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Sample records for high temperature superconductive

  1. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  2. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  3. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  4. High-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Ken C.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and near-term prospects are briefly reviewed with particular reference to Lockheed's experience. Emphasis is placed on an integrated approach to systems applications of HTSC thin films, which hold the greatest near-term promise. These new materials are applied in the production of smaller, more sensitive, and more efficient electronic components to meet the ever-increasing demands for higher-performance signal acquisition and processing systems, communications systems, and computers.

  5. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  6. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  7. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  8. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  9. High-temperature superconductivity in perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-04-01

    The technology of superconductivity and its potential applications are discussed; it is warned that U.S companies are investing less than their main foreign competitors in both low- and high-temperature superconductivity R and D. This is by far the most critical issue affecting the future U.S. competitive position in superconductivity, and in many other emerging technologies. The major areas covered include: Executive summary; High-temperature superconductivity - A progress report; Applications of superconductivity; The U.S. response to high-temperature superconductivity; High-temperature superconductivity programs in other countries; Comparison of industrial superconductivity R and D efforts in the United States and Japan - An OTA survey; Policy issues and options.

  10. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  11. Dimensionality of high temperature superconductivity in oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Many models have been proposed to account for the high temperature superconductivity observed in oxide systems. Almost all of these models proposed are based on the uncoupled low dimensional carrier Cu-O layers of the oxides. Results of several experiments are presented and discussed. They suggest that the high temperature superconductivity observed cannot be strictly two- or one-dimensional, and that the environment between the Cu-O layers and the interlayer coupling play an important role in the occurrence of such high temperature superconductivity. A comment on the very short coherence length reported is also made.

  12. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  13. High-temperature superconducting vector switch

    SciTech Connect

    Chelluri, B.; Barber, J.; Clements, N.; Johnson, D. ); Spyker, R.; Sarkar, A.K.; Kozlowoski, G. )

    1991-04-15

    The feasibility of a high-temperature superconducting switch based on the principle of the superconducting vector switch (SVS) is discussed. This switch exploits the anisotropy in electrical conductivities of the high-temperature superconductors. Underlying the SVS mechanism is the ability to turn on/off large superconducting currents confined to the CuO{sub 2} planes that characterize these materials using lower currents flowing normal to the planes. The required conditions to optimize the switch and increase the gain are presented.

  14. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  15. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  16. The high temperature superconductivity space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Denis C.; Nisenoff, M.

    1991-01-01

    The history and the current status of the high temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE) initiated in 1988 are briefly reviewed. The goal of the HTSSE program is to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology into space systems. The anticipated payoffs include the development of high temperature superconductor devices for space systems; preparation and space qualification of a cryogenically cooled experimental package containing HTS devices and components; and acquisition of data for future space experiments using more complex HTS devices and subsystems. The principal HTSSE systems and devices are described.

  17. A high temperature superconductivity communications flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, P.; Krishen, K.; Arndt, D.; Raffoul, G.; Karasack, V.; Bhasin, K.; Leonard, R.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) millimeter-wave communications flight experiment from the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter to the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) in geosynchronous orbit is described. The experiment will use a Ka-band HTSC phased array antenna and front-end electronics to receive a downlink communications signal from the ACTS. The discussion covers the system configuration, a description of the ground equipment, the spacecraft receiver, link performance, thermal loading, and the superconducting antenna array.

  18. Space applications of high temperature superconductivity technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Aron, P. R.; Leonard, R. F.; Wintucky, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the present status of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology and related areas of potential space application. Attention is given to areas of application that include microwave communications, cryogenic systems, remote sensing, and space propulsion and power. Consideration is given to HTS phase shifters, miniaturization of microwave filters, far-IR bolometers, and magnetic refrigeration using flux compression.

  19. Magnetic suspension using high temperature superconducting cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The development of YBCO high temperature superconductors, in wire and tape forms, is rapidly approaching the point where the bulk transport current density j vs magnetic field H characteristics with liquid nitrogen cooling will enable its use in model cores. On the other hand, BSCCO high temperature superconductor in wire form has poor j-H characteristics at 77 K today, although with liquid helium or hydrogen cooling, it appears to be superior to NbTi superconductor. Since liquid nitrogen cooling is approx. 100 times cheaper than liquid helium cooling, the use of YBCO is very attractive for use in magnetic suspension. The design is discussed of a model core to accommodate lift and drag loads up to 6000 and 3000 N respectively. A comparison is made between the design performance of a liquid helium cooled NbTi (or BSCCO) superconducting core and a liquid nitrogen cooled YBCO superconducting core.

  20. The NASA high temperature superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    It has been recognized from the onset that high temperature superconductivity held great promise for major advances across a broad range of NASA interests. The current effort is organized around four key areas: communications and data, sensors and cryogenics, propulsion and power, and space materials technology. Recently, laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films on LaAIO produced far superior RF characteristics when compared to metallic films on the same substrate. This achievement has enabled a number of unique microwave device applications, such as low insertion loss phase shifters and high Q filters. Melt texturing and melt quenched techniques are being used to produce bulk materials with optimized magnetic properties. These yttrium enriched materials possess enhanced flux pinning characteristics and will lead to prototype cryocooler bearings. Significant progress has also occurred in bolometer and current lead technology. Studies are being conducted to evaluate the effect of high temperature superconducting materials on the performance and life of high power magneto-plasma-dynamic thrusters. Extended studies were also performed to evaluate the benefit of superconducting magnetic energy storage for LEO space station, lunar and Mars mission applications. The project direction and level of effort of the program are also described.

  1. High temperature superconducting digital circuits and subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, J.S.; Pance, A.; Whiteley, S.R.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.F.; Lee, L.; Hietala, V.M.; Wendt, J.R.; Hou, S.Y.; Phillips, J.

    1993-10-01

    The advances in the fabrication of high temperature superconducting devices have enabled the demonstration of high performance and useful digital circuits and subsystems. The yield and uniformity of the devices is sufficient for circuit fabrication at the medium scale integration (MSI) level with performance not seen before at 77 K. The circuits demonstrated to date include simple gates, counters, analog to digital converters, and shift registers. All of these are mid-sized building blocks for potential applications in commercial and military systems. The processes used for these circuits and blocks will be discussed along with observed performance data.

  2. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, V. O.; Connolly, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Space application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials may occur before most terrestrial applications because of the passive cooling possibilities in space and because of the economic feasibility of introducing an expensive new technology which has a significant system benefit in space. NASA Lewis Research Center has an ongoing program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of HTS materials. The applications being pursued include space communications, power and propulsion systems, and magnetic bearings. In addition, NASA Lewis is pursuing materials research to improve the performance of HTS materials for space applications.

  3. Perspectives on high temperature superconducting electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1990-01-01

    The major challenges in making high temperature superconducting (HTSC) electronics viable are predominantly materials problems. Unlike their predecessors the metal oxide-based superconductors are integratable with other advanced technologies such as opto-electronics and micro-electronics. The materials problems to be addressed relate to the epitaxial growth of high quality films, highly oriented films on non-lattice matched substrates, heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces of junctions and other novel devices, and the processing of these films with negligible deterioration of the superconducting properties. These issues are illustrated with results based on films prepared in-situ by a pulsed laser deposition process. Films with zero-transition temperatures of 90 K and critical current densities of 5 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K have been prepared by this technique. Ultra-thin films, less than 100 A show T(sub c) is greater than 80 K, supporting the idea of two-dimensional transport in these materials. By the use of appropriate buffer layers, films with T(sub c) of 87 K and J(sub c) of 6 x 10(exp 4) A/sq cm were fabricated on silicon substrates. Submicron structures with J(sub c) is greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) at 10 K were fabricated. Results on nonlinear switching elements, IR detectors, and microwave studies will be briefly summarized.

  4. Perspectives on high temperature superconducting electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1991-01-01

    The major challenges in making high temperature superconducting (HTSC) electronics viable are predominantly materials problems. Unlike their predecessors, the metal oxide-based superconductors are integratable with other advanced technologies such as opto-electronics and micro-electronics. The materials problems to be addressed relate to the epitaxial growth of high quality films, highly oriented films on non-lattice matched substrates, heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces of junctions and other novel devices, and the processing of these films with negligible deterioration of the superconducting properties. These issues are illustrated with results based on films prepared in-situ by a pulsed laser deposition process. Films with zero-transition temperatures of 90 K and critical current densities of 5 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K have been prepared by this technique. Ultra-thin films, less than 100 A show T(sub c) is greater than 80 K, supporting the idea of two-dimensional transport in these materials. By the use of appropriate buffer layers, films with T(sub c) of 87 K and J(sub c) of 6 x 10(exp 4) A/sq cm were fabricated on silicon substrates. Submicron structures with J(sub c) is greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) at 10 K were fabricated. Results on nonlinear switching elements, IR detectors, and microwave studies will be briefly summarized.

  5. Use of high-temperature superconducting films in superconducting bearings.

    SciTech Connect

    Cansiz, A.

    1999-07-14

    We have investigated the effect of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) films deposited on substrates that are placed above bulk HTSs in an attempt to reduce rotational drag in superconducting bearings composed of a permanent magnet levitated above the film/bulk HTS combination. According to the critical state model, hysteresis energy loss is inversely proportional to critical current density, J{sub c}, and because HTS films typically have much higher J{sub c} than that of bulk HTS, the film/bulk combination was expected to reduce rotational losses by at least one order of magnitude in the coefficient of fiction, which in turn is a measure of the hysteresis losses. We measured rotational losses of a superconducting bearing in a vacuum chamber and compared the losses with and without a film present. The experimental results showed that contrary to expectation, the rotational losses are increased by the film. These results are discussed in terms of flux drag through the film, as well as of the critical state model.

  6. High temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage for future NASA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Rudnick, Stanley J.

    1988-01-01

    Several NASA sponsored studies based on 'conventional' liquid helium temperature level superconductivity technology have concluded that superconducting magnetic energy storage has considerable potential for space applications. The advent of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) may provide additional benefits over conventional superconductivity technology, making magnetic energy storage even more attractive. The proposed NASA space station is a possible candidate for the application of HTSC energy storage. Alternative energy storage technologies for this and other low Earth orbit missions are compared.

  7. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Heinen, V. O.; Aron, P. R.; Lazar, J.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of all the applications that are part of the NASA program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of high temperature superconducting materials. The applications in three major areas are being pursued: sensors and cryogenic systems, space communications, and propulsion and power systems. This review places emphasis on space communications applications and the propulsion and power applications. It is concluded that the power and propulsion applications will eventually be limited by structural considerations rather than by the availability of suitable superconductors. A cursory examination of structural limitations implied by the virial theorem suggested that there is an upper limit to the size of high field magnetic systems that are feasible in space.

  8. High temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, J. C.; Nisenoff, M.; Price, G.; Wolf, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment dealing with high-temperature superconducting devices and components in space is discussed. A variety of devices (primarily passive microwave and millimeter-wave components) has been procured and will be integrated with a cryogenic refrigerating and data acquisition system to form the space package, which will be launched in late 1992. This space experiment is expected to demonstrate that this technology is sufficiently robust to survive the space environment and that the technology has the potential to improve the operation of space systems significantly. The devices for the initial launch have been evaluated electrically, thermally, and mechanically, and will be integrated into the final space package early in 1991. The performance of the devices is summarized, and some potential applications of this technology in space systems are outlined.

  9. Parameters of high-temperature superconducting transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, E. P.; Dzhafarov, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Parameters of the high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) transformer with a core-type magnetic circuit and with coaxial and symmetrical interleaved windings made of the first-generation HTSC wire with a localized magnetic field are considered. The parameters of the most widespread core-type transformer with a coaxial HTSC winding are compared with those of a conventional transformer with a copper wire winding. Advantages of the HTSC transformers, such as reduction in the leakage inductive reactance and the HTSC winding's cross section, volume, and mass, as compared with the same parameters of conventional transformers with a copper wire winding are demonstrated. The efficiency of the HTSC transformers has proven to be determined predominantly by the core loss. In order to increase the efficiency of the HTSC transformer, it is proposed to use the amorphous electrical steel as the material of its magnetic circuit.

  10. Aerospace Applications Of High Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. W.

    1988-05-01

    The existence of superconductors with TcOOK (which implies device operating temper-atures the order of Top ≍45K) opens up a variety of potential applications within the aerospace/defense industry. This is partly due to the existence of well developed cooler technologies to reach this temperature regime and partly due to the present operation of some specialized components at cryogenic temperatures. In particular, LWIR focal planes may operate at 10K with some of the signal processing electronics at an intermediate temperature of 40K. Addition of high Tc superconducting components in the latter system may be "free" in the sense of additional system complexity required. The established techniques for cooling in the 20K to 50K temperature regime are either open cycle, expendable material (stored gas with Joule-Thomson expansion, liquid cryogen or solid cryogen) or mechanical refrigerators (Stirling cycle, Brayton cycle or closed cycle Joule-Thomson). The high Tc materials may also contribute to the development of coolers through magnetically levitated bearings or providing the field for a stage of magnetic refrigeration. The discovery of materials with Tc, 90K has generated a veritable shopping list of applications. The superconductor properties which are of interest for applications are (1) zero resistance, (2) Meissner effect, (3) phase coherence and (4) existence of an energy gap. The zero resistance property is significant in the development of high field magnets requiring neglible power to maintain the field. In addition to the publicized applications to rail guns and electromagnetic launcher, we can think of space born magnets for charged particle shielding or whistler mode propagation through a plasma sheath. Conductor losses dominate attenuation and dispersion in microstrip transmission lines. While the surface impedance of a superconductor is non vanishing, significant improvements in signal transmission may be obtained. The Meissner effect may be utilized

  11. Can doping graphite trigger room temperature superconductivity? Evidence for granular high-temperature superconductivity in water-treated graphite powder.

    PubMed

    Scheike, T; Böhlmann, W; Esquinazi, P; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Ballestar, A; Setzer, A

    2012-11-14

    Granular superconductivity in powders of small graphite grains (several tens of micrometers) is demonstrated after treatment with pure water. The temperature, magnetic field and time dependence of the magnetic moment of the treated graphite powder provides evidence for the existence of superconducting vortices with some similarities to high-temperature granular superconducting oxides but even at temperatures above 300 K. Room temperature superconductivity in doped graphite or at its interfaces appears to be possible. PMID:22949348

  12. Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Peter R.; Michels, William; Bingert, John F.

    2001-01-01

    An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

  13. Engineer's guide to high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, James D.

    The physics, properties, preparation, and applications of high-Tc superconductors are described. Chapters are devoted to the history of superconductivity, fundamental considerations, superconductor applications, the processing of high-Tc superconductors, measurement techniques, and safety problems. Also provided are a review of basic electrical and magnetic theory; a table of units and conversions; a glossary of terms and symbols; and lists of superconductor-related products, services, publications, and associations.

  14. High-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Qimiao; Yu, Rong; Abrahams, Elihu

    2016-04-01

    Superconductivity develops in metals upon the formation of a coherent macroscopic quantum state of electron pairs. Iron pnictides and chalcogenides are materials that have high superconducting transition temperatures. In this Review, we describe the advances in the field that have led to higher superconducting transition temperatures in iron-based superconductors and the wide range of materials that are used to form these superconductors. We summarize the essential aspects of the normal state and the mechanism for superconductivity. We emphasize the degree of electron–electron correlations and their manifestation in properties of the normal state. We examine the nature of magnetism, analyse its role in driving the electronic nematicity and discuss quantum criticality at the border of magnetism in the phase diagram. Finally, we review the amplitude and structure of the superconducting pairing, and survey the potential material settings for optimizing superconductivity.

  15. High-temperature superconductivity: Electron mirages in an iron salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaanen, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The detection of unusual 'mirage' energy bands in photoemission spectra of single-atom layers of iron selenide reveals the probable cause of high-temperature superconductivity in these artificial structures. See Letter p.245

  16. Macroscopic character of composite high temperature superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, Steven; Spivak, Boris

    The ``d-wave'' symmetry of the superconducting order in the cuprate high temperature superconductors is a well established fact, and one which identifies them as ``unconventional.'' However, in macroscopic contexts - including many potential applications (i.e. superconducting ``wires'') - the material is a composite of randomly oriented superconducting grains in a metallic matrix, in which Josephson coupling between grains mediates the onset of long-range phase coherence. Here, we analyze the physics at length scales large compared to the size of such grains, and in particular the macroscopic character of the long-range order that emerges. While XY-superconducting glass order and macroscopic d-wave superconductivity may be possible, we show that under many circumstances - especially when the d-wave superconducting grains are embedded in a metallic matrix - the most likely order has global s-wave symmetry.

  17. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  18. Microwave properties of high transition temperature superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive studies of the interaction of microwaves with YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), Bi-based, and Tl-based superconducting thin films deposited in several microwave substrates were performed. The data were obtained by measuring the microwave power transmitted through the film in the normal and the superconducting state and by resonant cavity techniques. The main motives were to qualify and understand the physical parameters such as the magnetic penetration depth, the complex conductivity, and the surface impedance, of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials at microwave frequencies. Based on these parameters, the suitability of these HTS thin films is discussed for microwave applications.

  19. High-temperature superconducting thin films and their application to superconducting-normal-superconducting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mankiewich, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    The existence of the proximity effect between the high temperature superconductor YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] (YBCO) and normal metal thin films has been demonstrated, and this effect has been exploited to produce lithographically fabricated superconducting-normal-superconducting (SNS) Josephson junctions. Improvement of the fabrication processes has led to new methods of in-situ film growth and plasma etching of YBCO, as well a YBCO-compatible processes for the deep-ultraviolet and electron-beam lithography required to fabricate submicron device structures. This proximity effect approach helps to circumvent the short coherence length ([xi] [approximately] 3 nm) characteristic of the high T[sub c] superconductors. In a clean normal metal such as gold or silver the relevant coherence length is governed by the higher Fermi velocity and longer mean free path. A Josephson device containing a normal metal weak link can be longer than an ideal all-YBCO microbridge (dimensions comparable to [xi]). Initially, SNS devices were fabricated and showed evidence for a supercurrent through the normal region. Properly spaced Shapiro steps as a function of microwave frequency were observed. This result was evidence for a proximity effect between a normal metal and YBCO. The fabrication process was not sufficiently reproducible, so new techniques were developed. In-situ film growth and fabrication is desirable to minimize contamination of and damage to the surface of the superconductor. In-situ reactive coevaporation of YBCO was demonstrated. Patterning of these in-situ films in to a structure required the development of a low-damage reactive ion etch. New lithographic techniques were developed to minimize chemical degradation of the superconductor. Deposition of gold onto heated device structures was demonstrated to produce a superior SNS device. The application of YBCO thin films to passive microwave devices and to active superconducting circuits was evaluated.

  20. Fabrication of Large Bulk High Temperature Superconducting Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczor, Ronald (Inventor); Hiser, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of fabricating large bulk high temperature superconducting articles which comprises the steps of selecting predetermined sizes of crystalline superconducting materials and mixing these specific sizes of particles into a homogeneous mixture which is then poured into a die. The die is placed in a press and pressurized to predetermined pressure for a predetermined time and is heat treated in the furnace at predetermined temperatures for a predetermined time. The article is left in the furnace to soak at predetermined temperatures for a predetermined period of time and is oxygenated by an oxygen source during the soaking period.

  1. High temperature superconductive flux gate magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gershenson, M. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper proposes a different type of HTS superconducting magnetometer based on the non-linear magnetic behavior of bulk HTS materials. The device design is based on the generation of second harmonics which arise as a result of non-linear magnetization observed in Type-II superconductors. Even harmonics are generated from the non-linear interaction of an ac excitation signal with an external DC magnetic field which acts as a bias signal.

  2. Towards a better understanding of superconductivity at high transition temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, R.; Hanke, W.

    2010-10-01

    We provide an overview over the following eleven contributions on superconductivity in copper-oxygen and iron-based compounds. The main objective of this volume is an improved general understanding of superconductivity at high transition temperatures. The key questions on the way towards understanding superconducting pairing beyond electron-phonon coupling are spelled out, and the present status of theoretical reasoning is summarized. The crucial experiments, their results and interrelations are discussed. The central result is that fluctuations of spin and charge contribute substantially to superconductivity and also to other ordering phenomena. Methodically, the simultaneous analysis of results obtained from different experimental techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy and neutron scattering, on one and the same sample, turned out to be of pivotal importance.

  3. Optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Setsuko

    2016-09-01

    The optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates (HTSC) are reviewed. From the doping dependence of room temperature spectra, a dramatic change of the electronic state from a Mott (charge transfer) insulator to a Fermi liquid has been revealed. Additionally, the unusual 2D nature of the electronic state has been found. The temperature dependence of the optical spectra provided a rich source of information on the pseudogap, superconducting gap, Josephson plasmon, transverse Josephson plasma mode and precursory superconductivity. Among these issues, Josephson plasmons and transverse Josephson plasma mode were experimentally discovered by optical measurements, and thus are unique to HTSC. The effect of the spin/charge stripe order is also unique to HTSC, reflecting the conducting nature of the stripe order in this system. The pair-breaking due to the stripe order seems stronger in the out-of-plane direction than in the in-plane one. PMID:27472654

  4. Optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Setsuko

    2016-09-01

    The optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates (HTSC) are reviewed. From the doping dependence of room temperature spectra, a dramatic change of the electronic state from a Mott (charge transfer) insulator to a Fermi liquid has been revealed. Additionally, the unusual 2D nature of the electronic state has been found. The temperature dependence of the optical spectra provided a rich source of information on the pseudogap, superconducting gap, Josephson plasmon, transverse Josephson plasma mode and precursory superconductivity. Among these issues, Josephson plasmons and transverse Josephson plasma mode were experimentally discovered by optical measurements, and thus are unique to HTSC. The effect of the spin/charge stripe order is also unique to HTSC, reflecting the conducting nature of the stripe order in this system. The pair-breaking due to the stripe order seems stronger in the out-of-plane direction than in the in-plane one.

  5. High-temperature Superconductivity in compressed Solid Silane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huadi; Jin, Xilian; Lv, Yunzhou; Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Yunxian; Lv, Qianqian; Bao, Kuo; Li, Da; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Crystal structures of silane have been extensively investigated using ab initio evolutionary simulation methods at high pressures. Two metallic structures with P21/c and C2/m symmetries are found stable above 383 GPa. The superconductivities of metallic phases are fully explored under BCS theory, including the reported C2/c one. Perturbative linear-response calculations for C2/m silane at 610 GPa reveal a high superconducting critical temperature that beyond the order of 102 K. PMID:25746861

  6. Macroscopic character of composite high-temperature superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, S. A.; Spivak, B.

    2015-11-01

    The "d -wave" symmetry of the superconducting order in the cuprate high temperature superconductors is a well established fact [J. Tsuei and J. R. Kirtley, Rev. Mod. Phys. 72, 969 (2000), 10.1103/RevModPhys.72.969 and D. J. Vanharlingen, Rev. Mod. Phys. 67, 515 (1995), 10.1103/RevModPhys.67.515], and one which identifies them as "unconventional." However, in macroscopic contexts—including many potential applications (i.e., superconducting "wires")—the material is a composite of randomly oriented superconducting grains in a metallic matrix, in which Josephson coupling between grains mediates the onset of long-range phase coherence. [See, e.g., D. C. Larbalestier et al., Nat. Mater. 13, 375 (2014), 10.1038/nmat3887, A. P. Malozemoff, MRS Bull. 36, 601 (2011), 10.1557/mrs.2011.160, and K. Heine et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 55, 2441 (1989), 10.1063/1.102295] Here we analyze the physics at length scales that are large compared to the size of such grains, and in particular the macroscopic character of the long-range order that emerges. While X Y -superconducting glass order and macroscopic d -wave superconductivity may be possible, we show that under many circumstances—especially when the d -wave superconducting grains are embedded in a metallic matrix—the most likely order has global s -wave symmetry.

  7. Apparatus for continuous manufacture of high temperature superconducting wires from molten superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hed, A.Z.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes an apparatus for making a composite high-temperature superconducting wire, comprising a refractory core having a melting point above a melt temperature of a superconducting oxide ceramic having a critical temperature T{sub c} above 23{degrees} K and a layer of the superconducting oxide ceramic on the core. It comprises means forming a controlled-atmosphere chamber; a vessel received in the chamber and formed with an opening at a bottom thereof, the vessel receiving an annular mass of the superconducting oxide ceramic in solid form surrounding a passage traversing the mass and extending upwardly from the opening; means for forming a melt of the superconductive oxide ceramic in a small pool in the mass above the passage and at a temperature slightly above a melting point of the superconducting oxide ceramic; means for drawing the refractory core through the opening, the passage and the melt in succession and depositing the melt on the core, the pool being in contact only with the mass, the core and the atmosphere; means in the chamber above the pool for cooling the melt deposited on the core by radiation and convection.

  8. Structural features that optimize high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Hinks, D.G. Chmaissem, O.; Argyriou, D.N.; Mitchell, J.F.; Dabrowski, B.

    1996-01-01

    For example, various defects can be introduced into the blocking layer to provide the optimum carrier concentration, but defects that form in or adjacent to the CuO{sub 2} layers will lower T{sub c} and eventually destroy superconductivity. After these requirements are satisfied, the highest T{sub c}`s are observed for compounds (such as the HgBa{sub 2}Ca{sub n-1}CuO{sub 2n{plus}2{plus}x} family) that have flat and square CuO{sub 2} planes and long apical Cu-O bonds. This conclusion is confirmed by the study of materials in which the flatness of the CuO{sub 2} plane can be varied in a systematic way. In more recent work, attention has focused on how the structure can be modified, for example, by chemical substitution, to improve flux pinning properties. Two strategies are being investigated: (1) Increasing the coupling of pancake vortices to form vortex-lines by shortening or ``metallizing`` the blocking layer; and (2) the formation of defects that pin flux.

  9. Spin-bag mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrieffer, J. R.; Wen, X.-G.; Zhang, S.-C.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to the theory of high-temperature superconductivity is proposed, based on the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic spin correlations observed in these materials over distances large compared to the lattice spacing. The spin ordering produces an electronic pseudogap which is locally suppressed by the addition of a hole. This suppression forms a bag inside which the hole is self-consistently trapped. Two holes are attracted by sharing a common bag. The resulting pairing interaction leads to a superconducting energy gap which is nodeless over the Femri surface.

  10. A Snapshot View of High Temperature Superconductivity 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Bansil, Arun; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2002-04-05

    This report outlines the conclusions of a workshop on High Temperature Superconductivity held April 5-8, 2002 in San Diego. The purpose of this report is to outline and highlight some outstanding and interesting issues in the field of High Temperature Superconductivity. The range of activities and new ideas that arose within the context of High Temperature Superconductors is so vast and extensive that it is impossible to summarize it in a brief document. Thus this report does not pretend to be all-inclusive and cover all areas of activity. It is a restricted snapshot and it only presents a few viewpoints. The complexity and difficulties with high temperature superconductivity is well illustrated by the Buddhist parable of the blind men trying to describe “experimentally” an elephant. These very same facts clearly illustrate that this is an extremely active field, with many unanswered questions, and with a great future potential for discoveries and progress in many (sometimes unpredictable) directions. It is very important to stress that independently of any current or future applications, this is a very important area of basic research.

  11. Silver alloys for high-temperature superconducting wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, B. N.; Zhou, R.; Holesinger, T. G.; Hults, W. L.; Lacerda, A.; Murray, A. S.; Ray, R. D.; Buford, Cm.; Phillips, L. G.; Kebede, A.; Smith, J. L.

    1995-12-01

    The silver cladding for high-temperature superconducting wire can be modified for various applications by alloying. For example, for powder-in-tube wire, stiffer cladding improves the smoothness of the interface. For large coils, higher strength is needed at low temperatures to hold them together. Power applications require more resistance in the cladding. We have made a survey of the properties of alloys to check their feasibility for various applications. Alloys with several elements added to silver have been prepared and evaluated for hardness, electrical properties, and compatibility with high-temperature superconductors during processing.

  12. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  13. High-temperature-superconducting magnetic susceptibility bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Lakew, B.; Lee, C.

    1992-01-01

    An infrared detector called the magnetic susceptibility bolometer is introduced which is based on the tmperature dependence of the diamagnetic screening of a high-Tc superconductor film near Tc. Results are reported for the response of a prototype model to modulated blackbody radiation. Possible improvements are discussed as is the potential sensitivity of an improved device.

  14. High temperature superconducting infrared imaging satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, B.; Covelli, J.; Davinic, N.; Hailey, J.; Jones, E.; Ortiz, V.; Racine, J.; Satterwhite, D.; Spriesterbach, T.; Sorensen, D.

    1992-01-01

    A low earth orbiting platform for an infrared (IR) sensor payload is examined based on the requirements of a Naval Research Laboratory statement of work. The experiment payload is a 1.5-meter square by 0.5-meter high cubic structure equipped with the imaging system, radiators, and spacecraft mounting interface. The orbit is circular at 509 km (275 nmi) altitude and 70 deg. inclination. The spacecraft is three-axis stabilized with pointing accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 deg. in each axis. The experiment payload requires two 15-minute sensing periods over two contiguous orbit periods for 30 minutes of sensing time per day. The spacecraft design is presented for launch via a Delta 2 rocket. Subsystem designs include attitude control, propulsion, electric power, telemetry, tracking and command, thermal design, structure, and cost analysis.

  15. Space applications for high temperature superconductivity - Brief review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of materials and devices based on high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) that could have useful space-oriented applications. Of specific interest are applications of HTS technologies to mm and microwave systems, spaceborne and planet-surface sensors, and to magnetic subsystems for robotic, rescue, and docking maneuvers. HTS technologies can be used in optoelectronics, magnetic-field detectors, antennae, transmission/delay lines, and launch/payload coils.

  16. Experimental Investigation of High Temperature Superconducting Imaging Surface Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Matlachov, A.N.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.

    1999-06-21

    The behavior of high temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in the presence of high temperature superconducting surfaces has been investigated. When current sources are placed close to a superconducting imaging surface (SIS) an image current is produced due to the Meissner effect. When a SQUID magnetometer is placed near such a surface it will perform in a gradiometric fashion provided the SQUID and source distances to the SIS are much less than the size of the SIS. We present the first ever experimental verification of this effect for a high temperature SIS. Results are presented for two SQUID-SIS configurations, using a 100 mm diameter YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} disc as the SIS. These results indicate that when the current source and sensor coil (SQUID) are close to the SIS, the behavior is that of a first-order gradiometer. The results are compared to analytic solutions as well as the theoretical predictions of a finite element model.

  17. Materials science challenges for high-temperature superconducting wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltyn, S. R.; Civale, L.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Jia, Q. X.; Maiorov, B.; Wang, H.; Maley, M.

    2007-09-01

    Twenty years ago in a series of amazing discoveries it was found that a large family of ceramic cuprate materials exhibited superconductivity at temperatures above, and in some cases well above, that of liquid nitrogen. Imaginations were energized by the thought of applications for zero-resistance conductors cooled with an inexpensive and readily available cryogen. Early optimism, however, was soon tempered by the hard realities of these new materials: brittle ceramics are not easily formed into long flexible conductors; high current levels require near-perfect crystallinity; and - the downside of high transition temperature - performance drops rapidly in a magnetic field. Despite these formidable obstacles, thousands of kilometres of high-temperature superconducting wire have now been manufactured for demonstrations of transmission cables, motors and other electrical power components. The question is whether the advantages of superconducting wire, such as efficiency and compactness, can outweigh the disadvantage: cost. The remaining task for materials scientists is to return to the fundamentals and squeeze as much performance as possible from these wonderful and difficult materials.

  18. High Temperature Superconducting RF Resonators for Resonator Stabilized Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettee, Jeffrey David

    Electromagnetic resonators made of superconducting materials show unusually sharp resonances because resistive losses are minimized. The availability of high quality thin films of YB_2CU_3 O_{7-delta} (YBCO) with superconducting transitions at 92K has aroused interest in thin film resonators at microwave frequencies for use in filters and oscillators in communication and radar systems. I have investigated the design and radio frequency (rf) properties of superconducting resonators in microstrip geometries (in which the resonant element and a single ground plane are on opposite faces of the LaAlO_3 substrates). This monolithic approach minimizes vibration sensitivity, but exposes the resonators to interactions with the packaging structure. I used niobium (Nb) superconducting 2 GHz resonators at 4.2K to investigate the geometry dependence of the quality factor Q and the high frequency phase noise S_ {y}(f). Q's in excess of 250,000 and S_{y}(1 Hz) = -227 were achieved. Desirable geometries were then fabricated in YBCO thin films produced by coevaporation or sputtering. They typically showed Q's that are a factor of four lower than the comparable Nb resonator, but retained their usefulness to substantially higher temperatures ( ~60K). One of these YBCO resonators was successfully operated to stabilize an oscillator operating at 2 GHz with overall single-sideband phase noise }(1 Hz) = -30 dBc/Hz comparable to the best available competing technologies.

  19. Insights from the study of high-temperature interface superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, J; Bollinger, A T; Logvenov, G; Gozar, A; Panagopoulos, C; Bozović, I

    2012-10-28

    A brief overview is given of the studies of high-temperature interface superconductivity based on atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE). A number of difficult materials science and physics questions have been tackled, frequently at the expense of some technical tour de force, and sometimes even by introducing new techniques. ALL-MBE is especially suitable to address questions related to surface and interface physics. Using this technique, it has been demonstrated that high-temperature superconductivity can occur in a single copper oxide layer-the thinnest superconductor known. It has been shown that interface superconductivity in cuprates is a genuine electronic effect-it arises from charge transfer (electron depletion and accumulation) across the interface driven by the difference in chemical potentials rather than from cation diffusion and mixing. We have also understood the nature of the superconductor-insulator phase transition as a function of doping. However, a few important questions, such as the mechanism of interfacial enhancement of the critical temperature, are still outstanding. PMID:22987034

  20. High temperature superconductivity in sulfur hydride under ultrahigh pressure: A complex superconducting phase beyond conventional BCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, M.-H.; Bianconi, Antonio; Simon, Arndt

    2016-05-01

    The recent report of superconductivity under high pressure at the record transition temperature of Tc =203 K in pressurized H2S has been identified as conventional in view of the observation of an isotope effect upon deuteration. Here it is demonstrated that conventional theories of superconductivity in the sense of BCS or Eliashberg formalisms cannot account for the pressure dependence of the isotope coefficient. The only way out of the dilemma is a multi-band approach of superconductivity where already small interband coupling suffices to achieve the high values of Tc together with the anomalous pressure dependent isotope coefficient. In addition, it is shown that anharmonicity of the hydrogen bonds vanishes under pressure whereas anharmonic phonon modes related to sulfur are still active.

  1. High temperature superconducting composite conductor and method for manufacturing the same

    DOEpatents

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Bingert, John F.

    2002-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting composite conductor is provided including a high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, the high temperature superconducting composite conductor characterized as having a fill factor of greater than about 40. Additionally, the conductor can be further characterized as containing multiple cores of high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, said multiple cores characterized as having substantially uniform geometry in the cross-sectional dimensions. Processes of forming such a high temperature superconducting composite conductor are also provided.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of High Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounce, Andrew M.

    The high temperature superconductors HgBa2CuO 4+delta (Hg1201) and Bi2SrCa2Cu2O 8+delta (Bi2212) have been treated with 17O for both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensitivity and various electronic properties. Subsequently, NMR experiments were performed on Hg1201 and Bi2212 to reveal the nature of the pseudogap, in the normal state, and vortex phases, in the superconducting state. NMR has been performed on 17O in an underdoped Hg1201 crystal with a superconducting transition transition temperature of 74 K to look for circulating orbital currents proposed theoretically and inferred from neutron scattering. The measurements reveal narrow spectra which preclude static local fields in the pseudogap phase at the apical site, suggesting that the moments observed with neutrons are fluctuating or the orbital current ordering is not the correct model for the neutron scattering observation. The fine detail of the NMR frequency shifts at the apical oxygen site are consistent with a dipolar field from the Cu+2 site and diamagnetism below the superconducting transition. It has been predicted that superconducting vortices should be electrically charged and that this effect is particularly enhanced for high temperature superconductors. Here it is shown that the Abrikosov vortex lattice, characteristic of the mixed state of superconductors, will become unstable at sufficiently high magnetic field if there is charge trapped on the vortex core for highly anisotropic superconductors. NMR measurements of the magnetic fields generated by vortices in Bi2212 single crystals provide evidence for an electro-statically driven vortex lattice reconstruction with the magnitude of charge on each vortex pancake of 2x10-3e, depending on doping, in line with theoretical estimates. Competition with magnetism is at the heart of high temperature superconductivity, most intensely felt near a vortex core. To investigate vortex magnetism spatially resolved NMR has been used, finding a strongly non

  3. High temperature superconducting current leads for fusion magnet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. L.; Dederer, J. T.; Singh, S. K.; Hull, J. R.

    Superconducting magnets for fusion applications typically have very high operating currents. These currents are transmitted from the room temperature power supplies to the low temperature superconducting coils by way of helium-vapor-cooled current leads. Because of the high current magnitude and the resistive characteristics associated with the normal metallic lead conductors, a substantial amount of power is dissipated in the lead. To maintain a stable operation, a high rate of helium vapor flow, generated by the boil-off of liquid helium, is required to cool the lead conductors. This helium boil-off substantially increases both the installation capacity and the operating cost of the helium refrigerator/liquefier. The boil-off of liquid helium can be significantly reduced by employing ceramic high temperature superconductors, such as Y-Ba-Cu-O, in the low temperature part of the lead conductor structure. This concept utilizes the superconducting, as well as the low thermal conductivity properties of the superconductor materials in eliminating power dissipation in part of the current lead and in inhibiting heat conduction into the liquid helium pool, resulting in reduced helium boil-off. This design concept has been conclusively demonstrated by a 2-kA current lead test model using Y-Ba-Cu-O (123) material which, although not optimized in design, has significantly reduced the rate of helium boil-off in comparison to optimized conventional leads. There appear to be no major technological barriers for scaling up this design to higher current levels for applications in fusion magnet systems or in fusion related testing activities. The theoretical basis of the current lead concept, as well as the important design and technology issues are addressed. The potential cost saving derived from employing these leads in fusion magnets is also discussed. In addition, a design concept for a 10-kA lead is presented.

  4. Silver Alloys for High-Temperature Superconducting Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. L.; Zhou, R.; Holesinger, T. C.; Hults, W. L.; Peterson, E. J.

    1996-03-01

    Pure silver is commonly used for cladding or as substrates for making bismuth- and thallium-based high-temperature superconductor wires. Pure silver's softness, lack of mechanical strength, and high-electrical conductivity cause various problems with the final conductor. We have made many alloys of silver with small amounts of additions, studied their mechanical and electrical properties, and checked compatibility with the superconducting materials. The use of silver alloys improves the usefulness of the conductors and improves or does not change the critical currents of the final conductor. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S.D.O.E.

  5. Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Pleva, E. F.; Mehrotra, V.; Schwenterly, S W

    2010-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

  6. Adaptive high temperature superconducting filters for interference rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Raihn, K.F.; Fenzi, N.O.; Hey-Shipton, G.L.; Saito, E.R.; Loung, P.V.; Aidnik, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    An optically switched high temperature superconducting (HTS) band-reject filter bank is presented. Fast low loss switching of high quality (Q) factor HTS filter elements enables digital selection of arbitrary pass-bands and stop-bands. Patterned pieces of GaAs and silicon are used in the manufacture of the photosensitive switches. Fiber optic cabling is used to transfer the optical energy from an LED to the switch. The fiber optic cable minimizes the thermal loading of the filter package and de-couples the switch`s power source from the RF circuit. This paper will discuss the development of a computer-controlled HTS bank of optically switchable, narrow band, high Q bandstop filters which incorporates a cryocooler to maintain the 77 K operating temperature of the HTS microwave circuit.

  7. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  8. Photoemission, low-dimensionality and high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritondo, G.

    1996-12-31

    Several experiments by different authors have established the existence of an anomalous photoemission effect in one-dimensional systems, including one-dimensional metallic crystals and other examples of one-dimensional metals. The effect consists of the suppression of the photoemission signal at energies close to the Fermi level--whereas for metals one would expect to see a Fermi edge. Increasing evidence exists, in the authors opinion, that this phenomenon is due to the decoupling of charge and spin coordinates and to a departure from the Fermi-liquid framework. If confirmed, this conclusion would be extremely relevant to high-temperature superconductivity, since it would pave the way to the use of a similar concept for non-Fermi-liquid theories of high-temperature superconductors.

  9. Rotor instrumentation study for high-temperature superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Wilson, C.T.

    1996-06-01

    In FY 9195, ORNL carried out work on rotor instrumentation systems in support of the General Electric (GE) Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI) on Superconducting Generator Development. The objective was to develop a system for tramsitting data from sensors in the spinning rotor to a stationary data acquisition system. Previous work at ORNL had investigated an optical method of cryogenic temperature measurement using laser-induced fluorescence in certain phosphors. Later follow-up discussions with experts in the ORNL Engineering Technology Division indicated that this method could also be extended to measure strain and magnetic field. Another optical alternative using standard fiber optic transmission modules was also investigated. The equipment is very inexpensive, but needs to be adapted for operation in a high-g-force rotating environment. An optical analog of a commutator or slip ring also needs to be developed to couple the light signals from the rotor to the stationary frame. Sealed mercury-film rotary contacts are manufactured by Meridian Laboratory. Unlike conventional slipring assemblies, these offer low noise and long lifetime, with low costs per channel. Standard units may need some upgrading for 3600-rpm or high-voltage operation. A commercial electronic telemetry system offered by Wireless Data Corporation (WDC) was identified as a viable candidate, and information on this system was presented to GE. GE has since ordered two of these systems from WDC for temperature measurements in their rotating test cryostat.

  10. Importance of structural instability to high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bussmann-Holder, A. University of Bayreuth, D-8550 Bayreuth, Federal Republic of Germany ); Migliori, A.; Fisk, Z.; Sarrao, J.L.; Leisure, R.G. ); Cheong, S. )

    1991-07-22

    The orthorhombic-tetragonal structural phase transition of La{sub 2{minus}{ital x}}Sr{sub {ital x}}CuO{sub 4} is quantitatively analyzed as a function of composition {ital x} within an anharmonic electron-phonon interaction model. The correct temperature dependence of the soft mode and the elastic constant {ital c}{sub 66} is obtained. The double-well potential in the electron-phonon interaction is derived self-consistently and found to vary strongly with {ital x}. In the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} electron--two-phonon interactions dominate the harmonic ones which may explain the high {ital T}{sub {ital c}}'s observed.

  11. The fabrication and characterization of high temperature superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Purpura, J.W.; Clem, T.R.

    1989-03-01

    Tubes fabricated of polycrystalline YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/ are characterized and details of the fabrication procedure are discussed. The microstructure of the tubes determined by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry is described. Resistive measurements of T/sub c/ and /Delta/T/sub c/ have been made. The tubes have also been characterized by means of SQUID magnetometry. The temperature dependence of magnetic fields trapped axially in the tubes has been measured and estimates of penetration depth are given. Moreover, measurements of transverse shielding effectiveness of the tubes have been made and are compared with theoretical predictions. Studies on flux penetration into the tubes are described. Findings from the microstructure studies are correlated with the observed superconductivity properties. The results on the high temperature materials are compared to results obtained previously on tubes made from conventional superconductors.

  12. The DARPA manufacturing initiative in high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has a very aggressive Technology Base program in high temperature superconductivity. This program is expected to provide the basis for a specialized set of military products - passive microwave and millimeter wave devices - within the next three years. In order to get these high leverage products into military systems, a manufacturing base must be developed for HTSC components. A plan for DARPA in HTSC manufacturing is directly coupled with the ongoing DARPA materials and device oriented R and D program. In essence, this plan recommends a three phased effort: 1. Phase I (two years); Fund companies through R and D contracts for specialized HTSC components; prepare a detailed plan and develop an HTSC consortium. 2. Phase II (six years): Establish an HTSC Sematech initiative for electronic applications, including active devices. 3. Phase III (optional): Continue the HTSC Sematech with emphasis on high power applications.

  13. Transient analysis and burnout of high temperature superconducting current leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, S. Y.; Hull, J. R.

    The transient behaviour of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads operated between liquid helium and liquid nitrogen temperatures is analysed for burnout conditions upon transition of the HTS into the normal state. Leads composed of HTS only and of HTS sheathed by pure silver or silver alloy are investigated numerically for temperature-dependent properties and analytically for temperature-independent properties. For lower values of shape factor (current density times length), the lead can be operated indefinitely without burnout. At higher values of shape factor, the lead reaches burnout in a finite time. With high current densities, the leads heat adiabatically. For a fixed shape factor, low current densities are desired to achieve long burnout times. To achieve a low helium boil-off rate in the superconducting state without danger of burnout, there is a preferred temperature dependence for thermal conductivity, and silver alloy sheaths are preferred to pure silver sheaths. However, for a given current density, pure silver sheaths take longer to burn out.

  14. High-temperature superconducting transformer performance, cost, and market evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, J.A.; Dagle, J.E.; DeSteese, J.G.; Huber, H.D.; Smith, S.A.; Currie, J.W.; Merrick, S.B.; Williams, T.A.

    1993-09-01

    Recent laboratory breakthroughs in high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials have stimulated both the scientific community and general public with questions regarding how these materials can be used in practical applications. While there are obvious benefits from using HTS materials (most notably the potential for reduced energy losses in the conductors), a number of issues (such as overall system energy losses, cost, and reliability) may limit applications of HTS equipment, even if the well known materials problems are solved. This study examined the future application potential of HTS materials to power transformers. This study effort was part of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD) research program, Superconductivity Technology for Electric Power Systems (STEPS). The study took a systems perspective to gain insights to help guide DOE in managing research designed to realize the vision of HTS applications. Specific objectives of the study were as follows: to develop an understanding of the fundamental HTS transformer design issues that can provide guidance for developing practical devices of interest to the electric utility industry; to identify electric utility requirements for HTS transformers and to evaluate the potential for developing a commercial market; to evaluate the market potential and national benefits for HTS transformers that could be achieved by a successful HTS development program; to develop an integrated systems analysis framework, which can be used to support R&D planning by DOE, by identifying how various HTS materials characteristics impact the performance, cost, and national benefits of the HTS application.

  15. High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Maguire

    2008-06-05

    In 2001, under DOE's Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. (Dupont) was awarded a cost-share contract to build a fully functional full-scale model high temperature superconducting reciprocating magnet unit specifically designed for the koalin clay industry. After competitive bidding, American Superconductor (AMSC) was selected to provide the coil for the magnet. Dupont performed the statement of work until September 2004, when it stopped work, with the concurrence of DOE, due to lack of federal funds. DOE had paid all invoices to that point, and Dupont had provided all cost share. At this same time, Dupont determined that this program did not fit with its corporate strategies and notified DOE that it was not interesting in resuming the program when funding became available. AMSC expressed interest in assuming performance of the Agreement to Dupont and DOE, and in March 2005, this project was transferred to AMSC by DOE amendment to the original contract and Novation Agreement between AMSC and Dupont. Design drawings and some hardware components and subassemblies were transferred to AMSC. However, no funding was obligated by DOE and AMSC never performed work on the project. This report contains a summary of the work performed by Dupont up to the September 04 timeframe.

  16. Reluctance machines incorporating high temperature superconducting materials on the rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, A. L.; Pires, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The computer modelling of reluctance machines with rotors containing both iron and high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, using the finite element method (FEM), is presented in this paper. The modelling permits to obtain the field and stator current distribution from where reluctance torque is evaluated. Different solutions are analyzed and experimental results on a 2 kW reluctance motor using HTS materials on the rotor and cooled by liquid nitrogen, show a significant increase in the torque values, when compared with that of a correspondent conventional machine. Pre-magnetization of these rotors by field cooling is explained and this process gives a mechanical output power undoubtedly better than that of a conventional reluctance machine.

  17. JETC (Japanese Technology Evaluation Center) Panel Report on High Temperature Superconductivity in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Duane; Gamota, George

    1989-01-01

    The Japanese regard success in R and D in high temperature superconductivity as an important national objective. The results of a detailed evaluation of the current state of Japanese high temperature superconductivity development are provided. The analysis was performed by a panel of technical experts drawn from U.S. industry and academia, and is based on reviews of the relevant literature and visits to Japanese government, academic and industrial laboratories. Detailed appraisals are presented on the following: Basic research; superconducting materials; large scale applications; processing of superconducting materials; superconducting electronics and thin films. In all cases, comparisons are made with the corresponding state-of-the-art in the United States.

  18. The spin bag mechanism of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrieffer, J. R.; Wen, X.-G.; Zhang, S.-C.

    1989-01-01

    In oxide superconductors the local suppression of antiferromagnetic correlations in the vicinity of a hole lowers the energy of the system. This quasi two-dimensional bag of weakened spin order follows the hole in its motion. In addition, holes prefer to share a bag, leading to a strong pairing attraction and a high Tc superconductivity. There are many experimental consequences of this mechanism for both the superconducting and normal phases.

  19. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  20. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  1. High-temperature study of superconducting hydrogen and deuterium sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durajski, A. P.; Szczȩśniak, R.; Pietronero, L.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds are extensively explored as candidates for a high-temperature superconductors. Currently, the measured critical temperature of $203$ K in hydrogen sulfide (H$_3$S) is among the highest over all-known superconductors. In present paper, using the strong-coupling Eliashberg theory of superconductivity, we compared in detail the thermodynamic properties of two samples containing different hydrogen isotopes H$_3$S and D$_3$S at $150$ GPa. Our research indicates that it is possible to reproduce the measured values of critical temperature $203$ K and $147$ K for H$_3$S and D$_3$S by using a Coulomb pseudopotential of $0.123$ and $0.131$, respectively. However, we also discuss a scenario in which the isotope effect is independent of pressure and the Coulomb pseudopotential for D$_3$S is smaller than for H$_3$S. For both scenarios, the energy gap, specific heat, thermodynamic critical field and related dimensionless ratios are calculated and compared with other conventional superconductors. We shown that the existence of the strong-coupling and retardation effects in the systems analysed result in significant differences between values obtained within the framework of the Eliashberg formalism and the prediction of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.

  2. An overview of recent developments in high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1987-10-01

    The BCS theory, in all probability, will explain the properties of new superconducting oxide materials. However, a detailed account of why they have such an unusually high transition temperature will require much more work. The key to the answer to the theoretical questions may be found in the fact that all these materials are ceramics, i.e., bad conductors in their normal phase. In fact, they are ''almost insulators'', with strange and varied magnetic properties. And although the lattice polarization will certainly play a role (as shown by the isotope effect), the detailed motion of the electrons and the short-range Coulomb repulsion may give the unusual characteristics which result in high transition temperatures. From the point of view of practical applications and their implications in our everyday life, much can be speculated: transmission lines without any power losses, levitated trains, super-super-computers, new and not-yet-invented devices. But all these innovations will require the solution of complicated (and expensive to solve) materials problems (brittle, hard to handle ceramics; unstable phases; low critical currents) as well as a cool-headed economic analysis which this author is unable to provide. 13 refs.

  3. The infinite range Heisenberg model and high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir-Kheli, Jamil

    1992-01-01

    The thesis deals with the theory of high temperature superconductivity from the standpoint of three-band Hubbard models.Chapter 1 of the thesis proposes a strongly coupled variational wavefunction that has the three-spin system of an oxygen hole and its two neighboring copper spins in a doublet and the background Cu spins in an eigenstate of the infinite range antiferromagnet. This wavefunction is expected to be a good "zeroth order" wavefunction in the superconducting regime of dopings. The three-spin polaron is stabilized by the hopping terms rather than the copper-oxygen antiferromagnetic coupling Jpd. Considering the effect of the copper-copper antiferromagnetic coupling Jdd, we show that the three-spin polaron cannot be pure Emery (Dg), but must have a non-negligible amount of doublet-u (Du) character for hopping stabilization. Finally, an estimate is made for the magnitude of the attractive coupling of oxygen holes.Chapter 2 presents an exact solution to a strongly coupled Hamiltonian for the motion of oxygen holes in a 1-D Cu-O lattice. The Hamiltonian separates into two pieces: one for the spin degrees of freedom of the copper and oxygen holes, and the other for the charge degrees of freedom of the oxygen holes. The spinon part becomes the Heisenberg antiferromagnet in 1-D that is soluble by the Bethe Ansatz. The holon piece is also soluble by a Bethe Ansatz with simple algebraic relations for the phase shifts.Finally, we show that the nearest neighbor Cu-Cu spin correlation increases linearly with doping and becomes positive at x [...] 0.70.

  4. Relevance of Phonons in High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Takeshi; Chung, Jae-Ho; Piekarz, Przemek; Arai, Masatoshi; Tajima, Setsuko; Tachiki, Masashi

    2002-03-01

    For a long time phonons have been regarded to be irrelevant to high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). However, our recent measurements of phonon dispersion in YBCO with neutron inelastic scattering at MAPS of the ISIS and of electron dressing of phonons by x-ray inelastic scattering at the APS suggest otherwise. They show that the in-plane Cu-O bond-stretching mode interacts strongly with electrons, reflecting the SC order parameter, and the electronic structure is strongly anisotropic in the Cu-O plane. The results are consistent with the formation of a short-range stripe structure and a resonant vibronic state. We conjecture that the spin-charge stripe structure brings down the electronic energy scale close to those of phonons, creating the resonant condition. A model based upon overscreening of phonons by charge and formation of the vibronic state yields a SC transition temperature over 300K. While this magnitude may not be accurate it suggests that the phonons are likely to be closely involved in the mechanism of HTSC.

  5. Microwave response of high transition temperature superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix Antonio

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the microwave response of YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta), Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O high transition temperature superconducting (HTS) thin films by performing power transmission measurements. These measurements were carried out in the temperature range of 300 K to 20 K and at frequencies within the range of 30 to 40 GHz. Through these measurements we have determined the magnetic penetration depth (lambda), the complex conductivity (sigma(sup *) = sigma(sub 1) - j sigma(sub 2)) and the surface resistance (R(sub s)). An estimate of the intrinsic penetration depth (lambda approx. 121 nm) for the YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta) HTS has been obtained from the film thickness dependence of lambda. This value compares favorably with the best values reported so far (approx. 140 nm) in single crystals and high quality c-axis oriented thin films. Furthermore, it was observed that our technique is sensitive to the intrinsic anisotropy of lambda in this superconductor. Values of lambda are also reported for Bi-based and Tl-based thin films. We observed that for the three types of superconductors, both sigma(sub 1) and sigma(sub 2) increased when cooling the films below their transition temperature. The measured R(sub s) are in good agreement with other R(sub S) values obtained using resonant activity techniques if we assume a quadratic frequency dependence. Our analysis shows that, of the three types of HTS films studied, the YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta) thin film, deposited by laser ablation and off-axis magnetron sputtering are the most promising for microwave applications.

  6. High temperature superconductivity technology for advanced space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Myers, Ira T.; Connolly, Denis J.

    1990-01-01

    In 1987, the Lewis Research center of the NASA and the Argonne National Laboratory of the Department of Energy joined in a cooperative program to identify and assess high payoff space and aeronautical applications of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). The initial emphasis of this effort was limited, and those space power related applications which were considered included microwave power transmission and magnetic energy storage. The results of these initial studies were encouraging and indicated the need of further studies. A continuing collaborative program with Argonne National Laboratory has been formulated and the Lewis Research Center is presently structuring a program to further evaluate HTSC, identify applications and define the requisite technology development programs for space power systems. This paper discusses some preliminary results of the previous evaluations in the area of space power applications of HTSC which were carried out under the joint NASA-DOE program, the future NASA-Lewis proposed program, its thrusts, and its intended outputs and give general insights on the anticipated impact of HTSC for space power applications of the future.

  7. Trial manufacture of liquid nitrogen cooling High Temperature Superconductivity Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, H.; Nishikawa, T.; Tsuda, T.; Hondou, Y.; Akita, Y.; Takeda, T.; Okazaki, T.; Ohashi, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2006-06-01

    We present a new high temperature superconductivity (HTS) synchronous motor using the liquid nitrogen as the refrigerant in this paper. This motor is designed to be used as the propulsion motor in ship. Because we use the liquid nitrogen as the refrigerant, it is possible to simplify the cooling equipments in the motor. And in our design, we apply the axial flux type of motor to simplify the cryostat of the HTS wires used to make the field coils. Here, the fields using the bismuth HTS wire for the HTS coils are fixed. Moreover, the cores used in the fields are separated from cryostat, and the armature applies the core-less structure. According to various the electromagnetic field analysis results, the new motor was designed and produced. The diameter of the motor is 650mm, and the width of the motor is 360mm. The motor's rated output is 8.8kW at 100rpm, while the overload output is 44kW, and the maximum efficiency is 97.7%. Also, in order to further miniaturize the motor, other magnetic field analysis have been done when the high-current-density type HTS wire was used and the permendur was used instead of magnetic steel plates. In this case, the motor's rated output is 12kW, and the overload output is 60kW.

  8. A simple tuning method for high temperature superconducting microstrip filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Srikanta; Stevens, Chris; Edwards, David

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we report a simple tuning methodology of high temperature superconducting (HTS) microstrip filters. In order to establish this new tuning approach a 5 pole lumped element HTS bandpass filter, centre frequency 800 MHz, narrowband (bandwidth, 7.6 MHz), is designed and fabricated on a 2 inch (diameter) Y Ba2Cu3O6.94 thin film of thickness 700 nm and lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) substrate of 0.5 mm thickness. The filter was etched using conventional photolithography and a wet chemical etching process. The 5 pole lumped element filter is tested in an integrated RF-cryocooler measurement system at 65 K and also in liquid nitrogen (77 K). We demonstrate a 19.3 MHz downward shift of the centre frequency of the 5 pole filter response. This is achieved by overlaying two layers of thin dielectric tape (PTFE) (50.0 µm thickness, permittivity 3.2) over the conducting patterned part of the filter surface. A full wave electromagnetic analysis of the dielectric environment of this tuning arrangement matches the measured response closely. To improve the passband response, the filter is tuned in liquid nitrogen, placing pieces of sapphire rods over the resonators of the filter layout.

  9. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  10. High Temperature Superconducting Thin Films and Their Application to Superconducting-Normal Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankiewich, Paul M.

    The existence of the proximity effect between the high temperature superconductor YBa_2Cu _3O_7 (YBCO) and normal metal thin films has been demonstrated for the first time, and this effect has been exploited to produce lithographically fabricated superconducting-normal-superconducting (SNS) Josephson junctions. Improvement of the fabrication processes has led to new methods of in-situ film growth and plasma etching of YBCO, as well as YBCO-compatible processes for the deep -ultraviolet and electron-beam lithography required to fabricate submicron device structures. This proximity effect approach helps to circumvent the short coherence length (xi~3 nm) characteristic of the high T_ {c} superconductors. In a clean normal metal such as gold or silver the relevant coherence length is governed by the higher Fermi velocity and longer mean free path. As a result a Josephson device containing a normal metal weak link can be longer than an ideal all -YBCO microbridge (dimensions comparable to xi ). This makes fabrication possible. Initially, SNS devices were fabricated and showed evidence for a supercurrent through the normal region. Properly spaced Shapiro steps as a function of microwave frequency were also observed. This result was evidence for a proximity effect between a normal metal and YBCO. Nevertheless, due to the short coherence length and the sensitivity of the YBCO to damage, the fabrication process was not sufficiently reproducible. As a result, new techniques were developed to enable more reproducible device fabrication. In-situ film growth and fabrication is desirable to minimize contamination of and damage to the surface of the superconductor. In -situ reactive coevaporation of YBCO was demonstrated. Patterning of these in-situ films into a structure required the development of a low-damage reactive ion etch. New lithographic techniques were developed to minimize chemical degradation of the superconductor. Finally, deposition of gold onto heated device

  11. Infinite-range Heisenberg model and high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir-Kheli, Jamil; Goddard, William A., III

    1993-11-01

    A strongly coupled variational wave function, the doublet spin-projected Néel state (DSPN), is proposed for oxygen holes in three-band models of high-temperature superconductors. This wave function has the three-spin system of the oxygen hole plus the two neighboring copper atoms coupled in a spin-1/2 doublet. The copper spins in the neighborhood of a hole are in an eigenstate of the infinite-range Heisenberg antiferromagnet (SPN state). The doublet three-spin magnetic polaron or hopping polaron (HP) is stabilized by the hopping terms tσ and tτ, rather than by the copper-oxygen antiferromagnetic coupling Jpd. Although, the HP has a large projection onto the Emery (Dg) polaron, a non-negligible amount of doublet-u (Du) character is required for optimal hopping stabilization. This is due to Jdd, the copper-copper antiferromagnetic coupling. For the copper spins near an oxygen hole, the copper-copper antiferromagnetic coupling can be considered to be almost infinite ranged, since the copper-spin-correlation length in the superconducting phase (0.06-0.25 holes per in-plane copper) is approximately equal to the mean separation of the holes (between 2 and 4 lattice spacings). The general DSPN wave function is constructed for the motion of a single quasiparticle in an antiferromagnetic background. The SPN state allows simple calculations of various couplings of the oxygen hole with the copper spins. The energy minimum is found at symmetry (π/2,π/2) and the bandwidth scales with Jdd. These results are in agreement with exact computations on a lattice. The coupling of the quasiparticles leads to an attraction of holes and its magnitude is estimated.

  12. A Transverse Flux High-Temperature Superconducting Generator Topology for Large Direct Drive Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keysan, Ozan; Mueller, Markus A.

    The cost and mass of an offshore wind turbine power-train can be reduced by using high-temperature superconducting generators, but for a successful commercial design the superconducting generator should be as reliable as its alternatives. In this paper, we present a novel transverse flux superconducting generator topology which is suitable for low-speed, high-torque applications. The generator is designed with a stationary superconducting field winding and a variable reluctance claw pole motor for simplified mechanical structure and maximum reliability. 3D FEA simulation results of a 70 kW prototype is presented.

  13. A novel excitonic mechanism for high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Tesanovic, Z.; Bishop, A.R.; Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for superconductivity, based on intra and interband Cu/longleftrightarrow/O charge transfer excitations in oxide superconductors. The dynamic polarizability of the environment surrounding CuO/sup 2/ planes plays an important role in enhancing T/sub c/. The ''sandwich'' structure in which CuO/sub 2/ planes are separated by a highly polarizable medium is ideally suited for this mechanism. Our proposal is consistent with a variety of available data, and suggests several new experimental directions. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Recovery time of high temperature superconducting tapes exposed in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jie; Zeng, Weina; Yao, Zhihao; Zhao, Anfeng; Hu, Daoyu; Hong, Zhiyong

    2016-08-01

    The recovery time is a crucial parameter to high temperature superconducting tapes, especially in power applications. The cooperation between the reclosing device and the superconducting facilities mostly relies on the recovery time of the superconducting tapes. In this paper, a novel method is presented to measure the recovery time of several different superconducting samples. In this method criterion used to judge whether the sample has recovered is the liquid nitrogen temperature, instead of the critical temperature. An interesting phenomenon is observed during the testing of superconducting samples exposed in the liquid nitrogen. Theoretical explanations of this phenomenon are presented from the aspect of heat transfer. Optimization strategy of recovery characteristics based on this phenomenon is also briefly discussed.

  15. Exploratory research for a high temperature superconducting integrated circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Track, E. K.; Mukhanov, O.; Eckstein, J. N.; Bozovic, I.; Virshup, G. F.

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this effort was the investigation of the molecular beam epitaxy trilayer Josephson junction process under development by Varian Corporation. Under this effort, Stanford University provided fundamental materials characterization to understand and improve the surfaces and interfaces of the thin film structures. HYPRES Inc. provided an independent assessment of the junctions produced by Varian and addressed the possibilities of rapid single fluxquantum (RSFQ) circuit designs. The material system chosen for this investigation was bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide (BSSCO). The Josephson junction character of the devices was confirmed by the observation of microwave induced (Shapior) steps in the I-V curves. Contact resistance was reduced by three orders of magnitude by modulation doping the top few molecular layers of the upper superconductive electrode. The desired properties to warrant RSFQ circuit fabrication were not obtained. A material system with a higher Josephson junction critical temperature and higher critical current is necessary for circuits.

  16. Effect of ‘microwave window’ on the performance of high temperature superconducting antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M. H.; Cao, B. S.; Huang, H. S.; Zhang, X. X.; Liu, T.; Liu, T. J.; Tu, G. B.; Jin, S. L.; Zhou, Y. L.; He, M.; Cui, D. F.

    We studied the effect of ‘microwave window’ on the performance of a high temperature superconducting antenna that was installed in a metal dewar with a low temperature superconducting magnet inside. Although the window was in the antenna's near and Fresnel zones, the signal attenuation induced by the ‘microwave window’ can be reduced to less than 1 dB in the far field. The configuration of the ‘microwave window’ is also presented.

  17. High temperature superconductivity in sulfur and selenium hydrides at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Livas, José A.; Sanna, Antonio; Gross, E. K. U.

    2016-03-01

    Due to its low atomic mass, hydrogen is the most promising element to search for high-temperature phononic superconductors. However, metallic phases of hydrogen are only expected at extreme pressures (400 GPa or higher). The measurement of the record superconducting critical temperature of 203 K in a hydrogen-sulfur compound at 160 GPa of pressure [A.P. Drozdov, M.I. Eremets, I.A. Troyan, arXiv:1412.0460 [cond-mat.supr-con] (2014); A.P. Drozdov, M.I. Eremets, I.A. Troyan, V. Ksenofontov, S.I. Shylin, Nature 525, 73 (2015)], shows that metallization of hydrogen can be reached at significantly lower pressure by inserting it in the matrix of other elements. In this work we investigate the phase diagram and the superconducting properties of the H-S systems by means of minima hopping method for structure prediction and density functional theory for superconductors. We also show that Se-H has a similar phase diagram as its sulfur counterpart as well as high superconducting critical temperature. We predict H3Se to exceed 120 K superconductivity at 100 GPa. We show that both H3Se and H3S, due to the critical temperature and peculiar electronic structure, present rather unusual superconducting properties. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70020-0

  18. Damping and support in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; McIver, Carl R.; Mittleider, John A.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses to provide improved auxiliary damping for superconducting bearings in superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. In a superconducting bearing, a cryostat housing the superconductors is connected to a ground state with a combination of a damping strip of material, a set of linkage arms to provide vertical support, and spring washers to provide stiffness. Alternately, the superconducting bearing may be supported by a cryostat connected to a ground state by posts constructed from a mesh of fibers, with the damping and stiffness controlled by the fiber composition, size, and mesh geometry.

  19. High Temperature Superconducting Bearings for Lunar Telescope Mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Mark; BuiMa, Ki; Cooley, Rodger; Mackey, Daniel; Meng, Ruling; Chu, Ching Wu; Chu, Wei Kan; Chen, Peter C.; Wilson, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    A telescope to be installed on the lunar surface in the near future must work in a cold and dusty vacuum environment for long periods without on site human maintenance. To track stars, the drive mechanism must be capable of exceedingly fine steps and repeatability. Further, the use of lightweight telescopes for obvious economic benefits burdens the requirement for stable support and rotation. Conventional contact bearings and gear drives have numerous failure modes under such a restrictive and harsh environment. However, hybrid superconducting magnetic bearings (HSMB) fit in naturally. These bearings are stable, light, passive, and essentially frictionless, allowing high precision electronic positioning control. By passive levitation, the HSMB does not wear out and requires neither maintenance nor power. A prototype illustrating the feasibility of this application is presented.

  20. Method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a high temperature super-conducting transformer

    DOEpatents

    Golner, Thomas M.; Mehta, Shirish P.

    2005-07-26

    A method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a super-conducting transformer is provided that includes a first super-conducting coil set, a second super-conducting coil set, and a third super-conducting coil set. The first, second and third super-conducting coil sets are connected via an insulated interconnect system that includes insulated conductors and insulated connectors that are utilized to connect the first, second, and third super-conducting coil sets to the high voltage leads.

  1. The phenomenology of high-temperature superconductive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    High-temperature superconductors offer considerable promise for high current applications. Some of the relevant issues, such as materials, grain boundaries and dissipation, will be introduced and both the fundamental and practical aspects will be addressed. For example, the first generation powder-in-tube wires based on the bismuth cuprate have restricted high field performance at liquid nitrogen temperature due to the weak inter-bilayer coupling of magnetic vortices. The second generation coated conductor uses YBa2Cu3O7 to overcome this, but it requires a high degree of biaxial texturing in order to provide notable performance in high fields in liquid nitrogen. .

  2. Performance evaluation of high-temperature superconducting current leads for micro-SMES systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R.; Buckles, W.E.; Weber, B.R.; Yang, S.T.

    1995-08-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Technology Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Superconductivity, Inc., are developing high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads for application to micro-superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Two 1500-A HTS leads have been designed and constructed. The performance of the current lead assemblies is being evaluated in a zero-magnetic-field test program that includes assembly procedures, tooling, and quality assurance; thermal and electrical performance; and flow and mechanical characteristics. Results of evaluations performed to data are presented.

  3. Preisach-type modeling of high-temperature superconducting hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2016-05-01

    Even though Isaak Mayergoyz described it as: "much more accurate for the description of superconducting hysteresis than for the description of hysteresis of magnetic materials", Preisach modeling of superconducting hysteresis is not a popular investigative tool. This might be due to the complexity of identifying the Preisach distribution function or due to lack of convincing physical reasoning behind pure phenomenological versions. In this paper, a two-component Preisach-type model is presented which is computationally-efficient and physically-sound. The change in the slope of the minor hysteresis loops is incorporated in the model and is attributed to reversible fluxoid motion. The model presented is clearly capable of simulating various shapes of superconducting hysteresis loops and could be easily coupled with finite element method (FEM) numerical software.

  4. Hidden Fermionic Excitation Boosting High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shiro; Civelli, Marcello; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a microscopic cuprate model, namely, the two-dimensional Hubbard model, is studied with a cluster extension of the dynamical mean-field theory. We find a nontrivial structure of the frequency-dependent self-energies, which describes an unprecedented interplay between the pseudogap and superconductivity. We show that these properties are well described by quasiparticles hybridizing with (hidden) fermionic excitations, emergent from the strong electronic correlations. The hidden fermion enhances superconductivity via a mechanism distinct from a conventional boson-mediated pairing, and originates the normal-state pseudogap. Though the hidden fermion is elusive in experiments, it can solve many experimental puzzles.

  5. Hidden Fermionic Excitation Boosting High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shiro; Civelli, Marcello; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a microscopic cuprate model, namely, the two-dimensional Hubbard model, is studied with a cluster extension of the dynamical mean-field theory. We find a nontrivial structure of the frequency-dependent self-energies, which describes an unprecedented interplay between the pseudogap and superconductivity. We show that these properties are well described by quasiparticles hybridizing with (hidden) fermionic excitations, emergent from the strong electronic correlations. The hidden fermion enhances superconductivity via a mechanism distinct from a conventional boson-mediated pairing, and originates the normal-state pseudogap. Though the hidden fermion is elusive in experiments, it can solve many experimental puzzles. PMID:26894730

  6. High temperature superconductivity research in selected laboratories in West Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebenberg, Donald H.; Clark, Alan

    1988-07-01

    The superconductivity work at eight West German laboratories is reviewed. The laboratories are (or located at): the University of Giessen; the Technical University at Darmstadt; Hoechst AG; Siemens AG; KFA Julich; KFK, Karlsruhe; the Walter Meissner Institute, Garching; and the Max Planck Institute, Stuttgart.

  7. High temperature superconductive microwave technology for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. F.; Connolly, D. J.; Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress being made on space application technology research on film fabrication, passive microwave circuits, and semiconductor devices for cryogenic circuits is reviewed. Achievements in YBCO and TCBCO films are addressed along with circuit evaluations of microstrip resonators, phase shifters, microstrip filters, dielectric resonator filters, and superconducting antennas.

  8. 630 kVA high temperature superconducting transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueger, H.

    This document describes the 630 KVA HTS transformer project made by ABB jointly with EDF and ASC. The project started April 1994 and its goal was to manufacture a real scale superconducting distribution transformer and to operate it during one year in the grid of Geneva's utility (SIG). The conclusion highlights the future perspective of HTS transformers.

  9. Doping dependence of spin excitations and its correlations with high-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Chenglin; Lu, Xingye; Tan, Guotai; Luo, Huiqian; Song, Yu; Wang, Miaoyin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Goremychkin, E.A.; Perring, T.G.; Maier, T.A.; Yin, Zhiping; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel; Dai, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides occurs when electrons and holes are doped into their antiferromagnetic parent compounds. Since spin excitations may be responsible for electron pairing and superconductivity, it is important to determine their electron/hole-doping evolution and connection with superconductivity. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to show that while electron doping to the antiferromagnetic BaFe2As2 parent compound modifies the low-energy spin excitations and their correlation with superconductivity (<50 meV) without affecting the high-energy spin excitations (>100 meV), hole-doping suppresses the high-energy spin excitations and shifts the magnetic spectral weight to low-energies. In addition, our absolute spin susceptibility measurements for the optimally hole-doped iron pnictide reveal that the change in magnetic exchange energy below and above Tc can account for the superconducting condensation energy. These results suggest that high-Tc superconductivity in iron pnictides is associated with both the presence of high-energy spin excitations and a coupling between low-energy spin excitations and itinerant electrons. PMID:24301219

  10. The Fabrication Technique and Property Analysis of Racetrack-Type High Temperature Superconducting Magnet for High Power Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, D. Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Li, L.; Li, Y. N.; Chen, P. M.

    2013-03-01

    The superconducting motor is now the focus of the research on the application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. In this manuscript, we mainly introduce the recent progress on the fabrication technique and property research of the superconducting motor magnet in Luoyang Ship Material Research Institute (LSMRI) in China, including the materials, the winding and impregnation technique, and property measurement of magnet. Several techniques and devices were developed to manufacture the magnet, including the technique of insulation and thermal conduction, the device for winding the racetrack-type magnet, etc. At last, the superconducting magnet used for the MW class motor were successfully developed, which is the largest superconducting motor magnet in china at present. The critical current of the superconducting magnet exceeds the design value (90 A at 30 K).

  11. From quantum matter to high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxides.

    PubMed

    Keimer, B; Kivelson, S A; Norman, M R; Uchida, S; Zaanen, J

    2015-02-12

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the copper oxides in 1986 triggered a huge amount of innovative scientific inquiry. In the almost three decades since, much has been learned about the novel forms of quantum matter that are exhibited in these strongly correlated electron systems. A qualitative understanding of the nature of the superconducting state itself has been achieved. However, unresolved issues include the astonishing complexity of the phase diagram, the unprecedented prominence of various forms of collective fluctuations, and the simplicity and insensitivity to material details of the 'normal' state at elevated temperatures. PMID:25673411

  12. Thermodynamics of the interplay between magnetism and high-temperature superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Kivelson, Steven A.; Aeppli, G.; Emery, Victor J.

    2001-01-01

    Copper–oxide-based high-temperature superconductors have complex phase diagrams with multiple ordered phases. It even appears that the highest superconducting transition temperatures for certain cuprates are found in samples that display simultaneous onset of magnetism and superconductivity. We show here how the thermodynamics of fluid mixtures—a touchstone for chemistry as well as hard and soft condensed matter physics—accounts for this startling observation, as well as many other properties of the cuprates in the vicinity of the instability toward “striped” magnetism. PMID:11593001

  13. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40-110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification. PMID:26490223

  14. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-10-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40-110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification.

  15. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40–110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification. PMID:26490223

  16. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections.

  17. Narrowband high temperature superconducting receiver for low frequency radio waves

    DOEpatents

    Reagor, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An underground communicating device has a low-noise SQUID using high temperature superconductor components connected to detect a modulated external magnetic flux for outputting a voltage signal spectrum that is related to the varying magnetic flux. A narrow bandwidth filter may be used to select a portion of the voltage signal spectrum that is relatively free of power line noise to output a relatively low noise output signal when operating in a portion of the electromagnetic spectra where such power line noise exists. A demodulator outputs a communication signal, which may be an FM signal, indicative of a modulation on the modulated external magnetic flux.

  18. No mixing of superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in a high-temperature superconductor.

    PubMed

    Bozovic, I; Logvenov, G; Verhoeven, M A J; Caputo, P; Goldobin, E; Geballe, T H

    2003-04-24

    There is still no universally accepted theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Most models assume that doping creates 'holes' in the valence band of an insulating, antiferromagnetic 'parent' compound, and that antiferromagnetism and high-temperature superconductivity are intimately related. If their respective energies are nearly equal, strong antiferromagnetic fluctuations (temporally and spatially restricted antiferromagnetic domains) would be expected in the superconductive phase, and superconducting fluctuations would be expected in the antiferromagnetic phase; the two states should 'mix' over an extended length scale. Here we report that one-unit-cell-thick antiferromagnetic La2CuO4 barrier layers remain highly insulating and completely block a supercurrent; the characteristic decay length is 1 A, indicating that the two phases do not mix. We likewise found that isolated one-unit-cell-thick layers of La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 remain superconducting. The latter further implies that, on doping, new electronic states are created near the middle of the bandgap. These two findings are in conflict with most proposed models, with a few notable exceptions that include postulated spin-charge separation. PMID:12712200

  19. High-temperature superconductivity in potassium-coated multilayer FeSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Y.; Nakayama, K.; Sugawara, K.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-08-01

    The recent discovery of possible high-temperature (Tc) superconductivity over 65 K in a monolayer FeSe film on SrTiO3 (refs , , , , , ) triggered a fierce debate on how superconductivity evolves from bulk to film, because bulk FeSe crystal exhibits a Tc of no higher than 10 K (ref. ). However, the difficulty in controlling the carrier density and the number of FeSe layers has hindered elucidation of this problem. Here, we demonstrate that deposition of potassium onto FeSe films markedly expands the accessible doping range towards the heavily electron-doped region. Intriguingly, we have succeeded in converting non-superconducting films with various thicknesses into superconductors with Tc as high as 48 K. We also found a marked increase in the magnitude of the superconducting gap on decreasing the FeSe film thickness, indicating that the interface plays a crucial role in realizing the high-temperature superconductivity. The results presented provide a new strategy to enhance and optimize Tc in ultrathin films of iron-based superconductors.

  20. High temperature superconducting microwave switch. Interim report, April 1995-June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, M.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the design, construction, and testing of a high temperature superconducting microwave switch. The circuit is implemented in microstrip transmission line geometry and utilizes voltage and or current to create the switching action. Results of RF power limiting are also presented.

  1. Spacecraft design project: High temperature superconducting infrared imaging satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The High Temperature Superconductor Infrared Imaging Satellite (HTSCIRIS) is designed to perform the space based infrared imaging and surveillance mission. The design of the satellite follows the black box approach. The payload is a stand alone unit, with the spacecraft bus designed to meet the requirements of the payload as listed in the statement of work. Specifications influencing the design of the spacecraft bus were originated by the Naval Research Lab. A description of the following systems is included: spacecraft configuration, orbital dynamics, radio frequency communication subsystem, electrical power system, propulsion, attitude control system, thermal control, and structural design. The issues of testing and cost analysis are also addressed. This design project was part of the course Advanced Spacecraft Design taught at the Naval Postgraduate School.

  2. High Temperature Superconducting Terahertz Emitters with Various Mesa Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfanazari, Kaveh; Tsujimoto, M.; Kashiwagi, T.; Asai, H.; Kitamura, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Sawamura, M.; Ishida, K.; Watanabe, C.; Sekimoto, S.; Minami, H.; Tachiki, M.; Hattori, T.; Klemm, R. A.; Kadowaki, K.

    2013-03-01

    In 2007, the first observation of the coherent terahertz (THz) electromagnetic (EM) waves from a mesa structures of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) in high temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) is reported. The ac-Josephson effect as well as the cavity resonance conditions is considered as the principle mechanism of the THz radiation. In order to understand the cavity effect in THz radiation from IJJ mesas more clearly, we studied mesas with various geometries; various kinds of triangles, and pentagonal mesas with various sizes and thicknesses. The focused ion beam (FIB) milling technique is used in all mesa fabrications. In this talk, we discuss our recent progress in THz emission observation in pentagonal mesas. This work has been supported in part by CREST-JST (Japan Science and Technology Agency), WPI-MANA project (NIMS).

  3. High-temperature superconductivity in a single copper-oxygen plane.

    PubMed

    Logvenov, G; Gozar, A; Bozovic, I

    2009-10-30

    The question of how thin cuprate layers can be while still retaining high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) has been challenging to address, in part because experimental studies require the synthesis of near-perfect ultrathin HTS layers and ways to profile the superconducting properties such as the critical temperature and the superfluid density across interfaces with atomic resolution. We used atomic-layer molecular beam epitaxy to synthesize bilayers of a cuprate metal (La(1.65)Sr(0.45)CuO4) and a cuprate insulator (La2CuO4) in which each layer is just three unit cells thick. We selectively doped layers with isovalent Zn atoms, which suppress superconductivity and act as markers, to show that this interface HTS occurs within a single CuO2 plane. This approach may also be useful in fabricating HTS devices. PMID:19900926

  4. High-Temperature Superconductivity in a Single Copper-Oxygen Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Logvenov, G.; Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2009-10-30

    The question of how thin cuprate layers can be while still retaining high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) has been challenging to address, in part because experimental studies require the synthesis of near-perfect ultrathin HTS layers and ways to profile the superconducting properties such as the critical temperature and the superfluid density across interfaces with atomic resolution. We used atomic-layer molecular beam epitaxy to synthesize bilayers of a cuprate metal (La{sub 1.65}Sr{sub 0.45}CuO{sub 4}) and a cuprate insulator (La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}) in which each layer is just three unit cells thick. We selectively doped layers with isovalent Zn atoms, which suppress superconductivity and act as markers, to show that this interface HTS occurs within a single CuO{sub 2} plane. This approach may also be useful in fabricating HTS devices.

  5. High-temperature interface superconductivity between metallic and insulating copper oxides.

    PubMed

    Gozar, A; Logvenov, G; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Bollinger, A T; Giannuzzi, L A; Muller, D A; Bozovic, I

    2008-10-01

    The realization of high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) superconductivity confined to nanometre-sized interfaces has been a long-standing goal because of potential applications and the opportunity to study quantum phenomena in reduced dimensions. This has been, however, a challenging target: in conventional metals, the high electron density restricts interface effects (such as carrier depletion or accumulation) to a region much narrower than the coherence length, which is the scale necessary for superconductivity to occur. By contrast, in copper oxides the carrier density is low whereas T(c) is high and the coherence length very short, which provides an opportunity-but at a price: the interface must be atomically perfect. Here we report superconductivity in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La(2)CuO(4)) and a metal (La(1.55)Sr(0.45)CuO(4)), neither of which is superconducting in isolation. In these bilayers, T(c) is either approximately 15 K or approximately 30 K, depending on the layering sequence. This highly robust phenomenon is confined within 2-3 nm of the interface. If such a bilayer is exposed to ozone, T(c) exceeds 50 K, and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from an interface layer about 1-2 unit cells thick. Enhancement of T(c) in bilayer systems was observed previously but the essential role of the interface was not recognized at the time. PMID:18843365

  6. A universal scaling behavior in magnetic resonance peak in high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung Joon; Salk, Sung-Ho Suck

    2015-08-01

    Eminent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements of high temperature cuprates currently lacking theoretical interpretations are the observed temperature dependence of magnetic resonance peak and linear scaling relation between the resonance peak energy, Eres and the superconducting transition temperature, Tc. Using our slave-boson approach of the t-J Hamiltonian (Phys. Rev. 64, 052501 (2001)) for this study, we show that starting from the pseudogap temperature T∗, the magnetic resonance peak increases with decreasing temperature, revealing its inflection point at Tc and that spin pairing correlations are responsible for d-wave superconductivity. We find that there exists a universal linear scaling behavior of Eres/Tc = const., irrespective of the Heisenberg exchange coupling.

  7. Noise properties of high-temperature superconducting dc-SQUID gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, P.; Becker, C.; Steppke, A.; Foerster, T.; Wunderlich, S.; Grosse, V.; Pietzcker, R.; Schmidl, F.

    2007-09-01

    We have developed different types of superconducting magnetic field sensors based on high temperature superconducting (HTS) thin films. Here, we describe the fabrication of single layer dc-SQUID gradiometers with bicrystal Josephson junctions for operation in a flip-chip configuration to improve sensor performance. High-quality thin films are known to be essential in achieving suitable electrical properties in these superconducting devices. The influence of sample processing on sensor performance is discussed. The most important parameter for practical applications is the field gradient resolution of the investigated dc-SQUID sensors. To determine this parameter for different gradiometer layouts we measured their noise properties in unshielded as well as magnetically or electrically shielded environments.

  8. Progress in Nanoengineered Microstructures for Tunable High-Current, High-Temperature Superconducting Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T. G.; Civale, L.; Maiorov, B.; Feldmann, D. M.; Coulter, Yates; Miller, D. J.; Maroni, Victor A.; Chen, Zhijun; Larbalestier, D. C.; Feenstra, Roeland; Li, Xiaoping; Huang, Y.; Kodenkandath, Thomas; Zhang, W.; Rupich, Marty; Malozemoff, Alex

    2008-01-01

    High critical current densities (J{sub c}) in thick films of the Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO, {Tc}{approx}92 K) superconductor directly depend upon the types of nanoscale defects and their densities within the films. A major challenge for developing a viable wire technology is to introduce nanoscale defect structures into the YBCO grains of the thick film suitable for flux pinning and the tailoring of the superconducting properties to specific, application-dependent, temperature and magnetic field conditions. Concurrently, the YBCO film needs to be integrated into a macroscopically defect-free conductor in which the grain-to-grain connectivity maintains levels of inter-grain J{sub c} that are comparable to the intra-grain J{sub c}. That is, high critical current (I{sub c}) YBCO coated conductors must contain engineered in homogeneities on the nanoscale, while being homogeneous on the macroscale. An analysis is presented of the advances in high-performance YBCO coated-conductors using chemical solution deposition (CSD) based on metal trifluoroacetates and the subsequent processing to nano-engineer the microstructure for tunable superconducting wires. Multi-scale structural, chemical, and electrical investigations of the CSD film processes, thick film development, key microstructural features, and wire properties are presented. Prospects for further development of much higher I{sub c} wires for large-scale, commercial application are discussed within the context of these recent advances.

  9. Thermal response of large area high temperature superconducting YBaCuO infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, Ali E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal analysis of large area high temperature superconducting infrared detector operating in the equilibrium mode (bolometer) was performed. An expression for the temperature coefficient beta = 1/R(dR/dT) in terms of the thermal conductance and the thermal time constant of the detector were derived. A superconducting transition edge bolometer is a thermistor consisting of a thin film superconducting YBaCuO evaporated into a suitable thermally isolated substrate. The operating temperature of the bolometer is maintained close to the midpoint of the superconducting transition region where the resistance R has a maximum dynamic range. A detector with a strip configuration was analyzed and an expression for the temperature rise (delta T) above the ambient due to a uniform illumination with a source of power density was calculated. An expression for the thermal responsibility depends upon the spatial modulation frequency and the angular frequency of the incoming radiation. The problem of the thermal cross talk between different detector elements was addressed. In the case of monolithic HTS detector array with a row of square elements of dimensions 2a and CCD or CID readout electronics the thermal spread function was derived for different spacing between elements.

  10. Thermal response of large area high temperature superconducting YBaCuO infrared bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, Ali E.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal analysis of large area high temperature superconducting infrared detector operating in the equilibrium mode (bolometer) was performed. An expression for the temperature coefficient beta=1/R(dR/dT) in terms of the thermal conductance and the thermal time constant of the detector were derived. A superconducting transition edge bolometer is a thermistor consisting of a thin film superconducting YBaCuO evaporated into a suitable thermally isolated substrate. The operating temperature of the bolometer is maintained close to the midpoint of the superconducting transition region where the resistance R has a maximum dynamic range. A detector with a strip configuration was analyzed and an expression for the temperature rise (delta T) above the ambient due to a uniform illumination with a source of power density P(sub i) was calculated. An expression for the thermal responsivity of the detector was derived using the thermal diffusion analysis with appropriate boundary conditions. It was found that the thermal responsibility depends upon the spatial modulation frequency and the angular frequency of the incoming radiation. The problem of the thermal cross talk between different detector elements was addressed. In the case of monolithic HTS detector array with a row of square elements of dimensions 2a and CCD or CID readout electronics the thermal spread function was derived for different spacing between elements. This analysis can be critical for future design and applications of large area focal plane arrays as broad band optical detectors made of granular thin films HTS YBaCuO.

  11. Two-stage heat treatment of high temperature superconducting coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, E. N.; Mikheenko, P. N.

    1991-12-01

    The properties of YBa2Cu3O(x) coatings, 30-40 microns thick, plasma-sprayed on quartz, Pyroceram, stainless steel, and ceramic dielectric substrates were investigated experimentally using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and resistance measurements. It is found that the properties of the films depend to a large degree on the spraying conditions, the dispersity and grain size distribution of the starting powder, and substrate temperature during spraying. Coatings sprayed under optimal conditions have a critical current density of 300-400 A/sq cm at the liquid nitrogen temperature and effectively shield magnetic fields of several oersteds.

  12. A review of basic phenomena and techniques for sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.; Lichtenwalner, D.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Krauss, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The processes involved in plasma and ion beam sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting thin films are critically reviewed. Recent advances in the development of these techniques are discussed in relation to basic physical phenomena, specific to each technique, which must be understood before high quality films can be produced. Control of film composition is a major issue in sputter-deposition of multicomponent materials. Low temperature processing of films is a common goal for each technique, particularly in relation to integrating high temperature superconducting films with the current microelectronics technology. It has been understood for some time that for Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} deposition, the most intensely studied high-{Tc} compound, incorporation of sufficient oxygen into the film during deposition is necessary to produce as-deposited superconducting films at relatively substrate temperatures. Recent results have shown that with the use of suitable buffer layers, high quality Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} sputtered films can be obtained on Si substrates without the need for post-deposition anneal processing. This review is mainly focussed on issues related to sputter-deposition of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films, although representative results concerning the bismuth and thallium based compounds are included. 143 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Possible light-induced superconductivity in K3C60 at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Mitrano, M; Cantaluppi, A; Nicoletti, D; Kaiser, S; Perucchi, A; Lupi, S; Di Pietro, P; Pontiroli, D; Riccò, M; Clark, S R; Jaksch, D; Cavalleri, A

    2016-02-25

    The non-equilibrium control of emergent phenomena in solids is an important research frontier, encompassing effects such as the optical enhancement of superconductivity. Nonlinear excitation of certain phonons in bilayer copper oxides was recently shown to induce superconducting-like optical properties at temperatures far greater than the superconducting transition temperature, Tc (refs 4-6). This effect was accompanied by the disruption of competing charge-density-wave correlations, which explained some but not all of the experimental results. Here we report a similar phenomenon in a very different compound, K3C60. By exciting metallic K3C60 with mid-infrared optical pulses, we induce a large increase in carrier mobility, accompanied by the opening of a gap in the optical conductivity. These same signatures are observed at equilibrium when cooling metallic K3C60 below Tc (20 kelvin). Although optical techniques alone cannot unequivocally identify non-equilibrium high-temperature superconductivity, we propose this as a possible explanation of our results. PMID:26855424

  14. A Cryogenic Magnetostrictive Actuator Using a Persistent High Temperature Superconducting Magnet. Part 1; Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett; Bromberg, Leslie; Teter, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenic magnetostrictive materials, such as rare earth zinc crystals, offer high strains and high forces with minimally applied magnetic fields, making the material ideally suited for deformable optics applications. For cryogenic temperature applications the use of superconducting magnets offer the possibility of a persistent mode of operation, i.e., the magnetostrictive material will maintain a strain field without power. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are attractive options if the temperature of operation is higher than 10 degrees Kelvin (K) and below 77 K. However, HTS wires have constraints that limit the minimum radius of winding, and even if good wires can be produced, the technology for joining superconducting wires does not exist. In this paper, the design and capabilities of a rare earth zinc magnetostrictive actuator using bulk HTS is described. Bulk superconductors can be fabricated in the sizes required with excellent superconducting properties. Equivalent permanent magnets, made with this inexpensive material, are persistent, do not require a persistent switch as in HTS wires, and can be made very small. These devices are charged using a technique which is similar to the one used for charging permanent magnets, e.g., by driving them into saturation. A small normal conducting coil can be used for charging or discharging. Because of the magnetic field capability of the superconductor material, a very small amount of superconducting magnet material is needed to actuate the rare earth zinc. In this paper, several designs of actuators using YBCO and BSCCO 2212 superconducting materials are presented. Designs that include magnetic shielding to prevent interaction between adjacent actuators will also be described. Preliminary experimental results and comparison with theory for BSCCO 2212 with a magnetostrictive element will be discussed.

  15. Development of high-efficiency Stirling cryocoolers for high temperature superconducting motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, K.; Yumoto, K.; Hiratsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For wide spread high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, a cryocooler having COP of >0.1, with a compact size, light weight, high efficiency and high reliability is required. For practical use of superconductive devices, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) developed a high-efficiency Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler (STPC). The STPC had high reliability and low vibration. However, its efficiency was not enough to meet the demands of an HTS motor. To further improve the efficiency, we reconsidered the expander of cryocooler and developed a Stirling cryocooler (STC). Two prototype units of a compact, high-efficiency split Stirling cryocooler were designed, built and tested. With the second prototype unit, a cooling capacity of 151 W at 70 K and a minimum temperature of 33 K have been achieved with a compressor input power of 2.15 kW. Accordingly, COP of about 0.07 has been achieved. The detailed design of the prototype units and the experimental results will be reported in this paper.

  16. A Tl-based high-temperature superconducting X-band cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, P. N.; Cooke, D. W.; Elliott, N. E.; Gray, E. R.; Hubbard, K. M.; Piel, H.; Swain, G. R.

    1992-08-01

    A nonplanar X-band cavity amenable to coating with high-temperature superconducting films by conventional physical vapor deposition processes has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The cavity geometry resembles a symmetric clamshell configuration. It consists of two truncated cones joined at their bases. The specific dimensions of the cavity were calculated using the SUPERFISH computer code. Cavities were constructed using a silver-based alloy, Consil 995. The separate cavity sections were coated with Tl-based high-temperature superconducting material using a two-step deposition and annealing process. The unloaded Q values for this coated clamshell cavity are 66,000 and 105,000 at 77 and 20 K, respectively.

  17. Application of high-temperature superconducting wires to magnetostrictive transducers for underwater sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Voccio, J.P.; Joshi, C.H.; Lindberg, J.F.

    1994-07-01

    Recently discovered cryogenic magnetostrictive materials show maximum strains greater than any room temperature materials. These cryogenic magnetostrictors can be combined with high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a sonar transducer with high efficiency and high acoustic power density. A prototype low-frequency (< 1,000 Hz) magnetostrictive transducer is described. This transducer uses a terbium-dysprosium (TbDy) magnetostrictor rod with HTS coils cooled to 50--80 K using a single-stage cryocooler. The device is designed for operation at water depths of 100 m and is believed to be the first fully integrated prototype demonstration of HTS.

  18. The processing of high temperature ceramic superconducting devices, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, James H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    BEI has completed the preliminary evaluation on the planar coil and conductor requirements for the brushless DC motor. Results indicate that current density is adequate. However, there is not enough cross section of the conductor using the thin film approach. Preliminary design was based on two planar coils attached on each side of a central chill plate filled with liquid nitrogen. Evaluation was further performed on the output anticipated in thick film substrates 100 times thicker than the 1 micron thin film. Estimates with thick film substrates yielded .168 watts output which is still inefficient for DC brushless motor design. Thick film designs appear to be the correct approach to achieve a high conductor cross section, enabling sufficient power levels to drive the actuator or motor.

  19. Use of thin films in high-temperature superconducting bearings.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.; Cansiz, A.

    1999-09-30

    In a PM/HTS bearing, locating a thin-film HTS above a bulk HTS was expected to maintain the large levitation force provided by the bulk with a lower rotational drag provided by the very high current density of the film. For low drag to be achieved, the thin film must shield the bulk from inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Measurement of rotational drag of a PM/HTS bearing that used a combination of bulk and film HTS showed that the thin film is not effective in reducing the rotational drag. Subsequent experiments, in which an AC coil was placed above the thin-film HTS and the magnetic field on the other side of the film was measured, showed that the thin film provides good shielding when the coil axis is perpendicular to the film surface but poor shielding when the coil axis is parallel to the surface. This is consistent with the lack of reduction in rotational drag being due to a horizontal magnetic moment of the permanent magnet. The poor shielding with the coil axis parallel to the film surface is attributed to the aspect ratio of the film and the three-dimensional nature of the current flow in the film for this coil orientation.

  20. High-temperature superconducting superconductor/normal metal/superconducting devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M. C.; Hunt, B. D.; Bajuk, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and characterization of superconductor/normal metal/superconductor (SNS) devices made with the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Structures of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)/Au/Nb on c-axis-oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) were made in both sandwich and edge geometries in order to sample the HTS material both along and perpendicular to the conducting a-b planes. These devices display fairly ideal Josephson properties at 4.2 K. In addition, devices consisting of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)/YBa2Cu3O(y)/YBa2Cu3O(7-x), with a 'normal metal' layer of reduced transition temperature YBa2Cu3O(7-x) were fabricated and show a great deal of promise for applications near 77 K. Current-voltage characteristics like those of the Resistively-Shunted Junction model are observed, with strong response to 10 GHz radiation above 60 K.

  1. Theory of high-TC superconductivity: transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshman, Dale R.; Fiory, Anthony T.; Dow, John D.

    2010-12-01

    After reading over our published manuscript, we noticed that the discussion concerning the determination of σ for the ruthenate Ba2YRu0.9Cu0.1O6 in section 2.3.1 (3rd paragraph) is somewhat terse. Herein we provide an expanded analysis which better explains our estimate of γ (and thus σ) for this compound. All numbers, figures and conclusions remain unaltered. The ruthenate compounds A2YRu1-xCuxO6 (with A = Ba or Sr; x = 0.05-0.15) are double-perovskites containing no cuprate planes and with ν = μ = 1 [1] (reference [82] in the paper). The determination of γ follows from equation (2.5b), wherein rule 1b introduces the factor 1/2. In the lower limit, one expects a minimum of ~2 charges per Cu dopant, which are shared between two charge reservoirs of each layer type (AO and 1/2 (YRu1-xCuxO4)), producing a net factor of unity. Thus, for Ba2YRu0.9Cu0.1O6 (with TC0 ~ 30-40 K), we estimate γ = (1/2)(1) = 1/2, yielding σ = 0.05 as stated by equation (2.5c) in the paper. While one may expect an average effective charge state for Ru near +5, and that of Cu to be between +2 and +3 (post anneal) [2], the lower-limit estimation provided, which places the corresponding data point in figure 2 to the left of the line, appears sufficient to include the ruthenates with the other high-TC compounds found to follow equation (2.6) so far. Owing to the uncertainty in the experimental values for TC0, as well as the Ru and Cu valence states, however, this compound was excluded in the data analyses presented. Future research will attempt a more accurate determination of the charge per doped Cu, and thus σ. We would also like to point out a typographical correction in the definition of the corresponding ruthenate type II reservoir in the last column of table 1, which should read 1/2 (YRu0.9Cu0.1O4). An unrelated item is found in the fourth line of section 2.3.3, where Tb(O0.80F0.20)FeAs should read Tb(O0.80-yF0.20)FeAs. Additionally, reference [132] is now known and has the form

  2. DC characterization and 3D modelling of a triangular, epoxy-impregnated high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, D.; Ainslie, M. D.; Rush, J. P.; Durrell, J. H.; Zou, J.; Raine, M. J.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2015-06-01

    The direct current (dc) characterization of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for applications, such as electric machines, superconducting magnetic energy storage and transformers. In this paper, the dc characterization of a triangular-shaped, epoxy-impregnated HTS coil wound with YBCO coated conductor intended for use in an axial-flux HTS motor is presented. Voltage was measured at several points along the coil to provide detailed information of its dc characteristics. The coil is modelled based on the H -formulation using a new three-dimensional (3D) technique that utilizes the real superconducting layer thickness, and this model allows simulation of the actual geometrical layout of the HTS coil structure. Detailed information on the critical current density’s dependence on the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic flux density, Jc(B,θ), determined from experimental measurement of a short sample of the coated conductor comprising the coil is included directly in the numerical model by a two-variable direct interpolation to avoid developing complicated equations for data fitting and greatly improve the computational speed. Issues related to meshing the finite elements of the real thickness 3D model are also discussed in detail. Based on a comparison of the measurement and simulation results, it is found that non-uniformity along the length exists in the coil, which implies imperfect superconducting properties in the coated conductor, and hence, coil. By evaluating the current-voltage (I-V) curves using the experimental data, and after taking into account a more practical n value and critical current for the non-uniform region, the modelling results show good agreement with the experimental results, validating this model as an appropriate tool to estimate the dc I-V relationship of a superconducting coil. This work provides a further step towards effective and efficient 3D modelling of superconducting devices for large

  3. Real-time measurement of the emergence of superconducting order in a high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, I.; Kusar, P.; Baranov, V. V.; Lu-Dac, M.; Kabanov, V. V.; Mertelj, T.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-06-01

    Systems which rapidly evolve through symmetry-breaking transitions on timescales comparable to the fluctuation timescale of the single-particle excitations may behave very differently than under controlled near-ergodic conditions. A real-time investigation with high temporal resolution may reveal insights into the ordering through the transition that are not available in static experiments. We present an investigation of the system trajectory through a normal-to-superconductor transition in a prototype high-temperature superconducting cuprate in which such a situation occurs. Using a multiple pulse femtosecond spectroscopy technique we measure the system trajectory and time evolution of the single-particle excitations through the transition in La1.9Sr0.1CuO4 and compare the data to a simulation based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, using the laser excitation fluence as an adjustable parameter controlling the quench conditions in both experiment and theory. The comparison reveals the presence of significant superconducting fluctuations which precede the transition on short timescales. By including superconducting fluctuations as a seed for the growth of the superconducting order we can obtain a satisfactory agreement of the theory with the experiment. Remarkably, the pseudogap excitations apparently play no role in this process.

  4. High-temperature superconductivity for avionic electronic warfare and radar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    The electronic warfare (EW) and radar communities expect to be major beneficiaries of the performance advantages high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) has to offer over conventional technology. Near term upgrades to system hardware can be envisioned using extremely small, high Q, microwave filters and resonators; compact, wideband, low loss, microwave delay and transmission lines; as well as, wideband, low loss, monolithic microwave integrated circuit phase shifters. The most dramatic impact will be in the far term, using HTS to develop new, real time threat identification and response strategy receiver/processing systems designed to utilize the unique high frequency properties of microwave and ultimately digital HTS. To make superconductivity practical for operational systems, however, technological obstacles need to be overcome. Compact cryogenically cooled subsystems with exceptional performance able to withstand rugged operational environments for long periods of time need to be developed.

  5. Soldered joints—an essential component of demountable high temperature superconducting fusion magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Yeekin; Surrey, Elizabeth; Hampshire, Damian

    2016-07-01

    Demountable superconducting magnet coils would offer significant benefits to commercial nuclear fusion power plants. Whether large pressed joints or large soldered joints provide the solution for demountable fusion magnets, a critical component or building block for both will be the many, smaller-scale joints that enable the supercurrent to leave the superconducting layer, cross the superconducting tape and pass into the solder that lies between the tape and the conductor that eventually provides one of the demountable surfaces. This paper considers the electrical and thermal properties of this essential component part of demountable high temperature superconducting (HTS) joints by considering the fabrication and properties of jointed HTSs consisting of a thin layer of solder (In52Sn48 or Pb38Sn62) sandwiched between two rare-earth-Ba2Cu3O7 (REBCO) second generation HTS coated conductors (CCs). The HTS joints are analysed using numerical modelling, critical current and resistivity measurements on the joints from 300 to 4.2 K in applied magnetic fields up to 12 T, as well as scanning electron microscopy studies. Our results show that the copper/silver layers significantly reduce the heating in the joints to less than a few hundred mK. When the REBCO alone is superconducting, the joint resistivity (R J) predominantly has two sources, the solder layer and an interfacial resistivity at the REBCO/silver interface (∼25 nΩ cm2) in the as-supplied CCs which together have a very weak magnetoresistance in fields up to 12 T. We achieved excellent reproducibility in the R J of the In52Sn48 soldered joints of better than 10% at temperatures below T c of the REBCO layer which can be compared to variations of more than two orders of magnitude in the literature. We also show that demountable joints in fusion energy magnets are viable and need only add a few percent to the total cryogenic cost for a fusion tokamak.

  6. Improving homogeneity of the magnetic field by a high-temperature superconducting shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, E.; Agapov, N.; Drobin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Trubnikov, G.; Dorofeev, G.; Malinowski, H.

    2014-05-01

    The shielding opportunity of the magnetic field perpendicular component by the high-temperature superconducting tape (HTS) is shown experimentally for the first time. The tapes are laid closely to each other with a shift of pieces from layer to layer equal to a half of the tape width at the experimental set-up. This multilayer cylindrical structure inserted into the solenoid is similar to the unclosed shield from a uniform piece of the superconducting foil with the corresponding current-carrying capacity. It has been found that the maximum shielding field is proportional to the number of layers and a half of the full magnetization field of one tape for the regular multilayer structure of the HTS segments. The obtained results are necessary to construct systems with the high magnetic field homogeneity, in particular, for the electron cooling system of charged particle beams at the new accelerator complex which is being developed at JINR in Dubna, Russia.

  7. Design analysis of a solid nitrogen cooled ''permanent'' high-temperature superconducting magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haid, Benjamin J.; Lee, Haigun; Iwasa, Yukikazu; Oh, Sang-Soo; Kwon, Young-Kil; Ryu, Kang-Sik

    2002-10-01

    Potential performance advantages of a solid nitrogen cooled "permanent" high-temperature superconducting (SN2/HTS) magnet system over a liquid helium cooled low-temperature superconducting (LHe/LTS) system are explored. The SN2/HTS system design includes a second solid heat capacitor that cools a radiation shield. Recooling of the heat capacitors is performed with a demountable cryocooler. The SN2/HTS system offers both enhanced stability and improved portability over a LHe/LTS system. Design codes are constructed to compare the SN2/HTS system design with a LHe/LTS design for a general permanent superconducting magnet system employing a room temperature bore. The codes predict the system volume and mass that should be expected for a given set of design requirements, i.e. field strength and bore size, and a given set of conductor properties. The results indicate that present HTS conductor critical current and index are not yet sufficient for producing SN2/HTS systems of a size that is comparable with that expected for a LHe/LTS system; however, the conductor properties of Bi2223/Ag have been consistently improving, and new HTS conductors are expected to be developed in the near future. The codes are used to determine the minimum Bi2223/Ag conductor performance required for a SN2/HTS system to be competitive with a LHe/LTS system.

  8. Method and apparatus for measuring gravitational acceleration utilizing a high temperature superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operating temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling may be accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  9. Method and Apparatus for measuring Gravitational Acceleration Utilizing a high Temperature Superconducting Bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, John R.

    1998-11-06

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operative temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling maybe accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  10. The 20 GHz circularly polarized, high temperature superconducting microstrip antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Jarrett D.; Williams, Jeffery T.; Long, Stuart A.; Wolfe, John C.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal was to design and characterize a four-element, 20 GHz, circularly polarized microstrip patch antenna fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(x) superconductor. The purpose is to support a high temperature superconductivity flight communications experiment between the space shuttle orbiter and the ACTS satellite. This study is intended to provide information into the design, construction, and feasibility of a circularly polarized superconducting 20 GHz downlink or cross-link antenna. We have demonstrated that significant gain improvements can be realized by using superconducting materials for large corporate fed array antennas. In addition, we have shown that when constructed from superconducting materials, the efficiency, and therefore the gain, of microstrip patches increases if the substrate is not so thick that the dominant loss mechanism for the patch is radiation into the surface waves of the conductor-backed substrate. We have considered two design configurations for a superconducting 20 GHz four-element circularly polarized microstrip antenna array. The first is the Huang array that uses properly oriented and phased linearly polarized microstrip patch elements to realize a circularly polarized pattern. The second is a gap-coupled array of circularly polarized elements. In this study we determined that although the Huang array operates well on low dielectric constant substrates, its performance becomes extremely sensitive to mismatches, interelement coupling, and design imperfections for substrates with high dielectric constants. For the gap-coupled microstrip array, we were able to fabricate and test circularly polarized elements and four-element arrays on LaAlO3 using sputtered copper films. These antennas were found to perform well, with relatively good circular polarization. In addition, we realized a four-element YBa2Cu3O(x) array of the same design and measured its pattern and gain relative to a room temperature copper array. The patterns were

  11. Ultra-Low Heat-Leak, High-Temperature Superconducting Current Leads for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has a need for current leads used in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) for space applications. These leads must comply with stringent requirements such as a heat leak of approximately 100 W or less while conducting up to 10 A of electric current, from more than 90 K down to 10 K. Additionally, a length constraint of < 300 mm length and < 50 mm diameter is to be maintained. The need for these current leads was addressed by developing a superconducting hybrid lead. This hybrid lead comprises two different high-temperature superconducting (HTS) conductors bonded together at a thermally and electrically determined optimum point along the length of the current lead. By taking advantage of material properties of each conductor type, employing advanced fabrication techniques, and taking advantage of novel insulation materials, the company was able to develop and fabricate the lightweight, low heat-leak leads currently to NASA's specs.

  12. Performance evaluation of high-temperature superconducting current leads for micro-SMES systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R.; Buckles, W.E.; Weber, B.R.; Yang, S.T.

    1995-02-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Technology Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Superconductivity, Inc., are developing high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads for application to micro-SMES systems. Two 1500-A HTS leads have been designed and constructed. A component performance evaluation program was conducted to confirm performance predictions and/or to qualify the design features for construction. The evaluations included HTS characteristics, demountable electrical connections, and heat intercept effectiveness. The performance of current lead assemblies is being evaluated in a zero-magnetic-field test program that included assembly procedures, tooling, and quality assurance; thermal and electrical performance; and flow and mechanical characteristics. The leads were installed in a liquid helium test cryostat and connected at their cold ends by a current jumper. The leads were heat intercepted with a cryocooler.

  13. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Sytnikov, V. E. Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  14. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnikov, V. E.; Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  15. Physical and Material Properties of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide High Critical Temperature Superconducting Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiyuan

    1990-01-01

    A simple method of using layered structures and rapid thermal annealing to produce Y_1 Ba_2 Cu_3 O_{7-x} (YBCO) superconducting thin films is presented. Material properties of the films depend strongly on the processing conditions, the film stoichiometry, and the substrates. The films with critical temperature (T_{ rm c}) higher than liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) have been made on various substrates including magnesium oxide, sapphire, and silicon. The best film was obtained on a MgO substrate with T_{rm c} of 84 K. Silicon diffusion and reaction with oxygen during a high temperature anneal degrade the superconductivity of the film on a Si substrate. Using a buffer layer of gold, the Si-YBCO interaction is greatly reduced. Typical resistivity of the film shows a linear temperature dependence which may be attributed to an electron -phonon interaction. Anisotropic resistance behavior has been observed due to the layered structures. Different metal contacts to the YBCO films have been used to study the chemical and electrical properties of metal-YBCO film interfaces. Gold has been found nonreactive to YBCO film, thus, it has the lowest contact resistivity. Near the T_{rm c}, the contact resistivity of a Au-YBCO contact approaches zero. This may be due to the proximity effect. Other metals such as Pt, Pd, Sn and Ti, react with the YBCO film and form thin oxide layers at the interfaces. The oxide layer acts as an insulating barrier which forbids the proximity effect and causes a large contact resistivity. The structural and electrical properties of the Si-YBCO intermixed film have been studied for different thicknesses of the silicon layers. A novel patterning technique of using Si-YBCO intermixing has been developed for fabricating the YBCO superconducting device structures. A superconductor sample has a critical current value I _{rm c}. Below the I _{rm c} the material is superconducting, and above I_{rm c} the sample has a finite resistance. Based on this effect

  16. High T(c) superconducting NbN films deposited at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, S.; Lamb, J. L.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The dc reactive magnetron sputtering process yields stoichiometric NbN films with superconducting transition temperature T(c) as high as 15.7 K on substrates as varied as glass, glazed ceramic, fused quartz, and sapphire. These films posses fcc (B1) structure and (111) texture. The most dominant factors governing the formation of the transition metal nitrides are the relative metal and nitrogen fluxes incident on the substrate and the background argon pressure (which dictates the overall reactive sites and residence times for nitrogen).

  17. Vertical Vibration Characteristics of a High-Temperature Superconducting Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Li, Ke Cai; Zhao, Li Feng; Ma, Jia Qing; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2013-06-01

    The vertical vibration characteristics of a high-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system are investigated experimentally. The displacement variations of the maglev vehicle system are measured with different external excitation frequency, in the case of a certain levitation gap. When the external vibration frequency is low, the amplitude variations of the response curve are small. With the increase of the vibration frequency, chaos status can be found. The resonance frequencies with difference levitation gap are also investigated, while the external excitation frequency range is 0-100 Hz. Along with the different levitation gap, resonance frequency is also different. There almost is a linear relationship between the levitation gap and the resonance frequency.

  18. Evaluation of high temperature superconductive thermal bridges for space-borne cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Elaine P.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this research is on the reduction of the refrigeration requirements for infrared sensors operating in space through the use of high temperature superconductive (HTS) materials as electronic leads between the cooled sensors and the relatively warmer data acquisition components. Specifically, this initial study was directed towards the design of an experiment to quantify the thermal performance of these materials in the space environment. First, an intensive review of relevant literature was undertaken, and then, design requirements were formulated. From this background information, a preliminary experimental design was developed. Additional studies will involve a thermal analysis of the experiment and further modifications of the experimental design.

  19. The high temperature superconductivity in cuprates: physics of the pseudogap region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the physics of the high temperature superconductivity in hole doped copper oxide ceramics in the pseudogap region. Starting from an effective reduced Hamiltonian relevant to the dynamics of holes injected into the copper oxide layers proposed in a previous paper, we determine the superconductive condensate wavefunction. We show that the low-lying elementary condensate excitations are analogous to the rotons in superfluid 4He. We argue that the rotons-like excitations account for the specific heat anomaly at the critical temperature. We discuss and compare with experimental observations the London penetration length, the Abrikosov vortices, the upper and lower critical magnetic fields, and the critical current density. We give arguments to explain the origin of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. We investigate the nodal gap in the cuprate superconductors and discuss both the doping and temperature dependence of the nodal gap. We suggest that the nodal gap is responsible for the doping dependence of the so-called nodal Fermi velocity detected in angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies. We discuss the thermodynamics of the nodal quasielectron liquid and their role in the low temperature specific heat. We propose that the ubiquitous presence of charge density wave in hole doped cuprate superconductors in the pseudogap region originates from instabilities of the nodal quasielectrons driven by the interaction with the planar CuO2 lattice. We investigate the doping dependence of the charge density wave gap and the competition between charge order and superconductivity. We discuss the effects of external magnetic fields on the charge density wave gap and elucidate the interplay between charge density wave and Abrikosov vortices. Finally, we examine the physics underlying quantum oscillations in the pseudogap region.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: The physics behind high-temperature superconducting cuprates: the 'plain vanilla' version of RVB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. W.; Lee, P. A.; Randeria, M.; Rice, T. M.; Trivedi, N.; Zhang, F. C.

    2004-06-01

    One of the first theoretical proposals for understanding high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates was Anderson's RVB theory using a Gutzwiller projected BCS wavefunction as an approximate ground state. Recent work by Paramekanti et al has shown that this variational approach gives a semi-quantitative understanding of the doping dependences of a variety of experimental observables in the superconducting state of the cuprates. In this paper we revisit these issues using the 'renormalized mean field theory' of Zhang et al based on the Gutzwiller approximation in which the kinetic and superexchange energies are renormalized by different doping-dependent factors gt and gS respectively. We point out a number of consequences of this early mean field theory for experimental measurements which were not available when it was first explored, and observe that it is able to explain the existence of the pseudogap, properties of nodal quasiparticles and approximate spin-charge separation, the latter leading to large renormalizations of the Drude weight and superfluid density. We use the Lee-Wen theory of the phase transition as caused by thermal excitation of nodal quasiparticles, and also obtain a number of further experimental confirmations. Finally, we remark that superexchange, and not phonons, is responsible for d-wave superconductivity in the cuprates.

  1. Large oscillations of the magnetoresistance in nanopatterned high-temperature superconducting films.

    PubMed

    Sochnikov, Ilya; Shaulov, Avner; Yeshurun, Yosef; Logvenov, Gennady; Bozović, Ivan

    2010-07-01

    Measurements on nanoscale structures constructed from high-temperature superconductors are expected to shed light on the origin of superconductivity in these materials. To date, loops made from these compounds have had sizes of the order of hundreds of nanometres(8-11). Here, we report the results of measurements on loops of La(1.84)Sr(0.16)CuO(4), a high-temperature superconductor that loses its resistance to electric currents when cooled below approximately 38 K, with dimensions down to tens of nanometres. We observe oscillations in the resistance of the loops as a function of the magnetic flux through the loops. The oscillations have a period of h/2e, and their amplitude is much larger than the amplitude of the resistance oscillations expected from the Little-Parks effect. Moreover, unlike Little-Parks oscillations, which are caused by periodic changes in the superconducting transition temperature, the oscillations we observe are caused by periodic changes in the interaction between thermally excited moving vortices and the oscillating persistent current induced in the loops. However, despite the enhanced amplitude of these oscillations, we have not detected oscillations with a period of h/e, as recently predicted for nanoscale loops of superconductors with d-wave symmetry, or with a period of h/4e, as predicted for superconductors that exhibit stripes. PMID:20543834

  2. A novel high temperature superconducting magnetic flux pump for MRI magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhiming; Yan, Guo; Wu, Chunli; Ding, Shufang; Chen, Chuan

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a kind of minitype magnetic flux pump made of high temperature superconductor. This kind of novel high temperature superconducting (HTS) flux pump has not any mechanical revolving parts or thermal switches. The excitation current of copper coils in magnetic pole system is controlled by a singlechip. The structure design and operational principle have been described. The operating performance of the new model magnetic flux pump has been preliminarily tested. The experiments show that the maximum pumping current is approximately 200 A for Bi2223 flux pump and 80 A for MgB 2 flux pump operating at 20 K. By comparison, it is discovered that the operating temperature range is wider, the ripple is smaller and the pumping frequency is higher in Bi2223 flux pump than those in MgB 2 flux pump. These results indicate that the newly developed Bi2223 magnetic flux pump may efficiently compensate the magnetic field decay in HTS magnet and make the magnet operate in persistent current mode, this point is significant to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnets. This new flux pump is under construction presently. It is expected that the Bi2223 flux pump would be applied to the superconducting MRI magnets by further optimizing structure and improving working process.

  3. Large Oscillations of the Magnetoresistance in Nanopatterned High-temperature Superconducting Films

    SciTech Connect

    Sochnikov, I.; Bozovic, I.; Shaulov, A.; Yeshurun, Y.; Logvenov, G.

    2010-07-01

    Measurements on nanoscale structures constructed from high-temperature superconductors are expected to shed light on the origin of superconductivity in these materials. To date, loops made from these compounds have had sizes of the order of hundreds of nanometeres. Here, we report the results of measurements on loops of La{sub 1.84}Sr{sub 0.16}CuO{sub 4}, a high-temperature superconductor that loses its resistance to electric currents when cooled below {approx}38 K, with dimensions down to tens of nanometres. We observe oscillations in the resistance of the loops as a function of the magnetic flux through the loops. The oscillations have a period of h/2e, and their amplitude is much larger than the amplitude of the resistance oscillations expected from the Little-Parks effect. Moreover, unlike Little-Parks oscillations, which are caused by periodic changes in the superconducting transition temperature, the oscillations we observe are caused by periodic changes in the interaction between thermally excited moving vortices and the oscillating persistent current induced in the loops. However, despite the enhanced amplitude of these oscillations, we have not detected oscillations with a period of h/e, as recently predicted for nanoscale loops of superconductors with d-wave symmetry or with a period of h/4e, as predicted for superconductors that exhibit stripes.

  4. High-temperature superconductivity in two-band materials with interband pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, E. A. Dubovik, V. M.

    2015-07-15

    The Eliashberg theory generalized using peculiar properties of two-band electron–phonon (EP) systems is employed for studying T{sub c} in two-band materials (in particular, pnictides). In view of probably strong EP coupling, we take into account pairing within the entire width of the electron band, not only in a narrow layer at the Fermi surface. It is found that the effect of pairing of electrons belonging to different bands is a decisive factor for manifestation of the effect of high T{sub c} in these materials. It is shown that in materials analogous to pnictides, high T{sub c} values are reproduced by the two-band spectral function of electron–phonon interaction. The existence of one more family of two-band high-temperature materials with a superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} comparable to that in cuprates is predicted.

  5. Cryogenics Vision Workshop for High-Temperature Superconducting Electric Power Systems Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Energetics, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems sponsored the Cryogenics Vision Workshop, which was held on July 27, 1999 in Washington, D.C. This workshop was held in conjunction with the Program's Annual Peer Review meeting. Of the 175 people attending the peer review meeting, 31 were selected in advance to participate in the Cryogenics Vision Workshops discussions. The participants represented cryogenic equipment manufactures, industrial gas manufacturers and distributors, component suppliers, electric power equipment manufacturers (Superconductivity Partnership Initiative participants), electric utilities, federal agencies, national laboratories, and consulting firms. Critical factors were discussed that need to be considered in describing the successful future commercialization of cryogenic systems. Such systems will enable the widespread deployment of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) electric power equipment. Potential research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities and partnership opportunities for advancing suitable cryogenic systems were also discussed. The workshop agenda can be found in the following section of this report. Facilitated sessions were held to discuss the following specific focus topics: identifying Critical Factors that need to be included in a Cryogenics Vision for HTS Electric Power Systems (From the HTS equipment end-user perspective) identifying R and D Needs and Partnership Roles (From the cryogenic industry perspective) The findings of the facilitated Cryogenics Vision Workshop were then presented in a plenary session of the Annual Peer Review Meeting. Approximately 120 attendees participated in the afternoon plenary session. This large group heard summary reports from the workshop session leaders and then held a wrap-up session to discuss the findings, cross-cutting themes, and next steps. These summary reports are presented in this document. The ideas and suggestions raised during

  6. High-temperature superconductivity from fine-tuning of Fermi-surface singularities in iron oxypnictides

    PubMed Central

    Charnukha, A.; Evtushinsky, D. V.; Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; Büchner, B.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Batlogg, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    In the family of the iron-based superconductors, the REFeAsO-type compounds (with RE being a rare-earth metal) exhibit the highest bulk superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) up to 55 K and thus hold the key to the elusive pairing mechanism. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the intrinsic electronic structure of SmFe0.92Co0.08AsO (Tc = 18 K) is highly nontrivial and consists of multiple band-edge singularities in close proximity to the Fermi level. However, it remains unclear whether these singularities are generic to the REFeAsO-type materials and if so, whether their exact topology is responsible for the aforementioned record Tc. In this work, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the inherent electronic structure of the NdFeAsO0.6F0.4 compound with a twice higher Tc = 38 K. We find a similarly singular Fermi surface and further demonstrate that the dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in this compound correlates closely with the fine-tuning of one of the band-edge singularities to within a fraction of the superconducting energy gap Δ below the Fermi level. Our results provide compelling evidence that the band-structure singularities near the Fermi level in the iron-based superconductors must be explicitly accounted for in any attempt to understand the mechanism of superconducting pairing in these materials. PMID:26678565

  7. A visualization instrument to investigate the mechanical-electro properties of high temperature superconducting tapes under multi-fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xingyi; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Wentao; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, YouHe

    2016-07-01

    We construct a visible instrument to study the mechanical-electro behaviors of high temperature superconducting tape as a function of magnetic field, strain, and temperature. This apparatus is directly cooled by a commercial Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The minimum temperature of sample can be 8.75 K. A proportion integration differentiation temperature control is used, which is capable of producing continuous variation of specimen temperature from 8.75 K to 300 K with an optional temperature sweep rate. We use an external loading device to stretch the superconducting tape quasi-statically with the maximum tension strain of 20%. A superconducting magnet manufactured by the NbTi strand is applied to provide magnetic field up to 5 T with a homogeneous range of 110 mm. The maximum fluctuation of the magnetic field is less than 1%. We design a kind of superconducting lead composed of YBa2Cu3O7-x coated conductor and beryllium copper alloy (BeCu) to transfer DC to the superconducting sample with the maximum value of 600 A. Most notably, this apparatus allows in situ observation of the electromagnetic property of superconducting tape using the classical magnetic-optical imaging. PMID:27475594

  8. A visualization instrument to investigate the mechanical-electro properties of high temperature superconducting tapes under multi-fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xingyi; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Wentao; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, YouHe

    2016-07-01

    We construct a visible instrument to study the mechanical-electro behaviors of high temperature superconducting tape as a function of magnetic field, strain, and temperature. This apparatus is directly cooled by a commercial Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The minimum temperature of sample can be 8.75 K. A proportion integration differentiation temperature control is used, which is capable of producing continuous variation of specimen temperature from 8.75 K to 300 K with an optional temperature sweep rate. We use an external loading device to stretch the superconducting tape quasi-statically with the maximum tension strain of 20%. A superconducting magnet manufactured by the NbTi strand is applied to provide magnetic field up to 5 T with a homogeneous range of 110 mm. The maximum fluctuation of the magnetic field is less than 1%. We design a kind of superconducting lead composed of YBa2Cu3O7-x coated conductor and beryllium copper alloy (BeCu) to transfer DC to the superconducting sample with the maximum value of 600 A. Most notably, this apparatus allows in situ observation of the electromagnetic property of superconducting tape using the classical magnetic-optical imaging.

  9. Towards material-specific simulations of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulthess, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Simulations of high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) cuprates have typically fallen into two categories: (1) studies of generic models such as the two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model, that are believed to capture the essential physics necessary to describe the superconducting state, and, (2) first principles electronic structure calculations that are based on the local density approximation (LDA) to density functional theory (DFT) and lead to materials specific models. With advent of massibely parallel vector supercomputers, such as the Cray X1E at ORNL, and cluster algorithms such as the Dynamical Cluster Approximation (DCA), it is now possible to systematically solve the 2D Hubbard model with Quantum Monte Carol (QMC) simulations and to establish that the model indeed describes d-wave superconductivity [1]. Furthermore, studies of a multi-band model with input parameters generated from LDA calculations demonstrate that the existence of a superconducting transition is very sensitive to the underlying band structure [2]. Application of the LDA to transition metal oxides is, however, hampered by spurious self-interactions that particularly affects localized orbitals. Here we apply the self-interaction corrected local spin-density method (SIC-LSD) to describe the electronic structure of the cuprates. It was recently applied with success to generate input parameters for simple models of Mn doped III-V semiconductors [3] and is known to properly describe the antiferromagnetic insulating ground state of the parent compounds of the HTSC cuprates. We will discus the models for HTSC cuprates derived from the SIC-LSD study and how the differences to the well-known LDA results impact the QMC-DCA simulations of the magnetic and superconducting properties. [1] T. A. Maier, M. Jarrell, T. C. Schulthess, P. R. C. Kent, and J. B. White, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 237001 (2005). [2] P. Kent, A. Macridin, M. Jarrell, T. Schulthess, O. Andersen, T. Dasgupta, and O. Jepsen, Bulletin of

  10. Impurities: A smoking gun for the physical origin of high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, D.

    1994-12-31

    Philippe Monthoux and the author have recently carried out detailed strong coupling (Eliashberg) calculations for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} of the influence of impurities on the normal state quasiparticle self-energy and resistivity, and the superconducting transition temperature, T{sub c}. They find, in agreement with experiment, that although both Ni and Zn impurities primarily substitute for planar Cu(2) atoms, their influence on T{sub c} is markedly different. That difference arises from the experimental fact that Zn, when substituted for Cu(2), alters the local magnetic order, and hence the local spin fluctuation spectrum, while Ni does not. This difference is the equivalent of the isotope effect for conventional superconductors: it is a smoking gun for the physical origin of high temperature superconductivity and provides strong evidence for the spin-fluctuation mechanism, and the d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}} pairing state to which it gives rise.

  11. Biomolecular ion detection using high-temperature superconducting MgB2 strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, N.; Shibata, H.; Mawatari, Y.; Koike, M.; Ohkubo, M.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting strip ion detectors (SSIDs) are promising for realization of ideal ion detection with 100% efficiency and nanosecond-scale time response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We have detected single biomolecular ions in the keV range using a 10-nm-thick and 250-nm-wide strip of a high temperature superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), at temperatures of up to 13 K. The output pulse shape is explained remarkably well using circuit simulations and time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations coupled with a heat diffusion equation. The simulations show that the hot spot model is applicable to the proposed MgB2-SSIDs and the normal region expansion is completed within 16 ps, which corresponds to a maximum length of 1010 nm.

  12. Space-deployed, thin-walled enclosure for a cryogenically-cooled high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Allison K.

    The interaction of magnetic fields generated by large superconducting coils has multiple applications in space, including actuation of spacecraft or spacecraft components, wireless power transfer, and shielding of spacecraft from radiation and high energy particles. These applications require coils with major diameters as large as 20 meters and a thermal management system to maintain the superconducting material of the coil below its critical temperature. Since a rigid thermal management system, such as a heat pipe, is unsuitable for compact stowage inside a 5 meter payload fairing, a thin-walled thermal enclosure is proposed. A 1.85 meter diameter test article consisting of a bladder layer for containing chilled nitrogen vapor, a restraint layer, and multilayer insulation was tested in a custom toroidal vacuum chamber. The material properties found during laboratory testing are used to predict the performance of the test article in low Earth orbit. Deployment motion of the same test article was measured using a motion capture system and the results are used to predict the deployment in space. A 20 meter major diameter and coil current of 6.7 MA is selected as a point design case. This design point represents a single coil in a high energy particle shielding system. Sizing of the thermal and structural components of the enclosure is completed. The thermal and deployment performance is predicted.

  13. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J. P.; Matsuura, K.; Ye, G. Z.; Mizukami, Y.; Shimozawa, M.; Matsubayashi, K.; Yamashita, M.; Watashige, T.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Yan, J. -Q.; Sales, B. C.; Uwatoko, Y.; Cheng, J. -G.; Shibauchi, T.

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ∼15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ∼6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc≤38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates. PMID:27431724

  14. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. P.; Matsuura, K.; Ye, G. Z.; Mizukami, Y.; Shimozawa, M.; Matsubayashi, K.; Yamashita, M.; Watashige, T.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Yan, J.-Q.; Sales, B. C.; Uwatoko, Y.; Cheng, J.-G.; Shibauchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ~15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ~6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc<=38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates.

  15. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe.

    PubMed

    Sun, J P; Matsuura, K; Ye, G Z; Mizukami, Y; Shimozawa, M; Matsubayashi, K; Yamashita, M; Watashige, T; Kasahara, S; Matsuda, Y; Yan, J-Q; Sales, B C; Uwatoko, Y; Cheng, J-G; Shibauchi, T

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ∼15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ∼6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc≤38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates. PMID:27431724

  16. A Temperature-Stable Cryo-System for High-Temperature Superconducting MR In-Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-01-01

    To perform a rat experiment using a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator, a cryostat is essential to maintain the rat's temperature. In this work, a compact temperature-stable HTS cryo-system, keeping animal rectal temperature at 37.4°C for more than 3 hours, was successfully developed. With this HTS cryo-system, a 40-mm-diameter Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) surface resonator at 77 K was demonstrated in a 3-Tesla MRI system. The proton resonant frequency (PRF) method was employed to monitor the rat's temperature. Moreover, the capacity of MR thermometry in the HTS experiments was evaluated by correlating with data from independent fiber-optic sensor temperature measurements. The PRF thermal coefficient was derived as 0.03 rad/°C and the temperature-monitoring architecture can be implemented to upgrade the quality and safety in HTS experiments. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the HTS surface resonator at 77 K was higher than that of a professionally made copper surface resonator at 300 K, which has the same geometry, by a 3.79-fold SNR gain. Furthermore, the temperature-stable HTS cryo-system we developed can obtain stable SNR gain in every scan. A temperature-stable HTS cryo-system with an external air-blowing circulation system is demonstrated. PMID:23637936

  17. Processing study of high temperature superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, A.; Wachtman, J.B. Jr.; Ward, C.; Parkhe, V.; Jisrawi, N.; McLean, W.L. )

    1987-07-01

    Processing of the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} superconducting phase by employing different precursor powder preparation techniques (ball milling, attrition milling) and samples formed by different sintering conditions are discussed. The superconducting phase has been identified by powder x-ray diffraction. The effect of different powder processing and pressing conditions on the structure, density, resistivity and a.c. magnetic susceptibility were studied. Though there is no variation in T{sub c} for all the samples, attrition milled samples show a much lower resistance and less temperature dependence compared to ball milled samples above the superconducting transition temperature up to room temperature. Ball milled samples were loosely packed with more voids compared to attrition milled samples which are more densely packed with a needle-like structure.

  18. Compact design of high-temperature superconducting duplexer and triplexer for satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; He, Ming; Ji, Lu; Zhao, Xinjie; Fang, Lan; Yan, Shaolin

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a compact C-band high-temperature superconducting (HTS) input module duplexer, which can be scaled to a triplexer. The duplexer includes a common node as the input port, which is an extensible and effective structure for integrating a HTS multiplexer on a single superconducting film. The input node is realized by an open-loop microstrip line, which resonates at the frequency in the guard band between the two channels. In addition two four-pole bandpass filters consisting of rectangular spiral line resonators are used as output channels of the device. The duplexer is designed at 3995 MHz with a bandwidth of 226 MHz. The frequency ranges of the two channels are 3882-3942 MHz and 4048-4108 MHz, respectively. It is fabricated using double-sided Y Ba2Cu3O7 (YBCO) thin films on a piece of 30× 10 mm 2 MgO substrate. The experimental results show that the insertion loss is less than 0.1 dB for both channel filters and the isolation between the two channels is higher than 40 dB. Good agreement has been achieved between simulations and measurements to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Moreover, the triplexer is also designed and measured and the scalability is verified by simulation and experiments.

  19. Magnetic properties of superconducting GdBa2Cu3O(6 + delta) at low temperature and high field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Shapira, Y.; Hor, P. H.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetization of antiferromagnetic superconducting GdBa2Cu3O(6 + delta) has been measured for T in the range of 1.5 - 4.2 K for magnetic fields up to about 20 T. It is found that all Gd(3+) spins are nearly parallel at very high fields, and that this saturated spin subsystem coexists with superconductivity. Below the Neel temperature, 2.22 K, the transition from the 'canted' phase to the paramagnetic phase is observed by the application of a high magnetic field. The temperature dependence of this phase transition is also reported.

  20. Studies on the levitation height decay of the high temperature superconducting Maglev vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. G.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, J.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, L.

    2007-10-01

    The levitation height decay was found in the high temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev test vehicle system during man-loading running. Experimental results show that the no-load levitating system would drift to a new equilibrium position by the external loaded history, but the new equilibrium position will almost not drift by the second-round same loaded history. A new method is proposed to improve the stability of the HTS Maglev vehicle, that is, a pre-load was applied to the HTS Maglev vehicle before running. The impulse responses are performed on the HTS Maglev vehicle before the pre-load and after the pre-load. The results show that the pre-load method is considerably effective to improve the stiffness and damping coefficient of the HTS Maglev vehicle. Moreover, it helps to suppress the levitation height decay and enhance the stability of the HTS Maglev vehicle in practical operation.

  1. Compensation techniques for high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device gradiometers operating in unshielded environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgmann, J.; David, P.; Krause, H. J.; Otto, R.; Braginski, A. I.

    1997-08-01

    We have tested two methods of compensating environmental disturbances applicable to high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems operating in magnetically unshielded environments. For testing, we used first- and second-order axial electronic gradiometer setups with rf SQUID magnetometers operating at 77 K and base lines between 7 and 8 cm. The magnetometers were single-layer washer rf SQUIDs with bulk or thin-film magnetic flux concentrators in flip-chip geometry. The tested methods resulted in disturbance compensation levels comparable to those attained using electronically formed gradiometers. The white noise of the compensated magnetometers resulted in 13.5 fT/cm √Hz for first-order and 22 fT/cm2 √Hz for second-order compensation down to a few Hz. Common mode rejection was balanced to better than 10 000 for homogeneous fields and better than 200 for gradient fields with second-order compensation.

  2. Performance improvement of a high-temperature superconducting coil by separating and grading the coil edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguri, Shinichi; Funamoto, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we establish a model to analyze the transport current performance of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, considering the dependencies of critical current and n-value of an HTS tape on magnetic field and magnetic field angles. This analysis shows that relatively large electric fields appear at the coil’s edges, preventing improvement in the transport current performance of the coil. To solve this problem, in this paper, we propose a graded coil in which several coil edges of different heights are separated and graded. Analysis of its performance shows that the coil’s critical current increases, thus confirming that there exists an optimum coil cross section at which the stored energy and central magnetic field improve 2.1 times and 45%, respectively, compared with a typical rectangular coil that employs the same total length of the HTS tape. It is recommended that these results of the coil should be applied to SMES.

  3. Triple-band high-temperature superconducting microstrip filter based on multimode split ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Wen; Wang, Yan; Fan, Yi-Chao; Guan, Xue-Hui; He, Yusheng

    2013-09-01

    A compact triple-band high-temperature superconducting (HTS) YBa2Cu3Oy microstrip bandpass filter using multimode split ring resonator (SRR) is presented in this letter. Also, its properties and equivalent circuit models are investigated by even- and odd-mode analysis. Moreover, design method of the proposed triple-band HTS filter for the applications of global positioning system at 1.57 GHz, worldwide interoperability for microwave access at 3.5 GHz, and wireless local area networks at 5.8 GHz is discussed. The centre frequencies and the bandwidths of the three passbands can be allocated properly choosing the dimension parameters of the multimode SRR. In addition, four transmission zeros are produced to improve the selectivity of this filter.

  4. Design and construction of a high temperature superconducting power cable cryostat for use in railway system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, M.; Muralidhar, M.; Suzuki, K.; Fukumoto, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Akasaka, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-10-01

    The primary objective of the current effort was to design and test a cryostat using a prototype five-meter long high temperature Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Oy (Bi-2223) superconducting dc power cable for railway systems. To satisfy the safety regulations of the Govt of Japan a mill sheet covered by super-insulation was used inside the walls of the cryostat. The thicknesses of various walls in the cryostat were obtained from a numerical analysis. A non-destructive inspection was utilized to find leaks under vacuum or pressure. The cryostat target temperature range was around 50 K, which is well below liquid nitrogen temperature, the operating temperature of the superconducting cable. The qualification testing was carried out from 77 down to 66 K. When using only the inner sheet wire, the maximum current at 77.3 K was 10 kA. The critical current (Ic) value increased with decreasing temperature and reached 11.79 kA at 73.7 K. This is the largest dc current reported in a Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Oy or YBa2Cu3Oy (Y-123) superconducting prototype cable so far. These results verify that the developed DC superconducting cable is reliable and fulfils all the requirements necessary for successful use in various power applications including railway systems. The key issues for the design of a reliable cryogenic system for superconducting power cables for railway systems are discussed.

  5. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    SciTech Connect

    Yung Moo Huh

    2001-05-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H{parallel}c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {zeta}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic fields near H{sub c2}.

  6. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas K. Finnemore

    2001-06-25

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H {parallel} c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {xi}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near H{sub c2}.

  7. AC loss in high-temperature superconducting conductors, cables and windings for power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomen, M. P.; Rieger, J.; Hussennether, V.; Leghissa, M.

    2004-05-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) transformers and reactor coils promise decreased weight and volume and higher efficiency. A critical design parameter for such devices is the AC loss in the conductor. The state of the art for AC-loss reduction in HTS power devices is described, starting from the loss in the single HTS tape. Improved tape manufacturing techniques have led to a significant decrease in the magnetization loss. Transport-current loss is decreased by choosing the right operating current and temperature. The role of tape dimensions, filament twist and resistive matrix is discussed and a comparison is made between state-of-the-art BSCCO and YBCO tapes. In transformer and reactor coils the AC loss in the tape is influenced by adjacent tapes in the coil, fields from other coils, overcurrents and higher harmonics. These factors are accounted for by a new AC-loss prediction model. Field components perpendicular to the tape are minimized by optimizing the coil design and by flux guidance pieces. High-current windings are made of Roebel conductors with transposed tapes. The model iteratively finds the temperature distribution in the winding and predicts the onset of thermal instability. We have fabricated and tested several AC windings and used them to validate the model. Now we can confidently use the model as an engineering tool for designing HTS windings and for determining the necessary tape properties.

  8. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X J

    2016-03-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near T c, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below T c, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high T c: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order. PMID:26973872

  9. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M.; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X. J.

    2016-01-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near Tc, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below Tc, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high Tc: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order. PMID:26973872

  10. Interface-induced high-temperature superconductivity in FeSe/TiO2(001) heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao

    2015-03-01

    The recently discovered high transition temperature (Tc) superconductivity at the interface of single unit-cell (UC) FeSe films on SrTiO3(001) has generated considerable excitement, which may eventually lead to the discovery of a new family of high-Tc superconductors at many different interfaces. In this talk, we will present our recent work on a new interfacial system with high-Tc superconductivity, 1 UC FeSe films on anatase TiO2(001). By using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques, we have successfully prepared high-quality 1 UC FeSe films on anatase TiO2(001) formed on SrTiO3. In situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) reveals large superconducting gap (Δ) ranging from 17 meV to 22 meV, which is nearly one order of magnitude larger than Δ = 2.2 meV of bulk FeSe with Tc = 9.4 K, indicating the signature of high-Tc superconductivity. The superconductivity of this heterostructure system is further verified by imaging vortex lattice under external magnetic field. By examining the distinct properties of anatase TiO2 from SrTiO3, as well as their influences on superconductivity, we will also discuss about the possible pairing mechanism of this system. Together with our previous work of 1 UC FeSe/SrTiO3, this work demonstrates that interface engineering is a powerful way to fabricate new high-Tc superconductors and investigate the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity.

  11. Magnetic levitation using high temperature superconducting pancake coils as composite bulk cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A.; Hopkins, S. C.; Baskys, A.; Kalitka, V.; Molodyk, A.; Glowacki, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    Stacks of superconducting tape can be used as composite bulk superconductors for both trapped field magnets and for magnetic levitation. Little previous work has been done on quantifying the levitation force behavior between stacks of tape and permanent magnets. This paper reports the axial levitation force properties of superconducting tape wound into pancake coils to act as a composite bulk cylinder, showing that similar stable forces to those expected from a uniform bulk cylinder are possible. Force creep was also measured and simulated for the system. The geometry tested is a possible candidate for a rotary superconducting bearing. Detailed finite element modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics was also performed including a full critical state model for induced currents, with temperature and field dependent properties and 3D levitation force models. This work represents one of the most complete levitation force modeling frameworks yet reported using the H-formulation and helps explain why the coil-like stacks of tape are able to sustain levitation forces. The flexibility of geometry and consistency of superconducting properties offered by stacks of tapes, make them attractive for superconducting levitation applications.

  12. Dynamic compaction of high-temperature superconducting YBa2Cu3O(x) powders by laser-driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darquey, P.; Kieffer, J. C.; Gauthier, J.; Pepin, H.; Chaker, M.; Champagne, B.; Villeneuve, D.; Baldis, H.

    1991-10-01

    Laser-driven shocks are successfully used to density high-temperature superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 ceramic powders. Pressures of 10 GPa on a nanosecond time scale were generated by producing a confined plasma with a high-intensity laser pulse. Significant consolidation is generated up to 300 microns below the irradiated surface. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that the pinning of the intergranular vortices is strongly affected by the shock propagation. Recovery of superconductivity in compacted material is obtained with a postshock oxygen annealing.

  13. Influence of ion beam mixing on the growth of high temperature oxide superconducting thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Bordes, N.; Rollett, A.D.; Cohen, M.R.; Nastasi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The superconducting properties of high temperature superconductor thin films are dependent on the quality of the substrate used to grow these films. In order to maximize the lattice matching between the superconducting film and the substrate, we have used a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin film deposited on {l angle}100{r angle} SrTiO{sub 3} as a template. The first film was prepared by coevaporation of Y, BaF{sub 2} and Cu on {l angle}100{r angle} SrTiO{sub 3}, followed by an anneal in wet'' oxygen at 850{degree}C. This film showed a sharp transition at about 90 K. A thicker layer of about 5000 A was then deposited on top of this first 2000 {angstrom} film, using the same procedure. After the post anneal at 850{degree}C, the transition took place at 80 K and no epitaxy of the second film was observed. Ion beam mixing at 400{degree}C, using 400 keV O ions was done at the interface of the two films (the second one being not annealed). After the post anneal, the film displayed an improved Tc at 90K. Moreover, epitaxy was shown to take place from the interface SrTiO{sub 3}-123 film towards the surface and was dependent of the dose. These results will be discussed from the data obtained from Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) combined with channeling experiments, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. van Hove Singularities and Spectral Smearing in High Temperature Superconducting H3S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pickett, Warren E.

    The superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide at Tc=200 K observed by Drozdov and collaborators at pressures around 200 GPa is simple bcc Im 3 m H3S reopens questions about what is achievable in high Tc. The various ''extremes'' that are involved - pressure, implying extreme reduction of volume, extremely high H phonon energy scale around 1400K, extremely high temperature for a superconductor - necessitate a close look at new issues raised by these characteristics in relation to high Tc. We have applied first principles methods to analyze the H3S electronic structure, particularly the van Hove singularities (vHs) and the effect of sulfur. Focusing on the two closely spaced vHs near the Fermi level that give rise to the impressively sharp peak in the density of states, the implications of strong coupling Migdal-Eliashberg theory are assessed. The electron spectral density smearing due to virtual phonon emission and absorption, as done in earlier days for A15 superconductors, must be included explicitly to obtain accurate theoretical predictions and a correct understanding. Means for increasing Tc in H3S-like materials will be mentioned. NSF DMR Grant 1207622.

  15. Quench Detection and Protection for High Temperature Superconducting Transformers by Using the Active Power Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    AC high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils have been developed for transformers, motors and so on. Quench detection and protection system are essential for safety operations of the AC HTS facilities. The balance voltage method is universally used for the quench detection and protection, however especially for AC operations, the method has risks in terms of high voltage sparks. Because the method needs a voltage tap soldered to a midpoint of the coil winding and the AC HTS facilities generally operate at high voltages and therefore high voltage sparks may occur at the midpoint with no insulation. We have proposed the active power method for the quench detection and protection. The method requires no voltage tap on the midpoint of the coil winding and therefore it has in-built effectiveness for the AC HTS facilities. In this paper, we show that the method can detect the quench in an HTS transformer and moreover our proposed quench protection circuits which consist of thyristors are simple and useful for the AC HTS facilities.

  16. Van Hove singularities and spectral smearing in high-temperature superconducting H3S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pickett, Warren E.

    2016-03-01

    The superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide at Tc=200 K observed by Drozdov and collaborators at pressures around 200 GPa is simple bcc I m 3 ¯m H3S from a combination of theoretical and experimental confirmation. The various "extremes" that are involved—high pressure implying extreme reduction of volume, extremely high H phonon energy scale around 1400 K, extremely high temperature for a superconductor—necessitates a close look at new issues raised by these characteristics in relation to high Tc itself. First principles methods are applied to analyze the H3S electronic structure, beginning with the effect of sulfur and then focusing on the origin and implications of the two van Hove singularities (vHs) providing an impressive peak in the density of states near the Fermi energy. Implications arising from strong coupling Migdal-Eliashberg theory are studied. It becomes evident that electron spectral density smearing due to virtual phonon emission and absorption must be accounted for in a correct understanding of this unusual material and to obtain accurate theoretical predictions. Means for increasing Tc in H3S -like materials are noted.

  17. Strong-coupling theory of high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A. S.

    2005-08-01

    We argue that the extension of the BCS theory to the strong-coupling regime describes the high-temperature superconductivity of cuprates and the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) of ferromagnetic oxides if the phonon dressing of carriers and strong attractive correlations are taken into account. The attraction between carriers, which is prerequisite to high-temperature superconductivity, is caused by an almost unretarted electron-phonon interaction sufficient to overcome the direct Coulomb repulsion in the strong-coupling limit, where electrons become polarons and bipolarons (real-space electron or hole pairs dressed by phonons). The long-range Froehlich electron-phonon interaction has been identified as the most essential in cuprates providing "superlight" lattice polarons and bipolarons. A number of key observations have been predicted and/or explained with polarons and bipolarons including unusual isotope effects, normal state (pseudo)gaps, upper critical fields, etc. Here some kinetic, magnetic, and more recent thermomagnetic normal state measurements are interpreted in the framework of the strong-coupling theory, including the Nernst effect and normal state diamagnetism. Remarkably, a similar strong-coupling approach offers a simple explanation of CMR in ferromagnetic oxides, while the conventional double-exchange (DEX) model, proposed half a century ago and generalised more recently to include the electronphonon interaction, is in conflict with a number of modern experiments. Among these experiments are site-selective spectroscopies, which have shown that oxygen p-holes are current carriers rather than d-electrons in ferromagnetic manganites (and in cuprates) ruling out DEX mechanism of CMR. Also some samples of ferromagnetic manganites manifest an insulating-like optical conductivity at all temperatures contradicting the DEX notion that their ferromagnetic phase is metallic. On the other hand, the pairing of oxygen holes into heavy bipolarons in the

  18. Evaluation of high temperature superconductive thermal bridges for space borne cryogenic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Elaine P.

    1996-01-01

    Infrared sensor satellites are used to monitor the conditions in the earth's upper atmosphere. In these systems, the electronic links connecting the cryogenically cooled infrared detectors to the significantly warmer amplification electronics act as thermal bridges and, consequently, the mission lifetimes of the satellites are limited due to cryogenic evaporation. High-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials have been proposed by researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley's Research Center (NASA-LaRC) as an alternative to the currently used manganin wires for electrical connection. The potential for using HTS films as thermal bridges has provided the motivation for the design and the analysis of a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the performance of this superconductive technology in the space environment. The initial efforts were focused on the preliminary design of the experimental system which allows for the quantitative comparison of superconductive leads with manganin leads, and on the thermal conduction modeling of the proposed system. Most of the HTS materials were indicated to be potential replacements for the manganin wires. In the continuation of this multi-year research, the objectives of this study were to evaluate the sources of heat transfer on the thermal bridges that have been neglected in the preliminary conductive model and then to develop a methodology for the estimation of the thermal conductivities of the HTS thermal bridges in space. The Joule heating created by the electrical current through the manganin wires was incorporated as a volumetric heat source into the manganin conductive model. The radiative heat source on the HTS thermal bridges was determined by performing a separate radiant interchange analysis within a high-T(sub c) superconductor housing area. Both heat sources indicated no significant contribution on the cryogenic heat load, which validates the results obtained in the preliminary conduction

  19. Ac susceptibility of a coated conductor with high-temperature superconducting film and covered copper stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.-X.

    2014-07-01

    The ac susceptibility, χ=χ‧-jχ″, of a nearly square sample, cut from a coated conductor tape consisting of a high-temperature superconducting film and a covered copper stabilizer, is measured as a function of temperature, T, at several values of frequency, f. It is found that the χ(f) at T>Tc can be well simulated by a modeling eddy-current susceptibility of the stabilizer, and there is an extra low-T stage, where χ is not constant as expected and may be separated into two parts. The T-independent part is contributed by Meissner currents in the film with over-low |χ‧|, indicating that the film edge was damaged by cutting during tape and sample preparation. The T-dependent part is contributed by both eddy-currents and supercurrents, having a special f dependence with unknown mechanism. Both currents are interacted to each other in a complex way in the T range below and near Tc, resulting in interesting features in χ(T,f).

  20. Protection of high temperature superconducting thin-films in a semiconductor processing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yizi; Fiske, R.; Sanders, S.C.; Ekin, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    Annealing studies have been carried out for high temperature superconductor YBaCuO{sub 7{minus}{delta}} in a reducing ambient, in order to identify insulator layer(s) that will effectively protect the superconducting film in the hostile environment. While a layer of magnesium oxide (MgO) sputter deposited directly on YBaCuO{sub 7{minus}{delta}} film provides some degree of protection, the authors found that a composite structure of YBCO/SrTiO{sub 3}/MgO, where the SrTiO{sub 3} was grown by laser ablation immediately following YBCO deposition (in-situ process), was much more effective. They also address the need for a buffer layer between YBCO and aluminum (Al) during annealing. Al is most commenly used for semiconductor metalization, but is known to react readily with YBCO at elevated temperatures. The authors found that the most effective buffer layers are platinum (Pt) and gold/platinum (Au/Pt).

  1. Development of practical high temperature superconducting wire for electric power application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Sokolowski, Robert S.; Haldar, Pradeep; Motowidlo, Leszek R.

    1995-01-01

    The technology of high temperature superconductivity has gone from beyond mere scientific curiousity into the manufacturing environment. Single lengths of multifilamentary wire are now produced that are over 200 meters long and that carry over 13 amperes at 77 K. Short-sample critical current densities approach 5 x 104 A/sq cm at 77 K. Conductor requirements such as high critical current density in a magnetic field, strain-tolerant sheathing materials, and other engineering properties are addressed. A new process for fabricating round BSCCO-2212 wire has produced wires with critical current densities as high as 165,000 A/sq cm at 4.2 K and 53,000 A/sq cm at 40 K. This process eliminates the costly, multiple pressing and rolling steps that are commonly used to develop texture in the wires. New multifilamentary wires with strengthened sheathing materials have shown improved yield strengths up to a factor of five better than those made with pure silver. Many electric power devices require the wire to be formed into coils for production of strong magnetic fields. Requirements for coils and magnets for electric power applications are described.

  2. Development of practical high temperature superconducting wire for electric power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Haldar, P.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    The technology of high temperature superconductivity has gone from beyond mere scientific curiosity into the manufacturing environment. Single lengths of multifilamentary wire are now produced that are over 200 meters long and that carry over 13 amperes at 77 K. Short-sample critical current densities approach 5 {times} 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K. Conductor requirements such as high critical current density in a magnetic field, strain-tolerant sheathing materials, and other engineering properties are addressed. A new process for fabricating round BSCCO-2212 wire has produced wires with critical current densities as high as 165,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2 K and 53,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 40 K. This process eliminates the costly, multiple pressing and rolling steps that are commonly used to develop texture in the wires. New multifilamentary wires with strengthened sheathing materials have shown improved yield strengths up to a factor of five better than those made with pure silver. Many electric power devices require the wire to be formed into coils for production of strong magnetic fields. Requirements for coils and magnets for electric power applications are described.

  3. Progress in development of high temperature superconducting wire for electric power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Haldar, P.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    The technology of high temperature superconductivity has gone beyond mere scientific curiosity and into the manufacturing environment. Single lengths of multifilamentary wire are now produced that are over 200 meters long and that carry over 13 amperes at 77 K. Short-sample critical current densities approach 5 x 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K. Conductor requirements such as high critical current density in a magnetic field, strain-tolerant sheathing materials, and other engineering properties are addressed. A new process for fabricating round BSCCO-2212 wire has produced wires with critical current densities as high as 165,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2 K and 53,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 40 K. This process eliminates the costly, multiple pressing and rolling steps that are commonly used to develop texture in the wires. New multifilamentary wires with strengthened sheathing materials have shown improved yield strengths up to a factor of five better than those made with pure silver. Many electric power devices require the wire to be formed into coils for production of strong magnetic fields. Requirements for coils and magnets for electric power applications are described.

  4. Magnetic and levitation characteristics of bulk high-temperature superconducting magnets above a permanent magnet guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Zheng, Botian; He, Dabo; Sun, Ruixue; Deng, Zigang; Xu, Xun; Dou, Shixue

    2016-09-01

    Due to the large levitation force or the large guidance force of bulk high-temperature superconducting magnets (BHTSMs) above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG), it is reasonable to employ pre-magnetized BHTSMs to replace applied-magnetic-field-cooled superconductors in a maglev system. There are two combination modes between the BHTSM and the PMG, distinguished by the different directions of the magnetization. One is the S-S pole mode, and the other is the S-N pole mode combined with a unimodal PMG segment. A multi-point magnetic field measurement platform was employed to acquire the magnetic field signals of the BHTSM surface in real time during the pre-magnetization process and the re-magnetization process. Subsequently, three experimental aspects of levitation, including the vertical movement due to the levitation force, the lateral movement due to the guidance force, and the force relaxation with time, were explored above the PMG segment. Moreover, finite element modeling by COMSOL Multiphysics has been performed to simulate the different induced currents and the potentially different temperature rises with different modes inside the BHTSM. It was found that the S-S pole mode produced higher induced current density and a higher temperature rise inside the BHTSM, which might escalate its lateral instability above the PMG. The S-N pole mode exhibits the opposite characteristics. In general, this work is instructive for understanding and connecting the magnetic flux, the inner current density, the levitation behavior, and the temperature rise of BHTSMs employed in a maglev system.

  5. Performance Calculation of High Temperature Superconducting Hysteresis Motor Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, G.; Chakraborty, N.; Das, J.

    Hysteresis motors being capable of producing a steady torque at low speeds and providing good starting properties at loaded condition became popular among different fractional horse power electrical motors. High temperature superconducting materials being intrinsically hysteretic are suitable for this type of motor. In the present work, performance study of a 2-pole, 50 Hz HTS hysteresis motor with conventional stator and HTS rotor has been carried out numerically using finite element method. The simulation results confirm the ability of the segmented HTS rotor with glued circular sectors to trap the magnetic field as high as possible compared to the ferromagnetic rotor. Also the magnetization loops in the HTS hysteresis motor are obtained and the corresponding torque and AC losses are calculated. The motor torque thus obtained is linearly proportional to the current which is the common feature of any hysteresis motor. Calculations of torques, current densities etc are done using MATLAB program developed in-house and validated using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The simulation result shows reasonable agreement with the published results.

  6. Analyses, algorithms, and computations for models of high-temperature superconductivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.

    1997-06-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, the authors have achieved significant progress in the modeling, analysis, and computation of superconducting phenomena. The work so far has focused on mezoscale models as typified by the celebrated Ginzburg-Landau equations; these models are intermediate between the microscopic models (that can be used to understand the basic structure of superconductors and of the atomic and sub-atomic behavior of these materials) and the macroscale, or homogenized, models (that can be of use for the design of devices). The models they have considered include a time dependent Ginzburg-Landau model, a variable thickness thin film model, models for high values of the Ginzburg-landau parameter, models that account for normal inclusions and fluctuations and Josephson effects, and the anisotropic ginzburg-Landau and Lawrence-Doniach models for layered superconductors, including those with high critical temperatures. In each case, they have developed or refined the models, derived rigorous mathematical results that enhance the state of understanding of the models and their solutions, and developed, analyzed, and implemented finite element algorithms for the approximate solution of the model equations.

  7. Study of second generation, high-temperature superconducting coils: Determination of critical current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Kim, Jae-Ho; Pamidi, Sastry; Chudy, Michal; Yuan, Weijia; Coombs, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the modeling of second generation (2 G) high-temperature superconducting (HTS) pancake coils using finite element method. The axial symmetric model can be used to calculate current and magnetic field distribution inside the coil. The anisotropic characteristics of 2 G tapes are included in the model by direct interpolation. The model is validated by comparing to experimental results. We use the model to study critical currents of 2 G coils and find that 100 μV/m is too high a criterion to determine long-term operating current of the coils, because the innermost turns of a coil will, due to the effect of local magnetic field, reach their critical current much earlier than outer turns. Our modeling shows that an average voltage criterion of 20 μV/m over the coil corresponds to the point at which the innermost turns' electric field exceeds 100 μV/m. So 20 μV/m is suggested to be the critical current criterion of the HTS coil. The influence of background field on the coil critical current is also studied in the paper.

  8. Engineering Nanocolumnar Defect Configurations for Optimized Vortex Pinning in High Temperature Superconducting Nanocomposite Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Wee, Sung Hun; Zuev, Yuri L; Cantoni, Claudia; Goyal, Amit; Ahuja, Raj; Abiade, J.

    2013-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS), coated conductor wires based on nanocomposite films containing self-assembled, insulating BaZrO3 (BZO) nanocolumnar defects have previously been reported to exhibit enhanced vortex pinning. Here, we report on microstructural design via control of BZO nanocolumns density in YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO)+BZO nancomposite films to achieve the highest critical current density, Jc(H, ,T). X-ray diffraction and microstructural examination shows increasing number density of epitaxial BZO nanocolumns in the highly cube-textured YBCO matrix with increasing nominal BZO additions. Transport property measurement reveals that an increase in BZO content upto 4 vol% is required to sustain the highest pinning and Jc performance as the magnetic field increases. By growing thicker, single-layer nanocomposite films (~4 m) with controlled density of BZO columnar defects, the critical current (Ic) of ~1000 A/cm at 77 K, self-field and the minimum Ic of 455 A/cm at 65 K and 3 T for all magnetic field orientations were obtained. This is the highest Ic reported to date for films on metallic templates which are the basis for the 2nd generation, coated conductor-based HTS wires.

  9. Analyses, algorithms, and computations for models of high-temperature superconductivity. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gunzburger, M.D.; Peterson, J.S.

    1998-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, the authors have achieved significant progress in the modeling, analysis, and computation of superconducting phenomena. Their work has focused on mezoscale models as typified by the celebrated ginzburg-Landau equations; these models are intermediate between the microscopic models (that can be used to understand the basic structure of superconductors and of the atomic and sub-atomic behavior of these materials) and the macroscale, or homogenized, models (that can be of use for the design of devices). The models the authors have considered include a time dependent Ginzburg-Landau model, a variable thickness thin film model, models for high values of the Ginzburg-Landau parameter, models that account for normal inclusions and fluctuations and Josephson effects, and the anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau and Lawrence-Doniach models for layered superconductors, including those with high critical temperatures. In each case, they have developed or refined the models, derived rigorous mathematical results that enhance the state of understanding of the models and their solutions, and developed, analyzed, and implemented finite element algorithms for the approximate solution of the model equations.

  10. Fermi-surface reconstruction and the origin of high-temperature superconductivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M. R.; Materials Science Division

    2010-01-01

    lattice into a d{sup 9} configuration, with one localized hole in the 3d shell per copper site. Given the localized nature of this state, it was questioned whether a momentum-space picture was an appropriate description of the physics of the cuprates. In fact, this question relates to a long-standing debate in the physics community: Since the parent state is also an antiferromagnet, one can, in principle, map the Mott insulator to a band insulator with magnetic order. In this 'Slater' picture, Mott physics is less relevant than the magnetism itself. It is therefore unclear which of the two, magnetism or Mott physics, is more fundamentally tied to superconductivity in the cuprates. After twenty years of effort, definitive quantum oscillations that could be used to map the Fermi surface were finally observed in a high-temperature cuprate superconductor in 2007. This and subsequent studies reveal a profound rearrangement of the Fermi surface in underdoped cuprates. The cause of the reconstruction, and its implication for the origin of high-temperature superconductivity, is a subject of active debate.

  11. Contribution of ion beam analysis methods to the development of 2nd generation high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires

    SciTech Connect

    Usov, Igor O; Arendt, Paul N; Stan, Liliana; Holesinger, Terry G; Foltyn, Steven R; Depaula, Raymond F

    2009-01-01

    One of the crucial steps in the second generation high temperature superconducting wire program was development of the buffer layer architecture. The architecture designed at the Superconductivity Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of several oxide layers wherein each layer plays a specific role, namely: nucleation layer, diffusion barrier, biaxially textured template, and an intermediate layer with a good match to the lattice parameter of superconducting Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) compound. This report demonstrates how a wide range of ion beam analysis techniques (SIMS, RBS, channeling, PIXE, PIGE, NRA, ERD) was employed for analysis of each buffer layer and the YBCO films. These results assisted in understanding of a variety of physical processes occurring during the buffet layer fabrication and helped to optimize the buffer layer architecture as a whole.

  12. Possible high-temperature superconductivity in hole-doped MgB2C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, A. K.; Modak, P.; Gaitonde, D. M.; Rao, R. S.; Godwal, B. K.; Gupta, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    We report first-principles full potential linearised augmented plane wave calculations of the electronic band structure of the compound MgB2C2 and its hole-doped derivatives Mg0.5Li0.5B2C2, Mg0.5Na0.5B2C2, Mg0.9Na0.1B2C2 and Mg0.5K0.5B2C2. The parent compound MgB2C2 is a band insulator, which on hole doping, is predicted to turn metallic with a large density of states at the Fermi energy. Its band dispersion shows a flat band feature close to the Fermi energy, reminiscent of MgB2. Based on our estimates of changes in the density of states at the Fermi level, we predict that hole-doped MgB2C2 is a potential candidate for high-temperature superconductivity.

  13. Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

    2010-10-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

  14. A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W. J.; Fang, X. Y.; Fang, J.; Wei, B.; Hou, J. Z.; Liu, L. F.; Lu, K. K.; Li, Shuo

    2015-11-01

    A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is proposed, which is mainly based on phase angle between voltage and current of two coils to detect the quench resistance voltage. The approach is analyzed theoretically, verified experimentally and analytically by MATLAB Simulink and LabVIEW. An analog quench circuit is built on Simulink and a quench alarm system program is written in LabVIEW. Experiment of quench detection is further conducted. The sinusoidal AC currents ranging from 19.9 A to 96 A are transported to the HTS coils, whose critical current is 90 A at 77 K. The results of analog simulation and experiment are analyzed and they show good consistency. It is shown that with the increase of current, the phase undergoes apparent growth, and it is up to 60° and 15° when the current reaches critical value experimentally and analytically, respectively. It is concluded that the approach proposed in this paper can meet the need of precision and quench resistance voltage can be detected in time.

  15. Dynamic response characteristics of the high-temperature superconducting maglev system under lateral eccentric distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Zheng, Jun; Si, Shuaishuai; Qian, Nan; Li, Haitao; Li, Jipeng; Deng, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    Off-centre operation of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev systems caused by inevitable conditions such as the misregistration of vehicle, crosswind and curve negotiation, may change the distribution of the trapped flux in the HTS bulks and the magnetic interaction between HTS bulks and the PMG. It impacts on the performance of HTS maglev, and more seriously makes the maglev vehicle overturned. Therefore, understanding the performance of the HTS maglev in off-center operation is very important. In this paper, the dynamic response characteristics of a cryostat with twenty-four onboard YBaCuO superconductor bulks were experimentally investigated at different eccentric distances under loads before the initial FC process. Parameters such as vibration accelerations, displacement, natural frequency and dynamic stiffness were acquired and analyzed via the B&K vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. Results suggest that the natural frequency and dynamic stiffness of the maglev vehicle would be obviously reduced with the eccentric distance, posing negative effects on the stability of HTS maglev.

  16. Operating experience with the southwire 30-meter high-temperature superconducting power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, J. P.; Lue, J. W.; Demko, J. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Gouge, M. J.; Hawsey, R. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Hughey, R. L.; Lindsay, D. T.; Roden, M. L.; Sinha, U. K.; Tolbert, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    Southwire Company is operating a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system at its corporate headquarters. The 30-m long, 3-phase cable system is powering three Southwire manufacturing plants and is rated at 12.4-kV, 1250-A, 60-Hz. Cooling is provided by a pressurized liquid nitrogen system operating at 70-80 K. The cables were energized on January 5, 2000 for on-line testing and operation and in April 2000 were placed into extended service. As of June 1, 2001, the HTS cables have provided 100% of the customer load for 8000 hours. The cryogenic system has been in continuous operation since November 1999. The HTS cable system has not been the cause of any power outages to the average 20 MW industrial load served by the cable. The cable has been exposed to short-circuit currents caused by load-side faults without damage. Based upon field measurements described herein, the cable critical current-a key performance parameter-remains the same and has not been affected by the hours of real-world operation, further proving the viability of this promising technology.

  17. High Temperature Superconducting Magnets with Active Control for Attraction Levitation Transport Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Jenkins, Richard G.; Goodall, Roger M.; Macleod, Colin; ElAbbar, Abdallah A.; Campbell, Archie M.

    1996-01-01

    A research program, involving 3 British universities, directed at quantifying the controllability of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) magnets for use in attraction levitation transport systems will be described. The work includes measurement of loss mechanisms for iron cored HTS magnets which need to produce a flux density of approx. 1 tesla in the airgap between the magnet poles and a ferromagnetic rail. This flux density needs to be maintained and this is done by introducing small variations of the magnet current using a feedback loop, at frequencies up to 10 Hz to compensate for load changes, track variation etc. The test magnet assemblies constructed so far will be described and the studies and modelling of designs for a practical levitation demonstrator (using commercially obtained HTS tape) will be discussed with particular emphasis on how the field distribution and its components, e.g., the component vector normal to the broad face of the tape, can radically affect design philosophy compared to the classical electrical engineering approach. Although specifically aimed at levitation transport the controllability data obtained have implications for a much wider range of applications.

  18. Engineering nanocolumnar defect configurations for optimized vortex pinning in high temperature superconducting nanocomposite wires.

    PubMed

    Wee, Sung Hun; Zuev, Yuri L; Cantoni, Claudia; Goyal, Amit

    2013-01-01

    We report microstructural design via control of BaZrO3 (BZO) defect density in high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires based on epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films to achieve the highest critical current density, Jc, at different fields, H. We find the occurrence of Jc(H) cross-over between the films with 1-4 vol% BZO, indicating that optimal BZO doping is strongly field-dependent. The matching fields, Bφ, estimated by the number density of BZO nanocolumns are matched to the field ranges for which 1-4 vol% BZO-doped films exhibit the highest Jc(H). With incorporation of BZO defects with the controlled density, we fabricate 4-μm-thick single layer, YBCO + BZO nanocomposite film having the critical current (Ic) of ~1000 A cm(-1) at 77 K, self-field and the record minimum Ic, Ic(min), of 455 A cm(-1) at 65 K and 3 T for all field angles. This Ic(min) is the largest value ever reported from HTS films fabricated on metallic templates. PMID:23939231

  19. Engineering nanocolumnar defect configurations for optimized vortex pinning in high temperature superconducting nanocomposite wires

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Sung Hun; Zuev, Yuri L.; Cantoni, Claudia; Goyal, Amit

    2013-01-01

    We report microstructural design via control of BaZrO3 (BZO) defect density in high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires based on epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films to achieve the highest critical current density, Jc, at different fields, H. We find the occurrence of Jc(H) cross-over between the films with 1–4 vol% BZO, indicating that optimal BZO doping is strongly field-dependent. The matching fields, Bφ, estimated by the number density of BZO nanocolumns are matched to the field ranges for which 1–4 vol% BZO-doped films exhibit the highest Jc(H). With incorporation of BZO defects with the controlled density, we fabricate 4-μm-thick single layer, YBCO + BZO nanocomposite film having the critical current (Ic) of ~1000 A cm−1 at 77 K, self-field and the record minimum Ic, Ic(min), of 455 A cm−1 at 65 K and 3 T for all field angles. This Ic(min) is the largest value ever reported from HTS films fabricated on metallic templates. PMID:23939231

  20. Calculating AC Losses in High-temperature Superconducting Cables Comprising Coated Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noji, Hideki; Kawano, Shouta; Akaki, Yoji; Hamada, Tsugio

    In this study, we present a new calculation model of AC loss in a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable comprising coated conductors. AC loss is calculated by an electric circuit (EC) model. A previous EC model had three circuit elements: resistance as a function of the layer current, inductances related to the circumferential and axial fields. The new EC model has only inductances, and resistance is eliminated. In both models, AC loss of the coated conductor in each layer of an HTS cable is calculated on the basis of the Norris equation for a thin strip. The differences between measurement and calculations using the previous and new models are 12% and 14%, respectively, when transporting 1 kArms, which indicates that the new model is applicable for the calculation of AC loss in an HTS cable. These results indicate that layer current is dependent on inductances and not on resistance. The elimination of resistance simplifies AC loss calculation because it does not require repeated calculations for the convergence of the layer current. The calculation time was 1/20th of that of the previous model. In the new model, the Norris equation can be replaced with the calculation result obtained by the two-dimensional finite element method to obtain more accurate AC loss.

  1. High pressure studies of superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Narelle Jayne

    Superconductivity has been studied extensively since it was first discovered over 100 years ago. High pressure studies, in particular, have been vital in furthering our understanding of the superconducting state. Pressure allows researchers to enhance the properties of existing superconductors, to find new superconductors, and to test the validity of theoretical models. This thesis presents a series of high pressure measurements performed in both He-gas and diamond anvil cell systems on various superconductors and on materials in which pressure-induced superconductivity has been predicted. Under pressure the alkali metals undergo a radical departure from the nearly-free electron model. In Li this leads to a superconducting transition temperature that is among the highest of the elements. All alkali metals have been predicted to become superconducting under pressure. Pursuant to this, a search for superconductivity has been conducted in the alkali metals Na and K. In addition, the effect of increasing electron concentration on Li1-xMgx alloys has been studied. Metallic hydrogen and hydrogen-rich compounds are believed to be good candidates for high temperature superconductivity. High pressure optical studies of benzene (C6H6) have been performed to 2 Mbar to search for pressure-induced metallization. Finally, cuprate and iron-based materials are considered high-Tc superconductors. These layered compounds exhibit anisotropic behavior under pressure. Precise hydrostatic measurements of dTc/dP on HgBa2CuO 4+delta have been carried out in conjunction with uniaxial pressure experiments by another group. The results obtained provide insight into the effect of each of the lattice parameters on Tc. Finally, a series of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic measurements on LnFePO (Ln = La, Pr, Nd) reveal startling evidence that the superconducting state in the iron-based superconductors is highly sensitive to lattice strain.

  2. High temperature superconducting thin film microwave circuits: Fabrication, characterization, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Chorey, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 films were grown on several microwave substrates. Surface resistance and penetration depth measurements were performed to determine the quality of these films. Here the properties of these films on key microwave substrates are described. The fabrication and characterization of a microwave ring resonator circuit to determine transmission line losses are presented. Lower losses than those observed in gold resonator circuits were observed at temperatures lower than critical transition temperature. Based on these results, potential applications of microwave superconducting circuits such as filters, resonators, oscillators, phase shifters, and antenna elements in space communication systems are identified.

  3. High-temperature superconductivity from fine-tuning of Fermi-surface singularities in iron oxypnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnukha, Aliaksei

    2015-03-01

    In the family of iron-based superconductors, 1111-type materials exhibit superconductivity with the highest transition temperature Tc=55K. Early theoretical predictions of their electronic structure revealed multiple large circular sheets of the Fermi surface. Here we use ARPES to show that two prototypical compounds of the 1111 type are at odds with this description. Their low-energy band structure is formed by the edges of several bands, which are pulled to the Fermi level from the depths of the theoretically predicted band structure by strong electronic interactions. We further demonstrate that although their low-energy electronic looks remarkably similar, the Tc differs by a factor of 2. Upon closer examination we uncover that one of the bands in the higher-Tc compound sinks to 2.3meV below the Fermi level and thus does not produce a Fermi surface. And yet we find that it hosts a superconducting energy gap 10x larger than the same band in the lower-Tc sister compound. Our results show that the Fermi-surface singularities in the iron-oxypnictides dramatically affect their low-energy electronic properties, including superconductivity, and must therefore be explicitly taken into account in any attempt to understand the pairing mechanism.

  4. Photoemission results and understanding of high-temperature superconducting oxides: Non-issues, real issues, limitations and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritondo, G.

    1994-12-31

    The authors argue that the photoelectric effect in high-temperature superconductors is not only a source of extremely valuable information, but one of the most important and interesting open problems in today`s physics. Even without a complete picture of this phenomenon, very important conclusions can be obtained from an empirical analysis of photoemission data, notably on the parity (see Onellion`s article in this volume) and on the link between superconductivity and Anderson locations But a complete theoretical framework is urgently needed. Its development can contribute to the conceptual revolution that might be necessary to understand high-temperature superconductivity, as the Drude-Fermi-Landau revolution was necessary to understand metallic conductivity.

  5. Basic concepts, status, opportunities, and challenges of electrical machines utilizing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenhofer, J.; Grundmann, J.; Klaus, G.; Nick, W.

    2008-02-01

    An overview of the different approaches towards achieving a marketable application of a superconducting electrical machine, either as synchronous motor or generator, will be given. This field ranges from relatively small industrial drives to utility generators with large power ratings, from the low speed and high torque of wind power generators and ship propulsion motors, to high speed generators attached to turbines. Essentially HTS machine technology offers several advantages such as compactness (weight and volume reduction), increased efficiency, and other operational benefits. The machine features have to be optimized with regard to the specific application, and different concepts were developed by internationally competing teams, with Siemens being one of them. The achieved status in these fields will be summarized, pointing to the specific technical challenges to overcome. For this purpose we have not only to consider the technology of manufacturing the HTS rotor winding itself, but also to check requirements and availability of supporting technologies. This ranges from new challenges posed to the non-superconducting ("conventional") components of such innovative HTS machines, manufacturing superconducting material in the coming transition from 1st to 2nd generation HTS tape, cryogenic technology including material behavior, to new and challenging tasks in simulating and predicting the performance of such machines by computational tools. The question of market opportunities for this technology obviously is a function of all these aspects; however, a strong tendency for the near future is seen in the area of high-torque ship propulsion.

  6. Local structural studies of oriented high-temperature superconducting cuprates by polarized XAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskel, Daniel

    1998-07-01

    Doping (Sr,Ba) in Lasb{2-x}(Sr,Ba)sb{x}CuOsb4 induces high Tsb{c} superconductivity in addition to profound changes in structural, magnetic and normal state electronic properties. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the structural characteristics accompanying this doping by performing orientation dependent x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on magnetically aligned powders. This type of measurements allowed obtaining critical information at the La/(Sr,Ba) site previously unavailable, as detailed below. The measurements show that hole carriers introduced with Sr are polaronic in nature as evident from the two site configuration found for the O(2) apical neighboring Sr and the lack of temperature dependence in the O(2) distribution, which indicates that the hole states associated with each site are not discrete but rather broader than ksb{B}T up to T = 300K. There is a good theoretical argument suggesting each O(2) site is associated with holes being doped into O(1) 2psb{x,y}-Cu 3dsb{xsp2-ysp2} in-plane and O(2) 2psb{z}-Cu 3dsb{3zsp2-rsp2} out-of-plane electronic bands resulting in two different Jahn-Teller distortions of the CuOsb6 octahedra neighboring Sr, where the doped holes are peaked. Based on this argument, the predominance of out-of-plane character for the doped holes, as evidenced from the concentration dependence of the relative population of O(2) sites, would imply that theories of high Tsb{c} relying only on in-plane character of the doped holes are not complete in describing the properties of these cuprates. Our measurements showed that all structural phase transitions in Lasb{2-x}(Sr,Ba)sb{x}CuOsb4 have a significant order-disorder component, as opposed to the purely displacive models found in crystallographic studies. The CuOsb6 octahedra are locally tilted in the high-doping, high-temperature phases but fail to order over long range resulting in the average structures of the crystallographic studies. A critical parameter in

  7. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ranga P.; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ∼6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity. PMID:23818624

  8. Ultrafast Dynamics Evidence of High Temperature Superconductivity in Single Unit Cell FeSe on SrTiO_{3}.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y C; Zhang, W H; Li, F S; Wu, Y L; Wu, Q; Sun, F; Zhou, G Y; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Zhao, Jimin

    2016-03-11

    We report the time-resolved excited state ultrafast dynamics of single unit cell (1 UC) thick FeSe films on SrTiO_{3} (STO), with FeTe capping layers. By measuring the photoexcited quasiparticles' density and lifetime, we unambiguously identify a superconducting (SC) phase transition, with a transition temperature T_{c} of 68 (-5/+2)  K and a SC gap of Δ(0)=20.2±1.5  meV. The obtained electron-phonon coupling strength λ is as large as 0.48, demonstrating the likely crucial role of electron-phonon coupling in the high temperature superconductivity of the 1 UC FeSe on STO systems. We further find a 0.05 THz coherent acoustic phonon branch in the capping layer, which provides an additional decay channel to the gluing bosons. PMID:27015504

  9. Ultrafast Dynamics Evidence of High Temperature Superconductivity in Single Unit Cell FeSe on SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y. C.; Zhang, W. H.; Li, F. S.; Wu, Y. L.; Wu, Q.; Sun, F.; Zhou, G. Y.; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Zhao, Jimin

    2016-03-01

    We report the time-resolved excited state ultrafast dynamics of single unit cell (1 UC) thick FeSe films on SrTiO3 (STO), with FeTe capping layers. By measuring the photoexcited quasiparticles' density and lifetime, we unambiguously identify a superconducting (SC) phase transition, with a transition temperature Tc of 68 (-5 /+2 ) K and a SC gap of Δ (0 )=20.2 ±1.5 meV . The obtained electron-phonon coupling strength λ is as large as 0.48, demonstrating the likely crucial role of electron-phonon coupling in the high temperature superconductivity of the 1 UC FeSe on STO systems. We further find a 0.05 THz coherent acoustic phonon branch in the capping layer, which provides an additional decay channel to the gluing bosons.

  10. Effects of interlayer coupling on the magnetic and transport properties of superconducting multilayers and high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, K.E.; Hettinger, J.D.; Kim, D.H.

    1994-06-01

    The effect of interlayer coupling on the transport properties and dissipation in a magnetic field is reviewed for superconducting multilayers including highly-anisotropic high-temperature superconductors (HTS). For the applied field parallel to the superconducting layers the absence of any Lorentz-force dependence of the dissipation leads to an explanation other than flux motion. This is consistent with a Josephson junction dissipation which dominates flux motion of the insulating regions between layers. However, in is seen to cross over from phase slips at Josephson junctions to depinning of vortices from the external field at high fields and temperatures. For fields perpendicular to the superconducting layers the much greater resistive broadening in HTS is due to dissipation by thermally-activated flux motion, consistent with a lack of intrinsic pinning. We show experimental evidence that the associated flux motion occurs as a result of a crossover from three dimensional (3D) vortex lines to 2D independent pancake-like vortices, residing in the Cu-O layers. This 3D to 2D crossover occurs after k{sub B}T exceeds the Josephson coupling energy.

  11. A simple method for characterizing the RF properties of high-temperature superconductive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K.; Pandey, R. K.; Skrehot, M. K.; Li, M.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method using a resonant strip in a rectangular waveguide has been devised for superconductive material characterization. The method has the advantages of simplicity; and it requires only a small piece of the superconductive material. The resonant frequency of the superconductive strip can be predicted theoretically.

  12. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  13. Present Status and Future Perspective of Bismuth-Based High-Temperature Superconducting Wires Realizing Application Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ken-ichi; Kobayashi, Shin-ichi; Nakashima, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Among a series of high-temperature superconducting materials that have been discovered to date, (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x is the best candidate for superconducting wires that are long with commercial productivity, and critical current performance. In particular, the controlled overpressure (CT-OP) sintering technique gave us a 100% density of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x portion, which leads to robustness, increase in critical current, and mechanical tolerance. Many application prototypes are already verified and are being evaluated worldwide. Current leads for large magnets and magnetic billet heaters are already commercial products. Commercial applications for power cables, motors for ship propulsion and electric vehicles, and many kinds of magnets are promising in the near future.

  14. Ultra-High Performance, High-Temperature Superconducting Wires via Cost-effective, Scalable, Co-evaporation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dr. Hosup; Oh, Sang-Soo; Ha, HS; Youm, D; Moon, SH; Kim, JH; Heo, YU; Dou, SX; Wee, Sung Hun; Goyal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Long-length, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires capable of carrying high critical current, Ic, are required for a wide range of applications. Here, we report extremely high performance HTS wires based on 5 m thick SmBa2Cu3O7- (SmBCO) single layer films on textured metallic templates. SmBCO layer wires over 20 meters long were deposited by a cost-effective, scalable co-evaporation process using a batch-type drum in a dual chamber. All deposition parameters influencing the composition, phase, and texture of the films were optimized via a unique combinatorial method that is broadly applicable for co-evaporation of other promising complex materials containing several cations. Thick SmBCO layers deposited under optimized conditions exhibit excellent cube-on-cube epitaxy. Such excellent structural epitaxy over the entire thickness results in exceptionally high Ic performance, with average Ic over 1000 A/cm for the entire 22 meter long wire and maximum Ic over 1,500 A/cm for a short 12 cm long tape. The Ic values reported in this work are the highest values ever reported from any lengths of cuprate-based HTS wire or conductor.

  15. Ultra-High Performance, High-Temperature Superconducting Wires via Cost-effective, Scalable, Co-evaporation Process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Sup; Oh, Sang-Soo; Ha, Hong-Soo; Youm, Dojun; Moon, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Jung Ho; Dou, Shi Xue; Heo, Yoon-Uk; Wee, Sung-Hun; Goyal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Long-length, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires capable of carrying high critical current, Ic, are required for a wide range of applications. Here, we report extremely high performance HTS wires based on 5 μm thick SmBa2Cu3O7 − δ (SmBCO) single layer films on textured metallic templates. SmBCO layer wires over 20 meters long were deposited by a cost-effective, scalable co-evaporation process using a batch-type drum in a dual chamber. All deposition parameters influencing the composition, phase, and texture of the films were optimized via a unique combinatorial method that is broadly applicable for co-evaporation of other promising complex materials containing several cations. Thick SmBCO layers deposited under optimized conditions exhibit excellent cube-on-cube epitaxy. Such excellent structural epitaxy over the entire thickness results in exceptionally high Ic performance, with average Ic over 1,000 A/cm-width for the entire 22 meter long wire and maximum Ic over 1,500 A/cm-width for a short 12 cm long tape. The Ic values reported in this work are the highest values ever reported from any lengths of cuprate-based HTS wire or conductor. PMID:24752189

  16. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, Lisa; Fang, Fang; Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi; Keskar, Gayatri

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  17. Preparation, structure and superconductivity of high T(c) compounds: Research of high temperature superconductors in Hungary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschner, I.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the main directions, methods and results of the investigation of high-T(c) superconductors in Hungary are briefly summarized. The fundamental idea of this research is to study the effect of starting conditions on the microstructure of samples and the influence of the latter one on their superconducting parameters. The investigation concerning technical development is also mentioned.

  18. High- and Mid-temperature Superconducting Sensors for Far IR/Sub-mm Applications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, Brook; Brasunas, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    In this review paper an overview of the potential applications of high Tc (approx. 90 K) superconductors (HTS) and mid-Tc (approx. 39 K) superconductors (MTS) thin films in far IR/Sub-mm thermal detectors is presented. HTSs (YBCO, GdBCO etc.) were discovered in the late 80s while superconductivity in MgB2, an MTS, was discovered in 2001. The sharp transition in transport properties of HTS has allowed the fabrication of composite infrared thermal detectors (bolometers) with better figures of merit than thermopile detectors - thermopiles are currently on board the CIRS instrument on the Cassini mission to Saturn. The potential for developing even more sensitive sensors for IR/Sub-mm applications using MgB2 thin films is assessed. Current MgB2 thin film deposition techniques and film quality are reviewed.

  19. Neutron scattering experiments on high-temperature superconducting materials: Foreign trip report, September 13, 1988--October 4, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mook, H. A.

    1988-10-01

    The trip to the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) was made to perform neutron scattering experiments on the new high temperature superconducting materials. Part of this work could have been accomplished at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL had it been operational; other parts utilized the special instrumentation at the ILL available at no other place. Experiments performed were the following: high energy magnetic excitations in pure and Ba-doped La2CuO4, magnetic excitations and structural phase transitions in the Bi2Ba2Cu1O6 superconductor, search for the fluxoid lattice in the high temperature materials, and magnetic spin structures in ErBa2Cu3O7 and GdBa2Cu3O6.5. Measurements were also made on supermirrors important for polarizing and neutron guide applications.

  20. Electrodynamic stabilization conditions for high-temperature superconducting composites with different types of current-voltage characteristic nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkharov, A. M.; Lavrov, N. A.; Romanovskii, V. R.

    2014-06-01

    The current instability is studied in high-temperature superconducting current-carrying elements with I- V characteristics described by power or exponential equations. Stability analysis of the macroscopic states is carried out in terms of a stationary zero-dimensional model. In linear temperature approximation criteria are derived that allow one to find the maximum allowable values of the induced current, induced electric field intensity, and overheating of the superconductor. A condition is formulated for the complete thermal stabilization of the superconducting composite with regard to the nonlinearity of its I- V characteristic. It is shown that both subcritical and supercritical stable states may arise. In the latter case, the current and electric field intensity are higher than the preset critical parameters of the superconductor. Conditions for these states depending on the properties of the matrix, superconductor's critical current, fill factor, and nonlinearity of the I- V characteristic are discussed. The obtained results considerably augment the class of allowable states for high-temperature superconductors: it is demonstrated that there exist stable resistive conditions from which superconductors cannot pass to the normal state even if the parameters of these conditions are supercritical.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and High-Temperature Superconductivity in YTTRIUM(1-X)PRASEODYMIUM(X)BARIUM Cuprate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Arneil Payongayong

    Copper nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been performed on praseodymium-doped YBa_2Cu _3O_7, to investigate the nature of the depression of the superconducting transition temperature T_{c} with Pr concentration in this series and to provide insight into the microscopic and magnetic properties of high T_{c } planar cuprate materials. Praseodymium is unique among rare-earth dopants in suppressing superconductivity in the high T _{c} cuprate YBa _2Cu_3O_7 while maintaining the orthorhombic structure of the host. Temperature dependence of the Knight shift K and the nuclear relaxation rate 1/T_1 has been observed in Y-rich Y_{1-x}Pr _ xBa_2Cu _3O_7. Its striking resemblance to the behavior found in oxygen deficient YBa_2Cu_3O _{7-y} provides evidence that T_{c} depression in the former is primarily due to the removal of hole carriers as a consequence of Pr being close to tetravalent state. This hole-filling mechanism is consistent with the observed antiferromagnetic ordering of Cu spins on the plane sites in both PrBa_2Cu_3O_7 and YBa_2Cu_3O_6 since the absence of the doped-holes on the Cu -O_2 planes enhances spin correlations among Cu local moments. On the other hand, extensive analysis of the spin susceptibility has shown a tendency towards trivalency of Pr in specimens with low x values, suggesting that in the dilute limit pair-breaking due to conduction band-4f hybridization is also involved in the depression of T_{c}. The mixed-valent nature of Pr must therefore be considered for any adequate explanation of the suppression of superconductivity in Y_{1-x}Pr_ xBa_2Cu_3 O_7. The phenomenological model of antiferromagnetic Fermi liquid (AFL) proposed by Millis, Monien and Pines has been used to explain the behavior of the planar ^{63}Cu relaxation rate and to extract information on the strength of correlations among the local spins. Analysis has shown that the unusual behavior of the relaxation rate is a consequence of a competition between the temperature

  2. Model for superconductivity at any temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anber, Mohamed M.; Burnier, Yannis; Sabancilar, Eray; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    We construct a 2 +1 dimensional model that sustains superconductivity at all temperatures. This is achieved by introducing a Chern-Simons mixing term between two Abelian gauge fields A and Z . The superfluid is described by a complex scalar charged under Z , whereas a sufficiently strong magnetic field of A forces the superconducting condensate to form at all temperatures. In fact, at finite temperature, the theory exhibits Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition due to proliferation of topological vortices admitted by our construction. However, the critical temperature is proportional to the magnetic field of A , and thus, the phase transition can be postponed to high temperatures by increasing the strength of the magnetic field.

  3. High Power Intermodulation Measurements up to 30 W of High Temperature Superconducting Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilker, Charles; Carter, Charles F., III; Shen, Zhi-Yuan

    1999-01-01

    We have demonstrated a high power intermodulation measurement set-up capable of delivering 30 W in each of two fundamental tones. For closely spaced frequencies (less than 35 MHz), the dynamic range of the measurement is limited by the nonlinear performance of the mixer in the front end of the HP71210C spectrum analyzer. A tunable TE(sub 011) mode copper cavity was fabricated in which one of the endwalls could be adjusted shifting its resonant frequency between 5.7 and 6.6 GHz. Since the Q-value of this cavity is high, greater than 10(exp 4), and its bandwidth is small, less than 1 MHz, it can be used to attenuate the two fundamental tones relative to one of the harmonic tones, which greatly enhances the dynamic range of the measurement. This set-up can be used to measure the two-tone intermodulation distortion of any passive microwave device, e.g. a HTS filter, a connector, a cable, etc., over a frequency range of 5.9 to 6.4 GHz and a power range of 0.1 to 30 W. The third order intercept (TOI) of a prototype HTS filter measured at powers up to 30 W was +81.3 dBm.

  4. Ripple current loss measurement with DC bias condition for high temperature superconducting power cable using calorimetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. G.; Kim, A. R.; Park, M.; Yu, I. K.; Sim, K. D.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, S. J.; Cho, J. W.; Won, Y. J.

    2010-11-01

    The authors calculated the loss of the High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) model cable using Norris ellipse formula, and measured the loss of the model cable experimentally. Two kinds of measuring method are used. One is the electrical method, and the other is the calorimetric method. The electrical method can be used only in AC condition. But the calorimetric method can be used in both AC and DC bias conditions. In order to propose an effective measuring approach for Ripple Dependent Loss (RDL) under DC bias condition using the calorimetric method, Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide (BSCCO) wires were used for the HTS model cable, and the SUS tapes were used as a heating tape to make the same pattern of the temperature profiles as in the electrical method without the transport current. The temperature-loss relations were obtained by the electrical method, and then applied to the calorimetric method by which the RDL under DC bias condition was well estimated.

  5. Performance of a four-element Ka-band high-temperature superconducting microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, K. B.; Gilbert, C.; Metzler, S.; Koepf, G.; Claspy, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    Superconducting four-element microstrip array antennas operating at 30 GHz have been designed and fabricated on a lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) substrates. The experimental performance of these thin film Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting antennas is compared with that of identical antenna patterned with evaporated gold. Efficiency measurements of these antennas show an improvement of 2 dB at 70 K and as much as 3.5 dB at 40 K in the superconducting antenna over the gold antenna.

  6. Method and apparatus for forming high-critical-temperature superconducting layers on flat and/or elongated substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1994-01-01

    An elongated, flexible superconductive wire or strip is fabricated by pulling it through and out of a melt of metal oxide material at a rate conducive to forming a crystalline coating of superconductive metal oxide material on an elongated, flexible substrate wire or strip. A coating of crystalline superconductive material, such as Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.8, is annealed to effect conductive contact between adjacent crystalline structures in the coating material, which is then cooled to room temperature. The container for the melt can accommodate continuous passage of the substrate through the melt. Also, a second pass-through container can be used to simultaneously anneal and overcoat the superconductive coating with a hot metallic material, such as silver or silver alloy. A hollow, elongated tube casting method of forming an elongated, flexible superconductive wire includes drawing the melt by differential pressure into a heated tubular substrate.

  7. Method and apparatus for forming high-critical-temperature superconducting layers on flat and/or elongated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1994-04-19

    An elongated, flexible superconductive wire or strip is fabricated by pulling it through and out of a melt of metal oxide material at a rate conducive to forming a crystalline coating of superconductive metal oxide material on an elongated, flexible substrate wire or strip. A coating of crystalline superconductive material, such as Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8], is annealed to effect conductive contact between adjacent crystalline structures in the coating material, which is then cooled to room temperature. The container for the melt can accommodate continuous passage of the substrate through the melt. Also, a second pass-through container can be used to simultaneously anneal and overcoat the superconductive coating with a hot metallic material, such as silver or silver alloy. A hollow, elongated tube casting method of forming an elongated, flexible superconductive wire includes drawing the melt by differential pressure into a heated tubular substrate. 8 figures.

  8. Analytical approximations for thermophysical properties of supercritical nitrogen (SCN) to be used in futuristic high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondapati, Raja Sekhar; Ravula, Jeswanth; Thadela, S.; Usurumarti, Preeti Rao

    2015-12-01

    Future power transmission applications demand higher efficiency due to the limited resources of energy. In order to meet such demand, a novel method of transmission is being developed using High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables. However, these HTS cables need to be cooled below the critical temperature of superconductors used in constructing the cable to retain the superconductivity. With the advent of new superconductors whose critical temperatures having reached up to 134 K (Hg based), a need arises to find a suitable coolant which can accommodate the heating loads on the superconductors. The present work proposes, Supercritical Nitrogen (SCN) to be a feasible coolant to achieve the required cooling. Further, the feasibility of proposed coolant to be used in futuristic HTS cables is investigated by studying the thermophysical properties such as density, viscosity, specific heat and thermal conductivity with respect to temperature (TC + 10 K) and pressure (PC + 10 bar). In addition, few temperature dependent analytical functions are developed for thermophysical properties of SCN which are useful in predicting thermohydraulic performance (pressure drop, pumping power and cooling capacity) using numerical or computational techniques. Also, the developed analytical functions are used to calculate the pumping power and the temperature difference between inlet and outlet of HTS cable. These results are compared with those of liquid nitrogen (LN2) and found that the circulating pumping power required to pump SCN is significantly smaller than that to pump LN2. Further, it is found that the temperature difference between the inlet and outlet is smaller as compared to that when LN2 is used, SCN can be preferred to cool long length Hg based HTS cables.

  9. Experimental observation of high-temperature superconductivity in HxS at P ~150 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M.

    2015-03-01

    We found that sulfur hydride transforms at P ~90 GPa to metal and superconductor with Tc increasing with pressure to 150 K at ~ 200 GPa. Moreover we found superconductivity with Tc ~ 190 K in a H2S sample pressurized to P > 150 GPa at T > 220 K. This superconductivity likely associates with the dissociation of H2S, and formation of SHn (n > 2) hydrides. We proved occurrence of superconductivity by the drop of the resistivity at least 50 times lower than the copper resistivity, the decrease of Tc with magnetic field, and the strong isotope shift of Tc in D2S which evidences a major role of phonons in the superconductivity.

  10. Measurements and calculations of transport AC loss in second generation high temperature superconducting pancake coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weijia; Coombs, T. A.; Kim, Jae-Ho; Han Kim, Chul; Kvitkovic, Jozef; Pamidi, Sastry

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental AC loss data on a superconducting pancake coil wound using second generation (2 G) conductors are presented. An anisotropic critical state model is used to calculate critical current and the AC losses of a superconducting pancake coil. In the coil there are two regions, the critical state region and the subcritical region. The model assumes that in the subcritical region the flux lines are parallel to the tape wide face. AC losses of the superconducting pancake coil are calculated using this model. Both calorimetric and electrical techniques were used to measure AC losses in the coil. The calorimetric method is based on measuring the boil-off rate of liquid nitrogen. The electric method used a compensation circuit to eliminate the inductive component to measure the loss voltage of the coil. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical calculations thus validating the anisotropic critical state model for loss estimations in the superconducting pancake coil.