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Sample records for high wear applications

  1. Elastomer Compound Developed for High Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D.; Feuer, H.; Flanagan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Teets, A.; Touchet, P.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army is currently spending 300 million dollars per year replacing rubber track pads. An experimental rubber compound has been developed which exhibits 2 to 3 times greater service life than standard production pad compounds. To improve the service life of the tank track pads various aspects of rubber chemistry were explored including polymer, curing and reinforcing systems. Compounds that exhibited superior physical properties based on laboratory data were then fabricated into tank pads and field tested. This paper will discuss the compounding studies, laboratory data and field testing that led to the high wear elastomer compound.

  2. HVOF coatings for heavy wear, high impact applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, L.

    1994-12-31

    A-4 aircraft are used extensively for carrier training. The hook point used for grabbing the cable that arrests the aircraft during a carrier landing is relatively expensive to manufacture and can only be produced by a limited number of qualified vendors. For training, the aircraft lands on a concrete runway, then drags the hook for 100 to 1500 feet. A wear-resistant coating on the bottom of the hook point was desired to extend the life of parts used for training, especially if the coating could be reapplied several times. The coating sought had to be capable of withstanding the impact sustained when the hook point contacted the ground while moving at greater than 100 MPH, then survive the wear of rubbing across 1000 feet of concrete while moving at these speeds. A further restriction was that the coating had to be applied to an alloy steel heat treated to a hardness of RC 47--50, especially for recoat applications. Coating materials were selected on the basis of finding a material considered tough enough to withstand the initial impact, then hard enough to provide the wear resistance needed. It was felt that increased hardness and increased thickness would lower the ability to withstand impact, while increasing the ability to withstand the severe rubbing wear. Coating candidates included NiCrB systems at two hardnesses, each sprayed to three different thicknesses, 25%NiCr-CrC and Colmonoy 88A were selected for high hardness in a ductile matrix, Stellite compositions varying in as-sprayed hardness because of their ability to provide wear resistance by work hardening, molybdenum and Tribaloy for possible reduced friction, and an amorphous FeNiB alloy applied with twin arc wire. The coatings were first screened with simulated tests involving a drop weight for impact resistance and a spinning concrete wheel test developed by Dayton T. Brown Co. for wear resistance.

  3. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite useful over a wide temperature range is described herein. The composite includes metal bonded chromium oxide dispersed in a metal binder having a substantial amount of nickel. The composite contains a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II, or rare earth metal, and optionally a low temperature lubricant metal.

  4. High Strength and Wear Resistant Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new high strength and wear resistant aluminum cast alloy invented by NASA-MSFC for high temperature applications will be presented. Developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low-exhaust emission, the novel NASA 398 aluminum-silicon alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (500 F-800 F), enabling new pistons to utilize less material, which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance. NASA 398 alloy also offers greater wear resistance, surface hardness, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys for several commercial and automotive applications. The new alloy can be produced economically using permanent steel molds from conventional gravity casting or sand casting. The technology was developed to stimulate the development of commercial aluminum casting products from NASA-developed technology by offering companies the opportunity to license this technology.

  5. High Strength and Wear Resistant Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Chen, Po Shou

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent thermal growth stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  6. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings for high-temperature wear-protection applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.C.

    1980-03-01

    Under normal high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating conditions, faying surfaces of metallic components under high contact pressure are prone to friction, wear, and self-welding damage. Component design calls for coatings for the protection of the mating surfaces. Anticipated operating temperatures up to 850 to 950/sup 0/C (1562 to 1742/sup 0/F) and a 40-y design life require coatings with excellent thermal stability and adequate wear and spallation resistance, and they must be compatible with the HTGR coolant helium environment. Plasma and detonation-gun (D-gun) deposited chromium carbide-base and stabilized zirconia coatings are under consideration for wear protection of reactor components such as the thermal barrier, heat exchangers, control rods, and turbomachinery. Programs are under way to address the structural integrity, helium compatibility, and tribological behavior of relevant sprayed coatings. In this paper, the need for protection of critical metallic components and the criteria for selection of coatings are discussed. The technical background to coating development and the experience with the steam cycle HTGR (HTGR-SC) are commented upon. Coating characterization techniques employed at General Atomic Company (GA) are presented, and the progress of the experimental programs is briefly reviewed. In characterizing the coatings for HTGR applications, it is concluded that a systems approach to establish correlation between coating process parameters and coating microstructural and tribological properties for design consideration is required.

  7. Wear Properties of Thixoformed and High Pressure Die Cast Aluminium Alloys for Connecting Rod Applications in Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yücel; Birol, Feriha

    2007-04-01

    Hypereutectic aluminium casting alloys are attractive candidates for connecting rod applications in compressors. The wear properties of these alloys are largely controlled by their microstructural features which in turn are affected by the processing route. Several hypo- and hypereutectic Al-Si alloys were produced by high pressure die casting and thixoforming in the present work. The former route produced a very fine microstructure while relatively coarser, globular α-Al matrix dominated in thixoformed grades. A modified Falex Block on Ring equipment was employed to investigate the wear properties of these alloys. Wear tests were carried out under service conditions in the lubricated state at 75°C. The superior wear properties of hypereutectic alloys produced by high pressure die casting with respect to the thixoformed variety is accounted for by the very fine microstructure with a fine dispersion of primary Si particles in the former. Of the two production routes employed, thixoforming had a favorable effect on wear properties at equal Si levels.

  8. NASA PS400: A New Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    A new solid lubricant coating, NASA PS400, has been developed for high temperature tribological applications. This plasma sprayed coating is a variant of the patented PS304 coating and has been formulated to provide higher density, smoother surface finish and better dimensional stability than PS304. PS400 is comprised of a nickel-molybdenum binder that provides strength, creep resistance and extreme oxidative and dimensional stability. Chromium oxide, silver and barium-calcium fluoride eutectic are added to the binder to form PS400.Tribological properties were evaluated with a pin-on-disk test rig in sliding contact to 650 C. Coating material samples were exposed to air, argon and vacuum at 760 C followed by cross section microscopic analysis to assess microstructure stability. Oil-Free microturbine engine hot section foil bearing tests were undertaken to assess PS400 s suitability for hot foil gas bearing applications. The preliminary results indicate that PS400 exhibits tribological characteristics comparable to the PS304 coating but with enhanced creep resistance and dimensional stability suitable for demanding, dynamic applications.

  9. Wear of highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components

    PubMed Central

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Munn, Zachary; Howie, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Wear rates of highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) acetabular components have varied considerably between different published studies. This variation is in part due to the different techniques used to measure wear and to the errors inherent in measuring the relatively low amounts of wear in XLPE bearings. We undertook a scoping review of studies that have examined the in vivo wear of XLPE acetabular components using the most sensitive method available, radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Methods A systematic search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases was performed to identify published studies in which RSA was used to measure wear of XLPE components in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Results 18 publications examined 12 primary THA cohorts, comprising only 260 THAs at 2–10 years of follow-up. The mean or median proximal wear rate reported ranged from 0.00 to 0.06 mm/year. However, differences in the manner in which wear was determined made it difficult to compare some studies. Furthermore, differences in RSA methodology between studies, such as the use of supine or standing radiographs and the use of beaded or unbeaded reference segments, may limit future meta-analyses examining the effect of patient and implant variables on wear rates. Interpretation This scoping review confirmed the low wear rates of XLPE in THA, as measured by RSA. We make recommendations to enhance the standardization of reporting of RSA wear results, which will facilitate early identification of poorly performing implants and enable a better understanding of the effects of surgical and patient factors on wear. PMID:25301435

  10. P/M Materials for Wear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2000-10-01

    Wear resistant materials usually consist of either very hard homogeneous single phase materials (e.g., ceramics like Al2O3, SiC, etc.) or heterogenous materials (e.g., white cast irons, composites or cermets, or composite-type materials), typically with a hard reinforcing phase dispersed in a softer matrix. In both instances, the result is the same, less penetration of the abrasive into the surface of the material being worn. Composite type materials can be produced using either a melting/solidification scheme or through powder metallurgy (P/M) techniques. In either case the result is the same, a microstructure that consists of a high volume fraction of hard, usually brittle, second phase particles in a softer matrix. However, P/M can be used to create a wider range of these materials than can melting/solidification, because in P/M processing, the desired phase does not have to be precipitated during solidification. Thus, more materials can be produced with higher volume fractions of reinforcing phases. Obviously, other factors like reinforcement size, matrix-particle interfacial strength, plastic accommodation of the matrix, etc. become important in the wear behavior of these materials. Various categories of P/M wear resistant materials will be discussed, and their wear behavior will be compared against traditional wear resistant cast materials like white cast iron and tool steels.

  11. High Temperature Wear of Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.

    2005-01-01

    It was initially hypothesized that advanced ceramics would exhibit favorable high te- friction and wear properties because of their high hot hardness and low achievable surface roughness welding observed in metals does not occur in ceramics. More recent tribological studies of many nitride, carbide, oxide and composite ceramics, however, have revealed that ceramics often exhibit high friction and wear in non-lubricated, high temperature sliding contacts. A summary is given to measure friction and wear factor coefficients for a variety of ceramics from self mated ceramic pin-on-disk tests at temperatures from 25 to up to 1200 C. Observed steady state friction coefficients range from about 0.5 to 1.0 or above. Wear factor coefficients are also very high and range from about to 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -2) cubic millimeters per N-m. By comparison, oil lubricated steel sliding results in friction coefficients of 0.1 or less and wear factors less than 10(exp -9) cubic millimeters per N-m.

  12. Wear evaluation of high interstitial stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2008-07-01

    A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were found to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.

  13. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  14. Friction, wear, transfer and wear surface morphology of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  15. Wear performance of garnet aluminium composites at high contact pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anju; Arora, Rama; Kumar, Suresh; Singh, Gurmel; Pandey, O. P.

    2016-05-01

    To satisfy the needs of the engineering sector, researchers and material scientists in this area adopted the development of composites with tailor made properties to enhance efficiency and cost savings in the manufacturing sector. The technology of the mineral industry is shaping the supply and demand of minerals derived materials. The composites are best classified as high performance materials have high strength-to-weight ratios, and require controlled manufacturing environments for optimum performance. Natural mineral garnet was used as the reinforcement of composite because of satisfactory mechanical properties as well as an attractive ecological alternative to others ceramics. For this purpose, samples have been prepared with different sizesof the garnet reinforcement using the mechanical stirring method to achieve the homogeneously dispersed strengthening phase. A systematic study of the effect of high contact pressure on the sliding wear behaviour of garnet reinforced LM13 alloy composites is presented in this paper. The SEM analysis of the worn samples and debris reveals the clues about the wear mechanism. The drastic improvement in the wear resistance of the composites at high contact pressure shows the high potential of the material to be used in engineering applications.

  16. A review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syazwani, H.; Mebrahitom, G.; Azmir, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses a review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application. Wear of the nozzle becomes a major problem since it may affect the water jet machining performance. Design, materials, and life of the nozzle give significance effect to the nozzle wear. There are various parameters that may influence the wear rate of the nozzle such as nozzle length, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, abrasive flow rate and water pressure. The wear rate of the nozzle can be minimized by controlling these parameters. The mechanism of wear in the nozzle is similar to other traditional machining processes which uses a cutting tool. The high pressure of the water and hard abrasive particles may erode the nozzle wall. A new nozzle using a tungsten carbide-based material has been developed to reduce the wear rate and improve the nozzle life. Apart from that, prevention of the nozzle wear has been achieved using porous lubricated nozzle. This paper presents a comprehensive review about the wear of abrasive water jet nozzle.

  17. Microstructure and wear property of spray formed high leaded bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Deping; Yan, Biao

    2015-03-01

    In this research, Cu-9Pb high leaded bronze were prepared by spray forming. The microstructure and wear properties of this bronze alloy were systematically investigated. The results show that although the hardness of spray formed alloy was not increased comparing with the cast alloy, it still presented a lower wear rate and a lower friction coefficient in dry sliding wear tests as shallower grooves and more lubricating films were observed in the spray formed bronze (BSF14). Spray forming also refined the lead phase microstructure of Cu-9Pb bronze and improved its wear properties.

  18. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, J.H.; Rawers, J.C.; Alman, D.E.

    2007-04-01

    Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.

  19. New Oxide Ceramic Developed for Superior High-Temperature Wear Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Farmer, Serene C.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramics, for the most part, do not have inherently good tribological properties. For example friction coefficients in excess of 0.7 have been reported for silicon nitride sliding on silicon nitride or on bearing steel (ref. 1). High friction is always accompanied by considerable wear. Despite their inherently poor tribological properties, the high strength and high toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics has led to their successful use in tribological applications (refs. 1 to 4). The upper temperature limit for the application of Si3N4 as wear-resistant material is limited by reaction with the tribological environment (ref. 3). Silicon nitride is known to produce a thin silicon dioxide film with easy shear capability that results in low friction and low wear in a moist environment (ref. 5). At elevated temperatures, the removal of the reaction product that acts as lubricant causes the friction coefficient to increase and, consequently, the wear performance to become poor. New materials are sought that will have wear resistance superior to that of Si3N4 at elevated temperatures and in harsh environments. A new class of oxide ceramic materials has been developed with potential for excellent high-temperature wear resistance. The new material consists of a multicomponent oxide with a two-phase microstructure, in which the wear resistance of the mixed oxide is significantly higher than that of the individual constituents. This is attributed to the strong constraining effects provided by the interlocking microstructures at different length scales, to the large aspect ratio of the phases, to the strong interphase bonding, and to the residual stresses. Fretting wear tests were conducted by rubbing the new ceramic material against boron carbide (B4C). The new ceramic material produced a wear track groove on B4C, suggesting significantly higher wear resistance for the oxide ceramic. The new material did not suffer from any microstructural degradation after the wear

  20. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  1. High temperature, high wear resistant solid lubricants. (Latest citations from Fluidex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning solid lubricants for high wear and high temperature resistant applications. Emphasis is placed upon molybdenum disulfide, however, gold-molybdenum alloys and polysiloxanes are also discussed. Methods for depositing thin film solid lubricants, including sputtering and electrodeposition are presented. The corrosion properties of the solid lubricant-metal interface are also included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. High temperature, high wear resistant solid lubricants. (Latest citations from Fluidex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning solid lubricants for high wear and high temperature resistant applications. Emphasis is placed upon molybdenum disulfide, however, gold-molybdenum alloys and polysiloxanes are also discussed. Methods for depositing thin film solid lubricants, including sputtering and electrodeposition are presented. The corrosion properties of the solid lubricant-metal interface are also included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Carbon-Based Wear Coatings: Properties and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    The technical function of numerous engineering systems - such as vehicles, machines, and instruments - depends on the processes of motion and on the surface systems. Many processes in nature and technology depend on the motion and dynamic behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. Smart surface systems are essential because of the recent technological push toward higher speeds, loads, and operating temperatures; longer life; lighter weight and smaller size (including nanotechnology); and harsh environments in mechanical, mechatronic, and biomechanical systems. If proper attention is not given to surface systems, then vehicles, machines, instruments, and other technical systems could have short lives, consume excessive energy, experience breakdowns, result in liabilities, and fail to accomplish their missions. Surface systems strongly affect our national economy and our lifestyles. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we believe that proper attention to surface systems, especially in education, research, and application, could lead to economic savings of between 1.3 and 1.6 percent of the gross domestic product. Wear coatings and surface systems continue to experience rapid growth as new coating and surface engineering technologies are discovered, more cost-effective coating and surface engineering solutions are developed, and marketers aggressively pursue, uncover, and exploit new applications for engineered surface systems in cutting tools and wear components. Wear coatings and smart surface systems have been used widely in industrial, consumer, automotive, aerospace, and biomedical applications. This presentation expresses the author's views of and insights into smart surface systems in wear coatings. A revolution is taking place in carbon science and technology. Diamond, an allotrope of carbon, joins graphite, fullerenes, and nanotubes as its major pure carbon structures. It has a unique combination of extreme properties: hardness and abrasion resistance; adhesion

  4. Tribology: Wear test selection for design and application

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, A.W.; Bayer, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    One important area of concern that has not been covered in previous symposia by the ASTM's Committee on Wear and Erosion is the connection between laboratory testing and actual operating performance of systems or components. This connection between laboratory testing, test results, and final design and performance is a crucial one in the practical application of tribology science and engineering. One of the aims of this symposium was to show by example how successful simulative testing has been accomplished. Specific examples are presented from a number of applications involving different forms of wear, including some from such specialized areas as computer peripherals, engines, and prosthetic devices. An important consideration in all the presentations was the identification of critical use conditions. Nine of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  5. Wear Characteristics of Oleophobic Coatings in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Hamza; Siddiqui, Bilal A.; Saleem, Sajid

    This paper investigates the wear characteristics of oleophobic coatings when applied over Inconel 718, which has widespread applications in the aerospace industry. Coatings once applied were selectively exposed to controlled uni-and then multi-directional stand storm conditions. Size and speed of sand particles colliding with the work surface were carefully moderated to simulate sand storm conditions. Study of friction was performed using Lateral Force Microscopy (LFM) coupled with standard optical microscopy. The analysis has been used to devise a coefficient of friction value and in turn suggest wear behavior of the coated surface including the time associated with exposure of the base substrate. The analysis after validation aims to suggest methods for safe usage of these coatings for aerospace applications.

  6. Wear Characteristics of Oleophobic Coatings in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Hamza; Basit, Kanza

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the wear characteristics of oleophobic coatings when applied over Inconel 718, which has widespread applications in the aerospace industry. Coatings once applied were selectively exposed to controlled uni-and then multi-directional stand storm conditions. Size and speed of sand particles colliding with the work surface were carefully moderated to simulate sand storm conditions. Study of friction was performed using Lateral Force Microscopy (LFM) coupled with standard optical microscopy. The analysis has been used to devise a coefficient of friction value and in turn suggest wear behavior of the coated surface including the time associated with exposure of the base substrate. The analysis after validation aims to suggest methods for safe usage of these coatings for aerospace applications.

  7. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Hanni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, E.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings consisting of steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear resistant, chemical vapor deposited TiC are described. Experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, show that such bearings are suitable for space applications. The results of laboratory tests on the ESA Meteosat Radiometer Focalizing mechanism, which contains six coated bearings, are summarized.

  8. Friction and wear of hydroxyapatite reinforced high density polyethylene against the stainless steel counterface.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Chandrasekaran, M; Bonfield, W

    2002-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) was invented as a biomaterial for skeletal applications. In this investigation, tribological properties (e.g. wear rate and coefficient of friction) of unfilled HDPE and HA/HDPE composites were evaluated against the duplex stainless steel in dry and lubricated conditions, with distilled water or aqueous solutions of proteins (egg albumen or glucose) being lubricants. Wear tests were conducted in a custom-built test rig for HDPE and HA/HDPE containing up to 40 vol % of HA. It was found that HA/HDPE composites had lower coefficients of friction than unfilled HDPE under certain conditions. HA/HDPE also exhibited less severe fatigue failure marks than HDPE. The degradation and fatigue failure of HDPE due to the presence of proteins were severe for low speed wear testing (100 rpm) as compared to high speed wear testing (200 rpm). This was due possibly to the high shear rate at the contact which could remove any degraded film instantaneously at high sliding speed, while with a low sliding speed the build-up of a degraded layer of protein could occur. The degraded protein layer would stay at the contact for a longer time and mechanical activation would induce adverse reactions, weakening the surface layer of HDPE. Both egg albumen and glucose were found to be corrosive to steel and adversely reactive for HDPE and HA/HDPE composites. The wear modes observed were similar to that of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Specimens tested with egg albumen also displayed higher wear rates, which was again attributed to corrosion accelerated wear. PMID:15348592

  9. Erosive wear of selected materials for fossil energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, Thomas A.; Rawers, James C.; Tylczak, Joseph H.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    A number of materials have been evaluated to determine their erosion resistance for fossil energy applications. This is part of a larger program to study wear and corrosion at Albany Research Center. This paper will present the results for some of these materials, including FeAl, FeAl cermets, WC-Co cemented carbides, Si3N4-MoSi2, Si3N4, Stellite 6B, white cast irons and 440C steel. Trends in erosion rates due to material properties and erosive conditions will be presented. FeAl cermets performed well compared to the WC-Co cemented carbides. The interparticle spacing of the WC-Co cemented carbides correlated with the erosion rate. The erosion rate of the WC-Co cemented carbides decreased as the interparticle spacing decreased. It is important to realize that erosion resistance is not an intrinsic material property, but is a system response. A change in the wear environment can significantly alter the relative rankings of materials with respect to their wear rate. For example, at relatively low velocities, the carbides in the white cast irons are more erosion resistant than the matrix, while at higher velocities the matrix is more erosion resistant.

  10. Wear characteristics of microscopic bushings for MEMS applications investigated by an AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Jang, Cheol-Eun; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2007-09-01

    The wear characteristics of silicon-based materials that are widely utilized in MEMS applications were investigated. Silicon (1 0 0), silicon oxide, silicon nitride and polysilicon specimens with microscopic bushings were fabricated for the wear tests performed under 100 µN normal force. The wear tests were conducted for a relatively long sliding distance of 5.6-187 km. Following the sliding experiment, the wear characteristics of the bushings were assessed by using an atomic force microscope. It was found that the wear rate was highest for the silicon oxide specimens and decreased in the order of polysilicon, silicon (1 0 0) and silicon nitride. Observation of the wear region showed that the scratches due to wear particles were often formed on the silicon (1 0 0), silicon oxide and polysilicon specimens. However, silicon nitride specimens showed signs of burnishing wear. The wear coefficients of the specimens were in the order of 10-8 to 10-7. Based on the wear characteristics and the wear debris behavior, the application of microgrooves for wear debris removal at the contacting interface was proposed.

  11. Development of an extremely wear-resistant ultra high molecular weight polyethylene for total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Shen, F W; Lu, B; Campbell, P; Salovey, R

    1999-03-01

    Osteolysis induced by ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris is one of the primary factors limiting the lifespan of total hip replacements. Crosslinking polyethylene is known to improve its wear resistance in certain industrial applications, and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups have shown improved wear resistance in two clinical studies. In the present study, crosslinked polyethylene cups were produced by two methods. Chemically crosslinked cups were produced by mixing a peroxide with ultra high molecular weight polyethylene powder and then molding the cups directly to shape. Radiation-crosslinked cups were produced by exposing conventional extruded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene bar stock to gamma radiation at various doses from 3.3 to 100 Mrad (1 Mrad = 10 kGy), remelting the bars to extinguish residual free radicals (i.e., to minimize long-term oxidation), and then machining the cups by conventional techniques. In hip-joint simulator tests lasting as long as 5 million cycles, both types of cross-linked cups exhibited dramatically improved resistance to wear. Artificial aging of the cups by heating for 30 days in air at 80 degrees C induced oxidation of the chemically crosslinked cups. However, a chemically crosslinked cup that was aged 2.7 years at room temperature had very little oxidation. Thus, whether substantial oxidation of chemically crosslinked polyethylene would occur at body temperature remains unclear. The radiation-crosslinked remelted cups exhibited excellent resistance to oxidation. Because crosslinking can reduce the ultimate tensile strength, fatigue strength, and elongation to failure of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, the optimal crosslinking dose provides a balance between these physical properties and the wear resistance of the implant and might substantially reduce the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis with total hip replacements. PMID:10221831

  12. Improvement in high stress abrasive wear property of steel by hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Mondal, D.P.; Khaira, H.K.; Jha, A.K.

    1999-12-01

    High stress abrasive wear behavior of mild steel, medium carbon steel, and hardfacing alloy has been studied to ascertain the extent of improvement in the wear properties after hardfacing of steel. High stress abrasive wear tests were carried out by sliding the specimen against the abrasive media consisting of silicon carbide particles, rigidly bonded on paper base and mounted on disk. Maximum wear was found in the case of mild steel followed by a medium carbon alloy steel and a hardfacing alloy. Different compositions of steels and constituent phases present led to different wear rates of the specimen. The extent of improvement in wear performance of steel due to hardfacing is quite appreciable (twice compared to mild steel). Microstructural examination of the wear surface has been carried out to understand the wear mechanism.

  13. Development of wear resistant nanostructured duplex coatings by high velocity oxy-fuel process for use in oil sands industry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Gobinda C; Khan, Tahir I; Glenesk, Larry B

    2009-07-01

    Oil sands deposits in Northern Alberta, Canada represent a wealth of resources attracting huge capital investment and significant research focus in recent years. As of 2005, crude oil production from the current oil sands operators accounted for 50% of Canada's domestic production. Alberta's oil sands deposits contain approximately 1.7 trillion barrels of bitumen, of which over 175 billion are recoverable with current technology, and 315 billion barrels are ultimately recoverable with technological advances. A major problem of operating machinery and equipment in the oil sands is the unpredictable failure from operating in this highly aggressive environment. One of the significant causes of that problem is premature material wear. An approach to minimize this wear is the use of protective coatings and, in particular, a cermet thin coating. A high level of coating homogeneity is critical for components such as bucketwheels, draglines, conveyors, shovels, heavyhauler trucks etc. that are subjected to severe degradation through abrasive wear. The identification, development and application of optimum wear solutions for these components pose an ongoing challenge. Nanostructured cermet coatings have shown the best results of achieving the degree of homogeneity required for these applications. In this study, WC-17Co cermet powder with nanocrystalline WC core encapsulated with 'duplex' Co layer was used to obtain a nanostructured coating. To apply this coating, high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying technique was used, as it is known for producing wear-resistant coatings superior to those obtained from plasma-based techniques. Mechanical, sliding wear and microstructural behavior of the coating was compared with those of the microstructured coating obtained from spraying WC-10Co-4Cr cermet powder by HVOF technique. Results from the nanostructured coating, among others, showed an average of 25% increase in microhardness, 30% increase in sliding wear resistance and

  14. High-temperature, high-wear-resistant solid lubricants. (Latest citations from Fluidex data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning solid lubricants for high wear and high temperature resistant applications. Emphasis is on molybdenum disulfide; however, gold-molybdenum alloys and polysiloxanes are also discussed. Methods for depositing thin film solid lubricants, including sputtering and electrodeposition, are presented. The corrosion properties of the solid lubricant-metal interface are also included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Y.S.; Kingsbury, G.R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  16. Wear processes in rocks at slow to high slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Takehiro; Mizoguchi, Kauzo; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2012-05-01

    Frictional wear experiments are performed on diorite, granite and sandstone at sliding velocities of 0.004-0.27 m/s under normal stresses of 0.21-6.3 MPa using a rotary-shear apparatus, to establish velocity-dependent wear laws of rocks and to determine the partition of frictional work used for gouge generation. Power-laws between normal/shear stresses and steady-state wear rate, defined as (thickness of gouge formed)/(fault displacement), account for our data for diorite and granite at low velocities and most experimental data on wear of rocks reported in the literature. But an exponential law holds for wear of diorite at velocities greater than 0.11 m/s and its wear rate increases dramatically at seismic slip rates. A change from the power-law to the exponential law seems to be caused by frictional heating and thermal fracturing. Both power and exponential laws can describe data for granite. Sandstones exhibit complex wear behavior possibly due to development of shiny slickenside surface that suppresses wear. Our data for diorite indicate that, at the investigated normal stresses, only 0.004% of frictional work is consumed for gouge formation at velocities less than 0.11 m/s, but this fraction increases markedly with increasing velocity. Energy partition for gouge formation is not constant and changes with velocity during earthquakes.

  17. High-temperature corrosion and wear properties of HVOF coatings of cobalt-based (CoCr) surfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Raghu, D.; Lee, D.A.; Singh, P.M.

    1999-07-01

    High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying is extensively used in industry to produce high-density, low porosity functional coatings to resist severe wear and corrosion. Increasingly there is a need to provide high-quality coatings that resist both wear and corrosion at high temperatures at the same time. Very few engineering data exist on such coatings. In this paper, a study of HVOF coatings of Co-Cr-Mo alloys, that relies on Laves phases or on carbides for wear and corrosion resistance is reported. The paper covers the basic metallurgy of the alloys, their design and microstructure. The oxidation and sulfidation resistances of the coatings are evaluated at 600 C. The high-temperature hardness and the room-temperature abrasion resistance, hardness and bond strengths are compared to assess their utility in high-temperature corrosion and wear-resistant applications. The test results indicate that these alloys are strong candidate materials for providing protection in the form of HVOF coatings, in high-temperature wear and corrosion environments.

  18. Wear Measurement of Highly Cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be Tracer Implantation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, Markus A.; Laurent, Michael P.; Dwivedi, Yasha; Gallardo, Luis A.; Chipps, K.; Blackmon, Jeffery C; Kozub, R. L.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Gross, Carl J; Stracener, Daniel W; Smith, Michael Scott; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Erikson, Luke; Patel, Nidhi; Rehm, Karl E.; Ahmad, Irshad; Greene, John P.; Greife, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    The very low wear rates achieved with the current highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) used in joint prostheses have proven to be difficult to measure accurately by gravimetry. Tracer methods are there- fore being explored. The purpose of this study was to perform a proof-of-concept experiment on the use of the radioactive tracer beryllium-7 (7Be) for the determination of in vitro wear in a highly cross-linked orthopedic UHMWPE. Three cross-linked and four conventional UHMWPE pins made from compression- molded GUR 1050, were activated with 109 to 1010 7Be nuclei using a new implantation setup that produced a homogenous distribution of implanted nuclei up to 8.5 lm below the surface. The pins were tested for wear in a six-station pin-on-flat appara- tus for up to 7.1 million cycles (178 km). A Germanium gamma detector was employed to determine activity loss of the UHMWPE pins at preset intervals during the wear test. The wear of the cross-linked UHMWPE pins was readily detected and esti- mated to be 17 6 3 lg per million cycles. The conventional-to- cross-linked ratio of the wear rates was 13.1 6 0.8, in the expected range for these materials. Oxidative degradation dam- age from implantation was negligible; however, a weak depend- ence of wear on implantation dose was observed limiting the number of radioactive tracer atoms that can be introduced. Future applications of this tracer technology may include the analysis of location-specific wear, such as loss of material in the post or backside of a tibial insert.

  19. High-Power Diode Laser Surface Treated HVOF Coating to Combat High Energy Particle Impact Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.; Arya, Vivek; Pant, B. K.

    2013-07-01

    High-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed coatings have performed exceptionally well in low-energy particle impact wear and are accepted worldwide. However, their application for high-energy particle impact wear (HEPIW) requires a different approach and more efforts. HVOF-coating systems typically use WC-Co, WC-Co-Cr, WC-Ni-Cr, and FeCrAlY-Cr3C2 powders. WC-Co-Cr powders are preferred when there is a high demand for corrosion resistance. WC-10Co-4Cr coating powder has been selected in the current study. To improve coating properties such as microhardness, fracture toughness, and HEPIW resistance, a new approach of surface treatment with robotically controlled high-power diode laser (HPDL) is attempted. The robotically controlled HVOF-coating deposition and laser surface treatment were monitored using real-time diagnostic control. The HPDL-treated coating has been compared with "as-sprayed" HVOF coating for HEPIW resistance, fracture toughness, microhardness and microstructure. The coating characteristics and properties after laser surface treatment have improved many times compared with "as-sprayed" HVOF coating. This is due to the elimination of pores in the coating and formation of a metallurgical bond between coating and substrate. This new development opens up a possibility of using such laser treatments in specialized areas where HEPIW damages are acute. The fracture toughness and HEPIW resistance along with optical micrographs of HPDL-treated and untreated HVOF coatings are discussed and reported in this article. HEPIW resistance is observed to be proportional to the product of fracture toughness and microhardness of the HVOF coating.

  20. Increasing the wear resistance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene by adding solid lubricating fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.; Ivanova, L. R.; Suan, T. Nguen

    2014-11-14

    In order to compare effectiveness of adding solid lubricating fillers for polymeric composites based on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with graphite, molybdenum disulfide and polytetrafluoroethylene, their tribotechnical characteristics under dry friction, boundary lubrication and abrasive wearing were investigated. The optimal weight fractions of fillers in terms of improving wear resistance have been determined. The supramolecular structure and topography of wear track surfaces of UHMWPE-based composites with different content of fillers have been studied.

  1. High Density Infrared (HDI) Transient Liquid Coatings for Improved Wear and Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald W. Smith

    2007-07-05

    This report documents a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Materials Resources International and an industry team of participants to develop, evaluate and understand how high density infrared heating technology could be used to improve infiltrated carbide wear coatings and/or to densify sprayed coatings. The research included HDI fusion evaluations of infiltrated carbide suspensions such (BrazeCoat® S), composite suspensions with tool steel powders, thermally sprayed Ni-Cr- B-Si (self fluxing alloy) and nickel powder layers. The applied work developed practical HDI / transient liquid coating (TLC) procedures on test plates that demonstrated the ability to fuse carbide coatings for industrial applications such as agricultural blades, construction and mining vehicles. Fundamental studies helped create process models that led to improved process understanding and control. The coating of agricultural blades was demonstrated and showed the HDI process to have the ability to fuse industrial scale components. Sliding and brasive wear tests showed that high degree of wear resistance could be achieved with the addition of tool steel powders to carbide particulate composites.

  2. Highly wear-resistant and biocompatible carbon nanocomposite coatings for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Penkov, Oleksiy V; Pukha, Vladimir E; Starikova, Svetlana L; Khadem, Mahdi; Starikov, Vadym V; Maleev, Maxim V; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon coatings are increasingly used as wear-protective coatings for dental implants, artificial joints, etc. Despite their advantages, they may have several weak points such as high internal stress, poor adhesive properties or high sensitivity to ambient conditions. These weak points could be overcome in the case of a new carbon nanocomposite coating (CNC) deposited by using a C60 ion beam on a Co/Cr alloy. The structure of the coatings was investigated by Raman and XPS spectroscopy. The wear resistance was assessed by using a reciprocating tribotester under the loads up to 0.4 N in both dry and wet sliding conditions. Biocompatibility of the dental implants was tested in vivo on rabbits. Biocompatibility, bioactivity and mechanical durability of the CNC deposited on a Co/Cr alloy were investigated and compared with those of bulk Co/Cr and Ti alloys. The wear resistance of the CNC was found to be 250-650 fold higher compared to the Co/Cr and Ti alloys. Also, the CNC demonstrated much better biological properties with respect to formation of new tissues and absence of negative morphological parameters such as necrosis and demineralization. Development of the CNC is expected to aid in significant improvement of lifetime and quality of implants for dental applications. PMID:27336185

  3. Internal Diameter HVAF Spraying for Wear and Corrosion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyphout, C.; Björklund, S.

    2015-01-01

    Electrolytic hard chrome (EHC) methods are still widely utilized in the printing, automotive and off-shore industries. Alternative methods to EHC have been widely developed in the past decade by conventional HVOF processes and more recently HVAF systems, which are processing at higher kinetic energy and more particularly at lower temperature, significantly increasing wear and corrosion resistance properties. A dedicated internal diameter HVAF system is here presented, and coatings characteristics are compared to the one obtained by standard HVAF coatings. Specially R&D designed fixtures with inside bore of 200 mm have been manufactured for this purpose, with a possibility to spray samples at increasing depth up to 400 mm while simulating closed bottom bore spraying. WC-based and Cr3C2-based powder feedstock materials have been deposited onto high-strength steel substrates. Respective coating microstructures, thermally induced stresses and corrosion resistance are discussed for further optimization of coating performances. The fact that the ID-HVAF system is utilized both for spraying and gritblasting procedures is also given a particular interest.

  4. Application of surface analysis to solve problems of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented for the use of surface analytical tools including field ion microscopy, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis (AES), cylindrical mirror Auger analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Data from the field ion microscope reveal adhesive transfer (wear) at the atomic level with the formation of surface compounds not found in the bulk, and AES reveals that this transfer will occur even in the presence of surface oxides. Both AES and XPS reveal that in abrasive wear with silicon carbide and diamond contacting the transition metals, the surface and the abrasive undergo a chemical or structural change which effects wear. With silicon carbide, silicon volatilizes leaving behind a pseudo-graphitic surface and the surface of diamond is observed to graphitize.

  5. Friction and wear of alumina ceramics at high sliding speed

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.M.; Rigaut, B.; Armanet, F. Compiegne, Universite de Technologie )

    1991-07-01

    The influence of the sliding speed (from 5 m/s to 50 m/s) on friction properties of two Al2O3 steel sliding couples was studied on a pin-on-disk wear machine. For one Al2O3 pin on steel disk, a transition speed was found at about 30 m/s for both friction coefficient and wear rate of the pin. The wear rate is very small when the speed is lower than 30 m/s, and it becomes three times higher when the speed is over this value. In addition five alumina ceramics (94 percent, 95 percent, 96 percent, 99.7 percent, 99.8 percent HIP) were tested on the wear machine at 40 m/s. Four of them were also tested on an abrasion machine (pin-test) at very low speed (40 mm/s). Both experimental results show that the wear resistance of this kind of material is more closely related to fracture toughness than to hardness. 19 refs.

  6. Wear Resistance of H13 and a New Hot-Work Die Steel at High temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Wu, Xiaochun; Chen, Shihao; Li, Junwan

    2016-07-01

    The friction and wear behaviors of a new hot-work die steel, SDCM-SS, were studied at high temperature under dry air conditions. The wear mechanism and microstructural characteristics of the SDCM-SS steel were also investigated. The results showed that the SDCM-SS steel had greater wear resistance compared with H13 steel; this was owed to its high oxidizability and temper stability. These features facilitate the generation, growth, and maintenance of a tribo-oxide layer at high temperature under relatively stable conditions. The high oxidizability and thermal stability of the SDCM-SS steel originate from its particular alloy design. No chromium is added to the steel; this ensures that the material has high oxidizability, and facilitates the generation of tribo-oxides during the sliding process. Molybdenum, tungsten, and vanadium additions promote the high temper resistance and stability of the steel. Many fine Mo2C and VC carbides precipitate during the tempering of SDCM-SS steel. During sliding, these carbides can delay the recovery process and postpone martensitic softening. The high temper stability postpones the transition from mild to severe wear and ensures that conditions of mild oxidative wear are maintained. Mild oxidative wear is the dominant wear mechanism for SDCM-SS steel between 400 and 700 °C.

  7. Wear Resistance of H13 and a New Hot-Work Die Steel at High temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Wu, Xiaochun; Chen, Shihao; Li, Junwan

    2016-05-01

    The friction and wear behaviors of a new hot-work die steel, SDCM-SS, were studied at high temperature under dry air conditions. The wear mechanism and microstructural characteristics of the SDCM-SS steel were also investigated. The results showed that the SDCM-SS steel had greater wear resistance compared with H13 steel; this was owed to its high oxidizability and temper stability. These features facilitate the generation, growth, and maintenance of a tribo-oxide layer at high temperature under relatively stable conditions. The high oxidizability and thermal stability of the SDCM-SS steel originate from its particular alloy design. No chromium is added to the steel; this ensures that the material has high oxidizability, and facilitates the generation of tribo-oxides during the sliding process. Molybdenum, tungsten, and vanadium additions promote the high temper resistance and stability of the steel. Many fine Mo2C and VC carbides precipitate during the tempering of SDCM-SS steel. During sliding, these carbides can delay the recovery process and postpone martensitic softening. The high temper stability postpones the transition from mild to severe wear and ensures that conditions of mild oxidative wear are maintained. Mild oxidative wear is the dominant wear mechanism for SDCM-SS steel between 400 and 700 °C.

  8. Wear and Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Based Coatings Reinforced by TiC Particles for Application in Hydraulic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Linke, T. F.; Malik, K. M.

    2016-01-01

    Thermally sprayed Fe-based coatings reinforced by TiC particles are a cost-effective alternative to carbide coatings such as WC/CoCr, Cr3C2/NiCr, and hard chrome coatings. They feature a good wear resistance and—with sufficient amount of alloying elements like Cr and Ni—also a high corrosion resistance. In hydraulic systems, the piston is usually coated with hard chrome coatings for protection against corrosion and wear. New water-based hydraulic fluids require an adaption of the coating system. In order to investigate the wear and corrosion resistance of Fe/TiC, a novel powder consisting of a FeCr27Ni18Mo3 matrix and 34 wt.% TiC was applied by HVOF and compared to reference samples made of WC/CoCr (HVAF) and hard chrome. Besides an in-depth coating characterization (metallographic analyses, electron microprobe analyzer-EMPA), wear resistance was tested under reverse sliding in a water-based hydraulic fluid. The novel Fe/TiC coatings showed good wear protection properties, which are comparable to conventional coatings like WC/CoCr (HVAF) and electroplated hard chrome coatings. Corrosion resistance was determined by polarization in application-oriented electrolytes (hydraulic fluid at 60 °C, artificial sea water at RT). The corrosion resistance of the investigated iron-based coatings at 60 °C was superior to the references coatings for both hydraulic fluids. Selected coatings were tested in an application-oriented hydraulic test bench with HFC hydraulic fluid (water polymer solutions) showing comparably good wear and corrosion resistance as the hard chrome-coated reference.

  9. Friction and wear of carbon-graphite materials for high energy brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Caliper-type brakes simulation experiments were conducted on seven different carbon-graphite material formulations against a steel disk material and against a carbon-graphite disk material. The effects of binder level, boron carbide (B4C) additions, graphite fiber additions, and graphite cloth reinforcement on friction and wear behavior were investigated. Reductions in binder level and additions of B4C each resulted in increased wear. The wear rate was not affected by the addition of graphite fibers. Transition to severe wear and high friction was observed in the case of graphite-cloth-reinforced carbon sliding against a disk of similar composition. This transition was related to the disruption of a continuous graphite shear film that must form on the sliding surfaces if low wear is to occur. The exposure of the fiber structure of the cloth constituent is believed to play a role in the shear film disruption.

  10. Friction and wear of carbon-graphite materials for high-energy brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Caliper type brake simulation experiments were conducted on seven different carbon graphite materials formulations against a steel disk material and against a carbon graphite disk material. The effects of binder level, boron carbide (B4C) additions, SiC additions, graphite fiber additions, and graphite cloth reinforcement on friction and wear behavior were investigated. Reductions in binder level, additions of B4C, and additions of SiC each resulted in increased wear. The wear rate was not affected by the addition of graphite fibers. Transition to severe wear and high friction was observed in the case of graphite-cloth-reinforced carbon sliding against a disk of similar composition. The transition was related to the disruption of a continuous graphite shear film that must form on the sliding surfaces if low wear is to occur.

  11. High vitamin E content, impact resistant UHMWPE blend without loss of wear resistance.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ebru; Neils, Andrew; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2015-05-01

    Antioxidant stabilization of radiation cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been introduced to improve the oxidative stability of total joint implant bearing surfaces. Blending of antioxidants (most commonly vitamin E) with UHMWPE resin powder followed by consolidation and uniform radiation cross-linking is currently available for use in both total hips and total knees. It was previously shown that the fatigue resistance of vitamin E-blended and irradiated UHMWPEs could be further improved by spatially manipulating the vitamin E concentration throughout the implant and limiting cross-linking to the surface of the implant where it is necessary for wear resistance. This was possible by designing a low concentration of vitamin E on the surface and higher concentration in the bulk of the implant because cross-linking is hindered in UHMWPE as a function of increasing vitamin E concentration. In this study, we hypothesized that such a surface cross-linked UHMWPE with low wear rate and high fatigue strength could be obtained by limiting the penetration of radiation into UHMWPE with uniform vitamin E concentration. Our hypothesis tested positive; we were able to obtain control of the surface cross-linked region by manipulating the energy of the irradiation, resulting in extremely low wear, and high impact strength. In addition, we discussed alternatives of improving the oxidation resistance of such a material by using additional vitamin E reservoirs. These results are significant because this material may allow increased use of antioxidant-stabilized, cross-linked UHMWPEs in high stress applications and in more active patients. PMID:25115567

  12. Volatility and Wear Characteristics of a Variety of Liquid Lubricants for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The vapor pressures and wear characteristics are critical properties for liquid lubricants to assure long-term reliability and performance in space applications. Vapor pressures, obtained using a Knudsen cell technique, and wear properties, obtained using a vacuum four-ball apparatus, were measured for a series of unformulated liquid lubricants. These included two multiply alkylated cyclopentanes (MACs) (X-1000 and X2000), two linear perfluoropolyalkylethers (PFPAEs) (Z-25 and 815Z), and four silahydrocarbons (a tri, a tetra, and two pentas). Vapor pressures were measured at three elevated temperatures (423, 448, and 498 K) and extrapolated to room temperature 298 K. The lowest 298 K vapor pressure of 5.7 x 10(exp -14) Pa was obtained with the PFPAE fluid (815Z) and the highest value with the low molecular weight MAC (X-1000) at 3.6 x 10(exp -7) Pa. In addition, vacuum wear rates were determined for some of the lubricants. The lowest wear rates (approximately 3 x 10(exp -11) cubic mm/mm) were observed for three of the silahydrocarbons while the highest wear rates (approximately 2 x 10(exp -9) cubic mm/mm) were observed with the two PFPAE fluids (Z-25 and 815Z). The MAC (X-2000) yielded a wear rate of about 10(exp -10) cubic mm/mm. The results indicated that the silahydrocarbon class of liquid lubricants offers the better potential for space applications.

  13. Approach to in-process tool wear monitoring in drilling: Application of Kalman filter theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ning; Zhang, Youzhen; Pan, Liangxian

    1993-05-01

    The two parameters often used in adaptive control, tool wear and wear rate, are the important factors affecting machinability. In this paper, it is attempted to use the modern cybernetics to solve the in-process tool wear monitoring problem by applying the Kalman filter theory to monitor drill wear quantitatively. Based on the experimental results, a dynamic model, a measuring model and a measurement conversion model suitable for Kalman filter are established. It is proved that the monitoring system possesses complete observability but does not possess complete controllability. A discriminant for selecting the characteristic parameters is put forward. The thrust force Fz is selected as the characteristic parameter in monitoring the tool wear by this discriminant. The in-process Kalman filter drill wear monitoring system composed of force sensor microphotography and microcomputer is well established. The results obtained by the Kalman filter, the common indirect measuring method and the real drill wear measured by the aid of microphotography are compared. The result shows that the Kalman filter has high precision of measurement and the real time requirement can be satisfied.

  14. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    PubMed

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Ra<10nm). Such surface modification took place without any catastrophic features as cracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system. PMID:26024650

  15. Investigation of Wear and Corrosion of a High-Carbon Stellite Alloy for Hip Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, P. S.; Liu, R.; Liu, J.; McRae, G.

    2014-04-01

    Low-carbon Stellite 21 has been used as hip implant material for a number of decades; however, its limited metal-on-metal bearing has resulted in loosening between the femoral head and the acetabular cup of hip implants. In order to improve the metal-on-metal bearing, it is proposed that a high-carbon alloy, Stellite 720, surface coating be applied on Stellite 21 hip implants to improve mechanical and tribological performance. For this coating to be practical, it must also meet the requirements of corrosion resistance for orthopedic implant materials. In this research, Stellite 720 is investigated with pin-on-disk wear tests, and electrochemical and immersion corrosion tests in simulated human body fluid (Hank's solution; pH 7.4 at temperature of 37°C). The experimental results demonstrate that Stellite 720 exhibits much better wear resistance than Stellite 21, and has the potential for better corrosion resistance as well. The applicability of coating Stellite 21 hip implants with Stellite 720 is discussed.

  16. A thermal, thermoelastic, and wear simulation of a high-energy sliding contact problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E., Jr.; Ling, F. F.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the sliding contact problem encountered in high-energy disk brakes. The analysis includes a simulation modeling, using the finite element method, of the thermoelastic instabilities that cause transient changes in contact to occur on the friction surface. In order to include the effect of wear of the concentrated contacts on the friction surface, a wear criterion is proposed that results in prediction of wear rates for disk brakes that are quite close to experimentally determined wear rates. The thermal analysis shows that the transient temperature distribution in a disk brake can be determined more accurately by use of this thermomechanical analysis than by a more conventional analysis that assumes constant contact conditions. It is also shown that lower, more desirable, temperatures in disk brakes can be attained by increasing the volume, the thermal conductivity, and especially, the heat capacity of the brake components.

  17. A thermal, thermoelastic, and wear analysis of high-energy disk brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E., Jr.; Wu, J. J.; Ling, F. F.

    1974-01-01

    A thermomechanical investigation of the sliding contact problem encountered in high-energy disk brakes is described. The analysis includes a modelling, using the finite element method of the thermoelastic instabilities that cause transient changes in contact area to occur on the friction surface. In order to include the effect of wear at the contact surface, a wear criterion is proposed that results in the prediction of wear rates for disk brakes that are quite close to experimentally determined wear rates. The thermal analysis shows that the transient temperature distribution in a disk brake assembly can be determined more accurately by use of this thermomechanical analysis than by a more conventional analysis that assumes constant contact conditions. It also shows that lower, more desirable, temperatures in disk brakes can be attained by increasing the volume, the thermal conductivity, and, especially, the heat capacity of the brake components.

  18. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications. [coated with titanium carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Haenni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, M.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings for hostile environments were developed. They consist of normal ball bearing steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear-resistant, chemical vapor deposited (C.V.D) TiC. Experiments in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, have shown that such bearings are suitable for space applications.

  19. Microstructures and Hardness/Wear Performance of High-Carbon Stellite Alloys Containing Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Yao, J. H.; Zhang, Q. L.; Yao, M. X.; Collier, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Conventional high-carbon Stellite alloys contain a certain amount of tungsten which mainly serves to provide strengthening to the solid solution matrix. These alloys are designed for combating severe wear. High-carbon molybdenum-containing Stellite alloys are newly developed 700 series of Stellite family, with molybdenum replacing tungsten, which are particularly employed in severe wear condition with corrosion also involved. Three high-carbon Stellite alloys, designated as Stellite 706, Stellite 712, and Stellite 720, with different carbon and molybdenum contents, are studied experimentally in this research, focusing on microstructure and phases, hardness, and wear resistance, using SEM/EDX/XRD techniques, a Rockwell hardness tester, and a pin-on-disk tribometer. It is found that both carbon and molybdenum contents influence the microstructures of these alloys significantly. The former determines the volume fraction of carbides in the alloys, and the latter governs the amount of molybdenum-rich carbides precipitated in the alloys. The hardness and wear resistance of these alloys are increased with the carbide volume fraction. However, with the same or similar carbon content, high-carbon CoCrMo Stellite alloys exhibit worse wear resistance than high-carbon CoCrW Stellite alloys.

  20. Lightweight materials for automotive applications/topic 2: Wear resistant aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.

    1997-01-31

    The replacement of cast iron by aluminum alloys in automotive engine blocks and heads represents a significant weight reduction in automobiles. The primary hurdle to the widespread use of aluminum alloy engine blocks in the North American automobile industry was high cost. The lack of wear resistance in most aluminum alloys added to manufacturing cost, since expensive procedures such as the incorporation of cast iron liners or special coatings were needed to achieve the required wear properties. The project targeted the development of a wear resistant aluminum alloy, as well as tools and the knowledge-base required to design the casting process, to allow it to be cast economically into engine blocks without the use of a cast iron liner or special coating, thereby providing benefits to both the material and manufacturing aspects of the process. The project combined the alloy development, wear and microstructural characterization, and casting modeling capabilities of the laboratory with the partners extensive alloy and casting process development and manufacturing experience to develop a suitable wear resistant aluminum alloy and casting process.

  1. Optical diagnostic techniques in tribological analysis: Applications to wear film characterization, solid lubricant chemical transition, and electrical sliding contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windom, Bret C.

    Friction and wear have undisputedly huge macroscopic effects on the cost and lifetime of many mechanical systems. The cost to replace parts and the cost to overcome the energy losses associated with friction, although small in nature, can be enormous over long operating times. The understanding of wear and friction begins with the understanding of the physics and chemistry between the reacting surfaces on a microscopic level. Light as a diagnostic tool is a good candidate to perform the very sensitive microscopic measurements needed to help understand the fundamental science occurring in friction/wear systems. Light's small length scales provide the capabilities to characterize very local surface phenomena, including thin transfer films and surface chemical transitions. Light-based diagnostic techniques provide nearly instantaneous results, enabling one to make in situ/real time measurements which could be used to track wear events and associated chemical kinetics. In the present study, two optical diagnostic techniques were investigated for the analysis of tribological systems. The first technique employed was Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was investigated as a possible means for in situ measurement of thin transfer films in order to track the wear kinetics and structural transitions of bulk polymers. A micro-Raman system was designed, built, and characterized to track fresh wear films created from a pin-on-disk tribometer. The system proved capable of characterizing and tracking wear film thicknesses of ˜2 mum and greater. In addition, the system provided results indicating structural changes in the wear film as compared to the bulk when sliding speeds were increased. The spectral changes due to the altering of molecular vibrations can be attributed to the increase in temperature during high sliding speeds. Raman spectroscopy was also used to characterize the oxidation of molybdenum disulphide, a solid lubricant used in many applications, including high

  2. A surface crosslinked UHMWPE stabilized by vitamin E with low wear and high fatigue strength.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ebru; Ghali, Bassem W; Rowell, Shannon L; Micheli, Brad R; Lozynsky, Andrew J; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2010-09-01

    Wear particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis has been a clinical problem driving the development of wear resistant ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) for total joint replacement. Radiation crosslinking has been used to decrease wear through decreased plastic deformation; but crosslinking also reduces mechanical properties including fatigue resistance, a major factor limiting the longevity of joint implants. Reducing UHMWPE wear with minimal detriment to mechanical properties is an unaddressed need for articular bearing surface development. Here we report a novel approach to achieve this by limiting crosslinking to the articular surface. The antioxidant vitamin E reduces crosslinking efficiency in UHMWPE during irradiation with increasing concentration, thus we propose to spatially control the crosslink density distribution by controlling the vitamin E concentration profile. Surface crosslinking UHMWPE prepared using this approach had high wear resistance and decreased crosslinking in the bulk resulting in high fatigue crack propagation resistance. The interface region did not represent a weakness in the material due to the gradual change in the crosslink density. Such an implant has the potential of decreasing risk of fatigue fracture of total joint implants as well as expanding the use of UHMWPE to younger and more active patients. PMID:20579730

  3. Development of the High Temperature Fretting Wear Simulator for Steam Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choon Yeol; Kim, Joong Ho; Bae, Joon Woo; Chai, Young Suck

    In nuclear power plant, fretting wear due to a combination of impact and sliding motions of the U-tubes against the supports and/or foreign objects caused by flow induced vibration, can make a serious problem in steam generator. A test rig, fretting wear simulator, is developed to elucidate fretting wear mechanism qualitatively and quantitatively. The realistic condition of steam generator of high temperature up to 320°C, high pressure up to 15 MPa, and water environment could be achieved by a test rig. The fretting wear simulator consists of main frame, water loop system, and control unit. Actual contact region under a realistic condition of steam generator was isolated using autoclave. Effects of various parameters such as the amounts of impact and sliding motions, applied loads and initial gaps and so forth are considered in this research. After the experiment, wear damage was measured by a three-dimensional profiler and the surface was also studied by SEM microscopically. Initial results were also presented.

  4. Comprehensive study of the abrasive wear and slurry erosion behavior of an expanded system of high chromium cast iron and microstructural modification for enhanced wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Reinaldo Javier

    High chromium cast irons (HCCIs) have been demonstrated to be an effective material for a wide range of applications in aggressive environments, where resistances to abrasion, erosion and erosion-corrosion are required. For instance, machinery and facilities used in mining and extraction in Alberta's oil sands suffer from erosion and erosion-corrosion caused by silica-containing slurries, which create challenges for the reliability and maintenance of slurry pumping systems as well as other processing and handling equipment. Considerable efforts have been made to determine and understand the relationship between microstructural features of the HCCIs and their wear performance, in order to guide the material selection and development for specific service conditions with optimal performance. The focus was previously put on a narrow group of compositions dictated by ASTM A532. However, with recent advances in casting technology, the HCCI compositional range can be significantly expanded, which potentially brings new alloys that can be superior to those which are currently employed. This work consists of three main aspects of study. The first one is the investigation of an expanded system of white irons with their composition ranging from 1 to 6 wt.% C and 5 to 45 wt.% Cr, covering 53 alloys. This work has generated wear and corrosion maps and established correlation between the performance and microstructural features for the alloys. The work was conducted in collaboration with the Materials Development Center of Weir Minerals in Australia, and the results have been collected in a database that is used by the company to guide materials selection for slurry pump components in Alberta oil sands and in other mining operations throughout the world. The second part consists of three case studies on effects of high chromium and high carbon, respectively, on the performance of the HCCIs. The third aspect is the development of an approach to enhance the wear resistance of

  5. High-temperature, high-wear-resistant solid lubricants. April 1983-April 1990 (A Bibliography from FLUIDEX data base). Report for April 1983-April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning solid lubricants for high wear and high temperature resistant applications. Emphasis is on molybdenum disulfide; however, gold-molybdenum alloys and polysiloxanes are also discussed. Methods for depositing thin film solid lubricants, including sputtering and electrodeposition, are presented. The corrosion properties of the solid lubricant-metal interface are also included. (This updated bibliography contains 146 citations, 22 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  6. Wear and friction properties of experimental Ti-Si-Zr alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Serhii; Datskevich, Oleg; Kulak, Leonid; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2014-11-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their higher biocompatibility in comparison to other metallic biomaterials. However, they commonly contain aluminum and vanadium, whose ions may be detrimental to the nervous system. Furthermore, they suffer from poor wear resistance, which limits their applications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tribological performance of experimental Ti-1.25Si-5Zr, Ti-2.5Si-5Zr, Ti-6Si-5Zr and Ti-2.5Si-5Zr-0.2Pd alloys as compared to that of control Ti-6Al-4V, CoCr F75 and CoCr F799 alloys. Friction and wear tests were performed using a standard ball-on-disc rig in serum solution at ambient temperature with Si3N4-balls as counterparts. The alloys microstructure and hardness were investigated using optical microscopy, XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Vickers indentation. The coefficients of friction of the experimental Ti-Si-Zr alloys were generally lower than the commercial ones with Ti-6Si-5Zr presenting the lowest value (approx. 0.1). Their wear rates were found to be 2-7 times lower than that of the commercial Ti-6Al-4V alloy, but still higher than those of the CoCr alloys. SEM analysis of worn surfaces showed that abrasion was the predominant wear mechanism for all studied materials. Wear and friction were influenced by the formation and stability of transfer layers, and while commercial Ti-6Al-4V as well as the experimental Ti-Si-Zr alloys demonstrated extensive material transfer to the ceramic counterparts, the CoCr alloys did not show such material transfer. PMID:25105238

  7. Sliding wear, toughness and microstructural relationships in high strength Fe/Cr/C experimental steels

    SciTech Connect

    Salesky, W.J.

    1980-06-01

    Hardness has been believed to be the major parameter influencing wear resistance of materials. Recently, it was suggested that combinations of high strength and toughness may lead to optimum wear resistance. It is known that the martensite transformation can be exploited to provide a variety of strength-toughness combinations. Small additions of Mn or Ni to the Fe/4Cr/.3C martensitic alloys have been shown to increase toughness while maintaining strength via increasing the volume fraction of retained austenite. An investigation of the relationships between microstructure, toughness, and sliding wear resistance for these experimental alloys is reported. Comparative studies were performed on several industrial alloys to provide a practical basis for comparison of these medium carbon experimental steels.

  8. Characterization of High-Temperature Abrasive Wear of Cold-Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Compound Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Wang, Hong-Tao; Yang, Guan-Jun; Bao, Chong-Gao

    2011-01-01

    FeAl intermetallic compound coating was prepared by cold spraying using a mechanically alloyed Fe(Al) alloy powder followed by post-spray annealing at 950 °C. The high-temperature abrasive wear test was carried out for the FeAl coating at a temperature range from room temperature to 800 °C. The high-temperature abrasive wear of a heat-resistant stainless steel 2520 was performed for comparison. It was observed that the abrasive wear weight loss of FeAl coating was proportional to wear cycles in terms of sample revolutions at the tested temperatures. It was found that with the increase of the test temperature higher than 400 °C, the wear rate of cold-sprayed FeAl coating decreased with the increase of test temperature, while the wear rate of the heat-resistant steel increased significantly. The results indicate that the high-temperature abrasive wear resistance of the cold-sprayed FeAl intermetallic coating increased with the increase of the wear temperature in a temperature range from 400 to 800 °C. The wear resistance of cold-sprayed FeAl coating was higher than that of heat-resistant 2520 stainless steel under 800 °C by a factor of 3.

  9. Ultra-high wear resistance of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film: Correlation with microstructure and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, R.; Kumar, N.; Lin, I.-Nan

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured diamond films are having numerous unique properties including superior tribological behavior which is promising for enhancing energy efficiency and life time of the sliding devices. High wear resistance is the principal criterion for the smooth functioning of any sliding device. Such properties are achievable by tailoring the grain size and grain boundary volume fraction in nanodiamond film. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film was attainable using optimized gas plasma condition in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) system. Crystalline phase of ultra-nanodiamond grains with matrix phase of amorphous carbon and short range ordered graphite are encapsulated in nanowire shaped morphology. Film showed ultra-high wear resistance and frictional stability in micro-tribological contact conditions. The negligible wear of film at the beginning of the tribological contact was later transformed into the wearless regime for prolonged sliding cycles. Both surface roughness and high contact stress were the main reasons of wear at the beginning of sliding cycles. However, the interface gets smoothened due to continuous sliding, finally leaded to the wearless regime.

  10. Extended release of high molecular weight hydroxypropyl methylcellulose from molecularly imprinted, extended wear silicone hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    White, Charles J; McBride, Matthew K; Pate, Kayla M; Tieppo, Arianna; Byrne, Mark E

    2011-08-01

    Symptoms of contact lenses induced dry eye (CLIDE) are typically treated through application of macromolecular re-wetting agents via eye drops. Therapeutic soft contact lenses can be formulated to alleviate CLIDE symptoms by slowly releasing comfort agent from the lens. In this paper, we present an extended wear silicone hydrogel contact lens with extended, controllable release of 120 kDa hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) using a molecular imprinting strategy. A commercial silicone hydrogel lens was tailored to release approximately 1000 μg of HPMC over a period of up to 60 days in a constant manner at a rate of 16 μg/day under physiological flowrates, releasing over the entire range of continuous wear. Release rates could be significantly varied by the imprinting effect and functional monomer to template ratio (M/T) with M/T values 0, 0.2, 2.8, 3.4 corresponding to HPMC release durations of 10, 13, 23, and 53 days, respectively. Lenses had high optical quality and adequate mechanical properties for contact lens use. This work highlights the potential of imprinting in the design and engineering of silicone hydrogel lenses to release macromolecules for the duration of wear, which may lead to decreased CLIDE symptoms and more comfortable contact lenses. PMID:21601274

  11. Volatility and Wear Characteristics of a Variety of Liquid Lubricants for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quynhgiao N.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The vapor pressures and near characteristics are critical properties for liquid lubricants to assure long-term reliability and performance in space applications. Vapor pressures, obtained using a Knudsen cell technique, and near properties, obtained using a vacuum four-ball apparatus, were measured for a series of unformulated liquid lubricants. These include: two multiple alkylated cyclopentanes (MACs) (X-1000 and X-2000), two linear perfluoropolyalkylethers (PFPAEs) (Z-25 and 815Z), and four silahydrocarbons (a tri-, a tetra-, and two pentas). Vapor pressures were measured at three elevated temperatures (423, 448, and 498 K) and extrapolated to room temperature 298 K. The lowest 298 K vapor pressure of 5.7 x 10(exp -14) Pa, was obtained with the PFPAE fluid (815Z) and the highest value with the low molecular weight MAC (X-1000) at 3.6 x 10(exp -7) Pa. In addition, vacuum near rates were determined for some of the lubricants. The lowest wear rates (approximately 3 x 10(exp -11) cubic mm/mm) were observed for three of the silahydrocarbons while the highest wear rate (approximately 2 x 10(exp-9) cubic mm/mm) were observed with the two PFPAE fluids (Z-25 and 815Z). The MAC (X-2000) yielded a wear rate of about 10(exp -10) cubic mm/mm. The results indicated that the silahydrocarbon class of liquid lubricants offers the better potential for space applications.

  12. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviours of Valve Seat Inserts Produced from High Chromium White Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyon, Ali; Özyürek, Dursun; Günay, Mustafa; Aztekin, Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In this present study, wear behaviours of high chromium white iron valve seat inserts and tappets used in the automotive sector were investigated. Wear behaviours of three different rates of high chromium white cast irons (containing 10, 12 and 14% chromium) were examined under heavy service conditions. For that purpose, the produced valve seat inserts were characterized through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hardness measurements. They were tested at a sliding speed of 1 ms-1, under 120 N load and for six different sliding distances (500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000 m) by using a standard wear apparatus (pin-on-disk type). The result showed that as the amount of Cr increased in the alloys, their hardness decreased. The decrease in the hardness were considered to be as the result of transformation of M7C3 carbides into M23C6 carbides in the structure. This decrease in hardness with increasing chromium content also increased the weight loss. Thus, it was determined that the white iron with 14% Cr (which had a greater amount of M23C6 carbides) was subjected to the highest wear.

  13. Development of high gradient magnetic separation system for removing the metallic wear debris to be present in highly viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2010-11-01

    In the industrial plants processing highly viscous fluid such as foods or industrial materials, there is an issue of contamination by metallic wear debris originating from pipe of manufacturing line. It is necessary to remove the metallic wear debris in highly viscous fluid, since these debris causes quality loss. In this study, we developed a high gradient magnetic separation system by using superconducting magnet to remove the metallic wear debris. The particle trajectory simulation and the magnetic separation experiment were conducted with polyvinyl alcohol as a model material. As a result, ca. 100% and 92.2% of the separation efficiency was achieved respectively for the highly viscous fluid of 1 Pa s and 6 Pa s in viscosity, with 14 and 30 mesh magnetic filters.

  14. Cyclostationarity approach for monitoring chatter and tool wear in high speed milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamraoui, M.; Thomas, M.; El Badaoui, M.

    2014-02-01

    Detection of chatter and tool wear is crucial in the machining process and their monitoring is a key issue, for: (1) insuring better surface quality, (2) increasing productivity and (3) protecting both machines and safe workpiece. This paper presents an investigation of chatter and tool wear using the cyclostationary method to process the vibrations signals acquired from high speed milling. Experimental cutting tests were achieved on slot milling operation of aluminum alloy. The experimental set-up is designed for acquisition of accelerometer signals and encoding information picked up from an encoder. The encoder signal is used for re-sampling accelerometers signals in angular domain using a specific algorithm that was developed in LASPI laboratory. The use of cyclostationary on accelerometer signals has been applied for monitoring chatter and tool wear in high speed milling. The cyclostationarity appears on average properties (first order) of signals, on the energetic properties (second order) and it generates spectral lines at cyclic frequencies in spectral correlation. Angular power and kurtosis are used to analyze chatter phenomena. The formation of chatter is characterized by unstable, chaotic motion of the tool and strong anomalous fluctuations of cutting forces. Results show that stable machining generates only very few cyclostationary components of second order while chatter is strongly correlated to cyclostationary components of second order. By machining in the unstable region, chatter results in flat angular kurtosis and flat angular power, such as a pseudo (white) random signal with flat spectrum. Results reveal that spectral correlation and Wigner Ville spectrum or integrated Wigner Ville issued from second-order cyclostationary are an efficient parameter for the early diagnosis of faults in high speed machining, such as chatter, tool wear and bearings, compared to traditional stationary methods. Wigner Ville representation of the residual signal shows

  15. Investigations of High Temperature Wear Mechanisms for Tool Steel Under Open-Sliding Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnif, R.; Baccouch, Z.; Elleuch, R.; Richard, C.

    2014-08-01

    During hot working processes, working tools are subjected to severe conditions. Wear is one of the major life limiting factors of the hot working tools. The identification and understanding of the wear mechanism are extremely important for solving problems related to the hot working process. The ultimate aim of this paper is to assess some wear mechanisms of the tool steel used in hot drawing. The tribological tests were performed on high temperature pin-on-disc tribometer with an open-sliding contact for a simulation of hot-drawing process with a refreshed contact surface. The pin material was X40 CrMoV5 steel and the disc material was Fe 360B steel. Experiments were carried out for different disc temperatures ranging from room temperature to 800°C, a constant sliding speed of 50 rev/min and a constant normal load of 70 N. The evolution surface damage and oxides tribolayers have been investigated by SEM and EDS. The results have shown that an increase in test temperature facilitates the generation of oxide and assists in the compaction of the debris, thus producing a wear protective layer, and therefore, a reduction in friction coefficient.

  16. High pressure slurry pump. Sand slurry test loop design and results. Wear parts lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fongaro, S.; Severini, P.; Vinciguerra, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper shows the experimental phase, following previous work presented at the Sixth International Conference on ``Multiphase Flow in Industrial Plants'', Milan, September 98. A Sand Water Slurry Test Loop has been tested using different sand percentages for a total power of 680 HP with a flow-rate of 35,000 [gpm] and pressure of 2300 [psig]. Its design considered, carefully, the particles build-up effect respecting flow velocity and dead space along the loop and into the hydraulics. The test pump is a TRIPLEX SINGLE ACTING that is one third of the COAL SLURRY SEPTUPLEX PUMP designed for a CHINA PROJECT. Wear rate on the main parts of an high pressure slurry pump have been analyzed running at 145 rpm (piston mean speed of 3.3 [ft/s]) with a net flow of 33,290 [gpm] and pressures between 1216 and 1575 [psig]. Tests gave indications of a damaging process on valves, piston seals and the relative weight on the overall damages. Design changes of piston-seal and its material have been done, results being a longer parts lifetime. The authors compared the results with literature on coal slurry and other sand tests. The pump speed, i.e., valve cycle, isn't the main wear factor, while the fluid speed under the valve is. Their goals are to improve the wear parts lifetime and define functions to relate the wear to operating parameters, design choice, and materials used.

  17. Retrieved Highly Crosslinked UHMWPE Acetabular Liners Have Similar Wear Damage as Conventional UHMWPE

    PubMed Central

    Schroder, David T.; Kelly, Natalie H.; Parks, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Highly crosslinked UHMWPE is associated with increased wear resistance in hip simulator and clinical studies. Laboratory and case studies, however, have described rim fracture in crosslinked acetabular liners. Controversy exists, therefore, on the relative merits of crosslinked liners over conventional liners in terms of wear performance versus resistance to fatigue cracking. Questions/purposes We asked whether crosslinked liners would show less surface damage than conventional liners but would be more susceptible to fatigue damage. Methods We examined 36 conventional UHMWPE and 39 crosslinked UHMWPE retrieved implants with similar patient demographics and identical design for evidence of wear damage, including articular surface damage, impingement, screw-hole creep, and rim cracks. Results We observed no difference in wear damage scores for the two liners. Conventional liners more frequently impinged but were more often elevated with smaller head sizes. We observed creep in approximately 70% of both types of liners. Incipient rim cracks were found in five crosslinked liners, and one liner had a rim fracture. Only one conventional liner had an incipient rim crack. Conclusions Contrary to our expectation, damage was similar between crosslinked and conventional UHMWPE liners. Moreover, the 15% occurrence (six of 39) of incipient or complete fractures in crosslinked liners as compared with a 3% occurrence (one of 36) in conventional liners may have implications for the long-term performance of crosslinked liners. Longer-term studies will be necessary to establish the fate of rim cracks and thus the overall clinical fatigue performance of crosslinked liners. PMID:20844998

  18. Wear transition of solid-solution-strengthened Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloys by interstitial oxygen for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Narita, Kengo; Cho, Ken; Liu, Huihong

    2015-11-01

    In previous studies, it has been concluded that volume losses (V loss) of the Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ) discs and balls are larger than those of the respective Ti-6Al-4V extra-low interstitial (Ti64) discs and balls, both in air and Ringer's solution. These results are related to severe subsurface deformation of TNTZ, which is caused by the lower resistance to plastic shearing of TNTZ than that of Ti64. Therefore, it is necessary to further increase the wear resistance of TNTZ to satisfy the requirements as a biomedical implant. From this viewpoint, interstitial oxygen was added to TNTZ to improve the plastic shear resistance via solid-solution strengthening. Thus, the wear behaviors of combinations comprised of a new titanium alloy, TNTZ with high oxygen content of 0.89 mass% (89O) and a conventional titanium alloy, Ti64 were investigated in air and Ringer's solution for biomedical implant applications. The worn surfaces, wear debris, and subsurface damage were analyzed using a scanning electron microscopy and an electron probe microanalysis. V loss of the 89O discs and balls are smaller than those of the respective TNTZ discs and balls in both air and Ringer's solution. It can be concluded that the solid-solution strengthening by oxygen effectively improves the wear resistance for TNTZ materials. However, the 89O disc/ball combination still exhibits higher V loss than the Ti64 disc/ball combination in both air and Ringer's solution. Moreover, V loss of the disc for the 89O disc/Ti64 ball combination significantly decreases in Ringer's solution compared to that in air. This decrease for the 89O disc/Ti64 ball combination in Ringer's solution can be explained by the transition in the wear mechanism from severe delamination wear to abrasive wear. PMID:26301568

  19. Does cyclic stress and accelerated ageing influence the wear behavior of highly crosslinked polyethylene?

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; De Mattia, Jonathan Salvatore; Bracco, Pierangiola; Pavoni, Eleonora; Taddei, Paola

    2016-06-01

    First-generation (irradiated and remelted or annealed) and second-generation (irradiated and vitamin E blended or doped) highly crosslinked polyethylenes were introduced in the last decade to solve the problems of wear and osteolysis. In this study, the influence of the Vitamin-E addition on crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE_VE) was evaluated by comparing the in vitro wear behavior of crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) versus Vitamin-E blended polyethylene XLPE and conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (STD_PE) acetabular cups, after accelerated ageing according to ASTM F2003-02 (70.0±0.1°C, pure oxygen at 5bar for 14 days). The test was performed using a hip joint simulator run for two millions cycles, under bovine calf serum as lubricant. Mass loss was found to decrease along the series XLPE_VE>STD_PE>XLPE, although no statistically significant differences were found between the mass losses of the three sets of cups. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate at a molecular level the morphology changes induced by wear. The spectroscopic analyses showed that the accelerated ageing determined different wear mechanisms and molecular rearrangements during testing with regards to the changes in both the chain orientation and the distribution of the all-trans sequences within the orthorhombic, amorphous and third phases. The results of the present study showed that the addition of vitamin E was not effective to improve the gravimetric wear of PE after accelerated ageing. However, from a molecular point of view, the XLPE_VE acetabular cups tested after accelerated ageing appeared definitely less damaged than the STD_PE ones and comparable to XLPE samples. PMID:26970299

  20. Wear Performance of Laser Processed Tantalum Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10−4mm3(N.m)−1, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. PMID:22058608

  1. Sliding wear behavior of tungsten carbide thermal spray coatings for replacement of chromium electroplate in aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savarimuthu, A. C.; Taber, H. F.; Megat, I.; Shadley, J. R.; Rybicki, E. F.; Cornell, W. C.; Emery, W. A.; Somerville, D. A.; Nuse, J. D.

    2001-09-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) thermal spray coatings have gained increased acceptance for commercial aircraft applications driven by the desire to replace chromium electroplate due to environmental and economic considerations. In order to confidently replace electroplated chrome with WC thermal spray coatings in aircraft applications, the coatings must demonstrate fatigue and wear characteristics as good as or better than those of electroplated chrome. Previous research in this area has shown that the fatigue life of the WC thermal spray coatings can be improved by inducing compressive residual stresses in the coating. This paper compares the wear characteristics of several types of WC thermal spray coatings with those of electroplated chrome in sliding wear tests using the “block-on-ring” procedures described in the ASTM G77 standard. Wear results are interpreted in terms of coating residual stresses and in terms of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses.

  2. Optical Emission Characterization of High-Power Hall Thruster Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    WIlliams, George J.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to correlate BN insulator erosion with high-power operation of the NASA 300M Hall-effect thruster. Actinometry leveraging excited xenon states is used to normalize the emission spectra of ground state boron as a function of thruster operating condition. Trends in the strength of the boron signal are correlated with thruster power, discharge voltage, discharge current and magnetic field strength. The boron signals are shown to trend with discharge current and show weak dependence on discharge voltage. The trends are consistent with data previously collected on the NASA 300M and NASA 457M thrusters but are different from conventional wisdom.

  3. Wear characteristics of bonded solid film lubricant under high load condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiraoka, Naofumi; Sasaki, Akira; Kawashima, Noritsugu; Honda, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Wear properties of phenolic resin bonded molybdenum disulfide film lubricant were studied. In-vacuo journal bearing tests were performed to evaluate the wear-life of this film lubricant. The wear-life depends on substrate materials and on sliding velocity. Pretreated substrate surfaces were examined to reveal the reasons for these results. Additionally, investigations on film wear mechanisms were made.

  4. Nanoscale wear and kinetic friction between atomically smooth surfaces sliding at high speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Rajauria, Sukumar Canchi, Sripathi V. Schreck, Erhard; Marchon, Bruno

    2015-02-23

    The kinetic friction and wear at high sliding speeds is investigated using the head-disk interface of hard disk drives, wherein the head and the disk are less than 10 nm apart and move at sliding speeds of 5–10 m/s relative to each other. While the spacing between the sliding surfaces is of the same order of magnitude as various AFM based fundamental studies on friction, the sliding speed is nearly six orders of magnitude larger, allowing a unique set-up for a systematic study of nanoscale wear at high sliding speeds. In a hard disk drive, the physical contact between the head and the disk leads to friction, wear, and degradation of the head overcoat material (typically diamond like carbon). In this work, strain gauge based friction measurements are performed; the friction coefficient as well as the adhering shear strength at the head-disk interface is extracted; and an experimental set-up for studying friction between high speed sliding surfaces is exemplified.

  5. Measurements of elastohydrodynamic film thickness, wear and tempering behavior of high pressure oxygen turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Merriman, T. L.; Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.; Hauser, D.; Vanecho, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The reusable design of the Space Shuttle requires a target life of 7.5 hours for the turbopumps of the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME). This large increase from the few hundred seconds required in single-use rockets has caused various problems with the bearings of the turbopumps. The berings of the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) were of particular concern because of wear, spalling, and cage failures at service time well below the required 7.5 hours. Lubrication and wear data were developed for the bearings. Since the HPOTP bearings operate in liquid oxygen, conventional liquid lubricants cannot be applied. Therefore, solid lubricant coatings and lubricant transfer from the polytetrafluorethylene (FTFE) cage were the primary lubrication approaches for the bearings. Measurements were made using liquid nitrogen in a rolling disk machine to determine whether usable elastohydrodynamic films could be generated to assist in the bearing lubrication.

  6. Once Annealed Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene Exhibits Low Wear at 9 to 15 Years.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, James; Capello, William N; Ramakrishnan, Rama

    2016-05-01

    A once annealed highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) was introduced in 1998. Concerns regarding its long-term performance and oxidative resistance exist because of the presence of retained free radicals. The authors studied 48 patients with 50 hip implants having an average age of 62 years. They were followed for 9 to 15 years. The purpose of this study was to determine linear wear rate and the incidence of osteolysis and/or mechanical failure. At an average follow-up of 12.2 years, the annual linear wear rate was 0.018 mm (SD, 0.024 mm). No mechanical failures or osteolysis have been found to date. The clinical performance of this HXLPE continues to meet expectations despite the presence of free radicals. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e565-e571.]. PMID:27088350

  7. Friction and wear properties of high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed WC-17Co coating under rotational fretting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Cai, Zhenbing; Mo, Jiliang; Peng, Jinfang; Zhu, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    Rotational fretting which exist in many engineering applications has incurred enormous economic loss. Thus, accessible methods are urgently needed to alleviate or eliminate damage by rotational fretting. Surface engineering is an effective approach that is successfully adopted to enhance the ability of components to resist the fretting damage. In this paper, using a high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed (HVOF) technique WC-17Co coating is deposited on an LZ50 steel surface to study its properties through Vickers hardness testing, scanning electric microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffractrometry (XRD). Rotational fretting wear tests are conducted under normal load varied from 10 N to 50 N, and angular displacement amplitudes vary from 0.125° to 1°. Wear scars are examined using SEM, EDX, optical microscopy (OM), and surface topography. The experimental results reveal that the WC-17Co coating adjusted the boundary between the partial slip regime (PSR) and the slip regime (SR) to the direction of smaller amplitude displacement. As a result, the coefficients of friction are consistently lower than the substrate's coefficients of friction both in the PSR and SR. The damage to the coating in the PSR is very slight. In the SR, the coating exhibits higher debris removal efficiency and load-carrying capacity. The bulge is not found for the coating due to the coating's higher hardness to restrain plastic flow. This research could provide experimental bases for promoting industrial application of WC-17Co coating in prevention of rotational fretting wear.

  8. Friction and wear properties of high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed WC-17Co coating under rotational fretting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Cai, Zhenbing; Mo, Jiliang; Peng, Jinfang; Zhu, Minhao

    2016-04-01

    Rotational fretting which exist in many engineering applications has incurred enormous economic loss. Thus, accessible methods are urgently needed to alleviate or eliminate damage by rotational fretting. Surface engineering is an effective approach that is successfully adopted to enhance the ability of components to resist the fretting damage. In this paper, using a high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed (HVOF) technique WC-17Co coating is deposited on an LZ50 steel surface to study its properties through Vickers hardness testing, scanning electric microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffractrometry (XRD). Rotational fretting wear tests are conducted under normal load varied from 10 N to 50 N, and angular displacement amplitudes vary from 0.125° to 1°. Wear scars are examined using SEM, EDX, optical microscopy (OM), and surface topography. The experimental results reveal that the WC-17Co coating adjusted the boundary between the partial slip regime (PSR) and the slip regime (SR) to the direction of smaller amplitude displacement. As a result, the coefficients of friction are consistently lower than the substrate's coefficients of friction both in the PSR and SR. The damage to the coating in the PSR is very slight. In the SR, the coating exhibits higher debris removal efficiency and load-carrying capacity. The bulge is not found for the coating due to the coating's higher hardness to restrain plastic flow. This research could provide experimental bases for promoting industrial application of WC-17Co coating in prevention of rotational fretting wear.

  9. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particle effects on bioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hsu-Wei

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles have been recognized as one of the major causes of aseptic loosening in total joint replacements. Macrophage phagocytosis of wear particles induces human biological/physiological responses which eventually lead to bone resorption and osteolysis. However, the dependence of these reactions on the size and shape of the particles has not been elucidated and is not understood. The goal of this study is to develop a technique for producing UHMWPE particles with specified sizes and shapes so as to be able to study the effects of different UHMWPE particles on bioactivity. We applied surface texturing techniques to generate UHMWPE particles and air pouch animal tests to study the biological responses induced by UHMWPE particles. The thesis describes a procedure for generating narrowly distributed UHMWPE particles with controlled size and shape through surface texturing by microfabrication. The textured surface is used to rub against the polymer pins to produce wear particles in water. The surface texture produces narrowly distributed elongated particles or equiaxed particles by design. Experimental results show that the cutting-edge length of the surface features is proportional to the particle length. A larger penetration depth, larger normal load, and smaller sliding speed lead to a smaller aspect ratio of the particle. With this technique, we have been able to generate UHMWPE wear particles with different size and shape within phagocytosable and non-phagocytosable ranges for biological response studies. A mathematical model to predict the dimensions of generated UHMWPE particles has been developed. A correlation model based on the empirical results is also presented. The models can be used to design the dimensions of the surface textures and the operating conditions of the wear tests for generation of the particle population with specified size and shape. Murine air pouch animal tests have been used to test

  10. Cryogenic Treatment of Production Components in High-Wear Rate Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, M.

    2002-04-29

    Deep Cryogenic Tempering (DCT) is a specialized process whereby the molecular structure of a material is ''re-trained'' through cooling to -300 F and then heating to +175-1100 F. Cryocon, Inc. (hereafter referred to as Cryocon) and RMOTC entered an agreement to test the process on oilfield production components, including rod pumps, rods, couplings, and tubing. Three Shannon Formation wells were selected (TD about 500 ft) based on their proclivity for high component wear rates. Phase 1 of the test involved operation for a nominal 120 calendar day period with standard, non-treated components. In Phase 2, treated components were installed and operated for another nominal 120 calendar day period. Different cryogenic treatment profiles were used for components in each well. Rod pumps (two treated and one untreated) were not changed between test phases. One well was operated in pumped-off condition, resulting in abnormal wear and disqualification from the test. Testing shows that cryogenic treatment reduced wear of rods, couplers, and pump barrels. Testing of production tubing produced mixed results.

  11. Brush Seals for Cryogenic Applications: Performance, Stage Effects, and Preliminary Wear Results in LN2 and LH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.; Perkins, H. Douglas; Hoopes, Joan F.; Williamson, G. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant contacting seals and have significantly lower leakage than labyrinth seals in gas turbine applications. Their long life and low leakage make them candidates for use in rocket engine turbopumps. Brush seals, 50.8 mm (2 in.) in diameter with a nominal 127-micron (0.005-in.) radial interference, were tested in liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) at shaft speeds up to 35,000 and 65,000 rpm, respectively, and at pressure drops up to 1.21 MPa (175 psid) per brush. A labyrinth seal was also tested in liquid nitrogen to provide a baseline. The LN2 leakage rate of a single brush seal with an initial radial shaft interference of 127 micron (0.005 in.) measured one-half to one-third the leakage rate of a 12-tooth labyrinth seal with a radial clearance of 127 micron (0.005 in.). Two brushes spaced 7.21 micron (0.248 in.) apart leaked about one-half as much as a single brush, and two brushes tightly packed together leaked about three-fourths as much as a single brush. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor with a surface finish of 0.81 micron (32 microinch) was 25 micron (0.0010 in.) after 4.3 hr of shaft rotation in liquid nitrogen. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25 to 76 micron (0.001 to 0.003 in.) under the same conditions. Wear results in liquid hydrogen were significantly different. In liquid hydrogen the rotor did not wear, but the bristle material transferred onto the rotor and the initial 127 micron (0.005 in.) radial interference was consumed. Relatively high leakage rates were measured in liquid hydrogen. More testing is required to verify the leakage performance, to validate and calibrate analysis techniques, and to determine the wear mechanisms. Performance, staging effects, and preliminary wear results are presented.

  12. A novel high-wear-resistant glass-ionomer cement for class I and class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Weng, Yiming; Xie, Dong

    2009-02-01

    This study reports the results of an evaluation on the in vitro wear of a newly developed experimental light-cured glass-ionomer cement composed of the synthesized six-arm star-shape poly(acrylic acid) and Fuji II LC glass fillers. The resin composite P-60, as well as glass-ionomer cements Fuji II and Fuji II LC, were used for comparison. All specimens were conditioned in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 d prior to testing. The experimental cement exhibited statistically the same wear-resistance to abrasion as P-60, but the wear-resistance was 14 times higher for the experimental cement than for Fuji II and Fuji II LC. Furthermore, the experimental cement showed a degree of wear-resistance to attrition that was 1.4 times higher than both Fuji II and Fuji II LC but six times lower than that of P-60. Impressively, after 1 month of aging the experimental cement was able to compete with P-60 in wear-resistance to attrition, showing a degree of wear depth that was only 1.3 times more than that of P-60. It appears that this novel cement is a clinically attractive dental restorative that can be potentially used for high-wear sites such as class I and class II restorations. PMID:19196323

  13. Wear of Spur Gears Having a Dithering Motion and Lubricated with a Perfluorinated Polyether Grease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy; Oswald, Fred; Handschuh, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Gear contact surface wear is one of the important failure modes for gear systems. Dedicated experiments are required to enable precise evaluations of gear wear for a particular application. The application of interest for this study required evaluation of wear of gears lubricated with a grade 2 perfluorinated polyether grease and having a dithering (rotation reversal) motion. Experiments were conducted using spur gears made from AISI 9310 steel. Wear was measured using a profilometer at test intervals encompassing 10,000 to 80,000 cycles of dithering motion. The test load level was 1.1 GPa maximum Hertz contact stress at the pitch-line. The trend of total wear as a function of test cycles was linear, and the wear depth rate was approximately 1.2 nm maximum wear depth per gear dithering cycle. The observed wear rate was about 600 times greater than the wear rate for the same gears operated at high speed and lubricated with oil.

  14. Voltage assisted asymmetric nanoscale wear on ultra-smooth diamond like carbon thin films at high sliding speeds

    PubMed Central

    Rajauria, Sukumar; Schreck, Erhard; Marchon, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of tribo- and electro-chemical phenomenons on the molecular level at a sliding interface is a field of growing interest. Fundamental chemical and physical insights of sliding surfaces are crucial for understanding wear at an interface, particularly for nano or micro scale devices operating at high sliding speeds. A complete investigation of the electrochemical effects on high sliding speed interfaces requires a precise monitoring of both the associated wear and surface chemical reactions at the interface. Here, we demonstrate that head-disk interface inside a commercial magnetic storage hard disk drive provides a unique system for such studies. The results obtained shows that the voltage assisted electrochemical wear lead to asymmetric wear on either side of sliding interface. PMID:27150446

  15. Friction and oxidative wear of 440C ball bearing steels under high load and extreme bulk temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, Dilip K.; Slifka, Andrew J.; Siegwarth, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Unlubricated sliding friction and wear of 440C steels in an oxygen environment have been studied under a variety of load, speed, and temperature ranging from approximately -185 to 675 deg C. A specially designed test apparatus with a ball-on-flat geometry has been used for this purpose. The observed dependencies of the initial coefficient of friction, the average dynamic coefficient of friction, and the wear rate on load, speed, and test temperatures have been examined from the standpoint of existing theories of friction and wear. High contact temperatures are generated during the sliding friction, causing rapid oxidation and localized surface melting. A combination of fatigue, delamination, and loss of hardness due to tempering of the martensitic structure is responsible for the high wear rate observed and the coefficient of friction.

  16. Voltage assisted asymmetric nanoscale wear on ultra-smooth diamond like carbon thin films at high sliding speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajauria, Sukumar; Schreck, Erhard; Marchon, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The understanding of tribo- and electro-chemical phenomenons on the molecular level at a sliding interface is a field of growing interest. Fundamental chemical and physical insights of sliding surfaces are crucial for understanding wear at an interface, particularly for nano or micro scale devices operating at high sliding speeds. A complete investigation of the electrochemical effects on high sliding speed interfaces requires a precise monitoring of both the associated wear and surface chemical reactions at the interface. Here, we demonstrate that head-disk interface inside a commercial magnetic storage hard disk drive provides a unique system for such studies. The results obtained shows that the voltage assisted electrochemical wear lead to asymmetric wear on either side of sliding interface.

  17. Voltage assisted asymmetric nanoscale wear on ultra-smooth diamond like carbon thin films at high sliding speeds.

    PubMed

    Rajauria, Sukumar; Schreck, Erhard; Marchon, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of tribo- and electro-chemical phenomenons on the molecular level at a sliding interface is a field of growing interest. Fundamental chemical and physical insights of sliding surfaces are crucial for understanding wear at an interface, particularly for nano or micro scale devices operating at high sliding speeds. A complete investigation of the electrochemical effects on high sliding speed interfaces requires a precise monitoring of both the associated wear and surface chemical reactions at the interface. Here, we demonstrate that head-disk interface inside a commercial magnetic storage hard disk drive provides a unique system for such studies. The results obtained shows that the voltage assisted electrochemical wear lead to asymmetric wear on either side of sliding interface. PMID:27150446

  18. Application of CCD measurement technique for wear on pantograph sliding plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Wang, Li; Gao, Xiaorong; Zhao, Quanke; Wang, Zeyong; Peng, Chaoyong

    2009-05-01

    Pantograph sliding plate is the most important electricity-collecting part in locomotive power supply system. Once the sliding plates are disabled, they will be severe dangerous for safety. The measurement for pantograph of 27.5KV is especially difficult. The article uses non-contact and online dynamic detection by utilizing CCD technique to solve the problem. The system will get all images of sliding plates after triggering by space arrangement of CCD cameras cooperated with flashlights. The precision of demarcate is guaranteed by special methods. It adopts directional edge search to get sliding plates, and connect the images of different CCDS. It also makes use of conditional Hough transformation to locate the wire. The wear on sliding plates will be given after complicated processing. The system is applicable to the detection for all kinds of pantographs by adding different arithmetic amends. At last the precision can achieve +/-0.5mm . At the same time a database is setup which can give the trend curve of wear, it can predict the limit time of the sliding plates.

  19. A hybrid floating brush seal (HFBS) for improved sealing and wear performance in turbomachinery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattime, Scott Byran

    A conceptually new type of seal has been developed for gas turbine applications which dramatically reduces wear and leakage associated with current labyrinth and brush seal technologies. The Hybrid Floating Brush Seal (HFBS) combines brush seal and film riding face seal technologies to create a hybrid seal that allows both axial and radial excursions of the sealed shaft, while simultaneously eliminating interface surface speeds (friction and heat) between the rotor and the brush material that characterize standard brush seal technology. A simple test rig was designed to evaluate feasibility of the HFBS under relatively low pressures and rotational speeds (50psig, 5krpm). A second test stand was created to study the effects of centrifugal force on bristle deflection. A third test facility was constructed for prototype development and extensive room temperature testing at moderate pressures and fairly high rotational speeds (100psig, 40krpm). This test rig also allowed the evaluation of the HFBS during axial movement of a rotating shaft. An analytical model to predict the effects of centrifugal force on the bristles of a rotating brush seal was developed. Room temperature analysis of the HFBS proved successful for relatively high operating rotational velocities at moderate pressures with very acceptable leakage rates for gas turbine engines. Brush seals were able to track rotor speeds up to 24krpm while maintaining sealing integrity. The HFBS's ability to function under axial shaft displacement and synchronous dynamic radial loading was also proven successful. Hydrodynamic performance of the face seal was proven to provide adequate stiffness and load carrying capacity to keep the brush seal from contacting the face seal at pressure drops across the brush of up to 100psi. Leakage performance over standard brush seal and labyrinth technology was quite dramatic. The HFBS showed its sealing advantage using much higher radial interference between the rotor and the bristle

  20. Wear of the high-density polyethylene socket in total hip arthroplasty and its role in endosteal cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, B M

    1997-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDP) has been used in clinical practice in total hip replacement since its introduction by Charnley in November 1962. Fears are being expressed that this may be the weakest link and the ultimate cause of failure of the arthroplasty. Long-term clinical experience suggests that loosening may be the primary cause while the presence of HDP wear particles is secondary. Healing of endosteal cavities can take place in the presence of HDP wear particles. PMID:9141896

  1. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of High-Cr WCI Matrix Surface Composite Reinforced with Cemented Carbide Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shuzeng; Bao, Chonggao; Zhang, Zhiyun; Bai, Yaping

    2013-07-01

    The present article reports a new superior wear resistance surface composite prepared by a vacuum evaporative pattern casting-in process. This surface composite was constructed with reinforcing cemented carbide rod (CCR) array within high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) matrix. Three reaction zones that formed around the CCRs were characterized and established the good metallurgical bonding between CCRs and matrix. In addition, some compound carbide containing Fe, Cr, W, and Co elements were formed in the reaction zones, owing to the partial dissolution of the CCRs and the resulting interdiffusion of elements such as W, Co, C, Fe, and Cr. The wear behavior of the composite was evaluated and compared with unreinforced high-Cr WCI by means of a three-body abrasive wear tester. The results showed that the wear resistance of the composite was significantly higher than that of the unreinforced high-Cr WCI. The exciting wear resistance can be ascribed to protective effect introduced by the CCRs during wear process and the good metallurgical bonding between CCRs and matrix.

  2. Effects of Alloying Elements on Microstructure, Hardness, Wear Resistance, and Surface Roughness of Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Sung, Hyo Kyung; Park, Joon Wook; Lee, Sunghak

    2009-11-01

    A study was made of the effects of carbon, tungsten, molybdenum, and vanadium on the wear resistance and surface roughness of five high-speed steel (HSS) rolls manufactured by the centrifugal casting method. High-temperature wear tests were conducted on these rolls to experimentally simulate the wear process during hot rolling. The HSS rolls contained a large amount (up to 25 vol pct) of carbides, such as MC, M2C, and M7C3 carbides formed in the tempered martensite matrix. The matrix consisted mainly of tempered lath martensite when the carbon content in the matrix was small, and contained a considerable amount of tempered plate martensite when the carbon content increased. The high-temperature wear test results indicated that the wear resistance and surface roughness of the rolls were enhanced when the amount of hard MC carbides formed inside solidification cells increased and their distribution was homogeneous. The best wear resistance and surface roughness were obtained from a roll in which a large amount of MC carbides were homogeneously distributed in the tempered lath martensite matrix. The appropriate contents of the carbon equivalent, tungsten equivalent, and vanadium were 2.0 to 2.3, 9 to 10, and 5 to 6 pct, respectively.

  3. The effect of ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification on the high-frequency fretting wear behavior of AISI304 steel.

    PubMed

    Cho, In-Shik; Lee, Chang-Soon; Amanov, Auezhan; Pyoun, Young-Shik; Park, In-Gyu

    2011-01-01

    The fact that one of fundamental characteristics of fretting is the very small sliding amplitude dictates the unique feature of wear mechanism. Ultrasonic Nanocrystalline Surface Modification (UNSM) technology was applied in order to investigate its effect on the high-frequency fretting wear behavior of AISI304 steel. Its influence on the fretting wear is also reported in this paper with these treated and untreated samples. UNSM delivers force onto the workpiece surface 20,000 times per second with 1,000 to 4,000 contact counts per square millimeter. UNSM creates homogenous nanocrystalline structures as well on the surface. UNSM process is expected to eliminate or significantly retard the formation of fretting wear. Nanocrystalline structure generation after UNSM has been reported to produce its unique structure and to offer a variety of beneficial properties compared to conventionally treated materials. A deformed layer of 220 microm exhibits high dislocation density, where top layer transformed to a nanostructure of the grain size in 23 nm and mechanical twins were observed. Deformation-induced martensite was observed to form at the intersections of mechanical twins, whose volume fraction has increased up to 38.4% and wear loss rate at 800,000 cycles has decreased by 40%. In this paper, experimental results are discussed to elucidate potential mechanism of high-frequency fretting wear. PMID:21446536

  4. Predominant factor determining wear properties of β-type and (α+β)-type titanium alloys in metal-to-metal contact for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Narita, Kengo; Cho, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The predominant factor determining the wear properties of a new titanium alloy, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ) and a conventional titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V extra-low interstitial (Ti64) was investigated for TNTZ and Ti64 combinations in metal-to-metal contacting bio-implant applications. The worn surfaces, wear debris, and subsurface damages were analyzed using a scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron-back scattered diffraction analysis. The volume loss of TNTZ is found to be larger than that of Ti64, regardless of the mating material. The wear track of TNTZ exhibits the galled regions and severe plastic deformation with large flake-like debris, indicative of delamination wear, which strongly suggests the occurrence of adhesive wear. Whereas, the wear track of Ti64 have a large number of regular grooves and microcuttings with cutting chip-like wear debris and microfragmentation of fine oxide debris, indicative of abrasive wear combined with oxidative wear. This difference in the wear type is caused by severe and mild subsurface deformations of TNTZ and Ti64, respectively. The lower resistance to plastic shearing for TNTZ compared to that of Ti64 induces delamination, resulting in a higher wear rate. PMID:25460417

  5. In vivo comparative wear study of traditional and highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manning, David W; Chiang, P P; Martell, J M; Galante, J O; Harris, W H

    2005-10-01

    In this study, we compare the in vivo wear performance of electron beam-irradiated, postirradiation-melted, highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) and traditional UHMWPE via the Martell method. Seventy hips with HXLPE performed at the Massachusetts General Hospital had 138 radiograph pairs for wear analysis and a 31.2-month average follow-up (range, 24-44 months). An age-matched, sex-matched, and body mass index-matched subgroup of 111 hips with 214 acceptable radiograph pairs and a 4-year follow-up from our previously published study on traditional polyethylene performed at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center served as a control group. Martell wear analysis was performed for each group. Overall and steady-state wear rates were compared via a specialized t test. The steady-state wear in the HXLPE arm was observed after 2.0 years, was 0.007 mm/y, and was significantly less than the steady-state wear in the traditional arm (0.174 mm/y) (P = .003). Highly cross-linked polyethylene penetration rate was not affected by sex, age, activity, or body mass index by Mann-Whitney analysis. PMID:16230239

  6. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Properties of Clean Surfaces: Adhesion, Friction, and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter presents the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of smooth, atomically clean surfaces of solid-solid couples, such as metal-ceramic couples, in a clean environment. Surface and bulk properties, which determine the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of solid-solid couples, are described. The primary emphasis is on the nature and character of the metal, especially its surface energy and ductility. Also, the mechanisms of friction and wear for clean, smooth surfaces are stated.

  7. High Wear Resistance of White Cast Iron Treated by Novel Process: Principle and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiaoshuai; Zuo, Xunwei; Liu, Yu; Chen, Nailu; Rong, Yonghua

    2015-12-01

    Based on microstructure desired, a novel process is proposed to treat Fe-2.4C-12.0Cr (mass pct) white cast iron balls, that is, destabilizing heat treatment following multicycle quenching and sub-critical treatment (De-MQ-Sct) process, and such a complex process is simply performed by alternate water quenching and air cooling. For comparison, the white cast iron balls also were treated by conventional normalization (NOR) process and Oil-quenching process, respectively. The partitioning of carbon from martensite to retained austenite during De-MQ-Sct process promotes the interaction between carbide precipitation and martensitic transformation, while this interaction is a unique effect only produced by multicycle quenching linking destabilizing and sub-critical treatments, which leads to more and finer secondary carbides and more carbon-enriched austenite in De-MQ-Sct sample than those in NOR or Oil-quenching sample. The average hardness of 60 HRC and impact toughness of 12.6 J/cm2 are obtained in De-MQ-Sct white cast iron balls, which are much higher than those in NOR and Oil-quenching ones. The wear behaviours measured by pin-on-disk wear tests indicate that the weight loss of De-MQ-Sct sample is only about one third of the NOR sample and one half of the Oil-quenching sample. Microstructural characterization reveals that high wear resistance related to hardness and toughness of the De-MQ-Sct balls are mainly attributed to the considerable fine secondary carbides and stable carbon-enriched retained austenite.

  8. Erosive Wear Behavior of High-Alloy Cast Iron and Duplex Stainless Steel under Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganandh, J.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Centrifugal pumps used in the lignite mines encounter erosive wear problems, leading to a disastrous failure of the pump casings. This paper attempts to evaluate the erosive wear resistance of Ni-Hard 4, high-chromium iron, and Cast CD4MCu duplex stainless steel (DSS), for mining conditions. The prepared test coupons were subjected to an erosion test by varying the impingement velocity and the angle of impingement, under two different pH conditions of 3 and 7, which pertained to the mining conditions. XRD analysis was carried out to confirm the phases present in the alloy. The eroded surface was subjected to SEM analysis to identify the erosion mechanisms. The surface degradation of Ni-Hard 4 and high-chromium iron came from a low-angle abrasion with a grooving and plowing mechanism at a low angle of impingement. At normal impingement, deep indentations resulted in lips and crater formations, leading to degradation of the surface in a brittle manner. A combined extrusion-forging mechanism is observed in the CD4MCu DSS surface at all the impingement angles.

  9. Lubricous Deposit Formed In Situ Between Wearing Surfaces at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Many components of future aircraft will be constructed from novel high-temperature materials, such as superalloys and ceramic composites, to meet expected operating temperatures in excess of 300 C. There are no known liquid lubricants that can lubricate above 300 C without significant decomposition. Solid lubricants could be considered, but problems caused by the higher friction coefficients and wear rates of the solid lubricant film make this an undesirable approach. An alternative method of lubrication is currently being investigated: vapor phase lubrication. In vapor phase lubrication, an organic liquid (in our studies a thioether was used) is vaporized into a flowing air stream that is directed to sliding surfaces where lubrication is needed. The organic vapor reacts at the concentrated contact sliding area generating a lubricous deposit. This deposit has been characterized as a thin polymeric film that can provide effective lubrication at temperatures greater than 400 C. Initial tribological studies were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center and Cleveland State University with a high-temperature friction and wear tribometer. A cast iron rod was loaded (a 4-kg mass was used to generate a contact pressure of 1.2 MPa) against a reciprocating, cast iron plate at 500 C. This system was then lubricated with the vapor phase of thioether.

  10. Damage tolerant functionally graded materials for advanced wear and friction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prchlik, Lubos

    The research work presented in this dissertation focused on processing effects, microstructure development, characterization and performance evaluation of composite and graded coatings used for friction and wear control. The following issues were addressed. (1) Definition of prerequisites for a successful composite and graded coating formation by means of thermal spraying. (2) Improvement of characterization methods available for homogenous thermally sprayed coating and their extension to composite and graded materials. (3) Development of novel characterization methods specifically for FGMs, with a focus on through thickness property measurement by indentation and in-situ curvature techniques. (4) Design of composite materials with improved properties compared to homogenous coatings. (5) Fabrication and performance assessment of FGM with improved wear and impact damage properties. Materials. The materials studied included several material systems relevant to low friction and contact damage tolerant applications: MO-Mo2C, WC-Co cermets as materials commonly used sliding components of industrial machinery and NiCrAlY/8%-Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia composites as a potential solution for abradable sections of gas turbines and aircraft engines. In addition, uniform coatings such as molybdenum and Ni5%Al alloy were evaluated as model system to assess the influence of microstructure variation onto the mechanical property and wear response. Methods. The contact response of the materials was investigated through several techniques. These included methods evaluating the relevant intrinsic coating properties such as elastic modulus, residual stress, fracture toughness, scratch resistance and tests measuring the abrasion and friction-sliding behavior. Dry-sand and wet two-body abrasion testing was performed in addition to traditional ball on disc sliding tests. Among all characterization techniques the spherical indentation deserved most attention and enabled to

  11. Optimizing Wear Resistance and Impact Toughness in High Chromium Iron Mo-Ni Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. K.; Verma, R. S.; Murty, G. M. D.

    2009-06-01

    An alloy with carbon and chromium in the range of 2.0 to 2.5% and 20 to 25%, respectively, with the addition of Mo and Ni in the range of 1.0 to 1.5% each when heat-treated at a quenching temperature of 1010 °C and tempering temperature of 550 °C produces a hardness in the range of 54 to 56 HRC and a microstructure that consists of discontinuous bands of high volume (35-40%) of wear resistant primary (eutectic) carbides in a tempered martensitic matrix with uniformly dispersed secondary precipitates. This alloy has been found to possess adequate impact toughness (5-6 J/cm2) with a wear resistance of the order of 3-4 times superior to Mn steel and 1.25 times superior to martensitic stainless steel with a reduction in cost-to-life ratio by a factor of 1.25 in both the cases.

  12. Development of a gear vibration indicator and its application in gear wear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chongqing; Smith, Wade A.; Randall, Robert B.; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2016-08-01

    Gear tooth wear is an inevitable phenomenon and has a significant influence on gear dynamic features. Although vibration analysis has been widely used to diagnose localised gear tooth faults, its techniques for gear wear monitoring have not been well-established. This paper aims at developing a vibration indicator to evaluate the effects of wear on gear performance. For this purpose, a gear state vector is extracted from time synchronous averaged gear signals to describe the gear state. This gear state vector consists of the sideband ratios obtained from a number of tooth meshing harmonics and their sidebands. Then, two averaged logarithmic ratios, ALR and mALR, are defined with fixed and moving references, respectively, to provide complementary information for gear wear monitoring. Since a fixed reference is utilised in the definition of ALR, it reflects the cumulated wear effects on the gear state. An increase in the ALR value indicates that the gear state deviates further from its reference condition. With the use of a moving reference, the indicator mALR shows changes in the gear state within short time intervals, making it suitable for wear process monitoring. The efficiency of these vibration indicators is demonstrated using experimental results from two sets of tests, in which the gears experienced different wear processes. In addition to gear wear monitoring, the proposed indicators can be used as general parameters to detect the occurrence of other faults, such as a tooth crack or shaft misalignment, because these faults would also change the gear vibrations.

  13. Wear Testing of Moderate Activities of Daily Living Using In Vivo Measured Knee Joint Loading

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Vot, Leo; Gibney, Christian; Nowack, Moritz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Resumption of daily living activities is a basic expectation for patients provided with total knee replacements. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the impact of different activities on the wear performance. In this study the wear performance under application of different daily activities has been analyzed. In vivo load data for walking, walking downstairs/upstairs, sitting down/standing up, and cycling (50 W & 120 W) has been standardized for wear testing. Wear testing of each activity was carried out on a knee wear simulator. Additionally, ISO walking was tested for reasons of comparison. Wear was assessed gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. In vivo walking produced the highest overall wear rates, which were determined to be three times higher than ISO walking. Moderate wear rates were determined for walking upstairs and downstairs. Low wear rates were determined for standing up/sitting down and cycling at power levels of 50 W and 120 W. The largest wear particles were observed for cycling. Walking based on in vivo data has been shown to be the most wear-relevant activity. Highly demanding activities (stair climbing) produced considerably less wear. Taking into account the expected number of loads, low-impact activities like cycling may have a greater impact on articular wear than highly demanding activities. PMID:25811996

  14. Effect of high-intensity ultrasonic treatment on microstructure, hardness and wear behaviour of the hypereutectic Mg-5Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, M. E.; Waly, M. A.; El-Sheikh, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of high-intensity ultrasonic treatment (HIUST) on microstructure, hardness and wear behavior in Mg-5wt.%Si hypereutectic alloy has been investigated. The results showed clearly that without HIUST, most of primary Mg2Si appeared as coarse dendritic morphology with average size of about 200 µm. With HIUST, the average size of primary Mg2Si decreased significantly to about 33 µm and their morphologies changed to polyhedral shape. The modification mechanism is mainly attributed conjugation of two mechanisms: cavitation-enhanced heterogeneous nucleation and cavitation-induced dendrite fragmentation. The alloy treated with HIUST has higher hardness and wear resistance than that untreated with HIUST. The wear mechanism of investigated alloys at low applied load (10 N) and low sliding speed (0.3 m/s) is a mild abrasive oxidative wear with little adhesion. However, the wear mechanism due to the applied high loads (30, 50 N) at low sliding speed (0.3 m/s) and/or to the applied high sliding speeds (0.6, 0.9 m/s) under low load (10 N), could be described as delamination mechanism. The microstructures of the specimens were analyzed by optical microscope (OM) (model OPTIKA M-790, Italy). Energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) affiliated to field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) (model Quanta FEG, The Netherlands) were performed to reveal the concentration of alloying elements in selected areas of the microstructure.

  15. Communication research between working capacity of hard- alloy cutting tools and fractal dimension of their wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, K.; Nesterenko, V.; Daneykina, N.

    2016-06-01

    The results of communication research between the wear resistance of the K applicability hard-alloy cutting tools and the fractal dimension of the wear surface, which is formed on a back side of the cutting edge when processing the materials showing high adhesive activity are presented in the paper. It has been established that the wear resistance of tested cutting tools samples increases according to a fractal dimension increase of their wear surface.

  16. Fabrication of wear-resistant silicon microprobe tips for high-speed surface roughness scanning devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Yu, Feng; Doering, Lutz; Völlmeke, Stefan; Brand, Uwe; Bakin, Andrey; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Silicon microprobe tips are fabricated and integrated with piezoresistive cantilever sensors for high-speed surface roughness scanning systems. The fabrication steps of the high-aspect-ratio silicon microprobe tips were started with photolithography and wet etching of potassium hydroxide (KOH) resulting in crystal-dependent micropyramids. Subsequently, thin conformal wear-resistant layer coating of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was demonstrated on the backside of the piezoresistive cantilever free end using atomic layer deposition (ALD) method in a binary reaction sequence with a low thermal process and precursors of trimethyl aluminum and water. The deposited Al2O3 layer had a thickness of 14 nm. The captured atomic force microscopy (AFM) image exhibits a root mean square deviation of 0.65 nm confirming the deposited Al2O3 surface quality. Furthermore, vacuum-evaporated 30-nm/200-nm-thick Au/Cr layers were patterned by lift-off and served as an etch mask for Al2O3 wet etching and in ICP cryogenic dry etching. By using SF6/O2 plasma during inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching, micropillar tips were obtained. From the preliminary friction and wear data, the developed silicon cantilever sensor has been successfully used in 100 fast measurements of 5- mm-long standard artifact surface with a speed of 15 mm/s and forces of 60-100 μN. Moreover, the results yielded by the fabricated silicon cantilever sensor are in very good agreement with those of calibrated profilometer. These tactile sensors are targeted for use in high-aspect-ratio microform metrology.

  17. The Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure and Wear Resistance of a Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minwoo; Lee, Young-Kook

    2016-04-01

    The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and wear resistance of a centrifugally cast high-speed steel roll were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and high-temperature wear tests. When the austenitizing temperature was between 1323 K and 1423 K (1050 °C and 1150 °C), coarse eutectic M2C plates were decomposed into a mixture of MC and M6C particles. However, at 1473 K (1200 °C), the M2C plates were first replaced by both new austenite grains and MC particles without M6C particles, and then remaining M2C particles were dissolved during the growth of MC particles. The wear resistance of the HSS roll was improved with increasing austenitizing temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C) because the coarse eutectic M2C plates, which are vulnerable to crack propagation, changed to disconnected hard M6C and MC particles.

  18. The Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure and Wear Resistance of a Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minwoo; Lee, Young-Kook

    2016-07-01

    The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and wear resistance of a centrifugally cast high-speed steel roll were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and high-temperature wear tests. When the austenitizing temperature was between 1323 K and 1423 K (1050 °C and 1150 °C), coarse eutectic M2C plates were decomposed into a mixture of MC and M6C particles. However, at 1473 K (1200 °C), the M2C plates were first replaced by both new austenite grains and MC particles without M6C particles, and then remaining M2C particles were dissolved during the growth of MC particles. The wear resistance of the HSS roll was improved with increasing austenitizing temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C) because the coarse eutectic M2C plates, which are vulnerable to crack propagation, changed to disconnected hard M6C and MC particles.

  19. Wear resistance of the biocompatible phospholipid polymer-grafted highly cross-linked polyethylene liner against larger femoral head.

    PubMed

    Moro, Toru; Takatori, Yoshio; Kyomoto, Masayuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Masami; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Oshima, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-07-01

    The use of larger femoral heads to prevent the dislocation of artificial hip joints has recently become more common. However, concerns about the subsequent use of thinner polyethylene liners and their effects on wear rate have arisen. Previously, we prepared and evaluated the biological and mechanical effects of a novel highly cross-linked polyethylene (CLPE) liner with a nanometer-scaled graft layer of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC). Our findings showed that the PMPC-grafted particles were biologically inert and caused no subsequent bone resorptive responses and that the PMPC-grafting markedly decreased wear in a hip joint simulator. However, the metal or ceramic femoral heads used in this previous study had a diameter of 26 mm. Here, we investigated the wear-resistance of the PMPC-grafted CLPE liner with a 40-mm femoral head during 10 × 10(6) cycles of loading in the hip joint simulator. The results provide preliminary evidence that the grafting markedly decreased gravimetric wear rate and the volume of wear particles, even when coupled with larger femoral heads. Thus, we believe the PMPC-grafting will prolong artificial hip joint longevity both by preventing aseptic loosening and by improving the stability of articular surface. PMID:25764495

  20. Design of High-speed Wear Lifetime Tester of the Instrument Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Gu, J. M.; Sun, Y.; Chen, X. Y.

    2006-10-01

    The instrument ball bearings are the key components of movable components for various kinds of measuring and control instruments; they often operate in the environmental condition of high-speed and light preload. In general, the non metal, disposable oilimpregnated retainer material has been used for these kinds of high precision miniature bearing. The engineering practice shows that the common failure mode of them is the wear which appears under the condition of insufficient lubrication condition. As the results, the vibration and noise will be enlarged, so does the frictional torque, which makes the ball bearings to lose its original working accuracy. It is the lifetime test of bearings that can enable the designers and manufacturers to chose the material of the bearing properly, optimize the product structure, mend the manufacturing technique process, and to enhance the technical level of the bearing products significantly. In this paper, the wear lifetime tester has been designed according to the requirements of the life test for the instrument ball bearings, which consists of the main body of tester, electric system, drive unit and computer measure and control system, etc. The motor spindle has been selected to drive the device which is supported by the aerostatic bearing; frequency conversion speed adjustment mode, its scope of rotating speed is between 0 and 10,000 rpm. A pair of bearings can be tested under the pure axial preload condition, the maximum load is up to 50N, the control accuracy is ±2% the scope of temperature control is up to 200°C. The variation of frictional torque on the bearing couple will be measured by an online torque transducer. The variation of power dissipation can be monitored under arbitrary speed by use of an on-line high-precision power meter. The wear and quality situation of the contact surface of the bearings will be reflected on these two parameters. Meanwhile, the values of temperature and vibration will also be monitored

  1. Improving Tribological Properties of Cast Al-Si Alloys through Application of Wear-Resistant Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culliton, David; Betts, Anthony; Carvalho, Sandra; Kennedy, David

    2013-04-01

    Flame Spray Thermal Spray coatings are low-cost, high-wear surface-treatment technologies. However, little has been reported on their potential effects on cast automotive aluminum alloys. The aim of this research was to investigate the tribological properties of as-sprayed NiCrBSi and WC/12Co Flame Spray coatings applied to two cast aluminum alloys: high-copper LM24 (AlSi8Cu3Fe), and low-copper LM25 (AlSi7Mg). Potential interactions between the mechanical properties of the substrate and the deposited coatings were deemed to be significant. Microstructural, microhardness, friction, and wear (pin-on-disk, microabrasion, Taber abrasion, etc.) results are reported, and the performance differences between coatings on the different substrates were noted. The coefficient of friction was reduced from 0.69-0.72 to 0.12-0.35. Wear (pin-on-disk) was reduced by a factor of 103-104, which was related to the high surface roughness of the coatings. Microabrasion wear was dependent on coating hardness and applied load. Taber abrasion results showed a strong dependency on the substrate, coating morphology, and homogeneity.

  2. Effect of Size Refinement and Distribution of the Lubricating Lead Phases in the Spray Forming High-Leaded Tin Bronze on Wear Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Deping; Yan, Biao; Mo, Fan

    2013-07-01

    Recently, the wear properties of high-leaded tin bronze were greatly concerned. In this work, the effect of size refinement and distribution of the lubricating lead phases in the spray forming (SF) high-leaded tin bronze on wear rates was studied by using scanning electron microscopy and sliding adhesive wear tests. It was observed that compared to the conventional casting bronze, the SF bronze features finer and more dispersed lead phases that formed more lubricating films in microstructure, which leads to the less wear rates.

  3. Definition and evaluation of testing scenarios for knee wear simulation under conditions of highly demanding daily activities.

    PubMed

    Schwiesau, Jens; Schilling, Carolin; Kaddick, Christian; Utzschneider, Sandra; Jansson, Volkmar; Fritz, Bernhard; Blömer, Wilhelm; Grupp, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    The objective of our study was the definition of testing scenarios for knee wear simulation under various highly demanding daily activities of patients after total knee arthroplasty. This was mainly based on a review of published data on knee kinematics and kinetics followed by the evaluation of the accuracy and precision of a new experimental setup. We combined tibio-femoral load and kinematic data reported in the literature to develop deep squatting loading profiles for simulator input. A servo-hydraulic knee wear simulator was customised with a capability of a maximum flexion of 120°, a tibio-femoral load of 5000N, an anterior-posterior (AP) shear force of ±1000N and an internal-external (IE) rotational torque of ±50Nm to simulate highly demanding patient activities. During the evaluation of the newly configurated simulator the ability of the test machine to apply the required load and torque profiles and the flexion kinematics in a precise manner was examined by nominal-actual profile comparisons monitored periodically during subsequent knee wear simulation. For the flexion kinematics under displacement control a delayed actuator response of approximately 0.05s was inevitable due to the inertia of masses in movement of the coupled knee wear stations 1-3 during all applied activities. The axial load and IE torque is applied in an effective manner without substantial deviations between nominal and actual load and torque profiles. During the first third of the motion cycle a marked deviation between nominal and actual AP shear load profiles has to be noticed but without any expected measurable effect on the latter wear simulation due to the fact that the load values are well within the peak magnitude of the nominal load amplitude. In conclusion the described testing method will be an important tool to have more realistic knee wear simulations based on load conditions of the knee joint during activities of daily living. PMID:22922096

  4. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  5. Effects of high heel wear and increased weight on the knee during walking.

    PubMed

    Titchenal, Matthew R; Asay, Jessica L; Favre, Julien; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Chu, Constance R

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a leading cause of disability, is more prevalent in women than men. Wearing high heeled shoes has been implicated as a potential contributing factor for the higher lifetime risk of osteoarthritis in women. This study tests the hypotheses that changes to knee kinematics and kinetics observed during high heeled walking increase in magnitude with increasing heel height and are accentuated by a 20% increase in weight. Fourteen healthy females were tested using marker-based gait analysis in combinations of footwear (flat athletic shoe, 3.8 cm and 8.3 cm heeled shoes) and weight (with and without 20% bodyweight vest). At preferred walking speed, knee flexion angle at heel-strike and midstance increased with increasing heel height and weight. Maximum knee extension moment during loading response decreased with added weight; maximum knee extension moment during terminal stance decreased with heel height; maximum adduction moments increased with heel height. Many of the changes observed with increasing heel height and weight were similar to those seen with aging and OA progression. This suggests that high heel use, especially in combination with additional weight, may contribute to increased OA risk in women. PMID:25532875

  6. Application of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) model to dithiophosphate and dithiocarbamate engine wear inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.; Jiang, S.; Cagin, T.; Yamaguchi, E.S.; Frazier, R.; Ho, A.; Tang, Y.; Goddard, W.A. III

    2000-03-23

    In previous studies of dithiophosphate [TP=S{sub 2}P(OR){sub 2}] wear inhibitors bound to an oxidized iron surface, it was found that the cohesive energy of the self-assembled monolayers (SAM) for DTP molecules with various organic R groups correlate with the wear inhibition observed in full engine experiments. In this paper the calculations are expanded to consider dynamics at 500 K and the SAM model is used to predict new candidates for wear inhibitors. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the SAM has one DTP per two surface Fe sites of iron oxide. At this coverage the cohesive energy of the SAM at 500 K is in the sequence 2-alkyl > 1-alkyl > aryl, which again correlates with wear inhibitor performance in engine wear tests. Dithiocarbamates are selected as the best candidate to supplement DTP.A number of possible alkyl substitutions for DTC were considered. The SAM model suggests that iC{sub 5} and nC{sub 3} are the best candidates, followed closely by iC{sub 3}.

  7. The Effects of Wearing High Heels while Pressing a Car Accelerator Pedal on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemin; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of wearing high heels while driving on lower extremity muscle activation. [Subjects] The subjects of this experimental study were 14 healthy women in their 20s who normally wear shoes with high heels. [Methods] The subjects were asked to place their shoes on an accelerator pedal with the heel touching the floor and then asked to press the pedal with as much pressure as possible for 3 seconds before removing their feet from the pedal. A total of 3 measurements were taken for each heel height (flat, 5 cm, 7 cm), and the heel height was randomly selected. [Results] The levels of muscle activity, indicated as the percentage of reference voluntary contraction, for gastrocnemius muscle in the flat, 5 cm, and 7 cm shoes were 180.8±61.8%, 285.4±122.3%, and 366.2±193.7%, respectively, and there were significant differences between groups. Those for the soleus muscle were 477.3±209.2%, 718.8±380.5%, and 882.4±509.9%, and there were significant differences between groups. [Conclusion] To summarize the results of this study, it was found that female drivers require greater lower extremity muscle activation when wearing high heels than when wearing low heels. Furthermore, instability and muscle fatigue of the ankle joint, which results from wearing high heels on a daily basis, could also occur while driving. PMID:25435684

  8. Applicability of Macroscopic Wear and Friction Laws on the Atomic Length Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Feldbauer, G.; Bianchi, D.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Betz, G.; Vernes, A.

    2015-07-01

    Using molecular dynamics, we simulate the abrasion process of an atomically rough Fe surface with multiple hard abrasive particles. By quantifying the nanoscopic wear depth in a time-resolved fashion, we show that Barwell's macroscopic wear law can be applied at the atomic scale. We find that in this multiasperity contact system, the Bowden-Tabor term, which describes the friction force as a function of the real nanoscopic contact area, can predict the kinetic friction even when wear is involved. From this the Derjaguin-Amontons-Coulomb friction law can be recovered, since we observe a linear dependence of the contact area on the applied load in accordance with Greenwood-Williamson contact mechanics.

  9. Effect of experimental parameters on the high-stress abrasive wear behavior of steels and a software package for its prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, R.; Roy, A.; Prasad, B.K.; Yegneswaran, A.H.

    1999-06-01

    The effect of different experimental factors on the high-stress abrasive wear properties of steels has been studied. A correlation among the factors has been established by linear regression analysis. A computer software in Microsoft Basic language utilizing linear regression analysis has been developed with the capability of predicting the wear response of steels from the experimental factors.

  10. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  11. Increased total knee arthroplasty ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear using a clinically relevant hyaluronic acid simulator lubricant.

    PubMed

    DesJardins, J; Aurora, A; Tanner, S L; Pace, T B; Acampora, K B; Laberge, M

    2006-07-01

    In this study, osteoarthritic and periprosthetic synovial fluid samples were rheologically and biochemically compared to develop a hyaluronic acid (HA) supplemented bovine serum (BS) lubricant that mimicked the properties of human joint synovial fluid. The effect of this BS + HA lubricant (50 per cent bovine calf serum + 1.5 g/l HA) on the wear rate of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) during a total knee replacement wear test was then investigated. In conjunction with biochemical similarities, the rheological analysis showed that the BS + HA lubricant viscosity was not statistically different to aspirated total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision joint fluid viscosity over a range of physiologic shear rates. Gravimetric results at 5 million wear testing cycles showed that the BS + HA lubricant produced an average of 6.88 times more UHMWPE wear than 50 per cent bovine serum lubricant alone. The BS + HA lubricated CoCr femoral component surfaces revealed pitting and surface roughening that was not observed using standard bovine serum only lubricants, but that was similar to the metallic surface corrosion observed on in vivo CoCr femoral component retrievals. These findings support the hypothesis that the addition of HA to simulator lubricant is capable of producing CoCr femoral component surface damage similar to that observed in vivo. PMID:16898218

  12. Improved resistance to wear and fatigue fracture in high pressure crystallized vitamin E-containing ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Beckos, Christine A. Godleski; Lozynsky, Andrew J.; Malhi, Arnaz S.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2013-01-01

    Higher crystallinity and extended chain morphology are induced in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in the hexagonal phase at temperatures and pressures above the triple point, resulting in improved mechanical properties. In this study, we report the effects of the presence of a plasticizing agent, namely vitamin E (α-tocopherol), in UHMWPE during high pressure crystallization. We found that this new vitamin E-blended and high pressure crystallized UHMWPE (VEHPE) has improved fatigue strength and wear resistance compared to virgin high pressure crystallized (HP) UHMWPE. This suggested different mechanisms of wear reduction and fatigue crack propagation resistance in UHMWPE. PMID:19135247

  13. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  14. Improved wear resistance of Al-15Si alloy with a high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y.; Gao, B.; Tu, G. F.; Li, S. W.; Dong, C.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2011-07-01

    A hypereutectic Al-15Si alloy (Si 15 wt.%, Al balance) was irradiated by high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB). The HCPEB treatment causes ultra-rapid heating, melting and cooling at the top surface layer. As a result, the special "halo" microstructure centering on the primary Si phase is formed on the surface due to interdiffusion of Al and Si elements. The composition of the "halo" microstructure is distributed continuously from the center to the edge of the "halo". Compared to an untreated matrix, the remelted layer underneath the surface presents single contrast because of the compositional homogeneity after HCPEB treatment. The thickness of the remelted layer increases slightly from 4.4 μm (5 pulses) to 5.6 μm (25 pulses). HCPEB treatment broadens and shifts the diffraction peaks of Al and Si. The lattice parameters of Al decreases due to the formation of a supersaturated solid solution of Al in the melted layer. Through analysis of Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the amorphous Si (a-Si) and nanocrystalline Si are formed in the near-surface region under multiple bombardments of HCPEB. The relative wear resistance of a 15-pulse sample is effectively improved by a factor of 9, which can be attributed to the formation of metastable structures.

  15. Effect of molecular weight, calcium stearate, and sterilization methods on the wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in a hip joint simulator.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H A; Shen, F W; Campbell, P; Ota, T

    1999-05-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons must currently choose from several types of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups that differ in their material properties and in the methods used for their sterilization. Information on the wear resistance of these different cups may help in the selection process. This study included two separate tests for wear run on a hip simulator to investigate the effect of molecular weight, calcium stearate, and sterilization methods on the wear resistance of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups. Test 1 revealed nearly identical wear rates for acetabular cups with molecular weights in two distinct ranges, as well as for cups with molecular weights in the same range but with or without calcium stearate added. In Test 2, cups that were sterilized in air with gamma irradiation exhibited lower rates of wear than those sterilized with ethylene oxide, presumably due to the crosslinking induced by the irradiation. In addition, cups that were irradiated while packed in a partial vacuum to minimize oxygen absorbed in the surface layer initially showed lower rates of wear than those irradiated in air, with the wear rates becoming similar as wear penetrated the more oxidized surface layer and the more crosslinked subsurface region. Because these tests were run a few months after the irradiation, the potential effects of long-term oxidation of any residual free radicals in the irradiated materials could not be taken into account. After artificial aging to accelerate oxidative degradation of the materials, the wear rates could be markedly different. Analyses performed after wear indicated that the irradiated (i.e., crosslinked) cups exhibited a smaller proportion of, as well as shorter, fibrils in the wear debris and an increased crystallinity and melting temperature and that gamma irradiation in the low-oxygen environment reduced the level of oxidation and increased the level of crosslinking in the surface region of the cups

  16. Perspectives for Wear Reduction with Ceramic Extruder Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampers, Holger

    Against the background of the very high wear of the contact material surfaces, ceramics with their outstanding wear properties are ideally suited to application in extrusion processes. Thanks to their high wear resistance, it is possible to reduce machine downtime, metal contamination of the product as well as the torque moment. The application of ceramic components requires a new mindset of the design engineers because they also have to take into account the typical disadvantages of ceramics, like pure linear material behaviour, limited breaking elongation and statistical fracture behaviour including size effect.

  17. Bench wear and single-cylinder engine evaluations of high-temperature lubricants for US Army ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Paul I.; Frame, Edwin A.; Yost, Douglas M.

    1994-09-01

    High-temperature lubricant (HTL) requirements for future U.S. Army ground vehicles were investigated. A single-cylinder diesel engine (SCE-903) was successfully modified to operate at increased cylinder liner temperatures and to serve as an evaluation tool for HTL's. Oil D, one of six lubricants evaluated, completed 200 test hours at an average cylinder wall temperature of 247 deg C and an oil sump temperature of 166 deg C with only minor oil degradation. However, improved piston cleanliness is desired. A wide range of bench scale wear techniques have been developed to highlight different lubricant performance characteristics, with particular emphasis on high-temperature operation and oxidation. Based on the bench tests, Oil D would be expected to have inadequate high-temperature, long-term wear protection. Oil D passed the Allison C-4 graphite clutch friction test.

  18. Effect of cryogenic treatment on wear resistance of Ti-6Al-4V alloy for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gu, Kaixuan; Wang, Junjie; Zhou, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    The effect of cryogenic treatment on wear resistance of Ti-6Al-4V alloy for biomedical applications was experimentally investigated in this paper. Cryogenic treatments with the same soaking time of 24h at different temperatures of -80°C, -140°C and -196°C were conducted and the treatments at the same temperature of -196°C were then further given different soaking time of 3h, 48h and 72h to be investigated. After cryogenic treatment, the Vickers hardness of specimens was measured. Wear resistance of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was measured by pin-on-disk wear test under dry sliding condition. The results demonstrated that the Vickers hardness increased slightly with the reduction of temperature while it increased obviously with the elongation of soaking time at -196°C. The friction coefficients of specimens cryo-treated at -196°C were lower than those of untreated and of cryo-treated at -80°C and -140°C. And the longer the soaking time is during the cryogenic treatment, the higher the friction coefficient reduction can be achieved. The obvious reduction of mass loss can be obtained at -196°C with 72h soaking. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to detect the microstructure and worn surface of specimens. By cryogenic treatment, the plowing in the worn surface was smoothed and shallowed, and the degree of plastic deformation in the subsurface was decreased. There was no obvious phase transformation which can be detected in the microstructure after cryogenic treatment. However, the tendency of refinement in grain size can be detected by XRD which improved the wear resistance of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. PMID:24287307

  19. Low wear partially fluorinated polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Hady, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tribological studies were conducted on five different polyimide solid bodies formulated from the diamine 2,2-bis 4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF) and the dianhydrides pyromellitic acid (PMDS) and benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDA). The following polyimides were evaluated 4-BDAF/PMDA, 4-BDAF/BTDA, 4-BDAF/80 mole percent PMDA, 20 mole percent BTDA, 4-BDAF/60 mole percent BTDA. Friction coefficients, polyimide wear rates, polyimide surface morphology and transfer films were evaluated at sliding speeds of 0.31 to 11.6 m/s and at temperatures of 25 C to 300 C. The results indicate that the tribological properties are highly dependent on the composition of the polyimide and on the experimental conditions. Two polyimides were found which produced very low wear rates but very high friction coefficients (greater than 0.85) under ambient conditions. They offer considerable potential for high traction types of application such as brakes.

  20. Influence of contact pressure, cross-shear and counterface material on the wear of PEEK and CFR-PEEK for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Brockett, C L; Carbone, S; Abdelgaied, A; Fisher, J; Jennings, L M

    2016-10-01

    Total joint replacement is a successful surgical intervention for the treatment of the degeneration of many joints, particularly the hip and knee. As the demand for joint replacement grows, and the life expectancy of the population increases, the performance requirements of these implants also changes. New materials, to improve longevity and enhance performance have been explored including PEEK and CFR-PEEK. This study investigated whether CFR-PEEK and PEEK were appropriate materials for total joint replacement by examining wear performance in simple configuration studies articulating against cobalt chrome under a range of cross-shear and contact pressure conditions. Simple geometry pin on plate studies were conducted for one million cycles for each test condition, with the contact pressure and cross-shear conditions representing a range in which the material may need to operate in-vivo. The wear factor for PEEK was significantly higher than CFR-PEEK and conventional polyethylene under all test conditions. Both PEEK and CFR-PEEK wear were influenced by contact pressure, with the highest wear factors for both materials measured at the highest pressure conditions. PEEK appeared to have a cross-shear dependent wear response, but this was not observed for the CFR-PEEK material. This study has further characterised the wear performance of two materials that are gaining interest for total joint replacement. The wear performance of the PEEK material showed poorer wear performance compared to polyethylene when articulating with a metal counterface, but the performance of the CFR-PEEK material suggested it may provide a suitable alternative to polyethylene in some applications. The wear performance of CFR-PEEK was poorer than polyethylene when it was used as the plate, when there was translation of the contact zone over the surface of the CFR-PEEK plate. This has implications for applications in low conforming contacts, such as lower conformity knee replacement. PMID

  1. Eye Wear

    MedlinePlus

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  2. Developing acceptance limits for measured bearing wear of the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genge, Gary G.

    1991-01-01

    The probabilistic design approach currently receiving attention for structural failure modes has been adapted for obtaining measured bearing wear limits in the Space Shuttle Main Engine high-pressure oxidizer turbopump. With the development of the shaft microtravel measurements to determine bearing health, an acceptance limit was neeed that protects against all known faiure modes yet is not overly conservative. This acceptance criteria limit has been successfully determined using probabilistic descriptions of preflight hardware geometry, empirical bearing wear data, mission requirements, and measurement tool precision as an input for a Monte Carlo simulation. The result of the simulation is a frequency distribution of failures as a function of preflight acceptance limits. When the distribution is converted into a reliability curve, a conscious risk management decision is made concerning the acceptance limit.

  3. An advanced AFM sensor: its profile accuracy and low probe wear property for high aspect ratio patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Baba, Shuichi; Nakata, Toshihiko; Kurenuma, Toru; Kunitomo, Yuichi; Edamura, Manabu

    2007-03-01

    Design rule shrinkage and wider adoption of new device structures such as STI, copper damascene interconnects, and deep trench structures have made the need for in-line process monitoring of step heights and profiles of device structures more urgent. To monitor active device patterns, as opposed to test patterns as in OCD, AFM is the only non-destructive 3D monitoring tool. The barriers to using AFM in-line monitoring are its slow throughput and the accuracy degradation associated with probe tip wear and spike noise caused by unwanted oscillation on the steep slopes of high-aspect-ratio patterns. Our proprietary AFM scanning method, StepIn TM mode, is the method best suited to measuring high-aspect-ratio pattern profiles. Because the probe is not dragged on the sample surface as in conventional AFM, the profile trace fidelity across steep slopes is excellent. Because the probe does not oscillate and hit the sample at a high frequency, as in AC scanning mode, this mode is free from unwanted spurious noises on steep sample slopes and incurs extremely little probe tip wear. To take full advantage of the above properties, we have developed an AFM sensor that is optimized for in-line use and produces accurate profile data at high speeds and incurs little probe tip wear. The control scheme we have developed for the AFM sensor, which we call "Advanced StepIn TM", elaborately analyses the contact force signal, enabling efficient probe tip scanning and a low and stable contact force. With a developed AFM sensor that realizes this concept, we conducted an intensive evaluation on the effect of low and stable contact force scan. Probes with HDC (high density carbon) tips were used for the evaluation. The experiment proves that low contact force enhances the measured profile fidelity by preventing probe tip slip on steep slopes. Dynamics simulation of these phenomena was also conducted, and its results agreed well with the experimental results. The low contact force scan also

  4. Processing, Characterization and Fretting Wear of Zinc Oxide and Silver Nanoparticles Reinforced Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Biopolymer Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Fahad; Kumar, Anil; Patel, Anup Kumar; Sharma, Rajeev K.; Balani, Kantesh

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the most widely used biopolymer for articulating surfaces, such as an acetabular cup liner interfacing with a metal/ceramic femoral head. However, the formation of wear debris leads to the aseptic loosening of implants. Thus, in order to improve the life span via enhancing the fretting wear resistance, UHMWPE is reinforced with ZnO/Ag nanoparticles. It is envisaged that the ZnO/Ag addition will also exhibit antibacterial properties. In the current study, the synergetic effect of the reinforcement of ZnO/Ag nanoparticles (0-3 wt.% combinations) on the fretting wear behavior of a UHMWPE matrix is assessed. The phase characterization of compression- molded UHMWPE-Ag-ZnO biopolymer nanocomposites has elicited the retention of starting phases. All samples were processed at >98% density using compression molding. Silver and ZnO reinforcement showed enhanced hardness ~20.4% for U3A and 42.0% for U3Z. Fretting wear performance was evaluated at varying loads (5-15 N), keeping in mind the weight at different joints, with constant frequency (5 Hz) as well as amplitude of oscillation (100 µm). Laser surface profilometry showed change of wear volume from 8.6 × 10-5 mm3 for neat polymer to 5.8 × 10-5 mm3 with 1 wt.% Ag + 1 wt.% ZnO reinforcement (at 15 N load). Consequently, the mechanics of resistance offered by Ag and ZnO is delineated in the UHMWPE matrix. Further, S. aureus viability reduction is ~28.7% in cases with 1 wt.% Ag addition, ~42.5% with 1 wt.% ZnO addition, but synergistically increase to ~58.6% and 47.1% when each of Ag and ZnO is added with 1 wt.% and 3 wt.%, respectively (when compared to that of the UHMWPE control sample). Increased wear resistance and superior bioactivity and enhanced anti-bacterial properties of 1 wt.% Ag + 1 wt.% ZnO and 3 wt.% Ag + 3 wt.% ZnO shows the potential use of ZnO-Ag-UHMWPE biopolymer composites as an articulating surface.

  5. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  6. Fabrication and Wear Behavior Analysis on AlCrFeNi High Entropy Alloy Coating Under Dry Sliding and Oil Lubrication Test Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yipin; Wang, Shouren; Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Yang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, AlCrFeNi high entropy alloy coating was fabricated on the surface of Q235 steel using hot pressing sintering process. The coating has the controlled thickness size and excellent mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), XRD and hardness testing method were used to study the morphology, phase structure and hardness of high entropy alloys coating. The lattice distortion plays a significant role in increasing the hardness. Coating formation mechanism caused by the element diffusion under the hot pressing effect is also discussed in the paper. Simultaneously, the dry sliding and oil lubrication wear tests, wear morphology observation and wear mechanism discussion were completed. As the result shows, AlCrFeNi high entropy alloys coating exhibits superior wear resistance either at dry sliding or oil lubrication tests owing to its hard high entropy solid solution structure.

  7. Ultralow wear of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Tan, Chee-Keong; Tansu, Nelson; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we reveal a remarkable (and surprising) physical property of GaN: it is extremely wear resistant. In fact, we measured the wear rate of GaN is approaching wear rates reported for diamond. Not only does GaN have an ultralow wear rate but also there are quite a few experimental factors that control the magnitude of its wear rate, further contributing to the rich and complex physics of wear of GaN. Here, we discovered several primary controlling factors that will affect the wear rate of III-Nitride materials: crystallographic orientation, sliding environment, and coating composition (GaN, InN and InGaN). Sliding in the ⟨ 1 2 ¯ 10 ⟩ is significantly lower wear than ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩ . Wear increases by 2 orders of magnitude with increasing humidity (from ˜0% to 50% RH). III-Nitride coatings are promising as multifunctional material systems for device design and sliding wear applications.

  8. Unveiling Ultra-High Temperature Wear and Indentation Damage Mechanisms of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumgardner, Clifton; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are necessary to protect turbine blades within jet engines from extreme environments that the substrate material may not be capable of withstanding. Therefore, failure of the coating due to wear during its operational lifecycle is a critical event. In order to understand the failure mechanisms of the coating layers, a zirconia-based coating on a nickel alloy substrate was subjected to wear testing to simulate pressure and temperature conditions within a jet engine. Using a Hertzian contact model, the maximum shear and its depth were determined and analyzed in conjunction with the coating material properties and scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry images. The coupled imaging and contact model analyses made possible the identification of the location and time of delamination and its underlying causes. Our findings provide key insights for the development of more resilient thermal barrier coatings.

  9. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.; Tylczak, J.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate. In this study stainless steel was evaluated as a function of wear erosion conditions.

  10. High frequency circular translation pin-on-disk method for accelerated wear testing of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2015-01-21

    The temporal change of the direction of sliding relative to the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component of prosthetic joints is known to be of crucial importance with respect to wear. One complete revolution of the resultant friction vector is commonly called a wear cycle. It was hypothesized that in order to accelerate the wear test, the cycle frequency may be substantially increased if the circumference of the slide track is reduced in proportion, and still the wear mechanisms remain realistic and no overheating takes place. This requires an additional slow motion mechanism with which the lubrication of the contact is maintained and wear particles are conveyed away from the contact. A three-station, dual motion high frequency circular translation pin-on-disk (HF-CTPOD) device with a relative cycle frequency of 25.3 Hz and an average sliding velocity of 27.4 mm/s was designed. The pins circularly translated at high frequency (1.0 mm per cycle, 24.8 Hz, clockwise), and the disks at low frequency (31.4mm per cycle, 0.5 Hz, counter-clockwise). In a 22 million cycle (10 day) test, the wear rate of conventional gamma-sterilized UHMWPE pins against polished CoCr disks in diluted serum was 1.8 mg per 24 h, which was six times higher than that in the established 1 Hz CTPOD device. The wear mechanisms were similar. Burnishing of the pin was the predominant feature. No overheating took place. With the dual motion HF-CTPOD method, the wear testing of UHMWPE as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty can be substantially accelerated without concerns of the validity of the wear simulation. PMID:25498368

  11. WEAR RESISTANCE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF HIGHLY CROSSLINKED UHMWPE DOPED WITH VITAMIN-E

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Christensen, Steven D.; Malhi, Arnaz S.; Wannomae, Keith K.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2008-01-01

    Our hypothesis was that cross-linked UHMWPE stabilized with vitamin-E would be wear and fatigue resistant. Acetabular liners were radiation cross-linked, doped with vitamin E and γ-sterilized. Hip simulator wear rate of vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE was approximately 1 and 6 mg/million-cycles in clean serum and in serum with third-body bone cement particles, respectively; a four to ten-fold decrease from that of conventional UHMWPE. The ultimate strength, yield strength, elongation-at-break and fatigue resistance of vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE were significantly higher than that of 100-kGy irradiated and melted UHMWPE and were unaffected by accelerated aging. Rim impingement testing with 3.7 mm-thick acetabular liners up to 2 million-cycles showed no significant damage of the cross-linked liners compared to conventional, gamma-sterilized in inert UHMWPE vitamin-E stabilized liners. The data indicate good wear properties and improved mechanical and fatigue properties for vitamin-E stabilized cross-linked UHMWPE. PMID:16781413

  12. Oxide Ceramic Films Grown on 55Ni-45Ti for NASA and Department of Defense Applications: Unidirectional Sliding Friction and Wear Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Lukco, Dorothy; Cytron, Sheldon J.

    2004-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the friction and wear behavior of the two types of oxide ceramic films furnished by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) under Space Act Agreement SAA3 567. These two types of oxide ceramics were grown on 55Ni-45Ti (60 wt% Ni and 40 wt% Ti) substrates: one was a TiO2 with no other species (designated the B film) and the other was a TiO2 with additional species (designated the G film). Unidirectional ball-on-disk sliding friction experiments were conducted with the oxide films in contact with sapphire at 296 K (23 C) in approx. 50-percent relative humidity laboratory air in this investigation. All material characterization and sliding friction experiments were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The results indicate that both films greatly improve the surface characteristics of 55Ni-45Ti, enhancing its tribological characteristics. Both films decreased the coefficient of friction by a factor of 4 and increased wear resistance by a two-figure factor, though the B film was superior to the G film in wear resistance and endurance life. The levels of coefficient of friction and wear resistance of both films in sliding contact with sapphire were acceptable for NASA and Department of Defense tribological applications. The decrease in friction and increase in wear resistance will contribute to longer wear life for parts, lower energy consumption, reduced related breakdowns, decreased maintenance costs, and increased reliability.

  13. Refractory lining system for high wear area of high temperature reaction vessel

    DOEpatents

    Hubble, David H.; Ulrich, Klaus H.

    1998-01-01

    A refractory-lined high temperature reaction vessel comprises a refractory ring lining constructed of refractory brick, a cooler, and a heat transfer medium disposed between the refractory ring lining and the cooler. The refractory brick comprises magnesia (MgO) and graphite. The heat transfer medium contacts the refractory brick and a cooling surface of the cooler, and is composed of a material that accommodates relative movement between the refractory brick and the cooler. The brick is manufactured such that the graphite has an orientation providing a high thermal conductivity in the lengthwise direction through the brick that is higher than the thermal conductivity in directions perpendicular to the lengthwise direction. The graphite preferably is flake graphite, in the range of about 10 to 20 wt %, and has a size distribution selected to provide maximum brick density. The reaction vessel may be used for performing a reaction process including the steps of forming a layer of slag on a melt in the vessel, the slag having a softening point temperature range, and forming a protective frozen layer of slag on the interior-facing surface of the refractory lining in at least a portion of a zone where the surface contacts the layer of slag, the protective frozen layer being maintained at or about the softening point of the slag.

  14. Refractory lining system for high wear area of high temperature reaction vessel

    DOEpatents

    Hubble, D.H.; Ulrich, K.H.

    1998-09-22

    A refractory-lined high temperature reaction vessel comprises a refractory ring lining constructed of refractory brick, a cooler, and a heat transfer medium disposed between the refractory ring lining and the cooler. The refractory brick comprises magnesia (MgO) and graphite. The heat transfer medium contacts the refractory brick and a cooling surface of the cooler, and is composed of a material that accommodates relative movement between the refractory brick and the cooler. The brick is manufactured such that the graphite has an orientation providing a high thermal conductivity in the lengthwise direction through the brick that is higher than the thermal conductivity in directions perpendicular to the lengthwise direction. The graphite preferably is flake graphite, in the range of about 10 to 20 wt %, and has a size distribution selected to provide maximum brick density. The reaction vessel may be used for performing a reaction process including the steps of forming a layer of slag on a melt in the vessel, the slag having a softening point temperature range, and forming a protective frozen layer of slag on the interior-facing surface of the refractory lining in at least a portion of a zone where the surface contacts the layer of slag, the protective frozen layer being maintained at or about the softening point of the slag. 10 figs.

  15. Refractory lining system for high wear area of high temperature reaction vessel

    DOEpatents

    Hubble, D.H.; Ulrich, K.H.

    1998-04-21

    A refractory-lined high temperature reaction vessel comprises a refractory ring lining constructed of refractory brick, a cooler, and a heat transfer medium disposed between the refractory ring lining and the cooler. The refractory brick comprises magnesia (MgO) and graphite. The heat transfer medium contacts the refractory brick and a cooling surface of the cooler, and is composed of a material that accommodates relative movement between the refractory brick and the cooler. The brick is manufactured such that the graphite has an orientation providing a high thermal conductivity in the lengthwise direction through the brick that is higher than the thermal conductivity in directions perpendicular to the lengthwise direction. The graphite preferably is flake graphite, in the range of about 10 to 20 wt %, and has a size distribution selected to provide maximum brick density. The reaction vessel may be used for performing a reaction process including the steps of forming a layer of slag on a melt in the vessel, the slag having a softening point temperature range, and forming a protective frozen layer of slag on the interior-facing surface of the refractory lining in at least a portion of a zone where the surface contacts the layer of slag, the protective frozen layer being maintained at or about the softening point of the slag. 10 figs.

  16. Body regional influences of L-menthol application on the alleviation of heat strain while wearing firefighter's protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Young; Nakao, Kouhei; Bakri, Ilham; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of menthol application according to the amount of surface area on physiological and psychological heat strains, along with body regional influences. Male students underwent two stages of experiments: [Experiment 1] Cutaneous thermal threshold test at rest on eight body regions with/without a 0.8% menthol application at T (a) 28°C and 50% RH; [Experiment 2] Six exercise tests with/without a 0.8% menthol spray at T (a) 28°C and 40% RH, while wearing firefighter's protective clothing (No menthol, PC(NO); Face and neck menthol, PC(FN); Upper body menthol, PC(UP); Whole body menthol application, PC(WB)) or wearing normal clothing (No menthol, NC(NO); Upper body menthol, NC(UP)). Experiment 1 showed that menthol caused no significant influence on cutaneous warm thresholds, while menthol applications evoked earlier detection of cool sensations, especially on the chest (P = 0.043). Experiment 2 revealed that NC(UP), PC(UP) and PC(WB) caused lower mean skin temperature, especially with higher peripheral vasoconstrictions on the extremities at rest. During exercise, NC(UP), PC(UP) and PC(WB) induced greater and earlier increases in rectal temperatures (T (re)) and a delayed sweat response, but lessened psychological burdens (P < 0.05). Both physiological and psychological effects of PC(FN) were insignificant. For a composite analysis, individual Menthol Sensitivity Index at cooling in Experiment 1 had significant relationships with the threshold for T (re) increase and changes in heart rate in NC(UP) of Experiment 2 (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that menthol's topical influence is body region-dependent, as well as depending on the exposed body surface area. PMID:21964942

  17. Establishing a role for vancomycin powder application for prosthetic joint infection prevention-results of a wear simulation study.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Rabah; Ochsner, J Lockwood; Chimento, George F; Meyer, Mark S; Waddell, Bradford; Zavatsky, Joseph M

    2014-07-01

    Topical vancomycin powder (VP) has shown efficacy and safety in decreasing post-operative spine infections. VP use in arthroplasty has not been established. Concerns remain for third-body wear with the addition of crystalline substrate at the implant interface. The study's purpose was to compare wear behavior of CoCr on UHMWPE to identical wear couples with VP. A six-station wear simulator was utilized and cyclic articulations were run for 10 million cycles (Mc). UHMWPE wear was measured using photography, stereomicroscopy, and gravimetric measurement. There were no differences in wear mark length (P = 0.43), width (P = 0.49), or gravimetric wear at 10 Mc (P = 0.98). VP and control groups lost 0.32 and 0.33 mg, respectively. VP may have a role in PJI prevention. A well-designed clinical study is needed. PMID:24636904

  18. The wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene sliding on metallic and ceramic counterfaces representative of current femoral surfaces in joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, J G; Dowson, D; Isaac, G H; Fisher, J

    1997-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the influence of surface roughness on the wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in total joint replacement. The results of these studies have shown that the wear factor is proportional to the counterface roughness raised to a power greater than one. In this laboratory study, the effect of surface finish of several biomaterials on the wear of UHMWPE was studied. The study was conducted using reciprocating pin-on-plate wear tests with bovine serum as a lubricant. The biomaterials investigated as the counterface material included stainless steel, cast cobalt chrome (CoCr), CoCr (ASTM F799), alumina ceramic and zirconia ceramic. The counterface topographies of the wear plates were produced using techniques representative of current manufacturing methods. The surface roughness of the wear plates was varied in the range Ra = 0.005-0.04 micron; this was representative of femoral heads and femoral knee components currently used clinically. Metals and ceramics with a similar surface roughness produced a similar wear rate of UHMWPE. For the limited range of smooth counterfaces used in this study only a moderate correlation was found between the surface roughness and the wear factors. For a change in counterface roughness Ra of 0.005 to 0.04 micron, the wear factor increased from 7.4 +/- 1.6 to 16.5 +/- 2.4 x 10(-9) mm3/N m (mean +/- standard error). This variation in counterface roughness had much less effect in wear than previously reported for rougher counterfaces. For an extended range of counterface roughness, a stronger correlation was found using an exponential function for the regression fit. The exponential function shows the benefits of decreased wear with decreased surface roughness. Although the wear rate decreased less rapidly with decreased counterface roughness for Ra values below 0.05 micron, there were significant advantages to be gained from improved femoral head roughness to below 0.01 micron Ra

  19. High-Temperature Sliding Wear Testing of Cathodic Arc Physical Vapor Deposition AlTiN- and AlTiON-Coated Hot Work Tool Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel; Isler, Duygu; Urgen, Mustafa

    2011-11-01

    Thin hard coatings provide the much needed protection for steel thixoforming tools that must resist wear at high temperatures. The wear resistance of AlTiN- and AlTiON-coated hot work tool steel was investigated at 1023 K (750 °C), measured to be the cavity surface temperature shortly after the steel slurry was forced into the thixoforming die. The wear tests were repeated in exactly the same fashion with uncoated tool steel samples to identify the impact of AlTiN and AlTiON coatings on the high-temperature wear performance of X32CrMoV33 tool steel. The nature, the thickness, and the adherence of the oxide scales impact the tribological behavior. The poor adherence and limited ductility of ferrous oxides promote the failure of the oxide scale impairing the resistance to wear of the hot work tool steel at elevated temperatures. The substantial softening in the X32CrMoV33 hot work tool steel is also critical in the wear volume loss it suffers. AlTiN and AlTiON coatings, on the other hand, form a stable and protective oxide surface layer at high temperatures and therefore provide an enhanced resistance to oxidation. The latter is relatively more resistant to oxidation and is thus the better of the two coatings tested in the present work.

  20. Recent developments in wear and corrosion resistant alloys for oil industry

    SciTech Connect

    Raghu, D.; Wu, J.B.C.

    1997-08-01

    Oil production and refining environments pose a very severe wear and corrosion environment. Material designers are challenged with the need to design and develop materials that combine a high corrosion resistance with very good wear resistance. Coupled with that is the need for these materials to meet requirements, such as, fracture toughness and resistance to sulfide and chloride stress corrosion cracking. Often times, increasing the resistance to wear compromises the corrosion and welding characteristics. This paper covers a variety of material developments that aim to address the twin problems of wear and corrosion. The paper covers the alloy design fundamentals and discusses the pertinent wear properties and general corrosion resistance compared to traditional wear resistant materials. Proven applications, with particular reference to petroleum and petro-chemical areas are discussed. Potential applications are also cited.

  1. Wear Independent Similarity.

    PubMed

    Steele, Adam; Davis, Alexander; Kim, Joohyung; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S

    2015-06-17

    This study presents a new factor that can be used to design materials where desired surface properties must be retained under in-system wear and abrasion. To demonstrate this factor, a synthetic nonwetting coating is presented that retains chemical and geometric performance as material is removed under multiple wear conditions: a coarse vitrified abradant (similar to sanding), a smooth abradant (similar to rubbing), and a mild abradant (a blend of sanding and rubbing). With this approach, such a nonwetting material displays unprecedented mechanical durability while maintaining desired performance under a range of demanding conditions. This performance, herein termed wear independent similarity performance (WISP), is critical because multiple mechanisms and/or modes of wear can be expected to occur in many typical applications, e.g., combinations of abrasion, rubbing, contact fatigue, weathering, particle impact, etc. Furthermore, these multiple wear mechanisms tend to quickly degrade a novel surface's unique performance, and thus many promising surfaces and materials never scale out of research laboratories. Dynamic goniometry and scanning electron microscopy results presented herein provide insight into these underlying mechanisms, which may also be applied to other coatings and materials. PMID:26018058

  2. High-temperature, high-wear-resistant solid lubricants. April 1983-April 1988 (Citations from Fluidex data base). Report for April 1983-April 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning solid lubricants for high wear and high-temperature-resistant surfaces. Emphasis is on molybdenum disulfide; however, gold-molybdenum alloys and polysiloxanes are also discussed. Methods for depositing thin film solid lubricants, including sputtering and electrodeposition, are presented. The corrosion properties of the solid lubricant-metal interface are also included. (This updated bibliography contains 288 citations, 97 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  3. Deposition and Characterization of Tungsten Carbide Thin Films by DC Magnetron Sputtering for Wear-Resistant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavsanoglu, Tolga; Begum, Ceren; Alkan, Murat; Yucel, Onuralp

    2013-04-01

    In this study, WC (tungsten carbide) thin films were deposited on high-speed steel (AISI M2) and Si (100) substrates by direct current magnetron sputtering of a tungsten carbide target having 7% cobalt as binding material. The properties of the coatings have been modified by the change in the bias voltages from grounded to 200 V. All the coatings were deposited at 250°C constant temperature. The microstructure and the thickness of the films were determined from cross-sectional field-emission gun scanning electron microscope micrographs. The chemical composition of the film was determined by electron probe micro analyzer. The x-ray diffractometer has been used for the phase analyses. Nanoindentation and wear tests were used to determine the mechanical and tribological properties of the films, respectively. It is found that the increase in the bias voltages increased drastically the hardness and elastic modulus, decreased the friction coefficient values and increased the wear resistance of tungsten carbide thin films by a phase transformation from metallic W (tungsten) to a nonstoichiometric WC1- x (tungsten carbide) phase.

  4. Hardface coating systems and methods for metal alloys and other materials for wear and corrosion resistant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Roland D.

    2015-08-18

    The present disclosure relates generally to hardface coating systems and methods for metal alloys and other materials for wear and corrosion resistant applications. More specifically, the present disclosure relates to hardface coatings that include a network of titanium monoboride (TiB) needles or whiskers in a matrix, which are formed from titanium (Ti) and titanium diboride (TiB.sub.2) precursors by reactions enabled by the inherent energy provided by the process heat associated with coating deposition and, optionally, coating post-heat treatment. These hardface coatings are pyrophoric, thereby generating further reaction energy internally, and may be applied in a functionally graded manner. The hardface coatings may be deposited in the presence of a number of fluxing agents, beta stabilizers, densification aids, diffusional aids, and multimode particle size distributions to further enhance their performance characteristics.

  5. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D. Schmidt, Susann; Garbrecht, Magnus; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Jensen, Jens; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Hultman, Lars

    2015-09-15

    GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant increase in film hardness and reduced elastic modulus with increasing V{sub s} for all techniques. The harder films were produced by MFMS with hardness as high as 25 GPa. Low friction coefficients, between 0.05 and 0.06, were recorded for all films. Furthermore, CN{sub x} films produced by MFMS and DCMS at V{sub s} = 100 and 120 V presented a high wear resistance with wear coefficients of k ≤ 2.3 × 10{sup −5} mm{sup 3}/Nm. While all CN{sub x} films exhibit low friction, wear depends strongly on the structural and mechanical characteristics of the films. The MFMS mode is best suited for the production of hard CN{sub x} films, although high compressive stresses challenge the application on steel substrates. Films grown in HiPIMS mode provide adequate adhesion due to low residual stress values, at the expense of lower film hardness. Thus, a relatively wide mechanical property envelope is presented for CN{sub x} films, which is relevant for the optimization of CN{sub x} film properties intended to be applied as low friction and wear resistant coatings.

  6. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James C.; Tylczak, Joseph H.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate.

  7. Plasma deposition of elastic wear resistant Si-C coatings on nickel-titanium for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Janine-Christina; Winter, Jörg

    2008-06-01

    A bilayer system consisting of carbon and silicon has been developed to coat metals such as copper, stainless steel, nickel, and especially NiTi with an elastic, wear, and corrosion resistant film. The plasma deposited film system exhibits excellent adhesion on all metals under investigation. This adhesion is promoted by silicide formation. Additionally, the film system shows good performance under extremely high load induced via cavitation admission. Tensile tests reveal high elasticity of the film system, in that it can be elongated up to 5% before occurrence of damage of the film. The intrinsic stress inside this film system is reduced compared to pure diamondlike carbon films. Both good chemical bonding and reduced stress lead to good adhesion of the film systems on metals.

  8. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated. PMID:24953823

  9. Effects of heat treatment on wear resistance and fracture toughness of duo-cast materials composed of high-chromium white cast iron and low-chromium steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sunghak; Jung, Jae-Young

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate effects of heat treatment on wear resistance and fracture toughness in duo-cast materials composed of a high-chromium white cast iron and a low-chromium steel as a wear-resistant part and a ductile part, respectively. Different size, volume fraction, and distribution of M7C3 carbides were employed in the wear-resistant part by changing the amount of chromium, and the volume fraction of martensite in the austenitic matrix was varied by the heat treatment. In the alloys containing a small amount of chromium, an interdendritic structure of eutectic M7C3 carbides was formed, and led to the improvement of wear resistance and fracture toughness. After the heat treatment, the selective wear of the matrix and the cracking or spalled-off carbides were considerably reduced since the hardness difference between carbides and matrix decreased by the increase in the matrix hardness, thereby leading to the improvement of the wear resistance. However, the fracture toughness of the heat-treated alloys was lower than that of the as-cast alloys because the matrix containing a considerable amount of martensite did not effectively prevent the crack propagation.

  10. Effects of high heeled shoes wearing experience and heel height on human standing balance and functional mobility.

    PubMed

    Hapsari, Vaniessa Dewi; Xiong, Shuping

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of high heeled shoes (HHS) wearing experience and heel height on human standing balance and functional mobility. Thirty young and healthy females (ten experienced and twenty inexperienced HHS wearers) participated in a series of balance tests when they wore shoes of four different heel heights: 1 cm (flat), 4 cm (low), 7 cm (medium) and 10 cm (high). Experimental results show that regardless of the wearing experience, the heel elevation induces more effort from lower limb muscles (particularly calf muscles) and results in worse functional mobility starting at 7 cm heel height. While the heel height increased to 10 cm, the standing balance also becomes worse. Experienced HHS wearers do not show significantly better overall performance on standing balance and functional mobility than inexperienced controls, even though they have better directional control (76.8% vs. 74.4%) and larger maximum excursion (93.3% vs. 89.7%). To maintain standing balance, experienced wearers exert less effort on tibialis anterior, vastus lateralis and erector spinae muscles at the cost of more intensive effort from gastrocnemius medialis muscle. PMID:26155823

  11. Investigation of the mechanical properties of FeNiCrMnSi high entropy alloy wear resistant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buluc, G.; Florea, I.; Chelariu, R.; Popescu, G.; Carcea, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we investigated microstructure, hardness and wear resistance for FeNiCrMnAl, high entropy alloy. The FeNiCrMnSi, high entropy alloy was elaborated in a medium induction furnace, by choosing the silicon, as an alliance element within the equi- atomic high entropy alloy, we managed to obtain a dendritic structure, the formation of intermetallic compounds or separated silicon. The medium hardness value of the investigated alloy was 948.33 HV and the medium value of the friction coefficient was 0.6655 in the first 20 seconds and 0.5425 for 1667 seconds. The volume loss of the high entropy alloy FeNiCrMnSi was 0.0557 mm3.

  12. Wear Resistance of Carbon Steels and Structure Parameters of Their Surface Layer After High Current Density Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    Dry sliding of carbon steels under the action of an AC current of a contact density higher than 100 A/cm2 is realized. It is shown that the contact layer is easily deteriorated in high-carbon steels. This becomes evident as lower wear resistance compared to that of low-carbon steels. There are signs of a developing liquid phase on the worn surface. Using the methods of Auger spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, it is demonstrated that a high content of carbon in the initial steel structure gives rise to formation of a large amount of γ-Fe (and)as well to a high concentration of carbon near the sliding surface.

  13. Optimization of the EMS process parameters in compocasting of high-wear-resistant Al-nano-TiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipour, Majid; Pahlevani, Zahra; Shabani, Mohsen Ostad; Mazahery, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Understanding of the electromagnetic stirrer (EMS) process parameters-wear relation in nanocomposite is required for further creation of tailored modifications of process in accordance with the demands for various applications. This study depicts the performance of hybrid algorithm for optimization of the parameters in EMS compocasting of nano-TiC-reinforced Al-Si alloys. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) coupled with particle swarm optimization (PSO) was applied to find the optimum combination of the inputs including mold temperature, mix time, impeller speed, powder temperature, cast temperature and average particle size. The optimized condition was obtained in minimization of objective function. The objective function is calculated by ANFIS and then minimized by PSO. The optimized parameters were used to produce semisolid cast aluminum matrix composites reinforced with nano-TiC particles. The optimized nanocomposites were then studied for their tribological properties.

  14. A kinetic model for impact/sliding wear of pressurized water reactor internal components: Application to rod cluster control assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Zbinden, M.; Durbec, V.

    1996-12-01

    Certain internal components of Pressurized Water Reactors are damaged by wear when subjected to vibration induced by flow. In order to enable predictive calculation of such wear, one must have a model which takes account reliably of real damages. The modelling of wear represents a final link in a succession of numerical calculations which begins by the determination of hydraulic excitations induced by the flow. One proceeds, then, in the dynamic response calculation of the structure to finish up with an estimation of volumetric wear and of the depth of wear scars. A new concept of industrial wear model adapted to components of nuclear plants is proposed. Its originality is to be supported, on one hand, by experimental results obtained via wear machines of relatively short operational times, and, on the other hand, by the information obtained from the operating feedback over real wear kinetics of the reactors components. The proposed model is illustrated by an example which correspond to a specific real situation. The determination of the coefficients permitting to cover all assembly of configurations and the validation of the model in these configurations have been the object of the most recent work.

  15. Friction and wear behaviors of MoS2/Zr coated HSS in sliding wear and in drilling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianxin; Yan, Pei; Wu, Ze

    2012-11-01

    MoS2 metal composite coatings have been successful used in dry turning, but its suitability for dry drilling has not been yet established. Therefore, it is necessary to study the friction and wear behaviors of MoS2/Zr coated HSS in sliding wear and in drilling processes. In the present study, MoS2/Zr composite coatings are deposited on the surface of W6Mo5Cr4V2 high speed steel(HSS). Microstructural and fundamental properties of these coatings are examined. Ball-on-disc sliding wear tests on the coated discs are carried out, and the drilling performance of the coated drills is tested. Test results show that the MoS2/Zr composite coatings exhibit decreases friction coefficient to that of the uncoated HSS in sliding wear tests. Energy dispersive X-ray(EDX) analysis on the wear surface indicates that there is a transfer layer formed on the counterpart ball during sliding wear processes, which contributes to the decreasing of the friction coefficient between the sliding couple. Drilling tests indicate that the MoS2/Zr coated drills show better cutting performance compared to the uncoated HSS drills, coating delamination and abrasive are found to be the main flank and rake wear mode of the coated drills. The proposed research founds the base of the application of MoS2 metal composite coatings on dry drilling.

  16. Abrasion and erosion wear resistance of Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings prepared by plasma, detonation and high-velocity oxyfuel spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Vuoristo, P.; Niemi, K.; Maekelae, A.; Maentylae, T.

    1994-12-31

    Chromium carbide based cermet coatings (Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr) deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), detonation gun spraying (DGS), and high-velocity oxyfuel flame spraying (HVOF) methods were evaluated with the microstructure, microhardness, phase structure, room temperature abrasion wear and particle erosion wear resistance. The influence of some spray parameters, e.g, the use of different plasma gases (Ar-H{sub 2}, Ar-He) in plasma spraying, and fuel gas-to-oxygen ratio (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}) and diluent gas content in detonation gun spraying, were studied in order to optimize the wear resistance of the coatings. The results showed that Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings had different wear properties depending on the spray parameters and spray methods used. Highest wear resistance was obtained with coatings prepared by the high-velocity combustion processes, i.e. by HVOF and detonation gun spraying.

  17. Application of high-rate cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John L., Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Widespread application of the newest high-rate cutting tools to the most appropriate jobs is slowed by the sheer magnitude of developments in tool types, materials, workpiece applications, and by the rapid pace of change. Therefore, a study of finishing and roughing sizes of coated carbide inserts having a variety of geometries for single point turning was completed. The cutting tools were tested for tool life, chip quality, and workpiece surface finish at various cutting conditions with medium alloy steel. An empirical wear-life data base was established, and a computer program was developed to facilitate technology transfer, assist selection of carbide insert grades, and provide machine operating parameters. A follow-on test program was implemented suitable for next generation coated carbides, rotary cutting tools, cutting fluids, and ceramic tool materials.

  18. Adverse events in allergy sufferers wearing contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Urgacz, Agnieszka; Mrukwa, Ewa; Gawlik, Radoslaw

    2015-06-01

    Allergy is the fifth leading chronic condition in industrialized countries among all ages, and the third most common chronic disease among children under 18 years old. Many of allergic patients also have problems with vision and want to improve their quality of life by wearing contact lenses. They are most frequently young and active individuals, for whom contact lenses provide greater convenience and more satisfying vision correction than spectacles. However, application of high quality and immunologically neutral products do not protect from allergic side reactions. Nowadays, eye-related allergy and contact lens wear concern larger and larger populations worldwide. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies on ocular complications associated with wearing contact lenses. The article presents indications for allergic patients especially on the care system and wear schedule. PMID:26161062

  19. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  20. Comparison of 10-year clinical wear of annealed and remelted highly cross-linked polyethylene: A propensity-matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Satoshi; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Mashima, Naohiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Kamada, Tomomi; Motomura, Goro; Imai, Hiroshi; Fukushi, Jun-Ichi; Miura, Hiromasa; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-06-01

    No previous studies comparing the clinical wear rates of the two different kinds of cross-linked ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (XLPE), annealed and remelted, are available. We compared the creep and steady wear rates of 36 matched pairs (72 hips in total) adjusting for baseline characteristics with propensity score matching techniques. Zirconia femoral heads with 26-mm diameter were used in all cases. The femoral-head cup penetration was measured digitally on radiographs. Significantly greater creep (p=0.006) was detected in the remelted (0.234mm) than annealed (0.159mm) XLPE. However, no significant difference (p=0.19) was found between the steady wear rates (0.003 and 0.008mm/year, respectively) of the annealed and remelted XLPE. Multiple regression analyses showed that remelted XLPE is significant independent variable (p<0.001) that is positively associated with creep. However, the patient age and body weight, cup size, the liner thickness, cup inclination, follow-up periods, and postoperative Merle d'Aubigné hip score had no significant effects (p>0.05) on the steady wear rates. No patients exhibited above the osteolysis threshold of 0.1mm/year, progressive radiolucencies, osteolysis, or polyethylene fracture. This propensity-matched cohort study document no significant difference in wear resistant performances of annealed and remelted XLPE over an average period of 10 years. PMID:26751705

  1. Synthesis of High-Temperature Self-lubricating Wear Resistant Composite Coating on Ti6Al4V Alloy by Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Xiang, Zhan-Feng; Shi, Shi-Hong; Chen, Yao; Shi, Gao-Lian; Wu, Shao-Hua; Wu, Yu-Nan

    2015-05-01

    Laser deposition was adopted to prepare novel Ni-based solid solution (γ-NiCrAlTi)/ TiC/α-Ti/CaF2 high-temperature self-lubricating wear resistant composite coating on Ti6Al4V alloy. Microstructure, micro-hardness, wear behavior, and counter-body effect of the coating were investigated systematically. It can be seen that the coating mainly consists of γ-NiCrAlTi, TiC, α-Ti, and small fine CaF2 particles. Average micro-hardness of the coating is 1023 HV0.3, which is about three-factor higher than that of Ti6Al4V substrate (380 HV0.3). The friction coefficient and wear rate of the coating decrease at all test temperatures to different extents with respect to the substrate. The improvement in wear resistance is believed to be the combined effects of the γ-NiCrAlTi solid solution, the dominating anti-wear capabilities of the reinforced TiC carbides, and the self-lubricating property of CaF2.

  2. Wear Mechanism of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Carbide Insert in Orthogonal Cutting Ti-6Al-4V ELI at High Cutting Speed

    SciTech Connect

    Gusri, A. I.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Jaharah, A. G.

    2011-01-17

    The performance of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) carbide insert with ISO designation of CCMT 12 04 04 LF, when turning titanium alloys was investigated. There were four layers of coating materials for this insert i.e.TiN-Al2O3-TiCN-TiN. The insert performance was evaluated based on the insert's edge resistant towards the machining parameters used at high cutting speed range of machining Ti-6Al-4V ELI. Detailed study on the wear mechanism at the cutting edge of CVD carbide tools was carried out at cutting speed of 55-95 m/min, feed rate of 0.15-0.35 mm/rev and depth of cut of 0.10-0.20 mm. Wear mechanisms such as abrasive and adhesive were observed on the flank face. Crater wear due to diffusion was also observed on the rake race. The abrasive wear occurred more at nose radius and the fracture on tool were found at the feed rate of 0.35 mm/rev and the depth of cut of 0.20 mm. The adhesion wear takes place after the removal of the coating or coating delaminating. Therefore, adhesion or welding of titanium alloy onto the flank and rake faces demonstrates a strong bond at the workpiece-tool interface.

  3. Patients presenting with miliaria while wearing flame resistant clothing in high ambient temperatures: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Clothing can be a cause of occupational dermatitis. Frequent causes of clothing-related dermatological problems can be the fabric itself and/or chemical additives used in the laundering process, friction from certain fabrics excessively rubbing the skin, or heat retention from perspiration-soaked clothing in hot working environments. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of miliaria rubra associated with prolonged use of flame resistant clothing in the medical literature. Case presentation We report 18 cases (14 men and 4 women, with an age range of 19 to 37 years) of moderate to severe skin irritation associated with wearing flame resistant clothing in hot arid environments (temperature range: 39 to 50°C, 5% to 25% relative humidity). We describe the medical history in detail of a 23-year-old Caucasian woman and a 31-year-old African-American man. A summary of the other 16 patients is also provided. Conclusions These cases illustrate the potential serious nature of miliaria with superimposed Staphylococcus infections. All 18 patients fully recovered with topical skin treatment and modifications to their dress ensemble. Clothing, in particular blend fabrics, must be thoroughly laundered to adequately remove detergent residue. While in hot environments, individuals with sensitive skin should take the necessary precautions such as regular changing of clothing and good personal hygiene to ensure that their skin remains as dry and clean as possible. It is also important that they report to their health care provider as soon as skin irritation or rash appears to initiate any necessary medical procedures. Miliaria rubra can take a week or longer to clear, so removal of exposure to certain fabric types may be necessary. PMID:21939537

  4. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  5. Investigation of the Effect of Tungsten Substitution on Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of In Situ VC-Reinforced High-Manganese Austenitic Steel Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Emad Galin; Karimzadeh, Neda; Varahram, Naser; Davami, Parviz

    2013-08-01

    Particulate VC-reinforced high-manganese austenitic steel matrix composites with different vanadium and tungsten contents were synthesized by conventional alloying and casting route. Microstructural characterizations showed that the composites processed by in situ precipitation of the reinforcements were composed of V8C7 particulates distributed in an austenitic matrix. It was observed that addition of tungsten to austenite increases work-hardening rate of subsurface layer during pin-on disk wear test. The maximum abrasive wear resistance was achieved at tungsten content equal to 2 wt pct. However, excessive addition of tungsten promoted the formation of W3C phase and reduced the abrasive wear resistance because of decrease in distribution homogeneity and volume fraction of the reinforcing VC particles.

  6. Comparison between PEEK and Ti6Al4V concerning micro-scale abrasion wear on dental applications.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, M; Buciumeanu, M; Henriques, B; Silva, F S; Souza, J C M; Gomes, J R

    2016-07-01

    In the oral cavity, abrasive wear is predictable at exposed tooth or restorative surfaces, during mastication and tooth brushing. Also, wear can occur at contacting surfaces between the Ti-based prosthetic structures and implants in presence of abrasive compounds from food or toothpaste. Thus, the aim of this work was to compare the abrasive wear resistance of PEEK and Ti6Al4V on three-body abrasion related to different hydrated silica content and loads. Surfaces of Ti6Al4V or PEEK cylinders (8mm diameter and 4mm height) were wet ground on SiC papers and then polished with 1µm diamond paste. After that, surfaces were ultrasonically cleaned in propyl alcohol for 15min and then in distilled water for 10min. Micro-scale abrasion tests were performed at 60rpm and on different normal loads (0.4, 0.8 or 1.2N) after 600 ball revolutions using suspensions with different weight contents of hydrated silica. After abrasive tests, wear scars on flat samples were measured to quantify the wear volume and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the dominant wear mechanisms. Results showed a higher volume loss rate on PEEK than that recorded on Ti6Al4V,, when subjected to three-body abrasion tests involving hydrated silica suspensions. An increase in volume loss was noted on both tested materials when the abrasive content or load was increased. PEEK was characterized by less wear resistance than that on Ti6Al4V after micro-scale abrasion wear in contact with hydrated silica particles, as commonly found in toothpastes. PMID:26849309

  7. The Changes of COP and Foot Pressure after One Hour's Walking Wearing High-heeled and Flat Shoes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Dong Yeol; Lee, Han Suk

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the most appropriate height for shoe heels by measuring the displacement of the COP (center of pressure) and changes in the distribution of foot pressure after walking in flat (0.5 cm), middle-heeled (4 cm), and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for 1 hour. [Methods] A single-subject design was used, with 15 healthy women wearing shoes with heels of each height in a random order. The foot pressure and displacement of COP before and after walking in an ordinary environment for 1 hour were measured using an FDM-S (zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). [Results] The distribution of foot pressure did not change significantly after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but did change significantly after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. Similarly, the COP was not significantly displaced after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but was significantly displaced after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. [Conclusion] Both flat and high-heeled shoes had adverse effects on the body. Middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes are preferable to both flat (0.5 cm) and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for the health and comfort of the feet. PMID:24259782

  8. Low-wear partially fluorinated polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Hady, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Tribological studies were conducted on five different polyimide solid bodies formulated from the diamine 2,2-bis 4-(4-aminophenoxy)pgenyl hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF) and the dianhydrides pyromellitic acid (PMDS) and benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDA). The following polyimides were evaluated 4-BDAF/PMDA, 4-BDAF/BTDA, 4-BDAF/80 mole percent PMDA, 20 mole percent BTDA, 4-BDAF/60 mole percent BTDA. Friction coefficients, polyimide wear rates, polyimide surface morphology and transfer films were evaluated at sliding speeds of 0.31 to 11.6 m/s and at temperatures of 25 C to 300 C. The results indicate that the tribological properties are highly dependent on the composition of the polyimide and on the experimental conditions. Two polyimides were found which produced very low wear rates but very high friction coefficients (greater than 0.85) under ambient conditions. They offer considerable potential for high traction types of application such as brakes.

  9. Investigation of wear and scuffing behaviour of ferrous thermal spray coatings for aluminum engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edrisy, Afsaneh

    The development of lightweight internal combustion engines using materials such as cast aluminum alloys represents one of the most significant technological developments in the automotive industry. These engines reduce weight, which in turn reduce fuel consumption and emission. However, poor wear resistance and low seizure load of unprotected Al-Si alloys are a major drawback for applications involving sliding contact in automotive engine blocks. The wear resistance of cast aluminum parts can be improved by depositing coatings on the sliding surfaces. In this respect, iron based coatings deposited through a thermal spray process may play an important role in improving wear resistances of aluminium parts used in the automotive industry. These coatings can be produced economically and be easily deposited on the curved surfaces in ambient air atmosphere. In this research, two promising thermal spray deposition processes were considered: These were (i) plasma transfer wire arc thermal spraying (PTWA) process, and (ii) high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process. The research work presented in this dissertation primarily focussed on the wear behaviour of low carbon steel thermal spray coatings which were applied using PTWA and HVOF processes deposited on engine grade cast aluminum alloy substrates. The main objective of the work was to characterize the micromechanisms of wear that control the wear rates of the coatings. Several new wear mechanisms that were previously unknown in thermal spray coatings were identified. In addition, the effect of the environment on the wear performance of coatings was investigated. The importance of controlling the atmospheric conditions during the sliding contact of coated aluminum components was established. Detailed analyses of compositions and microstructures of iron based coatings that were produced using PTWA and HVOF thermal deposition processes showed that the wear resistances of the coatings were sensitive to the production method. A

  10. Prediction of scratch resistance of cobalt chromium alloy bearing surface, articulating against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, due to third-body wear particles.

    PubMed

    Mirghany, M; Jin, Z M

    2004-01-01

    The entrapment of abrasive particles within the articulation between a cobalt chromium alloy (CoCrMo) femoral component and an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cup of artificial hip joints or tibial inserts of artificial knee joints usually scratches the metallic bearing surface and consequently increases the surface roughness. This has been recognized as one of the main causes of excessive polyethylene wear, leading to osteolysis and loosening of the prosthetic components. The purpose of this study was to use the finite element method to investigate the resistance of the cobalt chromium alloy bearing surface to plastic deformation, as a first approximation to causing scratches, due to various entrapped debris such as bone, CoCrMo and ZrO2 (contained in radiopaque polymethyl methacrylate cement). A simple axisymmetric micro contact mechanics model was developed, where a spherical third-body wear particle was indented between the two bearing surfaces, modelled as two solid cylinders of a given diameter, under the contact pressure determined from macro-models representing either hip or knee implants. The deformation of both the wear particle and the bearing surfaces was modelled and was treated as elastic-plastic. The indented peak-to-valley height on the CoCrMo bearing surface from the finite element model was found to be in good agreement with that reported in a previous study when the third-body wear particle was assumed to be rigid. Under the physiological contact pressure experienced in both hip and knee implants, ZrO2 wear particles were found to be fully embedded within the UHMWPE bearing surface, and the maximum von Mises stresses within the CoCrMo bearing surface reached the corresponding yield strength. Consequently, the CoCrMo bearing surface was deformed plastically and the corresponding peak-to-valley height (surface roughness) was found to increase with both the hardness and the size of the wear particle. Even in the case of CoCrMo wear

  11. Efficient Wear Leveling in NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Hao; Chang, Li-Pin

    In the recent years, flash storage devices such as solid-state drives (SSDs) and flash cards have become a popular choice for the replacement of hard disk drives, especially in the applications of mobile computing devices and consumer electronics. However, the physical constraints of flash memory pose a lifetime limitation on these storage devices. New technologies for ultra-high density flash memory such as multilevel-cell (MLC) flash further degrade flash endurance and worsen this lifetime concern. As a result, flash storage devices may experience a unexpectedly short lifespan, especially when accessing these devices with high frequencies. In order to enhance the endurance of flash storage device, various wear leveling algorithms are proposed to evenly erase blocks of the flash memory so as to prevent wearing out any block excessively. In this chapter, various existing wear leveling algorithms are investigated to point out their design issues and potential problems. Based on this investigation, two efficient wear leveling algorithms (i.e., the evenness-aware algorithm and dual-pool algorithm) are presented to solve the problems of the existing algorithms with the considerations of the limited computing power and memory space in flash storage devices. The evenness-aware algorithm maintains a bit array to keep track of the distribution of block erases to prevent any cold data from staying in any block for a long period of time. The dual-pool algorithm maintains one hot pool and one cold pool to maintain the blocks that store hot data and cold data, respectively, and the excessively erased blocks in the hot pool are exchanged with the rarely erased blocks in the cold pool to prevent any block from being erased excessively. In this chapter, a series of explanations and analyses shows that these two wear leveling algorithms could evenly distribute block erases to the whole flash memory to enhance the endurance of flash memory.

  12. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  13. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricating Diamond Films and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    The tribological properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films vary with the environment, possessing a Jekyll-and-Hyde character. CVD diamond has low coefficient of friction and high wear resistance in air but high coefficient of friction and low wear resistance in vacuum. Improving the tribological functionality of materials (such as achieving low friction and good wear resistance) was an aim of this investigation. Three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of CVD diamond have shown that its friction and wear are significantly reduced in ultrahigh vacuum. The main criteria for judging whether diamond films are an effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating material were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which must be less than 0.1 and on the order of 10(exp 6) cu mm/N(dot)m, respectively. In the first study the presence of a thin film (less than 1 micron thick) of amorphous, nondiamond carbon (hydrogenated carbon, also called diamondlike carbon or DLC) on CVD diamond greatly decreased the coefficient of friction and the wear rate. Therefore, a thin DLC film on CVD diamond can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating in ultrahigh vacuum. In the second study the presence of an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by ion implantation significantly reduced the coefficient of friction and the wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. Therefore, such surface layers are acceptable for effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant applications of CVD diamond. In the third study CVD diamond in contact with cubic boron nitride exhibited low coefficient of friction in ultra high vacuum. Therefore, this materials combination can provide an effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant couple in ultrahigh vacuum.

  14. New Mechanisms of rock-bit wear in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Macini, Paolo

    1996-01-24

    This paper presents recent results of an investigation on failure mode and wear of rock-bits used to drill geothermal wells located in the area of Larderello (Italy). A new wear mechanism, conceived from drilling records and dull bit evaluation analysis, has been identified and a particular configuration of rock-bit has been developed and tested in order to reduce drilling costs. The role of high Bottom Hole Temperature (BHT) on rock-bit performances seems not yet very well understood: so far, only drillability and formation abrasiveness are generally considered to account for poor drilling performances. In this paper, the detrimental effects of high BHT on sealing and reservoir system of Friction Bearing Rock-bits (FBR) have been investigated, and a new bearing wear pattern for FBR's run in high BHT holes has been identified and further verified via laboratory inspections on dull bits. A novel interpretation of flat worn cutting structure has been derived from the above wear pattern, suggesting the design of a particular bit configuration. Test bits, designed in the light of the above criteria, have been prepared and field tested successfully. The paper reports the results of these tests, which yielded a new rock-bit application, today considered as a standad practice in Italian geothermal fields. This application suggests that the correct evaluation of rock-bit wear can help to improve the overall drilling performances and to minimize drilling problems through a better interpretation of the relationships amongst rock-bits, formation properties and downhole temperature.

  15. Microstructure and high-temperature wear properties of in situ TiC composite coatings by plasma transferred arc surface alloying on gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Li, Jian-jun; Zheng, Zhi-zhen; Wang, Ai-hua; Huang, Qi-wen; Zeng, Da-wen

    2015-12-01

    In this work, an in situ synthesized TiC-reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) coating of approximately 350-400 µm thickness was fabricated on a gray cast iron (GCI) substrate by plasma transferred arc (PTA) surface alloying of Ti-Fe alloy powder. Microhardness tests showed that the surface hardness increased approximately four-fold after the alloying treatment. The microstructure of the MMC coating was mainly composed of residual austenite, acicular martensite, and eutectic ledeburite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analyzes revealed that the in situ TiC particles, which were formed by direct reaction of Ti with carbon originally contained in the GCI, was uniformly distributed at the boundary of residual austenite in the alloying zone. Pin-on-disc high-temperature wear tests were performed on samples both with and without the MMC coating at room temperature and at elevated temperatures (473 K and 623 K), and the wear behavior and mechanism were investigated. The results showed that, after the PTA alloying treatment, the wear resistance of the samples improved significantly. On the basis of our analysis of the composite coatings by optical microscopy, SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and microhardness measurements, we attributed this improvement of wear resistance to the transformation of the microstructure and to the presence of TiC particles.

  16. Response Surface Methodology Approach on Effect of Cutting Parameter on Tool Wear during End Milling of High Thermal Conductivity Steel -150 (HTCS-150)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Hadzley, A. B.; Mohd Azahar, W. M. Y. Wan; Izamshah, R.; Mohd Shahir, K.; Mohd Amran, A.; Anis Afuza, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study of development the tool life's mathematical model during the milling process on High Thermal Conductivity Steel 150 (HTCS-150) 56 HRC. Using response surface methodology, the mathematical models for tool life have been developed in terms of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. Box-Behnken techniques is a part of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to carry out the work plan to predict, the tool wear and generate the numerical equation in relation to independent variable parameters by Design Expert software. Dry milling experiments were conducted by using two levels of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. In this study, the variable for the cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut were in the range of 484-553 m/min, 0.31-0.36 mm/tooth, and 0.1-0.5 mm, width of cut is constantly 0.01mm per passes. The tool wear was measured using tool maker microscope. The effect of input factors that on the responds were identified by using mean of ANOVA. The responds of tool wear then simultaneously optimized. The validation of the test reveals the model accuracy 5% and low tool wear under same experimental condition.

  17. Optical Diagnostic Characterization of High-Power Hall Thruster Wear and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George J., Jr.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to correlate BN insulator erosion with high-power Hall thruster operation. Specifically, actinometry leveraging excited xenon states is used to normalize the emission spectra of ground state boron as a function of thruster operating condition. Trends in the strength of the boron signal are correlated with thruster power, discharge voltage, and discharge current. In addition, the technique is demonstrated on metallic coupons embedded in the walls of the HiVHAc EM thruster. The OES technique captured the overall trend in the erosion of the coupons which boosts credibility in the method since there are no data to which to calibrate the erosion rates of high-power Hall thrusters. The boron signals are shown to trend linearly with discharge voltage for a fixed discharge current as expected. However, the boron signals of the higher-power NASA 300M and NASA 457Mv2 trend with discharge current and show an unexpectedly weak to inverse dependence on discharge voltage. Electron temperatures measured optically in the near-field plume of the thruster agree well with Langmuir probe data. However, the optical technique used to determine Te showed unacceptable sensitivity to the emission intensities. Near-field, single-frequency imaging of the xenon neutrals is also presented as a function of operating condition for the NASA 457 Mv2.

  18. EROSIVE WEAR OF DUCTILE METALS BY A PARTICLE-LADEN HIGH-VELOCITY LIQUID-JET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Simon Ka-Keung; Humphrey, Joseph A.C.; Levy, Alan

    1980-12-01

    A liquid-solid particle jet impingement flow apparatus is described and experimental measurements are reported for the accelerated erosion of copper, aluminum and mild steel sheet metal by coal suspensions in kerosene and alumina and silicon carbide suspensions in water. Slurry velocities of up to 130 ft/sec (40 m/sec) and impingement angles ranging from 15 degrees to 90 degrees were investigated. The maximum particle concentration used was 40% by weight. For high velocity the results of this study show two erosion maxima arising at impingement angles of 90 degrees and 40 degrees respectively~ whereas in corresponding gas-solid particle investigations maximum erosion occurs at approximately 20 degrees. In the study both particle concentration and composition were varied. A polynomial regression technique was used to calculate empirical and semi-theoretical correlation constants.

  19. Features of erosion-corrosion wear in low-pressure evaporators of combined-cycle plant heat-recovery boilers at high void factor values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetsky, N. S.; Schwarz, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The features of erosion-corrosion wear (ECW) in a low-pressure evaporator (LPE) combinedcycle plant (CCP) at high void factor values in the heat carrier are considered. It is shown that if the medium pressure in the evaporator is less than 1 MPa and steam quality x ≈ 0.5, the void fraction β is close to 1, at the outlet of the evaporator almost dry saturated steam moves, and the formation of liquid films is excluded. Under these conditions, the wear of the evaporator coil sections has an erosive nature, caused by high velocity steam, carrying the dense particles of corrosion products and large drops of water, previously plucked from the surface of the liquid films.

  20. Adherence to Wearing Prescription Custom-Made Footwear in Patients With Diabetes at High Risk for Plantar Foot Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Waaijman, Roelof; Keukenkamp, Renske; de Haart, Mirjam; Polomski, Wojtek P.; Nollet, Frans; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Prescription custom-made footwear can only be effective in preventing diabetic foot ulcers if worn by the patient. Particularly, the high prevalence of recurrent foot ulcers focuses the attention on adherence, for which objective data are nonexisting. We objectively assessed adherence in patients with high risk of ulcer recurrence and evaluated what determines adherence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 107 patients with diabetes, neuropathy, a recently healed plantar foot ulcer, and custom-made footwear, footwear use was measured during 7 consecutive days using a shoe-worn, temperature-based monitor. Daily step count was measured simultaneously using an ankle-worn activity monitor. Patients logged time away from home. Adherence was calculated as the percentage of steps that prescription footwear was worn. Determinants of adherence were evaluated in multivariate linear regression analysis. RESULTS Mean ± SD adherence was 71 ± 25%. Adherence at home was 61 ± 32%, over 3,959 ± 2,594 steps, and away from home 87 ± 26%, over 2,604 ± 2,507 steps. In 35 patients with low adherence (<60%), adherence at home was 28 ± 24%. Lower BMI, more severe foot deformity, and more appealing footwear were significantly associated with higher adherence. CONCLUSIONS The results show that adherence to wearing custom-made footwear is insufficient, particularly at home where patients exhibit their largest walking activity. This low adherence is a major threat for reulceration. These objective findings provide directions for improvement in adherence, which could include prescribing specific off-loading footwear for indoors, and they set a reference for future comparative research on footwear adherence in diabetes. PMID:23321218

  1. Friction, wear, transfer, and wear surface morphology of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  2. A new methodology for predictive tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Sik

    An empirical approach to tool wear, which requires a series of machining tests for each combination of insert and work material, has been a standard practice for industries since early part of the twentieth century. With many varieties of inserts and work materials available for machining, the empirical approach is too experiment-intensive that the demand for the development of a model-based approach is increasing. With a model-based approach, the developed wear equation can be extended without additional machining experiments. The main idea is that the temperatures on the primary wear areas are increasing such that the physical properties of the tool material degrade substantially and consequently tool wear increases. Dissolution and abrasion are identified to be the main mechanisms for tool wear. Flank wear is predominantly a phenomenon of abrasion as evident by the presence of a scoring mark on the flank surface. Based on this statement, it is reasonable to expect that the flank-wear rate would increase with the content of hard inclusions. However, experimental flank wear results did not necessary correspond to the content of cementite phase present in the steels. Hence, other phenomena are believed to significantly affect wear behavior under certain conditions. When the cutting temperature in the flank interface is subjected to high enough temperatures, pearlitic structure austenizes. During the formation of a new austenitic phase, the existing carbon is dissolved into the ferrite matrix, which will reduce the abrasive action. To verify the austenitic transformation, turning tests were conducted with plain carbon steels. The machined surface areas are imaged using X-ray diffraction the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). On the other hand, crater wear occurs as a result of dissolution wear and abrasive wear. To verify the wear mechanisms of crater wear, various coating inserts as well as uncoated inserts were

  3. Investigations of mechanical and wear properties of alumina/titania/fire-clay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vinay Kumar; Chauhan, Shivani; Sharma, Aarushi

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effect of various particulates (alumina, titania, fire clay) reinforcements on mechanical and wear properties of epoxy composites have been studied with a prime motive of replacing the costly alumina and titania by much economical fire clay for high mechanical strength and/or wear resistant materials. Fire clay based epoxy composites delivered better mechanical (both tensile and impact) properties than the alumina filled or neat epoxy composites and slightly lower than titania reinforced composites, which qualified the fire clay a very suitable cost effective alternatives of both alumina and titania for high mechanical strength based applications. However, the poor wear behavior of fire clay reinforced composites revealed its poor candidacy for wear and tear applications.

  4. Dental wear in dolphins (Cetacea: Delphinidae) from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Loch, Carolina; Simões-Lopes, Paulo C

    2013-02-01

    (1) Dental wear is a common phenomenon in mammals. Its occurrence is influenced by tooth anatomy, animal physiology, biomechanics and behaviour. So far, investigations of dental wear in cetaceans have been scanty and superficial. We compare the frequencies of occurrence, location and intensity of dental wear in some species of dolphins from southern Brazil, South Atlantic Ocean. (2) Teeth of ten species were evaluated using a stereoscopic microscope to identify wear facets, which were classified according to location, anatomical position and wear intensity. (3) Frequencies of dental wear were high for all species with exception of Delphinus capensis, with less than 50% of teeth worn. Simultaneous wear facets in the apex and lateral of teeth were more common than facets restricted to the apex or lateral faces. Wear on the dental crown was more common, but some species showed less frequent wear down to the cingulum or root level. Superficial wear seems to be the general trend for dolphins, but Stenella coeruleoalba and Pseudorca crassidens showed a higher frequency of severe wear. Only for Tursiops truncatus the frequencies of wear were significantly different between males and females. When considering the ontogeny of dental wear, only for T. truncatus and Stenella frontalis indexes of dental wear were correlated with body length. (4) Whether dental wear has implications or not in fitness and feeding behaviour, severely worn teeth may expose the pulp cavity and increase the susceptibility to local infections. PMID:22939372

  5. Influence of third-body particles originating from bone void fillers on the wear of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Cowie, Raelene M; Carbone, Silvia; Aiken, Sean; Cooper, John J; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Calcium sulfate bone void fillers are increasingly being used for dead space management in infected arthroplasty revision surgery. The presence of these materials as loose beads close to the bearing surfaces of joint replacements gives the potential for them to enter the joint becoming trapped between the articulating surfaces; the resulting damage to cobalt chrome counterfaces and the subsequent wear of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene is unknown. In this study, third-body damage to cobalt chrome counterfaces was simulated using particles of the calcium sulfate bone void fillers Stimulan® (Biocomposites Ltd., Keele, UK) and Osteoset® (Wright Medical Technology, TN, USA) using a bespoke rig. Scratches on the cobalt chrome plates were quantified in terms of their density and mean lip height, and the damage caused by the bone void fillers was compared to that caused by particles of SmartSet GMV PMMA bone cement (DePuy Synthes, IN, USA). The surface damage from Stimulan® was below the resolution of the analysis technique used; SmartSet GMV caused 0.19 scratches/mm with a mean lip height of 0.03 µm; Osteoset® led to a significantly higher number (1.62 scratches/mm) of scratches with a higher mean lip height (0.04 µm). Wear tests of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene were carried out in a six-station multi-axial pin on plate reciprocating rig against the damaged plates and compared to negative (highly polished) and positive control plates damaged with a diamond stylus (2 µm lip height). The wear of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was shown to be similar against the negative control plates and those damaged with third-body particles; there was a significantly higher (p < 0.001) rate of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear against the positive control plates. This study showed that bone void fillers of similar composition can cause varying damage to cobalt chrome counterfaces. However, the lip heights of the scratches

  6. Influence of third-body particles originating from bone void fillers on the wear of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Raelene M; Carbone, Silvia; Aiken, Sean; Cooper, John J; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-08-01

    Calcium sulfate bone void fillers are increasingly being used for dead space management in infected arthroplasty revision surgery. The presence of these materials as loose beads close to the bearing surfaces of joint replacements gives the potential for them to enter the joint becoming trapped between the articulating surfaces; the resulting damage to cobalt chrome counterfaces and the subsequent wear of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene is unknown. In this study, third-body damage to cobalt chrome counterfaces was simulated using particles of the calcium sulfate bone void fillers Stimulan(®) (Biocomposites Ltd., Keele, UK) and Osteoset(®) (Wright Medical Technology, TN, USA) using a bespoke rig. Scratches on the cobalt chrome plates were quantified in terms of their density and mean lip height, and the damage caused by the bone void fillers was compared to that caused by particles of SmartSet GMV PMMA bone cement (DePuy Synthes, IN, USA). The surface damage from Stimulan(®) was below the resolution of the analysis technique used; SmartSet GMV caused 0.19 scratches/mm with a mean lip height of 0.03 µm; Osteoset(®) led to a significantly higher number (1.62 scratches/mm) of scratches with a higher mean lip height (0.04 µm). Wear tests of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene were carried out in a six-station multi-axial pin on plate reciprocating rig against the damaged plates and compared to negative (highly polished) and positive control plates damaged with a diamond stylus (2 µm lip height). The wear of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was shown to be similar against the negative control plates and those damaged with third-body particles; there was a significantly higher (p < 0.001) rate of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene wear against the positive control plates. This study showed that bone void fillers of similar composition can cause varying damage to cobalt chrome counterfaces. However, the lip heights of the

  7. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 3, Traditional approaches to wear prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  8. Microstructural Characterization and Wear Behavior of Nano-Boride Dispersed Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Hybrid High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spraying Laser Surface Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2015-07-01

    The current study concerns the detailed microstructural characterization and investigation of wear behavior of nano-boride dispersed coating developed on AISI 304 stainless steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spray deposition of nickel-based alloy and subsequent laser melting. There is a significant refinement and homogenization of microstructure with improvement in microhardness due to laser surface melting (1200 VHN as compared to 945 VHN of as-sprayed and 250 VHN of as-received substrate). The high temperature phase stability of the as-coated and laser melted surface has been studied by differential scanning calorimeter followed by detailed phase analysis at room and elevated temperature. There is a significant improvement in wear resistance of laser melted surface as compared to as-sprayed and the as-received one due to increased hardness and reduced coefficient of friction. The mechanism of wear has been investigated in details. Corrosion resistance of the coating in a 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution is significantly improved (4.43 E-2 mm/year as compared to 5 E-1 mm/year of as-sprayed and 1.66 mm/year of as-received substrate) due to laser surface melting as compared to as-sprayed surface.

  9. Simulated oral wear of packable composites.

    PubMed

    Clelland, Nancy L; Villarroel, Soraya C; Knobloch, Lisa A; Seghi, Robert R

    2003-01-01

    Wear resistance has been a problem for the posterior application of resin composites. This study evaluated and compared the wear characteristics of two conventional and two packable composites. Opposing enamel wear was also measured. One traditional hybrid composite-Herculite XR (HXR), one micro-filled composite-Heliomolar (HM) and two packable composites-Filtek P60 (P60) and Surefil (SF) were formed into disks (n = 10) and used as substrates for the wear test. Enamel was harvested from extracted human third molars and machined into cusps with a 5-mm spherical radius (n = 40). The Oregon Health Sciences University oral wear simulator was used to evaluate abrasive wear and attrition of the composite materials and wear of the opposing enamel. The resulting enamel wear facets were measured and recorded in mm2 using optical scanning methods and a computer graphics program. Abrasion and attrition of the composite substrates were measured using a profilometer. Both sets of data were subjected to ANOVA and multiple comparison tests to determine significant differences. After wear testing, scanning electron micrographs were made using representative composite samples from each group. The packable composites showed significantly less attrition and abrasive wear (p < 0.001) than the conventional controls. The microfilled composite HM resulted in significantly lower enamel wear (p < 0.001) than the materials HXR and P60 but was not significantly different from the packable composite SF at the alpha = 0.05 level. The results of this in-vitro study suggest that packable composites may have improved wear resistance over some conventional composites. Clinical studies are needed to evaluate packable composites over time. PMID:14653301

  10. Spectroscopic wear detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The elemental composition of a material exposed to hot gases and subjected to wear is determined. Atoms of an elemental species not appearing in this material are implanted in a surface at a depth based on the maximum allowable wear. The exhaust gases are spectroscopically monitored to determine the exposure of these atoms when the maximum allowable wear is reached.

  11. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Y.S. )

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alternatives to high-tensile-strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine-tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive-contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and microhardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of ductile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricant sliding wear tests on specimens and components for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylindrical unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine-tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  12. Resilience of ultra-thin oxynitride films to percolative wear-out and reliability implications for high-κ stacks at low voltage stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Nagarajan; Padovani, Andrea; Li, Xiang; Wu, Xing; Lip Lo, Vui; Bosman, Michel; Larcher, Luca; Leong Pey, Kin

    2013-09-01

    Localized progressive wear-out and degradation of ultra-thin dielectrics around the oxygen vacancy percolation path formed during accelerated time dependent dielectric breakdown tests is a well-known phenomenon documented for silicon oxynitride (SiON) based gate stacks in metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. This progressive or post breakdown stage involves an initial phase characterized by "digital" random telegraph noise fluctuations followed by the wear-out of the percolation path, which results in an "analog" increase in the leakage current, culminating in a thermal runaway and hard breakdown. The relative contribution of the digital and analog phases of degradation at very low voltage stress in ultra-thin SiON (16 Å´) is yet to be fully investigated, which represents the core of this study. We investigate the wear-out process by combining electrical and physical analysis evidences with modeling and simulation results using Kinetic Monte Carlo defect generation and multi-phonon trap assisted tunneling (PTAT) models. We show that the transition from the digital to the analog regime is governed by a critical voltage (VCRIT), which determines the reliability margin in the post breakdown phase. Our results have a significant impact on the post-breakdown operational reliability of SiON and advanced high-κ-SiOx interfacial layer gate stacks, wherein the SiOx layer seems to be the weakest link for percolation event.

  13. Comparison of joint angles and electromyographic activity of the lower extremities during standing with wearing standard and revised high-heeled shoes: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Lee, Suk Min

    2016-04-29

    Revised high-heeled shoes (HHSs) were designed to improve the shortcomings of standard HHSs. This study was conducted to compare revised and standard HHSs with regard to joint angles and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lower extremities during standing. The participants were five healthy young women. Data regarding joint angles and EMG activity of the lower extremities were obtained under three conditions: barefoot, when wearing revised HHSs, and when wearing standard HHSs. Lower extremity joint angles in the three dimensional plane were confirmed using a VICON motion capture system. EMG activity of the lower extremities was measured using active bipolar surface EMG. Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance by rank applied to analyze differences during three standing conditions. Compared with the barefoot condition, the standard HHSs condition was more different than the revised HHSs condition with regard to lower extremity joint angles during standing. EMG activity of the lower extremities was different for the revised HHSs condition, but the differences among the three conditions were not significant. Wearing revised HHSs may positively impact joint angles and EMG activity of the lower extremities by improving body alignment while standing. PMID:27163313

  14. Rolling-contact and wear resistance of hard coatings on bearing-steel substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.

    1992-02-01

    Ever-increasing needs for high-performance ball- and roller-bearing components that can endure extreme applications have led to a growing interest in hard coatings for improved fatigue life and wear resistance. In particular, hard TiN and TiC coatings and, quite recently, diamond like carbon films have attracted much attention from manufacturers that produce bearing systems for both rolling- and sliding-contact applications. This paper presents an overview that highlights recent incremental progress in achieving improved fatigue and wear resistance in bearing steels through the use of hard coatings. Effects of coating adhesion, thickness, and morphology on fatigue and wear resistance of hard coatings are discussed in detail. Specific references are made to a few mechanistic models that correlate coating thickness and adhesion to improved fatigue life and wear resistance.

  15. Frictional strength and wear-rate of carbonate faults during high-velocity, steady-state sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Yuval; Sagy, Amir; Reches, Ze'ev

    2013-11-01

    We ran an extensive series of shear experiments to test the effect of shear velocity and normal stress on wear-rate and frictional strength. The experiments were conducted on three types of carbonate samples with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters at slip velocity of V=0.002-0.96 m/s, and normal stress σn=0.25-6.9 MPa.

  16. Wear Behavior Characterization for the Screening of Magnesium-based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGhee, Paul R.

    This research is focused on the development of a systematic approach to evaluate the selection of materials for Mg-based alloys under wear conditions for biomedical applications. A pilot study was carried out in order to establish an accurate and reliable wear testing technique for magnesium and its alloys. This pilot study was conducted on aluminum (Al) and pure Mg, and showed that aluminum has a lower wear rate compared to Mg. The technique displayed good repeatability and high precision. For the main study, an ERC Mg-based alloy was to be compared with pure Mg. The same technique, when applied to pure Mg from a different vendor, produced up to 90% scatter in the data. Microstructure was studied to see if it had any correlation with the scatter. It was discovered that Mg ingot from the second vendor had outsized grains that contributed to the disproportional scatter in the wear data. Increasing the stroke length during wear testing was required so that the wear data would be averaged over multiple grains and reduces the variation in computed wear rates. In the main study, wear behavior and friction properties were analyzed using microtribometery, mechanical stylus profilometry, and microindentation. Surface morphology and microstructure were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. For the main study, pure Mg and the ERC alloy as-cast and extruded conditions were compared. Pure Mg and MZCR alloys were extruded at 350°C and 400°C, respectively. Mg and MZCR alloy were cast at 350°C and heat treated at 510°C. The extruded specimens were divided into two sections, cross-section and longitudinal section. Wear tests were carried out under the applied normal load 0.5 N - 2.5 N in 0.5 N increments sliding at a rate of 0.2 Hz for 240 passes. The results show that the alloying and extrusion processes increase the hardness of the MZCR alloy significantly up to 80%. The as-cast MZCR has a lower resistance to wear

  17. The hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance of coatings developed for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wilson, W.L.

    2000-05-01

    One potential approach for reducing the level of nuclear plant radiation exposure that results from activated cobalt wear debris is the use of a wear resistant coating. However, large differences in stiffness between a coating/substrate can result in high interfacial stresses that produce coating de-adhesion when a coated substrate is subjected to high stress wear contact. Scratch adhesion and indentation tests have been used to identify four promising coating processes [1,2]: (1) the use of a thin Cr-nitride coating with a hard and less-stiff interlayer, (2) the use of a thick, multilayered Cr-nitride coating with graded layers, (3) use of the duplex approach, or nitriding to harden the material subsurface followed by application of a multilayered Cr-nitride coating, and (4) application of nitriding alone. The processing, characterization, and adhesion of these coating systems are discussed. The wear resistance and performance has been evaluated using laboratory pin-on-disc, 4-ball, and high stress rolling contact tests. Based on the results of these tests, the best coating candidate from the high-stress rolling contact wear test was the thin duplex coating, which consists of ion nitriding followed deposition of a thin Cr-nitride coating, while the thin Cr-nitride coating exhibited the best results in the 4-ball wear test.

  18. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  19. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  20. IMPROVEMENT OF WEAR COMPONENT'S PERFORMANCE BY UTILIZING ADVANCED MATERIALS AND NEW MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES: CASTCON PROCESS FOR MINING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodi Huang; Richard Gertsch

    2003-02-27

    The project was highlighted by continued fabrication of drill bit inserts and testing them: (1) The inserts were subjected to hammer tests to determine brittleness. Selected inserts experienced multiple blows from a 16 pound sledge hammer. The resulting damage was minimal. (2) Three inserts were placed on three different 16.5 inch diameter rotary drill bits, and the bits drilled taconite rock until the entire bit failed. (3) The inserts had somewhat less wear resistance than current art, and exhibited no brittle failures. (4) More work is needed to produce the inserts at near net shape. The test inserts required too much machining. The project next turned to manufacturing 6.5 inch diameter disc cutters. The cutters will feature a core of tungsten carbide (TC) in a disc body composed of H13 tool steel. The TC inserts are in manufacture and the dies for the disc are being designed. The plan for next quarter: (1) Investigate materials and manufacturing changes for the fibrous monolith drill bit inserts that will increase their wear life. (2) Begin manufacturing disc cutters.

  1. Mobile-bearing knees reduce rotational asymmetric wear.

    PubMed

    Ho, Fang-Yuan; Ma, Hon-Ming; Liau, Jiann-Jong; Yeh, Chuan-Ren; Huang, Chun-Hsiung

    2007-09-01

    Polyethylene wear of bearing components is the most common long-term complication in total knee arthroplasty. One would anticipate differing kinematics would generate different wear patterns (including wear type, degree, and symmetry) on the articulating surface of mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing inserts. Because mobile-bearing designs facilitate movement of the insert relative to the tray when the knee rotates, we hypothesized mobile-bearing designs would reduce the incidence of rotational asymmetric wear. We examined 51 worn tibial inserts, including 15 from mobile-bearing rotating-platform posterior-cruciate-sacrificing dished prostheses and 36 from fixed-bearing posterior-cruciate-retaining flat prostheses, which were retrieved at revision surgery with an average implantation time of 115 months. We divided wear types into low-grade wear (burnishing, abrasion, and cold flow) and high-grade wear (scratching, pitting, metal embedding, and delamination) to assess wear degree of polyethylene. To assess symmetry of wear, the insert surface was divided into medial and lateral sides and each side was further divided into three equal zones along the anteroposterior direction. Low-grade wear was more common in mobile-bearing knees, whereas high-grade wear was more common in fixed-bearing knees. We identified no internal/external rotational asymmetric wear or anteroposterior asymmetric wear in mobile-bearing knees. PMID:17483732

  2. Effect of size and dimensional tolerance of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty on wear: An in-silico study.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Lorenza; Di Puccio, Francesca; Joyce, Thomas J; Ciulli, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    Although huge research efforts have been devoted to wear analysis of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in hip and knee implants, shoulder prostheses have been studied only marginally. Recently, the authors presented a numerical wear model of reverse total shoulder arthroplasties (RTSAs), and its application for estimating the wear coefficient k from experimental data according to different wear laws. In this study, such model and k expressions are exploited to investigate the sensitivity of UHMWPE wear to implant size and dimensional tolerance. A set of 10 different geometries was analysed, considering nominal diameters in the range 36-42mm, available on the market, and a cup dimensional tolerance of +0.2, -0.0mm (resulting in a diametrical clearance ranging between 0.04-0.24mm), estimated from measurements on RTSAs. Since the most reliable wear law and wear coefficient k for UHMWPE are still controversial in the literature, both the Archard law (AR) and the wear law of UHMWPE (PE), as well as four different k expressions were considered, carrying out a total of 40 simulations. Results showed that the wear volume increases with the implant size and decreases with the dimensional tolerance for both the wear laws. Interestingly, different trends were obtained for the maximum wear depth vs. clearance: the best performing implants should have a high conformity according to the AR law but low conformity for the PE law. However, according to both laws, wear is highly affected by both implant size and dimensional tolerance, although it is much more sensitive to the latter, with up to a twofold variation of wear predicted. Indeed, dimensional tolerance directly alters the clearance, and therefore the lubrication and contact pressure distribution in the implant. Rather surprisingly the role of dimensional tolerance has been completely disregarded in the literature, as well as in the standards. Furthermore, this study notes some important issues for future

  3. Development of Modified Pag (Polyalkylene Glycol) High VI High Fuel Efficient Lubricant for LDV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Arup; McWatt, D. G.; Zdrodowski, R. J.; Liu, Zak; Elie, Larry; Simko, S. J.; Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Cuthbert, J.; Hock, E. D.

    2015-09-30

    Engine oils play a critical role in friction reduction. Improvements in engine oil technology steadily improved fuel economy as the industry moved through ILSAC GF-1 to GF-5 specifications. These improvements were influenced by changes in base oil chemistry, development of new friction modifiers and their treat levels, and the total additive package consisting of various other components. However, the improvements are incremental and further fuel consumption reduction opportunities are becoming more challenging. Polyalkylene glycol (PAG) based engine oils are being explored as a step forward for significant fuel consumption reduction. Although PAG fluids are used in many industrial applications, its application as an engine oil has been explored in a limited way. The objective of this project is to deep dive in exploring the applicability of PAG technology in engine oil, understanding the benefits, and limitations, elucidating the mechanism(s) for friction benefits, if any, and finally recommending how to address any limitations. The project was designed in four steps, starting with selection of lubricant technology, followed by friction and wear evaluations in laboratory bench tests which are relatively simple and inexpensive and also served as a screener for further evaluation. Selected formulations were chosen for more complex engine component level tests i.e., motored valvetrain friction and wear, piston ring friction using a motored single cylinder, and motored engine tests. A couple of formulations were further selected based on component level tests for engine dyno tests i.e., Sequence VID (ASTM D6709) for fuel economy, Sequence IVA (ASTM D6891) for valvetrain wear, and Sequence VG (ASTM D6593) for sludge and varnish protection. These are some of the industry standard tests required for qualifying engine oils. Out of these tests, a single PAG oil was selected for chassis roll dynamometer tests for fuel economy and emission measurements using FTP (Federal

  4. Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Russel, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by an Ames-led project team under a 4-year DOE-ITP sponsored project titled, 'Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency.' The Report serves as the project deliverable for the CPS agreement number 15015. The purpose of this project was to develop and commercialize a family of lightweight, bulk composite materials that are highly resistant to degradation by erosive and abrasive wear. These materials, based on AlMgB{sub 14}, are projected to save over 30 TBtu of energy per year when fully implemented in industrial applications, with the associated environmental benefits of eliminating the burning of 1.5 M tons/yr of coal and averting the release of 4.2 M tons/yr of CO{sub 2} into the air. This program targeted applications in the mining, drilling, machining, and dry erosion applications as key platforms for initial commercialization, which includes some of the most severe wear conditions in industry. Production-scale manufacturing of this technology has begun through a start-up company, NewTech Ceramics (NTC). This project included providing technical support to NTC in order to facilitate cost-effective mass production of the wear-resistant boride components. Resolution of issues related to processing scale-up, reduction in energy intensity during processing, and improving the quality and performance of the composites, without adding to the cost of processing were among the primary technical focus areas of this program. Compositional refinements were also investigated in order to achieve the maximum wear resistance. In addition, synthesis of large-scale, single-phase AlMgB{sub 14} powder was conducted for use as PVD sputtering targets for nanocoating applications.

  5. In-vivo degradation of middle-term highly cross-linked and remelted polyethylene cups: Modification induced by creep, wear and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Sudo, Akihiro; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Puppulin, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    In this study Raman (RS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic techniques were exploited to study 11 retrieved liners made of remelted highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE), with the intent to elucidate their in-vivo mechanical and chemical degradation. The retrievals had different follow-ups, ranging from a few months to 7 years of implantation time and belong to the first generation of highly cross-linked and remelted polyethylene clinically introduced in 1999, but still currently implanted. Raman assessments enabled to discriminate contributes of wear and creep on the total reduction of thickness in different locations of the cup. According to our results, although the most of the viscoelastic deformation occurred during the first year (bedding-in period), it progressed during the steady wear state up to 7 years with much lower but not negligible rate. Overall, the wear rate of this remelted HXLPE liner was low. Preliminary analysis on microtomed sections of the liners after in-vivo and in-vitro accelerated aging (ASTM F2003-02) enabled to obtain a phenomenological correlation between the oxidation index (OI) and the amount of orthorhombic phase fraction (αc), which can be easily non-destructively measured by RS. Profiles of αc obtained from different locations of the cups were used to judge the oxidative degradation of the 11 retrievals, considering also the ex-vivo time elapsed from the revision surgery to the spectroscopic experiments. Low but measurable level of oxidation was detected in all the short-term retrievals, while in the middle-term samples peaks of OI were observed in the subsurface (up to OI=4.5), presumably induced by the combined effect of mechanical stress, lipid absorption and prolonged ex-vivo shelf-aging in air. PMID:26202469

  6. Young Adolescents' Perception of Their Peers Who Wear Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Donna J.; Hood, Stephen B.

    1986-01-01

    Reactions of 87 normal hearing and 30 severely hearing impaired junior high school students to videotapes of two students (one hearing impaired and one normal) speaking when either wearing a postauricular hearing aid, wearing a body aid, or not wearing an aid were examined. (Author/DB)

  7. The Impact of Weather on Women’s Tendency to Wear Red or Pink when at High Risk for Conception

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Jessica L.; Beall, Alec T.

    2014-01-01

    Women are particularly motivated to enhance their sexual attractiveness during their most fertile period, and men perceive shades of red, when associated with women, as sexually attractive. Building on this research, we recently found that women are more likely to wear reddish clothing when at peak fertility (Beall & Tracy, 2013), presumably as a way of increasing their attractiveness. Here, we first report results from a methodological replication, conducted during warmer weather, which produced a null effect. Investigating this discrepancy, we considered the impact of a potentially relevant contextual difference between previous research and the replication: current weather. If the red-dress effect is driven by a desire to increase one’s sexual appeal, then it should emerge most reliably when peak-fertility women have few alternative options for accomplishing this goal (e.g., wearing minimal clothing). Results from re-analyses of our previously collected data and a new experiment support this account, by demonstrating that the link between fertility and red/pink dress emerges robustly in cold, but not warm, weather. Together, these findings suggest that the previously documented red-dress effect is moderated by current climate concerns, and provide further evidence that under certain circumstances red/pink dress is reliably associated with female fertility. PMID:24586414

  8. Fundamental deformation processes controlling nanoscale friction and wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsmann, Bernd

    2010-03-01

    Thermally activated processes are often responsible for the kinetics of deformation and can control tribological performance. In this contribution two such processes are discussed in combination with nanoscale tribology experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The first process describes single asperity wear as an atom-by-atom loss process driven by frictional shear stresses an interface. The wear rate is described by a thermally activated bond breaking process in which the energy barrier is reduced by the frictional shear stress. This leads to dramatic deviations from Archard's wear law which is commonly used to described macroscopic wear. Experimental confirmation of an atom-by-atom wear process is given by AFM wear experiments using different material combinations of tips sliding on surfaces [1]. The second process relates fundamental rearranging processes in polymers to friction. As an example, data of sliding friction between a silicon tip and a highly cross-linked polyaryletherketone film using friction force microscopy are presented. Energy dissipation into so-called molecular relaxations (alpha and beta relaxations) is identified as distinctive maxima of the friction force as a function of temperature between 150 and 500 K. A strong shift of such peak temperatures as a function of applied load is observed. Again, a model with an Arrhenius activation modulated by the applied shear stress describes experimental results quantitatively. The effect of the stress-shifted relaxation on friction-versus-load experiments is discussed [2]. Both processes will be discussed in the context of technological applications. [4pt] [1] B. Gotsmann and M. A. Lantz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 125501 (2008) [0pt] [2] L. Jansen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 236101 (2009)

  9. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of wear resistant gradual a-Si1-x:Cx:H coatings on nickel-titanium for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niermann, Benedikt; Böke, Marc; Schauer, Janine-Christina; Winter, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been used to deposit thin films with gradual transitions from silicon to carbon on Cu, Ni, stainless steel, and NiTi. Thus show low stress, elasticity, and wear resistance with excellent adhesion on all metals under investigation. Already at low Si concentrations of 10 at. % the intrinsic stress is considerably reduced compared to pure diamondlike carbon (DLC) films. The deposition process is controlled by optical emission spectroscopy. This technique has been applied to monitor the growth precursors and to correlate them with the film composition. The compositions of the films were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and XPS measurements. Due to the elastic properties of the gradual transition and the excellent biocompatibility of DLC, the described film systems present a useful coating for biomedical applications.

  10. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  11. Elevated temperature dry sliding wear behavior of nickel-based composite coating on austenitic stainless steel deposited by a novel central hollow laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang-Ming; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Wang, Ming-Di; Yang, Mao-Sheng; Shi, Shi-Hong; Fu, Ge-Yan; Chen, Shu-Fa

    2011-10-01

    In order to improve the high-temperature wear resistance of austenitic stainless steel, a wear resistant composite coating reinforced with hard (Cr,Fe) 7C 3 carbide and toughened by ductile γ-(Ni,Fe)/(Cr,Fe) 7C 3 eutectic matrix was fabricated by a novel central hollow laser cladding technique. The constituent phases and microstructure as well as high-temperature tribological behaviors of the Ni-based coating were investigated, respectively, and the corresponding wear mechanisms were discussed. It has been found that the composite coating exhibits superior wear resistance than substrate either at ambient or high temperatures. The coating shows better sliding wear resistance at 600 °C than 300 °C owing to high-temperature stability of the reinforced carbide and polishing effect as well as formation of continuous lubricious films, which implied it has large potential industrial applications at relatively higher temperatures.

  12. Processing of an ultrafine-grained titanium by high-pressure torsion: an evaluation of the wear properties with and without a TiN coating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan Ting; Gao, Nong; Gee, Mark G; Wood, Robert J K; Langdon, Terence G

    2013-01-01

    A commercial purity (CP) Grade 2 Ti was processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) using an imposed pressure of 3.0GPa at room temperature. The HPT processing reduced the grain size from ∼8.6 μm in the as-received state to ultra-fine grains (UFG) of ∼130 nm after HPT. Tensile testing showed the HPT-processed Ti exhibited a good combination of high ultimate tensile strength (∼940 MPa) and a reasonable elongation to failure (∼23%). Physical vapour deposition was used to deposit TiN coatings, with a thickness of 2.5 μm, on Ti samples both with and without HPT processing. Scratch tests showed the TiN coating on UFG Ti had a critical failure load of ∼22.5 N whereas the load was only ∼12.7 N for the coarse-grained Ti. The difference is explained using a simple composite hardness model. Wear tests demonstrated an improved wear resistance of TiN coating when using UFG Ti as the substrate. The results suggest that CP Ti processed by HPT and subsequently coated with TiN provides a potentially important material for use in bio-implants. PMID:23140675

  13. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  14. Tribopolymerization as an anti-wear mechanism. Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Furey, M.J.

    1996-04-01

    The primary objective of this activity is to obtain the necessary data which would enhance, promote, and encourage the introduction of advanced lubrication technology into the marketplace. This includes (a) defining specific but different applications, (b) establishing the limits or ranges of applied loads, speeds, and temperatures over which the concept of tribopolymerization would work in reducing wear and/or friction, (c) continuing in efforts to understand the film-forming process (this rates to (b) above), using this knowledge to develop new and even more effective additives, and (d) exploring possible connections with private and investment companies for the licensing and marketing of products which will reduce friction and wear in a variety of applications. Progress was made in several different but connected areas. These included (a) establishing of load/velocity limits of selected monomers for ceramic lubrication, (b) the discovery of new and effective monomers designed for higher temperature anti-wear applications, (c) improvements and modifications of the high load/high speed pin-on-disk machine, (d) the initiation of related or spin-off projects designed to get their advanced technology into the marketplace, (e) the filing of three new patent applications, and (f) collaborative research with Dr. Kajdas--the co-inventor with Dr. Furey--on tribopolymerization as a novel and effective approach to the boundary lubrication of ceramics and steel. These and other elements of progress made during the first Quarter of 1996 are discussed briefly.

  15. Wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in a physiological hip joint simulator in the anatomical position using bovine serum as a lubricant.

    PubMed

    Bigsby, R J; Hardaker, C S; Fisher, J

    1997-01-01

    The Leeds physiological anatomical (PA) hip joint simulator was developed to apply three axes of loading and a complex three-dimensional motion so that the forces and motions can reproduce exactly the walking cycles defined by Paul. This paper presents the results of a study using the Leeds PA hip joint simulator to determine the wear of 32 mm ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular cups against stainless steel and zirconia ceramic heads, using bovine serum as lubricant. These results have been compared with the results of a previous study that used water as the lubricant, which led to UHMWPE transfer film being formed on the stainless steel head. Comparisons are also made with clinical results and results from other simulators. The study indicates that it is preferable to use bovine serum in simulator studies. In addition, the results indicate that if the surface roughness of the metallic and femoral heads are similar, and they remain undamaged during the tests, the wear rates of the UHMWPE cups are likely to be similar. PMID:9256003

  16. Improvement in wear and corrosion resistance of AISI 1020 steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spray coating containing Ni-Cr-B-Si-Fe-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, M.; Thanu, A. Justin; Gopalakrishnan, P.

    2012-04-01

    In this investigation, AISI 1020 low carbon steel has been selected as the base material. The Ni based super alloy powder NiCrBSiFeC was sprayed on the base material using high velocity oxy-fuel spraying (HVOF) technique. The thickness of the coating was approximately 0.5 mm (500 μm). The coating was characterized using optical microscopy, Vickers microhardness testing, X-ray diffraction technique and scanning electron microscopy. Dry sliding wear tests were carried out at 3 m/s sliding speed under the load of 10 N for 1000 m sliding distance at various temperatures i.e., 35° C, 250° C and 350° C. The corrosion test was carried out in 1 M copper chloride in acetic acid solution. The polarization studies were also conducted for both base material and coating. The improvement in microhardness from 1.72 GPa (175 HV0.05) to 10.54 GPa (1075 HV0.05) was observed. The coatings exhibited 3-6 times improved wear resistance as compared with base material. Also, the corrosion rate was reduced by 3.5 times due to the presence of coatings.

  17. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear. Quarterly progress report, June 1981-January 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Kosel, T.H.; Rao, C.M.; Fernandes, M.T.; Fiore, N.F.

    1982-02-24

    This report describes research aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between microstructure and wear resistance of highly alloyed materials, including high-Cr white irons and powder metallurgy (PM) alloys now used or potentially to be used in coal mining, handling, and gasification. The specific types of wear under study are low-stress abrasion and gouging wear encountered in mining, coal conversion, and transfer applications. Recent work has concentrated on analysis of results. The many detailed observations obtained in the work on scratch test simulations of abrasive wear mechanisms have been summarized in drafts of three papers. The first, a study of abrasive wear mechanisms using diamond and alumina scratch tests, was included as an appendix to Quarterly Report 16/17 and has been accepted for publication in the journal Wear. Revision of the other two papers is in progress. Two papers representing our analysis of results are included as appendices to this report. The first, abrasion in multiphase alloys, was presented at the NACE conference on corrosion-erosion-wear of materials at Berkeley, California in January 1982, and will be published in the proceedings. The second, on a deformation-induced phase transformation during abrasive wear of Co-base alloys, is being submitted for publication in Metallurgical Transactions. In addition, work on the gouging abrasion resistance of the previously tested high Cr-Mo white cast irons is completed. The abstract of a short paper on the results is included as an appendix. (Note: since the appendices are, or will be, available in the open literature they have been removed from the report.)

  18. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear. Quarterly progress report, January 1-June 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, N.F.; Kosel, T.H.; Channagiri, M.; Desai, V.; Fulcher, J.; Shetty, H.R.

    1980-06-01

    Research aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between microstructure and wear resistance of highly alloyed materials is described including high-Cr white irons and experimental Co-base and Ni-base powder metallurgy (PM) alloys now used or potentially to be used in coal mining, handling and gasification. The specific types of wear under study are low-stress abrasion and gouging wear encountered in mining, coal conversion and transfer applications. Research has concentrated on the investigation of wear in Co-base PM alloys No. 19 and No. 6, which have been sintered to provide different carbide sizes at the same volume fraction in each respective alloy. Low-stress abrasion tests using Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ abrasive have been completed on Alloy No. 19 and the results show a monotonic decrease in wear rate with increasing size. A series of single-point scratch test simulations of abrasive wear mechanisms has been initiated, and these tests provide valuable insights into material removal processes in the Co-base alloys.

  19. Aluminum nanocomposites having wear resistance better than stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    An, Linan; Qu, Jun; Luo, Jinsong; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Ligong; Liu, Jinling; Xu, Chengying; Blau, Peter Julian

    2011-01-01

    Tribological behavior of alumina-particle-reinforced aluminum composites made by powder metallurgy process has been investigated. The nanocomposite containing 15 vol% of Al2O3 nanoparticles exhibits excellent wear resistance by showing significantly low wear rate and abrasive wear mode. The wear rate of the nanocomposite is even lower than stainless steel. We have also demonstrated that such excellent wear resistance only occurred in the composite reinforced with the high volume fraction of nanosized reinforcing particles. The results were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the nanocomposite.

  20. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the axial and radial force of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Y He, M.; Qi, C. X.; Li, Y. B.

    2013-12-01

    Varying of the wear-ring clearance not only has a distinct effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump including the axial and radial forces. Comparing with the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some special advantages, such as the low cost, fast and high efficiency, and convenient to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study in recent years. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the force performance of the centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump with three variable styles of the wear-rings was simulated: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Comparing with the experiment, numerical results show a good agreement. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the axial force of the centrifugal pump, while has tiny effect on the radial force for all the conditions.

  1. Wear of Selected Oxide Ceramics and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of oxide ceramics and coatings for moving mechanical components operating in high-temperature, oxidizing environments creates a need to define the tribological performance and durability of these materials. Results of research focusing on the wear behavior and properties of Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3) eutectics and coatings under dry sliding conditions are discussed. The importance of microstructure and composition on wear properties of directionally solidified oxide eutectics is illustrated. Wear data of selected oxide-, nitride-, and carbide-based ceramics and coatings are given for temperatures up to 973K in air.

  2. Characterization of Wear Mechanisms in Distorted Conical Picks After Coal Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    The interest in understanding the wear mechanisms of cemented carbide (CC) is not a new development. For a long time, there have been studies on different wear mechanisms under different coal/rock cutting conditions. These studies have helped improving the quality of CC, thereby preventing such wearing of tools. Due to highly unpredictable character of coal/rock, the wearing phenomena cannot be attributed to one single domain of conditions. However, one conclusion that can be drawn in this context is that, under similar working conditions, similar types of CC undergo similar nature of wearing process. An optimum combination of high wear resistance, strength and hardness has facilitated widespread application of CC in the field of mining engineering. The abrasive parts of the mining tools are made of CC materials. The current study is focussed on a detailed characterization of the wear mechanisms of conical picks, which are used for coal mining. Conical picks consist of a steel body with an inserted cone-shaped CC tip. After being used for a certain period of time, both, the CC tip and the steel body get distorted. In this study, selection of appropriate samples was followed by critical observation of them through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In the previous study, we explained the distortion process of both, the tip as well as the body, using the SEM images. For the present study, two samples were taken from our previous investigation for further analysis. Three other samples were also included in the present study. Seven different types of wear mechanisms, such as, cracking and crushing, cavity formation, coal intermixing, chemical degradation along with abrasion, long and deep cracks, heating effect and body deformation were observed in the five tool samples.

  3. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear. Quarterly progress report, December 1980-1 June 1981. [Alloys for use in coal mining, handling, and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Kosel, T.H.; Rao, M.C.; Shetty, H.R.; Fernandes, M.T.; Fiore, N.F.

    1981-10-29

    This report describes research aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between microstructure and wear resistance of highly alloyed materials, including high-Cr white irons and experimental Co-base and Ni-base powder metallurgy (PM) alloys now used or potentially to be used in coal mining, handling, and gasification. The specific types of wear under study are low-stress abrasion and gouging wear encountered in mining, coal conversion, and transfer applications. During this period, work was concentrated on analysis of results. The many detailed observations obtained in the work on scratch test simulations of abrasive wear mechanisms have been summarized in drafts of three papers. The first, A Study of Abrasive Wear Mechanisms Using Diamond and Alumina Scratch Tests, is included as an appendix to this report and is being submitted for publication. Revision of the other papers is in progress.

  4. Nanoscale thermomechanics of wear-resilient polymeric bilayer systems.

    PubMed

    Kaule, Tassilo; Zhang, Yi; Emmerling, Sebastian; Pihan, Sascha; Foerch, Renate; Gutmann, Jochen; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Berger, Rüdiger; Duerig, Urs; Knoll, Armin W

    2013-01-22

    We explore the effect of an ultrathin elastic coating to optimize the mechanical stability of an underlying polymer film for nanoscale applications. The coating consists of a several nanometer thin plasma-polymerized norbornene layer. Scanning probes are used to characterize the system in terms of shear-force-induced wear and thermally assisted indentation. The layer transforms a weakly performing polystyrene film into a highly wear-resistive system, ideal for high-density and low-power data storage applications. The result can be understood from the indentation characteristics with a hot and sharp indenter tip. The latter gives rise to a deformation mode in the fully plastic regime, enabling a simple interpretation of the results. The softening transition and the yield stress of the system on a microsecond time scale and a nanometer size scale were obtained. We show that the plastic deformation is governed by yielding in the polystyrene sublayer, which renders the overall system soft for plastic deformation. The ultrathin protection layer contributes as an elastic skin, which shields part of the temperature and pressure and enables the high wear resistance against lateral forces. Moreover, the method of probing polymers at microsecond and nanometer size scales opens up new opportunities for studying polymer physics in a largely unexplored regime. Thus, we find softening temperatures of more than 100 °C above the polystyrene glass transition, which implies that for the short interaction time scales the glassy state of the polymer is preserved up to this temperature. PMID:23256440

  5. 7-Be Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greife, Uwe; Erikson, L.; Patel, N.; Wimmer, M.; Dwiwedi, Y.; Laurent, M.; Chipps, K.; Blackmon, J.; Kozub, R.; Bardayan, D.; Gross, C.; Stracener, D.; Smith, M.; Nesaraya, C.; Rehm, E.; Ahmed, I.; Greene, J.

    2010-11-01

    The current generation of highly cross linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (PE) for hip and knee joint replacement have achieved such low in vitro wear rates that efforts have been underway to develop more sensitive methods to measure polyethylene wear. The most widely used technique, the gravimetric method, suffers from the notable disadvantage that mass gain by fluid absorption can considerably exceed mass loss by wear, making the wear measurement inaccurate, sometimes even leading to negative ``wear'' values. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the use of a radioactive tracer, beryllium-7 (7-Be), to circumvent the problem of fluid absorption and thereby achieve a much more sensitive and accurate wear measurement. This proof of principle study demonstrated the general feasibility of 7-Be implantation (performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory) for PE wear analysis.

  6. Structures and Properties of Polymers Important to Their Wear Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K.

    1984-01-01

    The wear and transfer of various semicrystalline polymers sliding against smooth steel or glass surfaces were examined. The effects of structures, and properties of polymers on their wear behavior are discussed. It is found that the high wear characteristics of PTFE is due to the easy destruction of the banded structure of PTFE. The size of spherulites and the molecular profile are closely related to the magnitude of wear rates of typical semicrystalline polymers. The effects of these factors on the wear rate on the basis of the destruction or melting of spherulites at the frictional surface are discussed. Although the fatigue theory of wear indicates that some mechanical properties are important to wear behavior, it is shown that the theory does not always explain the experimental result obtained on a smooth surface.

  7. Wear of artificial denture teeth by use of toothbrushes. Part 1: Abrasive wear of anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Y; Ohtani, K; Maejima, K; Morikawa, M; Matsuzu, M; Nagai, E; Toyoma, H; Ohwa, M; Ohki, K; Kaketani, M

    1990-12-01

    High-strength denture teeth (HS teeth) were developed in order to improve the hardness and wear resistance of conventional plastic denture teeth (PL teeth), while retaining their feature of easy occlusal adjustment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear resistance of HS teeth. We conducted wear tests and measured surface roughness using six types of anterior artificial teeth, i.e., three types of HS teeth and three types of PL teeth, the latter serving as the control. The results of the toothbrush abrasion test revealed that the HS teeth had about 5 times greater wear resistance than the PL teeth. It was also found that the type of artificial teeth and the number of abrasive wear-testing strokes had a significant (P less than 0.05) influence on the surface roughness of artificial teeth. PMID:2074493

  8. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  9. Theory of powdery rubber wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2009-12-01

    Rubber wear typically involves the removal of small rubber particles from the rubber surface. On surfaces with not too sharp roughness, e.g. most road surfaces, this involves (slow) crack propagation. In this paper I shall present a theory of mild rubber wear. I shall derive the distribution of wear particle sizes Φ(D), which is in excellent agreement with experiment. I shall also show that the calculated wear rate is consistent with experimental data for tire tread block wear.

  10. Long-wearing TFE/metal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brass, R. A.; Gillon, W. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Method for making metal/polytetrafluoroethylene (TFE) bearing surfaces embeds long-wearing layer of TFE in microscopic pits in metal. Technique has potential applications in automotive gears, ball joints, and roller chain components. Other applications are in use of unlubricated bearings in chemical, pharmaceutical, and food-processing equipment.