperature synthesis of microcrystalline 3C-SiC film by high-pressure hydrogen-plasma-enhanced chemical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Hiromasa; Hori, Takahiro; Mori, Tetsuya; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    The synthesis of microcrystalline 3C-SiC films on glass substrates at relatively low temperatures (<=600 °C) by the plasma-enhanced chemical transport method was carried out using a high-pressure pure hydrogen glow discharge. This method used the chemical erosion products of graphite and silicon in the hydrogen plasma as the deposition source. The temperature dependence of the etching rate of graphite and the generated volatile C-species were investigated by exposing sintered graphite to a pure hydrogen plasma at 100 Torr. Infrared absorption gas analysis indicated that the C-related film precursor generated from the graphite was mainly CH4. The etch rate of graphite reached a maximum at a sample temperature of 200 °C. The deposition rate of the SiC film prepared at a hydrogen pressure of 200 Torr increased monotonically from 14 to 29 nm min-1 with an increase in substrate temperature (Tsub) from 100 to 600 °C. The Si/C composition ratio in the films was independent of Tsub and all the film compositions were nearly stoichiometric. The prepared SiC films were microcrystalline 3C-SiC. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the film quality significantly depends on Tsub. The electrical conductivity of the films at room temperature was found to increase exponentially from 3 × 10-4 to 1.7 S cm-1 with Tsub.

  10. High-temperature stability of c-Si surface passivation by thick PECVD Al2O3 with and without hydrogenated capping layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Cast, Pierre; Kania, Daniel; Heller, René; Kuehnhold, Saskia; Hofmann, Marc; Rentsch, Jochen; Preu, Ralf

    2012-08-01

    We are studying the thermal stability of thick hydrogenated amorphous aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layers (20-50 nm) prepared by a high-throughput plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposition (PECVD) technique for the electrical passivation of crystalline silicon surfaces. These passivation layers can be applied alone or covered by a capping layer like amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiNx) or amorphous hydrogenated silicon oxide (SiOx), also prepared by PECVD. After firing at 870 °C for approximately 3 s, the layers show blistering for Al2O3 of 30 nm or higher, independently from the capping layer. For thinner Al2O3, no blistering can be observed even using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Very long carrier lifetimes up to 900 μs was obtained in passivated p-Si (1 Ωcm) wafer after annealing and firing, without observing a strong influence of the layer thickness and the capping layer. All the layer stacks, including the stacks with SiNx capping layer, show high negative charge densities in the layer (1-4 × 1012 cm-2). Additionally, low interface defect densities (˜1011 cm-2 eV-1), which could be achieved with and without a hydrogenated capping layer, were measured even after firing. To explain these phenomena, hydrogen concentration depth profiles were measured by nuclear reaction analysis. These measurements have shown that, at the Al2O3-Si interface, hydrogen atomic concentration ranging 5-7% after annealing and 4% after firing are obtained independently from the capping hydrogen concentration. We conclude that PECVD Al2O3 layers of 20 nm or thicker can provide enough hydrogen to passivate the interface defects, even after a high temperature step. However, the layer thickness should be limited to 30 nm in order to avoid the blistering.

  11. THE IMPACT OF TRACE ADDITIVES ON THE APPARENT SOLUBILITY OF HYDROGEN IN HEAVY OIL AND RELATED FEEDSTOCKS AT LOW AND HIGH TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Jalal Abedi

    2002-09-01

    A systematic investigation was conducted to provide an accurate determination of hydrogen solubility in liquid media in temperatures in the range of 25-250 C and pressures in the range of 0.5-8 MPa. Results were obtained by an indirect gas solubility measurement method. The method was intended for use with high-resolution camera. The hydrogen solubility measurements were indirect and were based on pressure changes at constant temperature and measured volumes. Since the volume of the view cell was fixed the volume available for the vapor phase could be determined by measuring the location of the liquid-vapor interface. The interface was located to within the height of one pixel using high-resolution camera, which added {+-} 0.4 ml to the uncertainty of the vapor volume. Liquid-liquid interface locations were measured with equal precision. The accuracy of the method was illustrated through hydrogen solubility measurements in hexadecane and tetralin, which were in close agreement with the values available in the literature. Hydrogen solubilities in Athabasca bitumen vacuum bottoms (ABVB) were reported over a broad range of temperatures (80-250 C) and pressures (0.5-8 MPa).

  12. Metal-Borohydride-Modified Zr(BH4 )4 ⋅8 NH3 : Low-Temperature Dehydrogenation Yielding Highly Pure Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianmei; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Gu, Qinfen; Yu, Xuebin; Zhu, Min

    2015-10-12

    Due to its high hydrogen density (14.8 wt %) and low dehydrogenation peak temperature (130 °C), Zr(BH4 )4 ⋅8 NH3 is considered to be one of the most promising hydrogen-storage materials. To further decrease its dehydrogenation temperature and suppress its ammonia release, a strategy of introducing LiBH4 and Mg(BH4 )2 was applied to this system. Zr(BH4 )4 ⋅8 NH3 -4 LiBH4 and Zr(BH4 )4 ⋅8 NH3 -2 Mg(BH4 )2 composites showed main dehydrogenation peaks centered at 81 and 106 °C as well as high hydrogen purities of 99.3 and 99.8 mol % H2 , respectively. Isothermal measurements showed that 6.6 wt % (within 60 min) and 5.5 wt % (within 360 min) of hydrogen were released at 100 °C from Zr(BH4 )4 ⋅8 NH3 -4 LiBH4 and Zr(BH4 )4 ⋅8 NH3 -2 Mg(BH4 )2 , respectively. The lower dehydrogenation temperatures and improved hydrogen purities could be attributed to the formation of the diammoniate of diborane for Zr(BH4 )4 ⋅8 NH3 -4 LiBH4 , and the partial transfer of NH3 groups from Zr(BH4 )4 ⋅8 NH3 to Mg(BH4 )2 for Zr(BH4 )4 ⋅8 NH3 -2 Mg(BH4 )2 , which result in balanced numbers of BH4 and NH3 groups and a more active H(δ+) ⋅⋅⋅(-δ) H interaction. These advanced dehydrogenation properties make these two composites promising candidates as hydrogen-storage materials. PMID:26315468

  13. Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J.

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment were studied to enhance anaerobic digestion of organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The whole waste pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C or 145 Degree-Sign C had the highest biogas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas production of the whole waste decreased at 175 Degree-Sign C due to formation of refractory compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pretreatment to 145 Degree-Sign C and 175 Degree-Sign C were the best when considering only the free liquid fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment had a lag phase and the biogas production was not higher than MW pretreated samples. - Abstract: In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175 Degree-Sign C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C and 145 Degree-Sign C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175 Degree-Sign C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP

  14. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: an extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques.

    PubMed

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Meijer, Harro A J; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ(2)H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ(2)H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  15. Preparation of Proton Conductor SrZr1-xYxO3-α for Pure Hydrogen Separation in high temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Usui, Tateo; Iwao, Katayama

    The SrZr1-xYxO3-α of proton conductor was prepared by normal sintering and SPS (spark plasma sintering) methods in order to separate pure hydrogen gas from H2-containing mixed gases in high temperature range. The SrZr1-xYxO3-α has high proton conductivity under H2 gas atmosphere from 973 K to 1273 K. In this hydrogen separation system, hydrogen is oxidized to proton at the anode, and proton is reduced to hydrogen at the cathode using proton conductor by electrochemical method. Proton conductors SrZr0.9Y0.1O3-α obtained by normal sintering at 1580°C for 10 h and SPS at 1500°C for 3 min were found to be single phase of perovskite structure. Furthermore, the crystal structure of SrZr0.9Y0.1O3-α was chemically stable under H2 and CO2 gases atmosphere. Relative densities of SrZr0.9Y0.1O3-α obtained by SPS at 1400 and 1500°C were over 95 %. Furthermore, the relative density increased with sintering temperature and time of SPS. The proton conductivity of SrZr0.9Y0.1O3-α of SPS increased with sintering temperature, and was higher than one of normal sintering under wet 10 % H2 and Ar gases atmosphere. From the measurement of EMF (electromotive force) of hydrogen concentration cell at 800°C, the ionic transport number of SrZr0.9Y0.1O3-α of SPS at 1400°C for 5 min was about 1, and the electron conductivity was considerably low.

  16. Interaction between a high density-low temperature plasma and a frozen hydrogen pellet in a railgun injector

    SciTech Connect

    Grapperhaus, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    A model has been developed which describes the ablation process of frozen hydrogen pellets in an electromagnetic railgun. The model incorporates the neutral gas shielding model in which the pellet surface is heated by incident electrons from the plasma arc. The heated surface then ablates, forming a neutral cloud which attenuates the incoming electrons. The energy lost in the cloud by the electrons heats the ablatant material as it flows into the plasma arc. Under steady-state conditions, a scaling law for the ablation rate was derived as a function of plasma-arc temperature and density. In addition, flow conditions and the criteria for the existence of a steady-state solution were formulated and subsequently examined under simplifying assumptions. Comparison with experimentally observed ablation rates shows good qualitative agreement.

  17. Hydrogen incorporation into high temperature protonic conductors: Nuclear microprobe microanalysis by means of 1H(p, p) 1H scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.; Gallien, J.-P.; Khodja, H.; Daudin, L.; Berger, M.-H.; Sayir, A.

    2006-08-01

    Protonic conductivity of some solid state materials at an intermediate temperature range (400-600 °C), referred as high temperature protonic conductor (HTPC), suggests their application as electrolytes in electrochemical cells, batteries, sensors, etc. Among them, some perovskites can be protonic and electronic conductors. Several obstacles remain to achieve the full potential of these ceramic membranes, among them the lack of measurement techniques and of an unambiguous model for conductivity. A precise understanding of the transport mechanisms requires local profiling of hydrogen concentrations within the microstructure of the ceramic. We have used the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratoire Pierre SÜE to investigate quantitatively the spatial distribution of hydrogen after water heat treatment of textured perovskites, SrCe0.9Y0.1O3-δ and Sr3Ca1+xNb2-xO9-δ, x = 0.18, synthesized according to a melt-process developed at NASA GRC. A not very common method has been developed for hydrogen measurements in thin samples, 1H(p, p)1H elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry (ERCS). Early experiments have evidenced hydrogen concentration enhancement within grain boundaries.

  18. CARS study of linewidths of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules at high temperatures in a pulsed high-pressure H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I; Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M

    2005-03-31

    The results of measurements of individual line widths of the Q-branch of a hydrogen molecule and the corresponding coefficients of broadening caused by collisions with water molecules at T = 2700 K in a repetitively pulsed high-pressure (50-200 atm) hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber are presented. CARS spectra of individual Q{sub 1}-Q{sub 7} hydrogen lines, pressure pulses, and the broadband CARS spectra of the entire Q-branch of hydrogen are recorded simultaneously during a single laser pulse. The shape of line profiles was analysed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The temperature in the volume being probed was determined from the 'broadband' CARS spectra. The entire body of the experimental results gives information on the spectral linewidths, temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber during CARS probing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Using A High-Temperature Hydrogen Co-Generation Reactor To Optimize Both Economic and Environmental Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, Mark R.; Wood, Thomas W.; Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2004-07-01

    This paper reports the analysis of outcomes for a 3000 MWt HTGR plant, given price and cost assumptions, and determines what level of hydrogen and electricity production would optimize the plant economically and environmentally (carbon reduction). Coupling nuclear power with hydrogen production could fundamentally alter the character of the nuclear industry and nuclear technology’s development path. For this to happen, the hydrogen economy will have to be realized, and a new generation of reactors technically suitable to co-production of hydrogen with electric power must be developed and proven. The paper shows that the tradeoff between producing hydrogen through steam methane reformation and producing electricity is disproportionate and would require significant price increases for electricity to change the outcomes. It also found that estimate of shadow values for carbon credits was in the range now under discussion.

  20. High temperature electrolytic recovery of oxygen from gaseous effluents from the carbo-chlorination of lunar anorthite and the hydrogenation of ilmenite: A theoretical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erstfield, T. E.; Williams, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis discusses the compositions of gaseous effluents from the reaction of carbon and chlorine and of hydrogen with lunar anorthite and ilmenite, respectively. The computations consider the effects of the indigenous volatiles on the solid/gas reactions and on the composition of the effluent gases. A theoretical parameterization of the high temperature electrolysis of such gases is given for several types of solid ceramic electrolytes, and the effect of oxygen removal on the effluents is computed. Potential chemical interactions between the gases and the ceramic electrolytes are analyzed and discussed.

  1. Nanodiamond for hydrogen storage: temperature-dependent hydrogenation and charge-induced dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S

    2012-02-21

    Carbon-based hydrogen storage materials are one of hottest research topics in materials science. Although the majority of studies focus on highly porous loosely bound systems, these systems have various limitations including use at elevated temperature. Here we propose, based on computer simulations, that diamond nanoparticles may provide a new promising high temperature candidate with a moderate storage capacity, but good potential for recyclability. The hydrogenation of nanodiamonds is found to be easily achieved, in agreement with experiments, though we find the stability of hydrogenation is dependent on the morphology of nanodiamonds and surrounding environment. Hydrogenation is thermodynamically favourable even at high temperature in pure hydrogen, ammonia, and methane gas reservoirs, whereas water vapour can help to reduce the energy barrier for desorption. The greatest challenge in using this material is the breaking of the strong covalent C-H bonds, and we have identified that the spontaneous release of atomic hydrogen may be achieved through charging of hydrogenated nanodiamonds. If the degree of induced charge is properly controlled, the integrity of the host nanodiamond is maintained, which indicates that an efficient and recyclable approach for hydrogen release may be possible. PMID:22089370

  2. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  3. High capacity hydrogen storage nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Wellons, Matthew S

    2015-02-03

    A novel hydrogen absorption material is provided comprising a mixture of a lithium hydride with a fullerene. The subsequent reaction product provides for a hydrogen storage material which reversibly stores and releases hydrogen at temperatures of about 270.degree. C.

  4. Neutral hydrogen in high-temperature pinch plasmas and its influence on the ionization dynamics of impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preissing, N.; König, R.; Kolk, K. H.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1992-08-01

    The neutral-hydrogen density in a hot pinch plasma and in the surrounding halo is investigated spectroscopically, and its influence on the ionization dynamics of impurity ions is analyzed. The results are employed in the analysis of effective-ionization-rate coefficients, which are derived for Si viii to Si xii from the time evolution of the respective ions in the plasma.

  5. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  6. Hydrogenation of solid hydrogen cyanide HCN and methanimine CH2NH at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theule, P.; Borget, F.; Mispelaer, F.; Danger, G.; Duvernay, F.; Guillemin, J. C.; Chiavassa, T.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Hydrogenation reactions dominate grain surface chemistry in dense molecular clouds and lead to the formation of complex saturated molecules in the interstellar medium. Aims: We investigate in the laboratory the hydrogenation reaction network of hydrogen cyanide HCN. Methods: Pure hydrogen cyanide HCN and methanimine CH2NH ices are bombarded at room temperature by H-atoms in an ultra-high vacuum experiment. Warm H-atoms are generated in an H2 plasma source. The ices are monitored with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in reflection absorption mode. The hydrogenation products are detected in the gas phase by mass spectroscopy during temperature-programmed desorption experiments. Results: HCN hydrogenation leads to the formation of methylamine CH3NH2, and CH2NH hydrogenation leads to the formation of methylamine CH3NH2, suggesting that CH2NH can be a hydrogenation-intermediate species between HCN and CH3NH2. Conclusions: In cold environments the HCN hydrogenation reaction can produce CH3NH2, which is known to be a glycine precursor, and to destroy solid-state HCN, preventing its observation in molecular clouds ices.

  7. Metallic Hydrogen - Potentially a High Energy Rocket Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, John; Silvera, Ike

    2007-01-01

    Pure metallic hydrogen is predicted to have a specific impulse (Isp) of 1700 seconds, but the reaction temperature is too high for current engine materials. Diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen can reduce the reaction temperature to levels compatible with current material limits and still provide an Isp greater than 900 s. Metallic hydrogen has not yet been produced on earth, but experimental techniques exist that may change this situation. This paper will provide a brief description of metallic hydrogen and the status of experiments that may soon produce detectable quantities of this material in the lab. Also provided are some characteristics for diluted metallic hydrogen engines and launch vehicles.

  8. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Helmholtz free energy of fluid hydrogen at high density and high temperature is developed. This model aims at describing both pressure and temperature dissociation and ionization and bears directly on equations of state of partially ionized plasmas, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. This paper focuses on a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules and is devoted to the study of the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperatures. In the present model, the strong interactions are described with realistic potentials and are computed with a modified Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluid perturbation theory that reproduces Monte Carlo simulations to better than 3 percent. Theoretical Hugoniot curves derived from the model are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  9. A low-temperature co-fired ceramic micro-reactor system for high-efficiency on-site hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Maeder, Thomas; Santis-Alvarez, Alejandro J.; Poulikakos, Dimos; Muralt, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A ceramic-based, meso-scale fuel processor for on-board production of syngas fuel was demonstrated for applications in micro-scale solid-oxide fuel cells (μ-SOFCs). The processor had a total dimension of 12 mm × 40 mm × 2 mm, the gas reforming micro reactor occupying the hot end of a cantilever had outer dimensions of 12 × 18 mm. The device was fabricated through a novel progressive lamination process in low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology. Both, heating function and desired fluidic structures were integrated monolithically into the processor. Using catalytic partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon fuel (propane) as a reaction model, a thermally self-sustaining hydrogen production was achieved. The output flow is sufficiently high to drive an optimized single membrane μSOFC cell of about the same footprint as the micro reactor. Microsystem design, fabrication, catalyst integration as well as the chemical characterization are discussed in detail.

  10. Gas chromatography flow rates for determining deuterium/hydrogen ratios of natural gas by gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wanglu; Peng, Ping'an; Liu, Jinzhong

    2008-08-01

    The effects of the gas chromatography flow rate on the determination of the deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios of natural gas utilising gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/TC/IRMS) have been evaluated. In general, the measured deltaD values of methane, ethane and propane decrease with increase in column flow rate. When the column flow rate is 1 mL/min or higher, which is commonly used for the determination of D/H ratios of natural gas, the organic H in gas compounds may not be completely converted into hydrogen gas. Based on the results of experiments conducted on a GC column with an i.d. of 0.32 mm, a GC flow rate of 0.6 mL/min is proposed for determining the D/H ratios of natural gas by GC/TC/IRMS. Although this value may be dependent on the instrument conditions used in this work, we believe that correct deltaD values of organic compounds with a few carbon atoms are obtained only when relatively low GC flow rates are used for D/H analysis by GC/TC/IRMS. Moreover, as the presence of trace water could significantly affect the determination of D/H ratios, a newly designed inlet liner was used to remove trace water contained in some gas samples. PMID:18636428

  11. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1992-01-01

    The Helmholtz-free-energy model for nonideal mixtures of hydrogen atoms and molecules by Saumon and Chabrier (1991) is extended to describe dissociation and ionization in similar mixtures in chemical equilibrium. A free-energy model is given that describes partial ionization in the pressure and temperature ionization region. The plasma-phase transition predicted by the model is described for hydrogen mixtures including such components as H2, H, H(+), and e(-). The plasma-phase transition has a critical point at Tc = 15,300 K and Pc = 0.614 Mbar, and thermodynamic instability is noted in the pressure-ionization regime. The pressure dissociation and ionization of fluid hydrogen are described well with the model yielding information on the nature of the plasma-phase transition. The model is shown to be valuable for studying dissociation and ionization in astrophysical objects and in high-pressure studies where pressure and temperature effects are significant.

  12. Mechanistic studies of water electrolysis and hydrogen electro-oxidation on high temperature ceria-based solid oxide electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunjuan; Yu, Yi; Grass, Michael E; Dejoie, Catherine; Ding, Wuchen; Gaskell, Karen; Jabeen, Naila; Hong, Young Pyo; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Bluhm, Hendrik; Li, Wei-Xue; Jackson, Gregory S; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi; Eichhorn, Bryan W

    2013-08-01

    Through the use of ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) and a single-sided solid oxide electrochemical cell (SOC), we have studied the mechanism of electrocatalytic splitting of water (H2O + 2e(-) → H2 + O(2-)) and electro-oxidation of hydrogen (H2 + O(2-) → H2O + 2e(-)) at ∼700 °C in 0.5 Torr of H2/H2O on ceria (CeO2-x) electrodes. The experiments reveal a transient build-up of surface intermediates (OH(-) and Ce(3+)) and show the separation of charge at the gas-solid interface exclusively in the electrochemically active region of the SOC. During water electrolysis on ceria, the increase in surface potentials of the adsorbed OH(-) and incorporated O(2-) differ by 0.25 eV in the active regions. For hydrogen electro-oxidation on ceria, the surface concentrations of OH(-) and O(2-) shift significantly from their equilibrium values. These data suggest that the same charge transfer step (H2O + Ce(3+) <-> Ce(4+) + OH(-) + H(•)) is rate limiting in both the forward (water electrolysis) and reverse (H2 electro-oxidation) reactions. This separation of potentials reflects an induced surface dipole layer on the ceria surface and represents the effective electrochemical double layer at a gas-solid interface. The in situ XPS data and DFT calculations show that the chemical origin of the OH(-)/O(2-) potential separation resides in the reduced polarization of the Ce-OH bond due to the increase of Ce(3+) on the electrode surface. These results provide a graphical illustration of the electrochemically driven surface charge transfer processes under relevant and nonultrahigh vacuum conditions. PMID:23822749

  13. Quantifying residual hydrogen adsorption in low-temperature STMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natterer, F. D.; Patthey, F.; Brune, H.

    2013-09-01

    We report on low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy observations demonstrating that individual Ti atoms on hexagonal boron nitride dissociate and adsorb hydrogen without measurable reaction barrier. The clean and hydrogenated states of the adatoms are clearly discerned by their apparent height and their differential conductance revealing the Kondo effect upon hydrogenation. Measurements at 50 K and 5 × 10- 11 mbar indicate a sizable hydrogenation within only 1 h originating from the residual gas pressure, whereas measurements at 4.7 K can be carried out for days without H2 contamination problems. However, heating up a low-T STM to operate it at variable temperature results in very sudden hydrogenation at around 17 K that correlates with a sharp peak in the total chamber pressure. From a quantitative analysis we derive the desorption energies of H2 on the cryostat walls. We find evidence for hydrogen contamination also during Ti evaporation and propose a strategy on how to dose transition metal atoms in the cleanliest fashion. The present contribution raises awareness of hydrogenation under seemingly ideal ultra-high vacuum conditions, it quantifies the H2 uptake by isolated transition metal atoms and its thermal desorption from the gold plated cryostat walls.

  14. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Lassila, David H.; Bonner, Brian P.

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  15. Hydrogen Embrittlement Evaluation in Tensile Properties of Stainless Steels at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.

    2008-03-01

    The advanced design of fuel-cell vehicles requires high-pressure low-temperature hydrogen systems, which in turn requires a high-pressure low-temperature mechanical properties database to address hydrogen embrittlement issues. A very simple and safe mechanical properties testing procedure to evaluate low temperature hydrogen embrittlement has been developed and is reported here. Tensile properties of stainless steel, SUS 304, 304L and 316L, obtained by this simple method are in good agreement with previous data obtained in a high pressure chamber. The effect of hydrogen changed also with the amount of strain-induced martensitic transformation in those steels at low temperatures.

  16. Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Phase Transition in High Temperature Hydrogenated Water Using the Contact Electric Resistance (CER) Technique

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; M.A. Ando; N.F. Panayotou; C.D. Thompson

    2001-05-08

    Prior studies of Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 have shown the existence of a maximum in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in high temperature water (e.g., at 360 C), when testing is conducted over a range of dissolved (i.e., aqueous) hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentrations. It has also been shown that this maximum in SCC susceptibility tends to occur in proximity to the nickel/nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition, suggesting that oxide phase stability may affect primary water SCC (PWSCC) resistance. Previous studies have estimated the Ni/NiO transition using thermodynamic calculations based on free energies of formation for NiO and H{sub 2}O. The present study reports experimental measurements of the Ni/NiO transition performed using a contact electric resistance (CER) instrument. The CER is capable of measuring the surface resistance of a metal to determine whether it is oxide-covered or oxide-free at a given condition. The transition aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentration corresponding to the Ni/NiO equilibrium was measured at 288, 316, 338 and 360 C using high purity Ni specimens. The results showed an appreciable deviation (i.e., 7 to 58 scc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O) between the measured Ni/NiO transition and the theoretical Ni/NiO transition previously calculated using free energy data from the Journal of Solution Chemistry. The CER-measured position of the Ni/NiO transition is in good agreement with the maxima in PWSCC susceptibility at 338 and 360 C. The measured Ni/NiO transition provides a reasonable basis for estimating the aqueous H{sub 2} level at which the maximum in SCC susceptibility is likely to be observed at temperatures lower than 338 to 360 C, at which SCC tests are time-consuming to perform. Limited SCC data are presented which are consistent with the observation that SCC susceptibility is maximized near the Ni/NiO transition at 288 C.

  17. Facile fabrication of high-performance InGaZnO thin film transistor using hydrogen ion irradiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byung Du; Park, Jin-Seong; Chung, K. B.

    2014-10-20

    Device performance of InGaZnO (IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) are investigated as a function of hydrogen ion irradiation dose at room temperature. Field effect mobility is enhanced, and subthreshold gate swing is improved with the increase of hydrogen ion irradiation dose, and there is no thermal annealing. The electrical device performance is correlated with the electronic structure of IGZO films, such as chemical bonding states, features of the conduction band, and band edge states below the conduction band. The decrease of oxygen deficient bonding and the changes in electronic structure of the conduction band leads to the improvement of device performance in IGZO TFT with an increase of the hydrogen ion irradiation dose.

  18. High temperature furnace

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  19. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Alga Mastigocladus laminosus: Effects of Nitrogen, Temperature, and Inhibition of Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Hallenbeck, Patrick C.; Benemann, John R.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by nitrogen-limited cultures of a thermophilic blue-green alga (cyanobacterium), Mastigocladus laminosus, was studied to develop the concept of a high-temperature biophotolysis system. Biophotolytic production of hydrogen by solar radiation was also demonstrated. Hydrogen consumption activity in these cultures was relatively high and is the present limiting factor on both the net rate and duration of hydrogen production. PMID:16345432

  20. High temperature hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R.J.; Karpuk, M.E.

    1992-11-01

    The objective is to develop and test a regenerable stannic oxide-based sorbent to remove H{sub 2}S from hot coal gases while producing sulfur as the only product. The detailed technical objectives in support of this are: (1) Develop mechanically strong and chemically inert support materials which will retain their properties through multiple absorption regeneration cycles. (2) Develop mathematical models to predict the performance of large-scale systems from benchscale results. (3) Test the durability of the best sorbent/support combinations. (4) Conduct a bench-scale proof of concept test with the best stannic-oxide sorbent. Several approaches are being used to develop long-life sorbents. The investigators have tested sorbents produced by agglomeration, pressing, and extrusion. To date over 50 formulations have been tested, with several showing promise. Table II presents the results on five of these formulations; all of these formulations had surface areas in excess of 2 m{sup 2}/gm. All of the formulations meet the goals for porosity, tin content, and surface area. The crush strength for a 1/8inches dia. by 1/8inches long sorbent is significantly affected by the method of preparing the sorbent.

  1. Interaction-induced dipoles of hydrogen molecules colliding with helium atoms: a new ab initio dipole surface for high-temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoping; Mandal, Anirban; Miliordos, Evangelos; Hunt, Katharine L C

    2012-01-28

    We report new ab initio results for the interaction-induced dipole moments Δμ of hydrogen molecules colliding with helium atoms. These results are needed in order to calculate collision-induced absorption spectra at high temperatures; applications include modeling the radiative profiles of very cool white dwarf stars, with temperatures from 3500 K to 9000 K. We have evaluated the dipoles based on finite-field calculations, with coupled cluster methods in MOLPRO 2006 and aug-cc-pV5Z (spdfg) basis sets for both the H and He centers. We have obtained values of Δμ for eight H(2) bond lengths ranging from 0.942 a.u. to 2.801 a.u., for 15 intermolecular separations R ranging from 2.0 a.u. to 10.0 a.u., and for 19 different relative orientations. In general, our values agree well with earlier ab initio results, for the geometrical configurations that are treated in common, but we have determined more points on the collision-induced dipole surface by an order of magnitude. These results make it possible to calculate transition probabilities for molecules in excited vibrational states, overtones, and rotational transitions with ΔJ > 4. We have cast our results in the symmetry-adapted form needed for absorption line shape calculations, by expressing Δμ as a series in the spherical harmonics of the orientation angles of the intermolecular vector and of a unit vector along the H(2) bond axis. The expansion coefficients depend on the H(2) bond length and the intermolecular distance R. For large separations R, we show that the ab initio values of the leading coefficients converge to the predictions from perturbation theory, including both classical multipole polarization and dispersion effects. PMID:22299884

  2. High-temperature diffusion of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide in liquid n-heptane, n-dodecane, and n-hexadecane

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.A.; Rodden, J.B.; Akgerman, A.

    1987-07-01

    Mutual diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution have been measured for hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide in the solvents n-heptane, n-dodecane, and n-hexadecane. The data cover the temperature range from 25 to 293/sup 0/C and pressures of 1415 and 3450 kPa. The Taylor dispersion method was used for diffusion measurements. It was found that the Sovova correlation for diffusion of dissolved gases in liquids failed to predict diffusivities at temperatures above ambient. A free-volume approach to correlation is indicated instead.

  3. Optical absorption measurements of hydrogen chloride at high temperature and high concentration in the presence of water using a tunable diode laser system for application in pyrohydrolysis non-ferrous industrial process control.

    PubMed

    Tzanetakis, Tommy; Susilo, Robin; Wang, Zhenyou; Padmanabhan, Arathi; Davis, Boyd R; Thomson, Murray J

    2015-06-01

    A tunable diode laser (TDL) was used to measure hydrogen chloride (HCl) spectra at 5747 cm(-1) (1.74 μm) and temperatures of 25-950 °C in a quartz cell. The purpose was to evaluate the capability of monitoring HCl concentration under pyrohydrolysis conditions using a near-infrared (NIR) laser. These conditions are characterized by 20-40% HCl, 2-40% H2O, and the presence of metal chloride vapors at temperatures of 600-1000 °C. Spectral peak area measurements of HCl-N2 mixtures at atmospheric pressure and a path length of 8.1 cm showed linear absorption behavior between concentrations of 5-95% and temperatures of 25-950 °C. Results from the addition of 2-40% water (H2O) indicate that the HCl peak area relationships are not affected for temperatures of 350-950 °C. Evaporating NiCl2 within the cell did not show spectral interference effects with HCl between 650 and 850 °C. The results from this work indicate that a near-infrared optical sensor is capable of measuring high HCl concentrations at high temperatures in the presence of high H2O content during pyrohydrolysis process conditions. PMID:26054333

  4. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  5. On the room-temperature phase diagram of high pressure hydrogen: an ab initio molecular dynamics perspective and a diffusion Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Ren, Xinguo; Li, Xin-Zheng; Alfè, Dario; Wang, Enge

    2014-07-14

    The finite-temperature phase diagram of hydrogen in the region of phase IV and its neighborhood was studied using the ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) and the ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD). The electronic structures were analyzed using the density-functional theory (DFT), the random-phase approximation, and the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. Taking the state-of-the-art DMC results as benchmark, comparisons of the energy differences between structures generated from the MD and PIMD simulations, with molecular and dissociated hydrogens, respectively, in the weak molecular layers of phase IV, indicate that standard functionals in DFT tend to underestimate the dissociation barrier of the weak molecular layers in this mixed phase. Because of this underestimation, inclusion of the quantum nuclear effects (QNEs) in PIMD using electronic structures generated with these functionals leads to artificially dissociated hydrogen layers in phase IV and an error compensation between the neglect of QNEs and the deficiencies of these functionals in standard ab initio MD simulations exists. This analysis partly rationalizes why earlier ab initio MD simulations complement so well the experimental observations. The temperature and pressure dependencies for the stability of phase IV were also studied in the end and compared with earlier results. PMID:25028021

  6. On the room-temperature phase diagram of high pressure hydrogen: An ab initio molecular dynamics perspective and a diffusion Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ji; Ren, Xinguo; Li, Xin-Zheng; Alfè, Dario; Wang, Enge

    2014-07-14

    The finite-temperature phase diagram of hydrogen in the region of phase IV and its neighborhood was studied using the ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) and the ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD). The electronic structures were analyzed using the density-functional theory (DFT), the random-phase approximation, and the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. Taking the state-of-the-art DMC results as benchmark, comparisons of the energy differences between structures generated from the MD and PIMD simulations, with molecular and dissociated hydrogens, respectively, in the weak molecular layers of phase IV, indicate that standard functionals in DFT tend to underestimate the dissociation barrier of the weak molecular layers in this mixed phase. Because of this underestimation, inclusion of the quantum nuclear effects (QNEs) in PIMD using electronic structures generated with these functionals leads to artificially dissociated hydrogen layers in phase IV and an error compensation between the neglect of QNEs and the deficiencies of these functionals in standard ab initio MD simulations exists. This analysis partly rationalizes why earlier ab initio MD simulations complement so well the experimental observations. The temperature and pressure dependencies for the stability of phase IV were also studied in the end and compared with earlier results.

  7. High-Pressure Studies of the Hydrogen Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Allen Israel

    This dissertation presents an experimental study of hydrogen bonding in the solid hydrogen halides under high pressure. The high pressures were obtained with a diamond-anvil high pressure cell. Raman scattering experiments were performed on hydrogen bromide and hydrogen fluoride under pressures up to 200 kilobars. Powder x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on hydrogen bromide under pressures up to 220 kilobars. All measurements were performed at low-temperature (approximately 20 Kelvin) in the ordered orthorhombic phase III consisting of planar zig-zag chains of hydrogen bonded molecules. In the x-ray measurements on hydrogen bromide, all three orthorhombic lattice parameters were measured. The out-of-plane c-lattice parameter decreased initially much faster than the b-lattice parameter which is in the direction of the zig-zag hydrogen bonded chains. This is expected due to the weak interchain forces as opposed to the much stronger hydrogen and molecular bond forces in the chain. Surprisingly, the a and b-lattice parameters have the same pressure dependence. Raman spectra were taken of both the high frequency molecular stretching modes and the lattice modes. The stretching mode frequencies of all three hydrogen halides decrease with increasing pressure, indicative of charge transfer out of the molecular bond and into the hydrogen bond. The stretching frequency of hydrogen fluoride was observed to decrease at the greatest rate with increasing pressure. In hydrogen bromide, the two lowest frequency librational modes crossed frequencies at about 50 kilobars. After this crossing, the lower frequency mode exhibited an unusual lack of pressure dependence and an unusually large intensity. The hydrogen fluoride lattice mode frequencies all appear flat with very little pressure dependence. The ambient temperature ruby pressure scale, used for all pressure measurements in this dissertation, was calibrated at 20 Kelvin by comparison to the equation -of-state for gold

  8. Mechanical properties of turbine blade alloys in hydrogen at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical properties of single crystal turbine blade alloys in a gaseous hydrogen environment were determined. These alloys are proposed for use in space propulsion systems in pure or partial high pressure hydrogen environments at elevated temperatures. Mechanical property tests included: tensile, creep, low fatigue (LCF), and crack growth. Specimens were in both transverse and longitudinal directions relative to the casting solidification direction. Testing was conducted on solid specimens exposed to externally pressurized environments of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched steam.

  9. Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement on Austenitic Stainless Steels from Room Temperature to Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) on austenitic stainless steels SUS304, 304L, and 316L in the high pressure hydrogen gas was evaluated from ambient temperature to 20 K using a very simple mechanical properties testing procedure. In the method, the high- pressure hydrogen environment is produced just inside the hole in the specimen and the specimen is cooled in a cooled-alcohol dewar and a cryostat with a GM refrigerator. The effect of HEE was observed in tensile properties, especially at lower temperatures, and fatigue properties at higher stress level but almost no effect around the stress level of yield strength where almost no strain-induced martensite was produced. So, no effect of HEE on austenitic stainless steels unless the amount of the ferrite phase is small.

  10. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  11. High temperature refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

  12. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy studies of adsorbates on Pt(111): Studies of CO at high pressures and temperatures, coadsorbed with olefins and its role as a poison in ethylene hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Kyle Yi

    2000-12-31

    High pressure high temperature CO adsorption and coadsorption with ethylene and propylene on Pt(111) was monitored in situ with infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG). At high pressures and high temperatures, CO dissociates on a Pt(111) surface to form carbon. At 400 torr CO pressure and 673K, CO modifies the Pt(111) surface through a carbonyl intermediate, and dissociates to leave carbon on the surface. SFG was used to follow the CO peak evolution from monolayer adsorption in ultra high vacuum (UHV) to 400 torr CO pressure. At this high pressure, a temperature dependence study from room temperature to 823K was carried out. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to identify carbon on the surface CO coadsorption with ethylene and CO coadsorption with propylene studies were carried out with 2-IR 1-visible SFG. With this setup, two spectral ranges covering the C-H stretch range and the CO stretch range can be monitored simultaneously. The coadsorption study with ethylene reveals that after 5L ethylene exposure on a Pt(111) surface to form ethylidyne , CO at high pressures cannot completely displace the ethylidyne from the surface. Instead, CO first adsorbs on defect sites at low pressures and then competes with ethylidyne for terrace sites at high pressures. Propylene coadsorption with CO at similar conditions shows that propylidyne undergoes conformation changes with increased CO pressure and at 1 torr, is absent from the Pt(111) surface. Experiments on CO poisoning of ethylene hydrogenation was carried by 2-IR 1-visible SFG. At 1 torr CO,10 torr ethylene and 100 torr hydrogen, CO was found to block active sites necessary for ethylene hydrogenation, Above 425K, CO desorbs from the surface to allow ethylene hydrogenation to occur. The gas phase species were monitored by gas chromatography.

  13. Low temperature, low pressure hydrogen gettering

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.R.; Courtney, R.L.; Harrah, L.A.

    1975-07-22

    A system is described for the gettering of hydrogen and its isotopes. The gettering materials are painted or coated onto, or otherwise disposed in an area or volume from which hydrogen is to be removed. (auth)

  14. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  15. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  16. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  17. Probing Hydrogen Diffusion under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, L. E.; Klotz, S.; Strassle, T.; Saitta, M.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the microscopic mechanism governing hydrogen and hydrogen-based liquids (as water, ammonia and methane) diffusion is crucial for a variety of scientific issues spanning most of natural sciences. As an example, characterizing hydrogen diffusion in a confined medium, like in porous systems or zeolites, is fundamental in problems relating to environment, hydrogen storage and industrial applications [1]. The presence of water diffusion in the minerals of the Earth's mantle have strong incidence on the processes governing volcanic eruptions and intermediate-depth seismicity. As last example, knowing in details the microscopic dynamics of hydrogen-based simple liquids under extreme conditions is essential in order to interpret observations and develop models of planet interiors [2]. On the other hand, water and other simple hydrogen-based liquids have always been key systems in the development of modern condensed-matter physics, because of their simple electronic structure and the peculiar properties deriving from the hydrogen-bond network. Their high compressibility and chemical reactivity have made these systems very challenging to study experimentally under static high P-T conditions. In the last few years, a large effort has been undertaken by several groups around the world [2] to extend the static and dynamic techniques to high temperatures and pressures, a program in which our group has been actively involved [3-6]. However, while the structure of water and other hydrogenated liquids of geological interest, is now known up to almost 20 GPa, the study of their transport properties greatly lags behind. We have recently developed a new large-volume gasket-anvil ensemble for the Paris-Edinburgh press based on a novel toroidal design [7], which allows to perform quasi elastic neutron scattering measurements on hydrogen based liquids up to one order of magnitude higher pressures (5 GPa) respect to what was achievable with standard methods [8]. The large

  18. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  19. Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360°C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20–100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

  20. Monitoring the hydrogen distribution in poly(2,5-benzimidazole)-based (ABPBI) membranes in operating high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells by using H-D contrast neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlt, Tobias; Lüke, Wiebke; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Banhart, John; Lehnert, Werner; Manke, Ingo

    2015-12-01

    Neutron imaging in combination with the deuterium contrast method was used to analyze the hydrogen distribution and exchange processes in a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell in-operando. While operating the cell at steady state conditions at 200 mA cm-2 and λan/ca = 2/2, changeovers of the anode feed gases between hydrogen (H2) and deuterium were analyzed by neutron radiography. Proton-deuterium exchange times and progresses were studied in-operando. The exchange of protons by deuterons proceeds much faster (approx. 108-138 s) than the exchange of deuterons by protons (approx. 144-174 s), whereby the exchange takes place first near the gas inlet while a delayed onset was observed near the outlet. We can explain this effect by the different diffusion coefficients and atomic masses of deuterium and hydrogen and the operating conditions of the cell.

  1. Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela; Narayanan, Deepa

    2011-03-08

    A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

  2. Thermal coupling of protons and neutral hydrogen with anisotropic temperatures in the fast solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Lorraine A.; Habbal, Shadia R.; Li, Xing

    2000-10-01

    The thermal coupling between the neutral hydrogen and protons in the inner corona is explored by extending the study of Allenet al. [1998] to include anisotropic proton temperature to determine what the neutral hydrogen Ly α spectral line measurements reveal about the proton temperature, temperature anisotropy, and outflow velocity in the fast solar wind. The anisotropic proton temperature is produced by ion cyclotron resonant interaction of protons with high-frequency waves, produced by a nonlinear cascade at the Kolmogorov dissipation rate from dominant lower-frequency Alfvén waves. As a result of the coupling between the respective parallel and perpendicular components of the neutral hydrogen and proton temperatures, a greater temperature anisotropy in the neutral hydrogen develops as compared to the case when the proton temperature is isotropic. The neutral hydrogen and proton effective temperatures (Teff), incorporating both random and wave motions of the particles, and outflow velocities, are comparable below ~3Rs. Neutral hydrogen anisotropy ratios, TH(eff)/T∥, ~4 below 3Rs are readily attained, in agreement with observations. Below ~3Rs, these reflect the proton anisotropy ratio. For plasma conditions typical of the fast solar wind, these results imply that the measured Ly α spectral line profiles, from which the neutral hydrogen temperature, anisotropy ratio, and outflow velocity are inferred, are equivalent to measurements of protons below ~3Rs. Beyond this distance the width of the measured Ly α spectral lines provides a lower limit to the proton effective temperature and temperature anisotropy in the inner corona.

  3. Hydrogen Storage at Ambient Temperature by the Spillover Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yang , Ralph T.

    2011-02-04

    The goal of this project was to develop new nanostructured sorbent materials, using the hydrogen spillover mechanism that could meet the DOE 2010 system targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Hydrogen spillover may be broadly defined as the transport (i.e., via surface diffusion) of dissociated hydrogen adsorbed or formed on a first surface onto another surface. The first surface is typically a metal (that dissociates H2) and the second surface is typically the support on which the metal is doped. Hydrogen spillover is a well documented phenomenon in the catalysis literature, and has been known in the catalysis community for over four decades, although it is still not well understood.1, 2 Much evidence has been shown in the literature on its roles played in catalytic reactions. Very little has been studied on hydrogen storage by spillover at ambient temperature. However, it is also known to occur at such temperature, e.g., direct evidence has been shown for spillover on commercial fuel-cell, highly dispersed Pt/C, Ru/C and PtRu/C catalysts by inelastic neutron scattering.3 To exploit spillover for storage, among the key questions are whether spillover is reversible at ambient temperature and if the adsorption (refill) and desorption rates at ambient temperature are fast enough for automotive applications. In this project, we explored new sorbents by using a transition metal (e.g., Pt, Ru, Pd and Ni) as the H2 dissociation source and sorbents as the hydrogen receptor. The receptors included superactivated carbons (AX-21 and Maxsorb), metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. Different metal doping methods have been used successfully to achieve high metal dispersion thereby allowing significant spillover enhancements, as well as a bridging technique used for bridging to MOFs. Among the metals tested, Pt is the hardest to achieve high metal dispersion (and consequently spillover) while Ru is the easiest to disperse. By properly dispersing Pt on

  4. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  5. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  6. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a

  7. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  8. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  9. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-02-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  10. High temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1991-03-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have acknowledged a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high-temperature operation. Aeropropulsion applications for high-temperature electronic devices include engine ground test instrumentation such as multiplexers, analog-to-digital converters, and telemetry systems capable of withstanding hot section engine temperatures in excess of 600 C. Uncooled operation of control and condition monitoring systems in advanced supersonic aircraft would subject the electronics to temperatures in excess of 300 C. Similarly, engine-mounted integrated electronic sensors could reach temperatures which exceed 500 C. In addition to aeronautics, there are many other areas that could benefit from the existence of high-temperature electronic devices. Space applications include power electronic devices for space platforms and satellites. Since power electronics require radiators to shed waste heat, electronic devices that operate at higher temperatures would allow a reduction in radiator size. Terrestrial applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, high power electronics, and nuclear reactor instrumentation and control. To meet the needs of the applications mentioned previously, the high-temperature electronics (HTE) program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high-temperature semiconductor material. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, growth modeling, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices. Interest in SiC has grown dramatically in recent years due to solid advances in the technology. Much research remains to be performed, but SiC appears ready to emerge as a useful semiconductor material.

  11. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  12. High temperature structural silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  13. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  14. Measurement component technology. Volume 1: Cryogenic pressure measurement technology, high pressure flange seals, hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer material, close coupled versus remote transducer installation and temperature compensation of pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayakawa, K. K.; Udell, D. R.; Iwata, M. M.; Lytle, C. F.; Chrisco, R. M.; Greenough, C. S.; Walling, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of an investigation into the availability and performance capability of measurement components in the area of cryogenic temperature, pressure, flow and liquid detection components and high temperature strain gages. In addition, technical subjects allied to the components were researched and discussed. These selected areas of investigation were: (1) high pressure flange seals, (2) hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer diaphragms, (3) The effects of close-coupled versus remote transducer installation on pressure measurement, (4) temperature transducer configuration effects on measurements, and (5) techniques in temperature compensation of strain gage pressure transducers. The purpose of the program was to investigate the latest design and application techniques in measurement component technology and to document this information along with recommendations for upgrading measurement component designs for future S-2 derivative applications. Recommendations are provided for upgrading existing state-of-the-art in component design, where required, to satisfy performance requirements of S-2 derivative vehicles.

  15. Metal-Hydrogen Phase Diagrams in the Vicinity of Melting Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalov, V.I.

    1999-01-06

    Hydrogen-metal interaction phenomena belong to the most exciting challenges of today's physical metallurgy and physics of solids due to the uncommon behavior of hydrogen in condensed media and to the need for understanding hydrogen's strong negative impact on properties of some high-strength steels and.alloys. The paper cites and summarizes research data on fundamental thermodynamic characteristics of hydrogen in some metals that absorb it endothermally at elevated temperatures. For a number of metal-hydrogen systems, information on some phase diagrams previously not available to the English-speaking scientific community is presented.

  16. Reaction kinetics for the oxygen hydrogenation process on Pt(111) derived from temperature-programmed XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näslund, Lars-Åke

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen hydrogenation under ultra high vacuum conditions at the platinum surface was explored using temperature-programmed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Through modeling of the oxygen consumption, information on the reaction kinetics was obtained indicating that the reaction rate of the oxygen hydrogenation process depends on the hydrogen diffusion and on the lifetime of hydroxyl intermediates. The reaction rate is, however, enhanced when an autocatalytic process stabilizes the hydroxyl intermediates through hydrogen bonding to neighboring water molecules. The overall activation energy for the hydrogenation of atomic oxygen to form water was determined to be 0.20 eV with a frequency factor of only 103 s- 1.

  17. High-Pressure Multi-Mbar Conductivity Experiments on Hydrogen: The Quest for Solid Metallic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D

    2007-02-07

    Ultra-dense hydrogen has long been the subject of intense experimental and theoretical research due to the fascinating physics which arises from this supposedly simple system. The properties of ultra-dense hydrogen also have important implications for planetary physics, since the interiors of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn are believed to consist of cores of dense, metallic hydrogen. Finally, ultra-dense hydrogen is of direct programmatic interest, and multiple-shock compression experiments on hydrogen to the metallic state have stimulated the accelerated development of new hydrogen equation-of-state (EOS) models used for ICF and other applications. The focus of our research has often been described as the ''Holy Grail'' of high-pressure physics research: The metallization of solid hydrogen. Metallic hydrogen has long been considered to be the prototypical system for the study of insulator-to-metal (I-M) transitions. Although metallic hydrogen (Z=1) may superficially appear to be a very simple material, it is in fact an extremely challenging system for theoretical analysis due to the presence of large zero-point atomic motions and the complete absence of any core electrons. Thus, solid metallic hydrogen promises to be a fascinating material. Among its predicted properties is the possibility of being a high temperature superconductor with a critical temperature T{sub c} of the order of {approx} 100K [1]. The successful metallization of solid hydrogen would be a groundbreaking scientific discovery and open up new frontiers in science and possibly technology as well.

  18. High temperature electronics technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dening, J. C.; Hurtle, D. E.

    1984-03-01

    This report summarizes the barrier metallization developments accomplished in a program intended to develop 300 C electronic controls capability for potential on-engine aircraft engine application. In addition, this report documents preliminary life test results at 300 C and above and discusses improved design practices required for high temperature integrated injection logic semiconductors. Previous Phase 1 activities focused on determining the viability of operating silicon semiconductor devices over the -55 C to +300 C temperature range. This feasibility was substantiated but the need for additional design work and process development was indicated. Phase 2 emphasized the development of a high temperature metallization system as the primary development need for high temperature silicon semiconductor applications.

  19. High resolution Holocene temperature records for the northeastern United States from hydrogen isotope ratios of mid-chain aquatic plant lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, L.; Huang, Y.; Hou, J.; Shuman, B. N.; Oswald, W.; Foster, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Holocene temperature changes for the northeastern U.S. are poorly defined due to the lack of suitable proxies. We developed a mathematic model to quantify the percentage contribution of aquatic plants to the mid-chain n-alkyl lipids in lake sediments (Gao et al., GCA, 2011). We show that Little Pond in Royalston, Massachusetts is characterized by exceptionally high percentages (>90%) of aquatic contribution to the mid-chain n-alkyl lipids in sediments, and generated a quantitative, high-resolution Holocene temperature record based on compound-specific D/H ratio of behenic acid (δDBA) (Figure). Our record shows that the Laurentide Ice Sheet suppressed the regional temperature by ~ 2 °C during the early Holocene. Numerous rapid and large (~4.9 °C) climate oscillations occurred as a result of major freshwater outbursts and the resulting changes in North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Following a major climate reversal at 8.2 ka, the regional climatic optimum occurred between ~8 ka and ~7 ka BP. Temperature gradually declined from ~8ka toward present by ~3.9 °C associated with the declining summer insolation. During the past two millennia, temperature changes closely mimic the synthesized borehole temperatures, with a temperature trough at ~1.8 ka and a peak at ~0.5 ka. Regional temperature does not show the typical little ice age trends, except a minimal temperature (~7 °C) at ~1850 A.D, which is followed by rapid temperature rise probably as a result of anthropogenic forcing. Combined with our previous data from Blood Pond, we have obtained centennial scale temperature history for the New England region for the past 15000 years.

  20. KINETIC EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF DISCRETE 1,4-DEHYDROBENZENE INTERMEDIATES. TRAPPING BY INTER- AND INTRAMOLECULAR HYDROGEN ATOM TRANSFER AND OBSERVATION OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE CIDNP

    SciTech Connect

    Lockhart, Thomas P.; Comita, Paul B.; Bergman, Robert C.

    1980-09-01

    Upon heating, alkyl substituted cis 1,2-diethynyl olefins under cyclization to yield reactive 1,4-dehydrobenzenes; the products isolated may be derived from either unimolecular or bimolecular reactions of the intermediate. Z-4,5-Diethynyl-4-octene (4) undergoes rearrangement to yield 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene (17). Solution pyrolysis of 4 in inert aromatic solvents produces three unimolecular products, Z-dodeca-4,8-diyn-6-ene (7), benzocyclooctene (9) and o-allyl-n-propylbenzene (10) in high yield. When 1,4-cyclohexadiene is added to the pyrolysis solution as a trapping agent, high yields of the reduced product o-di-n-propylbenzene (12) are obtained. The kinetics of solution pyrolysis of 4 in the presence and absence of trapping agent establish that 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene is a discrete intermediate on the pathway leading to products. When the reaction was run in the heated probe of an NMR spectrometer, CIDNP was observed in 10. This observation, along with kinetic and chemical trapping evidence, indicates the presence of two additional intermediates, formed from 17 by sequential intramolecular [1,5] hydrogen transfer, on the pathway to products. The observation of CIDNP, coupled with the reactivity exhibited by 17 and the other two intermediates, implicate a biradical description of these molecules. Biradical 17 has been estimated to have a lifetime of about 10{sup -9} sec at: 200°C and to lie in a well of kcal/mol with respect to the lowest energy unimolecular pathway ([1,5] hydrogen transfer). Ring opening (expected to be the lowest energy process for 1,4-dehydrobenzenes in which intramolecular hydrogen transfer is unlikely) to the isomeric diethynyl olefin 7 appears to have an activation enthalpy of about 10 kcal/moL Upon thermal reaction in the gas phase (400°C) or in solution in inert solvents Z-hexa-2,3-diethyl-1,5-~diyn-3-ene (5) rearranges in good yield to the isomeric diethynyl olefin Z-deca-3,7-diyn-5-ene (8) again presumably via 2

  1. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  2. Effect of hydrogen on the {beta} transus temperature of TC21 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, T.K. Li, M.Q.

    2011-09-15

    Effect of hydrogen on the {beta} transus temperature of TC21 alloy was investigated by metallographic technique and dilatometry. It is found that the {beta} transus temperature is closely related to the hydrogen content. For the hydrogenated TC21 alloy, the starting and finishing temperatures of {alpha} {yields} {beta} phase transition decrease with the increasing of hydrogen content before the hydride precipitates. And the finishing temperature of {alpha} {yields} {beta} phase transition increases as the hydrogen content increases after the hydride precipitates. Furthermore, corresponding inherent mechanisms of the above-mentioned phenomena have been presented according to atomic diffusivity, interface migration and the precipitation of hydride. - Research Highlights: {yields} The {beta} transus temperature of TC21 alloy is closely related to hydrogen content. {yields} The mechanism for effect of hydrogen on the {beta} transus temperature is presented. {yields} Precipitation of hydride has a significant influence on the {beta} transus temperature. {yields} The {alpha}/{beta} interface migration has an important effect on the {beta} transus temperature. {yields} The improvement of atom diffusivity affects the {beta} transus temperature highly.

  3. High-Temperature Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1980's, Lewis Research Center began a program to develop high-temperature lubricants for use on future aircraft flying at three or more times the speed of sound, which can result in vehicle skin temperatures as high as 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. A material that emerged from this research is a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating metal- glass-fluoride coating able to reduce oxidation at very high temperatures. Technology is now in commercial use under the trade name Surf-Kote C-800, marketed by Hohman Plating and Manufacturing Inc. and manufactured under a patent license from NASA. Among its uses are lubrication for sliding contact bearings, shaft seals for turbopumps, piston rings for high performance compressors and hot glass processing machinery; it is also widely used in missile and space applications.

  4. High temperature hydraulic seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. R.

    1993-05-01

    This program investigated and evaluated high temperature hydraulic sealing technology, including seals, fluids, and actuator materials. Test limits for fluid pressure and temperature were 8000 psi and 700 F respectively. The original plan to investigate CTFE fluid at 350 F as well as other fluids at higher temperatures was reduced in scope to include only the higher temperature investigation. Seals were obtained from 11 manufacturers. Design requirements including materials, dimensions, clearances, and tolerances were established and test modules were constructed from the detail designs which were produced. Nine piston seals and one rod seal were tested at temperatures ranging from -65 to +600 F and pressures to 6000 psi. Fluid performance under these conditions was evaluated. Details of this activity and results of the effort are summarized in this report.

  5. Comparative Spectroscopic Temperature Measurements In Hydrogen Hollow Cathode Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majstorovic, G. Lj.; Šišovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2010-07-01

    We report results of optical emission spectroscopy measurements of rotational Trot and translational temperature Ttr of hydrogen molecules. The light source was hollow cathode glow discharge with titanium cathode operated in hydrogen at low pressure. The rotational temperature of excited electronic states of H2 was determined either from relative line intensities of the R branch of the GK ? B band or from the Q branch of the Fulcher-a diagonal band. The population of excited energy levels, determined from relative line intensities, was used to derive ro-vibronic temperature of the ground state of hydrogen molecule.

  6. Hydrogen Absorption into Austenitic Stainless Steels Under High-Pressure Gaseous Hydrogen and Cathodic Charge in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Masato; Cheng, Lin; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Omura, Tomohiko; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Okuma, Ryuji

    2014-12-01

    Type 316L and Type 304 austenitic stainless steels, both deformed and non-deformed, were hydrogen charged cathodically in an aqueous solution as well as by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen in an attempt to identify suitable conditions of cathodic charge for simulating hydrogen absorption from gaseous hydrogen environments. Thermal desorption analysis (TDA) was conducted, and the amount of absorbed hydrogen and the spectrum shape were compared between the two charging methods. Simulations were performed by means of the McNabb-Foster model to analyze the spectrum shape and peak temperature, and understand the effects of deformation on the spectra. It was revealed that the spectrum shape and peak temperature were dependent directly upon the initial distribution of hydrogen within the specimen, which varied widely according to the hydrogen charge condition. Deformation also had a marked effect on the amount of absorbed hydrogen in Type 304 steel due to the strain-induced martensitic transformation.

  7. Evidence for ambient-temperature reversible catalytic hydrogenation in Pt-doped carbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao Ming; Tang, Youjian; Xu, En Shi; Fitzgibbons, Thomas C; Larsen, Gregory S; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Tseng, Huan-Hsiung; Yu, Ming-Sheng; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Badding, John V; Crespi, Vincent H; Lueking, Angela D

    2013-01-01

    In situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy, with corroborating density functional calculations, is used to probe C-H chemical bonds formed when dissociated hydrogen diffuses from a platinum nanocatalyst to three distinct graphenic surfaces. At ambient temperature, hydrogenation and dehydrogenation are reversible in the combined presence of an active catalyst and oxygen heteroatoms. Hydrogenation apparently occurs through surface diffusion in a chemisorbed state, while dehydrogenation requires diffusion of the chemisorbed species back to an active catalyst. PMID:23194179

  8. Hydrogen storage on high-surface-area carbon monoliths for Adsorb hydrogen Gas Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Pfeifer, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase hydrogen volumetric storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed hydrogen gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize hydrogen storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis atmosphere. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis atmosphere have influences on gravimetric excess adsorption. Compaction temperature has large influences on gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high hydrogen storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument.

  9. Measuring Rocket Engine Temperatures with Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Osborne, Robin J.; Trinh, Huu P.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Optically accessible, high pressure, hot fire test articles are available at NASA Marshall for use in development of advanced rocket engine propellant injectors. Single laser-pulse ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy has been used in the past in these devices for analysis of high pressure H2- and CH4-fueled combustion, but relies on an independent pressure measurement in order to provide temperature information. A variation of UV Raman (High Resolution Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy) is under development and will allow temperature measurement without the need for an independent pressure measurement, useful for flows where local pressure may not be accurately known. The technique involves the use of a spectrometer with good spectral resolution, requiring a small entrance slit for the spectrometer. The H2 Raman spectrum, when created by a narrow linewidth laser source and obtained from a good spectral resolution spectrograph, has a spectral shape related to temperature. By best-fit matching an experimental spectrum to theoretical spectra at various temperatures, a temperature measurement is obtained. The spectral model accounts for collisional narrowing, collisional broadening, Doppler broadening, and collisional line shifting of each Raman line making up the H2 Stokes vibrational Q-branch spectrum. At pressures from atmospheric up to those associated with advanced preburner components (5500 psia), collisional broadening though present does not cause significant overlap of the Raman lines, allowing high resolution H2 Raman to be used for temperature measurements in plumes and in high pressure test articles. Experimental demonstrations of the technique are performed for rich H2-air flames at atmospheric pressure and for high pressure, 300 K H2-He mixtures. Spectrometer imaging quality is identified as being critical for successful implementation of technique.

  10. Hydrogen trapping in high-strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, B.G.

    1998-10-09

    Hydrogen trapping in three high-strength steels -- AerMet 100 and AISI 4340 and H11 -- was studied using a potentiostatic pulse technique. Irreversible trapping constants (k) and hydrogen entry fluxes were determined for these alloys in 1 mol/1 acetic acid/1 mol/1 sodium acetate. The order of the k values for the three steels and two 18Ni maraging steels previously studies inversely parallels their threshold stress intensities for stress corrosion cracking (K{sub 1SCC}). Irreversible trapping in AerMet 100 varies with aging temperature and appears to depend on the type of carbide (Fe{sub 3}C or M{sub 2}C) present. For 4340 steel, k can be correlated with K{sub 1SCC} over a range of yield strengths. The change in k is consistent with a change in the principal type of irreversible trap from matrix boundaries to incoherent Fe{sub 3}C. The principal irreversible traps in H11 at high yield strengths are thought to be similar to those in 4340 steel.