Science.gov

Sample records for high-affinity camp phosphodiesterase

  1. cAMP phosphodiesterase and activator protein of mammalian cAMP phosphodiesterase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, M F; Zingales, B; Colli, W

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi contain a soluble cAMP phosphodiesterase. Optimal activity was found at pH 8.0 and in the presence of 5 mM Mn2+. Other cations were less efficient and did not give rise to an additional stimulation when added in the presence of optimal concentrations of Mn2+. The enzyme is not Ca2+ dependent. The apparent Km of the enzyme for the substrate is 40 microM and no kinetic evidence for the existence of two enzymes has been found. Theophylline and caffein did not inhibit the T. cruzi cAMP phosphodiesterase. The enzyme activity does not change during cell growth suggesting that the fluctuation observed in the levels of cAMP are largely a response to variations in adenylyl cyclase activity. The intracellular concentrations of cAMP ranged between 0.04--0.15 microM. No evidence that the T. cruzi cAMP phosphodiesterase is regulated by an endogenous activator could be found. However, T. cruzi contains a heat-stable, low molecular weight, non-dialysable protein that activates mammalian cAMP phosphodiesterase in the presence of Ca2+. The properties so far studied of such an activator suggest that it might be equivalent to other Ca2+-dependent regulators described in vertebrate and invertebrate species. PMID:6255327

  2. In vivo characterization of GSK256066, a high-affinity inhaled phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nials, Anthony T; Tralau-Stewart, Cathy J; Gascoigne, Michele H; Ball, Douglas I; Ranshaw, Lisa E; Knowles, Richard G

    2011-04-01

    Oral phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitors have demonstrated clinical efficacy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Preclinical and clinical investigation of inhaled PDE4 inhibitors is ongoing. 6-({3-[(Dimethylamino)carbonyl]phenyl}sulfonyl)-8-methyl-4-{[3-methyloxy)phenyl]amino}-3-quinolinecarboxamide (GSK256066) is an exceptionally high-affinity and selective inhibitor of PDE4 designed for inhaled delivery. The aim of these studies was to investigate the potency, duration of action, and therapeutic index of GSK256066 in animal models of pulmonary inflammation. The effects of intratracheally administered GSK256066 were investigated in rat lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and ovalbumin (OVA)-induced models of acute pulmonary inflammation. In some studies, fluticasone propionate (FP) was included as a comparator. The therapeutic index (anti-inflammatory effect versus emesis) of GSK256066 was studied in ferrets where acute pulmonary inflammation was induced with inhaled LPS. In rats, GSK256066 and FP caused significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of LPS-induced pulmonary neutrophilia. The duration of action of GSK256066 at 10 × ED(50) dose (10 μg/kg) was 12 h. GSK256066 and FP also inhibited LPS-induced increases in exhaled nitric oxide (ED(50) 35 and 92 μg/kg, respectively). In addition, GSK256066 inhibited pulmonary eosinophilia in rats exposed to OVA (ED(50) 0.4 μg/kg). In ferrets, inhaled GSK256066 inhibited LPS-induced pulmonary neutrophilia (ED(50) 18 μg/kg), and no emetic episodes were observed. Thus, GSK256066 may have an improved therapeutic index compared with oral PDE4 inhibitors, e.g., cilomilast and roflumilast. In summary, GSK256066 demonstrates potent and long-lasting anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of pulmonary inflammation and does not induce emetic episodes in ferrets. GSK256066 has potential as an inhaled therapeutic for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:21205924

  3. Regulation of cAMP by Phosphodiesterases in Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Adderley, Shaquria P.; Sprague, Randy S.; Stephenson, Alan H.; Hanson, Madelyn S.

    2010-01-01

    The erythrocyte, a cell responsible for carrying and delivering oxygen in the body, has often been regarded as simply a vehicle for the circulation of hemoglobin. However, it has become evident that this cell also participates in the regulation of vascular caliber in the microcirculation via release of the potent vasodilator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The regulated release of ATP from erythrocytes occurs via a defined signaling pathway and requires increases in cyclic 3’ 5’ adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). It is well recognized that cAMP is a critical second messenger in diverse signaling pathways. In all cells increases in cAMP are localized and regulated by the activity of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In erythrocytes activation of either β adrenergic receptors (β 2AR) or the prostacyclin receptor (IPR) results in increases in cAMP and ATP release. Receptor-mediated increases in cAMP are tightly regulated by distinct PDEs associated with each signaling pathway as shown by the finding that selective inhibitors of the PDEs localized to each pathway potentiate both increases in cAMP and ATP release. Here we review the profile of PDEs identified in erythrocytes, their association with specific signaling pathways and their role in the regulation of ATP release from these cells. Understanding the contribution of PDEs to the control of ATP release from erythrocytes identifies this cell as a potential target for the development of drugs for the treatment of vascular disease. PMID:20631411

  4. Temporal and spatial regulation of cAMP signaling in disease: role of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Otero, Carolina; Peñaloza, Juan P; Rodas, Paula I; Fernández-Ramires, Ricardo; Velasquez, Luis; Jung, Juan E

    2014-12-01

    Since its discovery, cAMP has been proposed as one of the most versatile second messengers. The remarkable feature of cAMP to tightly control highly diverse physiological processes, including metabolism, homeostasis, secretion, muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration, immune response, and gene transcription, is reflected by millions of different articles worldwide. Compartmentalization of cAMP in space and time, maintained by mainly phosphodiesterases, contributes to the maintenance of equilibrium inside the cell where one signal can trigger many different events. Novel cAMP sensors seem to carry out certain unexpected signaling properties of cAMP and thereby to permit delicate adaptations of biologic responses. Measuring space and time events with biosensors will increase our current knowledge on the pathophysiology of diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, cognitive impairment, cancer, and renal and heart failure. Further insights into the cAMP dynamics will help to optimize the pharmacological treatment for these diseases. PMID:24750474

  5. Electrostatic steering enhances the rate of cAMP binding to phosphodiesterase: Brownian dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-ming M; Huber, Gary; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Signaling in cells often involves co-localization of the signaling molecules. Most experimental evidence has shown that intracellular compartmentalization restricts the range of action of the second messenger, 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). The objective of this study is to understand the details of molecular encounter that may play a role in efficient operation of the cAMP signaling apparatus. The results from electrostatic potential calculations and Brownian dynamics simulations suggest that positive potential of the active site from PDE enhances capture of diffusing cAMP molecules. This electrostatic steering between cAMP and the active site of a PDE plays a major role in the enzyme-substrate encounter, an effect that may be of significance in sequestering cAMP released from a nearby binding site or in attracting more freely diffusing cAMP molecules. PMID:26346301

  6. Phosphodiesterase inhibition by a gastroprotective agent irsogladine: preferential blockade of cAMP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kyoi, Takashi; Oka, Michiko; Noda, Kumiko; Ukai, Yojiro

    2004-08-27

    The effect of irsogladine [2,4-diamino-6-(2,5-dichlorophenyl)-s-triazine maleate], an antiulcer drug, on contents of cyclic nucleotides including cAMP and cGMP was investigated in rat stomachs. Irsogladine concentration-dependently increased cAMP content in rat glandula stomach. However, irsogladine at higher concentration (10(-5) M) was unable to further increase cAMP level in the presence of non-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, although 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine by itself increased cAMP level. On the other hand, irsogladine had no effect on the glandula cGMP content. Subsequently, the effect of irsogladine on the cyclic nucleotide degradation by purified bovine brain and heart PDEs was investigated. The cAMP degradation by purified bovine brain PDE was partially suppressed by PDE1 inhibitor vinpocetin, PDE2 inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine hydrochloride and PDE4 inhibitor rolipram but not by PDE3 inhibitor cilostamide, and completely inhibited by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, suggesting that is attributed almost exclusively to PDE1, PDE2 and PDE4. Meanwhile, cGMP degradation by purified bovine brain PDE was partially suppressed by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine hydrochloride. Irsogladine preferentially inhibited the response to cAMP degradation compared with cGMP degradation by this brain PDE. The cAMP degradation by bovine heart PDE was almost completely inhibited by the combination with vinpocetine and cilostamide, indicating that is mediated almost exclusively by PDE1 and PDE3. Irsogladine suppressed this cAMP degradation measured in the presence of vinpocetine to almost the same extent as that determined in the presence of cilostamide. These results indicate that irsogladine produces the increase of intracellular cAMP content via non-selective inhibition of PDE isozymes, which may be a key mechanism involved in its gastroprotective actions. PMID:15302227

  7. GSK256066, an exceptionally high-affinity and selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4 suitable for administration by inhalation: in vitro, kinetic, and in vivo characterization.

    PubMed

    Tralau-Stewart, Cathy J; Williamson, Richard A; Nials, Anthony T; Gascoigne, Michele; Dawson, John; Hart, Graham J; Angell, Anthony D R; Solanke, Yemisi E; Lucas, Fiona S; Wiseman, Joanne; Ward, Peter; Ranshaw, Lisa E; Knowles, Richard G

    2011-04-01

    Oral phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitors such as roflumilast have established the potential of PDE4 inhibition for the treatment of respiratory diseases. However, PDE4 inhibitor efficacy is limited by mechanism-related side effects such as emesis and nausea. Delivering the inhibitor by the inhaled route may improve therapeutic index, and we describe 6-({3-[(dimethylamino)carbonyl]phenyl}sulfonyl)-8-methyl-4-{[3-methyloxy) phenyl]amino}-3-quinolinecarboxamide (GSK256066), an exceptionally high-affinity inhibitor of PDE4 designed for inhaled administration. GSK256066 is a slow and tight binding inhibitor of PDE4B (apparent IC(50) 3.2 pM; steady-state IC(50) <0.5 pM), which is more potent than any previously documented compound, for example, roflumilast (IC(50) 390 pM), tofimilast (IC(50) 1.6 nM), and cilomilast (IC(50) 74 nM). Consistent with this, GSK256066 inhibited tumor necrosis factor α production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human peripheral blood monocytes with 0.01 nM IC(50) (compared with IC(50) values of 5, 22, and 389 nM for roflumilast, tofimilast, and cilomilast, respectively) and by LPS-stimulated whole blood with 126 pM IC(50). GSK256066 was highly selective for PDE4 (>380,000-fold versus PDE1, PDE2, PDE3, PDE5, and PDE6 and >2500-fold against PDE7), inhibited PDE4 isoforms A-D with equal affinity, and had a substantial high-affinity rolipram binding site ratio (>17). When administered intratracheally to rats, GSK256066 inhibited LPS-induced pulmonary neutrophilia with ED(50) values of 1.1 μg/kg (aqueous suspension) and 2.9 μg/kg (dry powder formulation) and was more potent than an aqueous suspension of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate (ED(50) 9.3 μg/kg). Thus, GSK256066 has been demonstrated to have exceptional potency in vitro and in vivo and is being clinically investigated as a treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:21205923

  8. Differential regulation of human platelet responses by cGMP inhibited and stimulated cAMP phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Manns, J M; Brenna, K J; Colman, R W; Sheth, S B

    2002-05-01

    Platelets contain two cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) which regulate intracellular cAMP levels, cGMP-inhibited cAMP PDE (PDE3A) and cGMP-stimulated PDE (PDE2A). Using the PDE3 inhibitor, milrinone and the PDE2 inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA), we have explored the contribution of each PDE to the regulation of platelet function. Inhibition of PDE2 resulted in higher levels of intracellular cAMP than inhibition of PDE3A suggesting this PDE may be the more important regulator of cAMP in human platelets. However, a concentration-dependent inhibition of agonist-induced aggregation was observed with milrinone while little effect was seen with EHNA. In addition, we observed a concentration-dependent inhibition in the increase of intracellular Ca2+ with PDE3 inhibition and significantly less with PDE2 inhibition. PDE3 inhibition also resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of the vasodilator-stimulated phospho-protein (VASP) whereas there was no significant increase with PDE2 inhibition. In each of these experiments, synergism was noted with the combination of milrinone and EHNA. These results suggest that cAMP pools may be localized and the various PDEs regulate specific pools. These data also suggest that inhibitors of PDE3A may be more effective antiplatelet agents. PMID:12038792

  9. PDE4 cAMP phosphodiesterases: modular enzymes that orchestrate signalling cross-talk, desensitization and compartmentalization.

    PubMed Central

    Houslay, Miles D; Adams, David R

    2003-01-01

    cAMP is a second messenger that controls many key cellular functions. The only way to inactivate cAMP is to degrade it through the action of cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs). PDEs are thus poised to play a key regulatory role. PDE4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases appear to have specific functions with selective inhibitors serving as potent anti-inflammatory agents. The recent elucidation of the structure of the PDE4 catalytic unit allows for molecular insight into the mode of catalysis as well as substrate and inhibitor selectivity. The four PDE4 genes encode over 16 isoforms, each of which is characterized by a unique N-terminal region. PDE4 isoforms play a pivotal role in controlling functionally and spatially distinct pools of cAMP by virtue of their unique intracellular targeting. Targeting occurs by association with proteins, such as arrestins, SRC family tyrosyl kinases, A-kinase anchoring proteins ('AKAPs') and receptor for activated C kinase 1 ('RACK1'), and, in the case of isoform PDE4A1, by a specific interaction (TAPAS-1) with phosphatidic acid. PDE4 isoforms are 'designed' to be regulated by extracellular-signal-related protein kinase (ERK), which binds to anchor sites on the PDE4 catalytic domain that it phosphorylates. The upstream conserved region 1 (UCR1) and 2 (UCR2) modules that abut the PDE4 catalytic unit confer regulatory functions by orchestrating the functional outcome of phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase ('PKA') and ERK. PDE4 enzymes stand at a crossroads that allows them to integrate various signalling pathways with that of cAMP in spatially distinct compartments. PMID:12444918

  10. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase CpdA, required for cAMP homeostasis and virulence factor regulation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Erin L; Brutinel, Evan D; Klem, Erich R; Fehr, Anthony R; Yahr, Timothy L; Wolfgang, Matthew C

    2010-06-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is an important second messenger signaling molecule that controls a wide variety of eukaryotic and prokaryotic responses to extracellular cues. For cAMP-dependent signaling pathways to be effective, the intracellular cAMP concentration is tightly controlled at the level of synthesis and degradation. In the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cAMP is a key regulator of virulence gene expression. To better understand the role of cAMP homeostasis in this organism, we identified and characterized the enzyme CpdA, a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase. We demonstrate that CpdA possesses 3',5'-cAMP phosphodiesterase activity in vitro and that it utilizes an iron-dependent catalytic mechanism. Deletion of cpdA results in the accumulation of intracellular cAMP and altered regulation of P. aeruginosa virulence traits. Further, we demonstrate that the cAMP-dependent transcription factor Vfr directly regulates cpdA expression in response to intracellular cAMP accumulation, thus providing a feedback mechanism for controlling cAMP levels and fine-tuning virulence factor expression. PMID:20348254

  11. Studying mechanisms of cAMP and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase signaling in Leydig cell function with phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Golkowski, Martin; Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Suh, Hyong Won; Beavo, Joseph A; Ong, Shao-En

    2016-07-01

    Many cellular processes are modulated by cyclic AMP and nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate this second messenger by catalyzing its breakdown. The major unique function of testicular Leydig cells is to produce testosterone in response to luteinizing hormone (LH). Treatment of Leydig cells with PDE inhibitors increases cAMP levels and the activity of its downstream effector, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), leading to a series of kinase-dependent signaling and transcription events that ultimately increase testosterone release. We have recently shown that PDE4B and PDE4C as well as PDE8A and PDE8B are expressed in rodent Leydig cells and that combined inhibition of PDE4 and PDE8 leads to dramatically increased steroid biosynthesis. Here we investigated the effect of PDE4 and PDE8 inhibition on the molecular mechanisms of cAMP actions in a mouse MA10 Leydig cell line model with SILAC mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics. We treated MA10 cells either with PDE4 family specific inhibitor (Rolipram) and PDE8 family specific inhibitor (PF-04957325) alone or in combination and quantified the resulting phosphorylation changes at five different time points between 0 and 180min. We identified 28,336 phosphosites from 4837 proteins and observed significant regulation of 749 sites in response to PDE4 and PDE8 inhibitor treatment. Of these, 132 phosphosites were consensus PKA sites. Our data strongly suggest that PDE4 and PDE8 inhibitors synergistically regulate phosphorylation of proteins required for many different cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, lipid and glucose metabolism, transcription, endocytosis and vesicle transport. Our data suggests that cAMP, PDE4 and PDE8 coordinate steroidogenesis by acting on not one rate-limiting step but rather multiple pathways. Moreover, the pools of cAMP controlled by these PDEs also coordinate many other metabolic processes that may be regulated to assure timely and sufficient testosterone secretion

  12. RACK1 and β-arrestin2 attenuate dimerization of PDE4 cAMP phosphodiesterase PDE4D5.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Graeme B

    2016-07-01

    PDE4 family cAMP-selective cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases are important in the regulation of cAMP abundance in numerous systems, and thereby play an important role in the regulation of PKA and EPAC activity and the phosphorylation of CREB. We have used the yeast 2-hybrid system to demonstrate recently that long PDE4 isoforms form homodimers, consistent with data obtained recently by structural studies. The long PDE4 isoform PDE4D5 interacts selectively with β-arrestin2, implicated in the regulation of G-protein-coupled receptors and other cell signaling components, and also with the β-propeller protein RACK1. In the present study, we use 2-hybrid approaches to demonstrate that RACK1 and β-arrestin2 inhibit the dimerization of PDE4D5. We also show that serine-to-alanine mutations at PKA and ERK1/2 phosphorylation sites on PDE4D5 detectably ablate dimerization. Conversely, phospho-mimic serine-to-aspartate mutations at the MK2 and oxidative stress kinase sites ablate dimerization. Analysis of PDE4D5 that is locked into the dimeric configuration by the formation of a trans disulfide bond between Ser261 and Ser602 shows that RACK1 interacts strongly with both the monomeric and dimeric forms, but that β-arrestin2 interacts exclusively with the monomeric form. This is consistent with the concept that β-arrestin2 can preferentially recruit the monomeric, or "open," form of PDE4D5 to β2-adrenergic receptors, where it can regulate cAMP signaling. PMID:26257302

  13. IL-1 binds to high affinity receptors on human osteosarcoma cells and potentiates prostaglandin E2 stimulation of cAMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Rodan, S.B.; Wesolowski, G.; Chin, J.; Limjuco, G.A.; Schmidt, J.A.; Rodan, G.A. )

    1990-08-15

    IL-1 is a potent bone resorbing agent. Its mechanism of action is unknown, but the presence of osteoblasts was shown to be necessary for IL-1 stimulation of bone resorption by isolated osteoclasts. This study examines the presence of IL-1R and IL-1 effects in osteoblastic cells from a clonal human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2/B-10. We found that the binding affinity and the number of binding sites increases substantially during the postconfluent stage. Scatchard and curve-fitting analysis revealed one class of high affinity binding sites, with Kd/Ki's of 40 +/- 17 pM (mean +/- SD) for IL-1 alpha (n = 5) and 9 +/- 7 pM for IL-1 beta (n = 5) and 2916 +/- 2438 (n = 6) receptors/cell. Incubation of the cells with 125I-IL-1 alpha (100 pM) at 4 degrees C, followed by incubation at 37 degrees C up to 4 h, revealed internalization of receptor-bound IL-1 alpha. Chemical cross-linking studies showed that the IL-1R in Saos-2/B-10 cells had a molecular mass of approximately 80 kDa. To assess the biologic effect of IL-1 in Saos-2/B-10 cells, we determined PGE2 content and adenylate cyclase activity. Although IL-1 had no effect on PGE2 synthesis, both IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta enhanced PGE2 stimulation of adenylate cyclase two- to four-fold in a dose-dependent manner. The half-maximal effect for IL-1 alpha was seen at 8 to 10 pM and for IL-1 beta at 0.6 to 1.8 pM. IL-1 did not enhance basal adenylate cyclase or stimulation by parathyroid hormone, isoproterenol, or forskolin. IL-1 enhancement of PGE2-stimulated adenylate cyclase was detected between 1 to 2 h, was maximal at 4 to 5 h, was not prevented by cycloheximide treatment, and was seen in membranes from IL-1 pretreated cells. These data show effects of IL-1 on a human osteoblast-like cell line that are mediated by high affinity receptors. These IL-1 effects could contribute to the biologic action of IL-1 on bone.

  14. Evolution of self-organisation in Dictyostelia by adaptation of a non-selective phosphodiesterase and a matrix component for regulated cAMP degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Weening, Karin E.; Marquay-Markiewicz, Jacques; Schaap, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas coordinate aggregation and morphogenesis by secreting cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pulses that propagate as waves through fields of cells and multicellular structures. To retrace how this mechanism for self-organisation evolved, we studied the origin of the cAMP phosphodiesterase PdsA and its inhibitor PdiA, which are essential for cAMP wave propagation. D. discoideum and other species that use cAMP to aggregate reside in group 4 of the four major groups of Dictyostelia. We found that groups 1-3 express a non-specific, low affinity orthologue of PdsA, which gained cAMP selectivity and increased 200-fold in affinity in group 4. A low affinity group 3 PdsA only partially restored aggregation of a D. discoideum pdsA-null mutant, but was more effective at restoring fruiting body morphogenesis. Deletion of a group 2 PdsA gene resulted in disruption of fruiting body morphogenesis, but left aggregation unaffected. Together, these results show that groups 1-3 use a low affinity PdsA for morphogenesis that is neither suited nor required for aggregation. PdiA belongs to a family of matrix proteins that are present in all Dictyostelia and consist mainly of cysteine-rich repeats. However, in its current form with several extensively modified repeats, PdiA is only present in group 4. PdiA is essential for initiating spiral cAMP waves, which, by organising large territories, generate the large fruiting structures that characterise group 4. We conclude that efficient cAMP-mediated aggregation in group 4 evolved by recruitment and adaptation of a non-selective phosphodiesterase and a matrix component into a system for regulated cAMP degradation. PMID:22357931

  15. A cAMP Biosensor-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Identification of Gs-Coupled GPCR Ligands and Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff

    2015-08-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is an important second messenger, and quantification of intracellular cAMP levels is essential in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The intracellular cAMP levels are regulated by the adenylate cyclase (AC) upon activation of either Gs- or Gi-coupled GPCRs, which leads to increased or decreased cAMP levels, respectively. Here we describe a real-time Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for identification and characterization of Gs-coupled GPCR ligands and phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors in living cells. We used the β2-adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR) as a representative Gs-coupled receptor and characterized two cell lines with different expression levels. Low receptor expression allowed detection of desensitization kinetics and delineation of partial agonism, whereas high receptor expression resulted in prolonged signaling and enabled detection of weak partial agonists and/or ligands with low potency, which is highly advantageous in large HTS settings and hit identification. In addition, the assay enabled detection of β(2)AR inverse agonists and PDE inhibitors. High signal-to-noise ratios were also observed for the other representative Gs-coupled GPCRs tested, GLP-1R and GlucagonR. The FRET-based cAMP biosensor assay is robust, reproducible, and inexpensive with good Z factors and is highly applicable for HTS. PMID:25851033

  16. Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase 2 Augments cGMP and cAMP Signaling to Ameliorate Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bubb, Kristen J; Trinder, Sarah L; Baliga, Reshma S; Patel, Jigisha; Clapp, Lucie H; MacAllister, Raymond J; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening disorder characterized by increased pulmonary artery pressure, remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature, and right ventricular failure. Loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI2) contributes to PH pathogenesis and current therapies are targeted to restore these pathways. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a family of enzymes that break down cGMP and cAMP which underpin the bioactivity of NO and PGI2. The PDE5 inhibitor (PDE5i) sildenafil is licensed for PH, but a role for PDE2 in lung physiology and disease has yet to be established. Herein, we investigated whether PDE2 inhibition modulates pulmonary cyclic nucleotide signaling and ameliorates experimental PH. Methods and Results The selective PDE2 inhibitor BAY 60-7550 augmented atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and treprostinil -evoked pulmonary vascular relaxation in isolated arteries from chronically hypoxic rats. BAY 60-7550 prevented the onset of both hypoxia- and bleomycin-induced PH, and produced a significantly greater reduction in disease severity when given in combination with a neutral endopeptidase inhibitor (enhances endogenous natriuretic peptides), the PGI2 analogue treprostinil, inorganic nitrate (NO donor), or a PDE5i. Proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from PAH patients was reduced by BAY 60-7550, an effect further enhanced in the presence of ANP, NO and treprostinil. Conclusions PDE2 inhibition elicits pulmonary dilation, prevents pulmonary vascular remodeling, and reduces the RVH characteristic of PH. This favorable pharmacodynamic profile is dependent on natriuretic peptide bioactivity, and is additive with PGI2 analogues, PDE5i, and NO. PDE2 inhibition represents a viable, orally-active therapy for PH. PMID:24899690

  17. Iloprost- and isoproterenol-induced increases in cAMP are regulated by different phosphodiesterases in erythrocytes of both rabbits and humans

    PubMed Central

    Adderley, Shaquria P.; Dufaux, Eileen A.; Sridharan, Meera; Bowles, Elizabeth A.; Hanson, Madelyn S.; Stephenson, Alan H.; Ellsworth, Mary L.; Sprague, Randy S.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the G protein Gs results in increases in cAMP, a necessary step in the pathway for ATP release from rabbit and human erythrocytes. In all cells, the level of cAMP is the product of its synthesis by adenylyl cyclase and its hydrolysis by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Both iloprost (Ilo), a PGI2 analog, and isoproterenol (Iso), a β-agonist, stimulate receptor-mediated increases in cAMP in rabbit and human erythrocytes. However, the specific PDEs associated with each of these signaling pathways in the erythrocyte have not been fully characterized. Previously, we reported that PDE3B is present in rabbit and human erythrocyte membranes and that PDE3 inhibitors potentiate Ilo-induced increases in cAMP. Here we report that inhibitors of either PDE2 or PDE4, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) and rolipram, respectively, potentiate Iso-induced increases in cAMP in rabbit and human erythrocytes. Importantly, these inhibitors had no effect on cAMP increases associated with the incubation of erythrocytes with Ilo. In addition, we establish, for the first time, the presence of PDE2A protein in rabbit and human erythrocyte membranes. Finally, we determined that preincubation of human erythrocytes with EHNA and rolipram together potentiate Iso-induced ATP release, whereas preincubation with cilostazol enhances Ilo-induced release of ATP. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in rabbit and human erythrocytes, Ilo-induced increases in cAMP and ATP release are regulated by PDE3, whereas those associated with Iso are regulated by the activities of both PDE2 and PDE4. These studies demonstrate that PDE activity in these cells is localized to specific signaling pathways. PMID:19252089

  18. Acute hypoxia modifies cAMP levels induced by inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-4 in rat carotid bodies, carotid arteries and superior cervical ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Ana R; Batuca, Joana R; Monteiro, Emília C

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors are useful to treat hypoxia-related diseases and are used in experiments studying the effects of oxygen on 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production. We studied the effects of acute hypoxia on cAMP accumulation induced by PDE inhibitors in oxygen-specific chemosensors, the carotid bodies (CBs) and in non-chemosensitive CB-related structures: carotid arteries (CAs) and superior cervical ganglia (SCG). Experimental approach: Concentration–response curves for the effects of a non-specific PDE inhibitor [isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) ], PDE4 selective inhibitors (rolipram, Ro 20-1724) and a PDE2 selective inhibitor (erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine) on cAMP levels were obtained in normoxic (20% O2/5% CO2) or hypoxic (5% O2/5% CO2) conditions. Key results: Responses to the PDE inhibitors were compatible with the presence of PDE4 in rat CBs, CAs and SCG but in the absence of PDE2 in CAs and CBs. Acute hypoxia enhanced the effects of IBMX and PDE4 inhibitors on cAMP accumulation in CAs and CBs. In SCG, acute hypoxia reduced cAMP accumulation induced by all the four PDE inhibitors tested. Differences between the effects of Ro 20-1724 and rolipram on cAMP were found in CAs and CBs during hypoxia. Conclusions and implications: The effects of PDE4 inhibitors could be potentiated or inhibited by acute hypoxia depending on the PDE isoforms of the tissue. The similarities between the characterization of PDE4 inhibitors at the CBs and CAs, under normoxia and hypoxia, did not support a specific role for cAMP in the oxygen-sensing machinery at the CB and suggested that no direct CB-mediated, hyperventilatory, adverse effects would be expected with administration of PDE4 inhibitors. PMID:20082613

  19. Role of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoforms in cAMP compartmentation following β2-adrenergic stimulation of ICa,L in frog ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jurevičius, Jonas; Skeberdis, V Arvydas; Fischmeister, Rodolphe

    2003-01-01

    The role of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms in the β2-adrenergic stimulation of the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) was investigated in frog ventricular myocytes using double patch-clamp and double-barrelled microperfusion techniques. Isoprenaline (ISO, 1 nM to 10 μM) was applied on one half of the cell, either alone or in the presence of PDE inhibitors, and the local and distant responses of ICa,L were used to determine the gradient of local vs. distant cAMP concentration (α). IBMX (100 μM), a non-selective PDE inhibitor, reduced α from 40 to 4.4 indicating a 9-fold reduction in intracellular cAMP compartmentation when all PDE activity was blocked. While PDE1 and PDE2 inhibition had no effect, PDE3 inhibition by milrinone (3 μM) or PDE4 inhibition by Ro 20-1724 (3 μM) reduced α by 6- and 4-fold, respectively. A simultaneous application of milrinone and Ro 20-1724 produced a similar effect to IBMX, showing that PDE3 and PDE4 were the major PDEs accounting for cAMP compartmentation. Okadaic acid (3 μM), a non-selective phosphatase inhibitor, or H89 (1 μM), an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), had no effect on the distant response of ICa,L to ISO indicating that PDE activation by PKA played a minor role in cAMP compartmentation. Our results demonstrate that PDE activity determines the degree of cAMP compartmentation in frog ventricular cells upon β2-adrenergic stimulation. PDE3 and PDE4 subtypes play a major role in this process, and contribute equally to ensure a functional coupling of β2-adrenergic receptors with nearby Ca2+ channels via local elevations of cAMP. PMID:12815180

  20. β-Adrenergic cAMP Signals Are Predominantly Regulated by Phosphodiesterase Type 4 in Cultured Adult Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Valérie; Ji, Guangju; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Leblais, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    Background We investigated the role of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) in the spatiotemporal control of intracellular cAMP concentrations in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). Methodology/Principal Findings The rank order of PDE families contributing to global cAMP-PDE activity was PDE4> PDE3  =  PDE1. PDE7 mRNA expression but not activity was confirmed. The Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor, Epac1-camps, was used to monitor the time course of cytosolic cAMP changes. A pulse application of the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) agonist isoproterenol (Iso) induced a transient FRET signal. Both β1- and β2-AR antagonists decreased the signal amplitude without affecting its kinetics. The non-selective PDE inhibitor (IBMX) dramatically increased the amplitude and delayed the recovery phase of Iso response, in agreement with a role of PDEs in degrading cAMP produced by Iso. Whereas PDE1, PDE3 and PDE7 blockades [with MIMX, cilostamide (Cil) and BRL 50481 (BRL), respectively] had no or minor effect on Iso response, PDE4 inhibition [with Ro-20-1724 (Ro)] strongly increased its amplitude and delayed its recovery. When Ro was applied concomitantly with MIMX or Cil (but not with BRL), the Iso response was drastically further prolonged. PDE4 inhibition similarly prolonged both β1- and β2-AR-mediated responses. When a membrane-targeted FRET sensor was used, PDE3 and PDE4 acted in a synergistic manner to hydrolyze the submembrane cAMP produced either at baseline or after β-AR stimulation. Conclusion/Significance Our study underlines the importance of cAMP-PDEs in the dynamic control of intracellular cAMP signals in RASMCs, and demonstrates the prominent role of PDE4 in limiting β-AR responses. PDE4 inhibition unmasks an effect of PDE1 and PDE3 on cytosolic cAMP hydrolyzis, and acts synergistically with PDE3 inhibition at the submembrane compartment. This suggests that mixed PDE4/PDE1 or PDE4/PDE3 inhibitors would be attractive to

  1. The Dunce cAMP phosphodiesterase PDE-4 negatively regulates G alpha(s)-dependent and G alpha(s)-independent cAMP pools in the Caenorhabditis elegans synaptic signaling network.

    PubMed

    Charlie, Nicole K; Thomure, Angela M; Schade, Michael A; Miller, Kenneth G

    2006-05-01

    Forward genetic screens for mutations that rescue the paralysis of ric-8 (Synembryn) reduction-of-function mutations frequently reveal mutations that cause hyperactivation of one or more components of the G alpha(s) pathway. Here, we report that one of these mutations strongly reduces the function of the Dunce cAMP phosphodiesterase PDE-4 by disrupting a conserved active site residue. Loss of function and neural overexpression of PDE-4 have profound and opposite effects on locomotion rate, but drug-response assays suggest that loss of PDE-4 function does not affect steady-state acetylcholine release or reception. Our genetic analysis suggests that PDE-4 regulates both G alpha(s)-dependent and G alpha(s)-independent cAMP pools in the neurons controlling locomotion rate. By immunostaining, PDE-4 is strongly expressed throughout the nervous system, where it localizes to small regions at the outside boundaries of synaptic vesicle clusters as well as intersynaptic regions. The synaptic subregions containing PDE-4 are distinct from those containing active zones, as indicated by costaining with an antibody against the long form of UNC-13. This highly focal subsynaptic localization suggests that PDE-4 may exert its effects by spatially regulating intrasynaptic cAMP pools. PMID:16624912

  2. Pregnancy induces a modulation of the cAMP phosphodiesterase 4-conformers ratio in human myometrium: consequences for the utero-relaxant effect of PDE4-selective inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Méhats, C; Tanguy, G; Paris, B; Robert, B; Pernin, N; Ferré, F; Leroy, M J

    2000-02-01

    The inhibitory impacts of RP 73401, a phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4) selective inhibitor of the second generation, versus rolipram, the prototypal PDE4 inhibitor, were evaluated and compared on cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and contractility of the myometrium in nonpregnant and pregnant women. In enzymatic studies, RP 73401 and rolipram inhibited the cAMP PDE activity with significantly greater maximal efficiency in the myometrium of pregnant compared with nonpregnant women (75 versus 55%; P <.05). Although myometrial PDE4 presented a single class of interaction with RP 73401 [pD(2) (-log [IC(50)]) = -8.2], it exhibited at least two classes of interaction with rolipram (pD(2) = -8.2 and -5.6). In the myometrium of pregnant versus nonpregnant women, rolipram is significantly more efficacious in the concentration range >0.01 to 100 microM (P <.01), whereas no difference was observed for the concentration range <0.01 microM. In contractility studies, RP 73401 was equally effective in relaxing myometrial strips from both nonpregnant and pregnant women (pD(2) = -8.8). Conversely, the ability of rolipram to inhibit contractions of the myometrium in pregnant women was significantly lower (pD(2) = -7.2) compared with that in nonpregnant women (pD(2) = -8.2; P <.01). Concomitantly, in the myometrium of pregnant women, a rise in immunoreactive PDE4B2 signal was detected, whereas the PDE4D3 signal was less intense. These results demonstrate that parallel to an accumulation of PDE4B2 isoform, a modification in the ratio of PDE4 conformers HPDE4 and LPDE4 (conformer that binds rolipram with high and low affinity, respectively) occurs in the myometrium of near-term pregnant women with an increase of LPDE4 functionally implicated in the contractile process. Such modifications provide a strong rationale to propose LPDE4 as potential pharmacologic targets for the design of new tocolytic treatments. PMID:10640323

  3. Dimerization of cAMP phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) in living cells requires interfaces located in both the UCR1 and catalytic unit domains

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Graeme B.; Dunlop, Allan J.; Meng, Dong; Day, Jon P.; Klussmann, Enno; Baillie, George S.; Adams, David R.; Houslay, Miles D.

    2015-01-01

    PDE4 family cAMP phosphodiesterases play a pivotal role in determining compartmentalised cAMP signalling through targeted cAMP breakdown. Expressing the widely found PDE4D5 isoform, as both bait and prey in a yeast 2-hybrid system, we demonstrated interaction consistent with the notion that long PDE4 isoforms form dimers. Four potential dimerization sites were uncovered using a scanning peptide array approach, where a recombinant purified PDE4D5 fusion protein was used to probe a 25-mer library of overlapping peptides covering the entire PDE4D5 sequence. Key residues involved in PDE4D5 dimerization were defined using a site-directed mutagenesis programme directed by an alanine scanning peptide array approach. Critical residues stabilising PDE4D5 dimerization were defined within the regulatory UCR1 region found in long, but not short, PDE4 isoforms, namely the Arg173, Asn174 and Asn175 (DD1) cluster. Disruption of the DD1 cluster was not sufficient, in itself, to destabilise PDE4D5 homodimers. Instead, disruption of an additional interface, located on the PDE4 catalytic unit, was also required to convert PDE4D5 into a monomeric form. This second dimerization site on the conserved PDE4 catalytic unit is dependent upon a critical ion pair interaction. This involves Asp463 and Arg499 in PDE4D5, which interact in a trans fashion involving the two PDE4D5 molecules participating in the homodimer. PDE4 long isoforms adopt a dimeric state in living cells that is underpinned by two key contributory interactions, one involving the UCR modules and one involving an interface on the core catalytic domain. We propose that short forms do not adopt a dimeric configuration because, in the absence of the UCR1 module, residual engagement of the remaining core catalytic domain interface provides insufficient free energy to drive dimerization. The functioning of PDE4 long and short forms is thus poised to be inherently distinct due to this difference in quaternary structure. PMID

  4. Active site coupling in PDE:PKA complexes promotes resetting of mammalian cAMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Srinath; Moorthy, Balakrishnan Shenbaga; Xin Xiang, Lim; Xin Shan, Lim; Bharatham, Kavitha; Tulsian, Nikhil Kumar; Mihalek, Ivana; Anand, Ganesh S

    2014-09-16

    Cyclic 3'5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent-protein kinase (PKA) signaling is a fundamental regulatory pathway for mediating cellular responses to hormonal stimuli. The pathway is activated by high-affinity association of cAMP with the regulatory subunit of PKA and signal termination is achieved upon cAMP dissociation from PKA. Although steps in the activation phase are well understood, little is known on how signal termination/resetting occurs. Due to the high affinity of cAMP to PKA (KD ∼ low nM), bound cAMP does not readily dissociate from PKA, thus begging the question of how tightly bound cAMP is released from PKA to reset its signaling state to respond to subsequent stimuli. It has been recently shown that phosphodiesterases (PDEs) can catalyze dissociation of bound cAMP and thereby play an active role in cAMP signal desensitization/termination. This is achieved through direct interactions with the regulatory subunit of PKA, thereby facilitating cAMP dissociation and hydrolysis. In this study, we have mapped direct interactions between a specific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE8A) and a PKA regulatory subunit (RIα isoform) in mammalian cAMP signaling, by a combination of amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, peptide array, and computational docking. The interaction interface of the PDE8A:RIα complex, probed by peptide array and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, brings together regions spanning the phosphodiesterase active site and cAMP-binding sites of RIα. Computational docking combined with amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry provided a model for parallel dissociation of bound cAMP from the two tandem cAMP-binding domains of RIα. Active site coupling suggests a role for substrate channeling in the PDE-dependent dissociation and hydrolysis of cAMP bound to PKA. This is the first instance, to our knowledge, of PDEs directly interacting with a cAMP-receptor protein in a mammalian system, and

  5. Fourth-Generation Epac-Based FRET Sensors for cAMP Feature Exceptional Brightness, Photostability and Dynamic Range: Characterization of Dedicated Sensors for FLIM, for Ratiometry and with High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Klarenbeek, Jeffrey; Goedhart, Joachim; van Batenburg, Aernoud; Groenewald, Daniella; Jalink, Kees

    2015-01-01

    Epac-based FRET sensors have been widely used for the detection of cAMP concentrations in living cells. Originally developed by us as well as others, we have since then reported several important optimizations that make these sensors favourite among many cell biologists. We here report cloning and characterization of our fourth generation of cAMP sensors, which feature outstanding photostability, dynamic range and signal-to-noise ratio. The design is based on mTurquoise2, currently the brightest and most bleaching-resistant donor, and a new acceptor cassette that consists of a tandem of two cp173Venus fluorophores. We also report variants with a single point mutation, Q270E, in the Epac moiety, which decreases the dissociation constant of cAMP from 9.5 to 4 μM, and thus increases the affinity ~ 2.5-fold. Finally, we also prepared and characterized dedicated variants with non-emitting (dark) acceptors for single-wavelength FLIM acquisition that display an exceptional near-doubling of fluorescence lifetime upon saturation of cAMP levels. We believe this generation of cAMP outperforms all other sensors and therefore recommend these sensors for all future studies. PMID:25875503

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition prevents myocardial infarction-induced increase in renal cortical cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Clauss, François; Charloux, Anne; Piquard, François; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Talha, Samy; Zoll, Joffrey; Lugnier, Claire; Geny, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether myocardial infarction (MI) enhances renal phosphodiesterases (PDE) activities, investigating particularly the relative contribution of PDE1-5 isozymes in total PDE activity involved in both cGMP and cAMP pathways, and whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi) decreases such renal PDE hyperactivities. We also investigated whether ACEi might thereby improve atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) efficiency. We studied renal cortical PDE1-5 isozyme activities in sham (SH)-operated, MI rats and in MI rats treated with perindopril (ACEi) 1 month after coronary artery ligation. Circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), its second intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cGMP/ANP ratio were also determined. Cortical cGMP-PDE2 (80.3 vs. 65.1 pmol/min/mg) and cGMP-PDE1 (50.7 vs. 30.1 pmol/min/mg), and cAMP-PDE2 (161 vs. 104.1 pmol/min/mg) and cAMP-PDE4 (307.5 vs. 197.2 pmol/min/mg) activities were higher in MI than in SH rats. Despite increased ANP plasma level, ANP efficiency tended to be decreased in MI compared to SH rats. Perindopril restored PDE activities and tended to improve ANP efficiency in MI rats. One month after coronary ligation, perindopril treatment of MI rats prevents the increase in renal cortical PDE activities. This may contribute to increase renal ANP efficiency in MI rats. PMID:25939307

  7. Evidence that insulin and isoprenaline activate the cGMP-inhibited low-Km cAMP phosphodiesterase in rat fat cells by phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Degerman, E.; Smith, C.J.; Tornqvist, H.; Vasta, V.; Belfrage, P.; Manganiello, V.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Incubation of intact rat fat cells with maximally effective concentrations of insulin (1 nM, 12 min) or isoprenaline (300 nM, 3 min) increased particulate cGMP- and cilostamide-inhibited, low-Km cAMP phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity by about 50% and 100%, respectively. In 32P-labeled cells, these agents induced serine 32P-phosphorylation of a 135-kDa particulate protein and, to a variable and lesser extent, a 44-kDa protein, which were selectively immunoprecipitated by anti-cAMP-PDE, as analyzed by SDS/PAGE and autoradiography. In the absence of hormonal stimulation, little phosphorylation was detected (less than 10% of that with the hormones). The two phosphoproteins were identified as cAMP-PDE or a closely related molecule (in the case of the 44-kDa species, perhaps a proteolytic fragment) since (i) amounts of 32P in the immunoprecipitated 135-kDa protein paralleled enzyme inactivation, (ii) prior incubation of the anti-cAMP-PDE with the pure rat or bovine enzyme selectively blocked the immunoprecipitation of the phosphoproteins, (iii) 135- and 44-kDa proteins reacted with the anti-cAMP-PDE on Western immunoblots, and (iv) the two phosphoproteins copurified with cAMP-PDE activity through DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and were isolated by highly selective affinity chromatography on cilostamide-agarose. Thus, in fat cells, catecholamine- and insulin-induced activation of the cAMP-PDE may be mediated via phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and an insulin-activated serine protein kinase, respectively.

  8. Parallel Allostery by cAMP and PDE Coordinates Activation and Termination Phases in cAMP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Srinath; Tulsian, Nikhil Kumar; Chandramohan, Arun; Anand, Ganesh S

    2015-09-15

    The second messenger molecule cAMP regulates the activation phase of the cAMP signaling pathway through high-affinity interactions with the cytosolic cAMP receptor, the protein kinase A regulatory subunit (PKAR). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes responsible for catalyzing hydrolysis of cAMP to 5' AMP. It was recently shown that PDEs interact with PKAR to initiate the termination phase of the cAMP signaling pathway. While the steps in the activation phase are well understood, steps in the termination pathway are unknown. Specifically, the binding and allosteric networks that regulate the dynamic interplay between PKAR, PDE, and cAMP are unclear. In this study, PKAR and PDE from Dictyostelium discoideum (RD and RegA, respectively) were used as a model system to monitor complex formation in the presence and absence of cAMP. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to monitor slow conformational transitions in RD, using disordered regions as conformational probes. Our results reveal that RD regulates its interactions with cAMP and RegA at distinct loci by undergoing slow conformational transitions between two metastable states. In the presence of cAMP, RD and RegA form a stable ternary complex, while in the absence of cAMP they maintain transient interactions. RegA and cAMP each bind at orthogonal sites on RD with resultant contrasting effects on its dynamics through parallel allosteric relays at multiple important loci. RD thus serves as an integrative node in cAMP termination by coordinating multiple allosteric relays and governing the output signal response. PMID:26276689

  9. Hydrolysis of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-stimulated cAMP and cGMP by PDE4 and PDE2 phosphodiesterases in primary neuronal cultures of rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Neesha U; O'Donnell, James M

    2002-07-01

    Stimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors on neurons activates both cAMP and cGMP signaling pathways. Experiments were carried out to determine which phosphodiesterase (PDE) families are involved in the hydrolysis of the cyclic nucleotides formed via this mechanism, using primary neuronal cultures prepared from rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus. The nonselective PDE inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) potentiated the ability of NMDA to increase cAMP and cGMP. However, among the family-selective inhibitors, only the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram enhanced the ability of NMDA to increase cAMP in the neurons. In contrast, only the PDE2 inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA) enhanced the ability of NMDA to increase cGMP. Neither adenosine nor an adenosine deaminase inhibitor mimicked the effect of EHNA; this suggests that EHNA's inhibition of PDE2, not its effects on adenosine metabolism, mediates its effects on NMDA-stimulated cGMP concentrations. The PDE inhibitor-augmented effects of NMDA on cAMP and cGMP formation were antagonized by 5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d] cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801), verifying NMDA receptor mediation. In contrast, only NMDA-mediated cGMP formation was affected by altering either nitric oxide signaling or guanylyl cyclase; this suggests that NMDA-induced changes in cAMP are not secondary to altered cGMP concentrations. Overall, the present findings indicate that cAMP and cGMP formed in neurons as a result of NMDA receptor stimulation are hydrolyzed by PDE4 and PDE2, respectively. Selective inhibitors of the two PDE families will differentially affect the functional consequences of activation of these two signaling pathways by NMDA receptor stimulation. PMID:12065724

  10. Uncovering the function of Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 through interactions with the cAMP phosphodiesterase PDE4: Contributions of the Houslay lab to molecular psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    Nearly 10years ago the laboratory of Miles Houslay was part of a collaboration which identified and characterized the interaction between Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 and phosphodiesterase type 4. This work has had significant impact on our thinking of psychiatric illness causation and the potential for therapeutics. PMID:26432168

  11. Two Phosphodiesterases from Ustilago Maydis Share Structural and Biochemical Properties with Non-Fungal Phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Charu; Schultz, David J.; Perlin, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    The dependence of Protein Kinase A (PKA) activity on cAMP levels is an important facet of the dimorphic switch between budding and filamentous growth as well as for pathogenicity in some fungi. To better understand these processes in the pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis, we characterized the structure and biochemical functions of two phosphodiesterase (PDE) genes. Phosphodiesterases are enzymes involved in cAMP turnover and thus, contribute to the regulation of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway. Two predicted homologs of PDEs were identified in the genome of U. maydis and hypothesized to be involved in cAMP turnover, thus regulating activity of the PKA catalytic subunit. Both umpde1 and umpde2 genes contain domains associated with phosphodiesterase activity predicted by InterPro analysis. Biochemical characterization of recombinantly produced UmPde1 (U. maydis Phosphodiesterase I) and UmPde2 demonstrated that both enzymes have phosphodiesterase activity in vitro, yet neither was inhibited by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. Moreover, UmPde1 is specific for cAMP, while UmPde2 has broader substrate specificity, utilizing cAMP and cGMP as substrates. In addition, UmPde2 was also found to have nucleotide phosphatase activity that was higher with GMP compared to AMP. These results demonstrate that UmPde1 is a bona fide phosphodiesterase, while UmPde2 has more general activity as a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and/or GMP/AMP phosphatase. Thus, UmPde1 and UmPde2 likely have important roles in cell morphology and development and share some characteristics with a variety of non-fungal phosphodiesterases. PMID:21687762

  12. Defining the role of a FYVE domain in the localization and activity of a cAMP phosphodiesterase implicated in osmoregulation in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Schoijet, Alejandra C; Miranda, Kildare; Medeiros, Lia Carolina Soares; de Souza, Wanderley; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Torres, Héctor N; Pignataro, Omar P; Docampo, Roberto; Alonso, Guillermo D

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotide second messengers are regulated predominantly by a large superfamily of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, encodes four different PDE families. One of these PDEs, T. cruzi PDE C2 (TcrPDEC2) has been characterized as a FYVE domain containing protein. Here, we report a novel role for TcrPDEC2 in osmoregulation in T. cruzi and reveal the relevance of its FYVE domain. Our data show that treatment of epimastigotes with TcrPDEC2 inhibitors improves their regulatory volume decrease, whereas cells overexpressing this enzyme are unaffected by the same inhibitors. Consistent with these results, TcrPDEC2 localizes to the contractile vacuole complex, showing strong labelling in the region corresponding to the spongiome. Furthermore, transgenic parasites overexpressing a truncated version of TcrPDEC2 without the FYVE domain show a failure in its targeting to the contractile vacuole complex and a marked decrease in PDE activity, supporting the importance of this domain to the localization and activity of TcrPDEC2. Taking together, the results here presented are consistent with the importance of the cyclic AMP signalling pathway in regulatory volume decrease and implicate TcrPDEC2 as a specifically localized PDE involved in osmoregulation in T. cruzi. PMID:21166893

  13. Characterization of inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 1C on a human cellular system.

    PubMed

    Dunkern, Torsten R; Hatzelmann, Armin

    2007-09-01

    Different inhibitors of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-stimulated phosphodiesterase 1 family have been described and used for the examination of phosphodiesterase 1 in cellular, organ or animal models. However, the inhibitors described differ in potency and selectivity for the different phosphodiesterase family enzymes, and in part exhibit additional pharmacodynamic actions. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphodiesterase 1C is expressed in the human glioblastoma cell line A172 with regard to mRNA, protein and activity level, and that lower activities of phosphodiesterase 2, phosphodiesterase 3, phosphodiesterase 4 and phosphodiesterase 5 are also present. The identity of the phosphodiesterase 1C activity detected was verified by downregulation of the mRNA and protein through human phosphodiesterase 1C specific small interfering RNA. In addition, the measured K(m) values (cAMP, 1.7 microm; cGMP, 1.3 microm) are characteristic of phosphodiesterase 1C. We demonstrate that treatment with the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin increases intracellular Ca(2+) in a concentration-dependent way without affecting cell viability. Under conditions of enhanced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, a rapid increase in cAMP levels caused by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin was abolished, indicating the involvement of Ca(2+)-activated phosphodiesterase 1C. The reduction of forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels was reversed by phosphodiesterase 1 inhibitors in a concentration-dependent way. Using this cellular system, we compared the cellular potency of published phosphodiesterase 1 inhibitors, including 8-methoxymethyl-3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, vinpocetine, SCH51866, and two established phosphodiesterase 1 inhibitors developed by Schering-Plough (named compounds 31 and 30). We demonstrate that up to 10 microm 8-methoxymethyl-3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and vinpocetine had no effect on the reduction of forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels by ionomycin, whereas the more selective and up to 10

  14. Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Tripuraneni, Naga Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) is a member of the phosphodiesterase family of proteins that plays a critical role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by controlling its rate of degradation. It has been demonstrated that this isoform is involved in the orchestra of events which includes inflammation, schizophrenia, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, contractility of the myocardium, and psoriatic arthritis. Phosphodiesterase 4B has constituted an interesting target for drug development. In recent years, a number of PDE4B inhibitors have been developed for their use as therapeutic agents. In this review, an up-to-date status of the inhibitors investigated for the inhibition of PDE4B has been given so that this rich source of structural information of presently known PDE4B inhibitors could be helpful in generating a selective and potent inhibitor of PDE4B. PMID:25853062

  15. Detailed characterization of a purified type 4 phosphodiesterase, HSPDE4B2B: differentiation of high- and low-affinity (R)-rolipram binding.

    PubMed

    Rocque, W J; Holmes, W D; Patel, I R; Dougherty, R W; Ittoop, O; Overton, L; Hoffman, C R; Wisely, G B; Willard, D H; Luther, M A

    1997-03-01

    We have overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system, and purified to > 95% homogeneity, milligram quantities of a human recombinant rolipram-sensitive cAMP phosphodiesterase, HSPDE4B2B (amino acid residues 81-564). The protein expression levels were approximately 8 mg of HSPDE4B2B (81-564) per liter of Sf9 cells. The Km of the purified enzyme for cAMP was 4 microM and the Ki for the Type 4 phosphodiesterase-specific inhibitor (R)-rolipram was 0.6 microM. The specific activity of the purified protein was 40 mumol/min/mg protein. A nonequilibrium filter binding assay revealed a high-affinity (R)-rolipram binding site on the purified enzyme with a Kd of 1.5 nM and a stoichiometry of 0.05-0.3 mol of (R)-rolipram per mol of HSPDE4B2B (81-564). Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed a single binding constant of 140 nM with a stoichiometry of 0.75 mol of (R)-rolipram per mol of HSPDE4B2B (81-564). Size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments suggest that the protein exists in multiple association states larger than a monomer. Proteolysis experiments revealed a 43-kDa fragment that contained catalytic and rolipram-inhibitable activities, but the fragment showed no high-affinity (R)-rolipram binding. Based on the proteolytic cleavage studies a 43-kDa protein was constructed, expressed, and purified. This protein, HSPDE4B2B (152-528), had Km and Vmax similar to those of the HSPDE4B2B (81-564) protein, but did not exhibit high-affinity (R)-rolipram binding. The protein did show low-affinity (R)-rolipram binding using the equilibrium binding assay. These results show that a low-affinity binding site for (R)-rolipram is solely contained within the catalytic domain of HSPDE4B2B, whereas high-affinity (R)-rolipram binding requires residues within the catalytic domain and residues flanking N- and/or C-terminal to the catalytic region. PMID:9056484

  16. cAMP-Specific Phosphodiesterases 8A and 8B, Essential Regulators of Leydig Cell Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Tsai, Li-Chun Lisa; Patrucco, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) 8A and PDE8B are high-affinity, cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases that are highly expressed in Leydig cells. PDE8A is largely associated with mitochondria, whereas PDE8B is broadly distributed in the cytosol. We used a new, PDE8-selective inhibitor, PF-04957325, and genetically ablated PDE8A(−/−), PDE8B(−/−) and PDE8A(−/−)/B(−/−) mice to determine roles for these PDEs in the regulation of testosterone production. PF-04957325 treatment of WT Leydig cells or MA10 cells increased steroid production but had no effect in PDE8A (−/−)/B(−/−) double-knockout cells, confirming the selectivity of the drug. Moreover, under basal conditions, cotreatment with PF-04957325 plus rolipram, a PDE4-selective inhibitor, synergistically potentiated steroid production. These results suggest that the pool(s) of cAMP regulating androgen production are controlled by PDE8s working in conjunction with PDE4. Likewise, PDE8A (−/−)/B(−/−) cells had higher testosterone production than cells from either PDE8A(−/−) or PDE8B(−/−) mice, suggesting that both PDE8s work in concert to regulate steroid production. We further demonstrate that combined inhibition of PDE8s and PDE4 greatly increased PKA activity including phosphorylation of cholesterol-ester hydrolase (CEH)/hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). CEH/HSL phosphorylation also was increased in PDE8A(−/−)/B(−/−) cells compared with WT cells. Finally, combined inhibition of PDE8s and PDE4 increased the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. Together these findings suggest that both PDE8A and PDE8B play essential roles to maintain low cAMP levels, thereby suppressing resting steroidogenesis by keeping CEH/HSL inactive and StAR protein expression low. They also suggest that in order for PDE inhibitor therapy to be an effective stimulator of steroidogenesis, both PDE8 isozymes and PDE4 need to be simultaneously targeted. PMID:22232524

  17. Targeting Phosphodiesterases in Anti-platelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rondina, Matthew T.; Weyrich, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    There are two primary modes of platelet inhibition: blockade of membrane receptors or neutralization of intracellular pathways. Both means of inhibition have proven benefits in the prevention and resolution of atherothrombotic events. With regard to intracellular inhibition, phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are fundamental for platelet function. Platelets possess several PDEs (PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5) that catalyze the hydrolysis of cyclic adenosine 3′-5′-monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 3′-5′-monophosphate (cGMP), thereby limiting the levels of intracellular nucleotides. PDE inhibitors, such as cilostazol and dipyridamole, dampen platelet function by increasing cAMP and cGMP levels. This review focuses on the roles of PDE inhibitors in modulating platelet function, with particular attention paid to drugs that have anti-platelet clinical indications. PMID:22918733

  18. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for the analysis of small-molecule inhibitor binding to human and parasitic phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Marco; Shanmugham, Anitha; England, Paul; van der Meer, Tiffany; Bebelman, Jan Paul; Blaazer, Antoni R; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob

    2016-06-15

    In the past decade, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based technology has been exploited more and more to characterize the interaction between drug targets and small-molecule modulators. Here, we report the successful application of SPR methodology for the analysis of small-molecule binding to two therapeutically relevant cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs), Trypanosoma brucei PDEB1 which is implicated in African sleeping sickness and human PDE4D which is implicated in a plethora of disease conditions including inflammatory pulmonary disorders such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and central nervous system (CNS) disorders. A protocol combining the use of directed capture using His-tagged PDE_CDs with covalent attachment to the SPR surface was developed. This methodology allows the determination of the binding kinetics of small-molecule PDE inhibitors and also allows testing their specificity for the two PDEs. The SPR-based assay could serve as a technology platform for the development of highly specific and high-affinity PDE inhibitors, accelerating drug discovery processes. PMID:27033007

  19. Phosphodiesterase 1A Modulates Cystogenesis in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher J.; Leightner, Amanda C.; Smith, Jordan L.; Agarwal, Reema; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates the importance of elevated cAMP in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Accumulation of cAMP in cystic tissues may be, in part, caused by enhanced adenylyl cyclase activity, but inhibition of cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterases (PDE) likely has an important role, because cAMP is inactivated much faster than it is synthesized. PDE1 is the only PDE family activated by Ca2+, which is reduced in PKD cells. To assess the contribution of the PDE1A subfamily to renal cyst formation, we examined the expression and function of PDE1A in zebrafish. We identified two splice isoforms with alternative starts corresponding to human PDE1A1 and PDE1A4. Expression of the two isoforms varied in embryos and adult tissues, and both isoforms hydrolyzed cAMP with Ca2+/calmodulin dependence. Depletion of PDE1A in zebrafish embryos using splice- and translation-blocking morpholinos (MOs) caused pronephric cysts, hydrocephalus, and body curvature. Human PDE1A RNA and the PKA inhibitors, H89 and Rp-cAMPS, partially rescued phenotypes of pde1a morphants. Additionally, MO depletion of PDE1A aggravated phenotypes in pkd2 morphants, causing more severe body curvature, and human PDE1A RNA partially rescued pkd2 morphant phenotypes, pronephric cysts, hydrocephalus, and body curvature. Together, these data indicate the integral role of PDE1A and cAMP signaling in renal development and cystogenesis, imply that PDE1A activity is altered downstream of polycystin-2, and suggest that PDE1A is a viable drug target for PKD. PMID:24700876

  20. Camp Chinkapin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook County School District, Prineville, OR.

    The Camp Chinkapin program, begun in 1957-58 as a pilot program for the State of Oregon, provides all sixth grade students in Crook County (Oregon) with a 5-day session in a resident camp setting in the early summer. The book serves as an introduction to and workbook for students attending the Crook County Outdoor Classroom at Suttle Lake. The…

  1. Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in Salmonella typhimurium: characteristics and physiological function.

    PubMed

    Botsford, J L

    1984-11-01

    The physiological function of cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase in Salmonella typhimurium was investigated with strains which were isogenic except for the cpd locus. In crude broken-cell extracts the properties of the enzyme were found to be similar to those reported for Escherichia coli. The specific activity in the mutant was less than 1% that in the wild type. Rates of cAMP production in the mutant were as much as twice those observed in the wild type. The amount of cAMP accumulated when cells grew overnight with limiting glucose was 4.5-fold greater in the mutant than in the wild type. The intracellular concentration of cAMP in the two strains was measured directly, using four different techniques to wash the cells to remove extracellular cAMP. The cAMP level in the cpd strain was only 25% greater than in the wild type. The functional concentration of the cAMP receptor protein-cAMP complex was estimated indirectly from the specific activity of beta-galactosidase in the two strains after introducing F'lac. When cells were grown with carbon sources permitting synthesis of different levels of cAMP, the specific activity of the enzyme was at most 25% greater in the cpd strain. The cpd strain was more sensitive to the effects of exogenous cAMP. Exogenous cAMP relieved both permanent and transient catabolite repression of the lac operon at lower concentrations in the cpd strain than in the wild type. When cells grew with glucose, glycerol, or ribose, exogenous cAMP inhibited growth of the mutant strain more than the wild type. PMID:6094495

  2. Selective inhibition of two soluble adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate phosphodiesterases partially purified from calf liver.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Lieberman, F; Osborne, J C; Manganiello, V C; Vaughan, M; Hidaka, H

    1984-02-14

    "Low Km" cAMP phosphodiesterase and cGMP-stimulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activities were partially purified from calf liver supernatant by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and DEAE-Sepharose and ammonium sulfate precipitation. The low Km phosphodiesterase was not retained on N6-H2N(CH2)2-cAMP-agarose and could be separated from the cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase which was absorbed by this matrix. From the proteins that did not bind, two distinct low Km cAMP phosphodiesterases were separated on Ultrogel AcA 34. One form (fraction C) hydrolyzed cAMP with an apparent Km of approximately 0.5 microM and was very sensitive to inhibition by cGMP. Lineweaver-Burk plots of cAMP hydrolysis by a second form (fraction B) were nonlinear, with an apparent low Km component of approximately 2 microM. This form was rather insensitive to inhibition by cGMP. With both fractions, hydrolysis of cAMP relative to cGMP was much greater at low (approximately 1 microM) than at high (approximately 100 microM) substrate concentrations. Maximal velocities for cAMP and cGMP were similar. From sedimentation equilibrium, the apparent weight-average molecular weight of fraction B was estimated as 174000, and that of fraction C was 85000. Another fraction (A) of cAMP phosphodiesterase eluted at the void volume of the AcA 34 column. On the basis of the relative affinities for cAMP and cGMP and inhibition by cGMP, fraction A is most likely an aggregated form of fraction B. No apparent interconversion of fractions A, B, or C was observed on high-performance liquid chromatography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6324851

  3. Identification of high-affinity calmodulin-binding proteins in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, R.M.; Dedman, J.R.; Shenolikar, S.

    1987-03-01

    The Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of (/sup 125/I) calmodulin (CaM) to hepatic proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was utilized to identify CaM binding or acceptor proteins or CAPs. Two proteins of apparent molecular weight of 60,000 (CAP-60) and 45,000 (CAP-45) comprised > 80% of the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding in rat liver cytosol. CAP-60 and CAP-45 were partially purified by a variety of chromatographic steps, including affinity chromatography on CaM Sepharose. CAP-60 possessed a native molecular size of 400,000, indicating it to be the CaM-binding subunit of a larger oligomeric complex. In contrast, CAP-45 was monomeric as judged by gel filtration. Neither CAP-60 nor CAP-45 possessed chromatographic properties consistent with known CaM-dependent enzymes reported in the literature. Two-dimensional peptide mapping provided convincing evidence that CAP-60 and CAP-45 were unrelated to other well-characterized CAPs, namely Ca/sup 2 +/ (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II, calcineurin, or the CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The relative abundance and high affinity for CaM could suggest that these novel target proteins, CAP-60 and CAP-45, represent a dominant pathway for CaM action in the mammalian liver.

  4. Mechanisms Restricting Diffusion of Intracellular cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shailesh R.; Clancy, Colleen E.; Harvey, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous receptors stimulate cAMP production in a wide array of cells, many elicit distinct, highly localized responses, implying that the subcellular distribution of cAMP is not uniform. One often used explanation is that phosphodiesterases, which breakdown cAMP, act as functional barriers limiting diffusion. However, several studies refute the notion that this is sufficient, suggesting that phosphodiesterase-independent movement of cAMP must occur at rates slower than free diffusion. But, until now this has never been demonstrated. Using Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS), we measured the diffusion coefficient of a fluorescently-labeled cAMP derivative (φ450-cAMP) as well as other fluorescent molecules in order to investigate the role that molecular size, cell morphology, and buffering by protein kinase A (PKA) play in restricting cAMP mobility in different cell types. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic movement of cAMP is indeed much slower than the rate of free diffusion and that interactions with PKA, especially type II PKA associated with mitochondria, play a significant role. These findings have important implications with respect to cAMP signaling in all cells. PMID:26795432

  5. Anti-platelet therapy: phosphodiesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gresele, Paolo; Momi, Stefania; Falcinelli, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of platelet aggregation can be achieved either by the blockade of membrane receptors or by interaction with intracellular signalling pathways. Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) are two critical intracellular second messengers provided with strong inhibitory activity on fundamental platelet functions. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs), by catalysing the hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, limit the intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotides, thus regulating platelet function. The inhibition of PDEs may therefore exert a strong platelet inhibitory effect. Platelets possess three PDE isoforms (PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5), with different selectivity for cAMP and cGMP. Several nonselective or isoenzyme-selective PDE inhibitors have been developed, and some of them have entered clinical use as antiplatelet agents. This review focuses on the effect of PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5 inhibitors on platelet function and on the evidence for an antithrombotic action of some of them, and in particular of dipyridamole and cilostazol. PMID:21649691

  6. Phosphodiesterase MoPdeH targets MoMck1 of the conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway to regulate cell wall integrity in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziyi; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jingzhen; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Lina; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-06-01

    In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the high-affinity cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase MoPdeH is important not only for cAMP signalling and pathogenicity, but also for cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance through an unknown mechanism. By utilizing affinity purification, we found that MoPdeH interacts with MoMck1, one of the components of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that regulates CWI. Overexpression of MoMCK1 suppressed defects in autolysis and pathogenicity of the ΔMopdeH mutant, although partially, suggesting that MoPdeH plays a critical role in CWI maintenance mediated by the MAP kinase pathway. We found that MoMck1 and two other MAP kinase cascade components, MoMkk1 and MoMps1, modulate intracellular cAMP levels by regulating the expression of MoPDEH through a feedback loop. In addition, disruption of MoMKK1 resulted in less aerial hyphal formation, defective asexual development and attenuated pathogenicity. Moreover, MoMkk1 plays a role in the response to osmotic stress via regulation of MoOsm1 phosphorylation levels, whereas endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress enhances MoMps1 phosphorylation and loss of the MAP kinase cascade component affects the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that MoPdeH functions upstream of the MoMck1-MoMkk1-MoMps1 MAP kinase pathway to regulate CWI, and that MoPdeH also mediates crosstalk between the cAMP signalling pathway, the osmotic sensing high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway and the dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced UPR pathway in M. oryzae. PMID:27193947

  7. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  8. Astro Camp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Children who attend NASA's summer Astro Camp at Stennis Space Center enjoy a week of fun-filled activities. Campers learn what it is like to be a couple of inches taller in space and go through an astronaut obstacle course. They also learn how to build their own model rockets, which are launched on the last day of each camp. Campers also attend field trips to places such as the Challenger Learning Center at the Louisiana Arts and Science Center in Baton Rouge. Four weeks of Astro Camp are held during the summer each year-two camps for 8- to 10-year-olds and two for 11- to 13-year olds.

  9. Astro Camp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Children who attend NASA's summer Astro Camp at Stennis Space Center enjoy a week of fun-filled activities. Campers learn what it feels like to be a couple of inches taller in space and treck through an astronaut obstacle course. They also have the opportunity to build their own model rockets, which are then launched on the last day of each camp. Campers also travel on field trips to places such as the Challenger Learning Center at the Louisiana Arts and Science Center in Baton Rouge. Four weeks of Astro Camp are held each year during the summer-two camps for 8- to 10-year-olds and two for 11- to 13-year olds.

  10. Phosphodiesterase 7 Inhibition Preserves Dopaminergic Neurons in Cellular and Rodent Models of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Garcia, Jose A.; Redondo, Miriam; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Gil, Carmen; Perez, Concepción; Martinez, Ana; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Background Phosphodiesterase 7 plays a major role in down-regulation of protein kinase A activity by hydrolyzing cAMP in many cell types. This cyclic nucleotide plays a key role in signal transduction in a wide variety of cellular responses. In the brain, cAMP has been implicated in learning, memory processes and other brain functions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show a novel function of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal death. We found that S14, a heterocyclic small molecule inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 7, conferred significant neuronal protection against different insults both in the human dopaminergic cell line SH-SY5Y and in primary rat mesencephalic cultures. S14 treatment also reduced microglial activation, protected dopaminergic neurons and improved motor function in the lipopolysaccharide rat model of Parkinson disease. Finally, S14 neuroprotective effects were reversed by blocking the cAMP signaling pathways that operate through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition can protect dopaminergic neurons against different insults, and they provide support for the therapeutic potential of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibitors in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Parkinson disease. PMID:21390306

  11. Challenge of human Jurkat T-cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin elicits major changes in cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) expression by up-regulating PDE3 and inducing PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 splice variants as well as down-regulating a novel PDE4A splice variant.

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, S; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    The cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and PDE4 isoforms provide the major cAMP-hydrolysing PDE activities in Jurkat T-cells, with additional contributions from the PDE1 and PDE2 isoforms. Challenge of cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin led to a rapid, albeit transient, increase in PDE3 activity occurring over the first 45 min, followed by a sustained increase in PDE3 activity which began after approximately 3 h and continued for at least 24 h. Only this second phase of increase in PDE3 activity was blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. After approximately 3 h of exposure to forskolin, PDE4 activity had increased, via a process that could be inhibited by actinomycin D, and it remained elevated for at least a 24 h period. Such actions of forskolin were mimicked by cholera toxin and 8-bromo-cAMP. Forskolin increased intracellular cAMP concentrations in a time-dependent fashion and its action was enhanced when PDE induction was blocked with actinomycin D. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis, using generic primers designed to detect transcripts representing enzymically active products of the four PDE4 genes, identified transcripts for PDE4A and PDE4D but not for PDE4B or PDE4C in untreated Jurkat T-cells. Forskolin treatment did not induce transcripts for either PDE4B or PDE4C; however, it reduced the RT-PCR signal for PDE4A transcripts and markedly enhanced that for PDE4D transcripts. Using RT-PCR primers for PDE4 splice variants, a weak signal for PDE4D1 was evident in control cells whereas, in forskolin-treated cells, clear signals for both PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 were detected. RT-PCR analysis of the PDE4A species indicated that it was not the PDE4A isoform PDE-46 (PDE4A4B). Immunoblotting of control cells for PDE4 forms identified a single PDE4A species of approximately 118 kDa, which migrated distinctly from the PDE4A4B isoform PDE-46, with immunoprecipitation analyses showing that it provided all of the PDE4 activity in control

  12. Cyclic Amp phosphodiesterase activity in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Menna, V; Serra, E; Santoleri, F; Perfetti, G; Ciavarelli, L; Trentini, P

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (cAMP PDE) seems to be important in pulp tissues. High levels of cAMP PDE have been demonstrated to be in dental pulp cells. In the present study cAMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cAMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 12.14 +/- 3.74 nmols/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cAMP PDE activity increased almost 2.5 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results could point to a role of cAMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury. PMID:16857100

  13. [Hemophilia camps.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Sierra, Julieta; Del Pilar Torres-Arreola, Laura; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Dueñas-González, María Teresa; Monteros-Rincón, Martha Patricia; Osorio-Guzmán, Maricela

    2013-01-01

    We reported the experience of hemophilia camps which was accomplished with patients from hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. The aim was to prepare the families and patients regarding the disease treatment, in order to promote the self sufficiency and to know the impact of the program on the course of the disease. Surveys were applied about treatment items and personal opinions were collected. The results of the national hemophilia camp were: group of 56 patients, average 14 years, 2 % women, 51 % severe hemophilia and 43 % had hemophilic brothers. Benefits: patients increased their knowledge about earlier bleeding identification and the self-infusion method; they became aware on their responsibility in self care, timely treatment and duties at home. Hemophilia camps with patients are an option for attitude change before disease complications. Social network creation and the increase in self-sufficiency are other benefits. PMID:24290020

  14. Effects of metal ions and disulfide bonds on the activity of phosphodiesterase from Trimeresurus stejnegeri venom.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lili; Xu, Xiaolong; Guo, Mingchun; Yan, Xincheng; Wang, Shasha; Gao, Shang; Zhu, Shanshan

    2013-06-01

    Obviously different from the other known phosphodiesterases, the phosphodiesterase from Trimeresurus stejnegeri venom (TS-PDE) consists of two different chains linked with disulfide bonds and contains both endogenous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) are important for its phosphodiesterase activity. In this study, the effects of metal ions and small-molecule reductants on its structure and activity have been investigated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, high performance liquid chromatography, fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results show that TS-PDE has one class of Zn(2+) binding site and two classes of Cu(2+) binding site, including the high affinity activator sites and the low affinity sites. Cu(2+) ions function as a switch for its phosphodiesterase activity. The catalytic activity of TS-PDE does not have an absolute requirement for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+) and Ca(2+) are all effective for its phosphodiesterase activity. TS-PDE has seven disulfide bonds and ten free cysteine residues. l-Ascorbate inhibits the phosphodiesterase activity of TS-PDE through reduction of the Cu(2+), while dithiothreitol, glutathione and tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine inhibit the phosphodiesterase activity of TS-PDE by reducing both the Cu(2+) and disulfide bonds. The catalytic activity of TS-PDE relies on its disulfide bonds and bimetallic cluster. In addition, biologically-relevant reductants, glutathione and l-ascorbate, have been found to be endogenous inhibitors to the phosphodiesterase activity of TS-PDE. PMID:23775423

  15. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  16. Alterations of Phosphodiesterases in Adrenocortical Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Faucz, Fabio R; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the cyclic (c)AMP-dependent signaling pathway have been implicated in the majority of benign adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) causing Cushing syndrome (CS). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels, including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Inactivating mutations and other functional variants in PDE11A and PDE8B, two cAMP-binding PDEs, predispose to ACTs. The involvement of these two genes in ACTs was initially revealed by a genome-wide association study in patients with micronodular bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Thereafter, PDE11A or PDE8B genetic variants have been found in other ACTs, including macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and cortisol-producing adenomas. In addition, downregulation of PDE11A expression and inactivating variants of the gene have been found in hereditary and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors, as well as in prostatic cancer. PDEs confer an increased risk of ACT formation probably through, primarily, their action on cAMP levels, but other actions might be possible. In this report, we review what is known to date about PDE11A and PDE8B and their involvement in the predisposition to ACTs. PMID:27625633

  17. Alterations of Phosphodiesterases in Adrenocortical Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Faucz, Fabio R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the cyclic (c)AMP-dependent signaling pathway have been implicated in the majority of benign adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) causing Cushing syndrome (CS). Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels, including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Inactivating mutations and other functional variants in PDE11A and PDE8B, two cAMP-binding PDEs, predispose to ACTs. The involvement of these two genes in ACTs was initially revealed by a genome-wide association study in patients with micronodular bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Thereafter, PDE11A or PDE8B genetic variants have been found in other ACTs, including macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and cortisol-producing adenomas. In addition, downregulation of PDE11A expression and inactivating variants of the gene have been found in hereditary and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors, as well as in prostatic cancer. PDEs confer an increased risk of ACT formation probably through, primarily, their action on cAMP levels, but other actions might be possible. In this report, we review what is known to date about PDE11A and PDE8B and their involvement in the predisposition to ACTs.

  18. High-throughput screening of phosphodiesterase activity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Rich, Thomas C; Karpen, Jeffrey W

    2005-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) hydrolyze the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) and play a crucial role in the termination and spatial segregation of cyclic nucleotide signals. Despite a wealth of molecular information, very little is known about how PDEs regulate cAMP and cGMP signals in living cells because conventional methods lack the necessary spatial and temporal resolution. We present here a sensitive optical method for monitoring cAMP levels and PDE activity near the membrane, using cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels as sensors. These channels are directly opened by the binding of cyclic nucleotides and allow cations to cross the membrane. The olfactory channel A subunit (CNGA2) has been genetically modified to improve its cAMP sensitivity and specificity. Channel activity is assessed by measuring Ca2+ influx using standard fluorometric techniques. In addition to studying PDEs in their native setting, the approach should be particularly useful in high-throughput screening assays to test for compounds that affect PDE activity, as well as the activities of the many G protein-coupled receptors that cause changes in intracellular cAMP. PMID:15988054

  19. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.

  20. High-affinity uptake of noradrenaline in postsynaptic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    al-Damluji, S.; Krsmanovic, L. Z.; Catt, K. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. Neurotransmitters released from nerve endings are inactivated by re-uptake into the presynaptic nerve terminals and possibly into neighbouring glial cells. While analysing the functional properties of alpha 1-adrenoceptors in the hypothalamus, we observed a high-affinity uptake process for noradrenaline in postsynaptic peptidergic neurones. 2. In primary hypothalamic cell cultures and in a hypothalamic neuronal cell line, [3H]-prazosin bound with high affinity and was displaced by unlabelled prazosin in concentrations of 10(-10) to 10(-7) M. However, at concentrations of unlabelled prazosin above 10(-7) M, there was a paradoxical increase in apparent [3H]-prazosin binding. 3. Methoxamine, an alpha 1-adrenoceptor ligand that is not subject to significant neuronal uptake, displaced [3H]-prazosin but did not cause the paradoxical increase in the apparent binding of [3H]-prazosin. Cooling the cells to 4 degrees C reduced the total amount of prazosin associated with the cells; under these conditions, methoxamine almost completely inhibited [3H]-prazosin binding to the cells. 4. In the presence of desipramine (DMI), unlabelled prazosin displaced [3H]-prazosin as before, but no paradoxical increase in apparent binding was seen above 10(-7) M. 5. The paradoxical increase of [3H]-prazosin binding was not observed in membrane preparations of hypothalamic neurones. These findings indicated that the paradoxical increase in apparent [3H]-prazosin binding was due to a cellular uptake process that becomes evident at high concentrations of the ligand. 6. DMI (10(-5) M) had no effect on the specific binding of [3H]-prazosin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8358534

  1. Gangliosides as high affinity receptors for tetanus neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Barbieri, Joseph T; Baldwin, Michael R

    2009-09-25

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) is an exotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani that causes paralytic death to hundreds of thousands of humans annually. TeNT cleaves vesicle-associated membrane protein-2, which inhibits neurotransmitter release in the central nervous system to elicit spastic paralysis, but the molecular basis for TeNT entry into neurons remains unclear. TeNT is a approximately 150-kDa protein that has AB structure-function properties; the A domain is a zinc metalloprotease, and the B domain encodes a translocation domain and C-terminal receptor-binding domain (HCR/T). Earlier studies showed that HCR/T bound gangliosides via two carbohydrate-binding sites, termed the lactose-binding site (the "W" pocket) and the sialic acid-binding site (the "R" pocket). Here we report that TeNT high affinity binding to neurons is mediated solely by gangliosides. Glycan array and solid phase binding analyses identified gangliosides that bound exclusively to either the W pocket or the R pocket of TeNT; GM1a bound to the W pocket, and GD3 bound to the R pocket. Using these gangliosides and mutated forms of HCR/T that lacked one or both carbohydrate-binding pocket, gangliosides binding to both of the W and R pockets were shown to be necessary for high affinity binding to neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The crystal structure of a ternary complex of HCR/T with sugar components of two gangliosides bound to the W and R supported the binding of gangliosides to both carbohydrate pockets. These data show that gangliosides are functional dual receptors for TeNT. PMID:19602728

  2. A fluorescence polarization assay for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Sportsman, J Richard

    2002-06-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the 3'-ester bond of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), important second messengers in the transduction of a variety of extracellular signals. There is growing interest in the study of PDEs as drug targets for novel therapeutics. We describe the development of a homogeneous fluorescence polarization assay for PDEs based on the strong binding of PDE reaction products (i.e., AMP or GMP) onto modified nanoparticles through interactions with immobilized trivalent metal cations. This assay technology (IMAP) is applicable to both cAMP- and cGMP-specific PDEs. Results of the assay in 384- and 1536-well microplates are presented. PMID:12097184

  3. Marketing Your Day Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, George

    1997-01-01

    Marketing strategies for day camps include encouraging camp staff to get involved in organizations involving children, families, and communities; holding camp fairs; offering the use of camp facilities to outside groups; hosting sport leagues and local youth outings; planning community fairs; and otherwise involving the camp in the community. (LP)

  4. Detection of Waterborne Viruses Using High Affinity Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Zeynep; Gittens, Micah; Guerreiro, Antonio; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Walker, Jimmy; Piletsky, Sergey; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2015-07-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are artificial receptor ligands which can recognize and specifically bind to a target molecule. They are more resistant to chemical and biological damage and inactivation than antibodies. Therefore, target specific-MIP nanoparticles are aimed to develop and implemented to biosensors for the detection of biological toxic agents such as viruses, bacteria, and fungi toxins that cause many diseases and death due to the environmental contamination. For the first time, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) targeting the bacteriophage MS2 as the template was investigated using a novel solid-phase synthesis method to obtain the artificial affinity ligand for the detection and removal of waterborne viruses through optical-based sensors. A high affinity between the artificial ligand and the target was found, and a regenerative MIP-based virus detection assay was successfully developed using a new surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-biosensor which provides an alternative technology for the specific detection and removal of waterborne viruses that lead to high disease and death rates all over the world. PMID:26008649

  5. Solubilization and partial characterization of a microsomal high affinity GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Nicchitta, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    Isolated rat liver microsomes release sequestered Ca/sup 2 +/ following addition of GTP. In contrast to permeabilized cells, GTP dependent microsomal Ca/sup 2 +/ release requires low concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG). They have identified a microsomal, PEG-sensitive high affinity GTPase which shares a number of characteristics with the GTP-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ release system. To aid in further characterization of this activity they have initiated studies on the solubilization and purification of the microsomal GTPases. When microsomes are solubilized under the following conditions (150 mM NaCl, 5 mg protein/ml, 1% Triton X-114) PEG sensitive GTPase activity selectively partitions into the detergent rich phase of the Triton X-114 extract. As observed in intact microsomal membranes the Triton X-114 soluble GTPase is maximally stimulated by 3% PEG. Half maximal stimulation is observed at 1% PEG. PEG increases the Vmax of this activity; no effects on Km were observed. The Km for GTP of the detergent soluble GTPase is 5 ..mu..M. This GTPase is sensitive to inhibition by sulfhydryl reagents. PEG-sensitive GTPase activity was completely inhibited in the presence of 25 ..mu..M p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (PHMB); half maximal inhibition was observed at 5 ..mu..M. Labeling of the Triton X-114 extract with the photosensitive compound (/sup 32/P) 8-azido GTP indicated the presence of two prominent GTP binding proteins of approximate molecular weights 17 and 54 kD.

  6. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  7. A novel high affinity human monoclonal antibody to mesothelin

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mitchell; Feng, Mingqian; Fisher, Robert J.; Rader, Christoph; Pastan, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Mesothelin is a glycosylphosphatidylinisotol-anchored glycoprotein that is highly expressed on the cell surface of mesothelioma, ovarian cancer and other malignant tumors. The interaction between mesothelin and CA125 (also called MUC16) may facilitate the implantation and metastasis of tumors in the peritoneal cavity. A desirable therapeutic agent involves finding a fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to mesothelin or CA125 and inhibits their interaction. Here we report the identification of a novel human mAb to mesothelin. HN1, a human single chain Fv specific for mesothelin, was isolated from a naïve human scFv phage display library. To investigate HN1 as a potential therapeutic, we generated a fully human IgG with the γ 1 heavy chain and the κ light chain, and an immuntoxin by fusing the HN1 scFv to a truncated Pseudomonas exotoxin A. The HN1 IgG kills cancer cells with very strong antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. HN1 binds a conformation-sensitive epitope in human mesothelin with high affinity (KD = 3 nM). The HN1 epitope is different from that of SS1, a mouse Fv used to develop therapeutic antibodies that are currently in clinical trials. HN1 binds to cell surface-associated mesothelin on human mesothelioma, ovarian cancer, lung adenocarcinoma and pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, HN1 can functionally block the interaction of mesothelin and CA125 on cancer cells. Most importantly, because the HN1 immuntoxin kills mesothelin-expressing cancer cells with high cytotoxic activity, we believe that it has significant potential for mesothelin-expressing cancer treatment and diagnosis. PMID:20635390

  8. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  9. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  10. Camp through the Decades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicodemus, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    Camp pioneers relate how camping has grown to become more diverse, environmentally aware, safe, and conscious of its responsibility to promote healthy development of children. Changing trends in clothing, transportation, and food preparation at camp are described. The joys, discoveries, and teachable moments that camp offers children have endured.…

  11. Astro Camp Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Stennis Space Center's new Astro Camp Plus camp kicked off June 19 for teens ages 13-15. The new camp delves more deeply into the science, math and technology concepts introduced in the center's popular Astro Camp series. Campers including Jasmyne White (left) and Dana Yingst, both of Slidell, La., learn how NASA uses 'podcasting' to broadcast video, and made their own podcasts.

  12. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  13. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W.; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Lewis, Timothy J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Harvey, Robert D.; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  14. Role of Membrane Microdomains in Compartmentation of cAMP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shailesh R.; Yang, Pei-Chi; Rice, Monica; Singer, Cherie A.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Lohse, Martin J.; Clancy, Colleen E.; Harvey, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially restricting cAMP production to discrete subcellular locations permits selective regulation of specific functional responses. But exactly where and how cAMP signaling is confined is not fully understood. Different receptors and adenylyl cyclase isoforms responsible for cAMP production are not uniformly distributed between lipid raft and non-lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane. We sought to determine the role that these membrane domains play in organizing cAMP responses in HEK293 cells. The freely diffusible FRET-based biosensor Epac2-camps was used to measure global cAMP responses, while versions of the probe targeted to lipid raft (Epac2-MyrPalm) and non-raft (Epac2-CAAX) domains were used to monitor local cAMP production near the plasma membrane. Disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion selectively altered cAMP responses produced by raft-associated receptors. The results indicate that receptors associated with lipid raft as well as non-lipid raft domains can contribute to global cAMP responses. In addition, basal cAMP activity was found to be significantly higher in non-raft domains. This was supported by the fact that pharmacologic inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity reduced basal cAMP activity detected by Epac2-CAAX but not Epac2-MyrPalm or Epac2-camps. Responses detected by Epac2-CAAX were also more sensitive to direct stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, but less sensitive to inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity. Quantitative modeling was used to demonstrate that differences in adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities are necessary but not sufficient to explain compartmentation of cAMP associated with different microdomains of the plasma membrane. PMID:24752595

  15. Age-related changes of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity in rat brain regions and a new phosphodiesterase inhibitor--nootropic agent adafenoxate.

    PubMed

    Stancheva, S L; Alova, L G

    1991-01-01

    1. The low- and high-KM cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (cAMP PDE) activity in cerebral cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and hippocampus of young (4-5-month-old) and aged (22-month-old) rats has been studied. 2. A significant rise in the high-KM cAMP PDE activity in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus in aged rats has been found. 3. The activity of the low-KM cAMP PDE does not change during senescence in all the brain structures studied. 4. In a series of increased concentrations (from 5 x 10(-4) to 1 x 10(-5) M) adafenoxate inhibits low- and high-KM cAMP PDE in most of the brain structures studied in both age groups. 5. The present results provide evidence for realization of the CNS effects of adafenoxate through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and regulation of the intracellular level of cAMP. PMID:1662175

  16. Activated G-protein releases cGMP from high affinity binding sites on PDE from toad rod outer segments (ROS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, P.S.T.; Walseth, T.F.; Panter, S.S.; Sundby, S.R.; Graeff, R.M.; Goldberg, N.D.

    1987-05-01

    cGMP binding proteins in toad ROS were identified by direct photoaffinity labeling (PAL) with /sup 32/P-cGMP and quantified by retention of complexes on nitrocellulose filters. By PAL, high affinity sites were present on the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) which have MW/sub app/ of 94 and 90 kDa. A doublet was deduced from its photolabeling properties to represent PDE/sub ..gamma../ photocrosslinked with PDE/sub ..cap alpha../ or PDE/sub ..beta../, respectively. cGMP prebound to these high affinity sites was released by light-activated G-protein or its ..cap alpha.. subunit complexed with GTP..gamma..S; this inhibition of cGMP binding to PDE did not result from decreased cGMP availability due to enhanced hydrolysis. A low affinity cGMP binding component identified by PAL is tightly associated with ROS membranes. Apparent ATP/light-dependent stimulation of cGMP binding was shown to result from light activated cGMP hydrolysis in conjunction with ATP-promoted conversion of GMP to GDP/GTP and increased GDP/GTP binding. These findings coincide with a model for light-related regulation of cGMP binding and metabolism predicted from intact and cellfree kinetic measurements: in the dark state the cGMP hydrolic rate is constrained by the availability of cGMP because of its binding to high affinity sites on PDE. Light activated G-protein releases cGMP from these sites and allows for its redistribution to lower affinity sites represented by PDE catalytic site(s) and possible cGMP-dependent membrane cation channels.

  17. Clinical and Molecular Genetics of the Phosphodiesterases (PDEs)

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Monalisa F.; Faucz, Fabio R.; Bimpaki, Eirini; Horvath, Anelia; Levy, Isaac; de Alexandre, Rodrigo B.; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Manganiello, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that have the unique function of terminating cyclic nucleotide signaling by catalyzing the hydrolysis of cAMP and GMP. They are critical regulators of the intracellular concentrations of cAMP and cGMP as well as of their signaling pathways and downstream biological effects. PDEs have been exploited pharmacologically for more than half a century, and some of the most successful drugs worldwide today affect PDE function. Recently, mutations in PDE genes have been identified as causative of certain human genetic diseases; even more recently, functional variants of PDE genes have been suggested to play a potential role in predisposition to tumors and/or cancer, especially in cAMP-sensitive tissues. Mouse models have been developed that point to wide developmental effects of PDEs from heart function to reproduction, to tumors, and beyond. This review brings together knowledge from a variety of disciplines (biochemistry and pharmacology, oncology, endocrinology, and reproductive sciences) with emphasis on recent research on PDEs, how PDEs affect cAMP and cGMP signaling in health and disease, and what pharmacological exploitations of PDEs may be useful in modulating cyclic nucleotide signaling in a way that prevents or treats certain human diseases. PMID:24311737

  18. Intracellular tortuosity underlies slow cAMP diffusion in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark; Lomas, Oliver; Jalink, Kees; Ford, Kerrie L.; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Aims 3′,5′-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signals in the heart are often confined to concentration microdomains shaped by cAMP diffusion and enzymatic degradation. While the importance of phosphodiesterases (degradative enzymes) in sculpting cAMP microdomains is well established in cardiomyocytes, less is known about cAMP diffusivity (DcAMP) and factors affecting it. Many earlier studies have reported fast diffusivity, which argues against sharply defined microdomains. Methods and results [cAMP] dynamics in the cytoplasm of adult rat ventricular myocytes were imaged using a fourth generation genetically encoded FRET-based sensor. The [cAMP]-response to the addition and removal of isoproterenol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) quantified the rates of cAMP synthesis and degradation. To obtain a read out of DcAMP, a stable [cAMP] gradient was generated using a microfluidic device which delivered agonist to one half of the myocyte only. After accounting for phosphodiesterase activity, DcAMP was calculated to be 32 µm2/s; an order of magnitude lower than in water. Diffusivity was independent of the amount of cAMP produced. Saturating cAMP-binding sites with the analogue 6-Bnz-cAMP did not accelerate DcAMP, arguing against a role of buffering in restricting cAMP mobility. cAMP diffused at a comparable rate to chemically unrelated but similar sized molecules, arguing for a common physical cause of restricted diffusivity. Lower mitochondrial density and order in neonatal cardiac myocytes allowed for faster diffusion, demonstrating the importance of mitochondria as physical barriers to cAMP mobility. Conclusion In adult cardiac myocytes, tortuosity due to physical barriers, notably mitochondria, restricts cAMP diffusion to levels that are more compatible with microdomain signalling. PMID:27089919

  19. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  20. Imaging cytoplasmic cAMP in mouse brainstem neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, SL; Skorova, E; Taschenberger, G; Hartelt, N; Nikolaev, VO; Lohse, MJ; Kügler, S

    2009-01-01

    Background cAMP is an ubiquitous second messenger mediating various neuronal functions, often as a consequence of increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. While imaging of calcium is commonly used in neuroscience applications, probing for cAMP levels has not yet been performed in living vertebrate neuronal tissue before. Results Using a strictly neuron-restricted promoter we virally transduced neurons in the organotypic brainstem slices which contained pre-Bötzinger complex, constituting the rhythm-generating part of the respiratory network. Fluorescent cAMP sensor Epac1-camps was expressed both in neuronal cell bodies and neurites, allowing us to measure intracellular distribution of cAMP, its absolute levels and time-dependent changes in response to physiological stimuli. We recorded [cAMP]i changes in the micromolar range after modulation of adenylate cyclase, inhibition of phosphodiesterase and activation of G-protein-coupled metabotropic receptors. [cAMP]i levels increased after membrane depolarisation and release of Ca2+ from internal stores. The effects developed slowly and reached their maximum after transient [Ca2+]i elevations subsided. Ca2+-dependent [cAMP]i transients were suppressed after blockade of adenylate cyclase with 0.1 mM adenylate cyclase inhibitor 2'5'-dideoxyadenosine and potentiated after inhibiting phosphodiesterase with isobutylmethylxanthine and rolipram. During paired stimulations, the second depolarisation and Ca2+ release evoked bigger cAMP responses. These effects were abolished after inhibition of protein kinase A with H-89 pointing to the important role of phosphorylation of calcium channels in the potentiation of [cAMP]i transients. Conclusion We constructed and characterized a neuron-specific cAMP probe based on Epac1-camps. Using viral gene transfer we showed its efficient expression in organotypic brainstem preparations. Strong fluorescence, resistance to photobleaching and possibility of direct estimation of [cAMP] levels using

  1. Compartmentation of cAMP signalling in cardiomyocytes in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Perera, R K; Nikolaev, V O

    2013-04-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger critically involved in the regulation of heart function. It has been shown to act in discrete subcellular signalling compartments formed by differentially localized receptors, phosphodiesterases and protein kinases. Cardiac diseases such as hypertrophy or heart failure are associated with structural and functional remodelling of these microdomains which leads to changes in cAMP compartmentation. In this review, we will discuss recent key findings which provided new insights into cAMP compartmentation in cardiomyocytes with a particular focus on its alterations in heart disease. PMID:23383621

  2. A Summer Camp Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratte, Janice L.; DiNardi, Salvatore R.

    1979-01-01

    Reported are the results of a project assessing the impact of a revised Massachusetts sanitary code on 500 summer camps for children. The study compared camp compliances with the proposed regulations to the level of compliance with existing regulations. (BT)

  3. Michelle: Growing Through Camping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellet, Annette M.

    1977-01-01

    A mother, whose physically handicapped 7-year-old daughter has prosthetic feet, describes how her child adjusted well first to a summer day camp and then to a week long camping program run by the Girl Scouts. (GW)

  4. Interplay of Ca2+ and cAMP signaling in the insulin-secreting MIN6 beta-cell line.

    PubMed

    Landa, Luis R; Harbeck, Mark; Kaihara, Kelly; Chepurny, Oleg; Kitiphongspattana, Kajorn; Graf, Oliver; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Lohse, Martin J; Holz, George G; Roe, Michael W

    2005-09-01

    Ca2+ and cAMP are important second messengers that regulate multiple cellular processes. Although previous studies have suggested direct interactions between Ca2+ and cAMP signaling pathways, the underlying mechanisms remain unresolved. In particular, direct evidence for Ca2+-regulated cAMP production in living cells is incomplete. Genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensors have made possible real-time imaging of spatial and temporal gradients of intracellular cAMP concentration in single living cells. Here, we used confocal microscopy, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and insulin-secreting MIN6 cells expressing Epac1-camps, a biosynthetic unimolecular cAMP indicator, to better understand the role of intracellular Ca2+ in cAMP production. We report that depolarization with high external K+, tolbutamide, or glucose caused a rapid increase in cAMP that was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and inhibited by nitrendipine, a Ca2+ channel blocker, or 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, a P-site antagonist of transmembrane adenylate cyclases. Stimulation of MIN6 cells with glucose in the presence of tetraethylammonium chloride generated concomitant Ca2+ and cAMP oscillations that were abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ and blocked by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase. Simultaneous measurements of Ca2+ and cAMP concentrations with Fura-2 and Epac1-camps, respectively, revealed a close temporal and causal interrelationship between the increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+ and cAMP levels following membrane depolarization. These findings indicate highly coordinated interplay between Ca2+ and cAMP signaling in electrically excitable endocrine cells and suggest that Ca2+-dependent cAMP oscillations are derived from an increase in adenylate cyclase activity and periodic activation and inactivation of cAMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase. PMID:15987680

  5. Role of phosphodiesterase 5 in synaptic plasticity and memory

    PubMed Central

    Puzzo, Daniela; Sapienza, Salvatore; Arancio, Ottavio; Palmeri, Agostino

    2008-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that break down the phosphodiesteric bond of the cyclic nucleotides, cAMP and cGMP, second messengers that regulate many biological processes. PDEs participate in the regulation of signal transduction by means of a fine regulation of cyclic nucleotides so that the response to cell stimuli is both specific and activates the correct third messengers. Several PDE inhibitors have been developed and used as therapeutic agents because they increase cyclic nucleotide levels by blocking the PDE function. In particular, sildenafil, an inhibitor of PDE5, has been mainly used in the treatment of erectile dysfunction but is now also utilized against pulmonary hypertension. This review examines the physiological role of PDE5 in synaptic plasticity and memory and the use of PDE5 inhibitors as possible therapeutic agents against disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:18728748

  6. Camp is a Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Farmers Union, Jamestown. Dept. of Youth Activities.

    A camping workbook provides materials for use in discussion of 3 important aspects of farm living: rural power, communication, and conservation. It is intended that this material be used in class sessions held during a junior youth camp. A sample of the youth camp schedule reveals 3 forty-five minute time periods during the day designated as class…

  7. Further characterization of a high affinity thyrotropin binding site on the rat thyrotropin receptor which is an epitope for blocking antibodies from idiopathic myxedema patients but not thyroid stimulating antibodies from Graves' patients.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, S; Ban, T; Akamizu, T; Kohn, L D

    1991-10-31

    Cysteine 390 of the rat thyrotropin (TSH) receptor, when mutated to serine, results in a receptor with a reduced ability of TSH to bind and increase cAMP levels but a preserved ability of thyroid stimulating autoantibodies (TSAbs) from hyperthyroid Graves' patients to increase cAMP levels. The ability of receptor autoantibodies from hypothyroid patients with idiopathic myxedema to inhibit the TSAb activity which is preserved is, however, like TSH binding, significantly reduced. Cysteine 390, together with tyrosine 385, thus appears to be an important determinant in a high affinity TSH binding site which is an epitope for receptor autoantibodies which block TSH or TSAb action and cause hypothyroidism rather than TSAbs which increase cAMP levels and are associated with hyperthyroidism. Threonine 388 and aspartic acid 403 may contribute to this ligand interaction site. PMID:1719963

  8. Creating healthy camp experiences.

    PubMed

    Walton, Edward A; Tothy, Alison S

    2011-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has created recommendations for health appraisal and preparation of young people before participation in day or resident camps and to guide health and safety practices for children at camp. These recommendations are intended for parents, primary health care providers, and camp administration and health center staff. Although camps have diverse environments, there are general guidelines that apply to all situations and specific recommendations that are appropriate under special conditions. This policy statement has been reviewed and is supported by the American Camp Association. PMID:21444589

  9. Chromosome localizations of genes for five cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases in man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Francke, U. ); Bolger, G.; Michaeli, T. )

    1994-03-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are important second messengers that mediate a number of cellular responses to external signals. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases play a role in signal transduction by regulating the cellular concentrations of these messengers. Here, the authors have applied Southern analyses of somatic cell hybrid lines and of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains as well as fluorescence chromosomal in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosomally localize five cAMP-specific nucleotide phosphodiesterase genes in human and mouse. Genes DPDE1, DPDE2, DPDE3, and DPDE4 that share sequence homology with the Drosophila dunce gene were assigned to human chromosomes 19 (DPDE1 and DPDE2), ga12 (DPDE3), and 1p31 (DPDE4) and to mouse chromosomes 8, 9, 13, and 4, respectively. The high-affinity cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase gene (HCP1) was mapped to human chromosome 8q13-q22. Since these genes are potential candidates for involvement in psychiatric or behavioral disorders, knowledge of their chromosomal localizations will facilitate the discovery of their association with disease genes as they are being mapped by linkage studies.

  10. Efficacy of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Is Coupled to Phosphodiesterase 2A in Cardiac Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Lu, Chieh-Ju; Hao, Guoliang; Wright, Hannah; Woodward, Lavinia; Liu, Kun; Vergari, Elisa; Surdo, Nicoletta C.; Herring, Neil; Zaccolo, Manuela; Paterson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) regulates cGMP-phosphodiesterase activity. Its elevation is regarded as an early compensatory response to cardiac failure where it can facilitate sympathovagal balance and cardiorenal homeostasis. However, recent reports suggest a paradoxical proadrenergic action of BNP. Because phosphodiesterase activity is altered in cardiovascular disease, we tested the hypothesis that BNP might lose its efficacy by minimizing the action of cGMP on downstream pathways coupled to neurotransmission. BNP decreased norepinephrine release from atrial preparations in response to field stimulation and also significantly reduced the heart rate responses to sympathetic nerve stimulation in vitro. Using electrophysiological recording and fluorescence imaging, BNP also reduced the depolarization evoked calcium current and intracellular calcium transient in isolated cardiac sympathetic neurons. Pharmacological manipulations suggested that the reduction in the calcium transient was regulated by a cGMP/protein kinase G pathway. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements for cAMP, and an immunoassay for cGMP, showed that BNP increased cGMP, but not cAMP. In addition, overexpression of phosphodiesterase 2A after adenoviral gene transfer markedly decreased BNP stimulation of cGMP and abrogated the BNP responses to the calcium current, intracellular calcium transient, and neurotransmitter release. These effects were reversed on inhibition of phosphodiesterase 2A. Moreover, phosphodiesterase 2A activity was significantly elevated in stellate neurons from the prohypertensive rat compared with the normotensive control. Our data suggest that abnormally high levels of phosphodiesterase 2A may provide a brake against the inhibitory action of BNP on sympathetic transmission. PMID:25916722

  11. Effect of some polysaccharides in cyclic nucleotide level and phosphodiesterase activity in organs of mice with lewis' lung carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Veksler, I.G.; Antonenko, S.G.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes the results of a study of the effect of the bacterial polysaccharide prodigiosan and the yeast cell membrane bipolymer zymosan on the absolute and relative levels of cAMP, cAMP, and cAMP-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the thymus, spleen, and lungs of healthy mice and of mice with metastasizing Lewis' lung carcinoma. The cyclic nucleotide concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay. Radioactivity of the samples was studied in an SL-30 liquid scintillation counter. PDE activity was determined by paper chromatography using 8-/sup 3/H-cAMP as the substrate.

  12. Lesbian camp: An unearthing.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Elly-Jean

    2016-01-01

    Camp-a sensibility, a style, and a form of artistic self-expression-is an elusive concept said to be in the eye of the beholder. To refute Susan Sontag's ( 1966 ) claims that camp is apolitical and not especially homosexual, a number of recent scholarly works have been geared toward revealing camp's fundamental gayness. With the odd footnote aside, lesbian camp has been collapsed into the category of gay male camp, if not eclipsed entirely. Despite the negligible efforts made to legitimize lesbian camp, there are numerous salient cultural examples one might draw on to illustrate, typify, and substantiate a lesbian camp sensibility. I lay the ground work for this scholarly exercise by outlining various definitions and critiques of camp, and by discussing its history and application to queer theory. Then, to unveil lesbian camp, three non-mutually exclusive categories are discussed: classic, erotic, and radical. By gathering various strands of inquiry, and various textual examples (e.g., photography, artistic performances, and literary tropes), this article attempts to reach a more inclusive and nuanced understanding of lesbian camp. PMID:26701773

  13. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain. PMID:24269284

  14. Phosphodiesterase Inhibition to Target the Synaptic Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, Kelly R.; Plath, Niels; Svenstrup, Niels; Menniti, Frank S.

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a disease of synaptic dysfunction that ultimately proceeds to neuronal death. There is a wealth of evidence that indicates the final common mediator of this neurotoxic process is the formation and actions on synaptotoxic b-amyloid (Aβ). The premise in this review is that synaptic dysfunction may also be an initiating factor in for AD and promote synaptotoxic Aβ formation. This latter hypothesis is consistent with the fact that the most common risk factors for AD, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele status, age, education, and fitness, encompass suboptimal synaptic function. Thus, the synaptic dysfunction in AD may be both cause and effect, and remediating synaptic dysfunction in AD may have acute effects on the symptoms present at the initiation of therapy and also slow disease progression. The cyclic nucleotide (cAMP and cGMP) signaling systems are intimately involved in the regulation of synaptic homeostasis. The phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a superfamily of enzymes that critically regulate spatial and temporal aspects of cyclic nucleotide signaling through metabolic inactivation of cAMP and cGMP. Thus, targeting the PDEs to promote improved synaptic function, or 'synaptic resilience', may be an effective and facile approach to new symptomatic and disease modifying therapies for AD. There continues to be a significant drug discovery effort aimed at discovering PDE inhibitors to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we review the current status of those efforts as they relate to potential new therapies for AD.

  15. Pharmacology of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Corbin, J D; Francis, S H

    2002-01-01

    The clinical properties (efficacy and safety profile) of a medicine are related not only to its mode of action, but also to its selectivity for its target (usually a receptor or enzyme) and are also influenced by its pharmacokinetic properties (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination). The growing number of phosphodiesterase inhibitors that are selective for phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) represent a promising new class of compounds that are useful for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and perhaps other disorders. Some of the basic pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters that describe drug action are discussed with regard to the new PDE5 inhibitors. Central topics reviewed are the concentration that produces a given in vitro response, or potency (IC50), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (Tmax), half-life (t 1/2), area under the curve (AUC), bioavailability, onset and duration of action, and the balance to achieve optimum safety and efficacy. To illustrate these concepts, a group of inhibitors with varying selectivities and potencies for PDE5 (theophylline, IBMX, zaprinast, sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil) are discussed. Each drug has its own set of unique pharmacological characteristics based on its specific molecular structure, enzyme inhibition profile and pharmacokinetic properties. Each PDE5 inhibitor has a distinct selectivity that contributes to its safety profile. As with all new drugs, and especially those in a new class, careful evaluation will be necessary to ensure the optimal use of the PDE5 inhibitors. PMID:12166544

  16. Engineering of a red-light–activated human cAMP/cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, Carlos; Taiber, Sandra; Yeh, Chen-Min; Wittig, Charlotte Helene; Hegemann, Peter; Ryu, Soojin; Wunder, Frank; Möglich, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Sensory photoreceptors elicit vital physiological adaptations in response to incident light. As light-regulated actuators, photoreceptors underpin optogenetics, which denotes the noninvasive, reversible, and spatiotemporally precise perturbation by light of living cells and organisms. Of particular versatility, naturally occurring photoactivated adenylate cyclases promote the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP under blue light. Here, we have engineered a light-activated phosphodiesterase (LAPD) with complementary light sensitivity and catalytic activity by recombining the photosensor module of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome with the effector module of Homo sapiens phosphodiesterase 2A. Upon red-light absorption, LAPD up-regulates hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP by up to sixfold, whereas far-red light can be used to down-regulate activity. LAPD also mediates light-activated cAMP and cGMP hydrolysis in eukaryotic cell cultures and in zebrafish embryos; crucially, the biliverdin chromophore of LAPD is available endogenously and does not need to be provided exogenously. LAPD thus establishes a new optogenetic modality that permits light control over diverse cAMP/cGMP-mediated physiological processes. Because red light penetrates tissue more deeply than light of shorter wavelengths, LAPD appears particularly attractive for studies in living organisms. PMID:24889611

  17. Atrazine Acts as an Endocrine Disrupter by Inhibiting cAMP-specific Phosphodiesterase-4

    PubMed Central

    Kucka, Marek; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Kovacevic, Radmila

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. PMID:23022511

  18. Characterization of a Pachymedusa dacnicolor–Sauvagine Analog as a New High-Affinity Radioligand for Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Studies

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Marilyn H.; Tan, Laura A.; Vaughan, Joan M.; Lewis, Kathy A.; Donaldson, Cynthia J.; Miller, Charleen; Erchegyi, Judit; Rivier, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) peptide family comprises the mammalian peptides CRF and the urocortins as well as frog skin sauvagine and fish urophyseal urotensin. Advances in understanding the roles of the CRF ligand family and associated receptors have often relied on radioreceptor assays using labeled CRF ligands. These assays depend on stable, high-affinity CRF analogs that can be labeled, purified, and chemically characterized. Analogs of several of the native peptides have been used in this context, most prominently including sauvagine from the frog Phyllomedusa sauvageii (PS-Svg). Because each of these affords both advantages and disadvantages, new analogs with superior properties would be welcome. We find that a sauvagine-like peptide recently isolated from a different frog species, Pachymedusa dacnicolor (PD-Svg), is a high-affinity agonist whose radioiodinated analog, [125ITyr0-Glu1, Nle17]-PD-Svg, exhibits improved biochemical properties over those of earlier iodinated agonists. Specifically, the PD-Svg radioligand binds both CRF receptors with comparably high affinity as its PS-Svg counterpart, but detects a greater number of sites on both type 1 and type 2 receptors. PD-Svg is also ∼10 times more potent at stimulating cAMP accumulation in cells expressing the native receptors. Autoradiographic localization using the PD-Svg radioligand shows robust specific binding to rodent brain and peripheral tissues that identifies consensus CRF receptor–expressing sites in a greater number and/or with greater sensitivity than its PS-Svg counterpart. We suggest that labeled analogs of PD-Svg may be useful tools for biochemical, structural, pharmacological, and anatomic studies of CRF receptors. PMID:25736419

  19. Architecture of high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers toward pharmaceutical applications

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Ken-ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Hanson, Charlotte; Sanford, Michael; Young, Howard A.; Hirao, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a remodeling method for high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers to augment their thermal stability and nuclease resistance, for use as drug candidates targeting specific proteins. Introducing a unique mini-hairpin DNA provides robust stability to unnatural-base DNA aptamers generated by SELEX using genetic alphabet expansion, without reducing their high affinity. By this method, >80% of the remodeled DNA aptamer targeting interferon-γ (KD of 33 pM) survived in human serum at 37 °C after 3 days under our experimental conditions, and sustainably inhibited the biological activity of interferon-γ. PMID:26690672

  20. Architecture of high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers toward pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Ken-ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Hanson, Charlotte; Sanford, Michael; Young, Howard A; Hirao, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a remodeling method for high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers to augment their thermal stability and nuclease resistance, for use as drug candidates targeting specific proteins. Introducing a unique mini-hairpin DNA provides robust stability to unnatural-base DNA aptamers generated by SELEX using genetic alphabet expansion, without reducing their high affinity. By this method, >80% of the remodeled DNA aptamer targeting interferon-γ (KD of 33 pM) survived in human serum at 37 °C after 3 days under our experimental conditions, and sustainably inhibited the biological activity of interferon-γ. PMID:26690672

  1. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in heart and vessels: A therapeutic perspective.

    PubMed

    Bobin, Pierre; Belacel-Ouari, Milia; Bedioune, Ibrahim; Zhang, Liang; Leroy, Jérôme; Leblais, Véronique; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) degrade the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), thereby regulating multiple aspects of cardiac and vascular muscle functions. This highly diverse class of enzymes encoded by 21 genes encompasses 11 families that are not only responsible for the termination of cyclic nucleotide signalling, but are also involved in the generation of dynamic microdomains of cAMP and cGMP, controlling specific cell functions in response to various neurohormonal stimuli. In the myocardium and vascular smooth muscle, the PDE3 and PDE4 families predominate, degrading cAMP and thereby regulating cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and smooth muscle contractile tone. PDE3 inhibitors are positive inotropes and vasodilators in humans, but their use is limited to acute heart failure and intermittent claudication. PDE5 is particularly important for the degradation of cGMP in vascular smooth muscle, and PDE5 inhibitors are used to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. There is experimental evidence that these PDEs, as well as other PDE families, including PDE1, PDE2 and PDE9, may play important roles in cardiac diseases, such as hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as several vascular diseases. After a brief presentation of the cyclic nucleotide pathways in cardiac and vascular cells, and the major characteristics of the PDE superfamily, this review will focus on the current use of PDE inhibitors in cardiovascular diseases, and the recent research developments that could lead to better exploitation of the therapeutic potential of these enzymes in the future. PMID:27184830

  2. Phosphodiesterase 10A Upregulation Contributes to Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xia; Vroom, Christina; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Weissmann, Norbert; Bieniek, Ewa; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai

    2011-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) modulate the cellular proliferation involved in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) by hydrolyzing cAMP and cGMP. The present study was designed to determine whether any of the recently identified PDEs (PDE7-PDE11) contribute to progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling in PH. All in vitro experiments were performed with lung tissue or pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) obtained from control rats or monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertensive (MCT-PH) rats, and we examined the effects of the PDE10 inhibitor papaverine (Pap) and specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, papaverine was administrated to MCT-induced PH rats from day 21 to day 35 by continuous intravenous infusion to examine the in vivo effects of PDE10A inhibition. We found that PDE10A was predominantly present in the lung vasculature, and the mRNA, protein, and activity levels of PDE10A were all significantly increased in MCT PASMCs compared with control PASMCs. Papaverine and PDE10A siRNA induced an accumulation of intracellular cAMP, activated cAMP response element binding protein and attenuated PASMC proliferation. Intravenous infusion of papaverine in MCT-PH rats resulted in a 40%–50% attenuation of the effects on pulmonary hypertensive hemodynamic parameters and pulmonary vascular remodeling. The present study is the first to demonstrate a central role of PDE10A in progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling, and the results suggest a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of PH. PMID:21494592

  3. Phosphodiesterase 10A upregulation contributes to pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xia; Vroom, Christina; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Weissmann, Norbert; Bieniek, Ewa; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai

    2011-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) modulate the cellular proliferation involved in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) by hydrolyzing cAMP and cGMP. The present study was designed to determine whether any of the recently identified PDEs (PDE7-PDE11) contribute to progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling in PH. All in vitro experiments were performed with lung tissue or pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) obtained from control rats or monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertensive (MCT-PH) rats, and we examined the effects of the PDE10 inhibitor papaverine (Pap) and specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, papaverine was administrated to MCT-induced PH rats from day 21 to day 35 by continuous intravenous infusion to examine the in vivo effects of PDE10A inhibition. We found that PDE10A was predominantly present in the lung vasculature, and the mRNA, protein, and activity levels of PDE10A were all significantly increased in MCT PASMCs compared with control PASMCs. Papaverine and PDE10A siRNA induced an accumulation of intracellular cAMP, activated cAMP response element binding protein and attenuated PASMC proliferation. Intravenous infusion of papaverine in MCT-PH rats resulted in a 40%-50% attenuation of the effects on pulmonary hypertensive hemodynamic parameters and pulmonary vascular remodeling. The present study is the first to demonstrate a central role of PDE10A in progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling, and the results suggest a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of PH. PMID:21494592

  4. Specific Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase-4B Results in Anxiolysis and Facilitates Memory Acquisition.

    PubMed

    McGirr, Alexander; Lipina, Tatiana V; Mun, Ho-Suk; Georgiou, John; Al-Amri, Ahmed H; Ng, Enoch; Zhai, Dongxu; Elliott, Christina; Cameron, Ryan T; Mullins, Jonathan G L; Liu, Fang; Baillie, George S; Clapcote, Steven J; Roder, John C

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature of dementia and a prominent feature in psychiatric disease. As non-redundant regulators of intracellular cAMP gradients, phosphodiesterases (PDE) mediate fundamental aspects of brain function relevant to learning, memory, and higher cognitive functions. Phosphodiesterase-4B (PDE4B) is an important phosphodiesterase in the hippocampal formation, is a major Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) binding partner and is itself a risk gene for psychiatric illness. To define the effects of specific inhibition of the PDE4B subtype, we generated mice with a catalytic domain mutant form of PDE4B (Y358C) that has decreased ability to hydrolyze cAMP. Structural modeling predictions of decreased function and impaired binding with DISC1 were confirmed in cell assays. Phenotypic characterization of the PDE4B(Y358C) mice revealed facilitated phosphorylation of CREB, decreased binding to DISC1, and upregulation of DISC1 and β-Arrestin in hippocampus and amygdala. In behavioral assays, PDE4B(Y358C) mice displayed decreased anxiety and increased exploration, as well as cognitive enhancement across several tests of learning and memory, consistent with synaptic changes including enhanced long-term potentiation and impaired depotentiation ex vivo. PDE4B(Y358C) mice also demonstrated enhanced neurogenesis. Contextual fear memory, though intact at 24 h, was decreased at 7 days in PDE4B(Y358C) mice, an effect replicated pharmacologically with a non-selective PDE4 inhibitor, implicating cAMP signaling by PDE4B in a very late phase of consolidation. No effect of the PDE4B(Y358C) mutation was observed in the prepulse inhibition and forced swim tests. Our data establish specific inhibition of PDE4B as a promising therapeutic approach for disorders of cognition and anxiety, and a putative target for pathological fear memory. PMID:26272049

  5. Union Camp`s deinking evolution

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.M.

    1995-12-01

    When Union Camp Corp. (Wayne, NJ) opened its fiber recycling plant in Franklin, VA, in December 1994, it was on the cutting edge of a new type of deinking mill that has sprung up in the US during the past few years. Designed to handle a lower-quality feedstock that was once a threat to deinking facilities, the mill is processing 400 tpd of mixed office waste paper. Although mill operators eventually hope to switch to a higher-quality feedstock, the mill has successfully been processing all its incoming fiber into 100% recycled pulp. This pulp is used for the company`s various recycled-content papers, which are manufactured at Union Camp`s paper mill, also located in Franklin, or sold on the open market. Combined with modern technology and teamwork, these factors have led to a deinking facility that is exceeding plant operators` expectations for both capacity and throughput.

  6. Foreign Language Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Jean S.

    The Colorado State University Foreign Language Weekend Camps (also called the "Poor Man's Study Abroad") are described in this report. Developed to provide an international component and a mini foreign experience for the university's students, the camps are designed to accomplish several purposes including: to offer both foreign and United States…

  7. Marketing for Camp Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Alicia

    1998-01-01

    To effectively market a camp, current trends and issues must be considered: specialty programming, the Americans With Disabilities Act, competing recreational programs, changes in the school year, programming for seniors, and accountability. Camps should have a marketing strategy that includes public relations, a marketing plan, a pricing…

  8. Camp Joy: Embracing Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krehbiel, Amy

    2001-01-01

    Camp Joy (Ohio) offers a racially integrated program to disadvantaged inner-city foster children. To attract quality minority staff, the camp recruits through former campers, word of mouth, a leader-in-training program, job and internship fairs, and networking with nearby colleges and social agencies. Staff training and the intrinsic rewards of…

  9. Today's Child - Tomorrow's Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditter, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Are camps solely in the business of providing fun, or are they facilitators of crucial life skills? A social worker explores the fun versus character-building debate, concluding that though camp is not group therapy, it contributes to overall personal growth and to the social and emotional development of all children. (JMM)

  10. Physical Fitness at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Thomas B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes decline in youth fitness, emphasizing role of camping programs in youth fitness education. Describes Michigan camp's fitness program, consisting of daily workouts, fitness education, and record keeping. Describes fitness consultants' role in program. Discusses program's highlights and problems, suggesting changes for future use. Shows…

  11. Maximizing Camp Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Provides selected 14-item outdoor-environmental education bibliography and 20-item checklist of factors weekend/summer camp directors should consider when pondering entry into the outdoor education market. Covers issues of camp philosophy, staff, facilities additions/alterations, equipment, food service, competition, environmental impact,…

  12. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  13. Friends' Discovery Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Seth

    2008-01-01

    This article features Friends' Discovery Camp, a program that allows children with and without autism spectrum disorder to learn and play together. In Friends' Discovery Camp, campers take part in sensory-rich experiences, ranging from hands-on activities and performing arts to science experiments and stories teaching social skills. Now in its 7th…

  14. High-affinity immobilization of proteins using biotin- and GST-based coupling strategies.

    PubMed

    Hutsell, Stephanie Q; Kimple, Randall J; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Adam J

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a highly sensitive method for the detection of molecular interactions. One interacting partner is immobilized on the sensor chip surface while the other is injected across the sensor surface. This chapter focuses on high-affinity immobilization of protein substrates for affinity and kinetic analyses using biotin/streptavidin interaction and GST/anti-GST-antibody interaction. PMID:20217614

  15. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  16. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  17. Substantial high-affinity methanotroph populations in Andisols effect high rates of atmospheric methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Maxfield, Pete J; Hornibrook, Ed R C; Evershed, Richard P

    2009-10-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria in soils derived from volcanic ash (Andisols) were characterized via time series (13) C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) labelling. Three Andisols were incubated under 2 ppmv (13) CH4 for up to 18 weeks, thus enabling high-affinity methanotrophs to be selectively characterized and quantified. PLFA profiles from all soils were broadly similar, but the magnitude of the high-affinity methanotrophic populations determined through (13) C-PLFA-stable isotope probing displayed sizeable differences. Substantial incorporation of (13) C indicated very large high-affinity methanotrophic populations in two of the soils. Such high values are far in excess (10×) of those observed for a range of mineral soils incubated under similar conditions (Bull et al., 2000; Maxfield et al., 2006; 2008a, b). Two of the three Andisols studied also displayed high but variable CH4 oxidation rates ranging from 0.03 to 1.58 nmol CH4 g(-1) d.wt. h(-1) . These findings suggest that Andisols, a previously unstudied soil class with respect to high-affinity methanotrophic bacteria, may oxidize significant amounts of atmospheric methane despite their low areal coverage globally. PMID:23765899

  18. 4,5-Disubstituted oxazolidinones: High affinity molecular effectors of RNA function.

    PubMed

    Anupam, Rajaneesh; Nayek, Abhijit; Green, Nicholas J; Grundy, Frank J; Henkin, Tina M; Means, John A; Bergmeier, Stephen C; Hines, Jennifer V

    2008-06-15

    The T box transcription antitermination system is a riboswitch found primarily in Gram-positive bacteria which monitors the aminoacylation of the cognate tRNA and regulates a variety of amino acid-related genes. Novel 4,5-disubstituted oxazolidinones were identified as high affinity RNA molecular effectors that modulate the transcription antitermination function of the T box riboswitch. PMID:18502126

  19. High affinity immobilization of proteins using biotin- and GST-based coupling strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hutsell, Stephanie Q.; Kimple, Randall J.; Siderovski, David P.; Willard, Francis S.; Kimple, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a highly sensitive method for the detection of molecular interactions. One interacting partner is immobilized on the sensor chip surface while the other is injected across the sensor surface. This chapter focuses on high affinity immobilization of protein substrates for affinity and kinetic analyses using biotin/streptavidin interaction and GST/anti-GST-antibody interaction. PMID:20217614

  20. High Affinity Iron Permease is Required for Virulence of Rhizopus oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus oryzae is the most common cause of mucormycosis. Clinical and animal model data clearly demonstrate that the presence of elevated available serum iron predisposes the host to develop mucormycosis. The high affinity iron permease gene (rFTR1) is required for R. oryzae iron transport in iro...

  1. Radioligand binding assays for high affinity binders in the presence of endogenous ligands

    SciTech Connect

    White, H.B. III; McGahan, T.

    1986-05-01

    Endogenous ligands complicate radioligand-binding assays of high-affinity binding proteins by obscuring binding sites or by diluting the labeled ligand. They have developed a mathematical model for such systems where structurally identical radioligand and endogenous ligand can be equilibrated on the binding site and bound radioligand measured. A double-reciprocal plot of bound radioligand, *L/sub B/, versus sample volume, V, yields a straight line. Introduction of scaling factors for sample dilution, F, and total radioligand available, *L/sub T/, produces a plot in which the x-intercept yields the endogenous ligand concentration, (L/sub T/); the slope is the reciprocal of the binding protein concentration, (P/sub T/)/sup -1/; and the y-intercept is the fractional saturation of the high-affinity binder, L/sub T//P/sub T/. This type of analysis has been applied to the assay of high-affinity biotin-binding proteins in egg yolk. Its use led to the detection of a second biotin-binding protein which is heat labile. The conceptual approach can be applied to the assay of other high-affinity binders.

  2. Molecular cloning of a type A chicken corticotropin-releasing factor receptor with high affinity for urotensin I.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Xie, L Y; Abou-Samra, A B

    1996-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is an essential physiological system in many species. CRF, the major neuropeptide regulating ACTH secretion, is highly conserved in its primary sequence. Evolutionary conservation of the CRF sequence suggests that the CRF receptor (CRF-R) complementary DNA and examined its properties. The avian CRF-R complementary DNA encodes a 420-amino acid protein that is 87-88% identical to those of human, rat, and mouse. Most sequence divergence occurs in the putative signal peptide and the extracellular amino-terminus of the receptor. Five additional amino acids are inserted in the amino-terminus of the cCRF-R. When expressed in COS-7 cells, the cCRF-R binds the CRF and urotensin I radioligands with high affinities. Urotensin I competes for binding to the chicken CRF-R, expressed in COS-7 cells, with an apparent affinity 20 times higher than that of CRF. Both urotensin I and sauvagine were more effective in stimulating cAMP accumulation in COS-7 cells transfected with the cCRF-R than CRF. The effects of CRF and urotensin I on inositol phosphate accumulation were also tested. Urotensin I was an effective as CRF in stimulating inositol phosphate accumulation in COS-7 cells transfected with the cCRF-R. These data suggest that the sequence of the CRF-R is highly conserved from avian to mammalian species and that, despite its high sequence homology to the type A mammalian CRF-R, the ligand binding properties of cCRF-R are similar to those of the type B CRF-R i.e. a higher affinity for urotensin I than for CRF. PMID:8536612

  3. Phosphodiesterase Isoform Regulation of Cell Proliferation and Fluid Secretion in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cibele S; Raman, Archana; Reif, Gail A; Magenheimer, Brenda S; White, Corey; Calvet, James P; Wallace, Darren P

    2016-04-01

    cAMP stimulates cell proliferation and Cl(-)-dependent fluid secretion, promoting the progressive enlargement of renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Intracellular cAMP levels are determined by the balance of cAMP synthesis by adenylyl cyclases and degradation by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Therefore, PDE isoform expression and activity strongly influence global and compartmentalized cAMP levels. We report here that PDE3 and PDE4 expression levels are lower in human ADPKD tissue and cells compared with those of normal human kidneys (NHKs), whereas PDE1 levels are not significantly different. Inhibition of PDE4 caused a greater increase in basal and vasopressin (AVP)-stimulated cAMP levels and Cl(-) secretion by ADPKD cells than inhibition of PDE1, and inhibition of PDE4 induced cyst-like dilations in cultured mouse Pkd1(-/-) embryonic kidneys. In contrast, inhibition of PDE1 caused greater stimulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and proliferation of ADPKD cells than inhibition of PDE4, and inhibition of PDE1 enhanced AVP-induced ERK activation. Notably, inhibition of PDE1, the only family of Ca(2+)-regulated PDEs, also induced a mitogenic response to AVP in NHK cells, similar to the effect of restricting intracellular Ca(2+). PDE1 coimmunoprecipitated with B-Raf and A-kinase anchoring protein 79, and AVP increased this interaction in ADPKD but not NHK cells. These data suggest that whereas PDE4 is the major PDE isoform involved in the regulation of global intracellular cAMP and Cl(-) secretion, PDE1 specifically affects the cAMP signal to the B-Raf/MEK/ERK pathway and regulates AVP-induced proliferation of ADPKD cells. PMID:26289612

  4. cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: role in pathogenesis and as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Makin, Laura; Gluenz, Eva

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent research linking cAMP signalling to virulence in trypanosomatids and detailed studies of trypanosomatid adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) since their discoveries 40 years ago, downstream components of the pathway and their biological functions have remained remarkably elusive. However, in recent years, significant discoveries have been made: a role for parasite ACs has been proposed in cytokinesis, evasion of the host immune response, and social motility. cAMP phosphodiesterases PDEB1 and PDEB2 were found to be essential for survival and virulence of Trypanosoma brucei and, in Trypanosoma cruzi, PDEC2 was shown to be required for normal osmoregulation. As we discuss here, these breakthroughs have led to an ongoing surge in the development of PDE inhibitors as lead compounds for trypanocidal drugs. PMID:26004537

  5. cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: role in pathogenesis and as a drug target

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Laura; Gluenz, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent research linking cAMP signalling to virulence in trypanosomatids and detailed studies of trypanosomatid adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) since their discoveries 40 years ago, downstream components of the pathway and their biological functions have remained remarkably elusive. However, in recent years, significant discoveries have been made: a role for parasite ACs has been proposed in cytokinesis, evasion of the host immune response, and social motility. cAMP phosphodiesterases PDEB1 and PDEB2 were found to be essential for survival and virulence of Trypanosoma brucei and, in Trypanosoma cruzi, PDEC2 was shown to be required for normal osmoregulation. As we discuss here, these breakthroughs have led to an ongoing surge in the development of PDE inhibitors as lead compounds for trypanocidal drugs. PMID:26004537

  6. Foreign Language Camps: Camp Waskowitz. Teacher's Guide and Planning Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudin, Phil; And Others

    This guide to running a foreign language camp is intended to cover all aspects of camp administration and program planning. The philosophy of language camps is set forth. The chairperson's responsibilities regarding staff recruitment, staff assignments, and handling finances are outlined. Sample schedules for French, Spanish, and German camps are…

  7. cAMP enhances BMP2-signaling through PKA and MKP1-dependent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ghayor, Chafik; Ehrbar, Martin; Miguel, Blanca San; Graetz, Klaus W.; Weber, Franz E.

    2009-04-03

    Recent studies suggest that the elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the activation of the protein kinase A regulate BMP-induced osteogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the enhancing effect of cAMP on BMP2 signaling were not completely revealed. In this study we investigated the effect of elevated cAMP level and PKA activation on the BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in pluripotent C2C12 cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and its mRNA were consistently induced by BMP2 treatment. The pretreatment of C2C12 cells with Forskolin, a cAMP generating agent, dbcAMP, an analogue of cAMP, or IBMX (3-isobutyl 1-methyl xanthine), and a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases elicited further activation of alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, elevated intracellular cAMP level increased BMP2-induced MKP1. On the other hand, BMP2-induced Erk phosphorylation (p44/p42) and cell proliferation were suppressed in the presence of cAMP. Thus, cAMP might enhance BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation by a MKP1-Erk-dependent mechanism.

  8. Global and local missions of cAMP signaling in neural plasticity, learning, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daewoo

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been a popular model to study cAMP signaling and resultant behaviors due to its powerful genetic approaches. All molecular components (AC, PDE, PKA, CREB, etc) essential for cAMP signaling have been identified in the fly. Among them, adenylyl cyclase (AC) gene rutabaga and phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene dunce have been intensively studied to understand the role of cAMP signaling. Interestingly, these two mutant genes were originally identified on the basis of associative learning deficits. This commentary summarizes findings on the role of cAMP in Drosophila neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and memory. It mainly focuses on two distinct mechanisms (global versus local) regulating excitatory and inhibitory synaptic plasticity related to cAMP homeostasis. This dual regulatory role of cAMP is to increase the strength of excitatory neural circuits on one hand, but to act locally on postsynaptic GABA receptors to decrease inhibitory synaptic plasticity on the other. Thus the action of cAMP could result in a global increase in the neural circuit excitability and memory. Implications of this cAMP signaling related to drug discovery for neural diseases are also described. PMID:26300775

  9. A Universal Stress Protein (USP) in Mycobacteria Binds cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arka; Adolph, Ramona S.; Gopalakrishnapai, Jayashree; Kleinboelting, Silke; Emmerich, Christiane; Steegborn, Clemens; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria are endowed with rich and diverse machinery for the synthesis, utilization, and degradation of cAMP. The actions of cyclic nucleotides are generally mediated by binding of cAMP to conserved and well characterized cyclic nucleotide binding domains or structurally distinct cGMP-specific and -regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase, and E. coli transcription factor FhlA (GAF) domain-containing proteins. Proteins with cyclic nucleotide binding and GAF domains can be identified in the genome of mycobacterial species, and some of them have been characterized. Here, we show that a significant fraction of intracellular cAMP is bound to protein in mycobacterial species, and by using affinity chromatography techniques, we identify specific universal stress proteins (USP) as abundantly expressed cAMP-binding proteins in slow growing as well as fast growing mycobacteria. We have characterized the biochemical and thermodynamic parameters for binding of cAMP, and we show that these USPs bind cAMP with a higher affinity than ATP, an established ligand for other USPs. We determined the structure of the USP MSMEG_3811 bound to cAMP, and we confirmed through structure-guided mutagenesis, the residues important for cAMP binding. This family of USPs is conserved in all mycobacteria, and we suggest that they serve as “sinks” for cAMP, making this second messenger available for downstream effectors as and when ATP levels are altered in the cell. PMID:25802331

  10. The genetically encoded tool set for investigating cAMP: more than the sum of its parts

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neha; Gold, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular fluctuations of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) are regulated with spatial and temporal precision. This regulation is supported by the sophisticated arrangement of cyclases, phosphodiesterases, anchoring proteins, and receptors for cAMP. Discovery of these nuances to cAMP signaling has been facilitated by the development of genetically encodable tools for monitoring and manipulating cAMP and the proteins that support cAMP signaling. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art in development of different genetically encoded tools for sensing cAMP and the activity of its primary intracellular receptor protein kinase A (PKA). We introduce sequences for encoding adenylyl cyclases that enable cAMP levels to be artificially elevated within cells. We chart the evolution of sequences for selectively modifying protein–protein interactions that support cAMP signaling, and for driving cAMP sensors and manipulators to different subcellular locations. Importantly, these different genetically encoded tools can be applied synergistically, and we highlight notable instances that take advantage of this property. Finally, we consider prospects for extending the utility of the tool set to support further insights into the role of cAMP in health and disease. PMID:26300778

  11. Better Positioning Those Camp Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses summer camps' difficulties in recruiting college students as staff, suggesting camps have "image problem." Describes study of job descriptions to evaluate whether camps offer useful career experiences. Examines frequency and types of job tasks. Examines how camp directors might use job descriptions to recruit more effectively. (TES)

  12. Camp Invention Connects to Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Danute V.; Clark, Barbara D.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes Camp Invention, a national creativity day camp that integrates science, math, social studies, and the arts. The one week camp for children entering grades 2-6 attracts many academically gifted children because of its hands-on curriculum. The camp's curriculum and activities are discussed. (Contains two references.) (CR)

  13. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications. PMID:26943906

  14. RNA mango aptamer-fluorophore: a bright, high-affinity complex for RNA labeling and tracking.

    PubMed

    Dolgosheina, Elena V; Jeng, Sunny C Y; Panchapakesan, Shanker Shyam S; Cojocaru, Razvan; Chen, Patrick S K; Wilson, Peter D; Hawkins, Nancy; Wiggins, Paul A; Unrau, Peter J

    2014-10-17

    Because RNA lacks strong intrinsic fluorescence, it has proven challenging to track RNA molecules in real time. To address this problem and to allow the purification of fluorescently tagged RNA complexes, we have selected a high affinity RNA aptamer called RNA Mango. This aptamer binds a series of thiazole orange (fluorophore) derivatives with nanomolar affinity, while increasing fluorophore fluorescence by up to 1,100-fold. Visualization of RNA Mango by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, together with injection and imaging of RNA Mango/fluorophore complex in C. elegans gonads demonstrates the potential for live-cell RNA imaging with this system. By inserting RNA Mango into a stem loop of the bacterial 6S RNA and biotinylating the fluorophore, we demonstrate that the aptamer can be used to simultaneously fluorescently label and purify biologically important RNAs. The high affinity and fluorescent properties of RNA Mango are therefore expected to simplify the study of RNA complexes. PMID:25101481

  15. Calcium channel antagonists. Omega-conotoxin defines a new high affinity site.

    PubMed

    Cruz, L J; Olivera, B M

    1986-05-15

    The omega-conotoxins, a class of Ca2+ channel antagonists from fish-hunting marine snails, have recently been described (Olivera, B. M., McIntosh, J. M., Zeikus, R., Gray, W. R., Varga, J., Rivier, J., de Santos, V., and Cruz, L. J. (1985) Science, 230, 1338-1343). One of these peptide neurotoxins, omega-conotoxin GVIA, was radiolabeled with iodine, and the 125I-labeled toxin was shown to bind specifically to high affinity sites on chick brain synaptosomes. The toxin-receptor complex was extremely stable; addition of an excess of unlabeled toxin did not cause significant displacement of the labeled toxin after 2 h. Binding competition data suggest that omega-conotoxin defines a new high affinity receptor site affecting voltage-activated Ca2+ channels, distinct from both the verapamil and dihydropyridine target sites. PMID:2939072

  16. Camping in the Snow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Constance

    1979-01-01

    Describes the experience of winter snow camping. Provides suggestions for shelter, snow kitchens, fires and stoves, cooking, latrines, sleeping warm, dehydration prevention, and clothing. Illustrated with full color photographs. (MA)

  17. Hitler's Death Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieser, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school lesson on Hitler's death camps and the widespread policy of brutality and oppression against European Jews. Includes student objectives, instructional procedures, and a chart listing the value of used clothing taken from the Jews. (CFR)

  18. Pre-Camp Checklists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides checklists to prepare for camp opening. Covers such areas as health histories of all campers and staff, staff credentials, condition of facilities and equipment, staff training, horse stables and equipment, and safety of swimming areas. (LP)

  19. Astro Camp Counselors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Barbara Marino (left), Stennis Space Center education technology specialist, shows Astro Camp Counselor Beverly Fitzsimmons a LEGO model during a teambuilding exercise May 29 at SSC's North Gate computer lab as a part of the counselors' `new hire' orientation.

  20. Novel Ubiquitin-derived High Affinity Binding Proteins with Tumor Targeting Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Lorey, Susan; Fiedler, Erik; Kunert, Anja; Nerkamp, Jörg; Lange, Christian; Fiedler, Markus; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva; Meysing, Maren; Gloser, Manja; Rundfeldt, Chris; Rauchhaus, Una; Hänssgen, Ilka; Göttler, Thomas; Steuernagel, Arnd; Fiedler, Ulrike; Haupts, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Targeting effector molecules to tumor cells is a promising mode of action for cancer therapy and diagnostics. Binding proteins with high affinity and specificity for a tumor target that carry effector molecules such as toxins, cytokines, or radiolabels to their intended site of action are required for these applications. In order to yield high tumor accumulation while maintaining low levels in healthy tissues and blood, the half-life of such conjugates needs to be in an optimal range. Scaffold-based binding molecules are small proteins with high affinity and short systemic circulation. Due to their low molecular complexity, they are well suited for combination with effector molecules as well as half-life extension technologies yielding therapeutics with half-lives adapted to the specific therapy. We have identified ubiquitin as an ideal scaffold protein due to its outstanding biophysical and biochemical properties. Based on a dimeric ubiquitin library, high affinity and specific binding molecules, so-called Affilin® molecules, have been selected against the extradomain B of fibronectin, a target almost exclusively expressed in tumor tissues. Extradomain B-binding molecules feature high thermal and serum stability as well as strong in vitro target binding and in vivo tumor accumulation. Application of several half-life extension technologies results in molecules of largely unaffected affinity but significantly prolonged in vivo half-life and tumor retention. Our results demonstrate the utility of ubiquitin as a scaffold for the generation of high affinity binders in a modular fashion, which can be combined with effector molecules and half-life extension technologies. PMID:24474690

  1. "DAKLI": a multipurpose ligand with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (kappa opioid) binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, A; Nestor, J J; Naidu, A; Newman, S R

    1988-01-01

    We describe a synthetic ligand, "DAKLI" (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as 125I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin (kappa opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites. PMID:2902630

  2. High-affinity triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Gaddis, Sara S; MacLeod, Michael C; Walborg, Earl F; Thames, Howard D; DiGiovanni, John; Vasquez, Karen M

    2007-01-01

    Site-specific recognition of duplex DNA by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provides a promising approach to manipulate mammalian genomes. A prerequisite for successful gene targeting using this approach is that the targeted gene must contain specific, high-affinity TFO target sequences (TTS). To date, TTS have been identified and characterized in only approximately 37 human or rodent genes, limiting the application of triplex-directed gene targeting. We searched the complete human and mouse genomes using an algorithm designed to identify high-affinity TTS. The resulting data set contains 1.9 million potential TTS for each species. We found that 97.8% of known human and 95.2% of known mouse genes have at least one potential high-affinity TTS in the promoter and/or transcribed gene regions. Importantly, 86.5% of known human and 83% of the known mouse genes have at least one TTS that is unique to that gene. Thus, it is possible to target the majority of human and mouse genes with specific TFOs. We found substantially more potential TTS in the promoter sequences than in the transcribed gene sequences or intergenic sequences in both genomes. We selected 12 mouse genes and 2 human genes critical for cell signaling, proliferation, and/or carcinogenesis, identified potential TTS in each, and determined TFO binding affinities to these sites in vitro. We identified at least one high-affinity, specific TFO binding site within each of these genes. Using this information, many genes involved in mammalian cell proliferation and carcinogenesis can now be targeted. PMID:17013831

  3. Low and high affinity dopamine transporter inhibitors block dopamine uptake within 5 sec of intravenous injection

    PubMed Central

    Yorgason, Jordan T.; Jones, Sara R.; España, Rodrigo A.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive evidence suggests that the reinforcing effects of cocaine involve inhibition of dopamine transporters (DAT) and subsequent increases in dopamine (DA) levels in the striatum. We have previously reported that cocaine inhibits the DAT within 4–5 sec of intravenous injection, matching the temporal profile of the behavioral and subjective effects of cocaine. Intravenous injection of GBR-12909, a high affinity, long-acting DAT inhibitor, also inhibits DA uptake within 5 sec. Given that high affinity, long-acting drugs are considered to have relatively low abuse potential, we found it intriguing that GBR-12909 had an onset profile similar to that of cocaine. To further explore the onset kinetics of both low and high affinity DAT inhibitors, we examined the effects of intravenous cocaine (1.5 mg/kg), methylphenidate (1.5 mg/kg), nomifensine (1.5 mg/kg), GBR-12909 (1.5 mg/kg), PTT (0.5 mg/kg), and WF23 (0.5 mg/kg) on electrically-evoked DA release and uptake in the nucleus accumbens core. Results indicate that all of the DAT inhibitors significantly inhibited DA uptake within 5 sec of injection. However, the timing of peak uptake inhibition varied greatly between the low and high affinity uptake inhibitors. Uptake inhibition following cocaine, methylphenidate, and nomifensine peaked 30 sec following injection. In contrast, peak effects for GBR-12909, PTT, and WF23 occurred between 20 and 60 min following injection. These observations suggest that the initial onset for intravenous DAT inhibitors is extremely rapid and does not appear to be dictated by a drug’s affinity. PMID:21402130

  4. Engineering high-affinity PD-1 variants for optimized immunotherapy and immuno-PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Maute, Roy L.; Gordon, Sydney R.; Mayer, Aaron T.; McCracken, Melissa N.; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Ring, Nan Guo; Kimura, Richard; Tsai, Jonathan M.; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Weissman, Irving L.; Ring, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the immune checkpoint programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) enables tumor progression by dampening antitumor immune responses. Therapeutic blockade of the signaling axis between PD-1 and its ligand programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) with monoclonal antibodies has shown remarkable clinical success in the treatment of cancer. However, antibodies have inherent limitations that can curtail their efficacy in this setting, including poor tissue/tumor penetrance and detrimental Fc-effector functions that deplete immune cells. To determine if PD-1:PD-L1–directed immunotherapy could be improved with smaller, nonantibody therapeutics, we used directed evolution by yeast-surface display to engineer the PD-1 ectodomain as a high-affinity (110 pM) competitive antagonist of PD-L1. In contrast to anti–PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies, high-affinity PD-1 demonstrated superior tumor penetration without inducing depletion of peripheral effector T cells. Consistent with these advantages, in syngeneic CT26 tumor models, high-affinity PD-1 was effective in treating both small (50 mm3) and large tumors (150 mm3), whereas the activity of anti–PD-L1 antibodies was completely abrogated against large tumors. Furthermore, we found that high-affinity PD-1 could be radiolabeled and applied as a PET imaging tracer to efficiently distinguish between PD-L1–positive and PD-L1–negative tumors in living mice, providing an alternative to invasive biopsy and histological analysis. These results thus highlight the favorable pharmacology of small, nonantibody therapeutics for enhanced cancer immunotherapy and immune diagnostics. PMID:26604307

  5. Selective high-affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2013-09-17

    This invention provides polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each binds different regions on the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  6. EF5 Is the High-Affinity Mg(2+) Site in ALG-2.

    PubMed

    Tanner, John J; Frey, Benjamin B; Pemberton, Travis; Henzl, Michael T

    2016-09-13

    The penta-EF-hand (PEF) protein ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2) has been implicated in several important physiological processes, including endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi vesicular transport and endosomal biogenesis/transport. ALG-2 was recently shown to harbor a metal ion-binding site with a high affinity for Mg(2+) and a low affinity for Ca(2+). We herein present the X-ray structure of Mg(2+)-bound ALG-2des23(wt). Although the C(α) trace is nearly indistinguishable from that of the Ca(2+)-free protein, the orientation of the C-terminal helix differs in the two structures. Consistent with that observation, replacement of the +x ligand in EF5, D169, with alanine eliminates high-affinity Mg(2+) binding. It also eliminates the low-affinity Ca(2+) site and lowers the affinity of the remaining Ca(2+)-binding sites, EF3 and EF1. The coordination environment in EF5 approaches ideal Mg(2+) octahedral geometry. The ligand array, consisting of three carboxylates (+x, +y, +z), a backbone carbonyl (-y), and two water molecules (-x, -z), may offer a recipe for a high-affinity, high-selectivity Mg(2+)-binding site. Sequence data for other PEF proteins indicate that select calpain large subunits, notably CAPN1 and CAPN8, may also possess a high-affinity Mg(2+)-binding site. In Mg(2+)-bound ALG-2, the carbonyl of F188 and the C-terminal carboxylate of V191 interact with the ε-ammonium group of K137 in the opposing subunit, suggesting that Mg(2+) binding could have an impact on dimerization. Interestingly, EF1 and EF3 are also occupied in the crystal, despite having modest affinity for Mg(2+). The results of a calorimetry-based analysis indicate that their Mg(2+) binding constants are 2 orders of magnitude lower than that determined for EF5. PMID:27541325

  7. Development of a high-affinity GABA uptake system in embryonic amphibian spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lamborghini, J E; Iles, A

    1985-11-01

    High-affinity uptake systems for amino acid neurotransmitter precursors have been highly correlated with the use of the particular amino acid or its derivative as a transmitter. We have found interneurons in the Xenopus embryo spinal cord which accumulate GABA by a high-affinity uptake system. They originate near the end of gastrulation and their ability to accumulate GABA first appears at the early tail bud stage. By position and appearance they are comparable to some of the embryonic interneurons described by A. Roberts and J. D. W. Clarke (1982, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. B 296, 195-212). GABA-accumulating neurons also develop in dissociated cell cultures made from the presumptive spinal cord of neural plate stage Xenopus embryos. GABA accumulation in cultured neurons, as in cells in vivo, occurs via a high-affinity uptake system; GABA-accumulating cells have the same time of origin as the cells in vivo, and the ability to accumulate GABA in the population of cultured neurons appears at a time equivalent to that observed in intact sibling embryos. Thus it seems likely that the population of GABA-accumulating neurons developing in cell culture corresponds to the GABA-accumulating interneurons in vivo. The development of these neurons in dissociated cell cultures permits perturbation experiments that would be difficult to perform in vivo. We have examined the development of high-affinity GABA uptake in conditions that permit no electrical impulse activity in the cultures. The onset and extent of development of GABA accumulation in the neuronal population are normal under these conditions. PMID:3932109

  8. Rescuing lesbian camp.

    PubMed

    Hemmings, Clare

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the limits of lesbian camp as it is currently conceived within Lesbian Studies. I argue, in what I hope is a rather circuitous way, that a reliance on repudiative models of identity formation fixes gender as complementary and sexuality as oppositional, irrespective of intention. In this context, I imagine instead what it would take to theorize femininity itself as camp, and femme subjects as ideal for working this through at the level of praxis. PMID:17804378

  9. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates.

    PubMed

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10(-7) s(-1)) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  10. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)neurotensin of rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Pettibone, D.J.; Totaro, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 3/H)Neurotensin (NT) was found to bind specifically and with high affinity to crude membranes prepared from rat uterus. Scatchard analysis of saturation binding studies indicated that (/sup 3/H)NT apparently binds to two sites (high affinity Kd 0.5 nM; low affinity Kd 9 nM) with the density of high affinity sites (41 fmoles/mg prot.) being about one-third that of the low affinity sites (100 fmoles/mg prot.). In competition studies, NT and various fragments inhibited (/sup 3/H)NT binding with the following potencies (approximately IC50): NT 8-13 (0.4 nM), NT 1-13 (4 nM), NT 9-13 (130 nM), NT 1-11, NT 1-8 (greater than 100 microM). Quantitatively similar results were obtained using brain tissue. These findings raise the possibility of a role for NT in uterine function.

  11. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. )

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  12. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  13. ELISA-mimic screen for synthetic polymer nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Hoshino, Yu; Shea, Kenneth J

    2012-09-10

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) that display high affinity to protein targets have significant potential for medical and biotechnological applications as protein capture agents or functional replacements of antibodies ("plastic antibodies"). In this study, we modified an immunological assay (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: ELISA) into a high-throughput screening method to select nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins. Histone and fibrinogen were chosen as target proteins to demonstrate this concept. The selection process utilized a biotinylated NP library constructed with combinations of functional monomers. The screen identified NPs with distinctive functional group compositions that exhibited high affinity to either histone or fibrinogen. The variation of protein affinity with changes in the nature and amount of functional groups in the NP provided chemical insight into the principle determinants of protein-NP binding. The NP affinity was semiquantified using the ELISA-mimic assay by varying the NP concentrations. The screening results were found to correlate with solution-based assay results. This screening system utilizing a biotinylated NP is a general approach to optimize functional monomer compositions and can be used to rapidly search for synthetic polymers with high (or low) affinity for target biological macromolecules. PMID:22813352

  14. cGMP Signaling, Phosphodiesterases and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reierson, Gillian W; Guo, Shuyu; Mastronardi, Claudio; Licinio, Julio; Wong, Ma-Li

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in neuroplasticity are hypothesized to underlie the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD): the effectiveness of antidepressants is thought to be related to the normalization of disrupted synaptic transmission and neurogenesis. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling cascade has received considerable attention for its role in neuroplasticity and MDD. However components of a closely related pathway, the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) have been studied with much lower intensity, even though this signaling transduction cascade is also expressed in the brain and the activity of this pathway has been implicated in learning and memory processes. Cyclic GMP acts as a second messenger; it amplifies signals received at postsynaptic receptors and activates downstream effector molecules resulting in gene expression changes and neuronal responses. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes degrade cGMP into 5’GMP and therefore they are involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of cGMP. Here we review a growing body of evidence suggesting that the cGMP signaling cascade warrants further investigation for its involvement in MDD and antidepressant action. PMID:22654729

  15. Targeting Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase in the Heart: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clint L.

    2010-01-01

    The second messengers, cAMP and cGMP, regulate a number of physiological processes in the myocardium, from acute contraction/relaxation to chronic gene expression and cardiac structural remodeling. Emerging evidence suggests that multiple spatiotemporally distinct pools of cyclic nucleotides can discriminate specific cellular functions from a given cyclic nucleotide-mediated signal. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), by hydrolyzing intracellular cyclic AMP and/or cyclic GMP, control the amplitude, duration, and compartmentation of cyclic nucleotide signaling. To date, more than 60 different isoforms have been described and grouped into 11 broad families (PDE1–PDE11) based on differences in their structure, kinetic and regulatory properties, as well as sensitivity to chemical inhibitors. In the heart, PDE isozymes from at least six families have been investigated. Studies using selective PDE inhibitors and/or genetically manipulated animals have demonstrated that individual PDE isozymes play distinct roles in the heart by regulating unique cyclic nucleotide signaling microdomains. Alterations of PDE activity and/or expression have also been observed in various cardiac disease models, which may contribute to disease progression. Several family-selective PDE inhibitors have been used clinically or pre-clinically for the treatment of cardiac or vascular-related diseases. In this review, we will highlight both recent advances and discrepancies relevant to cardiovascular PDE expression, pathophysiological function, and regulation. In particular, we will emphasize how these properties influence current and future development of PDE inhibitors for the treatment of pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. PMID:20632220

  16. Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases: important signaling modulators and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Faiyaz; Murata, Taku; Simizu, Kasumi; Degerman, Eva; Maurice, Donald; Manganiello, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    By catalyzing hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases are critical regulators of their intracellular concentrations and their biological effects. Since these intracellular second messengers control many cellular homeostatic processes, dysregulation of their signals and signaling pathways initiate or modulate pathophysiological pathways related to various disease states, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and psoriasis. Alterations in expression of PDEs and PDE-gene mutations (especially mutations in PDE6, PDE8B, PDE11A and PDE4) have been implicated in various diseases and cancer pathologies. PDEs also play important role in formation and function of multi-molecular signaling/regulatory complexes called signalosomes. At specific intracellular locations, individual PDEs, together with pathway-specific signaling molecules, regulators, and effectors, are incorporated into specific signalosomes, where they facilitate and regulate compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways and specific cellular functions. Currently, only a limited number of PDE inhibitors (PDE3, PDE4, PDE5 inhibitors) are used in clinical practice. Future paths to novel drug discovery include the crystal structure-based design approach, which has resulted in generation of more effective family-selective inhibitors, as well as burgeoning development of strategies to alter compartmentalized cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways by selectively targeting individual PDEs and their signalosome partners. PMID:25056711

  17. Atrazine acts as an endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4

    SciTech Connect

    Kucka, Marek; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Kovacevic, Radmila

    2012-11-15

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. -- Highlights: ► Atrazine stimulates cAMP accumulation in pituitary and Leydig cells. ► Atrazine also stimulates PRL and androgens secretion. ► Stimulatory effects of atrazine were abolished in cells with IBMX-inhibited PDEs. ► Atrazine specificity toward c

  18. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (epac): a multidomain cAMP mediator in the regulation of diverse biological functions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martina; Dekker, Frank J; Maarsingh, Harm

    2013-04-01

    Since the discovery nearly 60 years ago, cAMP is envisioned as one of the most universal and versatile second messengers. The tremendous feature of cAMP to tightly control highly diverse physiologic processes, including calcium homeostasis, metabolism, secretion, muscle contraction, cell fate, and gene transcription, is reflected by the award of five Nobel prizes. The discovery of Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) has ignited a new surge of cAMP-related research and has depicted novel cAMP properties independent of protein kinase A and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. The multidomain architecture of Epac determines its activity state and allows cell-type specific protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions that control fine-tuning of pivotal biologic responses through the "old" second messenger cAMP. Compartmentalization of cAMP in space and time, maintained by A-kinase anchoring proteins, phosphodiesterases, and β-arrestins, contributes to the Epac signalosome of small GTPases, phospholipases, mitogen- and lipid-activated kinases, and transcription factors. These novel cAMP sensors seem to implement certain unexpected signaling properties of cAMP and thereby to permit delicate adaptations of biologic responses. Agonists and antagonists selective for Epac are developed and will support further studies on the biologic net outcome of the activation of Epac. This will increase our current knowledge on the pathophysiology of devastating diseases, such as diabetes, cognitive impairment, renal and heart failure, (pulmonary) hypertension, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Further insights into the cAMP dynamics executed by the Epac signalosome will help to optimize the pharmacological treatment of these diseases. PMID:23447132

  19. Loss of high-affinity prostacyclin receptors in platelets and the lack of prostaglandin-induced inhibition of platelet-stimulated thrombin generation in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, N N; Bauman, W A; Sinha, A K

    1996-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of death in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, platelets of those with SCI (n = 30) showed neither increased aggregation nor resistance to the antiaggregatory effects of prostacyclin when compared with normal controls (n = 30). Prostanoid-induced cAMP synthesis was similar in both groups. In contrast, prostacyclin, which completely inhibited the platelet-stimulated thrombin generation in normal controls, failed to do so in those with SCI. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]prostaglandin E1, used as a prostacyclin receptor probe, showed the presence of one high-affinity (Kd1 = 8.11 +/- 2.80 nM; n1 = 172 +/- 32 sites per cell) and one low-affinity (Kd2 = 1.01 +/- 0.3 microM; n2 = 1772 +/- 226 sites per cell) prostacyclin receptor in normal platelets. In contrast, the same analysis in subjects with SCI showed significant loss (P < 0.001) of high-affinity receptor sites (Kd1 = 6.34 +/- 1.91 nM; n1 = 43 +/- 10 sites per cell) with no significant change in the low affinity-receptors (Kd2 = 1.22 +/- 0.23; n2 = 1820 +/- 421). Treatment of these platelets with insulin, which has been demonstrated to restore both of the high- and low-affinity prostaglandin receptor numbers to within normal ranges in coronary artery disease, increased high-affinity receptor numbers and restored the prostacyclin effect on thrombin generation. These results demonstrate that the loss of the inhibitory effect of prostacyclin on the stimulation of thrombin generation was due to the loss of platelet high-affinity prostanoid receptors, which may contribute to atherogenesis in individuals with chronic SCI. PMID:8552614

  20. Zinc deficiency decreases the activity of calmodulin regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in vivo in selected rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Law, J S; McBride, S A; Graham, S; Nelson, N R; Slotnick, B M; Henkin, R I

    1988-08-01

    The effect of zinc deficiency on calmodulin function was investigated by assessing the in vivo activity of two calmodulin regulated enzymes, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (c-AMP) and guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (c-GMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) in several rat tissues. Enzymatic activities in brain, heart, and testis of rats fed a zinc deficient diet were compared with activities in these tissues from pair fed, zinc supplemented rats. In testis, a tissue in which zinc concentration decreased with zinc deficient diet, enzyme activities were significantly decreased over those in rats who were pair fed zinc supplemented diets. In brain and heart, tissues in which zinc concentrations did not change with either diet, enzymatic activities between the groups were not different. These results indicate that zinc deficiency influences the activity of calmodulin-regulated phosphodiesterases in vivo supporting the hypothesis that zinc plays a role in calmodulin function in vivo in zinc sensitive tissues. PMID:2484550

  1. Are diabetes camps effective?

    PubMed

    Barone, Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Vivolo, Marco Antonio; Madden, Paul B

    2016-04-01

    In the present article data about Diabetes Camps (DC) from all continents were reviewed in order to answer the title question "are diabetes camps effective?". Articles from peer reviewed journals and abstracts published in international conferences proceedings were raised. The effectiveness was considered in terms of knowledge acquisition, and psychosocial and physiological changes. Even though expected improvements were not found in all studies, in a deeper and wider analysis the aspects that influence the most toward gains are identified. Among them are: number of participations in a DC, post-camp educational opportunities, staff training, and program oriented toward campers' autonomy. To conclude, practical recommendations are addressed intending to amplify DC's potential. PMID:27103364

  2. Analysis of the high-affinity iron uptake system at the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Terzulli, Alaina; Kosman, Daniel J

    2010-05-01

    Multicopper ferroxidases play a vital role in iron metabolism in bacteria, fungi, algae, and mammals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizes a channeling mechanism to couple the ferroxidase activity of Fet3p to Fe(3+) transport into the cell by Ftr1p. In contrast, the mechanisms by which mammals couple the ferroxidase reaction to iron trafficking is unclear. The human ferroxidases ceruloplasmin and hephaestin are twice the size of Fet3p and interact with proteins that are not expressed in fungi. Chlamydomonas FOX1 is a homolog of the human ferroxidases but likely supports iron uptake in a manner similar to that of yeast, since Chlamydomonas reinhardtii expresses a ferric iron permease homolog, FTR1. The results presented support this hypothesis. We show that FOX1 is trafficked to the plasma membrane and is oriented with its multicopper oxidase/ferroxidase domain in the exocytoplasmic space. Our analysis of FTR1 indicates its topology is similar to that of S. cerevisiae Ftr1p, with a potential exocytoplasmic iron channeling motif and two potential iron permeation motifs in membrane-spanning regions. We demonstrate that high-affinity iron uptake is dependent on FOX1 and the copper status of the cell. Kinetic inhibition of high-affinity iron uptake by a ferric iron chelator does not reflect the strength of the chelator, supporting a ferric iron channeling mechanism for high-affinity iron uptake in Chlamydomonas. Last, recombinant FOX1 (rFOX1) has been isolated in a partially holo form that exhibits the UV-visible absorbance spectrum of a multicopper oxidase and the catalytic activity of a ferroxidase. PMID:20348389

  3. Sensitivity of binding of high-affinity dopamine receptor radioligands to increased synaptic dopamine.

    PubMed

    Gatley, S J; Gifford, A N; Carroll, F I; Volkow, N D

    2000-12-15

    PET and SPECT studies have documented that D2 radioligands of moderate affinity, but not radioligands of high affinity, are sensitive to pharmacological challenges that alter synaptic dopamine levels. The objective of this work was to determine whether the brain kinetics of high-affinity radioligands for dopamine D1 ([(3)H]SCH 23390) and D2 ([(123)I]epidepride) receptors were altered by a prolonged elevation of synaptic dopamine induced by the potent cocaine analog RTI-55. Mice were injected intravenously with radioligands either 30 min after or 4 h before intraperitoneal administration of RTI-55 (2 mg/kg). In separate experiments, the pharmacological effects of RTI-55 were assessed biochemically by measuring uptake of dopamine in synaptosomes prepared from RTI-treated mice and behaviorally by monitoring locomotor activity. Consistent with the expected elevation of synaptic dopamine, RTI-55 induced a long-lasting decrement in dopamine uptake measured ex vivo, and a prolonged increase in locomotor activity. RTI-55 injected prior to the radioligands induced a significant (P < 0.05) increase in striatal concentration of [(123)I]epidepride at 15 min, relative to saline-treated controls, but there were no differences between the two groups at later time-points. For [(3)H]SCH 23390, both initial striatal uptake and subsequent clearance were slightly increased by preadministration of RTI-55. Administration of RTI-55 4 h after the radioligands (i.e., when it was presumed that a state of near equilibrium binding of the radioligands had been reached), was associated with a significant reduction of striatal radioactivity for both radiotracers. Our results are consistent with increased competition between dopamine and radioligand for binding to both D1 and D2 receptors after treatment with RTI-55. We suggest that the magnitude of the competition is reduced by failure of the receptor binding of high-affinity radioligands to rapidly attain equilibrium. PMID:11044896

  4. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1(157-165) peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW "peg" dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2-4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157-165) target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  5. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW “peg” dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2–4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165 target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  6. Characterization of specific high affinity receptors for human tumor necrosis factor on mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, P.E.; Hotchkiss, A.; Mohler, M.; Aggarwal, B.B.

    1985-10-05

    Mouse L-929 fibroblasts, an established line of cells, are very sensitive to lysis by human lymphotoxin (hTNF-beta). Specific binding of a highly purified preparation of hTNF-beta to these cells was examined. Recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was radiolabeled with (TH)propionyl succinimidate at the lysine residues of the molecule to a specific activity of 200 microCi/nmol of protein. (TH)hTNF-beta was purified by high performance gel permeation chromatography and the major fraction was found to be monomeric by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The labeled hTNF-beta was fully active in causing lysis of L-929 fibroblasts and bound specifically to high affinity binding sites on these cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity receptors with an apparent Kd of 6.7 X 10(-11) M and a capacity of 3200 binding sites/cell. Unlabeled recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was found to be approximately 5-fold more effective competitive inhibitor of binding than the natural hTNF-beta. The binding of hTNF-beta to these mouse fibroblasts was also correlated with the ultimate cell lysis. Neutralizing polyclonal antibodies to hTNF-beta efficiently inhibited the binding of (TH)hTNF-beta to the cells. The authors conclude that the specific high affinity binding site is the receptor for hTNF-beta and may be involved in lysis of cells.

  7. High-Affinity Fc Receptor Expression Indicates Relative Immaturity in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Clanchy, Felix I L

    2016-05-01

    Within monocyte heterogeneity, subsets represent discrete, well-characterized phenotypes. Although many studies have highlighted differences between subsets, there is evidence that subpopulations represent contiguous stages in a maturational series. As CD14(hi)CD64(hi) monocytes have higher proliferative potential than CD14(hi)CD64(lo) monocytes, the surface marker profile on 4 subsets defined by CD14 and CD64 was measured. The profiles were compared to that of subsets defined by the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcɛRIα), CD16, and CD14; further differences in size, granularity, and buoyancy were measured in subsets delineated by these markers. There was a positive correlation between proliferative monocyte (PM) prevalence and CD64 expression on the classical monocyte subset, and also between PM prevalence and circulating FcɛRIα(+) monocytes. The expression of CD64, the high-affinity IgG receptor, on canonical human monocyte subsets was determined before and after short-term culture, and in response to interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interferon-γ; the influence of these cytokines on monocyte subset transition was also measured. The loss of FcɛRIα expression preceded an increase in CD16 expression in whole blood cultures. These data indicate that high-affinity Fc receptors are expressed on less mature monocytes and that FcɛRIα(+) monocytes are developmentally antecedent to the canonical classical and intermediate monocyte subsets. PMID:26714112

  8. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  9. Microwave-assisted Organic Synthesis of a High-affinity Pyrazolo-pyrimidinyl TSPO Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dewei; Buck, Jason R.; Hight, Matthew R.; Manning, H. Charles

    2010-01-01

    We herein report a dramatically improved total synthesis of the high-affinity translocator protein (TSPO) ligand DPA-714, featuring microwave-assisted organic synthesis (MAOS). Compared with previously described approaches, our novel MAOS method dramatically reduces overall reaction time without adversely effecting reaction yields. We envision that the described MAOS protocol may be suitably applied to high-throughput, diversity-oriented synthesis of novel compounds based on the pyrazolo-pyrimidinyl scaffold. Such an approach could accelerate the development of focused libraries of novel TSPO ligands with potential for future development as molecular imaging and therapeutic agents. PMID:20689673

  10. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Silveira, C L; Eldefrawi, A T; Eldefrawi, M E

    1990-05-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-[3H]cis-methyldioxolane ([3H]CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites (KD 2.74 nM; Bmax of 82 fmol/mg protein) was detected and [3H]CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with [3H]CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the [3H]CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. [3H]CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of [3H]CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM [3H]CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting [3H]CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration. Nevertheless, the high affinities that cardiac muscarinic

  11. Studies on the nature of the high-affinity trialkyltin binding site of rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, A P; Farrow, B G; Selwyn, M J

    1982-01-01

    1. The proteolipid fraction isolated from rat liver mitochondria pretreated with [3H]triphenyltin chloride is enriched in triphenyltin compared with the original mitochondria. 2. Part of this [3H]triphenyltin is eluted with a protein of Mr 5000-6000 on Sephadex LH20 chromatography. 2. Mössbauer spectra of the proteolipid fraction treated with 119Sn-enriched triethyltin chloride show a doublet which corresponds closely with that assigned previously [Farrow & Dawson (1978) Eur. J. Biochem. 86. 85-95] to the absorption of triethyltin bound to the high-affinity binding site of the mitochondrial ATPase. PMID:7082305

  12. Designing and optimizing library selection strategies for generating high-affinity antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, H R

    1997-02-01

    Since its invention at the beginning of the 1990s, antibody phage display has revolutionized the generation of monoclonal antibodies and their engineering. It is now possible to create antibodies binding to any chosen target antigen without the use of laboratory animals or hybridomas, in a system that completely by-passes the immune system. Making antibodies from single-pot phage libraries, and improving their affinity up to the picomolar range if necessary, has never appeared easier. In this review, a variety of phage library-based strategies for the isolation of high-affinity antibodies are presented. PMID:9081300

  13. How Green Is Camping? Environmental Stewardship in North Carolina Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Roger; Bingham, Cindy

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 47 residential camps in North Carolina revealed that most camps had written environmental objectives, practiced recycling, attempted to reduce water use and energy consumption, practiced low-impact camping, included environmental issues in staff training, and provided environmental education to campers. Includes survey questions. (LP)

  14. A Camping We Will Go.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnaney, Kate Divine

    1989-01-01

    The mother of a physically disabled child encourages the participation of such children in mainstream camping programs. Suggestions to maximize the benefits of the camping experience are offered. (DB)

  15. Astro Camp 2000 Rocketry Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Children at Astro Camp at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., launch rockets as one of their activities in the weeklong camp. Each week during the summer, approximately 30 children ages 9-12 from across Mississippi and Louisiana spend a week learning about space flight. Astro Camp Saturday offers a condensed version of Astro Camp on the third Saturday of each month from January through May 2001.

  16. The HXT2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for high-affinity glucose transport.

    PubMed Central

    Kruckeberg, A L; Bisson, L F

    1990-01-01

    The HXT2 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was identified on the basis of its ability to complement the defect in glucose transport of a snf3 mutant when present on the multicopy plasmid pSC2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of HXT2 revealed an open reading frame of 541 codons, capable of encoding a protein of Mr 59,840. The predicted protein displayed high sequence and structural homology to a large family of procaryotic and eucaryotic sugar transporters. These proteins have 12 highly hydrophobic regions that could form transmembrane domains; the spacing of these putative transmembrane domains is also highly conserved. Several amino acid motifs characteristic of this sugar transporter family are also present in the HXT2 protein. An hxt2 null mutant strain lacked a significant component of high-affinity glucose transport when under derepressing (low-glucose) conditions. However, the hxt2 null mutation did not incur a major growth defect on glucose-containing media. Genetic and biochemical analyses suggest that wild-type levels of high-affinity glucose transport require the products of both the HXT2 and SNF3 genes; these genes are not linked. Low-stringency Southern blot analysis revealed a number of other sequences that cross-hybridize with HXT2, suggesting that S. cerevisiae possesses a large family of sugar transporter genes. Images PMID:2233722

  17. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    )/sup 3/H)cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  18. AtKUP1: an Arabidopsis gene encoding high-affinity potassium transport activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E J; Kwak, J M; Uozumi, N; Schroeder, J I

    1998-01-01

    Because plants grow under many different types of soil and environmental conditions, we investigated the hypothesis that multiple pathways for K+ uptake exist in plants. We have identified a new family of potassium transporters from Arabidopsis by searching for homologous sequences among the expressed sequence tags of the GenBank database. The deduced amino acid sequences of AtKUP (for Arabidopsis thaliana K+ uptake transporter) cDNAs are highly homologous to the non-plant Kup and HAK1 potassium transporters from Escherichia coli and Schwanniomyces occidentalis, respectively. Interestingly, AtKUP1 and AtKUP2 are able to complement the potassium transport deficiency of an E. coli triple mutant. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis suspension cells overexpressing AtKUP1 showed increased Rb+ uptake at micromolar concentrations with an apparent K(m) of approximately 22 microM, indicating that AtKUP1 encodes a high-affinity potassium uptake activity in vivo. A small, low-affinity Rb+ uptake component was also detected in AtKUP1-expressing cells. RNA gel blot analysis showed that the various members of the AtKUP family have distinct patterns of expression, with AtKUP3 transcript levels being strongly induced by K+ starvation. It is proposed that plants contain multiple potassium transporters for high-affinity uptake and that the AtKUP family may provide important components of high- and low-affinity K+ nutrition and uptake into various plant cell types. PMID:9477571

  19. Rapid high-affinity transport of a chemotherapeutic amino acid across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Takada, Y; Vistica, D T; Greig, N H; Purdon, D; Rapoport, S I; Smith, Q R

    1992-04-15

    The therapeutic efficacy of many anticancer drugs against intracerebral tumors is limited by poor uptake into the central nervous system. One way to enhance brain delivery is to design agents that are transported into the brain by the saturable nutrient carriers of the blood-brain barrier. In this paper, we describe a nitrogen mustard amino acid, DL-2-amino-7-bis[(2-chloroethyl)amino/bd-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-napthoi c acid, that is taken up into brain with high affinity by the large neutral amino acid carrier of the blood-brain barrier. Brain transport of DL-2-amino-7-bis[(2-chloroethyl)aminol-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphth oic acid in the rat was found to be rapid (cerebrovascular permeability-surface area product approximately 2 x 10(-2) ml/s/g), saturable and inhibitable by large neutral amino acids. Maximal influx rate (Vmax) and half-saturation (Km) constants equaled 0.26 nmol/min/g and 0.19 microM, respectively, in the parietal cortex. Regional brain uptake of acid exceeded that of the clinical analogue, melphalan, by greater than 20-fold. The results demonstrate that drug modification to produce high-affinity ligands for the cerebrovascular nutrient carriers is a viable means to enhance drug delivery to brain for the treatment of brain tumors and other central nervous system disorders. PMID:1559223

  20. Temperature dependence of high-affinity CCK receptor binding and CCK internalization in rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.A.; Bailey, A.C.; Roach, E. Univ. of California, San Francisco )

    1988-04-01

    {sup 125}I-labeled cholecystokinin (CCK) binding and internalization were studied as a function of temperatures in isolated rat pancreatic acini. At 37{degree}C, acini readily bound and degraded {sup 125}I-CCK. When labeled hormone binding was inhibited by increasing amounts of unlabeled CCK, competition-inhibition curves were biphasic, consistent with both high- (K{sub d}, 18 pM) and low-affinity (K{sub d}, 13 nM) binding sites. At 4{degree}C, acini bound only one-third as much {sup 125}I-CCK and degradation was essentially abolished. At 4{degree}C, CCK competition curves were consistent with a single class of low-affinity binding sites (K{sub d}, 19 nM). Internalization of {sup 125}I-CCK was evaluated by three washing procedures utilizing acid, base, and trypsin. All were shown to remove membrane-bound {sup 125}I-CCK, and this finding was validated for trypsin by electron microscope autotradiography. When internalization of {sup 125}I-CCK was evaluated as a function of the medium concentration of CCK, both high- and low-affinity components were observed. These results suggest that high-affinity CCK binding and CCK internalization are separate temperature-sensitive processes. Moreover, internalization is not uniquely associated with high-affinity binding.

  1. Genetic evidence of a high-affinity cyanuric acid transport system in Pseudomonas sp. ADP.

    PubMed

    Platero, Ana I; Santero, Eduardo; Govantes, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    The Pseudomonas sp. ADP plasmid pADP-1 encodes the activities involved in the hydrolytic degradation of the s-triazine herbicide atrazine. Here, we explore the presence of a specific transport system for the central intermediate of the atrazine utilization pathway, cyanuric acid, in Pseudomonas sp. ADP. Growth in fed-batch cultures containing limiting cyanuric acid concentrations is consistent with high-affinity transport of this substrate. Acquisition of the ability to grow at low cyanuric acid concentrations upon conjugal transfer of pADP1 to the nondegrading host Pseudomonas putida KT2442 suggests that all activities required for this phenotype are encoded in this plasmid. Co-expression of the pADP1-borne atzDEF and atzTUVW genes, encoding the cyanuric acid utilization pathway and the subunits of an ABC-type solute transport system, in P. putida KT2442 was sufficient to promote growth at cyanuric acid concentrations as low as 50 μM in batch culture. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the atzTUVW gene products are involved in high-affinity transport of cyanuric acid. PMID:24484197

  2. High affinity sorption domains in soil are blocked by polar soil organic matter components.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Perry J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2013-01-01

    Reported correlations between organic contaminant sorption affinity and soil organic matter (OM) structure vary widely, suggesting the importance of OM physical conformation and accessibility. Batch equilibration experiments were used to examine the sorption affinity of bisphenol A, atrazine, and diuron to five soils of varying OM composition. (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize the organic carbon chemistry of the soil samples. High sorption by a soil low in O-alkyl components suggested that these structures may block high affinity sorption sites in soil OM. As such, soil samples were subjected to acid hydrolysis, and NMR results showed a decrease in the O-alkyl carbon signal intensity for all soils. Subsequent sorption experiments revealed that organic carbon-normalized distribution coefficient (K(OC)) values increased for all three contaminants. Before hydrolysis, K(OC) values correlated positively with soil aromatic carbon content and negatively with polar soil O-alkyl carbon content. While these correlations were weaker after hydrolysis, the correlation between K(OC) values and soil alkyl carbon content improved. This study suggests that hydrolyzable O-alkyl soil OM components may block high affinity sorption sites and further highlights the importance of OM physical conformation and accessibility with respect to sorption processes. PMID:23206246

  3. A high affinity monoclonal antibody recognizing the light chain of human coagulating factor VII.

    PubMed

    Sarial, Sheila; Asadi, Farzad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Hadavi, Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Shokri, Fazel; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2012-12-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is a serine protease-coagulating element responsible for the initiation of an extrinsic pathway of clot formation. Here we generated and characterized a high affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes human FVII. Recombinant human FVII (rh-FVII) was used for the production of a monoclonal antibody using BALB/c mice. The specificity of the antibody was determined by Western blot using plasma samples from human, mouse, sheep, goat, bovine, rabbit, and rat. Furthermore, the antibody was used to detect transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cell line using Western blot and sandwich ELISA. A mouse IgG1 (kappa chain) monoclonal antibody clone 1F1-B11 was produced against rh-FVII. The affinity constant (K(aff)) of the antibody was calculated to be 6.4×10(10) M(-1). The antibody could specifically recognize an epitope on the light chain of hFVII, with no reactivity with factor VII from several other animals. In addition, transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cells was recognized by 1F1-B11. The high affinity as well as the specificity of 1F1-B11 for hFVII will facilitate the affinity purification of hFVII and also production of FVII deficient plasma and minimizes the risk of bovine FVII contamination when fetal bovine serum-supplemented media are used for production and subsequent purification of rh-FVII. PMID:23244324

  4. High-affinity binding sites involved in the import of porin into mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, R; Neupert, W

    1987-01-01

    The specific recognition by mitochondria of the precursor of porin and the insertion into the outer membrane were studied with a radiolabeled water-soluble form of porin derived from the mature protein. High-affinity binding sites had a number of 5-10 pmol/mg mitochondrial protein and a ka of 1-5 X 10(8) M-1. Binding was abolished after trypsin pretreatment of mitochondria indicating that binding sites were of protein-aceous nature. Specifically bound porin could be extracted at alkaline pH but not by high salt and was protected against low concentrations of proteinase K. It could be chased to a highly protease resistant form corresponding to mature porin. High-affinity binding sites could be extracted from mitochondria with detergent and reconstituted in asolectin-ergosterol liposomes. Water-soluble porin competed for the specific binding and import of the precursor of the ADP/ATP carrier, an inner membrane protein. We suggest that (i) binding of precursors to proteinaceous receptors serves as an initial step for recognition, (ii) the receptor for porin may also be involved in the import of precursors of inner membrane proteins, and (iii) interaction with the receptor triggers partial insertion of the precursor into the outer membrane. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2960520

  5. Screening of high-affinity scFvs from a ribosome displayed library using BIAcore biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Wang, Zhongkang; Nian, Siji; Yin, Youping; Chen, Gang; Xia, Yuxian

    2009-02-01

    An experimental protocol was developed to screen high-affinity single-chain Fv antibody fragments (scFvs) from a Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) immunized ribosome display library using BIAcore biosensor. The screening methods involved immobilizing antigen [lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of Xac] on sensor chip HPA and then unpurified expression products of scFvs flowing over the immobilized sensor chip. The affinity-improved scFvs were selected based on dissociation rate constants (k (d)). Thirty-five enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-positive scFvs were analyzed by BIAcore, and three of those (scFv A1, B2, and C5) with lower k (d) were screened. To demonstrate the accuracy of the screening method, the three scFvs were expressed in Escherichia coli HB2151 and purified. The purified scFvs were subsequently further identified according to association rate and affinity constants. The results showed that the three scFvs (A1, B2, and C5) had high affinity for LPS of Xac (3.51 x 10(-11), 1.13 x 10(-10), 5.06 x 10(-10) M, respectively). Furthermore, the scFv B2 was highly specific for LPS of Xac and had no any cross-reactions with bovine serum albumin and LPS from Xac-related bacteria. This provided evidence that the information from the BIAcore screening assay could be accurate. PMID:18574567

  6. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding.

    PubMed

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2014-10-21

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications. PMID:25171730

  7. The human organic cation transporter OCT1 mediates high affinity uptake of the anticancer drug daunorubicin.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Emil; Brosseau, Nicolas; Carmona, Euridice; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    Anthracyclines such as daunorubicin are anticancer agents that are transported into cells, and exert cytotoxicity by blocking DNA metabolism. Although there is evidence for active uptake of anthracyclines into cells, the specific transporter involved in this process has not been identified. Using the high-grade serous ovarian cancer cell line TOV2223G, we show that OCT1 mediated the high affinity (Km ~ 5 μM) uptake of daunorubicin into the cells, and that micromolar amounts of choline completely abolished the drug entry. OCT1 downregulation by shRNA impaired daunorubicin uptake into the TOV2223G cells, and these cells were significantly more resistant to the drug in comparison to the control shRNA. Transfection of HEK293T cells, which accommodated the ectopic expression of OCT1, with a plasmid expressing OCT1-EYFP showed that the transporter was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. These transfected cells exhibited an increase in the uptake of daunorubicin in comparison to control cells transfected with an empty EYFP vector. Furthermore, a variant of OCT1, OCT1-D474C-EYFP, failed to enhance daunorubicin uptake. This is the first report demonstrating that human OCT1 is involved in the high affinity transport of anthracyclines. We postulate that OCT1 defects may contribute to the resistance of cancer cells treated with anthracyclines. PMID:26861753

  8. Choline uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the high-affinity ChoXWV transporter.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called "Venus flytrap mechanism" of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  9. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  10. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  11. Eosinophil cationic protein high-affinity binding to bacteria-wall lipopolysaccharides and peptidoglycans.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Marc; Navarro, Susanna; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester

    2008-03-18

    The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an eosinophil-secreted RNase involved in the immune host defense, with a cytotoxic activity against a wide range of pathogens. The protein displays antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains. The protein can destabilize lipid bilayers, although the action at the membrane level can only partially account for its bactericidal activity. We have now shown that ECP can bind with high affinity to the bacteria-wall components. We have analyzed its specific association to lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), its lipid A component, and peptidoglycans (PGNs). ECP high-affinity binding capacity to LPSs and lipid A has been analyzed by a fluorescent displacement assay, and the corresponding dissociation constants were calculated using the protein labeled with a fluorophor. The protein also binds in vivo to bacteria cells. Ultrastructural analysis of cell bacteria wall and morphology have been visualized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus strains. The protein damages the bacteria surface and induces the cell population aggregation on E. coli cultures. Although both bacteria strain cells retain their shape and no cell lysis is patent, the protein can induce in E. coli the outer membrane detachment. ECP also activates the cytoplasmic membrane depolarization in both strains. Moreover, the depolarization activity on E. coli does not require any pretreatment to overcome the outer membrane barrier. The protein binding to the bacteria-wall surface would represent a first encounter step key in its antimicrobial mechanism of action. PMID:18293932

  12. The human organic cation transporter OCT1 mediates high affinity uptake of the anticancer drug daunorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Emil; Brosseau, Nicolas; Carmona, Euridice; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    Anthracyclines such as daunorubicin are anticancer agents that are transported into cells, and exert cytotoxicity by blocking DNA metabolism. Although there is evidence for active uptake of anthracyclines into cells, the specific transporter involved in this process has not been identified. Using the high-grade serous ovarian cancer cell line TOV2223G, we show that OCT1 mediated the high affinity (Km ~ 5 μM) uptake of daunorubicin into the cells, and that micromolar amounts of choline completely abolished the drug entry. OCT1 downregulation by shRNA impaired daunorubicin uptake into the TOV2223G cells, and these cells were significantly more resistant to the drug in comparison to the control shRNA. Transfection of HEK293T cells, which accommodated the ectopic expression of OCT1, with a plasmid expressing OCT1-EYFP showed that the transporter was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. These transfected cells exhibited an increase in the uptake of daunorubicin in comparison to control cells transfected with an empty EYFP vector. Furthermore, a variant of OCT1, OCT1-D474C-EYFP, failed to enhance daunorubicin uptake. This is the first report demonstrating that human OCT1 is involved in the high affinity transport of anthracyclines. We postulate that OCT1 defects may contribute to the resistance of cancer cells treated with anthracyclines. PMID:26861753

  13. Role of Phosphodiesterase 2 in Growth and Invasion of Human Malignant Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto, Kenichi; Murata, Taku; Shimizu, Kasumi; Morita, Hiroshi; Inui, Madoka; Manganiello, Vincent C.; Tagawa, Toshiro; Arai, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate the intracellular concentrations and effects of adenosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). The role of PDEs in malignant tumor cells is still uncertain. The role of PDEs, especially PDE2, in human malignant melanoma PMP cell line was examined in this study. In PMP cells, 8-bromo-cAMP, a cAMP analog, inhibited cell growth and invasion. However, 8-bromo-cGMP, a cGMP analog, had little or no effect. PDE2 and PDE4, but not PDE3, were expressed in PMP cells. Growth and invasion of PMP cells were inhibited by erythro-9-(2-Hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), a specific PDE2 inhibitor, but not by rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor. Moreover, cell growth and invasion were inhibited by transfection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific for PDE2A and a catalytically-dead mutant of PDE2A. After treating cells with EHNA or rolipram, intracellular cAMP concentrations were increased. Growth and invasion were stimulated by PKA14-22, a PKA inhibitor, and inhibited by N6-benzoyl-c AMP, a PKA specific cAMP analogue, whereas 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2’-O-methyl-cAMP, an Epac specific cAMP analogue, did not. Invasion, but not growth, was stimulated by A-kinase anchor protein (AKAP) St-Ht31 inhibitory peptide. Based on these results, PDE2 appears to play an important role in growth and invasion of the human malignant melanoma PMP cell line. Selectively suppressing PDE2 might possibly inhibit growth and invasion of other malignant tumor cell lines. PMID:24705027

  14. Role of phosphodiesterase 2 in growth and invasion of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Kenichi; Murata, Taku; Shimizu, Kasumi; Morita, Hiroshi; Inui, Madoka; Manganiello, Vincent C; Tagawa, Toshiro; Arai, Naoya

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate the intracellular concentrations and effects of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). The role of PDEs in malignant tumor cells is still uncertain. The role of PDEs, especially PDE2, in human malignant melanoma PMP cell line was examined in this study. In PMP cells, 8-bromo-cAMP, a cAMP analog, inhibited cell growth and invasion. However, 8-bromo-cGMP, a cGMP analog, had little or no effect. PDE2 and PDE4, but not PDE3, were expressed in PMP cells. Growth and invasion of PMP cells were inhibited by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), a specific PDE2 inhibitor, but not by rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor. Moreover, cell growth and invasion were inhibited by transfection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific for PDE2A and a catalytically-dead mutant of PDE2A. After treating cells with EHNA or rolipram, intracellular cAMP concentrations were increased. Growth and invasion were stimulated by PKA14-22, a PKA inhibitor, and inhibited by N(6)-benzoyl-c AMP, a PKA specific cAMP analog, whereas 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP, an Epac specific cAMP analog, did not. Invasion, but not growth, was stimulated by A-kinase anchor protein (AKAP) St-Ht31 inhibitory peptide. Based on these results, PDE2 appears to play an important role in growth and invasion of the human malignant melanoma PMP cell line. Selectively suppressing PDE2 might possibly inhibit growth and invasion of other malignant tumor cell lines. PMID:24705027

  15. Modulation of Polycystic Kidney Disease Severity by Phosphodiesterase 1 and 3 Subfamilies.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hong; Wang, Xiaofang; Sussman, Caroline R; Hopp, Katharina; Irazabal, Maria V; Bakeberg, Jason L; LaRiviere, Wells B; Manganiello, Vincent C; Vorhees, Charles V; Zhao, Haiqing; Harris, Peter C; van Deursen, Jan; Ward, Christopher J; Torres, Vicente E

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant intracellular calcium levels and increased cAMP signaling contribute to the development of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). cAMP can be hydrolyzed by various phosphodiesterases (PDEs). To examine the role of cAMP hydrolysis and the most relevant PDEs in the pathogenesis of PKD, we examined cyst development in Pde1- or Pde3-knockout mice on the Pkd2(-/WS25) background (WS25 is an unstable Pkd2 allele). These PDEs were selected because of their importance in cross-talk between calcium and cyclic nucleotide signaling (PDE1), control of cell proliferation and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) -driven fluid secretion (PDE3), and response to vasopressin V2 receptor activation (both). In Pkd2(-/WS25) mice, knockout of Pde1a, Pde1c, or Pde3a but not of Pde1b or Pde3b aggravated the development of PKD and was associated with higher levels of protein kinase A-phosphorylated (Ser133) cAMP-responsive binding protein (P-CREB), activating transcription factor-1, and CREB-induced CRE modulator proteins in kidney nuclear preparations. Immunostaining also revealed higher expression of P-CREB in Pkd2(-/) (WS25);Pde1a(-/-), Pkd2(-) (/WS25);Pde1c(-/-), and Pkd2(-/) (WS25);Pde3a(-/-) kidneys. The cystogenic effect of desmopressin administration was markedly enhanced in Pkd2(-/WS25);Pde3a(-/-) mice, despite PDE3 accounting for only a small fraction of renal cAMP PDE activity. These observations show that calcium- and calmodulin-dependent PDEs (PDE1A and PDE1C) and PDE3A modulate the development of PKD, possibly through the regulation of compartmentalized cAMP pools that control cell proliferation and CFTR-driven fluid secretion. Treatments capable of increasing the expression or activity of these PDEs may, therefore, retard the development of PKD. PMID:26374610

  16. CCI: A Worldwide Camping Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawver, Gary Keith

    1992-01-01

    Describes the efforts of Christian Camping International (CCI), an alliance of Christian camping associations from Australia, Canada, the Far East, Latin America, New Zealand, United States, South Africa, Japan, and Brazil. The purpose of CCI is to help develop effective Christian camps, conferences, and retreat ministries. (LP)

  17. Children's Camps in the Adirondacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Hallie E.

    2003-01-01

    In the late 19th century, camps in the Adirondacks responded to concerns that the American character was softening. Much camping philosophy came from the progressive movement in education. Aspects of Indian culture were adopted because they seemed to fit naturally in the Adirondacks, and children loved them. Adirondack camps have always been…

  18. A molecular recognizing system of serotonin in rat fetal axonal growth cones: uptake and high affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1992-09-18

    Axonal growth cone particles (AGCP) isolated from prenatal and postnatal rat brain had different high-affinity 5-HT uptake characteristics. In postnatal AGCP the uptake behaves as in the adult rat brain, while in the prenatal AGCP the uptake characteristics seem to be in a transitional stage. Also in prenatal AGCP we observed specific, high-affinity 5-HT binding sites. These results support the idea of an important role for 5-HT during axogenesis. PMID:1424085

  19. Quantitative and qualitative effects of N10-methylfolate on high-affinity folate binding in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Holm, J; Hansen, S I; Lyngbye, J

    1984-01-01

    N10-methylfolate acted as a potent competitive inhibitor of high-affinity [3H] folate binding in human leukocytes, while methotrexate had no effect. Furthermore, folate binding changed into a non-cooperative type in the presence of N10-methylfolate. Hence, in qualitative and quantitative respects, the substrate specificity characteristics of leukocyte folate binding resemble those of other high-affinity folate binding systems. PMID:6500843

  20. Outdoor Education, Camp Casey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansberry, Steve; And Others

    A curriculum guide for the Camp Casey Outdoor Education program is contained in this document. Designed for fifth grade students and teachers in Northshore School District, Bothell, Washington, it emphasizes learning activities for use in the outdoors. General understandings relevant to the objectives of the program form the frame into which the…

  1. Saving the Camping Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Jean S.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses developmental encroachment on isolated caves near Pittsford, Vermont. Describes cooperative effort by recreational camps and other agencies to acquire land surrounding cave entrances for conservation. Details successes and hurdles of land acquisition. Describes ongoing work by local campers to maintain and enjoy caves and property. (TES)

  2. Summer Fish Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remick, Dennis; Pulu, Tupou L.

    The booklet presents a description and illustrates, with photographs, the Eskimo lifestyle and the kinds of activities that occur at a summer fish camp on the Yukon River. Eleven suggested activities are listed for the teacher to present when using the booklet. Activities include studying the map of Alaska; tracing the life cycle of the fish;…

  3. A Flying Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Frank X.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a five-day summer camp which provided 12 children, ages 9-14, with a complete flying experience. The training consisted of ground school and one hour actual flying time, including the basics of aircraft control and a flight prepared and executed by the students. (MLH)

  4. Camp Animal Crackers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Erin; And Others

    This guide contains profiles of 16 activities for young children to participate in while attending camp. Each profile contains the theme of the activity, a list of materials needs, a description of the activity itself, and an explanation of the teacher's role in the activity. The activities focus on: (1) songs and dances; (2) dramatic play; (3)…

  5. Recycling at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, William M.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a Michigan summer camp's efforts to reduce solid waste disposal by recycling cardboard, tin, glass, aluminum, and plastic milk containers. Points out variables affecting the success of such efforts. Discusses Michigan state funding for the development of recycling programs. (SV)

  6. Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling controls the human trophoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gerbaud, Pascale; Taskén, Kjetil; Pidoux, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    During human placentation, mononuclear cytotrophoblasts fuse to form multinucleated syncytia ensuring hormonal production and nutrient exchanges between the maternal and fetal circulation. Syncytial formation is essential for the maintenance of pregnancy and for fetal growth. The cAMP signaling pathway is the major route to trigger trophoblast fusion and its activation results in phosphorylation of specific intracellular target proteins, in transcription of fusogenic genes and assembly of macromolecular protein complexes constituting the fusogenic machinery at the plasma membrane. Specificity in cAMP signaling is ensured by generation of localized pools of cAMP controlled by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and by discrete spatial and temporal activation of protein kinase A (PKA) in supramolecular signaling clusters inside the cell organized by A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) and by organization of signal termination by protein phosphatases (PPs). Here we present original observations on the available components of the cAMP signaling pathway in the human placenta including PKA, PDE, and PP isoforms as well as AKAPs. We continue to discuss the current knowledge of the spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling triggering trophoblast fusion. PMID:26441659

  7. A nitrogen-dependent switch in the high affinity ammonium transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Straub, Daniel; Ludewig, Uwe; Neuhäuser, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are crucial for the high affinity primary uptake and translocation of ammonium in plants. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the genomic set of AMT-type ammonium transporters comprises eight members. Only four genes were abundantly expressed in young seedlings, both in roots and shoots. While the expression of all AMTs in the shoot was not affected by the nitrogen availability, the dominating MtAMT1;1 gene was repressed by nitrogen in roots, despite that cellular nitrogen concentrations were far above deficiency levels. A contrasting de-repression by nitrogen was observed for MtAMT1;4 and MtAMT2;1, which were both expressed at intermediate level. Weak expression was found for MtAMT1;2 and MtAMT2;3, while the other AMTs were not detected in young seedlings. When expressed from their endogenous promoters, translational fusion proteins of MtAMT1;1 and MtAMT2;1 with green fluorescent protein were co-localized in the plasma membrane of rhizodermal cells, but also detected in cortical root layers. Both transporter proteins similarly functionally complemented a yeast strain that is deficient in high affinity ammonium transport, both at acidic and neutral pH. The uptake into yeast mediated by these transporters saturated with Km AMT1;1 = 89 µM and Km AMT2;1 = 123 µM, respectively. When expressed in oocytes, MtAMT1;1 mediated much larger (15)N-ammonium uptake than MtAMT2;1, but NH4 (+) currents were only recorded for MtAMT1;1. These currents saturated with a voltage-dependent Km = 90 µM at -80 mV. The cellular localization and regulation of the AMTs suggests that MtAMT1;1 encodes the major high affinity ammonium transporter gene in low nitrogen grown young M. truncatula roots and despite the similar localization and substrate affinity, MtAMT2;1 appears functionally distinct and more important at higher nitrogen supply. PMID:25164101

  8. Comparative involvement of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases and adenylyl cyclase on adrenocorticotropin-induced increase of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in rat and human glomerulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Côté, M; Payet, M D; Rousseau, E; Guillon, G; Gallo-Payet, N

    1999-08-01

    The present study investigated the role and identity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) in the regulation of basal and ACTH-stimulated levels of intracellular cAMP in human and rat adrenal glomerulosa cells. Comparative dose-response curves indicated that maximal hormone-stimulated cAMP accumulation was 11- and 24-fold higher in human and rat cells, compared with cAMP production obtained in corresponding membranes, respectively. Similarly to 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine, 25 microM erythro-9-[2-hydroxy-3-nonyl]adenine (EHNA, a specific PDE2 inhibitor), caused a large increase in ACTH-stimulated cAMP accumulation; by contrast, it did not change cAMP production in membranes. Moreover, in membrane fractions, addition of 10 microM cGMP inhibited ACTH-induced cAMP production, an effect completely reversed by addition of 25 microM EHNA. These results indicate that PDE2 activity is involved in the regulation of cAMP accumulation induced by ACTH, and suggest that ACTH inhibits this activity. Indeed, time-course studies indicated that ACTH induced a rapid decrease in cGMP production, resulting in PDE2 inhibition, which in turn, contributed [with adenylyl cyclase (AC) activation] to an accumulation in cAMP for 15 min. Thereafter, cAMP content decreased, because of cAMP-stimulated PDE2, as confirmed by measurement of PDE activity that was activated by ACTH, but only after a 10-min incubation. Hence, we demonstrate that the ACTH-induced increase in intracellular cAMP is the result of a balance between activation of AC and direct modulation of PDE2 activity, an effect mediated by cGMP content. Although similar results were observed in both models, PDE2 involvement is more important in rat than in human adrenal glomerulosa cells, whereas AC is more stimulated in human than in rat glomerulosa cells. PMID:10433216

  9. Role of the High Affinity Immunoglobulin E Receptor in Bacterial Translocation and Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowicz, David; Nutten, Sophie; Desreumaux, Pierre; Neut, Christel; Torpier, Gérard; Peeters, Marc; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Capron, Monique

    2001-01-01

    A role for immunoglobulin E and its high affinity receptor (FcεRI) in the control of bacterial pathogenicity and intestinal inflammation has been suggested, but relevant animal models are lacking. Here we compare transgenic mice expressing a humanized FcεRI (hFcεRI), with a cell distribution similar to that in humans, to FcεRI-deficient animals. In hFcεRI transgenic mice, levels of colonic interleukin 4 were higher, the composition of fecal flora was greatly modified, and bacterial translocation towards mesenteric lymph nodes was increased. In hFcεRI transgenic mice, 2,4,6-tri-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis was also more pronounced, whereas FcεRI-deficient animals were protected from colitis, demonstrating that FcεRI can affect the onset of intestinal inflammation. PMID:11136818

  10. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R.; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2014-09-01

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications.Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface

  11. Glycan-based high-affinity ligands for toxins and pathogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish A; Weiss, Alison A; Iyer, Suri S

    2010-03-01

    Glycans decorate over 95% of the mammalian cell surface in the form of glycolipids and glycoproteins. Several toxins and pathogens bind to these glycans to enter the cells. Understanding the fundamentals of the complex interplay between microbial pathogens and their glycan receptors at the molecular level could lead to the development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Using Shiga toxin and influenza virus as examples, we describe the complex biological interface between host glycans and these infectious agents, and recent strategies to develop glycan-based high-affinity ligands. These molecules are expected to ultimately be incorporated into diagnostics and therapeutics, and can be used as probes to study important biological processes. Additionally, by focusing on the specific glycans that microbial pathogens target, we can begin to decipher the "glycocode" and how these glycans participate in normal and aberrant cellular communication. PMID:20135686

  12. High affinity anti-Internalin B VHH antibody fragments isolated from naturally and artificially immunized repertoires.

    PubMed

    Gene, Robert W; Kumaran, Jyothi; Aroche, Cristina; van Faassen, Henk; Hall, J Christopher; MacKenzie, C Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    The need for rapid and easy technologies for the detection of food-borne and environmental pathogens is essential for safeguarding the health of populations. Furthermore, distribution of tainted food and water can have consequences which can affect whole economies. Antibodies and antibody fragments have been historically used in detection platforms due to their antigen specificity and robust physicochemical properties. In this study, we report the isolation and characterization of antibody fragments from the heavy chain antibody repertoire (VHH) of Camelidae which bind with specificity and high affinity to the Listeria monocytogenes invasin, Internalin B (InlB). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of anti-InlB VHHs from camelids. These anti-InlB VHHs were not cross-reactive to the structurally related Listeria invasin Internalin A (InlA) and are potential reagents to be used in the development of detection and medical technologies. PMID:25450000

  13. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (KD) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  14. Collagens are functional, high affinity ligands for the inhibitory immune receptor LAIR-1

    PubMed Central

    Lebbink, Robert Jan; de Ruiter, Talitha; Adelmeijer, Jelle; Brenkman, Arjan B.; van Helvoort, Joop M.; Koch, Manuel; Farndale, Richard W.; Lisman, Ton; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Lenting, Peter J.; Meyaard, Linde

    2006-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in the human body, important in maintenance of tissue structure and hemostasis. Here we report that collagens are high affinity ligands for the broadly expressed inhibitory leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1). The interaction is dependent on the conserved Gly-Pro-Hyp collagen repeats. Antibody cross-linking of LAIR-1 is known to inhibit immune cell function in vitro. We now show that collagens are functional ligands for LAIR-1 and directly inhibit immune cell activation in vitro. Thus far, all documented ligands for immune inhibitory receptors are membrane molecules, implying a regulatory role in cell–cell interaction. Our data reveal a novel mechanism of peripheral immune regulation by inhibitory immune receptors binding to extracellular matrix collagens. PMID:16754721

  15. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (K D) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  16. Experimental conditions can obscure the second high-affinity site in LeuT.

    PubMed

    Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Zehnpfennig, Britta; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2012-02-01

    Neurotransmitter:Na(+) symporters (NSSs), the targets of antidepressants and psychostimulants, recapture neurotransmitters from the synapse in a Na(+)-dependent symport mechanism. The crystal structure of the NSS homolog LeuT from Aquifex aeolicus revealed one leucine substrate in an occluded, centrally located (S1) binding site next to two Na(+) ions. Computational studies combined with binding and flux experiments identified a second substrate (S2) site and a molecular mechanism of Na(+)-substrate symport that depends upon the allosteric interaction of substrate molecules in the two high-affinity sites. Here we show that the S2 site, which has not yet been identified by crystallographic approaches, can be blocked during preparation of detergent-solubilized LeuT, thereby obscuring its crucial role in Na(+)-coupled symport. This finding points to the need for caution in selecting experimental environments in which the properties and mechanistic features of membrane proteins can be delineated. PMID:22245968

  17. Synthetic Receptors for the High-Affinity Recognition of O-GlcNAc Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rios, Pablo; Carter, Tom S; Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Crump, Matthew P; Lisbjerg, Micke; Pittelkow, Michael; Supekar, Nitin T; Boons, Geert-Jan; Davis, Anthony P

    2016-03-01

    The combination of a pyrenyl tetraamine with an isophthaloyl spacer has led to two new water-soluble carbohydrate receptors ("synthetic lectins"). Both systems show outstanding affinities for derivatives of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in aqueous solution. One receptor binds the methyl glycoside GlcNAc-β-OMe with Ka ≈20,000 m(-1), whereas the other one binds an O-GlcNAcylated peptide with Ka ≈70,000 m(-1). These values substantially exceed those usually measured for GlcNAc-binding lectins. Slow exchange on the NMR timescale enabled structural determinations for several complexes. As expected, the carbohydrate units are sandwiched between the pyrenes, with the alkoxy and NHAc groups emerging at the sides. The high affinity of the GlcNAcyl-peptide complex can be explained by extra-cavity interactions, raising the possibility of a family of complementary receptors for O-GlcNAc in different contexts. PMID:26822115

  18. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding.

    PubMed

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A T; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  19. An Arabidopsis thaliana high-affinity molybdate transporter required for efficient uptake of molybdate from soil

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Hajime; Takano, Junpei; Takahashi, Hideki; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Shibagaki, Nakako; Fujiwara, Toru

    2007-01-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a trace element essential for living organisms, however no molybdate transporter has been identified in eukaryotes. Here, we report the identification of a molybdate transporter, MOT1, from Arabidopsis thaliana. MOT1 is expressed in both roots and shoots, and the MOT1 protein is localized, in part, to plasma membranes and to vesicles. MOT1 is required for efficient uptake and translocation of molybdate and for normal growth under conditions of limited molybdate supply. Kinetics studies in yeast revealed that the Km value of MOT1 for molybdate is ≈20 nM. Furthermore, Mo uptake by MOT1 in yeast was not affected by coexistent sulfate, and MOT1 did not complement a sulfate transporter-deficient yeast mutant strain. These data confirmed that MOT1 is specific for molybdate and that the high affinity of MOT1 allows plants to obtain scarce Mo from soil. PMID:18003916

  20. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A. T.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  1. Further characterization of the subunits of the receptor with high affinity for immunoglobulin E

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, G.; Kinet, J.P.; Liu, T.Y.; Metzger, H.

    1987-05-05

    The ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., ..gamma.. subunits of the receptor with high affinity for immunoglobulin E were isolated and their compositions assessed by direct amino acid analysis and by incorporation of radioactive precursors. The compositions show no unusual features other than a rather high content of tryptophan in the ..cap alpha.. chain as assessed from the incorporation studies. The results combined with future sequence data will permit unambiguous determination of the multiplicity of the chains in the receptor. Chymotryptic peptide maps of the extrinsically iodinated subunits show several similar peptides, particularly for ..cap alpha.. and ..beta... However, these putative homologies were not apparent when tryptic maps of the biosynthetically ((/sup 3/H)leucine) labeled subunits were analyzed.

  2. AIRE-Deficient Patients Harbor Unique High-Affinity Disease-Ameliorating Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Steffen; Woodward, Martin; Hertel, Christina; Vlaicu, Philip; Haque, Yasmin; Kärner, Jaanika; Macagno, Annalisa; Onuoha, Shimobi C; Fishman, Dmytro; Peterson, Hedi; Metsküla, Kaja; Uibo, Raivo; Jäntti, Kirsi; Hokynar, Kati; Wolff, Anette S B; Krohn, Kai; Ranki, Annamari; Peterson, Pärt; Kisand, Kai; Hayday, Adrian

    2016-07-28

    APS1/APECED patients are defined by defects in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) that mediates central T cell tolerance to many self-antigens. AIRE deficiency also affects B cell tolerance, but this is incompletely understood. Here we show that most APS1/APECED patients displayed B cell autoreactivity toward unique sets of approximately 100 self-proteins. Thereby, autoantibodies from 81 patients collectively detected many thousands of human proteins. The loss of B cell tolerance seemingly occurred during antibody affinity maturation, an obligatorily T cell-dependent step. Consistent with this, many APS1/APECED patients harbored extremely high-affinity, neutralizing autoantibodies, particularly against specific cytokines. Such antibodies were biologically active in vitro and in vivo, and those neutralizing type I interferons (IFNs) showed a striking inverse correlation with type I diabetes, not shown by other anti-cytokine antibodies. Thus, naturally occurring human autoantibodies may actively limit disease and be of therapeutic utility. PMID:27426947

  3. Association of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 with the multichain high-affinity interleukin 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, J; Goldman, C K; Rao, P; Moos, M; Waldmann, T A

    1990-01-01

    Previously, using flow cytometric resonance energy transfer and lateral diffusion measurements, we demonstrated that a 95-kDa protein identified by two monoclonal antibodies (OKT27 and OKT27b) interacts physically with the 55-kDa alpha protein of the high-affinity interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor. In the present study, this 95-kDa protein (p95) was purified and amino acid sequence data were obtained that showed strong homology to the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). The identity of the p95 protein with ICAM-1 was confirmed by sequential immunoprecipitations using OKT27 and an antibody, WEHI-CAM-1, that is directed toward ICAM-1. We confirmed the physical proximity of p95/ICAM-1 to the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit by demonstrating that radiolabeled IL-2 could be cross-linked to this protein expressed on activated T cells. In functional studies, the antibodies OKT27 and OKT27b inhibited T-cell proliferative responses to OKT3, to soluble antigen, and to heterologous cells (mixed lymphocyte reaction). However, these antibodies did not inhibit IL-2-induced proliferation of an IL-2-dependent T-cell line. Taken together with our previous observations, the present studies suggest that ICAM-1 is in proximity and interacts physically with the high-affinity IL-2 receptor. The association of ICAM-1 with the IL-2 receptor may facilitate the paracrine IL-2-mediated stimulation of T cells expressing IL-2 receptors by augmenting homotypic T-T-cell interaction, by receptor-directed focusing of IL-2 release by helper T cells, and by focusing IL-2 receptors of the physically linked cells to the site of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1-ICAM-1-IL-2 receptor interaction. Images PMID:1976256

  4. High affinity binding of [3H]-tyramine in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, A.

    1986-01-01

    Optimum assay conditions for the association of [3H]-para-tyramine [( 3H]-pTA) with rat brain membranes were characterized, and a saturable, reversible, drug-specific, and high affinity binding mechanism for this trace amine was revealed. The binding capacity (Bmax) for [3H]-pTA in the corpus striatum was approximately 30 times higher than that in the cerebellum, with similar dissociation constants (KD). The binding process of [3H]-pTA involved the dopamine system, inasmuch as (a) highest binding capacity was associated with dopamine-rich regions; (b) dopamine and pTA equally displaced specifically bound [3H]-pTA; (c) there was a severe loss in striatal binding capacity for [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, for [3H]-dopamine, following unilateral nigrostriatal lesion; (d) acute in vivo reserpine treatment markedly decreased the density of [3H]-pTA and, reportedly, of [3H]-dopamine binding sites. In competition experiments [3H]-pTA binding sites, though displaying nanomolar affinity for dopamine, revealed micromolar affinities for the dopamine agonists apomorphine and pergolide, and for several dopamine antagonists, while having very high affinity for reserpine, a marker for the catecholamine transporter in synaptic vesicles. The binding process of [3H]-pTA was both energy-dependent (ouabain-sensitive), and ATP-Mg2+-insensitive; furthermore, the potencies of various drugs in competing for [3H]-pTA binding to rat striatal membranes correlated well (r = 0.96) with their reported potencies in inhibiting [3H]-dopamine uptake into striatal synaptosomes. It is concluded that [3H]-pTA binds at a site located on/within synaptic vesicles where it is involved in the transport mechanism of dopamine. PMID:3801770

  5. High affinity ATP/ADP analogues as new tools for studying CFTR gating.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Min; Sohma, Yoshiro; Zou, Xiaoqin; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and hydrolysis-deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutants have indicated that ATP hydrolysis precedes channel closing. Our recent data suggest that ATP binding is also important in modulating the closing rate. This latter hypothesis predicts that ATP analogues with higher binding affinities should stabilize the open state more than ATP. Here we explore the possibility of using N6-modified ATP/ADP analogues as high-affinity ligands for CFTR gating, since these analogues have been shown to be more potent than native ATP/ADP in other ATP-binding proteins. Among the three N6-modified ATP analogues tested, N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP) was the most potent, with a K(1/2) of 1.6 +/- 0.4 microm (>50-fold more potent than ATP). The maximal open probability (P(o)) in the presence of P-ATP was approximately 30% higher than that of ATP, indicating that P-ATP also has a higher efficacy than ATP. Single-channel kinetic analysis showed that as [P-ATP] was increased, the opening rate increased, whereas the closing rate decreased. The fact that these two kinetic parameters have different sensitivities to changes of [P-ATP] suggests an involvement of two different ATP-binding sites, a high-affinity site modulating channel closing and a low affinity site controlling channel opening. The effect of P-ATP on the stability of open states was more evident when ATP hydrolysis was abolished, either by mutating the nucleotide-binding domain 2 (NBD2) Walker B glutamate (i.e. E1371) or by using the non-hydrolysable ATP analogue AMP-PNP. Similar strategies to develop nucleotide analogues with a modified adenine ring could be valuable for future studies of CFTR gating. PMID:16223764

  6. High affinity ATP/ADP analogues as new tools for studying CFTR gating

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Min; Sohma, Yoshiro; Zou, Xiaoqin; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and hydrolysis-deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutants have indicated that ATP hydrolysis precedes channel closing. Our recent data suggest that ATP binding is also important in modulating the closing rate. This latter hypothesis predicts that ATP analogues with higher binding affinities should stabilize the open state more than ATP. Here we explore the possibility of using N6-modified ATP/ADP analogues as high-affinity ligands for CFTR gating, since these analogues have been shown to be more potent than native ATP/ADP in other ATP-binding proteins. Among the three N6-modified ATP analogues tested, N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP) was the most potent, with a K½ of 1.6 ± 0.4 μm (>50-fold more potent than ATP). The maximal open probability (Po) in the presence of P-ATP was ∼30% higher than that of ATP, indicating that P-ATP also has a higher efficacy than ATP. Single-channel kinetic analysis showed that as [P-ATP] was increased, the opening rate increased, whereas the closing rate decreased. The fact that these two kinetic parameters have different sensitivities to changes of [P-ATP] suggests an involvement of two different ATP-binding sites, a high-affinity site modulating channel closing and a low affinity site controlling channel opening. The effect of P-ATP on the stability of open states was more evident when ATP hydrolysis was abolished, either by mutating the nucleotide-binding domain 2 (NBD2) Walker B glutamate (i.e. E1371) or by using the non-hydrolysable ATP analogue AMP-PNP. Similar strategies to develop nucleotide analogues with a modified adenine ring could be valuable for future studies of CFTR gating. PMID:16223764

  7. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • This is the first report of DNA aptamer against EGFR in vitro. • Aptamer can bind targets with high affinity and selectivity. • DNA aptamers are more stable, cheap and efficient than RNA aptamers. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high affinity with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high selectivity. - Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher’s attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  8. Concurrent low- and high-affinity sulfate reduction kinetics in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder Tarpgaard, Irene; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    Bacterial sulfate reduction in marine sediments generally occurs in the presence of high millimolar concentrations of sulfate. Published data indicate that low sulfate concentrations may limit sulfate reduction rates below 0.2-2 mM. Yet, high sulfate reduction rates occur in the 1-100 μM range in freshwater sediments and at the sulfate-methane transition in marine sediments. Through a combination of 35S-tracer experiments, including initial velocity experiments and time course experiments, we searched for different sulfate affinities in the mixed community of sulfate reducers in a marine sediment. We supported the radiotracer experiments with a highly sensitive ion chromatographic technique for sulfate with a detection limit of 0.15 μM SO 42- in marine pore water. Our results showed that high and low affinities for sulfate co-occur and that the applied experimental approach may determine the observed apparent half saturation constant, Km. Our experimental and model data both show that sulfate reduction in the studied marine sediment could be explained by two dominating affinities for sulfate: a low affinity with a mean half saturation constant, Km, of 430 μM SO 42- and a high affinity with a mean Km of 2.6 μM SO 42-. The high-affinity sulfate reduction was thermodynamically un-constrained down to <1 μM SO 42-, both in our experiments and under in situ conditions. The reduction of radio-labeled sulfate was partly reversible due to concurrent re-oxidation of sulfide by Fe(III) and possibly due to a reversibility of the enzymatic pathway of sulfate reduction. A literature survey of apparent Km values for sediments and pure cultures is presented and discussed.

  9. Interprofessional Flight Camp.

    PubMed

    Alfes, Celeste M; Rowe, Amanda S

    2016-01-01

    The Dorothy Ebersbach Academic Center for Flight Nursing in Cleveland, OH, holds an annual flight camp designed for master's degree nursing students in the acute care nurse practitioner program, subspecializing in flight nursing at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University. The weeklong interprofessional training is also open to any health care provider working in an acute care setting and focuses on critical care updates, trauma, and emergency care within the critical care transport environment. This year, 29 graduate nursing students enrolled in a master's degree program from Puerto Rico attended. Although the emergency department in Puerto Rico sees and cares for trauma patients, there is no formal trauma training program. Furthermore, the country only has 1 rotor wing air medical transport service located at the Puerto Rico Medical Center in San Juan. Flight faculty and graduate teaching assistants spent approximately 9 months planning for their participation in our 13th annual flight camp. Students from Puerto Rico were extremely pleased with the learning experiences at camp and expressed particular interest in having more training time within the helicopter flight simulator. PMID:27021671

  10. Phosphodiesterase 4D Inhibitors Limit Prostate Cancer Growth Potential

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Ginny L.; Hammer, Kimberly D.P.; Domenech, Maribella; Frantskevich, Katsiaryna; Malinowski, Rita L.; Bushman, Wade; Beebe, David J.; Marker, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) has recently been implicated as a proliferation-promoting factor in prostate cancer and is over-expressed in human prostate carcinoma. However, the effects of PDE4D inhibition using pharmacological inhibitors have not been examined in prostate cancer. These studies examined the effects of selective PDE4D inhibitors, NVP-ABE171 and cilomilast, as anti-prostate cancer therapies in both in vitro and in vivo models. The effects of PDE4D inhibitors on pathways that are critical in prostate cancer and/or downstream of cyclic AMP (cAMP) were examined. Both NVP-ABE171 and cilomilast decreased cell growth. In vitro, PDE4D inhibitors lead to decreased signaling of the sonic hedgehog (SHH), Androgen Receptor (AR), and MAPK pathways, but growth inhibition was best correlated to the sonic hedgehog pathway. PDE4D inhibition also reduced proliferation of epithelial cells induced by paracrine signaling from co-cultured stromal cells that had activated hedgehog signaling. In addition, PDE4D inhibitors decreased the weight of the prostate in wild-type mice. Prostate cancer xenografts grown in nude mice that were treated with cilomilast or NVP-ABE171 had decreased wet weight and increased apoptosis compared to vehicle treated controls. These studies suggest the pharmacological inhibition of PDE4D using small molecule inhibitors is an effective option for prostate cancer therapy. Implications PDE4D inhibitors decrease the growth of prostate cancer cells in vivo and in vitro, and PDE4D inhibition has therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. PMID:25149359

  11. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors, pentoxifylline and rolipram, increase bone mass mainly by promoting bone formation in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, T; Kobayashi, S; Ebara, S; Yoshimura, Y; Horiuchi, H; Tsutsumimoto, T; Wakabayashi, S; Takaoka, K

    2000-12-01

    The administration of either Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine derivative and an inhibitor of cyclic AMP (c-AMP) phosphodiesterases (PDEs), or Rolipram, an inhibitor specific to type-4 PDE (PDE4) in normal mice, significantly increased both cortical and cancellous bone mass. Vertebrae and tibiae from mice treated with PTX or Rolipram were analyzed by means of bone densitometry and histomorphometry. The results revealed that both PTX and Rolipram increased bone mass in normal mice mainly through the acceleration of bone formation. These findings suggest that both PTX and Rolipram can enhance physiological bone formation and thereby increase bone mass in normal mice. The possibility that these agents may be of value for the treatment of osteoporosis is discussed. PMID:11113392

  12. ABCD of the phosphodiesterase family: interaction and differential activity in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, David MG

    2008-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are important enzymes that hydrolyze the cyclic nucleotides adenosine 3′5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3′5′-cyclic mono-phosphate (cGMP) to their inactive 5′ monophosphates. They are highly conserved across species and as well as their role in signal termination, they also have a vital role in intracellular localization of cyclic nucleotide signaling and integration of the cyclic nucleotide pathways with other signaling pathways. Because of their pivotal role in intracellular signaling, they are now of considerable interest as therapeutic targets in a wide variety diseases, including COPD where PDE inhibitors may have bronchodilator, anti-inflammatory and pulmonary vasodilator actions. This review examines the diversity and cellular localization of the isoforms of PDE, the known and speculative relevance of this to the treatment of COPD, and the range of PDE inhibitors in development together with a discussion of their possible role in treating COPD. PMID:19281073

  13. Phosphodiesterase 8B and cyclic AMP signaling in the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Leal, Leticia Ferro; Szarek, Eva; Faucz, Fabio; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-09-01

    Bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia (BAH) in humans and mice has been recently linked to phosphodiesterase (PDE) 8B (PDE8B) and 11 (PDE11A) defects. These findings have followed the discovery that defects of primary genes of the cyclic monophosphatase (cAMP) signaling pathway, such as guanine nucleotide binding alpha subunit and PRKAR1A, are involved in the pathogenesis of BAH in humans; complete absence of Prkar1a in the adrenal cortex of mice also led to pathology that mimicked the human disease. Here, we review the most recent findings in human and mouse studies on PDE8B, a cAMP-specific PDE that appears to be highly expressed in the adrenal cortex and whose deficiency may underlie predisposition to BAH and possibly other human diseases. PMID:25971952

  14. Various phosphodiesterase activities in different regions of the heart alter the cardiac effects of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Demirel-Yilmaz, Emine; Cenik, Basar; Ozcan, Gulnihal; Derici, Mehmet Kursat

    2012-09-01

    The modulation of cardiac functions by nitric oxide (NO) was established. This study examined the influences of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors on the action of NO in the different regions of the rat heart. NO donor diethylamine nonoate (DEA/NO) (0.1-100 μM) decreased functions of the right atrium. DEA/NO-induced depression of the developed tension of the right atrium was inhibited by [erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine] (PDE2 inhibitor), augmented by milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor), and upturned by rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor). A DEA/NO-induced decrease in the resting tension was inhibited by vinpocetine (PDE1 inhibitor) and [erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine] but reversed by rolipram. The decreased sinus rate by DEA/NO was prevented by vinpocetine and rolipram. DEA/NO increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations in the right atrium, and rolipram enhanced increased cAMP level. DEA/NO had no effect on the contraction of the papillary muscle. However, unchanged contraction under DEA/NO stimulation was decreased by vinpocetine, milrinone, and rolipram. DEA/NO increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate concentration but has no effect on cAMP in the papillary muscle. However, in the presence of vinpocetine and milrinone, DEA/NO reduced cAMP level. The PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil has no effect on DEA/NO actions. This study indicates that a variety of PDE activities in different regions of the rat heart shapes the action of NO on the myocardium. PMID:22653417

  15. Profiling of functional phosphodiesterase in mesangial cells using a CRE-SEAP-based reporting system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Yao, Jian; Meng, Yiman; Kasai, Ayumi; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Miida, Takashi; Takeda, Masayuki; Okada, Masahiko; Kitamura, Masanori

    2006-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are critically implicated in the regulation of mesangial cell function, but profile of functional PDEs in mesangial cells is still unclear. In this study, we investigated roles of individual PDEs in the regulation of mesangial cell behavior by the cAMP pathway. Reporter mesangial cells that express secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the cAMP response element (CRE) were exposed to selective PDE inhibitors in the presence or absence of cAMP, and activity of CRE, expression of CRE-regulated protein, mitogenesis and cell survival were examined. Exposure of reporter cells to cAMP-elevating agents resulted in time- and concentration-dependent activation of CRE. Treatment of the cells with any PDE inhibitors alone did not induce CRE activation. Under stimulation with 8-bromo-cAMP or 8-bromo-cGMP, however, inhibitors of PDE2, PDE3, PDE4 and PDE5 enhanced activation of CRE. Inhibition of PDE1 or PDE6 did not affect the CRE activation. Among different combinations tested, only inhibitors of PDE3 and PDE4 cooperatively increased the level of intracellular cAMP, activity of protein kinase A, activation of CRE, and CRE-regulated protein, connexin43. Concomitant inhibition of PDE3 and PDE4 attenuated mitogen-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and cell proliferation. Under serum deprivation, combinational inhibition of PDE3 and PDE4 exclusively caused activation of caspase-3 and apoptosis. The present data elucidated that PDE3 and PDE4 play critical roles in the regulation of mesangial cell function. PDE3 and PDE4 were identified as the novel, antiapoptotic machinery that supports survival of mesangial cells. PMID:16751794

  16. cAMP controls rod photoreceptor sensitivity via multiple targets in the phototransduction cascade

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Luba A.; Samoiliuk, Evgeniia V.; Govardovskii, Victor I.

    2012-01-01

    In early studies, both cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cGMP were considered as potential secondary messengers regulating the conductivity of the vertebrate photoreceptor plasma membrane. Later discovery of the cGMP specificity of cyclic nucleotide–gated channels has shifted attention to cGMP as the only secondary messenger in the phototransduction cascade, and cAMP is not considered in modern schemes of phototransduction. Here, we report evidence that cAMP may also be involved in regulation of the phototransduction cascade. Using a suction pipette technique, we recorded light responses of isolated solitary rods from the frog retina in normal solution and in the medium containing 2 µM of adenylate cyclase activator forskolin. Under forskolin action, flash sensitivity rose more than twofold because of a retarded photoresponse turn-off. The same concentration of forskolin lead to a 2.5-fold increase in the rod outer segment cAMP, which is close to earlier reported natural day/night cAMP variations. Detailed analysis of cAMP action on the phototransduction cascade suggests that several targets are affected by cAMP increase: (a) basal dark phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity decreases; (b) at the same intensity of light background, steady background-induced PDE activity increases; (c) at light backgrounds, guanylate cyclase activity at a given fraction of open channels is reduced; and (d) the magnitude of the Ca2+ exchanger current rises 1.6-fold, which would correspond to a 1.6-fold elevation of [Ca2+]in. Analysis by a complete model of rod phototransduction suggests that an increase of [Ca2+]in might also explain effects (b) and (c). The mechanism(s) by which cAMP could regulate [Ca2+]in and PDE basal activity is unclear. We suggest that these regulations may have adaptive significance and improve the performance of the visual system when it switches between day and night light conditions. PMID:23008435

  17. Immunomodulatory Effects of Lippia sidoides Extract: Induction of IL-10 Through cAMP and p38 MAPK-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rajgopal, Arun; Rebhun, John F.; Burns, Charlie R.; Scholten, Jeffrey D.; Balles, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lippia sidoides is an aromatic shrub that grows wild in the northeastern region of Brazil. In local traditional medicine, the aerial portions of this species are used as anti-infectives, antiseptics, spasmolytics, sedatives, hypotensives, and anti-inflammatory agents. In this research, we evaluate the potential immunological properties of Lippia extract through in vitro analysis of its ability to modulate intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. These results show that Lippia extract increases intracellular cAMP through the inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity. They also demonstrate that Lippia extract increases IL-10 production in THP-1 monocytes through both an increase in intracellular cAMP and the activation of p38 MAPK. These results suggest that the Lippia-mediated inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity and the subsequent increase in intracellular cAMP may explain some of the biological activities associated with L. sidoides. In addition, the anti-inflammatory activity of L. sidoides may also be due, in part, to its ability to induce IL-10 production through the inhibition of cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphodiesterase activity and by its activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:25599252

  18. Foreign Language Camps at the College Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Jean S.

    Information on Colorado State University's foreign language camps for college students is presented. Advantages of the following two models for camps are identified: a single language camp, and a combination multi-language camp with four languages (Spanish, French, German, and Chinese). Features of the camps include: speaking in the foreign…

  19. Astro Camp Goes to Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Katie Craig, daughter of former Stennis Space Center Deputy Director Mark Craig, launches a 'balloon rocket' with the help of Rebecca Compretta, Astro Camp coordinator at SSC. SSC took Astro Camp on the road to Florida this week to engage children and their parents during activities surrounding the Aug. 8 launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on NASA's STS-118 mission to the International Space Station. Astro Camp is SSC's popular space camp program designed to inspire and educate students using science and math principles.

  20. Kinetics of calcium dissociation from its high-affinity transport sites on sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, S; Champeil, P

    1991-01-15

    We investigated the kinetics of calcium dissociation from its high-affinity transport sites on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase by combining fast filtration with stopped-flow fluorescence measurements. At pH 6 and 20 degrees C, in the absence of potassium and in the presence of 20 mM MgCl2, isotopic exchange of bound calcium exhibited biphasic kinetics, with two phases of equal amplitude, regardless of the initial extent of binding site saturation. The rapidly exchangeable site, whose occupancy by calcium controlled the rate constant of the slow phase, had an apparent affinity for calcium of about 3-6 microM. A similar high affinity was also deduced from measurements of the calcium dependence of the rate constant for ATPase fluorescence changes. This affinity was higher than the overall affinity for calcium deduced from the equilibrium binding measurements (dissociation constant of 15-20 microM); this was consistent with the occurrence of cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 1.6-1.8). The drop in intrinsic fluorescence observed upon chelation of calcium was always slightly faster than the dissociation of calcium itself, although the rates for both this drop in fluorescence and calcium dissociation varied slightly from one preparation to the other. This fluorescence drop was therefore mainly due to dissociation of the bound ions, not to slow transconformation of the ATPase. Dissociation of the two bound calcium ions in a medium containing EGTA exhibited monophasic kinetics in the presence of a calcium ionophore, with a rate constant about half that of the fast phase of isotopic exchange. This particular pattern was observed over a wide range of experimental conditions, including the presence of KCl, dimethyl sulfoxide, 4-nonylphenol, or a nucleotide analogue, at pH 6 or 7, and at various temperatures. The kinetics of calcium dissociation under the above various conditions were not correlated with the ATPase affinity for calcium deduced from equilibrium

  1. UCR1C is a novel activator of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) long isoforms and attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Burmeister, Brian T.; Johnson, Keven R.; Baillie, George S.; Karginov, Andrei V.; Skidgel, Randal A.; O’Bryan, John P.; Carnegie, Graeme K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophy increases the risk of heart failure and arrhythmia. Prevention or reversal of the maladaptive hypertrophic phenotype has thus been proposed to treat heart failure. Chronic β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by elevating 3′, 5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and activating downstream effectors such protein kinase A (PKA). Conversely, hydrolysis of cAMP by phosphodiesterases (PDEs) spatiotemporally restricts cAMP signaling. Here, we demonstrate that PDE4, but not PDE3, is critical in regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and may represent a potential target for preventing maladaptive hypertrophy. We identify a sequence within the upstream conserved region 1 of PDE4D, termed UCR1C, as a novel activator of PDE4 long isoforms. UCR1C activates PDE4 in complex with A-Kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc resulting in decreased PKA signaling facilitated by AKAP-Lbc. Expression of UCR1C in cardiomyocytes inhibits hypertrophy in response to chronic β-AR stimulation. This effect is partially due to inhibition of nuclear PKA activity, which decreases phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). In conclusion, PDE4 activation by UCR1C attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by specifically inhibiting nuclear PKA activity. PMID:25683917

  2. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Aleš; Bay, Tina; Wellendorph, Petrine; Kehler, Jan; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Frølund, Bente; Pedersen, Martin H.F.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screening of 1 against different CNS targets establishes a high selectivity and we demonstrate in vivo brain penetration. In vitro characterization of [3H]-1 binding shows high specificity to the high-affinity GHB binding sites. PMID:24053696

  3. No ordinary boot camp.

    PubMed

    Tichy, N M

    2001-04-01

    Many companies now run boot camps--comprehensive orientation programs designed to help new hires hit the ground running. They're intense and intimidating, and new employees emerge from them with strong bonds to other recruits and to the organization. But at Trilogy, organizational consultant Noel Tichy discovered one program that's a breed apart. In this article, Tichy gives us a detailed tour of Trilogy's boot camp, Trilogy University, to demonstrate why it's so different--and so effective. Like the best boot camps, it serves as an immersion in both the technical skills new recruits will need for their jobs and Trilogy's corporate culture, which emphasizes risk-taking, teamwork, humility, and a strong customer focus. But this is a new-employee orientation session that's so fundamental to the company as a whole that it's presided over by the CEO and top corporate executives for fully six months of the year. Why? In two three-month sessions, these top executives hone their own strategic thinking about the company as they decide what to teach the new recruits each session. They also find the company's next generation of new products as they judge the innovative ideas the recruits are tasked with developing--making the program Trilogy's main R&D engine. And they pull the company's rising technical stars into mentoring roles for the new recruits, helping to build the next generation of top leadership. After spending months on-site studying Trilogy University, Tichy came away highly impressed by the power of the virtuous teaching cycle the program has set in motion. Leaders of the organization are learning from recruits at the same time that the recruits are learning from the leaders. It's a model, he argues, that other companies would do well to emulate. PMID:11299694

  4. The Camp Health Manual. An Excellent Reference Written Especially for Organized Camps. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, David; Middelkamp, J. Neal

    This book is a guide to the diagnosis and care of sick children in organized camping situations. This book presents health care information for the management of medical and surgical problems by the camp counselor, camp director, camp nurse, and camp physician. The chapters are: (1) Camp Standards; (2) The Infirmary; (3) Infirmary Supplies; (4)…

  5. Camp Greentop's Adventure Camp: We Ain't No Rudypoo's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Diane; Albright, Brian; Purvis, Katie; Creamer, Justin; Pease, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    A day-by-day account describes Camp Greentop's first 5-day adventure camping trip, which was attended by five individuals with disabilities and their counselors. The first day was spent in games and initiatives designed to develop communication, teamwork, and dependability. Other days were devoted to hiking, rock climbing, and whitewater rafting.…

  6. Blending Technology with Camp Tradition: Technology Can Simplify Camp Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzman, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Discusses uses of technology appropriate for camps, which are service organizations based on building relationships. Describes relationship marketing and how it can be enhanced through use of Web sites, interactive brochures, and client databases. Outlines other technology uses at camp: automated dispensing of medications, satellite tracking of…

  7. Summer Camp as Therapeutic Context: The Camp Logan Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCammon, Susan; And Others

    These symposium papers describe various aspects of the Camp Logan, South Carolina, program, a therapeutic summer residential program for children, ages 8-14, who have significant behavior problems. The philosophy and advantages of the therapeutic camping model are discussed, e.g., structure during the summer, controlled though informal…

  8. Renal Epithelial Cyst Formation and Enlargement in vitro: Dependence on cAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangoo-Karim, Roberto; Uchic, Marie; Lechene, Claude; Grantham, Jared J.

    1989-08-01

    Cysts, a common abnormality of kidneys, are collections of urine-like fluid enclosed by a continuous layer of epithelial cells. Renal cysts derive from nephrons and collecting ducts and progressively enlarge as a consequence of epithelial proliferation and transepithelial fluid secretion. The initiation of cyst formation and the factors that control cyst enlargement are unknown. We used an in vitro model of renal cysts to explore the role of the cAMP signal transduction system in the formation and expansion of cysts. MDCK cells, cultured in hydrated-collagen gel, produced polarized monolayered epithelial cysts when intracellular cAMP was increased by prostaglandin E1, arginine vasopressin, cholera toxin, forskolin, or 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. All agonists were potentiated by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor. The cell proliferation component of cyst enlargement was accelerated by cAMP agonists, as shown by the increased growth of MDCK cells in subconfluent monolayers. The fluid secretion component, reflected by the transepithelial movement of fluid across polarized monolayers of MDCK cells grown on permeable supports, was stimulated by cAMP agonists in the basolateral medium. Chloride levels were higher in the cyst fluid and the secreted fluid than in the bathing medium. We conclude that the development of MDCK cysts is dependent on cAMP. This signal transduction system may be an important modulator of epithelial cell proliferation and transepithelial fluid secretion in the kidney.

  9. Designing High-Affinity Peptides for Organic Molecules by Explicit Solvent Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gladich, Ivan; Rodriguez, Alex; Hong Enriquez, Rolando P; Guida, Filomena; Berti, Federico; Laio, Alessandro

    2015-10-15

    Short peptides offer a cheap alternative to antibodies for developing sensing units in devices for concentration measurement. We here describe a computational procedure that allows designing peptides capable of binding with high affinity a target organic molecule in aqueous or nonstandard solvent environments. The algorithm is based on a stochastic search in the space of the possible sequences of the peptide, and exploits finite temperature molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to check if a proposed mutation improves the binding affinity or not. The procedure automatically produces peptides which form thermally stable complexes with the target. The estimated binding free energy reaches the 13 kcal/mol for Irinotecan anticancer drug, the target considered in this work. These peptides are by construction solvent specific; namely, they recognize the target only in the solvent in which they have been designed. This feature of the algorithm calls for applications in devices in which the peptide-based sensor is required to work in denaturants or under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. PMID:26398715

  10. G Protein-Coupled Receptors Directly Bind Filamin A with High Affinity and Promote Filamin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although interaction of a few G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with Filamin A, a key actin cross-linking and biomechanical signal transducer protein, has been observed, a comprehensive structure–function analysis of this interaction is lacking. Through a systematic sequence-based analysis, we found that a conserved filamin binding motif is present in the cytoplasmic domains of >20% of the 824 GPCRs encoded in the human genome. Direct high-affinity interaction of filamin binding motif peptides of select GPCRs with the Ig domain of Filamin A was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetric experiments. Engagement of the filamin binding motif with the Filamin A Ig domain induced the phosphorylation of filamin by protein kinase A in vitro. In transfected cells, agonist activation as well as constitutive activation of representative GPCRs dramatically elicited recruitment and phosphorylation of cellular Filamin A, a phenomenon long known to be crucial for regulating the structure and dynamics of the cytoskeleton. Our data suggest a molecular mechanism for direct GPCR–cytoskeleton coupling via filamin. Until now, GPCR signaling to the cytoskeleton was predominantly thought to be indirect, through canonical G protein-mediated signaling cascades involving GTPases, adenylyl cyclases, phospholipases, ion channels, and protein kinases. We propose that the GPCR-induced filamin phosphorylation pathway is a conserved, novel biochemical signaling paradigm. PMID:26460884

  11. Off-rate screening for selection of high-affinity anti-drug antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ylera, Francisco; Harth, Stefan; Waldherr, Dirk; Frisch, Christian; Knappik, Achim

    2013-10-15

    The rapidly increasing number of therapeutic antibodies in clinical development and on the market requires corresponding detection reagents for monitoring the concentration of these drugs in patient samples and as positive controls for measurement of anti-drug antibodies. Phage display of large recombinant antibody libraries has been shown to enable the rapid development of fully human anti-idiotypic antibodies binding specifically to antibody drugs, since the in vitro panning approach allows for incorporation of suitable blockers to drive selection toward the paratope of the drug. A typical bottleneck in antibody generation projects is ranking of the many candidates obtained after panning on the basis of antibody binding strength. Ideally, such method will work without prior labeling of antigens and with crude bacterial lysates. We developed an off-rate screening method of crude Escherichia coli lysates containing monovalent Fab fragments obtained after phage display of the HuCAL PLATINUM® antibody library. We used the antibody drugs trastuzumab and cetuximab as antigen examples. Using the Octet® RED384 label-free sensor instrument we show that antibody off rates can be reliably determined in crude bacterial lysates with high throughput. We also demonstrate that the method can be applied to screening for high-affinity antibodies typically obtained after affinity maturation. PMID:23906643

  12. Hydroxamate Production as a High Affinity Iron Acquisition Mechanism in Paracoccidioides Spp

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Lechner, Beatrix Elisabeth; Gauthier, Gregory M.; Lindner, Herbert; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Haas, Hubertus; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Iron is a micronutrient required by almost all living organisms, including fungi. Although this metal is abundant, its bioavailability is low either in aerobic environments or within mammalian hosts. As a consequence, pathogenic microorganisms evolved high affinity iron acquisition mechanisms which include the production and uptake of siderophores. Here we investigated the utilization of these molecules by species of the Paracoccidioides genus, the causative agents of a systemic mycosis. It was demonstrated that iron starvation induces the expression of Paracoccidioides ortholog genes for siderophore biosynthesis and transport. Reversed-phase HPLC analysis revealed that the fungus produces and secretes coprogen B, which generates dimerumic acid as a breakdown product. Ferricrocin and ferrichrome C were detected in Paracoccidioides as the intracellular produced siderophores. Moreover, the fungus is also able to grow in presence of siderophores as the only iron sources, demonstrating that beyond producing, Paracoccidioides is also able to utilize siderophores for growth, including the xenosiderophore ferrioxamine. Exposure to exogenous ferrioxamine and dimerumic acid increased fungus survival during co-cultivation with macrophages indicating that these molecules play a role during host-pathogen interaction. Furthermore, cross-feeding experiments revealed that Paracoccidioides siderophores promotes growth of Aspergillus nidulans strain unable to produce these iron chelators. Together, these data denote that synthesis and utilization of siderophores is a mechanism used by Paracoccidioides to surpass iron limitation. As iron paucity is found within the host, siderophore production may be related to fungus pathogenicity. PMID:25157575

  13. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-03-05

    Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95/sup 0/C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na/sup +/ ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC/sub 50/ = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC/sub 50/ values below ..mu..M concentrations.

  14. Conformation-Dependent High-Affinity Potent Ricin-Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M.; Cherwonogrodzky, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μg, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  15. Comparison of biosensor platforms in the evaluation of high affinity antibody-antigen binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Danlin; Singh, Ajit; Wu, Helen; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    The acquisition of reliable kinetic parameters for the characterization of biomolecular interactions is an important component of the drug discovery and development process. While several benchmark studies have explored the variability of kinetic rate constants obtained from multiple laboratories and biosensors, a direct comparison of these instruments' performance has not been undertaken, and systematic factors contributing to data variability from these systems have not been discussed. To address these questions, a panel of ten high-affinity monoclonal antibodies was simultaneously evaluated for their binding kinetics against the same antigen on four biosensor platforms: GE Healthcare's Biacore T100, Bio-Rad's ProteOn XPR36, ForteBio's Octet RED384, and Wasatch Microfluidics's IBIS MX96. We compared the strengths and weaknesses of these systems and found that despite certain inherent systematic limitations in instrumentation, the rank orders of both the association and dissociation rate constants were highly correlated between these instruments. Our results also revealed a trade-off between data reliability and sample throughput. Biacore T100, followed by ProteOn XPR36, exhibited excellent data quality and consistency, whereas Octet RED384 and IBIS MX96 demonstrated high flexibility and throughput with compromises in data accuracy and reproducibility. Our results support the need for a "fit-for-purpose" approach in instrument selection for biosensor studies. PMID:27365220

  16. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the high-affinity K+ transporter gene family in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Yang, P; Hua, C; Zhou, F; Zhang, B-J; Cai, X-N; Chen, Q-Z; Wang, R-L

    2016-01-01

    The high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT) family comprises a group of multifunctional cation transporters widely distributed in organisms ranging from Bacteria to Eukarya. In angiosperms, the HKT family consists primarily of nine types, whose evolutionary relationships are not fully understood. The available sequences from 31 plant species were used to perform a comprehensive evolutionary analysis, including an examination of selection pressure and estimating phylogenetic tree and gene duplication events. Our results show that a gene duplication in the HKT1;5/HKT1;4 cluster might have led to the divergence of the HKT1;5 and HKT1;4 subfamilies. Additionally, maximum likelihood analysis revealed that the HKT family has undergone a strong purifying selection. An analysis of the amino acids provided strong statistical evidence for a functional divergence between subfamilies 1 and 2. Our study was the first to provide evidence of this functional divergence between these two subfamilies. Analysis of co-evolution in HKT identified 25 co-evolved groups. These findings expanded our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms driving functional diversification of HKT proteins. PMID:27525850

  17. In silico design of high-affinity ligands for the immobilization of inulinase.

    PubMed

    Holyavka, M G; Kondratyev, M S; Samchenko, A A; Kabanov, A V; Komarov, V M; Artyukhov, V G

    2016-04-01

    Using computer modeling, virtual screening of high-affinity ligands for immobilization of inulinase - an enzyme that cleaves inulin and fructose-containing polymers to fructose - has been performed. The inulinase molecule from Aspergillus ficuum (pdb: 3SC7) taken from the database of protein structures was used as a protein model and the target for flexible docking. The set of ligands studied included simple sugars (activators, inhibitors, products of enzymatic catalysis), as well as high-molecular weight compounds (polycation and polyanion exchange resins, glycoproteins, phenylalanine-proline peptide, polylactate, and caffeine). Based on the comparative analysis of the values of the total energy and the localization of ligand binding sites, we made several assumptions concerning the mechanisms of interaction of the suggested matrices for the immobilization of enzyme molecules and the structural features of such complexes. It was also assumed that the candidates for immobilization agents meeting the industrial requirements may be glycoproteins, for which we propose an additional incorporation of cysteine residues into their structure, aimed to create disulfide «anchors» to the surface. PMID:26945599

  18. Evolved Streptavidin Mutants Reveal Key Role of Loop Residue in High-affinity Binding

    SciTech Connect

    M Magalhaes; C Melo Czekster; R Guan; V Malashkevich; S Almo; M Levy

    2011-12-31

    We have performed a detailed analysis of streptavidin variants with altered specificity towards desthiobiotin. In addition to changes in key residues which widen the ligand binding pocket and accommodate the more structurally flexible desthiobiotin, the data revealed the role of a key, non-active site mutation at the base of the flexible loop (S52G) which slows dissociation of this ligand by approximately sevenfold. Our data suggest that this mutation results in the loss of a stabilizing contact which keeps this loop open and accessible in the absence of ligand. When this mutation was introduced into the wild-type protein, destabilization of the opened loop conferred a {approx}10-fold decrease in both the on-rate and off-rate for the ligand biotin-4-fluoroscein. A similar effect was observed when this mutation was added to a monomeric form of this protein. Our results provide key insight into the role of the streptavidin flexible loop in ligand binding and maintaining high affinity interactions.

  19. A high-affinity ammonium transporter from the mycorrhizal ascomycete Tuber borchii.

    PubMed

    Montanini, Barbara; Moretto, Nadia; Soragni, Elisabetta; Percudani, Riccardo; Ottonello, Simone

    2002-06-01

    An ammonium transporter cDNA, named TbAMT1, was isolated from the ectomycorrhizal ascomycetous truffle Tuber borchii. The polypeptide encoded by TbAMT1 (52 kDa) functionally complements ammonium uptake-defective yeast mutants and shares sequence similarity with previously characterized ammonium transporters from Saccharomyces (Mep) and Arabidopsis (AtAMT1). Structural characteristics common to the Mep/Amt family and peculiar features of the Tuber transporter have been evidenced by a detailed topological model of the TbAMT1 protein, which predicts 11 transmembrane helices with an N terminus(OUT)/C terminus(IN) orientation. As revealed by uptake/competition experiments conducted in yeast, TbAMT1 is a high-affinity transporter with an apparent K(m) for ammonium of 2 microM. The TbAMT1 mRNA was very slowly, yet specifically upregulated in nitrogen-deprived T. borchii mycelia. Instead, a much faster return to basal expression levels was observed upon resupplementation of either ammonium or nitrate, which thus appear to be utilized as equally effective nitrogen sources by Tuber mycelia. PMID:12051892

  20. E-selectin ligand complexes adopt an extended high-affinity conformation

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Roland C.; Jakob, Roman P.; Binder, Florian P.C.; Sager, Christoph P.; Ernst, Beat; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    E-selectin is a cell-adhesion molecule of the vascular endothelium that promotes essential leukocyte rolling in the early inflammatory response by binding to glycoproteins containing the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewisx (sLex). Efficient leukocyte recruitment under vascular flow conditions depends on an increased lifetime of E-selectin/ligand complexes under tensile force in a so-called catch-bond binding mode. Co-crystal structures of a representative fragment of the extracellular E-selectin region with sLex and a glycomimetic antagonist thereof reveal an extended E-selectin conformation, which is identified as a high-affinity binding state of E-selectin by molecular dynamics simulations. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments demonstrate a direct link between ligand binding and E-selectin conformational transition under static conditions in solution. This permits tracing a series of concerted structural changes connecting ligand binding to conformational stretching as the structural basis of E-selectin catch-bond-mediated leukocyte recruitment. The detailed molecular view of the binding site paves the way for the design of a new generation of selectin antagonists. This is of special interest, since their therapeutic potential was recently demonstrated with the pan-selectin antagonists GMI-1070 (Rivipansel). PMID:26117840

  1. A 45-amino acid scaffold mined from the Protein Data Bank for high affinity ligand engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kruziki, Max A.; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Woldring, Daniel R.; Duong, Vandon T.; Hackel, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Small protein ligands can provide superior physiological distribution versus antibodies and improved stability, production, and specific conjugation. Systematic evaluation of the Protein Data Bank identified a scaffold to push the limits of small size and robust evolution of stable, high-affinity ligands: 45-residue T7 phage gene 2 protein (Gp2) contains an α-helix opposite a β-sheet with two adjacent loops amenable to mutation. De novo ligand discovery from 108 mutants and directed evolution towards four targets yielded target-specific binders with affinities as strong as 200 ±100 pM, Tm’s from 65 ±3 °C to 80 ±1 °C, and retained activity after thermal denaturation. For cancer targeting, a Gp2 domain for epidermal growth factor receptor was evolved with 18 ±8 nM affinity, receptor-specific binding, and high thermal stability with refolding. The efficiency of evolving new binding function and the size, affinity, specificity, and stability of evolved domains render Gp2 a uniquely effective ligand scaffold. PMID:26165154

  2. Alterations of cortical pyramidal neurons in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are allosteric membrane proteins involved in multiple cognitive processes, including attention, learning, and memory. The most abundant form of heterooligomeric nAChRs in the brain contains the β2- and α4- subunits and binds nicotinic agonists with high affinity. In the present study, we investigated in the mouse the consequences of the deletion of one of the nAChR components: the β2-subunit (β2−/−) on the microanatomy of cortical pyramidal cells. Using an intracellular injection method, complete basal dendritic arbors of 650 layer III pyramidal neurons were sampled from seven cortical fields, including primary sensory, motor, and associational areas, in both β2−/− and WT animals. We observed that the pyramidal cell phenotype shows significant quantitative differences among different cortical areas in mutant and WT mice. In WT mice, the density of dendritic spines was rather similar in all cortical fields, except in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortex, where it was significantly higher. In the absence of the β2-subunit, the most significant reduction in the density of spines took place in this high-order associational field. Our data suggest that the β2-subunit is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis of pyramidal neurons and, in particular, in the circuits that contribute to the high-order functional connectivity of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20534523

  3. Bimodal high-affinity association of Brd4 with murine leukemia virus integrase and mononucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Larue, Ross C; Plumb, Matthew R; Crowe, Brandon L; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Sharma, Amit; DiFiore, Julia; Malani, Nirav; Aiyer, Sriram S; Roth, Monica J; Bushman, Frederic D; Foster, Mark P; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-04-01

    The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integration into host chromatin is highlighted by the development of MLV-based vectors for human gene-therapy. We have recently identified BET proteins (Brd2, 3 and 4) as the main cellular binding partners of MLV integrase (IN) and demonstrated their significance for effective MLV integration at transcription start sites. Here we show that recombinant Brd4, a representative of the three BET proteins, establishes complementary high-affinity interactions with MLV IN and mononucleosomes (MNs). Brd4(1-720) but not its N- or C-terminal fragments effectively stimulate MLV IN strand transfer activities in vitro. Mass spectrometry- and NMR-based approaches have enabled us to map key interacting interfaces between the C-terminal domain of BRD4 and the C-terminal tail of MLV IN. Additionally, the N-terminal fragment of Brd4 binds to both DNA and acetylated histone peptides, allowing it to bind tightly to MNs. Comparative analyses of the distributions of various histone marks along chromatin revealed significant positive correlations between H3- and H4-acetylated histones, BET protein-binding sites and MLV-integration sites. Our findings reveal a bimodal mechanism for BET protein-mediated MLV integration into select chromatin locations. PMID:24520112

  4. Inhibition of high affinity choline uptake by N-allyl-3-quinuclidinol

    SciTech Connect

    Asermely, K.E.; O'Neill, J.J.

    1986-03-01

    The peripheral actions of N-allyl-3-quinuclidinol (N-Al-3-OHQ) on high affinity choline uptake (HAChU) on rat phrenic nerve diaphragm are described. Endplate regions (EPA) identified by the Koelle histochemical techniques for acetylcholinesterase, were dissected from adult rat hemidiaphragms and placed in cold Krebs solution (pH-7.35). All measurements of HAChU were at 37/sup 0/C in buffers containing tritium choline (5 ..mu..M 0.124 ..mu..C/mmole) at intervals of 1, 2, 4, 8, 15 and 30 min. Tissues were washed 3x, digested in 1N NaOH and counted for tritium in Chaikoff's solution. All data are expressed as pmole Ch/g wet weight. Comparison between EPA and non-EPA tissue demonstrate HAChU and slow choline diffusion, respectively. Steady state is observed in 15 min. N-Al-3-OHQ produces 15% inhibition at 5 x 10/sup -5/ M compared with 50% inhibition on brain synaptosomes. At 5 x 10/sup -4/ M N-Al-3-OHQ, 30% inhibition is observed. Attempts to deplete ACh by pre-stimulation with high K/sup +/-ion (25 mM) were unsuccessful; tissue /sup 3/H-choline uptake appeared to oscillate over a 30 min period.

  5. Single-molecule dissection of the high-affinity cohesin–dockerin complex

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Stefan W.; Nash, Michael A.; Fried, Daniel B.; Slutzki, Michal; Barak, Yoav; Bayer, Edward A.; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose-degrading enzyme systems are of significant interest from both a scientific and technological perspective due to the diversity of cellulase families, their unique assembly and substrate binding mechanisms, and their potential applications in several key industrial sectors, notably cellulose hydrolysis for second-generation biofuel production. Particularly fascinating are cellulosomes, the multimodular extracellular complexes produced by numerous anaerobic bacteria. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy, we analyzed the mechanical stability of the intermolecular interfaces between the cohesin and the dockerin modules responsible for self-assembly of the cellulosomal components into the multienzyme complex. The observed cohesin–dockerin rupture forces (>120 pN) are among the highest reported for a receptor–ligand system to date. Using an atomic force microscope protocol that quantified single-molecule binding activity, we observed force-induced dissociation of calcium ions from the duplicated loop–helix F-hand motif located within the dockerin module, which in the presence of EDTA resulted in loss of affinity to the cohesin partner. A cohesin amino acid mutation (D39A) that eliminated hydrogen bonding with the dockerin’s critically conserved serine residues reduced the observed rupture forces. Consequently, no calcium loss occurred and dockerin activity was maintained throughout multiple forced dissociation events. These results offer insights at the single-molecule level into the stability and folding of an exquisite class of high-affinity protein–protein interactions that dictate fabrication and architecture of cellulose-degrading molecular machines. PMID:23188794

  6. Development of high-affinity single chain Fv against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Goo; Jeong, Gu Min; Yim, Sung Sun; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2016-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is caused by the FMD virus (FMDV) and results in severe economic losses in livestock farming. For rapid FMD diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, an effective antibody against FMDV is needed. Here, we developed a high-affinity antibody against FMDV by FACS-based high throughput screening of a random library. With the FITC-conjugated VP1 epitope of FMDV and high-speed FACS sorting, we screened the synthetic antibody (scFv) library in which antibody variants are displayed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After three rounds of sorting, we isolated one antibody fragment (#138-scFv) against the VP1 epitope of FMDV. Next, to improve its affinity, a mutation library of #138-scFV was constructed by error-prone PCR and screened by FACS. After three rounds of sorting, we isolated one antibody (AM-32 scFv), which has a higher binding affinity (KD=42.7nM) than that of the original #138-scFv. We also confirmed that it specifically binds to whole inactivated FMDV. PMID:26827774

  7. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17812.001 PMID:27436096

  8. Comparison of three high affinity SPECT radiotracers for the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    al-Tikriti, M S; Baldwin, R M; Zea-Ponce, Y; Sybirska, E; Zoghbi, S S; Laruelle, M; Malison, R T; Kung, H F; Kessler, R M; Charney, D S

    1994-02-01

    The regional brain distribution and pharmacological specificity of three high affinity tracers for the dopamine (DA) D2 receptor: [123I]IBF, [123I]epidepride, and [123I]2'-ISP were assessed by SPECT imaging of non-human primates. The ratios of striatal-to-occipital activities at the time of peak striatal uptake were 2.2, 6.3 and 1.7, respectively. From the peak striatal activities, washout rates were 33, 4 and 16%/h for [123I]IBF, [123I]epidepride and [123I]2'-ISP, respectively. The reversibility of the striatal uptake of all three agents was demonstrated by the rapid displacement induced by the dopamine D2 selective antipsychotic agent raclopride, which increased washout rates to 96, 58 and 43%/h. The administration of d-amphetamine, which induces release of dopamine, had no noticeable effect on [123I]epidepride but increased the washout rate of [123I]IBF. These results suggest that, among these three agents, [123I]epidepride is the superior tracer for in vivo displacement studies because of its slow washout and high target-to-background ratios. However, for tracer kinetic modeling, [123I]IBF may be the superior agent because of its early time of peak uptake and its higher target-to-background ratios than [123I]2'-ISP. PMID:9234281

  9. Identification of high affinity folate binding proteins in human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Antony, A C; Kincade, R S; Verma, R S; Krishnan, S R

    1987-09-01

    Mature human erythrocyte membranes contained specific, high affinity (Kd 3.3 X 10(-11) M) folate binding moieties. Folate binding was pH, time- and temperature-dependent, saturable, and was much greater for pteroylmonoglutamate and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate than 5-formyltetrahydrofolate and amethopterin. On detergent solubilization of membranes, two peaks of specific folate binding with Mr greater than or equal to 200,000 and 160,000 were identified on Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration chromatography in Triton X-100, and this corresponded to two similar peaks of immunoprecipitated material when solubilized iodinated membranes were probed with anti-human placental folate receptor antiserum. Age-dependent separation of erythrocytes by Stractan density gradients revealed a sevenfold greater folate binding capacity in membranes purified from younger compared with aged erythrocytes. Since this difference was not reflected in proportionately higher immunoreactive folate binding protein, (as determined by a specific radioimmunoassay for these proteins), or differences in affinity in younger than aged cells, these findings indicate that erythrocyte folate binding proteins become progressively nonfunctional at the onset of red cell aging. PMID:3624486

  10. Endocytosis of lutropin by Leydig cells through a pathway distinct from the high-affinity receptor.

    PubMed

    Bozon, V; Pajot-Augy, E; Vignon, X; Salesse, R

    1998-08-25

    In porcine Leydig cells in primary culture, 95% of the internalization of [125I]porcine lutropin ([125I]pLH, which bears sulfated GalNAc) could not be ascribed to the high-affinity LH receptor (LHR). In contrast, >40% of [125I]human choriogonadotropin (hCG, with sialylated sugar chains) uptake was performed by the LHR itself. When the LHR was down-regulated by excess unlabeled hormone, the LHR-independent incorporation of [125I]pLH could be inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion by sulfated polysaccharides such as fucoidan or chondroitin-(4 or 6)-sulfate, but not by other polyanionic compounds, nor by sulfated chondroitin disaccharides. Endocytosis occurred through a clathrin-dependent pathway and was inhibited by low temperature, endocytosis inhibitors, increased ionic strength, or by EDTA and dithiothreitol. Taken together, these results suggest that a Leydig cell membrane protein (possibly a lectin, or a glycosaminoglycan receptor) could perform specific LH clearance in the testis via recognition of its sulfated sugars. PMID:9806348

  11. Isolation and Characterization of a High Affinity Peptide Inhibitor of ClC-2 Chloride Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher H.; Olivetti, Pedro R.; Fuller, Matthew D.; Freeman, Cody S.; McMaster, Denis; French, Robert J.; Pohl, Jan; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A.

    2009-01-01

    The ClC protein family includes voltage-gated chloride channels and chloride/proton exchangers. In eukaryotes, ClC proteins regulate membrane potential of excitable cells, contribute to epithelial transport, and aid in lysosomal acidification. Although structure/function studies of ClC proteins have been aided greatly by the available crystal structures of a bacterial ClC chloride/proton exchanger, the availability of useful pharmacological tools, such as peptide toxin inhibitors, has lagged far behind that of their cation channel counterparts. Here we report the isolation, from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus venom, of a peptide toxin inhibitor of the ClC-2 chloride channel. This toxin, GaTx2, inhibits ClC-2 channels with a voltage-dependent apparent KD of ∼20 pm, making it the highest affinity inhibitor of any chloride channel. GaTx2 slows ClC-2 activation by increasing the latency to first opening by nearly 8-fold but is unable to inhibit open channels, suggesting that this toxin inhibits channel activation gating. Finally, GaTx2 specifically inhibits ClC-2 channels, showing no inhibitory effect on a battery of other major classes of chloride channels and voltage-gated potassium channels. GaTx2 is the first peptide toxin inhibitor of any ClC protein. The high affinity and specificity displayed by this toxin will make it a very powerful pharmacological tool to probe ClC-2 structure/function. PMID:19574231

  12. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. PMID:27436096

  13. High-affinity receptors for peptides of the bombesin family in Swiss 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary, I.; Rozengurt, E.

    1985-11-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) labeled with /sup 125/I at tyrosine-15 (/sup 125/I-GRP) binds to intact quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells in a specific and saturable manner. Scatchard analysis indicates the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites of Kd = 0.5 X 10(-9) M and a value for the number of sites per cell of about 100,000. /sup 125/I-GRP binding was not inhibited by other mitogens for these cells, and cell lines that are mitogenically unresponsive to GRP do not exhibit specific GRP binding. Structure-activity relationships show a close parallel between the ability of a range of GRP-related peptides to both inhibit GRP binding and to stimulate mitogenesis. Further, GRP binding is selectively blocked in a competitive fashion by a novel bombesin antagonist, (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11) substance P. In addition, this compound selectively inhibits GRP and bombesin-induced mitogenesis. These results demonstrate that the mitogenic response of Swiss 3T3 cells to peptides of the bombesin family is mediated by a class of receptors distinct from those of other mitogens for these cells.

  14. Cutting Edge: Resident Memory CD8 T Cells Express High-Affinity TCRs.

    PubMed

    Frost, Elizabeth L; Kersh, Anna E; Evavold, Brian D; Lukacher, Aron E

    2015-10-15

    Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells serve as vanguards of antimicrobial host defense in nonlymphoid tissues, particularly at barrier epithelia and in organs with nonrenewable cell types (e.g., brain). In this study, we asked whether an augmented ability to sense Ag complemented their role as early alarms of pathogen invasion. Using mouse polyomavirus, we show that brain-resident mouse polyomavirus-specific CD8 T cells, unlike memory cells in the spleen, progressively increase binding to MHC class I tetramers and CD8 coreceptor expression. Using the two-dimensional micropipette adhesion-frequency assay, we show that TRM cells in brain, as well as in kidney, express TCRs with up to 20-fold higher affinity than do splenic memory T cells, whereas effector cells express TCRs of similar high affinity in all organs. Together, these data demonstrate that TRM cells retain high TCR affinity, which endows them with the high Ag sensitivity needed for front-line defense against infectious agents. PMID:26371252

  15. Consequences of inducing intrinsic disorder in a high-affinity protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Grigorios; Sharma, Amit; Lancaster, Lorna E; Bowen, Rebecca; Kaminska, Renata; Leech, Andrew P; Walker, Daniel; Redfield, Christina; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-04-29

    The kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of intrinsic disorder in protein-protein recognition are controversial. We address this by inducing one partner of the high-affinity colicin E3 rRNase domain-Im3 complex (K(d) ≈ 10(-12) M) to become an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). Through a variety of biophysical measurements, we show that a single alanine mutation at Tyr507 within the hydrophobic core of the isolated colicin E3 rRNase domain causes the enzyme to become an IDP (E3 rRNase(IDP)). E3 rRNase(IDP) binds stoichiometrically to Im3 and forms a structure that is essentially identical to the wild-type complex. However, binding of E3 rRNase(IDP) to Im3 is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than that of the folded rRNase, with thermodynamic parameters reflecting the disorder-to-order transition on forming the complex. Critically, pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the E3 rRNase(IDP)-Im3 complex demonstrates that the decrease in affinity is mostly accounted for by a drop in the electrostatically steered association rate. Our study shows that, notwithstanding the advantages intrinsic disorder brings to biological systems, this can come at severe kinetic and thermodynamic cost. PMID:25856265

  16. Regulation of a high-affinity diamine transport system in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed Central

    Le Quesne, S A; Fairlamb, A H

    1996-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes take up exogenous [3H]putrescine and [3H]cadaverine by a rapid, high-affinity, transport system that exhibits saturable kinetics (putrescine K(m) 2.0 microM, V(max) 3.3 nmol/min per 10(8) cells; cadaverine K(m) 13.4 microM, V(max) 3.9 nmol/min per 10(8) cells). Putrescine transport is temperature dependent and requires the presence of a membrane potential and thiol groups for activity. Its activity is altered in response to extracellular putrescine levels and as the cells proceed through the growth cycle. This transporter shows high specificity for the diamines putrescine and cadaverine, but low specificity for the polyamines spermidine and spermine. The existence of rapid diamine/polyamine transport systems whose activity can be adjusted in response to the growth conditions is of particular importance, as they seem unable to synthesize their own putrescine [Hunter, Le Quesne and Fairlamb (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 226, 1019-1027]. PMID:8687391

  17. The Conundrum of the High-Affinity NGF Binding Site Formation Unveiled?

    PubMed Central

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Konarev, Petr V.; Cassetta, Alberto; Paoletti, Francesca; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    The homodimer NGF (nerve growth factor) exerts its neuronal activity upon binding to either or both distinct transmembrane receptors TrkA and p75NTR. Functionally relevant interactions between NGF and these receptors have been proposed, on the basis of binding and signaling experiments. Namely, a ternary TrkA/NGF/p75NTR complex is assumed to be crucial for the formation of the so-called high-affinity NGF binding sites. However, the existence, on the cell surface, of direct extracellular interactions is still a matter of controversy. Here, supported by a small-angle x-ray scattering solution study of human NGF, we propose that it is the oligomerization state of the secreted NGF that may drive the formation of the ternary heterocomplex. Our data demonstrate the occurrence in solution of a concentration-dependent distribution of dimers and dimer of dimers. A head-to-head molecular assembly configuration of the NGF dimer of dimers has been validated. Overall, these findings prompted us to suggest a new, to our knowledge, model for the transient ternary heterocomplex, i.e., a TrkA/NGF/p75NTR ligand/receptors molecular assembly with a (2:4:2) stoichiometry. This model would neatly solve the problem posed by the unconventional orientation of p75NTR with respect to TrkA, as being found in the crystal structures of the TrkA/NGF and p75NTR/NGF complexes. PMID:25650935

  18. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  19. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach. PMID:27498895

  20. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  1. N-Alkyl Ammonium Resorcinarene Salts as High-Affinity Tetravalent Chloride Receptors.

    PubMed

    Beyeh, N Kodiah; Pan, Fangfang; Bhowmik, Sandip; Mäkelä, Toni; Ras, Robin H A; Rissanen, Kari

    2016-01-22

    N-Alkyl ammonium resorcinarene salts (NARYs, Y=triflate, picrate, nitrate, trifluoroacetates and NARBr) as tetravalent receptors, are shown to have a strong affinity for chlorides. The high affinity for chlorides was confirmed from a multitude of exchange experiments in solution (NMR and UV/Vis), gas phase (mass spectrometry), and solid-state (X-ray crystallography). A new tetra-iodide resorcinarene salt (NARI) was isolated and fully characterized from exchange experiments in the solid-state. Competition experiments with a known monovalent bis-urea receptor (5) with strong affinity for chloride, reveals these receptors to have a much higher affinity for the first two chlorides, a similar affinity as 5 for the third chloride, and lower affinity for the fourth chloride. The receptors affinity toward chloride follows the trend K1 ≫K2 ≫K3 ≈5>K4, with Ka =5011 m(-1) for 5 in 9:1 CDCl3/[D6]DMSO. PMID:26671730

  2. Conformation-dependent high-affinity potent ricin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M; Cherwonogrodzky, John W

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μ g, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  3. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  4. SnAvi--a new tandem tag for high-affinity protein-complex purification.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Ursula; Schlosser, Andreas; Müller, Kristian M; Schäfer, Angelika; Katava, Nenad; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2010-04-01

    Systematic tandem-affinity-purification (TAP) of protein complexes was tremendously successful in yeast and has changed the general concept of how we understand protein function in eukaryotic cells. The transfer of this method to other model organisms has been difficult and may require specific adaptations. We were especially interested to establish a cell-type-specific TAP system for Caenorhabditis elegans, a model animal well suited to high-throughput analysis, proteomics and systems biology. By combining the high-affinity interaction between in vivo biotinylated target-proteins and streptavidin with the usage of a newly identified epitope of the publicly shared SB1 monoclonal antibody we created a novel in vivo fluorescent tag, the SnAvi-Tag. We show the versatile application of the SnAvi-Tag in Escherichia coli, vertebrate cells and in C. elegans for tandem affinity purification of protein complexes, western blotting and also for the in vivo sub-cellular localization of labelled proteins. PMID:20047968

  5. Identification and Localization of the Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase 10A in Bovine Testis and Mature Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Goupil, Serge; Maréchal, Loïze; El Hajj, Hassan; Tremblay, Marie-Ève; Richard, François J.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) is known to play highly important roles in sperm motility and acrosomal exocytosis. It is known to act through protein phosphorylation via PRKA and through the activation of guanine nucleotide exchange factors like EPAC. Sperm intracellular cAMP levels depend on the activity of adenylyl cyclases, mostly SACY, though transmembrane-containing adenylyl cyclases are also present, and on the activity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE) whose role is to degrade cAMP into 5’-AMP. The PDE superfamily is subdivided into 11 families (PDE1 to 11), which act on either cAMP or cGMP, or on both cAMP and cGMP although with different enzymatic properties. PDE10, which is more effective on cAMP than cGMP, has been known for almost 15 years and is mostly studied in the brain where it is associated with neurological disorders. Although a high level of PDE10A gene expression is observed in the testis, information on the identity of the isoforms or on the cell type that express the PDE10 protein is lacking. The objective of this study was to identify the PDE10A isoforms expressed in the testis and germ cells, and to determine the presence and localization of PDE10A in mature spermatozoa. As a sub-objective, since PDE10A transcript variants were reported strictly through analyses of bovine genomic sequence, we also wanted to determine the nucleotide and amino acid sequences by experimental evidence. Using RT-PCR, 5’- and 3’-RACE approaches we clearly show that PDE10A transcript variants X3 and X5 are expressed in bovine testis as well as in primary spermatocytes and spermatids. We also reveal using a combination of immunological techniques and proteomics analytical tools that the PDE10A isoform X4 is present in the area of the developing acrosome of spermatids and of the acrosome of mature spermatozoa. PMID:27548062

  6. Phosphodiesterase 4-targeted treatments for autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in phosphodiesterase (PDE)-targeted therapies have shown promise in recent years for treating patients with a variety of autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the development of PDE4 inhibitors and the associated literature with a focus on treatments for autoimmune diseases. After the initial investigations of the prototypic PDE inhibitor, rolipram, more selective inhibitors targeting the PDE4 isozyme have been developed. With phase II and phase III clinical trials currently underway to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the latest generation of PDE4 inhibitors, namely apremilast, a new class of treatments may be around the corner for patients suffering from chronic, autoimmune diseases. PMID:23557064

  7. Explaining the Value of Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth

    1994-01-01

    Overviews the philosophy and theory of camp experiences and discusses the special benefits of camps, including experiences that can lead to significant life-changing outcomes, sound educational goals, a sense of psychological and physical safety, and helping children to deal with social problems such as the degradation of the environment and human…

  8. Camping and the Nuclear Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Outlines effects on children of nuclear war threat and suggests that camping experiences can give children reasons to hope for and ways to work toward a peaceful world. Recommends 11 ways for camp staff to involve campers in social changes necessary to address nuclear issues. Includes resources list. (LFL)

  9. Kids Camping Takes the Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Vickie L.; Hohnbaum, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    A Wisconsin Girl Scout camp integrated The Healthy Kids Challenge into its program. The camp evaluated policies related to meals, snacks, physical activities, team building, and self-esteem. Staff inservice training resulted in healthier meals on the same budget and developed ownership of the program. Campers and families had opportunities to…

  10. Finding the Right Music Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart, Gene R.

    1984-01-01

    Many factors go into selecting a camp. Location, cost, and health facilities are all important considerations. The musical development and objectives of the child and the camp's particular instructional, emotional, recreational, physical, and geographical requirements are all important in the selection process. (CS)

  11. Encountering Child Abuse at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durall, John K.

    1997-01-01

    Defines child abuse, including the three categories: physical, sexual, and psychological. Presents characteristics and behaviors of each type of abuse, and long-term effects. Discusses how to handle abuse that occurs at camp, and the effects on the camp. Sidebars present abuse statistics, 15 activities that promote psychological wellness, and 8…

  12. An HD-domain phosphodiesterase mediates cooperative hydrolysis of c-di-AMP to affect bacterial growth and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Luo, Shukun; Pensinger, Daniel; Sauer, John-Demian; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide cyclic di-3′,5′- adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) was recently identified as an essential and widespread second messenger in bacterial signaling. Among c-di-AMP–producing bacteria, altered nucleotide levels result in several physiological defects and attenuated virulence. Thus, a detailed molecular understanding of c-di-AMP metabolism is of both fundamental and practical interest. Currently, c-di-AMP degradation is recognized solely among DHH-DHHA1 domain-containing phosphodiesterases. Using chemical proteomics, we identified the Listeria monocytogenes protein PgpH as a molecular target of c-di-AMP. Biochemical and structural studies revealed that the PgpH His-Asp (HD) domain bound c-di-AMP with high affinity and specifically hydrolyzed this nucleotide to 5′-pApA. PgpH hydrolysis activity was inhibited by ppGpp, indicating a cross-talk between c-di-AMP signaling and the stringent response. Genetic analyses supported coordinated regulation of c-di-AMP levels in and out of the host. Intriguingly, a L. monocytogenes mutant that lacks c-di-AMP phosphodiesterases exhibited elevated c-di-AMP levels, hyperinduced a host type-I IFN response, and was significantly attenuated for infection. Furthermore, PgpH homologs, which belong to the 7TMR-HD family, are widespread among hundreds of c-di-AMP synthesizing microorganisms. Thus, PgpH represents a broadly conserved class of c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase with possibly other physiological functions in this crucial signaling network. PMID:25583510

  13. Measurements of relative binding of cohesin and dockerin mutants using an advanced ELISA technique for high-affinity interactions.

    PubMed

    Slutzki, Michal; Barak, Yoav; Reshef, Dan; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    The cellulosome is a large bacterial extracellular multienzyme complex able to degrade crystalline cellulosic substrates. The complex contains catalytic and noncatalytic subunits, interconnected by high-affinity cohesin-dockerin interactions. In this chapter, we introduce an optimized method for comparative binding among different cohesins or cohesin mutants to the dockerin partner. This assay offers advantages over other methods (such as ELISA, cELIA, SPR, and ITC) for particularly high-affinity binding interactions. In this approach, the high-affinity interaction of interest occurs in the liquid phase during the equilibrated binding step, whereas the interaction with the immobilized phase is used only for detection of the unbound dockerins that remain in the solution phase. Once equilibrium conditions are reached, the change in free energy of binding (ΔΔG(binding)), as well as the affinity constant of mutants, can be estimated against the known affinity constant of the wild-type interaction. In light of the above, we propose this method as a preferred alternative for the relative quantification of high-affinity protein interactions. PMID:22608739

  14. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; Tran, Elizabeth N.; Semchenko, Evgeny A.; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Ng, Preston S. K.; King, Rebecca M.; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A.; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein–glycan or protein–protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host–glycan:bacterial–glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  15. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Tran, Elizabeth N; Semchenko, Evgeny A; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Ng, Preston S K; King, Rebecca M; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-12-29

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein-glycan or protein-protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host-glycan:bacterial-glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  16. High-Affinity Recombinant Antibody Fragments (Fabs) Can Be Applied in Peptide Enrichment Immuno-MRM Assays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-affinity antibodies binding to linear peptides in solution are a prerequisite for performing immuno-MRM, an emerging technology for protein quantitation with high precision and specificity using peptide immunoaffinity enrichment coupled to stable isotope dilution and targeted mass spectrometry. Recombinant antibodies can be generated from appropriate libraries in high-throughput in an automated laboratory and thus may offer advantages over conventional monoclonal antibodies. However, recombinant antibodies are typically obtained as fragments (Fab or scFv) expressed from E. coli, and it is not known whether these antibody formats are compatible with the established protocols and whether the affinities necessary for immunocapture of small linear peptides can be achieved with this technology. Hence, we performed a feasibility study to ask: (a) whether it is feasible to isolate high-affinity Fabs to small linear antigens and (b) whether it is feasible to incorporate antibody fragments into robust, quantitative immuno-MRM assays. We describe successful isolation of high-affinity Fab fragments against short (tryptic) peptides from a human combinatorial Fab library. We analytically characterize three immuno-MRM assays using recombinant Fabs, full-length IgGs constructed from these Fabs, or traditional monoclonals. We show that the antibody fragments show similar performance compared with traditional mouse- or rabbit-derived monoclonal antibodies. The data establish feasibility of isolating and incorporating high-affinity Fabs into peptide immuno-MRM assays. PMID:24568200

  17. Inter-residue coupling contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective binding of α-bungarotoxin to nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.; Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; daCOSTA, Corrie J. B.; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a pentameric α7 ligand-binding domain chimaera with bound α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) showed that of the five conserved aromatic residues in α7, only Tyr184 in loop C of the ligand-binding site was required for high-affinity binding. To determine whether the contribution of Tyr184 depends on local residues, we generated mutations in an α7/5HT3A (5-hydroxytryptamine type 3A) receptor chimaera, individually and in pairs, and measured 125I-labelled α-btx binding. The results show that mutations of individual residues near Tyr184 do not affect α-btx affinity, but pairwise mutations decrease affinity in an energetically coupled manner. Kinetic measurements show that the affinity decreases arise through increases in the α-btx dissociation rate with little change in the association rate. Replacing loop C in α7 with loop C from the α-btx-insensitive α2 or α3 subunits abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, but preserves acetylcholine-elicited single channel currents. However, in both the α2 and α3 construct, mutating either residue that flanks Tyr184 to its α7 counterpart restores high-affinity α-btx binding. Analogously, in α7, mutating both residues that flank Tyr184 to the α2 or α3 counterparts abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding. Thus interaction between Tyr184 and local residues contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective α-btx binding. PMID:23802200

  18. The molecular basis for high affinity of a universal ligand for human bombesin receptor (BnR) family members

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Hirotsugu; Hocart, Simon J.; González, Nieves; Mantey, Samuel A.; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Coy, David H.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    There is increased interest in the Bn-receptor family because they are frequently over/ectopically-expressed by tumors and thus useful as targets for imaging or receptor-targeted-cytotoxicity. The synthetic Bn-analog,[D-Tyr6,β-Ala11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn(6-14)[Univ.Lig] has the unique property of having high affinity for all three human BNRs(GRPR,NMBR,BRS-3), and thus could be especially useful for this approach. However, the molecular basis of this property is unclear and is the subject of this study. To accomplish this, site-directed mutagenesis was used after identifying potentially important amino acids using sequence homology analysis of all BnRs with high affinity for Univ.Lig compared to the Cholecystokinin-receptor(CCKAR), which has low affinity. Using various criteria 74 amino acids were identified and 101 mutations made in GRPR by changing each to those of CCKAR or to alanine. 22 GRPR mutations showed a significant decrease in affinity for Univ.Lig(>2-fold) with 2 in EC2[ D97N,G112V], 1 in UTM6[Y284A], 2 in EC4[R287N,H300S] showing >10-fold decrease in Univ.Lig affinity. Additional mutations were made to explore the molecular basis for these changes. Our results show that high affinity for Univ.Lig by human Bn-receptors requires positively charged amino acids in extracellular (EC)-domain 4 and to a lesser extent EC2 and EC3 suggesting charge-charge interactions may be particularly important for determining the general high affinity of this ligand. Furthermore, transmembrane amino acids particularly in UTM6 are important contributing both charge-charge interactions as well as interaction with a tyrosine residue in close proximity suggesting possible receptor-peptide cation-pi or H–bonding interactions are also important for determining its high affinity. PMID:22828605

  19. Specific high-affinity binding of high density lipoproteins to cultured human skin fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, R; Oram, J F; Albers, J J; Bierman, E L

    1983-03-01

    Binding of human high density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063-1.21) to cultured human fibroblasts and human arterial smooth muscle cells was studied using HDL subjected to heparin-agarose affinity chromatography to remove apoprotein (apo) E and B. Saturation curves for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL showed at least two components: low-affinity nonsaturable binding and high-affinity binding that saturated at approximately 20 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of high-affinity binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts yielded plots that were significantly linear, indicative of a single class of binding sites. Saturation curves for binding of both 125I-HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21) and apo E-free 125I-HDL to low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative fibroblasts also showed high-affinity binding that yielded linear Scatchard plots. On a total protein basis, HDL2 (d = 1.063-1.10), HDL3 and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25) competed as effectively as apo E-free HDL for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts. Also, HDL2, HDL3, and VHDL competed similarly for binding of 125I-HDL3 to LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. In contrast, LDL was a weak competitor for HDL binding. These results indicate that both human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells possess specific high affinity HDL binding sites. As indicated by enhanced LDL binding and degradation and increased sterol synthesis, apo E-free HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts. These effects also saturated at HDL3 concentrations of 20 micrograms/ml, suggesting that promotion of cholesterol efflux by HDL is mediated by binding to the high-affinity cell surface sites. PMID:6826722

  20. Biochemical characterization of high-affinity 3H-opioid binding. Further evidence for Mu1 sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.L.; Recht, L.D.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    In saturation studies with (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine, unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (1 nM) inhibited the high-affinity binding component far more potently than the lower-affinity one. Similarly, morphine (1 nM) inhibited the higher-affinity binding of /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin to a greater extent than its lower-affinity binding component, consistent with a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and enkephalins. Treatment of tissue with either trypsin (1 microgram/ml) or N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) effectively eliminated the high-affinity binding component of a series of /sup 3/H-opiates and opioid peptides. Competition studies following both treatments were consistent with a common high-affinity binding site. Both treatments also eliminated the ability of low morphine concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit /sup 3/H-D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin binding and of low D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin concentrations (less than 1 nM) to inhibit (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding. Protection experiments examining N-ethylmaleimide (25 microM) inhibition of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding showed significant protection (p less than 0.002) by both unlabeled D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin and morphine (both at 1 nM). When studied together, both naloxonazine and N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine binding to a similar extent. Equally important, tissue previously treated with naloxonazine was far less sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide than was untreated control tissue, consistent with the possibility that both treatments affected the same site. Together, these results support the concept of a common high-affinity binding site for opiates and opioid peptides.

  1. Solubilization and characterization of high-affinity [3H]serotonin binding sites from bovine cortical membranes.

    PubMed Central

    VandenBerg, S R; Allgren, R L; Todd, R D; Ciaranello, R D

    1983-01-01

    High-affinity [3H]serotonin binding activity has been solubilized from bovine cerebral cortical membranes by using Triton X-100, Tween-80, and octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside. This mixture of detergents solubilizes the high-affinity [3H]serotonin binding activity present in crude membrane preparations with retention of 75-90% specific binding. The detergent mixture was chosen because it can easily be removed from the solubilized fraction by dialysis and polystyrene bead adsorption, thus permitting further purification and isolation of the binding sites. Saturation analysis reveals multiple components of high-affinity [3H]serotonin binding. In crude bovine cortical membranes, at least two binding components are present. A higher-affinity binding component, as defined from curvilinear Scatchard plots, has a Kd for [3H]serotonin of 1-3 nM, whereas a lower-affinity component has a Kd of 10-20 nM. In the solubilized preparation, only a single class of binding sites is apparent, with a Kd of 50-100 nM. Removal of detergents by dialysis and polystyrene bead adsorption results in restoration of the curvilinear Scatchard plot with apparent Kds similar to those observed in crude membrane preparations and with increased Bmax values for each component. [3H]Serotonin binding activity in the solubilized preparation is stable to Sephacryl S-300 column chromatography and to glycerol gradient sedimentation. Saturation analysis of the peak binding fractions from both these procedures once again yields curvilinear Scatchard plots, indicating that the multiple high-affinity binding components are preserved and migrate together. The molecular weight, Stokes radius, and frictional coefficient of the binding site(s) have been calculated. After detergent removal the solubilized material shows many of the characteristics usually attributed to S1 receptors, such as high affinity for [3H]serotonin and its analogs and low affinity for serotonin antagonists. PMID:6574495

  2. High-affinity dextromethorphan binding sites in guinea pig brain. II. Competition experiments.

    PubMed

    Craviso, G L; Musacchio, J M

    1983-05-01

    Binding of dextromethorphan (DM) to guinea pig brain is stereoselective, since levomethorphan is 20 times weaker than DM in competing for DM sites. In general, opiate agonists and antagonists as well as their corresponding dextrorotatory isomers are weak competitors for tritiated dextromethorphan ([3H]DM) binding sites and display IC50 values in the micromolar range. In contrast, several non-narcotic, centrally acting antitussives are inhibitory in the nanomolar range (IC50 values for caramiphen, carbetapentane, dimethoxanate, and pipazethate are 25 nM, 9 nM, 41 nM, and 190 nM, respectively). Other antitussives, such as levopropoxyphene, chlophedianol, and fominoben, have poor affinity for DM sites whereas the antitussive noscapine enhances DM binding by increasing the affinity of DM for its central binding sites. Additional competition studies indicate that there is no correlation of DM binding with any of the known or putative neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. DM binding is also not related to tricyclic antidepressant binding sites or biogenic amine uptake sites. However, certain phenothiazine neuroleptics and typical and atypical antidepressants inhibit binding with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Moreover, the anticonvulsant drug diphenylhydantoin enhances DM binding in a manner similar to that of noscapine. Preliminary experiments utilizing acid extracts of brain have not demonstrated the presence of an endogenous ligand for DM sites. The binding characteristics of DM sites studied in rat and mouse brain indicate that the relative potencies of several antitussives to inhibit specific DM binding vary according to species. High-affinity, saturable, and stereoselective [3H]DM binding sites are present in liver homogenates, but several differences have been found for these peripheral binding sites and those described for brain. Although the nature of central DM binding sites is not known, the potent interaction of several classes of centrally

  3. Synthesis and characterization of a high affinity radioiodinated probe for the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, S.M.; Hess, H.J.; Grodski, A.; Graham, R.M.; Homcy, C.J.

    1986-03-01

    The availability of radioiodinated probes has facilitated the localization and molecular characterization of cell membrane receptors for hormones and neurotransmitters. However, such probes are not available for the study of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. This report describes the synthesis and characterization of functionalized derivatives of the selective alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists, rauwolscine and yohimbine, which can be radiolabeled to high specific activity with 125I. Following demethylation of rauwolscine or yohimbine, the resultant carboxylic acid derivatives were reacted with 4-aminophenethylamine to yield the respective 4-aminophenethyl carboxamides, 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-amino-phenethyl)carboxamide (rau-pAPC) and 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 beta-yohimban-16 alpha-(N-4-aminophenethyl)carboxamide. In competitive inhibition studies using rat renal membranes and the radioligand (3H)rauwolscine, rau-pAPC (Ki = 11 +/- 1 nM) exhibited a 14-fold greater affinity than the corresponding yohimbine derivative (Ki = 136 +/- 45 nM). The higher affinity compound, rau-pAPC, was radioiodinated by the chloramine T method, and the product, 125I-rau-pAPC (17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-amino-3 -(125I)iodophenethyl)carboxamide), was purified by reverse phase HPLC to high specific activity (2175 Ci/mmol) and its binding characteristics were investigated in rat kidney membranes. Specific binding of 125I-rau-pAPC was saturable and of high affinity as determined by Scatchard analysis (KD = 1.8 +/- 0.3 nM) or from kinetic studies (KD = k2/k1 = 0.056 +/- 0.013 min-1)/4.3 +/- 0.2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 = 1.3 +/- 0.3 nM).

  4. Early Signs of Pathological Cognitive Aging in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors.

    PubMed

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Polissidis, Alexia V; Stamatakis, Antonios; Skaliora, Irini

    2016-01-01

    In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. A deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors (β2-/-), which have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated/premature cognitive aging. Our aim was to identify behavioral signs that could serve as indicators or predictors of impending cognitive decline. We used test batteries in order to assess cognitive functions and additional tasks to investigate spontaneous behaviors, such as species-specific activities and exploration/locomotion in a novel environment. Our data confirm the hypothesis that β2-/- animals exhibit age-related cognitive impairments in spatial learning. In addition, they document age-related deficits in other areas, such as recognition memory, burrowing and nesting building, thereby extending the validity of this animal model for the study of pathological aging. Finally, our data reveal deficits in spontaneous behavior and habituation processes that precede the onset of cognitive decline and could therefore be useful as a non-invasive behavioral screen for identifying animals at risk. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an extensive behavioral assessment of an animal model of premature cognitive aging, and our results suggest that β2-nAChR dependent cognitive deterioration progressively evolves from initial subtle behavioral changes to global dementia due to the combined effect of the neuropathology and aging. PMID:27199738

  5. A High-Affinity Native Human Antibody Neutralizes Human Cytomegalovirus Infection of Diverse Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Keyi; Park, Minha; DeChene, Neal; Stephenson, Robert; Tenorio, Edgar; Ellsworth, Stote L.; Tabata, Takako; Petitt, Matthew; Tsuge, Mitsuru; Fang-Hoover, June; Adler, Stuart P.; Cui, Xiaohong; McVoy, Michael A.; Pereira, Lenore

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common infection causing poor outcomes among transplant recipients. Maternal infection and transplacental transmission are major causes of permanent birth defects. Although no active vaccines to prevent HCMV infection have been approved, passive immunization with HCMV-specific immunoglobulin has shown promise in the treatment of both transplant and congenital indications. Antibodies targeting the viral glycoprotein B (gB) surface protein are known to neutralize HCMV infectivity, with high-affinity binding being a desirable trait, both to compete with low-affinity antibodies that promote the transmission of virus across the placenta and to displace nonneutralizing antibodies binding nearby epitopes. Using a miniaturized screening technology to characterize secreted IgG from single human B lymphocytes, 30 antibodies directed against gB were previously cloned. The most potent clone, TRL345, is described here. Its measured affinity was 1 pM for the highly conserved site I of the AD-2 epitope of gB. Strain-independent neutralization was confirmed for 15 primary HCMV clinical isolates. TRL345 prevented HCMV infection of placental fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and epithelial cells, and it inhibited postinfection HCMV spread in epithelial cells. The potential utility for preventing congenital transmission is supported by the blockage of HCMV infection of placental cell types central to virus transmission to the fetus, including differentiating cytotrophoblasts, trophoblast progenitor cells, and placental fibroblasts. Further, TRL345 was effective at controlling an ex vivo infection of human placental anchoring villi. TRL345 has been utilized on a commercial scale and is a candidate for clinical evaluation. PMID:25534746

  6. Early Signs of Pathological Cognitive Aging in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Polissidis, Alexia V.; Stamatakis, Antonios; Skaliora, Irini

    2016-01-01

    In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. A deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors (β2-/-), which have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated/premature cognitive aging. Our aim was to identify behavioral signs that could serve as indicators or predictors of impending cognitive decline. We used test batteries in order to assess cognitive functions and additional tasks to investigate spontaneous behaviors, such as species-specific activities and exploration/locomotion in a novel environment. Our data confirm the hypothesis that β2-/- animals exhibit age-related cognitive impairments in spatial learning. In addition, they document age-related deficits in other areas, such as recognition memory, burrowing and nesting building, thereby extending the validity of this animal model for the study of pathological aging. Finally, our data reveal deficits in spontaneous behavior and habituation processes that precede the onset of cognitive decline and could therefore be useful as a non-invasive behavioral screen for identifying animals at risk. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an extensive behavioral assessment of an animal model of premature cognitive aging, and our results suggest that β2-nAChR dependent cognitive deterioration progressively evolves from initial subtle behavioral changes to global dementia due to the combined effect of the neuropathology and aging. PMID:27199738

  7. In vitro selection of an RNA sequence that interacts with high affinity with thymidylate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiukun; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Chen, Tian-men; Copur, Sitki M.; Maley, Gladys F.; Liu, Jun; Maley, Frank; Chu, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the repressive effect of thymidylate synthase (TS) mRNA translation is mediated by direct binding of TS itself to two cis-acting elements on its cognate mRNA. To identify the optimal RNA nucleotides that interact with TS, we in vitro synthesized a completely degenerate, linear RNA pool of 25 nt and employed in vitro selection to isolate high affinity RNA ligands that bind human TS protein. After 10 rounds of selection and amplification, a single RNA molecule was selected that bound TS protein with nearly 20-fold greater affinity than native, wild-type TS RNA sequences. Secondary structure analysis of this RNA sequence predicted it to possess a stem–loop structure. Deletion and/or modification of the UGU loop element within the RNA sequence decreased binding to TS by up to 1000-fold. In vivo transfection experiments revealed that the presence of the selected RNA sequence resulted in a significant increase in the expression of a heterologous luciferase reporter construct in human colon cancer H630 and TS-overexpressing HCT-C:His-TS+ cells, but not in HCT-C18 cells expressing a functionally inactive TS. In addition, the presence of this element in H630 cells leads to induced expression of TS protein. An immunoprecipitation method using RT–PCR confirmed a direct interaction between human TS protein and the selected RNA sequence in transfected human cancer H630 cells. This study identified a novel RNA sequence from a degenerate RNA library that specifically interacts with TS. PMID:11058126

  8. In vitro selection of an RNA sequence that interacts with high affinity with thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Mizunuma, N; Chen, T; Copur, S M; Maley, G F; Liu, J; Maley, F; Chu, E

    2000-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the repressive effect of thymidylate synthase (TS) mRNA translation is mediated by direct binding of TS itself to two cis-acting elements on its cognate mRNA. To identify the optimal RNA nucleotides that interact with TS, we in vitro synthesized a completely degenerate, linear RNA pool of 25 nt and employed in vitro selection to isolate high affinity RNA ligands that bind human TS protein. After 10 rounds of selection and amplification, a single RNA molecule was selected that bound TS protein with nearly 20-fold greater affinity than native, wild-type TS RNA sequences. Secondary structure analysis of this RNA sequence predicted it to possess a stem-loop structure. Deletion and/or modification of the UGU loop element within the RNA sequence decreased binding to TS by up to 1000-fold. In vivo transfection experiments revealed that the presence of the selected RNA sequence resulted in a significant increase in the expression of a heterologous luciferase reporter construct in human colon cancer H630 and TS-overexpressing HCT-C:His-TS+ cells, but not in HCT-C18 cells expressing a functionally inactive TS. In addition, the presence of this element in H630 cells leads to induced expression of TS protein. An immunoprecipitation method using RT-PCR confirmed a direct interaction between human TS protein and the selected RNA sequence in transfected human cancer H630 cells. This study identified a novel RNA sequence from a degenerate RNA library that specifically interacts with TS. PMID:11058126

  9. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests. PMID:24832237

  10. Devices and approaches for generating specific high-affinity nucleic acid aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kylan; Craighead, Harold G.

    2014-09-01

    High-affinity and highly specific antibody proteins have played a critical role in biological imaging, medical diagnostics, and therapeutics. Recently, a new class of molecules called aptamers has emerged as an alternative to antibodies. Aptamers are short nucleic acid molecules that can be generated and synthesized in vitro to bind to virtually any target in a wide range of environments. They are, in principal, less expensive and more reproducible than antibodies, and their versatility creates possibilities for new technologies. Aptamers are generated using libraries of nucleic acid molecules with random sequences that are subjected to affinity selections for binding to specific target molecules. This is commonly done through a process called Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, in which target-bound nucleic acids are isolated from the pool, amplified to high copy numbers, and then reselected against the desired target. This iterative process is continued until the highest affinity nucleic acid sequences dominate the enriched pool. Traditional selections require a dozen or more laborious cycles to isolate strongly binding aptamers, which can take months to complete and consume large quantities of reagents. However, new devices and insights from engineering and the physical sciences have contributed to a reduction in the time and effort needed to generate aptamers. As the demand for these new molecules increases, more efficient and sensitive selection technologies will be needed. These new technologies will need to use smaller samples, exploit a wider range of chemistries and techniques for manipulating binding, and integrate and automate the selection steps. Here, we review new methods and technologies that are being developed towards this goal, and we discuss their roles in accelerating the availability of novel aptamers.

  11. Binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon, a high affinity mu-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Spetea, Mariana; Tóth, Fanni; Schütz, Johannes; Otvös, Ferenc; Tóth, Géza; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2003-07-01

    The highly potent micro -opioid receptor agonist 14-methoxymetopon (4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-5beta,17-dimethylmorphinan-6-one) was prepared in tritium labelled form by a catalytic dehalogenation method resulting in a specific radioactivity of 15.9 Ci/mmol. Opioid binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon were determined using radioligand binding assay in rat brain membranes. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon specifically labelled a single class of opioid sites with affinity in low subnanomolar range (Ki = 0.43 nm) and maximal number of binding sites of 314 fmol/mg protein. Binding of [3H]14-methoxymetopon was inhibited by ligands selective for the micro -opioid receptor with high potency, while selective kappa-opioids and delta-opioids were weaker inhibitors. 14-Methoxymetopon increased guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding with an EC50 of 70.9 nm, thus, providing evidence for the agonist character of this ligand. The increase of [35S]GTPgammaS binding was inhibited by naloxone and selective micro -opioid antagonists, indicating a micro -opioid receptor-mediated action. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon is one of the few nonpeptide mu-opioid receptor agonists available in radiolabelled form up to now. Due to its high affinity and selectivity, high stability and extremely low nonspecific binding (<10%), this radioligand would be an important and useful tool in probing mu-opioid receptor mechanisms, as well as to promote a further understanding of the opioid system at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:12887410

  12. A two-component high-affinity nitrate uptake system in barley.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yiping; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Li, Zhensheng; Miller, Anthony J

    2005-02-01

    The analysis of genome databases for many different plants has identified a group of genes that are related to one part of a two-component nitrate transport system found in algae. Earlier work using mutants and heterologous expression has shown that a high-affinity nitrate transport system from the unicellular green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii required two gene products for function. One gene encoded a typical carrier-type structure with 12 putative trans-membrane (TM) domains and the other gene, nar2 encoded a much smaller protein that had only one TM domain. As both gene families occur in plants we investigated whether this transport model has more general relevance among plants. The screening for nitrate transporter activity was greatly helped by a novel assay using (15)N-enriched nitrate uptake into Xenopus oocytes expressing the proteins. This assay enables many oocytes to be rapidly screened for nitrate transport activity. The functional activity of a barley nitrate transporter, HvNRT2.1, in oocytes required co-injection of a second mRNA. Although three very closely related nar2-like genes were cloned from barley, only one of these was able to give functional nitrate transport when co-injected into oocytes. The nitrate transport performed by this two-gene system was inhibited at more acidic external pH and by acidification of the cytoplasm. This specific requirement for two-gene products to give nitrate transport function has important implications for attempts to genetically manipulate this fundamental process in plants. PMID:15659102

  13. Heterogenetiy of glucocorticoid binders: a high affinity triamcinolone acetonide binder in bovine serum.

    PubMed

    Do, Y; Feldman, D

    1980-11-01

    While investigating glucocorticoid-binding proteins in bovine tissues, a new binder was found in fresh bovine serum which exhibited high affinity for certain synthetic glucocorticoids. This serum binder was characterized using [3H]triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as the ligand. On sucrose gradients, the [3H]TA peak sedimented at 8S, which was easily distinguishable from the [3H]cortisol-transcortin peak at 4S. Unlike the tissue receptor, which showed ionically dependent transformation from 8S in equilibrium or formed from 4S, the serum binder sedimented at 8S in both hypo- and hypertonic gradients. Binding properties were evaluated employing sephadex G-50 chromatography to separate bound from free steroid. Scatchard analysis of specific [3H]TA binding data revealed a straight line. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was 7.8 +/- 0.7 X 10(-8) M, and the binding capacity was 772 +/- 70 fmol/mg serum protein. Hormonal specificity was determined by a competitive binding assay and revealed the following sequence: TA (100%) > betamethasone (47%) > triamcinolone (33%) > dexamethasone (2%) = cortisol = progesterone; aldosterone, estradiol, and testosterone exhibited negligible competitive activity. The serum binder was very stable, withstanding heating to 37 C for 60 min and long term storage in the frozen state. However, binding was significantly destroyed by trypsin. The binder was absent from fresh samples of chicken, mouse, rat, rabbit, dog, monkey, and human sera and frozen horse and porcine sera, but was clearly present in commercially available frozen calf, fetal calf, and lamb sera. At this time, we are unable to define the function of this binder, although its existence in both ovine and bovine sera suggests a possible role in ruminants. However, since bovine serum is routinely employed in tissue culture studies, the presence of this glucocorticoid binder might significantly influence many experiments. PMID:6775927

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana High-Affinity Phosphate Transporters Exhibit Multiple Levels of Posttranslational Regulation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bayle, Vincent; Arrighi, Jean-François; Creff, Audrey; Nespoulous, Claude; Vialaret, Jérôme; Rossignol, Michel; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Paz-Ares, Javier; Nussaume, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 (PHT1) family encodes the high-affinity phosphate transporters. They are transcriptionally induced by phosphate starvation and require PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER TRAFFIC FACILITATOR (PHF1) to exit the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), indicating intracellular traffic as an additional level of regulation of PHT1 activity. Our study revealed that PHF1 acts on PHT1, upstream of vesicle coat protein COPII formation, and that additional regulatory events occur during PHT1 trafficking and determine its ER exit and plasma membrane stability. Phosphoproteomic and mutagenesis analyses revealed modulation of PHT1;1 ER export by Ser-514 phosphorylation status. Confocal microscopy analysis of root tip cells showed that PHT1;1 is localized to the plasma membrane and is present in intracellular endocytic compartments. More precisely, PHT1;1 was localized to sorting endosomes associated with prevacuolar compartments. Kinetic analysis of PHT1;1 stability and targeting suggested a modulation of PHT1 internalization from the plasma membrane to the endosomes, followed by either subsequent recycling (in low Pi) or vacuolar degradation (in high Pi). For the latter condition, we identified a rapid mechanism that reduces the pool of PHT1 proteins present at the plasma membrane. This mechanism is regulated by the Pi concentration in the medium and appears to be independent of degradation mechanisms potentially regulated by the PHO2 ubiquitin conjugase. We propose a model for differential trafficking of PHT1 to the plasma membrane or vacuole as a function of phosphate concentration. PMID:21521698

  15. The Link between Inactivation and High-Affinity Block of hERG1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Gardner, Alison; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2015-06-01

    Block of human ether-à-go-go-related gene 1 (hERG1) K(+) channels by many drugs delays cardiac repolarization, prolongs QT interval, and is associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. Preferential block of hERG1 channels in an inactivated state has been assumed because inactivation deficient mutant channels can exhibit dramatically reduced drug sensitivity. Here we reexamine the link between inactivation gating and potency of channel block using concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing a variable number (0-4) of subunits harboring a point mutation (S620T or S631A) that disrupts inactivation. Concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing four wild-type subunits exhibited high-affinity block by cisapride, dofetilide, and MK-499, similar to wild-type channels formed from hERG1 monomers. A single S620T subunit within a tetramer was sufficient to fully disrupt inactivation gating, whereas S631A suppressed inactivation as a graded function of the number of mutant subunits present in a concatenated tetramer. Drug potency was positively correlated to the number of S620T subunits contained within a tetramer but unrelated to mutation-induced disruption of channel inactivation. Introduction of a second point mutation (Y652W) into S620T hERG1 partially rescued drug sensitivity. The potency of cisapride was not altered for tetramers containing 0 to 3 S631A subunits, whereas the potency of dofetilide was a graded function of the number of S631A subunits contained within a tetramer. Together these findings indicate that S620T or S631A substitutions can allosterically disrupt drug binding by a mechanism that is independent of their effects on inactivation gating. PMID:25855787

  16. The Link between Inactivation and High-Affinity Block of hERG1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Gardner, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Block of human ether-à-go-go–related gene 1 (hERG1) K+ channels by many drugs delays cardiac repolarization, prolongs QT interval, and is associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. Preferential block of hERG1 channels in an inactivated state has been assumed because inactivation deficient mutant channels can exhibit dramatically reduced drug sensitivity. Here we reexamine the link between inactivation gating and potency of channel block using concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing a variable number (0–4) of subunits harboring a point mutation (S620T or S631A) that disrupts inactivation. Concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing four wild-type subunits exhibited high-affinity block by cisapride, dofetilide, and MK-499, similar to wild-type channels formed from hERG1 monomers. A single S620T subunit within a tetramer was sufficient to fully disrupt inactivation gating, whereas S631A suppressed inactivation as a graded function of the number of mutant subunits present in a concatenated tetramer. Drug potency was positively correlated to the number of S620T subunits contained within a tetramer but unrelated to mutation-induced disruption of channel inactivation. Introduction of a second point mutation (Y652W) into S620T hERG1 partially rescued drug sensitivity. The potency of cisapride was not altered for tetramers containing 0 to 3 S631A subunits, whereas the potency of dofetilide was a graded function of the number of S631A subunits contained within a tetramer. Together these findings indicate that S620T or S631A substitutions can allosterically disrupt drug binding by a mechanism that is independent of their effects on inactivation gating. PMID:25855787

  17. [3H]-lifarizine, a high affinity probe for inactivated sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, A. C.; Wyatt, K. M.; McGivern, J. G.; Sheridan, R. D.; Brown, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. [3H]-lifarizine bound saturably and reversibly to an apparently homogeneous class of high affinity sites in rat cerebrocortical membranes (Kd = 10.7 +/- 2.9 nM; Bmax = 5.10 +/- 1.43 pmol mg-1 protein). 2. The binding of [3H]-lifarizine was unaffected by sodium channel toxins binding to site 1 (tetrodotoxin), site 3 (alpha-scorpion venom) or site 5 (brevetoxin), Furthermore, lifarizine at concentrations up to 10 microM had no effect on [3H]-saxitoxin (STX) binding to toxin site 1. Lifarizine displaced [3H]-batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX) binding with moderate affinity (pIC50 7.31 +/- 0.24) indicating an interaction with toxin site 2. However, lifarizine accelerated the dissociation of [3H]-BTX and decreased both the affinity and density of sites labelled by [3H]-BTX, suggesting an allosteric interaction with toxin site 2. 3. The binding of [3H]-lifarizine was voltage-sensitive, binding to membranes with higher affinity than to synaptosomes (pIC50 for cold lifarizine = 7.99 +/- 0.09 in membranes and 6.68 +/- 0.14 in synaptosomes). Depolarization of synaptosomes with 130 mM KCl increased the affinity of lifarizine almost 10 fold (pIC50 = 7.86 +/- 0.25). This suggests that lifarizine binds selectively to inactivated sodium channels which predominate both in the membrane preparation and in the depolarized synaptosomal preparation. 4. There was negligible [3H]-lifarizine and [3H]-BTX binding to solubilized sodium channels, although [3H]-STX binding was retained under these conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582509

  18. The marine phycotoxin gymnodimine targets muscular and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Kharrat, Riadh; Servent, Denis; Girard, Emmanuelle; Ouanounou, Gilles; Amar, Muriel; Marrouchi, Riadh; Benoit, Evelyne; Molgó, Jordi

    2008-11-01

    Gymnodimines (GYMs) are phycotoxins exhibiting unusual structural features including a spirocyclic imine ring system and a trisubstituted tetrahydrofuran embedded within a 16-membered macrocycle. The toxic potential and the mechanism of action of GYM-A, highly purified from contaminated clams, have been assessed. GYM-A in isolated mouse phrenic hemidiaphragm preparations produced a concentration- and time-dependent block of twitch responses evoked by nerve stimulation, without affecting directly elicited muscle twitches, suggesting that it may block the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR). This was confirmed by the blockade of miniature endplate potentials and the recording of subthreshold endplate potentials in GYM-A paralyzed frog and mouse isolated neuromuscular preparations. Patch-clamp recordings in Xenopus skeletal myocytes revealed that nicotinic currents evoked by constant iontophoretical ACh pulses were blocked by GYM-A in a reversible manner. GYM-A also blocked, in a voltage-independent manner, homomeric human alpha7 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Competition-binding assays confirmed that GYM-A is a powerful ligand interacting with muscle-type nAChR, heteropentameric alpha3beta2, alpha4beta2, and chimeric alpha7-5HT(3) neuronal nAChRs. Our data show for the first time that GYM-A broadly targets nAChRs with high affinity explaining the basis of its neurotoxicity, and also pave the way for designing specific tests for accurate GYM-A detection in shellfish samples. PMID:18990115

  19. Production of a High-affinity Monoclonal Antibody Reactive with Folate Receptors Alpha and Beta.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Furusho, Yuko; Li, Hua; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Matsukita, Sumika; Sueyoshi, Kazunobu; Yanagi, Masakazu; Hatae, Masaki; Takao, Sonshin; Matsuyama, Takami

    2015-06-01

    Folate receptors α (FRα) and β (FRβ) are two isoforms of the cell surface glycoprotein that binds folate. The expression of FRα is rare in normal cells and elevated in cancer cells. Thus, FRα-based tumor-targeted therapy has been a focus area of laboratory research and clinical trials. Recently, it was shown that a significant fraction of tumor-associated macrophages expresses FRβ and that these cells can enhance tumor growth. Although FRα and FRβ share 70% identity in their deduced amino acid sequence, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) reactive with both receptors has not been developed. A MAb that can target both FRα-expressing cancer cells and FRβ-expressing tumor-associated macrophages may provide a more potent therapeutic tool for cancer than individual anti-FRα or anti-FRβ MAbs. In this study, we developed a MAb that recognizes both FRα and FRβ (anti-FRαβ). The anti-FRαβ specifically stained trophoblasts and macrophages from human placenta, synovial macrophages from rheumatoid arthritis patient, liver macrophages from cynomolgus monkey and common marmoset, and cancer cells and tumor-associated macrophages from ovary and lung carcinomas. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the anti-FRαβ bound to soluble forms of the FRα and FRβ proteins with high affinity (KD=6.26×10(-9) M and 4.33×10(-9) M, respectively). In vitro functional analysis of the anti-FRαβ showed that this MAb mediates complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of FRα-expressing and FRβ-expressing cell lines. The anti-FRαβ MAb is a promising therapeutic candidate for cancers in which macrophages promote tumor progression. PMID:26090596

  20. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    PubMed Central

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-01-01

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 (Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 Å cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the “off-target” effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism. PMID:20194791

  1. High affinity binding sites for the Wilms' tumour suppressor protein WT1.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T B; Barilla, K C; Romaniuk, P J

    1995-01-01

    The Wilms' tumour suppressor protein (WT1) is a putative transcriptional regulatory protein with four zinc fingers, the last three of which have extensive sequence homology to the early growth response-1 (EGR-1) protein. Although a peptide encoding the zinc finger domain of WT1[-KTS] can bind to a consensus 9 bp EGR-1 binding site, current knowledge about the mechanisms of zinc finger-DNA interactions would predict a more extended recognition site for WT1. Using a WT1[-KTS] zinc finger peptide (WT1-ZFP) and the template oligonucleotide GCG-TGG-GCG-NNNNN in a binding site selection assay, we have determined that the highest affinity binding sites for WT1[-KTS] consist of a 12 bp sequence GCG-TGG-GCG-(T/G)(G/A/T)(T/G). The binding of WT1-ZFP to a number of the selected sequences was measured by a quantitative nitrocellulose filter binding assay, and the results demonstrated that these sequences have a 4-fold higher affinity for the protein than the nonselected sequence GCG-TGG-GCG-CCC. The full length WT1 protein regulates transcription of reporter genes linked to these high affinity sequences. A peptide lacking the first zinc finger of WT1[-KTS], but containing the three zinc fingers homologous to EGR-1 failed to select any specific sequences downstream of the GCG-TGG-GCG consensus sequence in the binding site selection assay. DNA sequences in the fetal promoter of the insulin-like growth factor II gene that confer WT1 responsiveness in a transient transfection assay bind to the WT1-ZFP with affinities that vary according to the number of consensus bases each sequence possesses in the finger 1 subsite. PMID:7862533

  2. Sequence and structural requirements for high-affinity DNA binding by the WT1 gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagama, H; Heinrich, G; Pelletier, J; Housman, D E

    1995-01-01

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor gene, WT1, encodes a zinc finger polypeptide which plays a key role regulating cell growth and differentiation in the urogenital system. Using the whole-genome PCR approach, we searched murine genomic DNA for high-affinity WT1 binding sites and identified a 10-bp motif 5'GCGTGGGAGT3' which we term WTE). The WTE motif is similar to the consensus binding sequence 5'GCG(G/T)GGGCG3' recognized by EGR-1 and is also suggested to function as a binding site for WT1, setting up a competitive regulatory loop. To evaluate the underlying biochemical basis for such competition, we compared the binding affinities of WT1 and EGR1 for both sequences. WT1 shows a 20- to 30-fold-higher affinity for the WTE sequence compared with that of the EGR-1 binding motif. Mutational analysis of the WTE motif revealed a significant contribution to binding affinity by the adenine nucleotide at the eighth position (5'GCGTGGGAGT3') as well as by the 3'-most thymine (5'GCGTGGGAGT3'), whereas mutations in either flanking nucleotides or other nucleotides in the core sequence did not significantly affect the specific binding affinity. Mutations within WT1 zinc fingers II to IV abolished the sequence-specific binding of WT1 to WTE, whereas alterations within the first WT1 zinc finger reduced the binding affinity approximately 10-fold but did not abolish sequence recognition. We have thus identified a WT1 target, which, although similar in sequence to the EGR-1 motif, shows a 20- to 30-fold-higher affinity for WT1. These results suggest that physiological action of WT1 is mediated by binding sites of significantly higher affinity than the 9-bp EGR-1 binding motif. The role of the thymine base in contributing to binding affinity is discussed in the context of recent structural analysis. PMID:7862142

  3. Insulin Regulates the Activity of the High-Affinity Choline Transporter CHT.

    PubMed

    Fishwick, Katherine J; Rylett, R Jane

    2015-01-01

    Studies in humans and animal models show that neuronal insulin resistance increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and that insulin treatment may promote memory function. Cholinergic neurons play a critical role in cognitive and attentional processing and their dysfunction early in AD pathology may promote the progression of AD pathology. Synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is closely linked to the activity of the high-affinity choline transporter protein (CHT), but the impact of insulin receptor signaling and neuronal insulin resistance on these aspects of cholinergic function are unknown. In this study, we used differentiated SH-SY5Y cells stably-expressing CHT proteins to study the effect of insulin signaling on CHT activity and function. We find that choline uptake activity measured after acute addition of 20 nM insulin is significantly lower in cells that were grown for 24 h in media containing insulin compared to cells grown in the absence of insulin. This coincides with loss of ability to increase phospho-Protein Kinase B (PKB)/Akt levels in response to acute insulin stimulation in the chronic insulin-treated cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in cells significantly lowers phospho-PKB/Akt levels and decreases choline uptake activity. We show total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF) imaging of the dynamic movement of CHT proteins in live cells in response to depolarization and drug treatments. These data show that acute exposure of depolarized cells to insulin is coupled to transiently increased levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface, and that this is attenuated by chronic insulin exposure. Moreover, prolonged inhibition of PI3-kinase results in enhanced levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface by decreasing their rate of internalization. PMID:26161852

  4. High-affinity σ1 protein agonist reduces clinical and pathological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Oxombre, B; Lee-Chang, C; Duhamel, A; Toussaint, M; Giroux, M; Donnier-Maréchal, M; Carato, P; Lefranc, D; Zéphir, H; Prin, L; Melnyk, P; Vermersch, P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective agonists of the sigma-1 receptor (σ1 protein) are generally reported to protect against neuronal damage and modulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Human and rodent lymphocytes possess saturable, high-affinity binding sites for compounds binding to the σ1 protein and potential immunomodulatory properties have been described for σ1 protein ligands. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is recognized as a valuable model of the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we have assessed the role of a σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, in EAE. Experimental Approach EAE was induced in SJL/J female mice by active immunization with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139–151 peptide. The σ1 protein agonist was injected i.p. at the time of immunization (day 0). Disease severity was assessed clinically and by histopathological evaluation of the CNS. Phenotyping of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells were performed by flow cytometry in spleen and cervical lymph nodes. Key Results Prophylactic treatment of EAE mice with the σ1 protein agonist prevented mononuclear cell accumulation and demyelination in brain and spinal cord and increased T2 B-cells and regulatory T-cells, resulting in an overall reduction in the clinical progression of EAE. Conclusions and Implications This σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, decreased the magnitude of inflammation in EAE. This effect was associated with increased proportions of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells with potential immunoregulatory functions. Targeting of the σ1 protein might thus provide new therapeutic opportunities in MS. PMID:25521311

  5. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse. PMID:27569547

  6. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    SciTech Connect

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-04-07

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 {angstrom} cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the 'off-target' effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism.

  7. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  8. Insulin Regulates the Activity of the High-Affinity Choline Transporter CHT

    PubMed Central

    Fishwick, Katherine J.; Rylett, R. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Studies in humans and animal models show that neuronal insulin resistance increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and that insulin treatment may promote memory function. Cholinergic neurons play a critical role in cognitive and attentional processing and their dysfunction early in AD pathology may promote the progression of AD pathology. Synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is closely linked to the activity of the high-affinity choline transporter protein (CHT), but the impact of insulin receptor signaling and neuronal insulin resistance on these aspects of cholinergic function are unknown. In this study, we used differentiated SH-SY5Y cells stably-expressing CHT proteins to study the effect of insulin signaling on CHT activity and function. We find that choline uptake activity measured after acute addition of 20 nM insulin is significantly lower in cells that were grown for 24 h in media containing insulin compared to cells grown in the absence of insulin. This coincides with loss of ability to increase phospho-Protein Kinase B (PKB)/Akt levels in response to acute insulin stimulation in the chronic insulin-treated cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in cells significantly lowers phospho-PKB/Akt levels and decreases choline uptake activity. We show total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF) imaging of the dynamic movement of CHT proteins in live cells in response to depolarization and drug treatments. These data show that acute exposure of depolarized cells to insulin is coupled to transiently increased levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface, and that this is attenuated by chronic insulin exposure. Moreover, prolonged inhibition of PI3-kinase results in enhanced levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface by decreasing their rate of internalization. PMID:26161852

  9. Phosphodiesterase 1C is dispensable for rapid response termination of olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cygnar, Katherine D.; Zhao, Haiqing

    2009-01-01

    In the nose, odorants are detected on the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), where a cAMP-mediated signaling pathway transforms odor stimulation into electrical responses. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in OSN cilia was long thought to account for rapid response termination by degrading odor-induced cAMP. Two PDEs with distinct cellular localization have been found in OSNs: PDE1C in cilia; PDE4A throughout the cell but absent from cilia. We disrupted both genes in mice and performed electroolfactogram analysis. Unexpectedly, eliminating PDE1C did not prolong response termination. Prolonged termination occurred only in mice lacking both PDEs, suggesting that cAMP degradation by PDE1C in cilia is not a rate-limiting factor for response termination in wildtype. Pde1c−/− OSNs instead displayed reduced sensitivity and attenuated adaptation to repeated stimulation, suggesting potential roles for PDE1C in regulating sensitivity and adaptation. These observations provide new perspectives in regulation of olfactory transduction. PMID:19305400

  10. Age-related alterations in cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in dystrophic mouse leg muscle.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Timothy J

    2005-11-01

    Previous reports have described both increased and decreased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in dystrophic muscle. Total PDE activity was measured in hind leg muscle from a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mdx) and a genetic control strain at 5, 8, 10, and 15 weeks of age. Total PDE activity declined in fractions isolated from mdx muscle over this time period, but was stable in fractions from control mice. Compared with age-matched controls, younger mdx muscle had higher cAMP and cGMP PDE activity. However, at 15 weeks, fractions from both strains had similar cGMP PDE activity and mdx fractions had lower cAMP PDE activity than controls. Particulate fractions from mdx muscle showed an age-related decline in sensitivity to the PDE4 inhibitor RO 20-1724. A similar loss of sensitivity to the PDE2 inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) was seen in a particulate fraction from mdx muscle and to a lesser degree in control muscle. These results suggest that the earlier disagreement regarding altered cyclic nucleotide metabolism in dystrophic muscle may be due to changes with age in PDE activity of dystrophic tissue. The age-related decline in particulate PDE activity seen in dystrophic muscle appears to be isozyme-specific and not due to a generalized decrease in total PDE activity. PMID:16391714

  11. Null mutations of the Dictyostelium cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase gene block chemotactic cell movement in developing aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sucgang, R; Weijer, C J; Siegert, F; Franke, J; Kessin, R H

    1997-12-01

    Extracellular cAMP is a critical messenger in the multicellular development of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The levels of cAMP are controlled by a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) that is secreted by the cells. The PDE gene (pdsA) is controlled by three promoters that permit expression during vegetative growth, during aggregation, and in prestalk cells of the older structures. Targeted disruption of the gene aborts development, and complementation with a modified pdsA restores development. Two distinct promoters must be used for full complementation, and an inhibitory domain of the PDE must be removed. We took advantage of newly isolated PDE-null cells and the natural chimerism of the organism to ask whether the absence of PDE affected individual cell behavior. PDE-null cells aggregated with isogenic wild-type cells in chimeric mixtures, but could not move in a coordinated manner in mounds. The wild-type cells move inward toward the center of the mound, leaving many of the PDE-null cells at the periphery of the aggregate. During the later stages of development, PDE-null cells in the chimera segregate to regions which correspond to the prestalk region and the rear of the slug. Participation in the prespore/spore population returns with the restoration of a modified pdsA to the null cells. PMID:9405107

  12. Perspectives on Camp Administration. Readings for Camp Director Education. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Elizabeth, Ed.

    The publication includes 47 selected readings for camp directors who are interested in reviewing the current status of the profession and who want to be a part of shaping its future. The articles, selected from periodicals directly related to camping and, where appropriate, from related journals, were selected and organized to support the American…

  13. β-Adrenergic receptor stimulation increases surface NKCC2 expression in rat thick ascending limbs in a process inhibited by phosphodiesterase 4.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mohammed Z; Caceres, Paulo S; Ortiz, Pablo A

    2012-11-01

    The thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (THAL) reabsorbs ∼30% of the filtered NaCl in a process mediated by the apical Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2. Stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors in the THAL enhances NaCl reabsorption and increases intracellular cAMP. We found that intracellular cAMP stimulates NKCC2 trafficking to the apical membrane via protein kinase A (PKA). Several cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE) have been identified in rat THALs, and PDE4 decreases cAMP generated by β-adrenergic stimulation in other cells. However, it is not known whether β-adrenergic receptors activation stimulates NKCC2 trafficking. Thus we hypothesized that β-adrenergic receptor stimulation enhances THAL apical membrane NKCC2 expression via the PKA pathway and PDE4 blunts this effect. THAL suspensions were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats, and surface NKCC2 expression was measured by surface biotinylation and Western blot. Incubation of THALs with the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol at 0.5 and 1.0 μM increased surface NKCC2 by 17 ± 1 and 29 ± 5% respectively (P < 0.05). Preventing cAMP degradation with 3-isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX; a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor) enhanced isoproterenol-stimulated surface NKCC2 expression to 51 ± 7% (P < 0.05 vs. isoproterenol). The β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol or the PKA inhibitor H-89 completely blocked isoproterenol + IBMX-induced increase on surface NKCC2, while propranolol or H-89 alone had no effect. Selective inhibition of PDE4 with rolipram (20 μM) potentiated the effect of isoproterenol on surface NKCC2 and increased cAMP levels. We concluded that β-adrenergic receptor stimulation enhances surface NKCC2 expression in the THALs via PKA and PDE4 blunts this effect. PMID:22933300

  14. High affinity group III mGluRs regulate mossy fiber input to CA3 interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Meriney, Stephen D.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    Stratum lacunosum-moleculare interneurons (L-Mi) in hippocampal area CA3 target the apical dendrite of pyramidal cells providing feedforward inhibition. Here we report that selective activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) 4/8 with L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphnobytyric acid (L-AP4; 10 μM) decreased the probability of glutamate release from the mossy fiber (MF) terminals synapsing onto L-Mi. Consistent with this interpretation, application of L-AP4 in the presence of 3 mM strontium decreased the frequency of asynchronous MF EPSCs in L-Mi. Furthermore, the dose response curve showed that L-AP4 at 400 μM produced no further decrease in MF EPSC amplitude compared to 20 μM L-AP4, indicating the lack of mGluRs 7 at these MF terminals. We also found that one mechanism of mGluRs 4/8-mediated inhibition of release is linked to N-type voltage gated calcium channels at MF terminals. Application of the group III mGluR antagonist MSOP (100 μM) demonstrated that mGluRs 4/8 are neither tonically active nor activated by low and moderate frequencies of activity. However, trains of stimuli to the MF at 20 and 40Hz delivered during the application of MSOP revealed a relief of inhibition of transmitter release and an increase in the overall probability of action potential firing in the postsynaptic L-Mi. Interestingly, the time to first action potential was significantly shorter in the presence of MSOP, indicating that mGluR 4/8 activation delays L-Mi firing in response to MF activity. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the timing and probability of action potentials in L-Mi evoked by MF synaptic input is regulated by the activation of presynaptic high affinity group III mGluRs. PMID:20824730

  15. Characterization of high affinity (/sup 3/H)triazolam binding in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, M.; Concas, A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    The hypnotic Triazolam (TZ), a triazolo (1,4)-benzodiazepine, displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. Specific binding properties of this recently tritiated TZ were characterized. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the GABA effect on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub d/ = 0.25 +/- 0.01 nM at O/sup 0/C; K/sub d/ = 1.46 +/- 0.03 nM at 37/sup 0/C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1003 +/- 37 fmoles/mg prot. at 0/sup 0/C and 1001 +/- 43 fmoles/mg prot. at 37/sup 0/C). Inhibition studies showed that (/sup 3/H)TZ binding displayed no GABA shift at 0/sup 0/C(K/sub i/ 0.37 +/- 0.03 nM/- GABA and K/sub i/ = 0.55 +/- 0.13 nM/+GABA) but a nearly two-fold shift was apparent at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub i/ = 2.92 +/- 0.2 nM/-GABA; K/sub i/ = 1.37 +/- 0.11 mM/+GABA). These results were also confirmed by saturation studies in the presence or absence of GABA showing a shift to higher affinity in the presence of GABA only at 37/sup 0/C. In Ro 15-1788/(/sup 3/H)TZ competition experiments the presence of GABA did not affect the inhibitory potency of Ro 15-1788 on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding at both temperatures. In conclusion (/sup 3/H)TZ binding showed an extremely high affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. In contrast to reported literature, the findings suggest that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors similar to other benzodiazepine agonists.

  16. A high-affinity human antibody that targets tumoral blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Tarli, L; Balza, E; Viti, F; Borsi, L; Castellani, P; Berndorff, D; Dinkelborg, L; Neri, D; Zardi, L

    1999-07-01

    Angiogenesis is a characteristic feature of many aggressive tumors and of other relevant disorders. Molecules capable of specifically binding to new-forming blood vessels, but not to mature vessels, could be used as selective vehicles and would, therefore, open diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. We have studied the distribution of the ED-B oncofetal domain of fibronectin, a marker of angiogenesis, in four different tumor animal models: the F9 murine teratocarcinoma, SKMEL-28 human melanoma, N592 human small cell lung carcinoma, and C51 human colon carcinoma. In all of these experimental models we observed accumulation of the fibronectin isoform containing the ED-B domain around neovascular structures when the tumors were in the exponentially growing phase, but not in the slow-growing phase. Then we performed biodistribution studies in mice bearing a subcutaneously implanted F9 murine teratocarcinoma, using a high-affinity human antibody fragment (L19) directed against the ED-B domain of fibronectin. Radiolabeled L19, but not an irrelevant anti-lysozyme antibody fragment (D1.3), efficiently localizes in the tumoral vessels. The maximal dose of L19 accumulated in the tumor was observed 3 hours after injection (8.2% injected dose per gram). By virtue of the rapid clearance of the antibody fragment from the circulation, tumor-to-blood ratios of 1.9, 3.7, and 11.8 were obtained at 3, 5, and 24 hours, respectively. The tumor-targeting performance of L19 was not dose-dependent in the 0.7 to 10 microg range of injected antibody. The integral of the radioactivity localized in tumoral vessels over 24 hours was greater than 70-fold higher than the integral of the radioactivity in blood over the same time period, normalized per gram of tissue or fluid. These findings quantitatively show that new-forming blood vessels can selectively be targeted in vivo using specific antibodies, and suggest that L19 may be of clinical utility for the immunoscintigraphic detection of

  17. Renal 2',3'-Cyclic Nucleotide 3'-Phosphodiesterase Is an Important Determinant of AKI Severity after Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Edwin K; Menshikova, Elizabeth V; Mi, Zaichuan; Verrier, Jonathan D; Bansal, Rashmi; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Jackson, Travis C; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2016-07-01

    A positional isomer of 3',5'-cAMP, 2',3'-cAMP, is produced by kidneys in response to energy depletion, and renal 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) metabolizes 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP; 2',3'-cAMP is a potent opener of mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTPs), which can stimulate autophagy. Because autophagy protects against AKI, it is conceivable that inhibition of CNPase protects against ischemia-reperfusion (IR) -induced AKI. Therefore, we investigated renal outcomes, mitochondrial function, number, area, and autophagy in CNPase-knockout (CNPase(-/-)) versus wild-type (WT) mice using a unique two-kidney, hanging-weight model of renal bilateral IR (20 minutes of ischemia followed by 48 hours of reperfusion). Analysis of urinary purines showed attenuated metabolism of 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP in CNPase(-/-) mice. Neither genotype nor IR affected BP, heart rate, urine volume, or albumin excretion. In WT mice, renal IR reduced (14)C-inulin clearance (index of GFR) and increased renal vascular resistance (measured by transit time nanoprobes) and urinary excretion of kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. IR did not affect these parameters in CNPase(-/-) mice. Histologic analysis revealed that IR induced severe damage in kidneys from WT mice, whereas histologic changes were minimal after IR in CNPase(-/-) mice. Measurements of renal cardiolipin levels, citrate synthase activity, rotenone-sensitive NADH oxidase activity, and proximal tubular mitochondrial and autophagosome area and number (by transmission electron microscopy) indicted accelerated autophagy/mitophagy in injured CNPase(-/-) mice. We conclude that CNPase deletion attenuates IR-induced AKI, in part by accelerating autophagy with targeted removal of damaged mitochondria. PMID:26574047

  18. Inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isozymes type-III and type-IV suppress mitogenesis of rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matousovic, K; Grande, J P; Chini, C C; Chini, E N; Dousa, T P

    1995-01-01

    We studied interactions between the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway and cAMP-protein kinase (PKA) signaling pathway in regulation of mitogenesis of mesangial cells (MC) determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation, with or without added EGF. Forskolin or dibutyryl cAMP strongly (by 60-70%) inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into MC. Cilostamide, lixazinone or cilostazol selective inhibitors of cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozyme PDE-III, inhibited mitogenesis to similar extent as forskolin and DBcAMP and activated in situ PKA, but without detectable increase in cAMP levels. Cilostamide and cilostazol were more than three times more effective at inhibiting mesangial mitogenesis than rolipram and denbufylline, inhibitors of isozyme PDE-IV, even though PDE-IV was two times more abundant in MC than was PDE-III. On the other hand, when incubated with forskolin, rolipram-enhanced cAMP accumulation was far greater (10-100x) than with cilostamide. EGF increased MAPK activity (+300%); PDE isozyme inhibitors which suppressed mitogenesis also inhibited MAPK. PDE isozyme inhibitors also suppressed PDGF-stimulated MC proliferation. We conclude that cAMP inhibits the mitogen-dependent MAPK-signaling pathway probably by decreasing the activity of Raf-1 due to PKA-catalyzed phosphorylation. Further, we surmise that minor increase in the cAMP pool metabolized by PDE-III is intimately related to regulation of mesangial proliferation. Thus, PDE isozyme inhibitors have the potential to suppress MC proliferation by a focused effect upon signaling pathways. Images PMID:7615811

  19. Camp Courageous of Iowa Staff Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp Courageous of Iowa, Monticello.

    Designed as a useful and practical tool for the staff at Camp Courageous of Iowa, a year-round residential camp serving all handicapped individuals, the manual outlines safety rules for camp activities, characteristics of the mentally and physically handicapped, and a general description of the camp and its objectives. Contents of the manual…

  20. Self-Concept Change in Camp Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    The 1981 study ascertained whether the self-concept of 66 camp staff from 2 Wisconsin camps changed more than a control group of 18 college students attending summer school; if differences in self-concept were based on a particular characteristic (age, gender, staff position, years at camp); and in what ways, if any, self-concept of camp staff…

  1. 1970s: Camping in Tough Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1999

    1999-01-01

    In the 1970s, camps were challenged by economic recession, growing administrative demands, and changing attitudes and interests of campers and staff. An illustrative article from 1972, "Facing the Camping Future with Confidence" (Michael F. Buynak), discusses hidden costs in camp operation and the need for camp administration to shift from…

  2. American Camping Association Annual Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    Founded in 1910 as the Camp Directors' Association of America, the American Camping Association (ACA) is the largest organization serving the organized camping industry. Over 5,500 members come from all segments of the camp profession. This annual report for 1999 describes ACA activities in support of organizational commitments. These commitments…

  3. Easter Seal Guide to Special Camping Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Helen B., Ed.

    Intended for organizations having or planning to establish resident resident camping programs for people with special needs, this guide supplements the American Camping Association's Standards. The philosophy, aims, and objectives of specialized camping programs are considered, and the following are discussed: administration, camp site selection,…

  4. Day Camp Manual: Administration. Book I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    The first book in a 5-book manual on day camping focuses on summer day camp administration. The book defines day camps as organized group experiences in outdoor living on a day-by-day basis and under trained leadership. It includes a philosophy of day camping, noting benefits to the campers. The book is divided into further chapters that describe…

  5. Foreign Language Weekend Camp Administrative Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Bow, M. Denise

    A procedure for undertaking a foreign language weekend camp is presented. Responsibilities before and after the camp are identified for the foreign language council, the administrators in charge of the camp program for each language, the camp director, participating teachers, and assistants. It is suggested that a minimum of three planning…

  6. Basic Camp Management: An Introduction to Camp Administration. Revised 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand; Ball, Beverly

    This book is the primary text for the Certified Camp Director Program and the Basic Camp Directors Course sponsored by the American Camping Association (Indiana). It provides an orientation for new and prospective camp directors and a quick reference for experienced camp directors. The book covers the following topics: (1) an historical overview…

  7. CCR-08-0827 Version 2 Targeted inhibition of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase-4 promotes brain tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Goldhoff, Patricia; Warrington, Nicole; Limbrick, David D.; Hope, Andrew; Woerner, B. Mark; Jackson, Erin; Perry, Arie; Piwnica-Worms, David; Rubin, Joshua B.

    2008-01-01

    Statement of Clinical Relevance Therapies that can overcome the resistance of malignant brain tumors would be a major clinical advance. Here, we investigate the role of cAMP Phosphodiesterase-4 in stimulating brain tumor growth and the therapeutic utility of cAMP Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibition in the treatment of malignant brain tumors. Cyclic AMP Phosphodiesterase-4 was widely expressed in human brain tumors of glial and neuronal lineage, and forced expression of PDE4A1 accelerated intracranial glioblastoma and medulloblastoma xenograft growth. Moreover, targeted inhibition of PDE4, in combination with standard radiation and chemotherapy, induced a unique regression of established intracranial glioblastoma xenografts. These findings identify PDE4 as a novel molecular target for brain tumor therapy and indicate that PDE4 inhibition should be evaluated in clinical trials for malignant brain tumors. Purpose As favorable outcomes from malignant brain tumors remain limited by poor survival and treatment-related toxicity, novel approaches to cure are essential. Previously, we identified the cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor Rolipram as a potent anti-tumor agent. Here, we investigate the role of PDE4 in brain tumors and examine the utility of PDE4 as a therapeutic target. Experimental Design Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression pattern of a subfamily of PDE4, PDE4A, in multiple brain tumor types. To evaluate the effect of PDE4A on growth, a brain-specific isoform, PDE4A1 was overexpressed in xenografts of Daoy medulloblastoma and U87 glioblastoma cells. To determine therapeutic potential of PDE4 inhibition, Rolipram, temozolomide, and radiation were tested alone and in combination on mice bearing intracranial U87 xenografts. Results We found that PDE4A is expressed in medulloblastoma, glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma, ependymoma and meningioma. Moreover, when PDE4A1 was overexpressed in Daoy medulloblastoma and U87 glioblastoma cells, in

  8. Von Braun's Dream: Space Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the "Space Camp" program for boys and girls at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center (Huntsville, Alabama), including typical activities. Includes address for obtaining information on participation in the program. (JN)

  9. Camping Out On An Asteroid

    NASA Video Gallery

    An astronaut and a geologist recently spent three days camping out as though they were on an asteroid. They were inside NASA's Space Exploration Vehicle prototype, flying it virtually in a digital ...

  10. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Donald H.; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants. PMID:24687066

  11. Psychiatric aspects of phosphodiesterases: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Vasantmeghna S.; Mangot, Ajish G.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDE) are exciting new targets in medical sciences. These enzymes are some of the key mediators of cellular functions in the body and hence are attractive sites for drug-induced modulations. With the finding that Tofisopam, a new anxiolytic, inhibits PDEs, the authors were inspired to look into the role of PDE and drugs acting on them in psychiatry. Hence, the review was undertaken. We found several research materials available highlighting the role of PDE in cellular functions and the possible newer etiological mechanisms of neuropsychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression/anxiety disorders, and cognitive dysfunction involving PDEs. We also found that there are many molecules acting on PDEs, which have the potential to alter the way we treat mental illnesses today. This article is intended to provide an in-depth look at these enzymes so that more cost-effective therapeutic molecules may be synthesized and marketed in India for managing mental illnesses. PMID:26729948

  12. Predictive QSAR modeling of phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kovalishyn, Vasyl; Tanchuk, Vsevolod; Charochkina, Larisa; Semenuta, Ivan; Prokopenko, Volodymyr

    2012-02-01

    A series of diverse organic compounds, phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE-4) inhibitors, have been modeled using a QSAR-based approach. 48 QSAR models were compared by following the same procedure with different combinations of descriptors and machine learning methods. QSAR methodologies used random forests and associative neural networks. The predictive ability of the models was tested through leave-one-out cross-validation, giving a Q² = 0.66-0.78 for regression models and total accuracies Ac=0.85-0.91 for classification models. Predictions for the external evaluation sets obtained accuracies in the range of 0.82-0.88 (for active/inactive classifications) and Q² = 0.62-0.76 for regressions. The method showed itself to be a potential tool for estimation of IC₅₀ of new drug-like candidates at early stages of drug development. PMID:22023934

  13. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C

    2014-04-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants. PMID:24687066

  14. Cardiac uses of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Bryan G; Levine, Laurence A; Comstock, Gary; Stecher, Vera J; Kloner, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) improve erectile function by enhancing nitric oxide availability in the penis and its supplying vasculature, resulting in vasodilation and increased blood flow. PDE5Is might benefit cardiovascular diseases because phosphodiesterase-5 is also located elsewhere in the body, including the pulmonary and systemic vasculature and in hypertrophied myocardium. PDE5Is are approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension, given that they improved several hemodynamic and clinical parameters in large randomized trials. Initial evidence suggests that PDE5Is benefit patients with congestive heart failure and secondary pulmonary hypertension. PDE5Is seem to improve hemodynamic and clinical parameters in patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high-altitude pulmonary hypertension. In climbers with prior episodes of HAPE, PDE5Is prevented HAPE in 2 small randomized trials. In small randomized trials of PDE5Is, patients with Raynaud's phenomenon demonstrated improved blood flow, fewer symptoms and frequency of attacks, and resolution of digital ulcers. In addition to enhancing vasodilation, PDE5Is seem to protect the myocardium through complex pathways that involve nitric oxide, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, protein kinase G, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase, B-cell lymphoma protein-2, and Rho kinase inhibition. In animal models of acute myocardial infarction, PDE5Is consistently reduced infarct size indicating cardioprotection and PDE5Is also promote reverse remodeling and reduce myocardial apoptosis, fibrosis, and hypertrophy. PDE5Is might also benefit patients with treatment-resistant hypertension, preeclampsia, or peripheral arterial disease. This review presents the pathophysiology and trial data with regard to the use of PDE5Is for cardiac diseases. PMID:22192662

  15. Soluble T cell receptor Vβ domains engineered for high-affinity binding to staphylococcal or streptococcal superantigens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Preeti; Wang, Ningyan; Kranz, David M

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus secrete a collection of toxins called superantigens (SAgs), so-called because they stimulate a large fraction of an individual's T cells. One consequence of this hyperactivity is massive cytokine release leading to severe tissue inflammation and, in some cases, systemic organ failure and death. The molecular basis of action involves the binding of the SAg to both a T cell receptor (TCR) on a T cell and a class II product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on an antigen presenting cell. This cross-linking leads to aggregation of the TCR complex and signaling. A common feature of SAgs is that they bind with relatively low affinity to the variable region (V) of the beta chain of the TCR. Despite this low affinity binding, SAgs are very potent, as each T cell requires only a small fraction of their receptors to be bound in order to trigger cytokine release. To develop high-affinity agents that could neutralize the activity of SAgs, and facilitate the development of detection assays, soluble forms of the Vβ regions have been engineered to affinities that are up to 3 million-fold higher for the SAg. Over the past decade, six different Vβ regions against SAgs from S. aureus (SEA, SEB, SEC3, TSST-1) or S. pyogenes (SpeA and SpeC) have been engineered for high-affinity using yeast display and directed evolution. Here we review the engineering of these high-affinity Vβ proteins, structural features of the six different SAgs and the Vβ proteins, and the specific properties of the engineered Vβ regions that confer high-affinity and specificity for their SAg ligands. PMID:24476714

  16. Characterization of tetanus toxin binding to rat brain membranes. Evidence for a high-affinity proteinase-sensitive receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, E J; Davison, M D; Parton, R G; Habig, W H; Critchley, D R

    1986-01-01

    Binding of 125I-labelled tetanus toxin to rat brain membranes in 25 mM-Tris/acetate, pH 6.0, was saturable and there was a single class of high-affinity site (KD 0.26-1.14 nM) present in high abundance (Bmax. 0.9-1.89 nmol/mg). The sites were largely resistant to proteolysis and heating but were markedly sensitive to neuraminidase. Trisialogangliosides were effective inhibitors of toxin binding (IC50 10 nM) and trisialogangliosides inserted into membranes lacking a toxin receptor were able to bind toxin with high affinity (KD 2.6 nM). The results are consistent with previous studies and the hypothesis that di- and trisialogangliosides act as the primary receptor for tetanus toxin under these conditions. In contrast, when toxin binding was assayed in Krebs-Ringer buffer, pH 7.4, binding was greatly reduced, was non-saturable and competition binding studies showed evidence for a small number of high-affinity sites (KD 0.42 nM, Bmax. 0.90 pmol/mg) and a larger number of low-affinity sites (KD 146 nM, Bmax. 179 pmol/mg). Treatment of membranes with proteinases, heat, and neuraminidase markedly reduced binding. Trisialogangliosides were poor inhibitors of toxin binding (IC50 11.0 microM), and trisialogangliosides inserted into membranes bound toxin with low affinity. The results suggest that in physiological buffers tetanus toxin binds with high affinity to a protein receptor, and that gangliosides represent only a low-affinity site. Images Fig. 5. PMID:3539106

  17. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  18. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  19. The effect of phosphodiesterase inhibitors on the extinction of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Liddie, Shervin; Anderson, Karen L; Paz, Andres; Itzhak, Yossef

    2012-10-01

    Several phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDEis) improve cognition, suggesting that an increase in brain cAMP and cGMP facilitates learning and memory. Since extinction of drug-seeking behavior requires associative learning, consolidation and formation of new memory, the present study investigated the efficacy of three different PDEis in the extinction of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in B6129S mice. Mice were conditioned by escalating doses of cocaine which was resistant to extinction by free exploration. Immediately following each extinction session mice received (a) saline/vehicle, (b) rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor), (c) BAY-73-6691 (PDE9 inhibitor) or (d) papaverine (PDE10A inhibitor). Mice that received saline/vehicle during extinction training showed no reduction in CPP for >10 days. BAY-73-6691 (a) dose-dependently increased cGMP in hippocampus and amygdala, (b) significantly facilitated extinction and (c) diminished the reinstatement of cocaine CPP. Rolipram, which selectively increased brain cAMP levels, and papaverine which caused increases in both cAMP and cGMP levels, had no significant effect on the extinction of cocaine CPP. The results suggest that increase in hippocampal and amygdalar cGMP levels via blockade of PDE9 has a prominent role in the consolidation of extinction learning. PMID:22596207

  20. A phosphodiesterase 4B-dependent interplay between tumor cells and the microenvironment regulates angiogenesis in B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Lin, An-Ping; Bhatnagar, Harshita; Kim, Sang-Woo; Moritz, August W.; Aguiar, Ricardo C. T.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis associates with poor outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but the contribution of the lymphoma cells to this process remains unclear. Addressing this knowledge gap may uncover unsuspecting proangiogenic signaling nodes and highlight alternative antiangiogenic therapies. Here we identify the second messenger cyclic-AMP (cAMP) and the enzyme that terminates its activity, phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B), as regulators of B-cell lymphoma angiogenesis. We first show that cAMP, in a PDE4B-dependent manner, suppresses PI3K/AKT signals to down-modulate VEGF secretion and vessel formation in vitro. Next, we create a novel mouse model that combines the lymphomagenic Myc transgene with germline deletion of Pde4b. We show that lymphomas developing in a Pde4b-null background display significantly lower microvessel density in association with lower VEGF levels and PI3K/AKT activity. We recapitulate these observations by treating lymphoma-bearing mice with the FDA-approved PDE4 inhibitor Roflumilast. Lastly, we show that primary human DLBCLs with high PDE4B expression display significantly higher microvessel density. Here, we defined an unsuspected signaling circuitry in which the cAMP generated in lymphoma cells downmodulates PI3K/AKT and VEGF secretion to negatively influence vessel development in the microenvironment. These data identify PDE4 as an actionable antiangiogenic target in DLBCL. PMID:26503641

  1. Differences between high-affinity forskolin binding sites in dopamine-riche and other regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Poat, J.A.; Cripps, H.E.; Iversen, L.L.

    1988-05-01

    Forskolin labelled with (/sup 3/H) bound to high- and low-affinity sites in the rat brain. The high-affinity site was discretely located, with highest densities in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercule, substantia nigra, hippocampus, and the molecular layers of the cerebellum. This site did not correlate well with the distribution of adenylate cyclase. The high-affinity striatal binding site may be associated with a stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Thus, the number of sites was increased by the addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. Cholera toxin stereotaxically injected into rat striatum increased the number of binding sites, and no further increase was noted following the subsequent addition of guanyl nucleotide. High-affinity forskolin binding sites in non-dopamine-rich brain areas (hippocampus and cerebullum) were modulated in a qualitatively different manner by guanyl nucleotides. In these areas the number of binding sites was significantly reduced by the addition of guanyl nucleotide. These results suggest that forskolin may have a potential role in identifying different functional/structural guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

  2. High-throughput kinetic screening of hybridomas to identify high-affinity antibodies using bio-layer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lad, Latesh; Clancy, Sheila; Kovalenko, Maria; Liu, Chian; Hui, Terence; Smith, Victoria; Pagratis, Nikos

    2015-04-01

    Kinetic analysis of antibodies is crucial in both clone selection and characterization. Historically, antibodies in supernatants from hybridomas are selected based on a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in which the antigen is immobilized on the assay plate. ELISA selects clones based on a combination of antibody concentration in the supernatant and affinity. The antibody concentration in the supernatant can vary significantly and is typically unknown. Using the ELISA method, clones that express high levels of a low-affinity antibody can give an equivalent signal as clones that express low levels of a high-affinity antibody. As a consequence, using the ELISA method, superior clones can be overshadowed by inferior clones. In this study, we have applied Bio-Layer Interferometry to screen hybridoma clones based on disassociation rates using the OctetRED 384 platform. Using the OctetRED platform, we were able to screen 2000 clones within 24 hours and select clones containing high-affinity antibodies for further expansion and subsequent characterization. Using this method, we were able to identify several clones producing high-affinity antibodies that were missed by ELISA. PMID:25425568

  3. Tripartite ATP-independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporters Use an Arginine-mediated Selectivity Filter for High Affinity Substrate Binding.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marcus; Hopkins, Adam P; Severi, Emmanuele; Hawkhead, Judith; Bawdon, Daniel; Watts, Andrew G; Hubbard, Roderick E; Thomas, Gavin H

    2015-11-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters are secondary transporters that have evolved an obligate dependence on a substrate-binding protein (SBP) to confer unidirectional transport. Different members of the DctP family of TRAP SBPs have binding sites that recognize a diverse range of organic acid ligands but appear to only share a common electrostatic interaction between a conserved arginine and a carboxylate group in the ligand. We investigated the significance of this interaction using the sialic acid-specific SBP, SiaP, from the Haemophilus influenzae virulence-related SiaPQM TRAP transporter. Using in vitro, in vivo, and structural methods applied to SiaP, we demonstrate that the coordination of the acidic ligand moiety of sialic acid by the conserved arginine (Arg-147) is essential for the function of the transporter as a high affinity scavenging system. However, at high substrate concentrations, the transporter can function in the absence of Arg-147 suggesting that this bi-molecular interaction is not involved in further stages of the transport cycle. As well as being required for high affinity binding, we also demonstrate that the Arg-147 is a strong selectivity filter for carboxylate-containing substrates in TRAP transporters by engineering the SBP to recognize a non-carboxylate-containing substrate, sialylamide, through water-mediated interactions. Together, these data provide biochemical and structural support that TRAP transporters function predominantly as high affinity transporters for carboxylate-containing substrates. PMID:26342690

  4. High affinity and covalent-binding microtubule stabilizing agents show activity in chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Benet; Calvo-Vidal, M. Nieves; Ambati, Srikanth; Jordi, Michel; Kahn, Alissa; Díaz, J. Fernando; Fang, Weishuo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cerchietti, Leandro; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently due to the persistence of a cell population resistant to chemotherapy through different mechanisms, in which drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, specifically P-glycoprotein, is one of the most recognized. However, disappointing results from clinical trials employing inhibitors for these transporters have demonstrated the need to adopt different strategies. We hypothesized that microtubule targeting compounds presenting high affinity or covalent binding could overcome the effect of ABC transporters. We therefore evaluated the activity of the high-affinity paclitaxel analog CTX-40 as well as the covalent binder zampanolide (ZMP) in AML cells. Both molecules were active in chemosensitive as well as in chemoresistant cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein. Moreover, ZMP or CTX-40 in combination with daunorubicin showed synergistic killing without increased in vitro hematopoietic toxicity. In a primary AML sample, we further demonstrated that ZMP and CTX-40 are active in progenitor and differentiated leukemia cell populations. In sum, our data indicate that high affinity and covalent-binding anti-microtubule agents are active in AML cells otherwise chemotherapy resistant. PMID:26277539

  5. Tripartite ATP-independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporters Use an Arginine-mediated Selectivity Filter for High Affinity Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marcus; Hopkins, Adam P.; Severi, Emmanuele; Hawkhead, Judith; Bawdon, Daniel; Watts, Andrew G.; Hubbard, Roderick E.; Thomas, Gavin H.

    2015-01-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters are secondary transporters that have evolved an obligate dependence on a substrate-binding protein (SBP) to confer unidirectional transport. Different members of the DctP family of TRAP SBPs have binding sites that recognize a diverse range of organic acid ligands but appear to only share a common electrostatic interaction between a conserved arginine and a carboxylate group in the ligand. We investigated the significance of this interaction using the sialic acid-specific SBP, SiaP, from the Haemophilus influenzae virulence-related SiaPQM TRAP transporter. Using in vitro, in vivo, and structural methods applied to SiaP, we demonstrate that the coordination of the acidic ligand moiety of sialic acid by the conserved arginine (Arg-147) is essential for the function of the transporter as a high affinity scavenging system. However, at high substrate concentrations, the transporter can function in the absence of Arg-147 suggesting that this bi-molecular interaction is not involved in further stages of the transport cycle. As well as being required for high affinity binding, we also demonstrate that the Arg-147 is a strong selectivity filter for carboxylate-containing substrates in TRAP transporters by engineering the SBP to recognize a non-carboxylate-containing substrate, sialylamide, through water-mediated interactions. Together, these data provide biochemical and structural support that TRAP transporters function predominantly as high affinity transporters for carboxylate-containing substrates. PMID:26342690

  6. High affinity IgM(+) memory B cells are generated through a germinal center-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yasushi; Tashiro, Yasuyuki; Murakami, Akikazu; Nishimura, Miyuki; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Kubo, Masato; Burrows, Peter D; Azuma, Takachika

    2015-12-01

    During a T cell-dependent immune response, B cells undergo clonal expansion and selection and the induction of isotype switching and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Although somatically mutated IgM(+) memory B cells have been reported, it has not been established whether they are really high affinity B cells. We tracked (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl hapten-specific GC B cells from normal immunized mice based on affinity of their B cell receptor (BCR) and performed BCR sequence analysis. SHM was evident by day 7 postimmunization and increased with time, such that high affinity IgM(+) as well as IgG(+) memory B cells continued to be generated up to day 42. In contrast, class-switch recombination (CSR) was almost completed by day 7 and then the ratio of IgG1(+)/IgM(+) GC B cells remained unchanged. Together these findings suggest that IgM(+) B cells undergo SHM in the GC to generate high affinity IgM(+) memory cells and that this process continues even after CSR is accomplished. PMID:26514429

  7. High-Affinity Glucose Transport in Aspergillus nidulans Is Mediated by the Products of Two Related but Differentially Expressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Luisa; González, Ramón; Ramón, Daniel; MacCabe, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Independent systems of high and low affinity effect glucose uptake in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Low-affinity uptake is known to be mediated by the product of the mstE gene. In the current work two genes, mstA and mstC, have been identified that encode high-affinity glucose transporter proteins. These proteins' primary structures share over 90% similarity, indicating that the corresponding genes share a common origin. Whilst the function of the paralogous proteins is little changed, they differ notably in their patterns of expression. The mstC gene is expressed during the early phases of germination and is subject to CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression whereas mstA is expressed as a culture tends toward carbon starvation. In addition, various pieces of genetic evidence strongly support allelism of mstC and the previously described locus sorA. Overall, our data define MstC/SorA as a high-affinity glucose transporter expressed in germinating conidia, and MstA as a high-affinity glucose transporter that operates in vegetative hyphae under conditions of carbon limitation. PMID:24751997

  8. Current concepts. I. High affinity receptors for bombesin/GRP-like peptides on human small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, T.W.; Carney, D.N.; Cuttitta, F.; Quattrocchi, K.; Minna, J.D.

    1985-07-15

    The binding of a radiolabeled bombesin analogue to human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines was investigated. (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 4/)bombesin bound with high affinity (Kd = 0.5 nM) to a single class of sites (2000/cell) using SCLC line NCI-H446. Binding was reversible, saturable and specific. The pharmacology of binding was investigated, using NCI-H466 and SCLC line NCI-H345. Bombesin and structurally related peptides, such as gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), but not other peptides, such as substance P or vasopressin, inhibited high affinity (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 4/)BN binding activity. Finally, the putative receptor, a 78,000 dalton polypeptide, was identified by purifying radiolabeled cell lysates on bombesin or GRP affinity resins and then displaying the bound polypeptides on sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gels. Because SCLC both produces bombesin/GRP-like peptides and contains high affinity receptors for these peptides, they may function as important autocrine regulatory factors for human SCLC. 31 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Energy-dependent dissociation of ATP from high affinity catalytic sites of beef heart mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Penefsky, H.S.

    1985-11-05

    Incubation of (gamma-TSP)ATP with a molar excess of the membrane-bound form of mitochondrial ATPase (F1) results in binding of the bulk of the radioactive nucleotide in high affinity catalytic sites (Ka = 10(12) M-1). Subsequent initiation of respiration by addition of succinate or NADH is accompanied by a profound decrease in the affinity for ATP. About one-third of the bound radioactive ATP appears to dissociate, that is, the (gamma-TSP)ATP becomes accessible to hexokinase. The NADH-stimulated dissociation of (gamma-TSP)ATP is energy-dependent since the stimulation is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and is prevented by respiratory chain inhibitors. The rate of the energy-dependent dissociation of ATP that occurs in the presence of NADH, ADP, and Pi is commensurate with the measured initial rate of ATP synthesis in NADH-supported oxidative phosphorylation catalyzed by the same submitochondrial particles. Thus, the rate of dissociation of ATP from the high affinity catalytic site of submitochondrial particles meets the criterion of kinetic competency under the conditions of oxidative phosphorylation. These experiments provide evidence in support of the argument that energy conserved during the oxidation of substrates by the respiratory chain can be utilized to reduce the very tight binding of product ATP in high affinity catalytic sites and to promote dissociation of the nucleotide.

  10. Self-incompatibility involved in the level of acetylcholine and cAMP.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Takafumi; Akita, Isamu; Yoshino, Natsuko

    2007-11-01

    Elongation of pollen tubes in pistils after self-pollination of Lilium longiflorum cv. Hinomoto exhibiting strong gametophytic self-incompatibility was promoted by cAMP and also promoted by some metabolic modulators, namely, activators (forskolin and cholera toxin) of adenylate cyclase and inhibitors (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and pertussis) of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. Moreover, the elongation was promoted by acetylcholine (ACh) and other choline derivatives, such as acetylthiocholine, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine and chlorocholinechloride [CCC; (2-chloroethyl) trimethyl ammonium chloride]. A potent inhibitor (neostigmine) of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as well as acetylcholine also promoted the elongation. cAMP enhanced choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity and suppressed AChE activity in the pistils, suggesting that the results are closely correlated with self-incompatibility in L. longiflorum. In short, it came to light that cAMP modulates ChAT (acetylcholine-forming enzyme) and AChE (acetylchoine-decomposing enzyme) activities to enhance the level of ACh in the pistils of L. logiflorum after self-incompatible pollination. These results indicate that the self-incompatibility on self-pollination is caused by low levels of ACh and/or cAMP. PMID:19704589

  11. The role of ventral striatal cAMP signaling in stress-induced behaviors.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Florian; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Hernández, Adan; Benavides, David R; Tassin, Tara C; Tan, Chunfeng; Day, Jonathan; Fina, Maggy W; Yuen, Eunice Y; Yan, Zhen; Goldberg, Matthew S; Nairn, Angus C; Greengard, Paul; Nestler, Eric J; Taussig, Ronald; Nishi, Akinori; Houslay, Miles D; Bibb, James A

    2015-08-01

    The cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling cascade is a ubiquitous pathway acting downstream of multiple neuromodulators. We found that the phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) by cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (Cdk5) facilitated cAMP degradation and homeostasis of cAMP/PKA signaling. In mice, loss of Cdk5 throughout the forebrain elevated cAMP levels and increased PKA activity in striatal neurons, and altered behavioral responses to acute or chronic stressors. Ventral striatum- or D1 dopamine receptor-specific conditional knockout of Cdk5, or ventral striatum infusion of a small interfering peptide that selectively targeted the regulation of PDE4 by Cdk5, produced analogous effects on stress-induced behavioral responses. Together, our results demonstrate that altering cAMP signaling in medium spiny neurons of the ventral striatum can effectively modulate stress-induced behavioral states. We propose that targeting the Cdk5 regulation of PDE4 could be a new therapeutic approach for clinical conditions associated with stress, such as depression. PMID:26192746

  12. Project REACH: Field Guides 1-4. No. 1: Camp Secretary, No. 2: Camp Nurse, No. 3: Camp Food Services, No. 4: Camp Maintenance Supervisor. Appendices Q 1-4. Camp Staff Training Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Gary; And Others

    Resulting from a 3 year project to develop competency based programs for camp personnel working with the physically handicapped, the four field guides task analyze the roles of the camp secretary, camp nurse, camp food services staff, and camp maintenance supervisor. All guides contain an introduction and information on general duties, job…

  13. 1985 Parents' Guide to Accredited Camps. Ninth Annual Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The ninth annual edition of the listing of American Camping Association camps provides information for parents on choosing a camp, brief descriptions of approximately 1,900 camps, and 5 indexes. A narrative section offers information on how to look for a camp, special needs campers, kinds of camps, accreditation, contacting a camp, budgeting,…

  14. Regulation of cAMP Intracellular Levels in Human Platelets Stimulated by 2-Arachidonoylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Signorello, Maria Grazia; Leoncini, Giuliana

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated that in human platelets the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) decreased dose- and time-dependently cAMP intracellular levels. No effect on cAMP decrease induced by 2-AG was observed in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 as well in platelets pretreated with the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548 or with aspirin, inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway. An almost complete recovering of cAMP level was measured in platelets pretreated with the specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A, milrinone. In platelets pretreated with LY294002 or MK2206, inhibitors of PI3K/AKT pathway, and with U73122, inhibitor of phospholipase C pathway, only a partial prevention was shown. cAMP intracellular level depends on synthesis by adenylate cyclase and hydrolysis by PDEs. In 2-AG-stimulated platelets adenylate cyclase activity seems to be unchanged. In contrast PDEs appear to be involved. In particular PDE3A was specifically activated, as milrinone reversed cAMP reduction by 2-AG. 2-AG enhanced PDE3A activity through its phosphorylation. The PI3K/AKT pathway and PKC participate to this PDE3A phosphorylation/activation mechanism as it was greatly inhibited by platelet pretreatment with LY294002, MK2206, U73122, or the PKC specific inhibitor GF109203X. Taken together these data suggest that 2-AG potentiates its power of platelet agonist reducing cAMP intracellular level. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1240-1249, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26460717

  15. The ever unfolding story of cAMP signaling in trypanosomatids: vive la difference!

    PubMed Central

    Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Kalejaiye, Titilola D.; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetoplastids are unicellular, eukaryotic, flagellated protozoans containing the eponymous kinetoplast. Within this order, the family of trypanosomatids are responsible for some of the most serious human diseases, including Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi), sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei spp.), and leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp). Although cAMP is produced during the life cycle stages of these parasites, its signaling pathways are very different from those of mammals. The absence of G-protein-coupled receptors, the presence of structurally different adenylyl cyclases, the paucity of known cAMP effector proteins and the stringent need for regulation of cAMP in the small kinetoplastid cells all suggest a significantly different biochemical pathway and likely cell biology. However, each of the main kinetoplastid parasites express four class 1-type cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEA-D), which have highly similar catalytic domains to that of human PDEs. To date, only TbrPDEB, expressed as two slightly different isoforms TbrPDEB1 and B2, has been found to be essential when ablated. Although the genomes contain reasonably well conserved genes for catalytic and regulatory domains of protein kinase A, these have been shown to have varied structural and functional roles in the different species. Recent discovery of a role of cAMP/AMP metabolism in a quorum-sensing signaling pathway in T. brucei, and the identification of downstream cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs) whose expression levels correlate with sensitivity to PDE inhibitors, suggests a complex signaling cascade. The interplay between the roles of these novel CARPs and the quorum-sensing signaling pathway on cell division and differentiation makes for intriguing cell biology and a new paradigm in cAMP signal transduction, as well as potential targets for trypanosomatid-specific cAMP pathway-based therapeutics. PMID:26441645

  16. Does phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A) hold promise as a future therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michy P

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A) is the most recently discovered 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. By breaking down both cAMP and cGMP, PDE11A is a critical regulator of intracellular signaling. To date, PDE11A has been implicated to play a role in tumorigenesis, brain function, and inflammation. Here, we consolidate and, where necessary, reconcile the PDE11A literature to evaluate this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target. We compare the results and methodologies of numerous studies that report conflicting tissue expression profiles for PDE11A. We conclude that PDE11A expression is relatively restricted in the body, with reliable expression reported in tissues such as the brain (particularly the hippocampus), the prostate, and the adrenal gland. Each of the four PDE11A splice variants (PDE11A1-4) appears to exhibit a distinct tissue expression profile and has a unique N-terminal regulatory region, suggesting that each isoform could be individually targeted with a small molecule or biologic. Progress has been made in identifying a tool PDE11A inhibitor as well as an activator; however, the functional effects of these pharmacological tools remain to be determined. Importantly, PDE11A knockout mice do exist and appear healthy into late age, suggesting a potential safety window for targeting this enzyme. Considering the implication of PDE11A in disease-relevant biology, the potential to selectively target specific PDE11A variants, and the possibility of either activating or inhibiting the enzyme, we believe PDE11A holds promise as a potential future therapeutic target. PMID:25159071

  17. Protein kinases A and C regulate receptor-mediated increases in cAMP in rabbit erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Meera; Bowles, Elizabeth A.; Stephenson, Alan H.; Ellsworth, Mary L.; Sprague, Randy S.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) or the prostacyclin receptor (IPR) results in increases in cAMP and ATP release from erythrocytes. cAMP levels depend on a balance between synthesis via adenylyl cyclase and hydrolysis by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Previously, we reported that cAMP increases associated with activation of the β-AR and IPR in rabbit and human erythrocytes are tightly regulated by distinct PDEs (1). Importantly, inhibitors of these PDEs potentiated both increases in cAMP and ATP release. It has been shown that increases in protein kinase (PK) activity can activate PDE3 and PDE4. Both PKA and PKC are present in the erythrocyte and can phosphorylate and activate these PDEs. Here we investigate the hypothesis that PKA regulates PDE activity associated with the β-AR and both PKA and PKC regulate the PDE activity associated with the IPR in rabbit erythrocytes. Pretreatment of erythrocytes with the PKA inhibitor, H89 (10 μM), in the presence of the PDE4 inhibitor, rolipram (10 μM), augmented isoproterenol (1 μM)-induced cAMP increases. In contrast, in the presence of the PDE3 inhibitor, cilostazol (10 μM), pretreatment of erythrocytes with either H89 (1 μM) or two chemically dissimilar inhibitors of PKC, calphostin C (1 μM) or GFX109203X (1 μM), potentiated iloprost (1 μM)-induced cAMP increases. Furthermore, pretreatment of erythrocytes with both H89 and GFX109203X in the presence of cilostazol augmented the iloprost-induced increases in cAMP to a greater extent than either PK inhibitor individually. These results support the hypothesis that PDEs associated with receptor-mediated increases in cAMP in rabbit erythrocytes are regulated by kinases specific to the receptor's signaling pathway. PMID:20008267

  18. Camp for Youth With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fegan-Bohm, Kelly; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; DeSalvo, Daniel; Gunn, Sheila; Hilliard, Marisa

    2016-08-01

    Camps for youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have grown in size and scope since they first emerged in the 1920s. Anecdotal evidence suggests that attending camp with other youth with T1D is beneficial, largely attributed to sharing fun, active experiences and removing the isolation of living with diabetes. However, few studies have evaluated the psychosocial and medical impacts of T1D camp attendance during and after camp sessions. In addition, T1D camps have been a setting for numerous studies on a variety of T1D-related research questions not related to camp itself, such as testing novel diabetes management technologies in an active, non-laboratory setting. This paper reviews the evidence of psychosocial and medical outcomes associated with T1D camp attendance across the globe, provides an overview of other research conducted at camp, and offers recommendations for future research conducted at T1D camp. PMID:27292106

  19. Constellation of HCN channels and cAMP regulating proteins in dendritic spines of the primate prefrontal cortex: potential substrate for working memory deficits in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Paspalas, Constantinos D; Wang, Min; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2013-07-01

    Schizophrenia associates with impaired prefrontal cortical (PFC) function and alterations in cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathways. These include genetic insults to disrupted-in-schizophrenia (DISC1) and phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) regulating cAMP hydrolysis, and increased dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) expression that elevates cAMP. We used immunoelectron microscopy to localize DISC1, PDE4A, PDE4B, and D1R in monkey PFC and to view spatial interactions with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels that gate network inputs when opened by cAMP. Physiological interactions between PDE4s and HCN channels were tested in recordings of PFC neurons in monkeys performing a spatial working memory task. The study reveals a constellation of cAMP-related proteins (DISC1, PDE4A, and D1R) and HCN channels next to excitatory synapses and the spine neck in thin spines of superficial PFC, where working memory microcircuits interconnect and spine loss is most evident in schizophrenia. In contrast, channels in dendrites were distant from synapses and cAMP-related proteins, and were associated with endosomal trafficking. The data suggest that a cAMP signalplex is selectively positioned in the spines to gate PFC pyramidal cell microcircuits. Single-unit recordings confirmed physiological interactions between cAMP and HCN channels, consistent with gating actions. These data may explain why PFC networks are especially vulnerable to genetic insults that dysregulate cAMP signaling. PMID:22693343

  20. Transcriptional regulation of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase gene expression by cyclic AMP in C6 cells.

    PubMed

    Gravel, M; Gao, E; Hervouet-Zeiber, C; Parsons, V; Braun, P E

    2000-11-01

    It was recently shown that the two transcripts encoding the isoforms of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP1 and CNP2) are differentially regulated during the process of oligodendrocyte maturation. In oligodendrocyte precursors, only CNP2 mRNA is present, whereas in differentiating oligodendrocytes, both CNP1 and CNP2 mRNAs are expressed. This pattern of CNP expression is likely due to stage-specific transcriptional regulation of the two CNP promoters during the process of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here, we report the influence of increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels on the transcription of both CNP1 and CNP2 mRNAs in rat C6 glioma cells. We found that the transcription of CNP1 mRNA was significantly increased in comparison with that of CNP2 mRNA in cells treated with cAMP analogues to elevate intracellular cAMP levels. This up-regulation of CNP1 expression (a) is due to an increase of transcription, (b) requires de novo protein synthesis, and (c) requires the activity of protein kinase A. These results are physiologically significant and support the idea that a cAMP-mediated pathway is part of the molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of CNP1 in oligodendrocytes. The regulation of CNP1 promoter activity by cAMP was then investigated in stably transfected C6 cell lines containing various deletions of the CNP promoter directing the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. We showed that the sequence between nucleotides -126 and -102 was essential for the cAMP-dependent induction of CNP1 expression. Gel retardation analysis showed that two protein-DNA complexes are formed between this sequence and nuclear factors from C6 cells treated or not treated with cAMP. This suggests that the induction of CNP1 mRNA transcription is not mediated by changes in binding of nuclear factors that interact directly with the -126/-102 sequence. Sequence analysis of this region revealed the presence of a putative activator protein-2 (AP

  1. Exposure to an Extremely-Low-Frequency Magnetic Field Stimulates Adrenal Steroidogenesis via Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase Activity in a Mouse Adrenal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Kawata, Shiyori; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Kadoriku, Fumiya; Kitamura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) are generated by power lines and household electrical devices. In the last several decades, some evidence has shown an association between ELF-MF exposure and depression and/or anxiety in epidemiological and animal studies. The mechanism underlying ELF-MF-induced depression is considered to involve adrenal steroidogenesis, which is triggered by ELF-MF exposure. However, how ELF-MFs stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis is controversial. In the current study, we investigated the effect of ELF-MF exposure on the mouse adrenal cortex-derived Y-1 cell line and the human adrenal cortex-derived H295R cell line to clarify whether the ELF-MF stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis directly. ELF-MF exposure was found to significantly stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis (p < 0.01–0.05) and the expression of adrenal steroid synthetic enzymes (p < 0.05) in Y-1 cells, but the effect was weak in H295R cells. Y-1 cells exposed to an ELF-MF showed significant decreases in phosphodiesterase activity (p < 0.05) and intracellular Ca2+ concentration (p < 0.01) and significant increases in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentration (p < 0.001–0.05) and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation (p < 0.05). The increase in cAMP was not inhibited by treatment with NF449, an inhibitor of the Gs alpha subunit of G protein. Our results suggest that ELF-MF exposure stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis via an increase in intracellular cAMP caused by the inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity in Y-1 cells. The same mechanism may trigger the increase in adrenal steroid secretion in mice observed in our previous study. PMID:27100201

  2. Hydromania: Summer Science Camp Curriculum.

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Joan

    1995-07-01

    In 1992, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a collaborative pilot project with the Portland Parks and Recreation Community Schools Program and others to provide summer science camps to children in Grades 4--6. Camps run two weeks in duration between late June and mid-August. Sessions are five days per week, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. In addition to hands-on science and math curriculum, at least three field trips are incorporated into the educational learning experience. The purpose of the BPA/DOE summer camps is to make available opportunities for fun, motivating experiences in science to students who otherwise would have difficulty accessing them. This includes inner city, minority, rural and low income students. Public law 101-510, which Congress passed in 1990, authorizes DOE facilities to establish collaborative inner-city and rural partnership programs in science and math. A primary goal of the BPA summer hands on science camps is to bring affordable science camp experiences to students where they live. It uses everyday materials to engage students` minds and to give them a sense that they have succeeded through a fun hands-on learning environment.

  3. Characterization of phosphodiesterase 2A in human malignant melanoma PMP cells

    PubMed Central

    MORITA, HIROSHI; MURATA, TAKU; SHIMIZU, KASUMI; OKUMURA, KENYA; INUI, MADOKA; TAGAWA, TOSHIRO

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis for malignant melanoma is poor; therefore, new diagnostic methods and treatment strategies are urgently needed. Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) is one of 21 phosphodiesterases, which are divided into 11 families (PDE1-PDE11). PDE2 hydrolyzes cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), and its binding to cGMP enhances the hydrolysis of cAMP. We previously reported the expression of PDE1, PDE3 and PDE5 in human malignant melanoma cells. However, the expression of PDE2 in these cells has not been investigated. Herein, we examined the expression of PDE2A and its role in human oral malignant melanoma PMP cells. Sequencing of RT-PCR products revealed that PDE2A2 was the only variant expressed in PMP cells. Four point mutations were detected; one missense mutation at nucleotide position 734 (from C to T) resulted in the substitution of threonine with isoleucine at amino acid position 214. The other three were silent mutations. An in vitro migration assay and a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay revealed that suppressing PDE2 activity with its specific inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), had no impact on cell motility or apoptosis. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of EHNA, assessed using a trypan blue exclusion assay, was negligible. On the other hand, assessment of cell proliferation by BrdU incorporation and cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry revealed that EHNA treatment inhibited DNA synthesis and increased the percentage of G2/M-arrested cells. Furthermore, cyclin A mRNA expression was downregulated, while cyclin E mRNA expression was upregulated in EHNA-treated cells. Our results demonstrated that the PDE2A2 variant carrying point mutations is expressed in PMP cells and may affect cell cycle progression by modulating cyclin A expression. Thus, PDE2A2 is a possible new molecular target for the treatment of malignant melanoma. PMID:23381931

  4. IGF-I–induced Differentiation of L6 Myogenic Cells Requires the Activity of cAMP-Phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    De Arcangelis, Vania; Coletti, Dario; Conti, Marco; Lagarde, Michel; Molinaro, Mario; Adamo, Sergio; Nemoz, Georges; Naro, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    Inhibition of type 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4) activity in L6-C5 and L6-E9 abolished myogenic differentiation induced by low-serum medium and IGF-I. L6-C5 cells cultured in low-serum medium displayed a PDE4 activity higher than cells cultured in serum-free medium, a condition not sufficient to induce differentiation. In the presence of serum, PDE4D3, the major isoform natively expressed in L6-C5 cells, translocated to a Triton-insoluble fraction, which increased the PDE specific activity of the fraction, and exhibited a Mr shift typical of phosphorylation of this isoform. Furthermore, serum promoted the localization of PDE4D3 to a vesicular subcellular compartment. In L6-C5 cells, IGF-I is a stronger inducer of myogenic differentiation in the presence than in absence of serum. Its ability to trigger differentiation in the absence of serum was restored by overexpressing wild-type PDE4D3, but not a phosphorylation-insensitive mutant. This finding was confirmed in single cells overexpressing a GFP-PDE4D3 fusion protein by assessing nuclear accumulation of myogenin in both L6-C5 and L6-E9. Overexpression of other PDE isoforms was less efficient, confirming that PDE4D3 is the physiologically relevant phosphodiesterase isoform in the control of myogenesis. These results show that downregulation of cAMP signaling through cAMP-phosphodiesterase stimulation is a prerequisite for induction of myogenesis. PMID:12686596

  5. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  6. Point mutation increases a form of the NK1 receptor with high affinity for neurokinin A and B and septide

    PubMed Central

    Ciucci, Alessandra; Palma, Carla; Manzini, Stefano; Werge, Thomas M

    1998-01-01

    The binding modalities of substance P and neurokinin A on the wild type and Gly166 to-Cys mutant NK1 receptors expressed on CHO cells were investigated in homologous and heterologous binding experiments using both radiolabelled substance P and neurokinin A.On the wild type NK1 receptor NKA displaces radiolabelled substance P with very low apparent affinity, despite its high-affinity binding constant (determined in homologous binding experiments). The Gly166 to-Cys substitution in the NK1 tachykinin receptor greatly enhances the apparent affinity of neurokinin A in competition for radiolabelled substance P, but it does not change the binding constant of neurokinin A. The mutation, thereby, eliminates the discrepancy between the low apparent affinity and the high binding constant of neurokinin A.On the wild type receptor the binding capacity of neurokinin A is significantly smaller than that of substance P. In contrast, the two tachykinins bind to approximately the same number of sites on the mutant receptor.Simultaneous mass action law analysis of binding data in which multiple radioligands were employed in parallel demonstrated that a one-site model was unable to accommodate all the experimental data, whereas a two-site model provided a dramatically better description.These two receptor-sites display equally high affinity for substance P, while neurokinin A strongly discriminates between a high and a low affinity component. The binding affinities of neurokinin A are not affected by the mutation, which instead specifically alters the distribution between receptor sites in favour of a high affinity neurokinin A binding form.The low apparent affinity and binding capacity of neurokinin A on the wild type receptor results from neurokinin A binding with high affinity only to a fraction of the sites labelled by substance P. The mutation increases the proportion of this site, and consequently enhances the apparent affinity and binding capacity of neurokinin A.The binding

  7. Cytochemical demonstration of cyclic 3', 5' AMP phosphodiesterase in different tissue of migratory locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides R.F.).

    PubMed

    Benedeczky, I; Rózsa, K S

    1981-01-01

    The localization of cyclic 3', 5'-AMP phosphodiesterase was studied by ultrastructural cytochemical methods in the various tissues of Locusta migratoria. Large amounts of electron dense, granular reaction products were detectable on the surface of the corpora allata and the corpus cardiacum, bound to the basal lamina. In the protocerebral neuropile rather large amounts of reaction products were observed in the processes of the glial cells. A significant number of lead phosphate deposit was found to occur on the membrane of certain large axons, the microtubules of the axons, furthermore on the membrane of several terminals. Reaction product was also observable in certain terminals, bound to the synaptic vesicles and the mitochondria. At the same time, electron dense deposits were not detectable at all on the surface of cerebral neurons. In the case of myocardium, reaction product was only found on the basal lamina and the extracellular surface of the sarcolemma. On the basis of our results it can be stated that the cyclic 3', 5'-AMP phosphodiesterase is detectable by cytochemical methods in different tissues of Locusta migratoria and presumably it fulfils the task of the extracellular cAMP level regulation. PMID:6260713

  8. Youth development and the camp experience.

    PubMed

    Garst, Barry A; Browne, Laurie P; Bialeschki, M Deborah

    2011-01-01

    The organized camp experience has been an important part of the lives of children, youth, and adults for over 150 years. The camp experience is a way for young people to explore and search for an authenticity often missing in other parts of their lives that contributes to their healthy transition into adulthood. Over the past decade, tremendous growth in the volume and rigor of camp-related research has occurred, facilitated by a targeted research agenda conducted by the American Camp Association. This agenda was founded on three national research projects conducted between 2003 and 2007: a study to identify the developmental outcomes of the camp experience, a benchmarking study of the youth development supports and opportunities provided through camp experiences, and a program improvement project directed toward enhancing supports and opportunities provided by camps. The findings from these research projects suggest that camp experiences promote developmental outcomes in both campers and staff and that camps provide the supports and opportunities needed for positive youth development. This article explores the developmental outcomes of the camp experience and the characteristics of the supports and opportunities afforded by camp experiences, including settings, structures, and programs and activities, as a way to provide a clearer understanding of camp as a positive youth development setting. Innovations and opportunities in research related to the provision of quality camp experiences are also considered. PMID:21786411

  9. Characterization of AMT-mediated high-affinity ammonium uptake in roots of maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Gu, Riliang; Duan, Fengying; An, Xia; Zhang, Fusuo; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Yuan, Lixing

    2013-09-01

    High-affinity ammonium uptake in plant roots is mainly mediated by AMT1-type ammonium transporters, and their regulation varies depending on the plant species. In this study we aimed at characterizing AMT-mediated ammonium transport in maize, for which ammonium-based fertilizer is an important nitrogen (N) source. Two ammonium transporter genes, ZmAMT1;1a and ZmAMT1;3, were isolated from a maize root-specific cDNA library by functional complementation of an ammonium uptake-defective yeast mutant. Ectopic expression of both genes in an ammonium uptake-defective Arabidopsis mutant conferred high-affinity ammonium uptake capacities in roots with substrate affinities of 48 and 33 μM for ZmAMT1;1a and ZmAMT1;3, respectively. In situ hybridization revealed co-localization of both ZmAMT genes on the rhizodermis, suggesting an involvement in capturing ammonium from the rhizosphere. In N-deficient maize roots, influx increased significantly while ZmAMT expression did not. Ammonium resupply to N-deficient or nitrate-pre-cultured roots, however, rapidly enhanced both influx and ZmAMT transcript levels, revealing a substrate-inducible regulation of ammonium uptake. In conclusion, the two rhizodermis-localized transporters ZmAMT1;1a and ZmAMT1;3 are most probably the major components in the high-affinity transport system in maize roots. A particular regulatory feature is their persistent induction by ammonium rather than an up-regulation under N deficiency. PMID:23832511

  10. Selection of a high-affinity and in vivo bioactive ssDNA aptamer against angiotensin II peptide.

    PubMed

    Heiat, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Reza; Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2016-08-01

    Unique features of aptamers have attracted interests for a broad range of applications. Aptamers are able to specifically bind to targets and inhibit their functions. This study, aimed to isolate the high affinity ssDNA aptamers against bio-regulator peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) and investigate their bioactivity in cellular and animal models. To isolate ssDNA aptamers, 12 rounds of affinity chromatography SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) procedure were carried out. The SPR (surface plasmon resonance) and ELONA (enzyme linked oligonucleotide assay) analysis were used to determine the affinity and specificity of aptamers. The ability of selected aptamers to inhibit the proliferative effect of Ang II on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HA-VSMCs) and their performance on Wistar rat urinary system and serum electrolyte levels were investigated. Two full-length aptamers (FLC112 and FLC125) with high affinity of respectively 7.52±2.44E-10 and 5.87±1.3E-9M were isolated against Ang II. The core regions of these aptamers (CRC112 and CRC125) also showed affinity of 5.33±1.15E-9 and 4.11±1.09E-9M. In vitro analysis revealed that FLC112 and FLC125 can inhibit the proliferative effect of Ang II on HA-VSMCs (P<0.05). They also significantly reduced the serum sodium level and increased the urine volume (P<0.05). The core regions of aptamers did not show high inhibitory potential against Ang II. It can be a spotlight that ssDNA aptamers have high potential for blocking Ang II. In conclusion, it appears that the researches focusing on high affinity and bioactive aptamers may lead to excellent results in blocking Ang II activity. PMID:27298205

  11. Insights from the Fungus Fusarium oxysporum Point to High Affinity Glucose Transporters as Targets for Enhancing Ethanol Production from Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahin S.; Nugent, Brian; Mullins, Ewen; Doohan, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt) from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km(glucose) was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing. PMID:23382943

  12. Topography of the high-affinity lysine binding site of plasminogen as defined with a specific antibody probe

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, L.A.; Plow, E.F.

    1986-11-04

    An antibody population that reacted with the high-affinity lysine binding site of human plasminogen was elicited by immunizing rabbits with an elastase degradation product containing kringles 1-3 (EDP I). This antibody was immunopurified by affinity chromatography on plasminogen-Sepharose and elution with 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The eluted antibodies bound (/sup 125/I)EDP I, (/sup 125/I)Glu-plasminogen, and (/sup 125/I)Lys-plasminogen in radioimmunoassays, and binding of each ligand was at least 99% inhibited by 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The concentrations for 50% inhibition of (/sup 125/I)EDP I binding by tranexamic acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, and lysine were 2.6, 46, and l730 ..mu..M, respectively. Similar values were obtained with plasminogen and suggested that an unoccupied high-affinity lysine binding site was required for antibody recognition. The antiserum reacted exclusively with plasminogen derivatives containing the EDP I region and did not react with those lacking an EDP I region, or with tissue plasminogen activator or prothrombin, which also contains kringles. By immunoblotting analyses, a chymotryptic degradation product of M/sub r/ 20,000 was derived from EDP I that retained reactivity with the antibody. ..cap alpha../sub 2/-Antiplasmin inhibited the binding of radiolabeled EDP I, Glu-plasminogen, or Lys-plasminogen by the antiserum, suggesting that the recognized site is involved in the noncovalent interaction of the inhibitor with plasminogen. The binding of (/sup 125/I)EDP I to fibrin was also inhibited by the antiserum. The observations provide independent evidence for the role of the high-affinity lysine binding site in the functional interactions of plasminogen with its primary substrate and inhibitor.

  13. Solubilization and reconstitution of the D-1 dopamine receptor: potentiation of the agonist high-affinity state of the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.

    1988-11-29

    The D-1 dopamine receptor was extracted from rat striatal membranes with sodium cholate and NaCl in the presence of a specific agonist and phospholipids. The soluble receptor then was reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles by further addition of phospholipids prior to detergent removal. Of the total membrane receptors, up to 48% were extracted and 36% were reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Yields were greatly reduced if the agonist was omitted or replaced with an antagonist. The solubilized and reconstituted D-1 receptors retained the pharmacological properties of the membrane-bound receptors, including the ability to discriminate between active and inactive enantiomers of specific agonists and antagonists. In this regard, the affinity of the reconstituted receptors for the D-1 specific antagonist /sup 125/I SCH 23982 was similar to that of the membrane-bound receptors with a Kd of 1.5 nM. Both the soluble and reconstituted forms of the D-1 receptor exhibited two affinity states for the D-1 specific agonist SKandF R-38393. In contrast to the low proportion of the receptors that had a high affinity for the agonists in striatal membranes (less than 6%), there was a dramatic increase following solubilization (22%) and reconstitution (40%). Similar results were obtained by using dopamine; the proportion of high-affinity sites increased from 4% (membrane-bound) to 48% (reconstituted) of the total receptor population. These high-affinity sites were coupled to G proteins, as guanyl nucleotides completely abolished them. Addition of guanyl nucleotides prior to solubilization or to reconstitution, however, had no effect on the subsequent yield of the reconstituted receptors.

  14. Phosphodiesterase-4 modulation as a potential therapeutic for cognitive loss in pathological and non-pathological aging: possibilities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Rolf T; Zhang, Han-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a super family of 11 enzyme families responsible for the hydrolysis of the intracellular secondary messengers cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). PDE4, in particular, is highly expressed in brain regions involved with regulation of memory, anxiety, and depression, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens. Senescence has been shown to result in extreme dysregulation of the cAMP pathway in various brain regions. Thus, as a critical controller of intracellular cAMP levels, PDE4 may be a potential target for the treatment of senescence-related cognitive disorders, which could be pathological and/or non-pathological in origin. While there is great potential in the development of novel PDE4 inhibitors for treatment of senescent-cognition impairment, there are also currently many pitfalls that need to be overcome. PDE4 has four subfamilies (PDE4A, B, C, and D) that are differentially expressed throughout the brain and body, as well as at least 25 splice variants derived from alternative splicing and multiple promoter sites. PDE4 subtypes have been shown to have differential effects on behavior, and cAMP itself has also been shown to play a contrasting role in behavior in different brain regions. This review will focus on what is currently understood about PDE4 in aging, the potential for PDE4 modulation as a cognitive therapy, and current pitfalls and limitations that need to be overcome in the PDE4 field. Overall, furthering our understanding of this incredibly complex pathway may one day assist with the development of novel therapeutics for both pathological and non-pathological cognitive disorders associated with senescence. PMID:25159075

  15. The effect of resveratrol on beta amyloid-induced memory impairment involves inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 related signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Ling; Pan, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jiechun; Wang, Liqun; Wang, Weijie; Cheng, Ruochuan; Wu, Fan; Feng, Xiaoqing; Yu, Yingcong; Zhang, Han-Ting; O'Donnell, James M; Xu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in red wine, has wide spectrum of pharmacological properties including antioxidative and antiaging activities. Beta amyloid peptides (Aβ) are known to involve cognitive impairment, neuroinflammatory and apoptotic processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Activation of cAMP and/or cGMP activities can improve memory performance and decrease the neuroinflammation and apoptosis. However, it remains unknown whether the memory enhancing effect of resveratrol on AD associated cognitive disorders is related to the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) subtypes and subsequent increases in intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP activities. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol on Aβ1-42-induced cognitive impairment and the participation of PDE4 subtypes related cAMP or cGMP signaling. Mice microinfused with Aβ1-42 into bilateral CA1 subregions displayed learning and memory impairment, as evidenced by reduced memory acquisition and retrieval in the water maze and retention in the passive avoidance tasks; it was also significant that neuroinflammatory and pro-apoptotic factors were increased in Aβ1-42-treated mice. Aβ1-42-treated mice also increased in PDE4A, 4B and 4D expression, and decreased in PKA level. However, PKA inhibitor H89, but not PKG inhibitor KT5823, prevented resveratrol's effects on these parameters. Resveratrol also reversed Aβ1-42-induced decreases in phosphorylated cAMP response-element binding protein (pCREB), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and anti-apoptotic factor BCl-2 expression, which were reversed by H89. These findings suggest that resveratrol reversing Aβ-induced learning and memory disorder may involve the regulation of neuronal inflammation and apoptosis via PDE4 subtypes related cAMP-CREB-BDNF signaling. PMID:26980711

  16. The effect of resveratrol on beta amyloid-induced memory impairment involves inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 related signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Ling; Pan, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jiechun; Wang, Liqun; Wang, Weijie; Cheng, Ruochuan; Wu, Fan; Feng, Xiaoqing; Yu, Yingcong; Zhang, Han-Ting; O'Donnell, James M.; Xu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in red wine, has wide spectrum of pharmacological properties including antioxidative and antiaging activities. Beta amyloid peptides (Aβ) are known to involve cognitive impairment, neuroinflammatory and apoptotic processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Activation of cAMP and/or cGMP activities can improve memory performance and decrease the neuroinflammation and apoptosis. However, it remains unknown whether the memory enhancing effect of resveratrol on AD associated cognitive disorders is related to the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) subtypes and subsequent increases in intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP activities. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol on Aβ1-42-induced cognitive impairment and the participation of PDE4 subtypes related cAMP or cGMP signaling. Mice microinfused with Aβ1-42 into bilateral CA1 subregions displayed learning and memory impairment, as evidenced by reduced memory acquisition and retrieval in the water maze and retention in the passive avoidance tasks; it was also significant that neuroinflammatory and pro-apoptotic factors were increased in Aβ1-42-treated mice. Aβ1-42-treated mice also increased in PDE4A, 4B and 4D expression, and decreased in PKA level. However, PKA inhibitor H89, but not PKG inhibitor KT5823, prevented resveratrol's effects on these parameters. Resveratrol also reversed Aβ1-42-induced decreases in phosphorylated cAMP response-element binding protein (pCREB), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and anti-apoptotic factor BCl-2 expression, which were reversed by H89. These findings suggest that resveratrol reversing Aβ-induced learning and memory disorder may involve the regulation of neuronal inflammation and apoptosis via PDE4 subtypes related cAMP-CREB-BDNF signaling. PMID:26980711

  17. Current use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in urology

    PubMed Central

    Hakky, Tariq Said; Jain, Lakshay

    2015-01-01

    The causes of male erectile dysfunction (ED) are quite variable and are now commonly divided into etiologies such as ischemia, smooth muscle damage, or altered blood flow. Although varying rates of ED have been reported in literature, the number of men with ED is projected to increase worldwide by 2025 to approximately 322 million. Since the introduction of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, there has been a paradigm shift in the treatment of ED because PDE5 inhibitors address a broad spectrum of etiologies for ED. Today, the American Urological Association recommends the use of three PDE5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, and vardenafil) as a first-line therapy for the treatment of ED. This review evaluates the pharmacological mechanism of PDE5 inhibitors along with the impact and use of sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil, and avanafil. By increasing intracellular cGMP levels, PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to be effective in the treatment of ED. Through their effects on other cellular signaling pathways, PDE5 inhibitors have the potential for treating other urologic conditions as well. The use of PDE5 inhibitors can also be combined to produce a synergistic effect in conditions such as male hypogonadism and benign prostatic hyperplasia in addition to ED. PMID:26328208

  18. Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors Attenuate the Asthma Phenotype Produced by β2-Adrenoceptor Agonists in Phenylethanolamine N-Methyltransferase-Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Forkuo, Gloria S; Kim, Hosu; Thanawala, Vaidehi J; Al-Sawalha, Nour; Valdez, Daniel; Joshi, Radhika; Parra, Sergio; Pera, Tonio; Gonnella, Patricia A; Knoll, Brian J; Walker, Julia K L; Penn, Raymond B; Bond, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Mice lacking the endogenous β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR) agonist epinephrine (phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase [PNMT]-knockout mice) are resistant to developing an "asthma-like" phenotype in an ovalbumin sensitization and challenge (Ova S/C) model, and chronic administration of β2AR agonists to PNMT-KO mice restores the phenotype. Based on these and other studies showing differential effects of various β2AR ligands on the asthma phenotype, we have speculated that the permissive effect of endogenous epinephrine and exogenous β2AR agonists on allergic lung inflammation can be explained by qualitative β2AR signaling. The β2AR can signal through at least two pathways: the canonical Gαs-cAMP pathway and a β-arrestin-dependent pathway. Previous studies suggest that β-arrestin-2 is required for allergic lung inflammation. On the other hand, cell-based assays suggest antiinflammatory effects of Gαs-cAMP signaling. This study was designed to test whether the in vitro antiinflammatory effects of phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors, known to increase intracellular cAMP in multiple airway cell types, attenuate the asthma-like phenotype produced by the β2AR agonists formoterol and salmeterol in vivo in PNMT-KO mice, based on the hypothesis that skewing β2AR signaling toward Gαs-cAMP pathway is beneficial. Airway inflammatory cells, epithelial mucus production, and airway hyperresponsiveness were quantified. In Ova S/C PNMT-KO mice, formoterol and salmeterol restored the asthma-like phenotype comparable to Ova S/C wild-type mice. However, coadministration of either roflumilast or rolipram attenuated this formoterol- or salmeterol-driven phenotype in Ova S/C PNMT-KO. These findings suggest that amplification of β2AR-mediated cAMP by phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors attenuates the asthma-like phenotype promoted by β-agonists. PMID:26909542

  19. 2'-Aminoethoxy-2-amino-3-methylpyridine in triplex-forming oligonucleotides: high affinity, selectivity and resistance to enzymatic degradation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Chenguang; Shelbourne, Montserrat; Fox, Keith R; Brown, Tom

    2011-12-23

    The phosphoramidite monomer of the C-nucleoside 2'-aminoethoxy-2-amino-3-methylpyridine (AE-MAP) has been synthesized for the first time and incorporated into triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). Ultraviolet melting and DNase I footprinting studies show that AE-MAP is a potent triplex-stabilizing monomer that is selective for GC base pairs. TFOs containing AE-MAP bind with high affinity to duplexes but only weakly to single stranded DNA. In addition, AE-MAP confers high nuclease resistance on oligonucleotides. TFOs containing AE-MAP have potential for gene knock-out and gene expression studies. PMID:22127905

  20. Crystallographic analysis reveals the structural basis of the high-affinity binding of iophenoxic acid to human serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Iophenoxic acid is an iodinated radiocontrast agent that was withdrawn from clinical use because of its exceptionally long half-life in the body, which was due in part to its high-affinity binding to human serum albumin (HSA). It was replaced by Iopanoic acid, which has an amino rather than a hydroxyl group at position 3 on the iodinated benzyl ring and, as a result, binds to albumin with lower affinity and is excreted more rapidly from the body. To understand how iophenoxic acid binds so tightly to albumin, we wanted to examine the structural basis of its interaction with HSA. Results We have determined the co-crystal structure of HSA in complex with iophenoxic acid at 2.75 Å resolution, revealing a total of four binding sites, two of which - in drugs sites 1 and 2 on the protein - are likely to be occupied at clinical doses. High-affinity binding of iophenoxic acid occurs at drug site 1. The structure reveals that polar and apolar groups on the compound are involved in its interactions with drug site 1. In particular, the 3-hydroxyl group makes three hydrogen bonds with the side-chains of Tyr 150 and Arg 257. The mode of binding to drug site 2 is similar except for the absence of a binding partner for the hydroxyl group on the benzyl ring of the compound. Conclusions The HSA-iophenoxic acid structure indicates that high-affinity binding to drug site 1 is likely to be due to extensive desolvation of the compound, coupled with the ability of the binding pocket to provide a full set of salt-bridging or hydrogen bonding partners for its polar groups. Consistent with this interpretation, the structure also suggests that the lower-affinity binding of iopanoic acid arises because replacement of the 3-hydroxyl by an amino group eliminates hydrogen bonding to Arg 257. This finding underscores the importance of polar interactions in high-affinity binding to albumin. PMID:21501503

  1. Characterization of Binding and Inhibitory Properties of TAK-063, a Novel Phosphodiesterase 10A Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Akina; Suzuki, Kazunori; Kamiguchi, Naomi; Miyamoto, Maki; Tohyama, Kimio; Nakashima, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Takahiko; Kimura, Haruhide

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibition is a novel and promising approach for the treatment of central nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia and Huntington’s disease. A novel PDE10A inhibitor, TAK-063 [1-[2-fluoro-4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)phenyl]-5-methoxy-3-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridazin-4(1H)-one] has shown high inhibitory activity and selectivity for human recombinant PDE10A2 in vitro; the half-maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.30 nM, and selectivity over other phosphodiesterases (PDEs) was more than 15000-fold. TAK-063 at 10 µM did not show more than 50% inhibition or stimulation of 91 enzymes or receptors except for PDEs. In vitro autoradiography (ARG) studies using rat brain sections revealed that [3H]TAK-063 selectively accumulated in the caudate putamen (CPu), nucleus accumbens (NAc), globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and striatonigral projection, where PDE10A is highly expressed. This [3H]TAK-063 accumulation was almost entirely blocked by an excess amount of MP-10, a PDE10A selective inhibitor, and the accumulation was not observed in brain slices of Pde10a-knockout mice. In rat brain sections, [3H]TAK-063 bound to a single high-affinity site with mean ± SEM dissociation constants of 7.2 ± 1.2 and 2.6 ± 0.5 nM for the CPu and NAc shell, respectively. Orally administered [14C]TAK-063 selectively accumulated in PDE10A expressing brain regions in an in vivo ARG study in rats. Striatal PDE10A occupancy by TAK-063 in vivo was measured using T-773 as a tracer and a dose of 0.88 mg/kg (p.o.) was calculated to produce 50% occupancy in rats. Translational studies with TAK-063 and other PDE10A inhibitors such as those presented here will help us better understand the pharmacological profile of this class of potential central nervous system drugs. PMID:25815469

  2. Going Camping? A Basic Guide to Camping with Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1977

    Beginning with the "often overlooked areas", this guide to camping trips for secondary students presents initial planning procedures such as: site selection; number of leaders per number of students (2 leaders for each group of 10-12); parental permission forms; transportation arrangements; public school announcements; medical aid expertise and…

  3. Making Camp Environmentally Friendly: How Two Camps Did It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, Martin; Griner-Johnson, Russ

    1991-01-01

    Describes the efforts of two camps administered by the Brandeis-Bardin Institute (Brandeis, California) in implementing water and energy conservation programs, involving recycling, composting, and landfill savings. Programs were successful in eliminating excess waste and teaching campers to care more about their environments at home and at work.…

  4. Dual specificity and novel structural folding of yeast phosphodiesterase-1 for hydrolysis of second messengers cyclic adenosine and guanosine 3',5'-Monophosphate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tian, Yuanyuan; Cui, Wenjun; Huang, Manna; Robinson, Howard; Wan, Yiqian; Wang, Yousheng; Ke, Hengming

    2014-08-05

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s⁻¹ for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s₅⁻¹ for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural foldingmore » that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP.« less

  5. Starting a Technology Camp for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litowitz, Len S.; Baylor, Steven C.

    1997-01-01

    Presents information for starting and maintaining a technology camp for students. Includes selecting topics, identifying participants, marketing, managing the camp, budgeting, and benefits to students and host institutions. (JOW)

  6. Reading Camps for Teenagers in Hungary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Attila

    1991-01-01

    Describes reading camps in Hungary, which numbered around 140 in the late 1980s and lasted from 10 to 14 days each summer. Notes that these camps arouse interest through a series of conversations between equal partners. (RS)

  7. Including People with Disabilities in Camp Programs: A Resource for Camp Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roswal, Glenn M., Ed.; Dowd, Karen J., Ed.; Bynum, Jerry W., Ed.

    Written primarily by camp administrators affiliated with the National Easter Seal Society, this publication is designed to help camp directors meet the challenges of including campers of all abilities in their camp programs. The first section provides an overview of the inclusion concept in general and at camp, and discusses legal and medical…

  8. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 2 reverses impaired cognition and neuronal remodeling caused by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun; Sun, Jiao; Ding, Lianshu; Ruan, Lina; Reed, Miranda; Yu, Xuefeng; Klabnik, Jonathan; Lin, Dan; Li, Jianxin; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Hanting; O'Donnell, James M

    2015-02-01

    Chronic stress and neuronal vulnerability have recently been recognized as factors contributing to cognitive disorders. One way to modify neuronal vulnerability is through mediation of phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2), an enzyme that exerts its action on cognitive processes via the control of intracellular second messengers, cGMP and, to a lesser extent, cAMP. This study explored the effects of a PDE2 inhibitor, Bay 60-7550, on stress-induced learning and memory dysfunction in terms of its ramification on behavioral, morphologic, and molecular changes. Bay 60-7550 reversed stress-induced cognitive impairment in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and location tasks (object recognition test and/or object location test), effects prevented by treatment with 7-NI, a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase; MK801, a glutamate receptor (NMDAR) inhibitor; myr-AIP, a CaMKII inhibitor; and KT5823, a protein kinase G inhibitor. Bay 60-7550 also ameliorated stress-induced structural remodeling in the CA1 of the hippocampus, leading to increases in dendritic branching, length, and spine density. However, the neuroplasticity initiated by Bay 60-7550 was not seen in the presence of 7-NI, MK801, myr-AIP, or KT5823. PDE2 inhibition reduced stress-induced extracellular-regulated protein kinase activation and attenuated stress-induced decreases in transcription factors (e.g., Elk-1, TORC1, and CREB phosphorylation) and plasticity-related proteins (e.g., Egr-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor). Pretreatment with inhibitors of NMDA, CaMKII, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and protein kinase G (or protein kinase A) blocked the effects of Bay 60-7550 on cGMP or cAMP signaling. These findings indicate that the effect of PDE2 inhibition on stress-induced memory impairment is potentially mediated via modulation of neuroplasticity-related NMDAR-CaMKII-cGMP/cAMP signaling. PMID:25442113

  9. Attenuation by phosphodiesterase inhibitors of lipopolysaccharide-induced thromboxane release and bronchoconstriction in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, S; Featherstone, R L; Held, H D; Nüsing, R; Schudt, C; Wendel, A

    1997-12-01

    Exposure of perfused rat lungs to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) causes induction of cyclooxygenase-2 followed by thromboxane (TX)-mediated bronchoconstriction (BC). Recently, phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors have received much interest because they not only are bronchodilators but also can suppress release of proinflammatory mediators. In the present study, we investigated the effect of three different PDE inhibitors on TX release and BC in LPS-exposed perfused rat lungs. The PDE inhibitors used were motapizone (PDE III specific), rolipram (PDE IV specific), and zardaverine (mixed PDE III and IV specific). At 5 microM, a concentration at which all three compounds selectively block their respective PDE isoenzyme, rolipram (IC50 = 0.04 microM) and zardaverine (IC50 = 1.8 microM) largely attenuated the LPS-induced BC, whereas motapizone was almost ineffective (IC50 = 40 microM). In contrast to LPS, BC induced by the TX-mimetic U46619 was prevented with comparable strength by motapizone and rolipram. In LPS-treated lungs, the TX release was reduced to 50% of controls by rolipram and zardaverine but was unaltered in the presence of 5 microM motapizone. Increasing intracellular cAMP through perfusion of db-cAMP or forskolin (activates adenylate cyclase) also reduced TX release and BC. We conclude that PDE inhibitors act via elevation of intracellular cAMP. Although both PDE III and PDE IV inhibitors can relax airway smooth muscle, in the model of LPS-induced BC, PDE IV inhibitors are more effective because (in contrast to PDE III inhibitors) they also attenuate TX release. PMID:9400021

  10. Phosphodiesterase 2 and 5 inhibition attenuates the object memory deficit induced by acute tryptophan depletion.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Eva L; Rutten, Kris; Blokland, Arjan; Akkerman, Sven; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Prickaerts, Jos

    2008-12-14

    The underlying mechanism of short-term memory improvement after inhibition of specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs) is still poorly understood. The present study aimed to reveal the ability of PDE5 and PDE2 inhibitors, that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cGMP, respectively, to reverse an object recognition deficit induced by acute tryptophan depletion. Acute tryptophan depletion is a pharmacological challenge tool to lower central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) levels by depleting the availability of its dietary precursor tryptophan. Short-term object memory was tested in male Wistar rats by exposing them to the object recognition task. First, the effects of acute tryptophan depletion upon object recognition 2 h after administration of the nutritional mixture were established. Subsequently, acute tryptophan depletion was combined with the PDE5 inhibitor vardenafil (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) or with the PDE2 inhibitor BAY 60-7550 (0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg), 30 min prior to testing. Acute tryptophan depletion significantly lowered plasma tryptophan levels and impaired object recognition performance. Vardenafil (3 and 10 mg/kg) and BAY 60-7550 (3 mg/kg) were able to attenuate the acute tryptophan depletion induced object recognition impairment. Thus, both PDE5 and PDE2 inhibition improved short-term object recognition performance after an acute tryptophan depletion induced deficit. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood and further studies are needed to determine whether the present findings can be explained by a direct effect of enhanced cAMP and cGMP levels upon 5-HT activity, or even other neurotransmitter systems, and possibly an interaction with synthesis of nitric oxide or effects upon cerebral blood flow function. PMID:18957291

  11. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 2 reverses impaired cognition and neuronal remodeling caused by chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun; Sun, Jiao; Ding, Lianshu; Ruan, Lina; Reed, Miranda; Yu, Xuefeng; Klabni, Jonathan; Lin, Dan; Li, Jianxin; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Hanting; O’Donnell, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress and neuronal vulnerability have recently been recognized as factors contributing to cognitive disorders. One way to modify neuronal vulnerability is through mediation of phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2), an enzyme that exerts its action on cognitive processes via the control of intracellular second messengers, cGMP and, to a lesser extent, cAMP. This study explored the effects of a PDE2 inhibitor, Bay 60-7550, on stress-induced learning and memory dysfunction in terms of its ramification on behavioral, morphological and molecular changes. Bay 60-7550 reversed stress-induced cognitive impairment in the Morris water maze (MWM), novel object recognition and location tasks (ORT/OLT), effects prevented by treatment with 7-NI, a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS); MK801, a glutamate receptor (NMDAR) inhibitor; myr-AIP, a CaMKII inhibitor; and KT5823, a PKG inhibitor. Bay 60-7550 also ameliorated stress-induced structural remodeling in the CA1 of the hippocampus, leading to increases in dendritic branching, length, and spine density. However, the neuroplasticity initiated by Bay 60-7550 was not seen in the presence of 7-NI, MK801, myr-AIP or KT5823. PDE2 inhibition reduced stress-induced ERK activation and attenuated stress-induced decreases in transcription factors (e.g., Elk-1, TORC1, and pCREB) and plasticity-related proteins (e.g, Egr-1 and BDNF). Pre-treatment with inhibitors of NMDA, CaMKII, nNOS, PKG (or PKA), blocked the effects of Bay 60-7550 on cGMP or cAMP signaling. These findings indicate that the effect of PDE2 inhibition on stress-induced memory impairment is potentially mediated via modulation of neuroplasticity-related, NMDAR-CaMKII-cGMP/cAMP signaling. PMID:25442113

  12. Basement-membrane heparan sulphate with high affinity for antithrombin synthesized by normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pejler, G; David, G

    1987-01-01

    Basement-membrane proteoglycans, biosynthetically labelled with [35S]sulphate, were isolated from normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by normal cells contained mainly heparan sulphate and, in addition, small amounts of chondroitin sulphate chains, whereas transformed cells synthesized a relatively higher proportion of chondroitin sulphate. Polysaccharide chains from transformed cells were of lower average Mr and of lower anionic charge density compared with chains isolated from the untransformed counterparts, confirming results reported previously [David & Van den Berghe (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7338-7344]. A large proportion of the chains isolated from normal cells bound with high affinity to immobilized antithrombin, and the presence of 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues, previously identified as unique markers for the antithrombin-binding region of heparin [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555], could be demonstrated. A significantly lower proportion of the chains derived from transformed cells bound with high affinity to antithrombin, and a corresponding decrease in the amount of incorporated 3-O-sulphate was observed. PMID:2963617

  13. The Structure of the Amyloid-[beta] Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N.

    2008-11-03

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of A{beta}-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in A{beta} may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of A{beta} peptides complexed with Cu{sup 2+} in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to A{beta} can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  14. High-affinity manganese uptake by the metal transporter NRAMP1 is essential for Arabidopsis growth in low manganese conditions.

    PubMed

    Cailliatte, Rémy; Schikora, Adam; Briat, Jean-François; Mari, Stéphane; Curie, Catherine

    2010-03-01

    In contrast with many other essential metals, the mechanisms of Mn acquisition in higher eukaryotes are seldom studied and poorly understood. We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana relies on a high-affinity uptake system to acquire Mn from the soil in conditions of low Mn availability and that this activity is catalyzed by the divalent metal transporter NRAMP1 (for Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage Protein 1). The nramp1-1 loss-of-function mutant grows poorly, contains less Mn than the wild type, and fails to take up Mn in conditions of Mn limitation, thus demonstrating that NRAMP1 is the major high-affinity Mn transporter in Arabidopsis. Based on confocal microscopy observation of an NRAMP1-green fluorescent protein fusion, we established that NRAMP1 is localized to the plasma membrane. Consistent with its function in Mn acquisition from the soil, NRAMP1 expression is restricted to the root and stimulated by Mn deficiency. Finally, we show that NRAMP1 restores the capacity of the iron-regulated transporter1 mutant to take up iron and cobalt, indicating that NRAMP1 has a broad selectivity in vivo. The role of transporters of the NRAMP family is well established in higher eukaryotes for iron but has been controversial for Mn. This study demonstrates that NRAMP1 is a physiological manganese transporter in Arabidopsis. PMID:20228245

  15. Bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium): a chiral scaffold for developing high-affinity ligands for SK channels.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Jean-François; Wouters, Johan; Seutin, Vincent; Dilly, Sébastien

    2014-04-01

    N-Methyl-bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium) analogues derived from AG525 (1,1'-(propane-1,3-diyl)-bis-(6,7-dimethoxy-2- methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline)) stereoisomers and tetrandrine, a rigid bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline) analogue with an S,S configuration, were synthesized and tested for their affinity for small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SK/KCa2) subtypes using radioligand binding assays. A significant increase in affinity was observed for the quaternized analogues over the parent 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline compounds. Interestingly, the impact of stereochemistry was not the same in the two groups of compounds. For quaternized analogues, affinities of S,S and R,R isomers for SK2 and SK3 channels were similar and in both cases higher than that of the meso derivative. Among the bis-tetrahydroisoquinoline compounds, the S,S isomers exhibited high affinity, while the R,R and meso isomers had similarly lower affinities. Furthermore, the SK2/SK3 selectivity ratio was slightly increased for quaternized analogues. Bis-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium) represents a new scaffold for the development of high-affinity ligands for SK channel subtypes. PMID:24829978

  16. Biphasic competition between opiates and enkephalins: does it indicate the existence of a common high affinity (mu-1) binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Sarne, Y.; Kenner, A.

    1987-08-03

    Displacement from brain membranes of labeled opiates by low concentrations of enkephalins and of labeled enkephalins by low concentrations of opiates has been previously explained by the existance of a common high affinity site termed mu-1. An alternative interpretation of the same results is that the trough seen in the low concentration zone of the displacement curves represents cross binding of mu and delta opioid ligands to delta and mu receptors, respectively. In three sets of experiments with brain membranes, the size of the trough is shown to be dependent on the labeled ligand used: The ratio between the size of troughs seen with (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin and with (TH)morphine varies with experimental conditions (storage of membranes at 4C for 72h), with ratio of mu:delta receptors (e.g. in thalamus and cortex which are enriched in mu and delta sites, respectively) and with pretreatment of membranes with naloxonazine. These results cannot be explained by a common high affinity site, but rather by binding of (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin to mu and of (TH)morphine to delta opioid receptors. 17 references, 3 figures.

  17. Identification of a high-affinity Ca sup 2+ pump associated with endocytotic vesicles in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, J.L.; Coukell, M.B. )

    1989-11-01

    In the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, changes in free cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} are thought to regulate certain processes during cell aggregation and differentiation. To understand the mechanisms controlling free Ca{sup 2+} levels in this organism, the authors previously isolated and characterized an ATP/Mg{sup 2+}-dependent, high-affinity Ca{sup 2+} pump which appeared to be a component of inside-out plasma membrane vesicles. In this report, they demonstrate that a high-affinity Ca{sup 2+} pump, with properties virtually identical to the isolated pump, can be detected in filipin- or digitonin-permeabilized cells of Dictyostelium. Moreover, Ca{sup 2+}-pumping vesicles, which migrate on Percoll/KCl gradients like the vesicles identified earlier, can be isolated from the permeabilized cells. Results of additional experiments suggest that this intracellular Ca{sup 2+} transporter is associated with a high-capacity non-IP{sub 3}-releasable Ca{sup 2+} store which is generated by endocytosis. A possible role for this store in maintaining Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in Dictyostelium is discussed.

  18. Biphasic regulation of development of the high-affinity saxitoxin receptor by innervation in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, S.J.; Catterall, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    Specific binding of /sup 3/H-saxitoxin (STX) was used to quantitate the density of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in developing rat skeletal muscle. In adult triceps surae, a single class of sites with a KD . 2.9 nM and a density of 21 fmol/mg wet wt was detected. The density of these high-affinity sites increased from 2.0 fmol/mg wet wt to the adult value in linear fashion during days 2-25 after birth. Denervation of the triceps surae at day 11 or 17 reduced final saxitoxin receptor site density to 10.4 or 9.2 fmol/mg wet wt, respectively, without changing KD. Denervation of the triceps surae at day 5 did not alter the subsequent development of saxitoxin receptor sites during days 5-9 and accelerated the increase of saxitoxin receptor sites during days 9-13. After day 13, saxitoxin receptor development abruptly ceased and the density of saxitoxin receptor sites declined to 11 fmol/wg wet wt. These results show that the regulation of high-affinity saxitoxin receptor site density by innervation is biphasic. During the first phase, which is independent of continuing innervation, the saxitoxin receptor density increases to 47-57% of the adult level. After day 11, the second phase of development, which is dependent on continuing innervation, gives rise to the adult density of saxitoxin receptors.

  19. High-Affinity Self-Reactive Human Antibodies by Design and Selection: Targeting the Integrin Ligand Binding Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbas, Carlos F., III; Languino, Lucia R.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    1993-11-01

    A strategy for the design and selection of human antibodies that bind receptors is described. We have demonstrated the validity of the approach by producing semisynthetic human antibodies that bind integrins α_vβ_3 and αIIbβ_3 with high affinity (10-10 M). The selected antibodies mimic the integrins' natural ligands as demonstrated by their ability to compete with these ligands and Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing peptides for binding to the integrins. Furthermore, the antibodies bind in a cation-dependent fashion and are functional in cell adhesion assays. Antibodies that are high-affinity inhibitors of cell adhesion receptors should be of use in assessing receptor function and dissecting mechanisms of adhesion. Semisynthetic human antibodies that target integrins are potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of a number of diseases including thrombosis and metastasis. Furthermore, antibodies that are optimized to bind by a single complementarity determining region may be important lead compounds for the design of small molecule pharmaceuticals.

  20. Camping & the Whirl of Insurance Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrim, Darrow

    1988-01-01

    Suggests possible responses for summer camp operators facing insurance rate increases and other insurance industry changes. Examines areas of risk in summer camping and suggests general ways that camps can become more desirable to the insurance industry as "insurable groups." (TES)

  1. DIRECTORY OF CAMPS FOR THE HANDICAPPED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Chicago, IL.

    ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SEVEN RESIDENT CAMPS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA AND 77 DAY CAMPS IN THE UNITED STATES WHICH SERVE CHILDREN OR ADULTS WITH PHYSICAL, MENTAL, SOCIAL, AND EMOTIONAL HANDICAPS ARE LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY STATE. FOR EACH CAMP, INFORMATION ON TYPES OF THE HANDICAPPED WHO ARE ACCEPTED, SPECIFIC EXCLUSIONS, AGE RANGE, NUMBER…

  2. 22 CFR 62.30 - Camp counselors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Camp counselors. 62.30 Section 62.30 Foreign... Provisions § 62.30 Camp counselors. (a) Introduction. In order to promote diverse opportunities for... sponsors to facilitate the entry of foreign nationals to serve as counselors in U.S. summer camps....

  3. 22 CFR 62.30 - Camp counselors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Camp counselors. 62.30 Section 62.30 Foreign... Provisions § 62.30 Camp counselors. (a) Introduction. In order to promote diverse opportunities for... sponsors to facilitate the entry of foreign nationals to serve as counselors in U.S. summer camps....

  4. The Elementary Camp Experience: An ARC Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krzemien, Marta; Krotzer, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language Elementary Summer Camp is a fantastic way to spend part of the summer. For the past ten years in Glastonbury, Connecticut, the authors have offered a variety of foreign language elementary camps that meet daily for three hours for three to four weeks during July. Currently, they offer camps for Chinese, English Language Learners…

  5. 22 CFR 62.30 - Camp counselors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Camp counselors. 62.30 Section 62.30 Foreign... Provisions § 62.30 Camp counselors. (a) Introduction. In order to promote diverse opportunities for... sponsors to facilitate the entry of foreign nationals to serve as counselors in U.S. summer camps....

  6. The Economic Impact of Organized Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    1982-01-01

    Organized camping for youth and adults has demonstrated economic benefits for many communities. A questionnaire was sent to various agencies and private individuals to collect information on the economic feasibility of organized camps. The data indicated that 300 organized camps in Wisconsin contributed approximately $51 million to the state's…

  7. Language Camps: Thirteen Years of Minor Miracles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jean

    A language camp program that began with a small group of 10- to 12-year-olds whose faculty parents wanted them to retain the German learned on sabbaticals abroad has developed into a program of annual week-long day and resident camps for 150 children, aged 9 to 14 years, learning German, French, Spanish, and Norwegian. The camp was originally…

  8. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from...

  9. Extension Sustainability Camp: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brain, Roslynn; Upton, Sally; Tingey, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability Camps provide an opportunity for Extension educators to be in the forefront of sustainability outreach and to meet the growing demand for sustainability education. This article shares development, implementation, and evaluation of an Extension Sustainability Camp for youth, grades 4-6. Camp impact was measured via daily pre-and…

  10. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from...

  11. Day Camp Manual: Program. Book IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    Book IV in a 5-book day camp manual discusses the camp program. Section I describes the organization, definition, and elements essential to successful day camp programs. Section II, which addresses the benefits and special considerations of mass programs, includes rainy day contingencies, materials to have on hand, and activity suggestions.…

  12. Camping for Youth with Chronic Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Joanna L.; Keller, M. Jean

    1994-01-01

    Camp Fortnight brought 25 British children with cystic fibrosis to experience a 2-week camping program in Texas. Campers (ages 11-15) participated in wilderness experiences, a challenge course, fishing, horseback riding, creative arts, cooking, hiking, outdoor camping, and field trips. Profiles campers and their experiences. (LP)

  13. Winter Wilderness Travel and Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrest, Norman

    Knowledge and skill are needed for safe and enjoyable travel and camping in the wilderness in winter. The beauty of snow and ice, reduced human use, and higher tolerance of animals toward humans make the wilderness attractive during winter. The uniqueness of winter travel presents several challenges that are not present in other seasons. Safety is…

  14. Applications of Research to Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.

    1987-01-01

    Considers contributions of basic/theoretical, applied/practical, and marketing research to the field of camping. Outlines research concerns: application of qualitative methods, practical application of marketing research, effective research dissemination, and focus on longitudinal studies using larger samples. Affirms role of research to document…

  15. Lyme Disease Comes to Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Describes one summer camp's plan for dealing with Lyme disease. Describes the disease and the deer tick. Recommends avoiding tick exposure through clothing, frequent examination, showers, and avoiding high grass and brushy areas, and using chemical insect repellents and chemicals to kill ticks in deer mouse nests. (DHP)

  16. AVTC Hosts TechnoCamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    The Area Vo-Tech Center (AVTC) in Russellville, Arkansas, recently hosted its first TechnoCamp to encourage enrollment based on the aptitude and interest level of the students enrolling in the various programs. The center currently offers student enrollment in auto technology, computer engineering, cosmetology, construction technology, drafting…

  17. A Successful French Weekend Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baughin, Judith A.

    A weekend immersion French language camp was organized by Raymond Walters College of the University of Cincinnati with the cooperation of a group of interested high school French teachers. The extensive planning and the activities of the weekend are described in detail. The most important aspects of the planning process are noted. These were (1)…

  18. Sleep At Camp: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pravda, Myra

    1997-01-01

    Among 40 camp directors surveyed, the majority believed that campers get enough sleep, but that staff members and directors do not get enough sleep. Addresses how sleep deprivation can affect job performance and offers strategies for helping staff understand the importance of sleep to keep them alert and functioning in their job. Includes…

  19. cAMP induction by ouabain promotes endothelin-1 secretion via MAPK/ERK signaling in beating rabbit atria.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li-Qun; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qiu-Li; Hong, Lan; Liu, Li-Ping; Cui, Xun; Cui, Bai-Ri

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) participates in the regulation of numerous cellular functions, including the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (sodium pump). Ouabain, used in the treatment of several heart diseases, is known to increase cAMP levels but its effects on the atrium are not understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of ouabain on the regulation of atrial cAMP production and its roles in atrial endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion in isolated perfused beating rabbit atria. Our results showed that ouabain (3.0 µmol/L) significantly increased atrial dynamics and cAMP levels during recovery period. The ouabain-increased atrial dynamics was blocked by KB-R7943 (3.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor for reverse mode of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers (NCX), but did not by L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine (1.0 µmol/L) or protein kinase A (PKA) selective inhibitor H-89 (3.0 µmol/L). Ouabain also enhanced atrial intracellular cAMP production in response to forskolin and theophyline (100.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase, potentiated the ouabain-induced increase in cAMP. Ouabain and 8-Bromo-cAMP (0.5 µmol/L) markedly increased atrial ET-1 secretion, which was blocked by H-89 and by PD98059 (30 µmol/L), an inhibitor of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) without changing ouabain-induced atrial dynamics. Our results demonstrated that ouabain increases atrial cAMP levels and promotes atrial ET-1 secretion via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway. These findings may explain the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to digitalis-like compounds. PMID:26807018

  20. cAMP induction by ouabain promotes endothelin-1 secretion via MAPK/ERK signaling in beating rabbit atria

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Li-qun; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qiu-li; Hong, Lan; Liu, Li-ping

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) participates in the regulation of numerous cellular functions, including the Na+-K+-ATPase (sodium pump). Ouabain, used in the treatment of several heart diseases, is known to increase cAMP levels but its effects on the atrium are not understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of ouabain on the regulation of atrial cAMP production and its roles in atrial endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion in isolated perfused beating rabbit atria. Our results showed that ouabain (3.0 µmol/L) significantly increased atrial dynamics and cAMP levels during recovery period. The ouabain-increased atrial dynamics was blocked by KB-R7943 (3.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor for reverse mode of Na+-Ca2+ exchangers (NCX), but did not by L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (1.0 µmol/L) or protein kinase A (PKA) selective inhibitor H-89 (3.0 µmol/L). Ouabain also enhanced atrial intracellular cAMP production in response to forskolin and theophyline (100.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase, potentiated the ouabain-induced increase in cAMP. Ouabain and 8-Bromo-cAMP (0.5 µmol/L) markedly increased atrial ET-1 secretion, which was blocked by H-89 and by PD98059 (30 µmol/L), an inhibitor of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) without changing ouabain-induced atrial dynamics. Our results demonstrated that ouabain increases atrial cAMP levels and promotes atrial ET-1 secretion via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway. These findings may explain the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to digitalis-like compounds. PMID:26807018

  1. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 and vascular aging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chen

    2015-12-01

    VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) play critical roles in arterial remodelling with aging, hypertension and atherosclerosis. VSMCs exist in diverse phenotypes and exhibit phenotypic plasticity, e.g. changing from a quiescent/contractile phenotype to an active myofibroblast-like, often called 'synthetic', phenotype. Synthetic VSMCs are able to proliferate, migrate and secrete ECM (extracellular matrix) proteinases and ECM proteins. In addition, they produce pro-inflammatory molecules, providing an inflammatory microenvironment for leucocyte penetration, accumulation and activation. The aging VSMCs have also shown changes in cellular phenotype, responsiveness to contracting and relaxing mediators, replicating potential, matrix synthesis, inflammatory mediators and intracellular signalling. VSMC dysfunction plays a key role in age-associated vascular remodelling. Cyclic nucleotide PDEs (phosphodiesterases), by catalysing cyclic nucleotide hydrolysis, play a critical role in regulating the amplitude, duration and compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signalling. Abnormal alterations of PDEs and subsequent changes in cyclic nucleotide homoeostasis have been implicated in a number of different diseases. In the study published in the latest issue of Clinical Science, Bautista Niño and colleagues have shown that, in cultured senescent human VSMCs, PDE1A and PDE1C mRNA levels are significantly up-regulated and inhibition of PDE1 activity with vinpocetine reduced cellular senescent makers in senescent VSMCs. Moreover, in the premature aging mice with genomic instability (Ercc1(d/-)), impaired aortic ring relaxation in response to SNP (sodium nitroprusside), an NO (nitric oxide) donor, was also largely improved by vinpocetine. More interestingly, using data from human GWAS (genome-wide association studies), it has been found that PDE1A single nucleotide polymorphisms is significantly associated with diastolic blood pressure and carotid intima-media thickening, two

  2. cGMP Binding Sites on Photoreceptor Phosphodiesterase: Role in Feedback Regulation of Visual Transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Rick H.; Deric Bownds, M.; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.

    1994-05-01

    A central step in vertebrate visual transduction is the rapid drop in cGMP levels that causes cGMP-gated ion channels in the photoreceptor cell membrane to close. It has long been a puzzle that the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) whose activation causes this decrease contains not only catalytic sites for cGMP hydrolysis but also noncatalytic cGMP binding sites. Recent work has shown that occupancy of these noncatalytic sites slows the rate of PDE inactivation. We report here that PDE activation induced by activated transducin lowers the cGMP binding affinity for noncatalytic sites on PDE and accelerates the dissociation of cGMP from these sites. These sites can exist in three states: high affinity (K_d = 60 nM) for the nonactivated PDE, intermediate affinity (K_d ≈ 180 nM) when the enzyme is activated in a complex with transducin, and low affinity (K_d > 1 μM) when transducin physically removes the inhibitory subunits of PDE from the PDE catalytic subunits. Activation of PDE by transducin causes a 10-fold increase in the rate of cGMP dissociation from one of the two noncatalytic sites; physical removal of the inhibitory subunits from the PDE catalytic subunits further accelerates the cGMP dissociation rate from both sites >50-fold. Because PDE molecules lacking bound cGMP inactivate more rapidly, this suggests that a prolonged cGMP decrease may act as a negative feedback regulator to generate the faster, smaller photoresponses characteristic of light-adapted photoreceptors.

  3. The role of ventral striatal cAMP signaling in stress-induced behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Florian; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Hernandez, Adan; Benavides, David R.; Tassin, Tara C.; Tan, Chunfeng; Day, Jonathan; Fina, Maggy W.; Yuen, Eunice Y.; Yan, Zhen; Goldberg, Matthew S.; Nairn, Angus C.; Greengard, Paul; Nestler, Eric J.; Taussig, Ronald; Nishi, Akinori; Houslay, Miles D.; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP/PKA signaling cascade is a ubiquitous pathway acting downstream of multiple neuromodulators. We found that the phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) by cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (Cdk5) facilitates cAMP degradation and homeostasis of cAMP/PKA signaling. In mice, loss of Cdk5 throughout the forebrain elevated cAMP levels and increased PKA activity in striatal neurons, and altered behavioral responses to acute or chronic stressors. Ventral striatum- or D1 dopamine receptor-specific conditional knockout of Cdk5, or ventral striatum infusion of a small interfering peptide that selectively targets the regulation of PDE4 by Cdk5, all produced analogical effects on stress-induced behavioral responses. Together, our results demonstrate that altering cAMP signaling in medium spiny neurons of the ventral striatum can effectively modulate stress-induced behavioral states. We propose that targeting the Cdk5 regulation of PDE4 could be a new therapeutic approach for clinical conditions associated with stress, such as depression. PMID:26192746

  4. Guanylyl cyclase and cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase participate in the acrosome reaction of starfish sperm.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Osamu; Ueno, Seiichi; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Hoshi, Motonori; Matsumoto, Midori

    2004-11-01

    In the starfish, Asterias amurensis, the cooperation of three components of the egg jelly, i.e. ARIS (acrosome reaction-inducing substance), Co-ARIS and asterosap, is responsible for inducing the acrosome reaction. Experimentally, ARIS and asterosap are sufficient for the induction. However, when sperm are treated only with asterosap, they become unresponsive to the egg jelly to undergo the reaction. In this study, we analysed the mechanism of the acrosome reaction, using sperm inactivation by asterosap as a clue. Asterosap causes a rapid and transient increase in intracellular cGMP through the activation of the asterosap receptor, a guanylyl cyclase, and causes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). When sperm were pretreated with asterosap, the guanylyl cyclase seemed to be inactivated irreversibly by dephosphorylation. They were still responsive to ARIS but no longer to asterosap. However, in the presence of IBMX or zaprinast, inhibitors against phosphodiesterases (PDEs), they retained their capacity to undergo the acrosome reaction in response to the egg jelly or ARIS alone. IBMX and zaprinast suppressed the intracellular catabolism of cGMP, but not of cAMP. These results suggest that guanylyl cyclase and cGMP-specific, IBMX- and zaprinast-susceptible PDEs are involved in the regulation of the acrosome reaction. PMID:15751545

  5. Structures of the Four Subfamilies of Phosphodiesterase-4 Provide Insight into the Selectivity of Their Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Peng, M; Chen , Y; Geng, J; Robinson, H; Houslay , M; Cai, J; Ke, H

    2007-01-01

    PDE4 (phosphodiesterase-4)-selective inhibitors have attracted much attention as potential therapeutics for the treatment of both depression and major inflammatory diseases, but their practical application has been compromised by side effects. A possible cause for the side effects is that current PDE4-selective inhibitors similarly inhibit isoforms from all four PDE4 subfamilies. The development of PDE4 subfamily-selective inhibitors has been hampered by a lack of structural information. In the present study, we rectify this by providing the crystal structures of the catalytic domains of PDE4A, PDE4B and PDE4D in complex with the PDE4 inhibitor NVP 4-[8-(3-nitrophenyl)-[1,7]naphthyridin-6-yl]benzoic acid as well as the unliganded PDE4C structure. NVP binds in the same conformation to the deep cAMP substrate pocket and interacts with the same residues in each instance. However, detailed structural comparison reveals significant conformational differences. Although the active sites of PDE4B and PDE4D are mostly comparable, PDE4A shows significant displacements of the residues next to the invariant glutamine residue that is critical for substrate and inhibitor binding. PDE4C appears to be more distal from other PDE4 subfamilies, with certain key residues being disordered. Our analyses provide the first structural basis for the development of PDE4 subfamily-selective inhibitors.

  6. Pharmacology of a new cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitor, V11294.

    PubMed

    Gale, Donna D; Hofer, Peter; Spina, Domenico; Seeds, Esther A; Banner, Katherine H; Harrison, Selina; Douglas, Gary; Matsumoto, Tatsui; Page, Clive P; Wong, Richard H; Jordan, Stephan; Smith, Forrest; Banik, Nandini; Halushka, Perry V; Cavalla, David; Rotshteyn, Yakov; Kyle, Donald J; Burch, Ronald M; Chasin, Mark

    2003-01-01

    V11294 is a new cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4) inhibitor of the rolipram class. In this report we present the pharmacological profile of V11294. V11294 inhibited PDE4 isolated from human lung with IC(50) 405 nM, compared to 3700 nM for rolipram. In contrast, V11294 inhibition of human PDE3 and PDE5 occurred only at concentrations greater than 100,000 nM. Like rolipram, V11294 inhibited PDE4D more potently than other PDE4 subtypes. V11294, when incubated with human anticoagulated whole blood in vitro, or administered to mice, caused increased cAMP concentration, consistent with inhibition of PDE4. V11294 inhibited lectin-induced proliferation and lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFalpha synthesis by human adherent monocytes in vitro and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFalpha synthesis in mice. V11294 caused relaxation of guinea pig isolated trachea and inhibited allergen-induced bronchoconstriction and eosinophilia in guinea pigs at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, p.o. In ferrets, V11294 was not emetogenic at doses up to 30 mg/kg, p.o., despite plasma concentration reaching 10-fold the IC(50) for PDE4. In contrast, rolipram induced severe retching and vomiting at 10 mg/kg, p.o. In conclusion, V11294 is an orally active PDE4 inhibitor that exhibits antiinflammatory activity in vitro, and in vivo at doses that are not emetogenic. PMID:12670778

  7. Structural basis for the design of selective phosphodiesterase 4B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fox, David; Burgin, Alex B; Gurney, Mark E

    2014-03-01

    Phosphodiesterase-4B (PDE4B) regulates the pro-inflammatory Toll Receptor -Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) pathway in monocytes, macrophages and microglial cells. As such, it is an important, although under-exploited molecular target for anti-inflammatory drugs. This is due in part to the difficulty of developing selective PDE4B inhibitors as the amino acid sequence of the PDE4 active site is identical in all PDE4 subtypes (PDE4A-D). We show that highly selective PDE4B inhibitors can be designed by exploiting sequence differences outside the active site. Specifically, PDE4B selectivity can be achieved by capture of a C-terminal regulatory helix, now termed CR3 (Control Region 3), across the active site in a conformation that closes access by cAMP. PDE4B selectivity is driven by a single amino acid polymorphism in CR3 (Leu674 in PDE4B1 versus Gln594 in PDE4D). The reciprocal mutations in PDE4B and PDE4D cause a 70-80 fold shift in selectivity. Our structural studies show that CR3 is flexible and can adopt multiple orientations and multiple registries in the closed conformation. The new co-crystal structure with bound ligand provides a guide map for the design of PDE4B selective anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24361374

  8. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 promotes oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation and enhances CNS remyelination.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yasir A; Baer, Alexandra; Hofer, Matthias P; González, Ginez A; Rundle, Jon; Myrta, Szymon; Huang, Jeffrey K; Zhao, Chao; Rossner, Moritz J; Trotter, Matthew W B; Lubec, Gert; Franklin, Robin J M; Kotter, Mark R

    2013-12-01

    The increasing effectiveness of new disease-modifying drugs that suppress disease activity in multiple sclerosis has opened up opportunities for regenerative medicines that enhance remyelination and potentially slow disease progression. Although several new targets for therapeutic enhancement of remyelination have emerged, few lend themselves readily to conventional drug development. Here, we used transcription profiling to identify mitogen-activated protein kinase (Mapk) signalling as an important regulator involved in the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) into oligodendrocytes. We show in tissue culture that activation of Mapk signalling by elevation of intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) using administration of either dibutyryl-cAMP or inhibitors of the cAMP-hydrolysing enzyme phosphodiesterase-4 (Pde4) enhances OPC differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that systemic delivery of a Pde4 inhibitor leads to enhanced differentiation of OPCs within focal areas of toxin-induced demyelination and a consequent acceleration of remyelination. These data reveal a novel approach to therapeutic enhancement of remyelination amenable to pharmacological intervention and hence with significant potential for translation. PMID:24293318

  9. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 promotes oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation and enhances CNS remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Yasir A; Baer, Alexandra; Hofer, Matthias P; González, Ginez A; Rundle, Jon; Myrta, Szymon; Huang, Jeffrey K; Zhao, Chao; Rossner, Moritz J; Trotter, Matthew W B; Lubec, Gert; Franklin, Robin J M; Kotter, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    The increasing effectiveness of new disease-modifying drugs that suppress disease activity in multiple sclerosis has opened up opportunities for regenerative medicines that enhance remyelination and potentially slow disease progression. Although several new targets for therapeutic enhancement of remyelination have emerged, few lend themselves readily to conventional drug development. Here, we used transcription profiling to identify mitogen-activated protein kinase (Mapk) signalling as an important regulator involved in the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) into oligodendrocytes. We show in tissue culture that activation of Mapk signalling by elevation of intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) using administration of either dibutyryl-cAMP or inhibitors of the cAMP-hydrolysing enzyme phosphodiesterase-4 (Pde4) enhances OPC differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that systemic delivery of a Pde4 inhibitor leads to enhanced differentiation of OPCs within focal areas of toxin-induced demyelination and a consequent acceleration of remyelination. These data reveal a novel approach to therapeutic enhancement of remyelination amenable to pharmacological intervention and hence with significant potential for translation. PMID:24293318

  10. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase in brain: effect on anxiety.

    PubMed

    Beer, B; Chasin, M; Clody, D E; Vogel, J R

    1972-04-28

    Drugs that reduce anxiety may be mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the brain because (i) potent anxiety-reducing drugs are also potent inhibitors of brain phosphodiesterase activity; (ii) dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate has the ability to reduce anxiety; (iii) the methylxanthines show significant anxiety-reducing effects; (iv) theophylline and chlordiazepoxide produce additive anxiety-reducing activity; and (v) there is a significant correlation between the anxiety-reducing property of drugs and their ability to inhibit phosphodiesterase activity in the brain. PMID:4402069

  11. Progress in the discovery of selective, high affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonists as clinical candidates.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Rao V; Zablocki, Jeff

    2009-03-01

    The selective, high affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor (AdoR) antagonists that were synthesized by several research groups should aid in determining the role of the A(2B) AdoR in inflammatory diseases like asthma or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and angiogenic diseases like diabetic retinopathy or cancer. CV Therapeutics scientists discovered the selective, high affinity A(2B) AdoR antagonist 10, a 8-(4-pyrazolyl)-xanthine derivative [CVT-6883, K(i)(hA(2B)) = 22 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 1,940 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 3,280; and K(i)(hA(3)) = 1,070 nM] that has favorable pharmacokinetic (PK) properties (t (1/2) = 4 h and F > 35% rat). Compound 10 demonstrated functional antagonism at the A(2B) AdoR (K(B) = 6 nM) and efficacy in a mouse model of asthma. In two phase 1 clinical trials, CVT-6883 was found to be safe, well tolerated, and suitable for once daily dosing. A second compound 20, 8-(5-pyrazolyl)-xanthine, has been nominated for development from Baraldi's group in conjunction with King Pharmaceuticals that has favorable A(2B) AdoR affinity and selectivity [K(i)(hA(2B)) = 5.5 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 1,000; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM], and it has been demonstrated to be a functional antagonist. A third compound 32, a 2-aminopyrimidine, from the Almirall group has high A(2B) AdoR affinity and selectivity [K(i)(hA(2B)) = 17 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 2,500; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM], and 32 has been moved into preclinical safety testing. Since three highly selective, high affinity A(2B) AdoR antagonists have been nominated for development with 10 (CVT-6883) being the furthest along in the development process, the role of the A(2B) AdoR in various disease states will soon be established. PMID:18568423

  12. Crystal Structure of the SH3 Domain of beta PIX in Complex with a High Affinity Peptide from PAK2

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelz,A.; Janz, J.; Lawrie, S.; Corwin, B.; Lee, A.; Sakmar, T.

    2006-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are important effector proteins of the small GTPases Cdc42 and Rac and control cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell proliferation. The direct interaction of PAKs with guanine nucleotide exchange factors from the PIX/Cool family, which is responsible for the localization of PAK kinases to focal complexes in the cell, is mediated by a 24-residue peptide segment in PAKs and an N-terminal src homology 3 (SH3) domain in PIX/Cool. The SH3-binding segment of PAK contains the atypical consensus-binding motif PxxxPR, which is required for unusually high affinity binding. In order to understand the structural basis for the high affinity and specificity of the PIX-PAK interaction, we solved crystal structures for the N-terminal SH3 domain of {beta}PIX and for the complex of the atypical binding segment of PAK2 with the N-terminal SH3 domain of {beta}PIX at 0.92 Angstroms and 1.3 Angstroms resolution, respectively. The asymmetric unit of the crystal contains two SH3 domains and two peptide ligands. The bound peptide adopts a conformation that allows for intimate contacts with three grooves on the surface of the SH3 domain that lie between the n-Src and RT-loops. Most notably, the arginine residue of the PxxxPR motif forms a salt-bridge and is tightly coordinated by a number of residues in the SH3 domain. This arginine-specific interaction appears to be the key determinant for the high affinity binding of PAK peptides. Furthermore, C-terminal residues of the peptide engage in additional interactions with the surface of the RT-loop, which significantly increases binding specificity. Compared to a recent NMR structure of a similar complex, our crystal structure reveals an alternate binding mode. Finally, we compare our crystal structure with the recently published {beta}PIX/Cbl-b complex structure, and suggest the existence of a molecular switch.

  13. Fast and high-affinity binding of B-lymphotropic papovavirus to human B-lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, M; Oppenländer, M; Pawlita, M

    1995-01-01

    Binding of B-lymphotropic papovavirus (LPV) to host cells differing in susceptibility to viral infection was determined by a newly established, direct, nonradioactive virus binding assay, which allows quantitative description of the binding characteristics by receptor saturation and Scatchard analysis. LPV binding to the highly susceptible human B-lymphoma cell line BJA-B K88 is specific, saturable, and noncooperative. Binding occurs very fast, with an association rate constant (k1) of 6.7 x 10(7) M-1s-1, and is of high affinity, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 2.9 x 10(-12) M; and the virus-receptor complex is stable, with a half life of 70 min. The binding affinities of receptors on four other highly, moderately, or weakly susceptible human B-lymphoma cell lines were similar, with up to twofold variation around a mean Kd value of 3 x 10(-12) M, suggesting the presence of the same LPV receptor on all of these cell lines. This view is further supported by the finding that in all cases a terminal sialic acid is necessary for LPV binding. Tunicamycin has been shown to drastically induce LPV susceptibility and LPV binding in weakly and moderately susceptible B-lymphoma cell lines (O.T. Keppler, M. Herrmann, M. Oppenländer, W. Meschede, and M. Pawlita, J. Virol. 68:6933-6939, 1994). The hypothesis that the constitutively expressed and tunicamycin-induced LPV receptors are identical is strengthened by our finding that both receptor types displayed the same high affinity. LPV susceptibility of different B-lymphoma cell lines was correlated with receptor number but not with receptor affinity. The numbers of receptors per cell on highly and moderately susceptible cell lines ranged from 2,000 to 400 and were directly proportional to LPV susceptibility. This indicates that the number of high-affinity receptors per cell is a key regulating factor for the LPV host range. PMID:7474091

  14. Molecular basis for high affinity and selectivity of peptide antagonist, Bantag-1, for the orphan BB3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taichi; Ramos-Álvarez, Irene; Iordanskaia, Tatiana; Moreno, Paola; Mantey, Samuel A; Jensen, R T

    2016-09-01

    Bombesin-receptor-subtype-3 (BB3 receptor) is a G-protein-coupled-orphan-receptor classified in the mammalian Bombesin-family because of high homology to gastrin-releasing peptide (BB2 receptor)/neuromedin-B receptors (BB1 receptor). There is increased interest in BB3 receptor because studies primarily from knockout-mice suggest it plays roles in energy/glucose metabolism, insulin-secretion, as well as motility and tumor-growth. Investigations into its roles in physiological/pathophysiological processes are limited because of lack of selective ligands. Recently, a selective, peptide-antagonist, Bantag-1, was described. However, because BB3 receptor has low-affinity for all natural, Bn-related peptides, little is known of the molecular basis of its high-affinity/selectivity. This was systematically investigated in this study for Bantag-1 using a chimeric-approach making both Bantag-1 loss-/gain-of-affinity-chimeras, by exchanging extracellular (EC) domains of BB3/BB2 receptor, and using site-directed-mutagenesis. Receptors were transiently expressed and affinities determined by binding studies. Bantag-1 had >5000-fold selectivity for BB3 receptor over BB2/BB1 receptors and substitution of the first EC-domain (EC1) in loss-/gain-of affinity-chimeras greatly affected affinity. Mutagenesis of each amino acid difference in EC1 between BB3 receptor/BB2 receptor showed replacement of His(107) in BB3 receptor by Lys(107) (H107K-BB3 receptor-mutant) from BB2 receptor, decreased affinity 60-fold, and three replacements [H107K, E11D, G112R] decreased affinity 500-fold. Mutagenesis in EC1's surrounding transmembrane-regions (TMs) demonstrated TM2 differences were not important, but R127Q in TM3 alone decreased affinity 400-fold. Additional mutants in EC1/TM3 explored the molecular basis for these changes demonstrated in EC1, particularly important is the presence of aromatic-interactions by His(107), rather than hydrogen-bonding or charge-charge interactions, for determining

  15. High-affinity consensus binding of target RNAs by the STAR/GSG proteins GLD-1, STAR-2 and Quaking

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background STAR/GSG proteins regulate gene expression in metazoans by binding consensus sites in the 5' or 3' UTRs of target mRNA transcripts. Owing to the high degree of homology across the STAR domain, most STAR proteins recognize similar RNA consensus sequences. Previously, the consensus for a number of well-characterized STAR proteins was defined as a hexameric sequence, referred to as the SBE, for STAR protein binding element. C. elegans GLD-1 and mouse Quaking (Qk-1) are two representative STAR proteins that bind similar consensus hexamers, which differ only in the preferred nucleotide identities at certain positions. Earlier reports also identified partial consensus elements located upstream or downstream of a canonical consensus hexamer in target RNAs, although the relative contribution of these sequences to the overall binding energy remains less well understood. Additionally, a recently identified STAR protein called STAR-2 from C. elegans is thought to bind target RNA consensus sites similar to that of GLD-1 and Qk-1. Results Here, a combination of fluorescence-polarization and gel mobility shift assays was used to demonstrate that STAR-2 binds to a similar RNA consensus as GLD-1 and Qk-1. These assays were also used to further delineate the contributions of each hexamer consensus nucleotide to high-affinity binding by GLD-1, Qk-1 and STAR-2 in a variety of RNA contexts. In addition, the effects of inserting additional full or partial consensus elements upstream or downstream of a canonical hexamer in target RNAs were also measured to better define the sequence elements and RNA architecture recognized by different STAR proteins. Conclusions The results presented here indicate that a single hexameric consensus is sufficient for high-affinity RNA binding by STAR proteins, and that upstream or downstream partial consensus elements may alter binding affinities depending on the sequence and spacing. The general requirements determined for high-affinity RNA

  16. The ACA Standards Organizer. A Tool for the Preparation of Camps for Visitation for American Camping Association Camp Accreditation and Site Approval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth

    This comprehensive guide helps camp administrators prepare for camp accreditation and site approval visits by the American Camping Association (ACA). The introductory sections outline the purpose and administration of the standards program and provide definitions of camping terms. Standards are organized under one section for camp accreditation…

  17. Phosphodiesterase types 3 and 4 regulate the phasic contraction of neonatal rat bladder smooth myocytes via distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Kui; Chang, Yan; Wei, Bin; Liu, Qinghua; Leblais, Véronique; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Ji, Guangju

    2014-05-01

    Activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway reduces bladder contractility. However, the role of phosphodiesterase (PDE) families in regulating this function is poorly understood. Here, we compared the contractile function of the cAMP hydrolyzing PDEs in neonatal rat bladder smooth myocytes. RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis revealed that several isoforms of PDE1-4 were expressed in neonatal rat bladder. While 8-methoxymethyl-3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (a PDE1 inhibitor) and BAY-60-7550 (a PDE2 inhibitor) had no effect on the carbachol-enhanced phasic contractions of bladder strips, cilostamide (Cil, a PDE3 inhibitor) and Ro-20-1724 (Ro, a PDE4 inhibitor) significantly reduced these contractions. This inhibitory effect of Ro was blunted by the PKA inhibitor H-89, while the inhibitory effect of Cil was strongly attenuated by the PKG inhibitor KT 5823. Application of Ro in single bladder smooth myocytes resulted in an increase in Ca(2+) spark frequency but a decrease both in Ca(2+) transients and in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content. In contrast, Cil had no effect on these events. Furthermore, Ro-induced inhibition of the phasic contractions was significantly blocked by ryanodine and iberiotoxin. Taken together, PDE3 and PDE4 are the main PDE isoforms in maintaining the phasic contractions of bladder smooth myocytes, with PDE4 being functionally more active than PDE3. However, their roles are mediated through different mechanisms. PMID:24463006

  18. The dual phosphodiesterase 3 and 4 inhibitor RPL554 stimulates CFTR and ciliary beating in primary cultures of bronchial epithelia.

    PubMed

    Turner, Mark J; Matthes, Elizabeth; Billet, Arnaud; Ferguson, Amy J; Thomas, David Y; Randell, Scott H; Ostrowski, Lawrence E; Abbott-Banner, Kathy; Hanrahan, John W

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene, is a life-limiting disease characterized by chronic bacterial airway infection and severe inflammation. Some CFTR mutants have reduced responsiveness to cAMP/PKA signaling; hence, pharmacological agents that elevate intracellular cAMP are potentially useful for the treatment of CF. By inhibiting cAMP breakdown, phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors stimulate CFTR in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that PDE inhibition by RPL554, a drug that has been shown to cause bronchodilation in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, stimulates CFTR-dependent ion secretion across bronchial epithelial cells isolated from patients carrying the R117H/F508del CF genotype. RPL554-induced CFTR activity was further increased by the potentiator VX-770, suggesting an additional benefit by the drug combination. RPL554 also increased cilia beat frequency in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The results indicate RPL554 may increase mucociliary clearance through stimulation of CFTR and increasing ciliary beat frequency and thus could provide a novel therapeutic option for CF. PMID:26545902

  19. Tsetse Salivary Gland Proteins 1 and 2 Are High Affinity Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins with Residual Nuclease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Caljon, Guy; Ridder, Karin De; Stijlemans, Benoît; Coosemans, Marc; Magez, Stefan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the tsetse fly salivary gland EST database revealed the presence of a highly enriched cluster of putative endonuclease genes, including tsal1 and tsal2. Tsal proteins are the major components of tsetse fly (G. morsitans morsitans) saliva where they are present as monomers as well as high molecular weight complexes with other saliva proteins. We demonstrate that the recombinant tsetse salivary gland proteins 1&2 (Tsal1&2) display DNA/RNA non-specific, high affinity nucleic acid binding with KD values in the low nanomolar range and a non-exclusive preference for duplex. These Tsal proteins exert only a residual nuclease activity with a preference for dsDNA in a broad pH range. Knockdown of Tsal expression by in vivo RNA interference in the tsetse fly revealed a partially impaired blood digestion phenotype as evidenced by higher gut nucleic acid, hematin and protein contents. PMID:23110062

  20. Localization of the binding site for the human high-affinity Fc receptor on IgG.

    PubMed

    Duncan, A R; Woof, J M; Partridge, L J; Burton, D R; Winter, G

    1988-04-01

    A major pathway in the clearance of pathogens involves the coating of the pathogen with specific antibodies, and the binding of the antibody Fc region to cell receptors. This can trigger engulfment of the pathogen by phagocytes or lysis by killer cells. By oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis we have engineered a single amino acid change in a mouse IgG2b antibody (Glu 235----Leu) which now enables the antibody to bind to the FcRI (high affinity) receptor on human monocytes with a 100-fold improvement in affinity. This indicates that Leu 235 is a major determinant in the binding of antibody to FcRI and that the receptor may interact directly with the region linking the CH2 domain to the hinge. Tailoring the affinity of antibodies for cell receptors could help dissect their role in clearing pathogen. PMID:2965792

  1. Membrane topology of the high-affinity L-glutamate transporter (GLAST- 1) of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The membrane topology of the high affinity, Na(+)-coupled L-glutamate/L- aspartate transporter (GLAST-1) of the central nervous system has been determined. Truncated GLAST-1 cDNA constructs encoding protein fragments with an increasing number of hydrophobic regions were fused to a cDNA encoding a reporter peptide with two N-glycosylation sites. The respective cRNA chimeras were translated in vitro and in vivo in Xenopus oocytes. Posttranslational N-glycosylation of the two reporter consensus sites monitors the number, size, and orientation of membrane- spanning domains. The results of our experiments suggest a novel 10- transmembrane domain topology of GLAST-1, a representative of the L- glutamate neurotransmitter transporter family, with its NH2 and COOH termini on the cytoplasmic side, six NH2-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices, and four COOH-terminal short hydrophobic domains spanning the bilayer predicted as beta-sheets. PMID:8991097

  2. Peptide-based protein capture agents with high affinity, selectivity, and stability as antibody replacements in biodetection assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrow, Blake; Warner, Candice; Finch, Amethist S.; Lai, Bert; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Heath, James R.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2014-05-01

    Current biodetection assays that employ monoclonal antibodies as primary capture agents exhibit limited fieldability, shelf life, and performance due to batch-to-batch production variability and restricted thermal stability. In order to improve upon the detection of biological threats in fieldable assays and systems for the Army, we are investigating protein catalyzed capture (PCC) agents as drop-in replacements for the existing antibody technology through iterative in situ click chemistry. The PCC agent oligopeptides are developed against known protein epitopes and can be mass produced using robotic methods. In this work, a PCC agent under development will be discussed. The performance, including affinity, selectivity, and stability of the capture agent technology, is analyzed by immunoprecipitation, western blotting, and ELISA experiments. The oligopeptide demonstrates superb selectivity coupled with high affinity through multi-ligand design, and improved thermal, chemical, and biochemical stability due to non-natural amino acid PCC agent design.

  3. High-level amikacin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa associated with a 3'-phosphotransferase with high affinity for amikacin.

    PubMed

    Torres, C; Perlin, M H; Baquero, F; Lerner, D L; Lerner, S A

    2000-08-01

    This work describes the characterization of the phosphotransferase enzymatic activity responsible for amikacin resistance in two clinical Pseudomona aeruginosa strains, isolated from a hospital that used amikacin as first-line aminoglycoside. Amikacin-resistant P. aeruginosa PA40 and PA43 (MIC: 128 mg/l) were shown to have APH activity with a substrate profile similar to that of APH(3')-VI. The enzyme from P. aeruginosa PA40 was purified to > 70% homogeneity. The Km of amikacin for this enzyme was 1.4 microM, the Vmax/Km ratio for amikacin was higher than for the other aminoglycosides tested and PCR and DNA sequencing ruled out the presence of aph(3')-IIps. Amikacin resistance in this strain was, therefore, associated with APH(3')-VI and the high affinity of this enzyme for amikacin could explain the high-level resistance that we observed. PMID:10929874

  4. Selectively Promiscuous Opioid Ligands: Discovery of High Affinity/Low Efficacy Opioid Ligands with Substantial Nociceptin Opioid Peptide Receptor Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Emerging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that a compound displaying high affinity for μ, κ, and δ opioid (MOP, KOP, and DOP) receptors and antagonist activity at each, coupled with moderate affinity and efficacy at nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptors will have utility as a relapse prevention agent for multiple types of drug abuse. Members of the orvinol family of opioid ligands have the desired affinity profile but have typically displayed substantial efficacy at MOP and or KOP receptors. In this study it is shown that a phenyl ring analogue (1d) of buprenorphine displays the desired profile in vitro with high, nonselective affinity for the MOP, KOP, and DOP receptors coupled with moderate affinity for NOP receptors. In vivo, 1d lacked any opioid agonist activity and was an antagonist of both the MOP receptor agonist morphine and the KOP receptor agonist ethylketocyclazocine, confirming the desired opioid receptor profile in vivo. PMID:24761755

  5. Human and rat mast cell high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors: Characterization of putative. alpha. -chain gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Akira; Benfey, P.N.; Leder, P. ); Tepler, I. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Berenstein, E.H.; Siraganian, R.P. )

    1988-03-01

    The authors have cloned and determined the entire nucleotide sequence of cDNAs corresponding to the putative {alpha} subunits of the human and rat mast cell high-affinity IgE receptors. Both human and rat cDNAs encode an NH{sub 2}-terminal signal peptide, two immunoglobulin-like extracellular domains (encoded by discrete exons), a hydrophobic transmembrane region, and a positively charged cytoplasmic tail. The human and rat {alpha} subunits share an overall homology with one another and the immunoglobulin gene family, suggesting that they arose from a common ancestral gene and continue to share structural homology with their ligands. In addition, the rat gene is transcribed into at least three distinct forms, each of which yields a somewhat different coding sequence.

  6. Corticotropin-releasing factor antagonist blocks microwave-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Acute (45-min) irradiation with pulsed low-level microwaves (2450-MHz, 2 microseconds pulses at 500 pps, average power density of 1 mW/cm2, whole-body average specific absorption rate of 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. These effects were blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with intracerebroventricular injection of the specific corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist, alpha-helical-CRF9-41 (25 micrograms). Similar injection of the antagonist had no significant effect on HACU in the brain of the sham-exposed rats. These data suggest that low-level microwave irradiation activates CRF in the brain, which in turn causes the changes in central HACU.

  7. Reconstitution of high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-03-05

    High affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 ..mu..M phenoxybenzamine to block ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance (/sup 3/H) UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist binding.

  8. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  9. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  10. Characterization of the Staphylococcal enterotoxin A: Vβ receptor interaction using human receptor fragments engineered for high affinity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Postel, S; Sundberg, E J; Kranz, D M

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is a gastrointestinal disorder caused by the consumption of food containing Staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is the most common enterotoxin recovered from food poisoning outbreaks in the USA. In addition to its enteric activity, SEA also acts as a potent superantigen through stimulation of T cells, although less is known about its interactions than the superantigens SEB, SEC and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. To understand more about SEA:receptor interactions, and to develop toxin-detection systems for use in food testing, we engineered various SEA-binding receptor mutants. The extracellular domain of the receptor, a variable region of the beta chain (Vβ22) of the T-cell receptor, was engineered for stability as a soluble protein and for high affinity, using yeast-display technology. The highest affinity mutant was shown to bind SEA with a Kd value of 4 nM. This was a 25 000-fold improvement in affinity compared with the wild-type receptor, which bound to SEA with low affinity (Kd value of 100 µM), similar to other superantigen:Vβ interactions. The SEA:Vβ interface was centered around residues within the complementarity determining region 2 loop. The engineered receptor was specific for SEA, in that it did not bind to two other closely related enterotoxins SEE or SED, providing information on the SEA residues possibly involved in the interaction. The specificity and affinity of these high-affinity Vβ proteins also provide useful agents for the design of more sensitive and specific systems for SEA detection. PMID:24167300

  11. Locating high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites on albumin by x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Simard, J. R.; Zunszain, P. A.; Ha, C.-E.; Yang, J. S.; Bhagavan, N. V.; Petitpas, I.; Curry, S.; Hamilton, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a versatile transport protein for endogenous compounds and drugs. To evaluate physiologically relevant interactions between ligands for the protein, it is necessary to determine the locations and relative affinities of different ligands for their binding site(s). We present a site-specific investigation of the relative affinities of binding sites on HSA for fatty acids (FA), the primary physiological ligand for the protein. Titration of HSA with [13C]carboxyl-labeled FA was used initially to identify three NMR chemical shifts that are associated with high-affinity binding pockets on the protein. To correlate these peaks with FA-binding sites identified from the crystal structures of FA–HSA complexes, HSA mutants were engineered with substitutions of amino acids involved in coordination of the bound FA carboxyl. Titration of [13C]palmitate into solutions of HSA mutants for either FA site four (R410A/Y411A) or site five (K525A) within domain III of HSA each revealed loss of a specific NMR peak that was present in spectra of wild-type protein. Because these peaks are among the first three to be observed on titration of HSA with palmitate, sites four and five represent two of the three high-affinity long-chain FA-binding sites on HSA. These assignments were confirmed by titration of [13C]palmitate into recombinant domain III of HSA, which contains only sites four and five. These results establish a protocol for direct probing of the relative affinities of FA-binding sites, one that may be extended to examine competition between FA and other ligands for specific binding sites. PMID:16330771

  12. Locating high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites on albumin by x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Simard, J R; Zunszain, P A; Ha, C-E; Yang, J S; Bhagavan, N V; Petitpas, I; Curry, S; Hamilton, J A

    2005-12-13

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a versatile transport protein for endogenous compounds and drugs. To evaluate physiologically relevant interactions between ligands for the protein, it is necessary to determine the locations and relative affinities of different ligands for their binding site(s). We present a site-specific investigation of the relative affinities of binding sites on HSA for fatty acids (FA), the primary physiological ligand for the protein. Titration of HSA with [(13)C]carboxyl-labeled FA was used initially to identify three NMR chemical shifts that are associated with high-affinity binding pockets on the protein. To correlate these peaks with FA-binding sites identified from the crystal structures of FA-HSA complexes, HSA mutants were engineered with substitutions of amino acids involved in coordination of the bound FA carboxyl. Titration of [(13)C]palmitate into solutions of HSA mutants for either FA site four (R410A/Y411A) or site five (K525A) within domain III of HSA each revealed loss of a specific NMR peak that was present in spectra of wild-type protein. Because these peaks are among the first three to be observed on titration of HSA with palmitate, sites four and five represent two of the three high-affinity long-chain FA-binding sites on HSA. These assignments were confirmed by titration of [(13)C]palmitate into recombinant domain III of HSA, which contains only sites four and five. These results establish a protocol for direct probing of the relative affinities of FA-binding sites, one that may be extended to examine competition between FA and other ligands for specific binding sites. PMID:16330771

  13. Dual Regulation of the Arabidopsis High-Affinity Root Iron Uptake System by Local and Long-Distance Signals1

    PubMed Central

    Vert, Grégory A.; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Regulation of the root high-affinity iron uptake system by whole-plant signals was investigated at the molecular level in Arabidopsis, through monitoring FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. These two genes encode the root ferric-chelate reductase and the high-affinity iron transporter, respectively, involved in the iron deficiency-induced uptake system. Recovery from iron-deficient conditions and modulation of apoplastic iron pools indicate that iron itself plays a major role in the regulation of root iron deficiency responses at the mRNA and protein levels. Split-root experiments show that the expression of IRT1 and FRO2 is controlled both by a local induction from the root iron pool and through a systemic pathway involving a shoot-borne signal, both signals being integrated to tightly control production of the root iron uptake proteins. We also show that IRT1 and FRO2 are expressed during the day and down-regulated at night and that this additional control is overruled by iron starvation, indicating that the nutritional status prevails on the diurnal regulation. Our work suggests, for the first time to our knowledge, that like in grasses, the root iron acquisition in strategy I plants may also be under diurnal regulation. On the basis of the new molecular insights provided in this study and given the strict coregulation of IRT1 and FRO2 observed, we present a model of local and long-distance regulation of the root iron uptake system in Arabidopsis. PMID:12805609

  14. Dual regulation of the Arabidopsis high-affinity root iron uptake system by local and long-distance signals.

    PubMed

    Vert, Grégory A; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine

    2003-06-01

    Regulation of the root high-affinity iron uptake system by whole-plant signals was investigated at the molecular level in Arabidopsis, through monitoring FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. These two genes encode the root ferric-chelate reductase and the high-affinity iron transporter, respectively, involved in the iron deficiency-induced uptake system. Recovery from iron-deficient conditions and modulation of apoplastic iron pools indicate that iron itself plays a major role in the regulation of root iron deficiency responses at the mRNA and protein levels. Split-root experiments show that the expression of IRT1 and FRO2 is controlled both by a local induction from the root iron pool and through a systemic pathway involving a shoot-borne signal, both signals being integrated to tightly control production of the root iron uptake proteins. We also show that IRT1 and FRO2 are expressed during the day and down-regulated at night and that this additional control is overruled by iron starvation, indicating that the nutritional status prevails on the diurnal regulation. Our work suggests, for the first time to our knowledge, that like in grasses, the root iron acquisition in strategy I plants may also be under diurnal regulation. On the basis of the new molecular insights provided in this study and given the strict coregulation of IRT1 and FRO2 observed, we present a model of local and long-distance regulation of the root iron uptake system in Arabidopsis. PMID:12805609

  15. High-Affinity Inhibitors of Human NAD+-Dependent 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase: Mechanisms of Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Niesen, Frank H.; Schultz, Lena; Jadhav, Ajit; Bhatia, Chitra; Guo, Kunde; Maloney, David J.; Pilka, Ewa S.; Wang, Minghua; Oppermann, Udo; Heightman, Tom D.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH, EC 1.1.1.141) is the key enzyme for the inactivation of prostaglandins, regulating processes such as inflammation or proliferation. The anabolic pathways of prostaglandins, especially with respect to regulation of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes have been studied in detail; however, little is known about downstream events including functional interaction of prostaglandin-processing and -metabolizing enzymes. High-affinity probes for 15-PGDH will, therefore, represent important tools for further studies. Principal Findings To identify novel high-affinity inhibitors of 15-PGDH we performed a quantitative high-throughput screen (qHTS) by testing >160 thousand compounds in a concentration-response format and identified compounds that act as noncompetitive inhibitors as well as a competitive inhibitor, with nanomolar affinity. Both types of inhibitors caused strong thermal stabilization of the enzyme, with cofactor dependencies correlating with their mechanism of action. We solved the structure of human 15-PGDH and explored the binding modes of the inhibitors to the enzyme in silico. We found binding modes that are consistent with the observed mechanisms of action. Conclusions Low cross-reactivity in screens of over 320 targets, including three other human dehydrogenases/reductases, suggest selectivity of the present inhibitors for 15-PGDH. The high potencies and different mechanisms of action of these chemotypes make them a useful set of complementary chemical probes for functional studies of prostaglandin-signaling pathways. Enhanced version This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S2. PMID:21072165

  16. High Affinity Binders to EphA2 Isolated from Abdurin Scaffold Libraries; Characterization, Binding and Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Christopher; Mathonet, Pascale; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Diamandakis, Agata; Tomei, Licia; Demartis, Anna; Nardi, Chiara; Sambucini, Sonia; Missineo, Antonino; Alt, Karen; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Harris, Matt; Hedt, Amos; Weis, Roland; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Abdurins are a novel antibody-like scaffold derived from the engineering of a single isolated CH2 domain of human IgG. Previous studies established the prolonged serum half-life of Abdurins, the result of a retained FcRn binding motif. Here we present data on the construction of large, diverse, phage-display and cell-free DNA display libraries and the isolation of high affinity binders to the cancer target, membrane-bound ephrin receptor tyrosine kinase class A2 (EphA2). Antigen binding regions were created by designing combinatorial libraries into the structural loops and Abdurins were selected using phage display methods. Initial binders were reformatted into new maturation libraries and low nanomolar binders were isolated using cell-free DNA display, CIS display. Further characterization confirmed binding of the Abdurins to both human and murine EphA2 proteins and exclusively to cell lines that expressed EphA2, followed by rapid internalization. Two different EphA2 binders were labeled with 64Cu, using a bifunctional MeCOSar chelator, and administered to mice bearing tumors from transplanted human prostate cancer cells, followed by PET/CT imaging. The anti-EphA2 Abdurins localized in the tumors as early as 4 hours after injection and continued to accumulate up to 48 hours when the imaging was completed. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate high affinity binders from the engineered Abdurin scaffold, which retain a long serum half-life, and specifically target tumors in a xenograft model. PMID:26313909

  17. High affinity binding of beta 2-glycoprotein I to human endothelial cells is mediated by annexin II.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Simantov, R; Zhang, J C; Silverstein, R; Hajjar, K A; McCrae, K R

    2000-05-19

    Beta(2)-glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI) is an abundant plasma phospholipid-binding protein and an autoantigen in the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Binding of beta(2)GPI to endothelial cells targets them for activation by anti-beta(2)GPI antibodies, which circulate and are associated with thrombosis in patients with the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. However, the binding of beta(2)GPI to endothelial cells has not been characterized and is assumed to result from association of beta(2)GPI with membrane phospholipid. Here, we characterize the binding of beta(2)GPI to endothelial cells and identify the beta(2)GPI binding site. (125)I-beta(2)GPI bound with high affinity (K(d) approximately 18 nm) to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Using affinity purification, we isolated beta(2)GPI-binding proteins of approximately 78 and approximately 36 kDa from HUVECs and EAHY.926 cells. Amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides from each of these were identical to sequences within annexin II. A role for annexin II in binding of beta(2)GPI to cells was confirmed by the observations that annexin II-transfected HEK 293 cells bound approximately 10-fold more (125)I-beta(2)GPI than control cells and that anti-annexin II antibodies inhibited the binding of (125)I-beta(2)GPI to HUVECs by approximately 90%. Finally, surface plasmon resonance studies revealed high affinity binding between annexin II and beta(2)GPI. These results demonstrate that annexin II mediates the binding of beta(2)GPI to endothelial cells. PMID:10809787

  18. Functional assessment of the Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD protein demonstrates that it is a high-affinity nitrate transporter.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Rammyani; Salehin, Mohammad; Adeyemo, O Sarah; Salazar, Carolina; Shulaev, Vladimir; Sherrier, D Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2012-10-01

    The Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD (for Numerous Infections and Polyphenolics/Lateral root-organ Defective) gene encodes a protein found in a clade of nitrate transporters within the large NRT1(PTR) family that also encodes transporters of dipeptides and tripeptides, dicarboxylates, auxin, and abscisic acid. Of the NRT1(PTR) members known to transport nitrate, most are low-affinity transporters. Here, we show that M. truncatula nip/latd mutants are more defective in their lateral root responses to nitrate provided at low (250 μm) concentrations than at higher (5 mm) concentrations; however, nitrate uptake experiments showed no discernible differences in uptake in the mutants. Heterologous expression experiments showed that MtNIP/LATD encodes a nitrate transporter: expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes conferred upon the oocytes the ability to take up nitrate from the medium with high affinity, and expression of MtNIP/LATD in an Arabidopsis chl1(nrt1.1) mutant rescued the chlorate susceptibility phenotype. X. laevis oocytes expressing mutant Mtnip-1 and Mtlatd were unable to take up nitrate from the medium, but oocytes expressing the less severe Mtnip-3 allele were proficient in nitrate transport. M. truncatula nip/latd mutants have pleiotropic defects in nodulation and root architecture. Expression of the Arabidopsis NRT1.1 gene in mutant Mtnip-1 roots partially rescued Mtnip-1 for root architecture defects but not for nodulation defects. This suggests that the spectrum of activities inherent in AtNRT1.1 is different from that possessed by MtNIP/LATD, but it could also reflect stability differences of each protein in M. truncatula. Collectively, the data show that MtNIP/LATD is a high-affinity nitrate transporter and suggest that it could have another function. PMID:22858636

  19. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-02-10

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 /sup 0/C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17..beta..-(/sup 3/H)estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins.

  20. Histones have high affinity for the glomerular basement membrane. Relevance for immune complex formation in lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Schmiedeke, T.M.; Stoeckl, F.W.W.; Weber, R.; Sugisaki, Y.; Batsford, S.R.; Vogt, A.

    1989-06-01

    An effort has been made to integrate insights on charge-based interactions in immune complex glomerulonephritis with nuclear antigen involvement in lupus nephritis. Attention was focussed on the histones, a group of highly cationic nuclear constituents, which could be expected to bind to fixed anionic sites present in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). We demonstrated that all histone subfractions, prepared according to Johns, have a high affinity for GBM and the basement membrane of peritubular capillaries. Tissue uptake of /sup 125/I-labeled histones was measured by injecting 200 micrograms of each fraction into the left kidney via the aorta and measuring organ uptake after 15 min. In glomeruli isolated from the left kidneys, the following quantities of histones were found: f1, 13 micrograms; f2a (f2al + f2a2), 17 micrograms; f2b, 17 micrograms; and f3, 32 micrograms. Kinetic studies of glomerular binding showed that f1 disappeared much more rapidly than f2a. The high affinity of histones (pI between 10.5 and 11.0; mol wt 10,000-22,000) for the GBM correlates well with their ability to form aggregates (mol wt greater than 100,000) for comparison lysozyme (pI 11, mol wt 14,000), which does not aggregate spontaneously bound poorly (0.4 micrograms in isolated glomeruli). The quantity of histones and lysozyme found in the isolated glomeruli paralleled their in vitro affinity for a Heparin-Sepharose column (gradient elution studies). This gel matrix contains the sulfated, highly anionic polysaccharide heparin, which is similar to the negatively charged heparan sulfate present in the GBM. Lysozyme eluted with 0.15 M NaCl, f1 with 1 M NaCl, and f2a, f2b, and f3 could not be fully desorbed even with 2 M NaCl; 6 M guanidine-HCl was necessary.

  1. High-affinity lead binding proteins in rat kidney cytosol mediate cell-free nuclear translocation of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, P.; Lucier, G.W.; Fowler, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PbII binding characteristics of the previously reported PbII binding proteins of rat kidney cytosol were investigated further. Saturation and Scatchard analysis of /sup 203/Pb binding in whole cytosol and in 40% saturated ammonium sulfate precipitated fractions disclosed a class of relatively high-affinity sites with an apparent Kd of approximately 50 nM and binding capacities of approximately 41 and 9 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. Two /sup 203/Pb binding proteins with approximate molecular masses of 63K and 11.5K daltons and a high molecular weight component (greater than 200K) were isolated by Sepharose-6B column chromatography. The time course of association of /sup 203/Pb with cytosol and the 63K protein showed maximum binding at 18 hr which was stable up to 25 hr at 4 degrees C. The approximate half-time dissociation rate (T 1/2) of specifically bound /sup 203/Pb to the 63K protein was 100 min at 4 degrees C whereas the 11.5K protein showed little dissociation of specifically bound ligand at this temperature. Saturation analysis of the three isolated proteins disclosed low capacity, high-affinity sites with similar apparent Kd values to the cytosol assay. Sucrose density gradient analysis of kidney cytosol showed approximate sedimentation coefficients of 2S, 4.6S and 7S for the 11.5K, 63K and the high molecular weight proteins, respectively. Competitive binding studies with cytosol demonstrated displacement of /sup 203/Pb by PbII, CdII and ZnII ions but not CaII ions.

  2. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  3. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the "AGIA" tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10-9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  4. Substrate specificity and mapping of residues critical for transport in the high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Mohammad; Yadav, Shambhu; Thakur, Anil; Singla, Shiffalli; Sharma, Monika; Bachhawat, Anand Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to a relatively new and structurally uncharacterized oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family. To understand the structural features required for interaction with Hgt1p, a quantitative investigation of substrate specificity of Hgt1p was carried out. Hgt1p showed a higher affinity for reduced glutathione (GSH), whereas it transported oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and other glutathione conjugates with lower affinity. To identify the residues of Hgt1p critical for substrate binding and translocation, all amino acid residues of the 13 predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) have been subjected to mutagenesis. Functional evaluation of these 269 mutants by growth and biochemical assay followed by kinetic analysis of the severely defective mutants including previous mutagenic studies on this transporter have led to the identification of N124 (TMD1), V185 (TMD3), Q222, G225 and Y226 (TMD4), P292 (TMD5), Y374 (TMD6), L429 (TMD7) and F523 and Q526 (TMD9) as critical for substrate binding with at least 3-fold increase in Km upon mutagenesis to alanine. In addition residues Y226 and Y374 appeared to be important for differential substrate specificity. An ab initio model of Hgt1p was built and refined using these mutagenic data that yielded a helical arrangement that includes TMD3, TMD4, TMD5, TMD6, TMD7, TMD9 and TMD13 as pore-lining helices with the functionally important residues in a channel-facing orientation. Taken together the results of this study provides the first mechanistic insights into glutathione transport by a eukaryotic high-affinity glutathione transporter. PMID:27252386

  5. Identification and characterization of the type-IVA cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase RD1 as a membrane-bound protein expressed in cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Shakur, Y; Wilson, M; Pooley, L; Lobban, M; Griffiths, S L; Campbell, A M; Beattie, J; Daly, C; Houslay, M D

    1995-03-15

    An antiserum was generated against a dodecapeptide whose sequence is found at the C-terminus of a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific, type-IVA phosphodiesterase encoded by the rat 'dunc-like' cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (RD1) cDNA. This antiserum identified a single approximately 73 kDa protein species upon immunoblotting of cerebellum homogenates. This species co-migrated upon SDS/PAGE with a single immunoreactive species observed in COS cells transfected with the cDNA for RD1. Native RD1 in cerebellum was found to be predominantly (approximately 93%) membrane-associated and could be found in isolated synaptosome populations, in particular those enriched in post-synaptic densities. Fractionation of lysed synaptosomes on sucrose density gradients identified RD1 as co-migrating with the plasma membrane marker 5'-nucleotidase. Laser scanning confocal and digital deconvolution immunofluorescence studies done on intact COS cells transfected with RD1 cDNA showed RD1 to be predominantly localized to plasma membranes but also associated with the Golgi apparatus and intracellular vesicles. RD1-specific antisera immunoprecipitated phosphodiesterase activity from solubilized cerebellum membranes. This activity had the characteristics expected of the type-IV cAMP phosphodiesterase RD1 in that it was cAMP specific, exhibited a low Km cAMP of 2.3 microM, high sensitivity to inhibition by 4-[3-(cyclopentoxyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidone (rolipram) (Ki approximately 0.7 microM) and was unaffected by Ca2+/calmodulin and low concentrations of cyclic GMP. The phosphodiesterase activities of RD1 solubilized from both cerebellum and transfected COS cell membranes showed identical first-order thermal denaturation kinetics at 50 degrees C. Native RD1 from cerebellum was shown to be an integral protein in that it was solubilized using the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 but not by either re-homogenization or high NaCl concentrations. The observation that hydroxylamine was unable to cause

  6. Comparison of indolidan analog binding sites of drug antibody and sarcoplasmic reticulum with inhibition of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Ashikaga, T; Robertson, D W; Sportsman, R J; Strada, S J; Thompson, W J

    1996-01-01

    Dihydropyridazinone(DHP) derivatives such as indolidan are positive inotropic agents that show inhibition of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase(PDE) activity. Indolidan inhibition is selective for PDE3 among the seven PDE gene families. DHP derivatives and related analogs have been used to define critical regions of the active site of PDE3 isoforms and radiolabeled analogs have been used to define indolidan sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) receptor sites. We report here studies comparing the structure-activity relationships (SAR) for PDE3 inhibition with indolidan binding to two types of sites: canine SR and a monoclonal antibody derived against indolidan conjugated to a hemocyanin. SR and monoclonal antibody binding both fit singlesite, high affinity models (IC50 = 1.2 and 62 nM) that were near 52 and 360 times that of SR PDE3. Indolidan and thirteen analogs showed similar competition with either SR 3H-LY186126 binding or SR PDE3 inhibition. Antibody binding maintained selectivity but showed a different rank order potency for SR binding. Indole ring C3 methylation increased and DHP ring C4' methylation decreased indolidan monoclonal antibody binding while both substitutions increased SR binding. These studies support the hypothesis that SR PDE3 is a cardiotonic receptor site in myocardial membranes and indicate that models of the structural features of binding sites derived from inhibitor data alone could produce models with limited topography relative to the natural ligand. PMID:8968964

  7. In vivo model with targeted cAMP biosensor reveals changes in receptor-microdomain communication in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Julia U; Perera, Ruwan K; Steinbrecher, Julia H; Lehnart, Stephan E; Maier, Lars S; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O

    2015-01-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an ubiquitous second messenger that regulates physiological functions by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Although several targeted cAMP biosensors are developed and used in single cells, it is unclear whether such biosensors can be successfully applied in vivo, especially in the context of disease. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse model expressing a targeted cAMP sensor and analyse microdomain-specific second messenger dynamics in the vicinity of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). We demonstrate the biocompatibility of this targeted sensor and its potential for real-time monitoring of compartmentalized cAMP signalling in adult cardiomyocytes isolated from a healthy mouse heart and from an in vivo cardiac disease model. In particular, we uncover the existence of a phosphodiesterase-dependent receptor-microdomain communication, which is affected in hypertrophy, resulting in reduced β-adrenergic receptor-cAMP signalling to SERCA. PMID:25917898

  8. Mechanisms of Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases in Modulating T Cell Responses in Murine Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Michael; Lupp, Corinna; Stein, Pamela; Kreft, Andreas; Bopp, Tobias; Wehler, Thomas C.; Schmitt, Edgar; Schild, Hansjörg; Radsak, Markus P.

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a key contributor to the morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Regulatory Foxp3+ CD4+ T cells (Treg) suppress conventional T cell activation and can control GvHD. In our previous work, we demonstrate that a basic mechanism of Treg mediated suppression occurs by the transfer of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to responder cells. Whether this mechanism is relevant for Treg mediated suppression of GvHD is currently unknown. To address this question, bone marrow and T cells from C57BL/6 mice were transferred into lethally irradiated BALB/c recipients, and the course of GvHD and survival were monitored. Transplanted recipients developed severe GvHD that was strongly ameliorated by the transfer of donor Treg cells. Towards the underlying mechanisms, in vitro studies revealed that Treg communicated with DCs via gap junctions, resulting in functional inactivation of DC by a metabolic pathway involving cAMP that is modulated by the phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor rolipram. PDE2 or PDE3 inhibitors as well as rolipram suppressed allogeneic T cell activation, indirectly by enhancing Treg mediated suppression of DC activation and directly by inhibiting responder T cell proliferation. In line with this, we observed a cooperative suppression of GvHD upon Treg transfer and additional rolipram treatment. In conclusion, we propose that an important pathway of Treg mediated control of GvHD is based on a cAMP dependent mechanism. These data provide the basis for future concepts to manipulate allogeneic T cell responses to prevent GvHD. PMID:23483980

  9. Mechanisms of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in modulating T cell responses in murine graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Lupp, Corinna; Stein, Pamela; Kreft, Andreas; Bopp, Tobias; Wehler, Thomas C; Schmitt, Edgar; Schild, Hansjörg; Radsak, Markus P

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a key contributor to the morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Regulatory Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells (Treg) suppress conventional T cell activation and can control GvHD. In our previous work, we demonstrate that a basic mechanism of Treg mediated suppression occurs by the transfer of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to responder cells. Whether this mechanism is relevant for Treg mediated suppression of GvHD is currently unknown. To address this question, bone marrow and T cells from C57BL/6 mice were transferred into lethally irradiated BALB/c recipients, and the course of GvHD and survival were monitored. Transplanted recipients developed severe GvHD that was strongly ameliorated by the transfer of donor Treg cells. Towards the underlying mechanisms, in vitro studies revealed that Treg communicated with DCs via gap junctions, resulting in functional inactivation of DC by a metabolic pathway involving cAMP that is modulated by the phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor rolipram. PDE2 or PDE3 inhibitors as well as rolipram suppressed allogeneic T cell activation, indirectly by enhancing Treg mediated suppression of DC activation and directly by inhibiting responder T cell proliferation. In line with this, we observed a cooperative suppression of GvHD upon Treg transfer and additional rolipram treatment. In conclusion, we propose that an important pathway of Treg mediated control of GvHD is based on a cAMP dependent mechanism. These data provide the basis for future concepts to manipulate allogeneic T cell responses to prevent GvHD. PMID:23483980

  10. Role of phosphodiesterase 4 expression in the Epac1 signaling-dependent skeletal muscle hypertrophic action of clenbuterol.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Nariyama, Megumi; Ito, Aiko; Kawamura, Naoya; Yagisawa, Yuka; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    Clenbuterol (CB), a selective β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist, induces muscle hypertrophy and counteracts muscle atrophy. However, it is paradoxically less effective in slow-twitch muscle than in fast-twitch muscle, though slow-twitch muscle has a greater density of β-AR We recently demonstrated that Epac1 (exchange protein activated by cyclic AMP [cAMP]1) plays a pivotal role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy through activation of the Akt and calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII)/histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) signaling pathways. Here, we investigated the role of Epac1 in the differential hypertrophic effect of CB using tibialis anterior muscle (TA; typical fast-twitch muscle) and soleus muscle (SOL; typical slow-twitch muscle) of wild-type (WT) and Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The TA mass to tibial length (TL) ratio was similar in WT and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased after CB infusion in WT, but not in Epac1KO The SOL mass to TL ratio was also similar in WT and Epac1KO at baseline, but CB-induced hypertrophy was suppressed in both mice. In order to understand the mechanism involved, we measured the protein expression levels of β-AR signaling-related molecules, and found that phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) expression was 12-fold greater in SOL than in TA These results are consistent with the idea that increased PDE4-mediated cAMP hydrolysis occurs in SOL compared to TA, resulting in a reduced cAMP concentration that is insufficient to activate Epac1 and its downstream Akt and CaMKII/HDAC4 hypertrophic signaling pathways in SOL of WT This scenario can account for the differential effects of CB on fast- and slow-twitch muscles. PMID:27207782

  11. Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases in the zebra finch: distribution, cloning and characterization of a PDE4B homolog.

    PubMed

    Thompson, B E; Freking, F; Pho, V; Schlinger, B A; Cherry, J A

    2000-11-10

    Songbirds are important animal models for studying neural mechanisms underlying learning and memory. While evidence has emerged that cAMP plays a significant role in invertebrate and mammalian learning, little is known about the role of cAMP pathways in regulating neuronal function in birds. With the goal of identifying important components of this pathway, we report the first cloning of a cAMP-specific, Type IV phosphodiesterase (PDE4) in a non-mammalian vertebrate. A combination of PCR analysis and cDNA library screening was used to show that homologs of the four known mammalian PDE4 genes also exist in zebra finch. A full-length cDNA representing the zebra finch homolog of PDE4B1 was isolated from a telencephalic library. Expression of this cDNA in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK) cells yielded an enzyme that hydrolyzed cAMP with a low K(m) and was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of rolipram; these properties are typical of all known mammalian PDE4s. In brain, northern blots revealed transcripts of 3.6 and 4.4 kb in adults, but only the 3.6 kb transcript in juveniles, suggesting that PDE4 expression is developmentally regulated. In situ hybridization of tissue sections demonstrated that PDE4 message was distributed widely throughout the adult zebra finch brain, including regions controlling the learning of songs and the acquisition of spatial memories. These data suggest that PDE4 enzymes may influence a variety of brain functions in these birds and play a role in learning. PMID:11072099

  12. Building the bacterial orisome: high affinity DnaA recognition plays a role in setting the conformation of oriC DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gulpreet; Vora, Mansi P.; Czerwonka, Christopher A.; Rozgaja, Tania A.; Grimwade, Julia E.; Leonard, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary During assembly of the E. coli pre-replicative complex (pre-RC), initiator DnaA oligomers are nucleated from three widely separated high affinity DnaA recognition sites in oriC. Oligomer assembly is then guided by low affinity DnaA recognition sites, but is also regulated by a switch-like conformational change in oriC mediated by sequential binding of two DNA bending proteins, Fis and IHF, serving as inhibitor and activator, respectively. Although their recognition sites are separated by up to 90 bp, Fis represses IHF binding and weak DnaA interactions until accumulating DnaA displaces Fis from oriC. It remains unclear whether high affinity DnaA binding plays any role in Fis repression at a distance and it is also not known whether all high affinity DnaA recognition sites play an equivalent role in oligomer formation. To examine these issues, we developed origin-selective recombineering methods to mutate E. coli chromosomal oriC. We found that, although oligomers were assembled in the absence of any individual high affinity DnaA binding site, loss of DnaA binding at peripheral sites eliminated Fis repression, and made binding of both Fis and IHF essential. We propose a model in which interaction of DnaA molecules at high affinity sites regulates oriC DNA conformation. PMID:24443848

  13. "Store-operated" cAMP signaling contributes to Ca2+-activated Cl- secretion in T84 colonic cells.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Jonathan M; Maiellaro, Isabella; Abi-Jaoude, Joanne; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2015-10-15

    Apical cAMP-dependent CFTR Cl(-) channels are essential for efficient vectorial movement of ions and fluid into the lumen of the colon. It is well known that Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists also stimulate colonic anion secretion. However, CFTR is apparently not activated directly by Ca(2+), and the existence of apical Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels in the native colonic epithelium is controversial, leaving the identity of the Ca(2+)-activated component unresolved. We recently showed that decreasing free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen elicits a rise in intracellular cAMP. This process, which we termed "store-operated cAMP signaling" (SOcAMPS), requires the luminal ER Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and does not depend on changes in cytosolic Ca(2+). Here we assessed the degree to which SOcAMPS participates in Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) transport as measured by transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) in polarized T84 monolayers in parallel with imaging of cAMP and PKA activity using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based reporters in single cells. In Ca(2+)-free conditions, the Ca(2+)-releasing agonist carbachol and Ca(2+) ionophore increased Isc, cAMP, and PKA activity. These responses persisted in cells loaded with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM. The effect on Isc was enhanced in the presence of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), inhibited by the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172 and the PKA inhibitor H-89, and unaffected by Ba(2+) or flufenamic acid. We propose that a discrete component of the "Ca(2+)-dependent" secretory activity in the colon derives from cAMP generated through SOcAMPS. This alternative mode of cAMP production could contribute to the actions of diverse xenobiotic agents that disrupt ER Ca(2+) homeostasis, leading to diarrhea. PMID:26316590

  14. cAMP/PKA/CREB/GLT1 signaling involved in the antidepressant-like effects of phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor (GEBR-7b) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Guo, Haibiao; Sayed, Mohammad Daud SOM; Lu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Zhou, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhongming; Wang, Haitao; Wang, Chuang; Xu, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives GEBR-7b, a potential phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor, has been shown to have memory-enhancing effects in rodents. However, it is still unknown whether GEBR-7b also has the antidepressant-like effects in rats. Herein, we examined the potential of GEBR-7b to attenuate depression-like behaviors in the rat model of depression induced by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Next, we also investigated the alterations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit (PKAca), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) levels produced by GEBR-7b in the rats model of depression. Methods Effects of GEBR-7b on CUS (35 days)-induced depression-like behaviors were examined by measuring immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST). Hippocampal cAMP levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas PKAca, phosphorylation of CREB (pCREB), CREB, and GLT1 in the hippocampus of rats were subjected to Western blot analysis. Results CUS exposure caused a depression-like behavior evidenced by the increased immobility time in FST. Depression-like behavior induced by CUS was accompanied by a significant increased GLT, decreased cAMP, PKAca, pCREB activities in hippocampus. However, repeated GEBR-7b administration significantly reversed CUS-induced depression-like behavior and changes of cAMP/PKA/CREB/GLT1 signaling. No alteration was observed in locomotor activity in open field test. Conclusion These findings indicate that GEBR-7b reversed the depression-like behaviors induced by CUS in rats, which is at least in part mediated by modulating cAMP, PKAca, pCREB, and GLT1 levels in the hippocampus of rats, supporting its neuroprotective potential against behavioral and biochemical dysfunctions induced by CUS. PMID:26855578

  15. US SPACE CAMP CALIFORNIA - DAY CAMP GRAND OPENING WITH KEVIN JONES (WHISMAN SCHOOL) AND LUCRETIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    US SPACE CAMP CALIFORNIA - DAY CAMP GRAND OPENING WITH KEVIN JONES (WHISMAN SCHOOL) AND LUCRETIA SUTHERLIN (MCNAIR SCHOOL). AMES SPONSORED STUDENTS AND RACHAEL QUIRING (STAFF) - AUTOGRAPH SIGNING BY Astronaut Wally Schirra

  16. Multiple mode of binding of phencyclidines: high affinity association between phencyclidine receptors in rat brain and a monovalent ion-sensitive polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Haring, R.; Kloog, Y.; Harshak-Felixbrodt, N.A.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-01-30

    Two populations of phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites are shown to exist in the rat brain: a high-affinity monovalent ion-sensitive site (Kd of 10-14 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP, (/sup 3/H)N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine), which exists in both the frontal cortex and the hippocampus, and a lower affinity site (Kd of 80-130 nM for (/sup 3/H)TCP) which is found in the hippocampus but not in the frontal cortex. The nature of the interactions between the ion-binding sites and the high affinity PCP receptors depend on both ligand structure (PCP or TCP) and the ion involved (K or Na). The high-affinity sites are associated with an Mr 90,000 polypeptide whose labeling by (/sup 3/H)azido phencyclidine is selectively inhibited by monovalent ions.

  17. A Day in the Life of Three Special Needs Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winbaum, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about three special needs camps--Camp Kirk, Camp Talisman and Camp Caglewood. Camp Kirk's philosophy is to encourage their children to take risks in a structured setting, like high ropes courses, rock climbing wall, martial arts, and traditional activities like swimming, arts and craft, drama, and others. Once…

  18. College Camp Fairs: Tips for Hosts, Directors, and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskill, Paul L.; Campbell, Don

    1995-01-01

    Camp fairs are held on college campuses to recruit students for summer camp positions. Provides marketing and promotion strategies, recruiting suggestions for camp directors, tips for students helping to organize the fair, and suggestions for students who want to secure a summer camp position. Includes a sample camp fair evaluation. (LP)

  19. Stories from Camp: Understanding the Impact of What We Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGraaf, Don; Glover, Jessie

    2002-01-01

    A study examining the impacts of camp on staff interviewed 29 former seasonal camp staff. All respondents reported positive benefits in their personal and professional lives and the strong influence of camp in shaping career choices. Reflections on camp fell into three categories: uniqueness of camp, making memories for kids, and freedom. (TD)

  20. A putative antipruritic mechanism of the phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor E6005 by attenuating capsaicin-induced depolarization of C-fibre nerves.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Hisashi; Ohkuro, Masayoshi; Ishii, Naoto; Hishinuma, Ieharu; Shirato, Manabu

    2015-03-01

    E6005, a potent, selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor, has been developed as a novel topical agent of atopic dermatitis (AD). It has been shown to inhibit itching in patients with AD as well in mouse models. To study the mechanism underlying the anti-pruritic effect of E6005, we examined its effect on the activation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons associated with the itch sensation. Depolarization of DRG neurons by a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV 1) activator, capsaicin was attenuated by E6005 as well as by a 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) elevator, forskolin. E6005 elevated intracellular levels of cAMP in DRG cells. Taken together, these results suggest that E6005 suppresses TRPV1-mediated C-fibre depolarization through elevation of cAMP levels, thereby exerting an anti-pruritic effect. Thus, E6005 shows the potential to be a new agent for managing pruritus in various skin disorders, including AD. PMID:25431172