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Sample records for high-angle twist grain

  1. Atomistic aspects of crack propagation along high angle grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, D.

    1997-12-31

    The author presents atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration near a high angle {Sigma} = 5 [001](210) symmetrical tilt grain boundary in NiAl. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and embedded atom (EAM) potentials. The cracks are stabilized near a Griffith condition involving the cohesive energy of the grain boundary. The atomistic configurations of the tip region are different in the presence of the high angle grain boundary than in the bulk. Three different configurations of the grain boundary were studied corresponding to different local compositions. It was found that in ordered NiAl, cracks along symmetrical tilt boundaries show a more brittle behavior for Al rich boundaries than for Ni-rich boundaries. Lattice trapping effects in grain boundary fracture were found to be more significant than in the bulk.

  2. Characterizing twist grain boundaries in BCC Nb by molecular simulation: Structure and shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zeng-Hui; Feng, Ya-Xin; Shang, Jia-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Atomic scale modeling was used to study the structure, energy and shear behaviors of (110) twist grain boundaries (TWGBs) in body-centered cubic Nb. The relation between grain boundary energy (GBE) and the twist angle θ agrees well with the Read-Shockley equation in low-angle range. At higher angles, the GBEs show no distinct trend with the variation of the twist angle or the density of coincident lattice sites. All (110) twist boundaries can be classified into two types: low-angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) and high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs). LAGBs contain a hexagonal dislocation network (HDN) which is composed of 1/2 [ 111 ], 1/2 [ 1 bar 1 bar 1 ] and [001] screw dislocations. HAGBs can be classified into three sub-types further: special boundaries with low Σ, boundaries in the vicinity of special boundaries with similar structures and ordinary HAGBs consisting of periodic patterns. Besides, a dependence of grain boundary shear response vs the twist angle over the entire twist angle range is obtained. Pure sliding behavior is found at all TWGBs. When θ < 12°, the flow stress of LAGBs is found to be correlated with the HDNs and decreases with the increasing twist angle. For ordinary HAGBs, the magnitude of flow stress is around 0.8-1.0 GPa and the twist angle has little effect on the anisotropy mobility. For special grain boundaries with low Σ, the boundary structures govern the GBEs and shear motion behavior significantly.

  3. Superplastic Constitutive Equation Including Percentage of High-Angle Grain Boundaries as a Microstructural Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Liu, F. C.; Xue, P.; Wang, D.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen Al-Mg-Sc samples with subgrain/grain sizes in the range of 1.8 to 4.9 μm were prepared through the processing methods of friction stir processing (FSP), equal-channel-angular pressing (ECAP), rolling, annealing, and combinations of the above. The percentages of high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) of these fine-grained alloys were distributed from 39 to 97 pct. The samples processed through FSP had a higher percentage of HAGBs compared to other samples. Superplasticity was achieved in all fifteen samples, but the FSP samples exhibited better superplasticity than other samples because their fine equiaxed grains, which were mostly surrounded by HAGBs, were conducive to the occurrence of grain boundary sliding (GBS) during superplastic deformation. The dominant deformation mechanism was the same for all fifteen samples, i.e., GBS controlled by grain boundary diffusion. However, the subgrains were the GBS units for the rolled or ECAP samples, which contained high percentages of unrecrystallized grains, whereas the fine grains were the GBS units for the FSP samples. Superplastic data analysis revealed that the dimensionless A in the classical constitutive equation for superplasticity of fine-grained Al alloys was not a constant, but increased with an increase in the percentage of HAGBs, demonstrating that the enhanced superplastic deformation kinetics can be ascribed to the high percentage of HAGBs. A modified superplastic constitutive equation with the percentage of HAGBs as a new microstructural parameter was established.

  4. HREM of general and twist grain boundaries.

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, K. L.; Thompson, L. J.

    1999-03-10

    The observation of atomic-scale structures of grain boundaries (GBs) via axial illumination HREM has been largely restricted to tilt GBs, due to the requirement that the electron beam be parallel to a low-index zone axis on both sides of the interface. This condition can be fulfilled for all tilt GBs with disorientation about a low-index direction. The information obtained through HREM studies in many materials has brought important insights concerning the atomic-scale structure of such boundaries. However, it is well known that tilt GBs occupy only an infinitesimally small fraction of the 5-dimensional phase space which describes the macroscopic geometry of all GBs. Therefore, although tilt GBs are very important due to their low energy, it would be useful to also study twist GBs and general GBs that contain twist and tilt components.

  5. Lamellar diblock copolymer grain boundary morphology. 1. Twist boundary characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gido, S.P.; Gunther, J.; Thomas, E.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Hoffman, D. . Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics)

    1993-08-16

    Grain boundary morphologies in poly(styrene-b-butadiene) lamellar diblock copolymers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two types of twist grain boundaries were observed in which microphase separation of the two blocks was maintained in the grain boundary region by intermaterial dividing surfaces that approximate classically known minimal surfaces. The geometry of these interfaces was demonstrated by comparing experimental TEM images with ray tracing computer simulations of the model surfaces as the projection direction was systematically varied in both the experimental and simulated images. The two morphologies observed were found to have intermaterial dividing surfaces that approximate either Scherk's first (doubly periodic) surface or a section of the right helicoid. The helicoid section boundary was observed at low twist angles, less than or equal to about 15. The Scherk surface family of boundary morphologies, which consists of a doubly periodic array of saddle surfaces, was found over the entire twist range from 0 to 90[degree]. As the twist angle approaches 0[degree] the Scherk surface grain boundary morphology is transformed into a single screw dislocation that has an intermaterial dividing surface with the geometry of a single helicoid. Direct TEM imaging of the detailed core structure of this screw dislocation is presented. These images demonstrate that in the lamellar diblock copolymer the screw dislocation core is nonsingular. This nonsingular core structure represents a radical departure from the singular core structures observed in classical studies of dislocations in atomic crystals.

  6. Nanoparticle-induced twist-grain boundary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trček, Maja; Cordoyiannis, George; Tzitzios, Vassilios; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Lelidis, Ioannis; Kutnjak, Zdravko

    2014-09-01

    By means of high-resolution ac calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy, it is demonstrated that surface-functionalized spherical CdSSe nanoparticles induce a twist-grain boundary phase when dispersed in a chiral liquid crystal. These nanoparticles can effectively stabilize the one-dimensional lattice of screw dislocations, thus establishing the twist-grain boundary order between the cholesteric and the smectic-A phases. A Landau-de Gennes-Ginzburg model is used to analyze the impact of nanoparticles on widening the temperature range of molecular organizations possessing a lattice of screw dislocations. We show that in addition to the defect-core-replacement mechanism, the saddle-splay elasticity may also play a significant role.

  7. Nanoparticle-induced twist-grain boundary phase.

    PubMed

    Trček, Maja; Cordoyiannis, George; Tzitzios, Vassilios; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Lelidis, Ioannis; Kutnjak, Zdravko

    2014-09-01

    By means of high-resolution ac calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy, it is demonstrated that surface-functionalized spherical CdSSe nanoparticles induce a twist-grain boundary phase when dispersed in a chiral liquid crystal. These nanoparticles can effectively stabilize the one-dimensional lattice of screw dislocations, thus establishing the twist-grain boundary order between the cholesteric and the smectic-A phases. A Landau-de Gennes-Ginzburg model is used to analyze the impact of nanoparticles on widening the temperature range of molecular organizations possessing a lattice of screw dislocations. We show that in addition to the defect-core-replacement mechanism, the saddle-splay elasticity may also play a significant role. PMID:25314459

  8. Defects in crystalline packings of twisted filament bundles. II. Dislocations and grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Amir; Grason, Gregory M

    2012-03-01

    Twisted and ropelike assemblies of filamentous molecules are common and vital structural elements in cells and tissues of living organisms. We study the intrinsic frustration occurring in these materials between the two-dimensional organization of filaments in cross section and out-of-plane interfilament twist in bundles. Using nonlinear continuum elasticity theory of columnar materials, we study the favorable coupling of twist-induced stresses to the presence of edge dislocations in the lattice packing of bundles, which leads to a restructuring of the ground-state order of these materials at intermediate twist. The stability of dislocations increases as both the degree of twist and lateral bundle size grow. We show that in ground states of large bundles, multiple dislocations pile up into linear arrays, radial grain boundaries, whose number and length grows with bundle twist, giving rise to a rich class of "polycrystalline" packings. PMID:22587105

  9. On the small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in Ti3AlC2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Tao; Zhan, Xun; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Tilt-dominated grain boundaries have been investigated in depth in the deformation of MAX phases. In stark contrast, another important type of grain boundaries, twist grain boundaries, have long been overlooked. Here, we report on the observation of small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in a typical MAX phase Ti3AlC2 compressed at 1200 °C, which comprise hexagonal screw dislocation networks formed by basal dislocation reactions. By first-principles investigations on atomic-scale deformation and general stacking fault energy landscapes, it is unequivocally demonstrated that the twist sub-grain boundaries are most likely located between Al and Ti4f (Ti located at the 4f Wyckoff sites of P63/mmc) layers, with breaking of the weakly bonded Al–Ti4f. The twist angle increases with the increase of deformation and is estimated to be around 0.5° for a deformation of 26%. This work may shed light on sub-grain boundaries of MAX phases, and provide fundamental information for future atomic-scale simulations. PMID:27034075

  10. On the small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in Ti3AlC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Tao; Zhan, Xun; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-04-01

    Tilt-dominated grain boundaries have been investigated in depth in the deformation of MAX phases. In stark contrast, another important type of grain boundaries, twist grain boundaries, have long been overlooked. Here, we report on the observation of small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in a typical MAX phase Ti3AlC2 compressed at 1200 °C, which comprise hexagonal screw dislocation networks formed by basal dislocation reactions. By first-principles investigations on atomic-scale deformation and general stacking fault energy landscapes, it is unequivocally demonstrated that the twist sub-grain boundaries are most likely located between Al and Ti4f (Ti located at the 4f Wyckoff sites of P63/mmc) layers, with breaking of the weakly bonded Al–Ti4f. The twist angle increases with the increase of deformation and is estimated to be around 0.5° for a deformation of 26%. This work may shed light on sub-grain boundaries of MAX phases, and provide fundamental information for future atomic-scale simulations.

  11. Molecular dynamical investigation on dislocation near twist-grain boundary of Ni under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Liang; Hsieh, Jin-Yuan; Chang, Jee-Gong; Lin, Hong-Chang; Chiang, Hsing-Jung; Huang, Huang-Kai; Hwang, Chi-Chuan

    2011-11-01

    The dislocations and the strength of a nickel bicrystal are investigated in present study. There are three kinds of crystalline orientations of the nickel bicrystal, namely (100), (110), and (111). Misfit dislocations are presented on the interface between two nickel grains when a compression process is utilized on the bicrystal. The misfit dislocations on a Ni(100) interface form a square-latticed network and those on a Ni(111) form a triangle-latticed network. When a large twist angle is applied to the Ni bicrystal, the square- and triangle-latticed unit of the misfit dislocation networks will shrink or even disappear. Thus, a plane defects distribute over the interface. If the bicrystal is compressed further, dislocations within each grain are developed from the defects on the interface between grains. The configuration of the dislocations within grains is more regular when the applied twist angle is smaller. A Ni(111) bicrystal owns the largest amount of maximal stress no matter what the twist angle is. Those of a Ni(110) bicrystal is the second and of a Ni(100) bicrystal is the smallest.

  12. Atomic structure of the Σ = 2 twist carbide grain boundary in WC-Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Sabine; Missiaen, Jean-Michel

    2013-04-01

    The Σ = 2 twist carbide grain boundary with a (10 ? 0) habit plane was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy in a WC-Co alloy. The atomic structure at the boundary was determined by comparing experimental images and simulations. It corresponds to the boundary model with the lowest energy according to atomistic calculations. Periodic monolayer interfacial steps, compensating for the parametric misfit at the boundary were studied. The displacement field around the defects was simulated and corresponds to a dislocation with a mixed character and a Burgers vectors equal to 1/6⟨ ? 2 ? 3⟩ lying in the boundary plane. Another step with a larger height and connected to a stacking fault was analyzed. It likely arises from the interaction of a matrix dislocation with the boundary. The observations suggest that the migration of Σ = 2 grain boundaries can be induced by the glide of the monolayer steps along the grain boundary.

  13. Physics and applications of novel structures with CVD graphene: edges, grain boundaries, twisted bilayers, and hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong P.

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, I will discuss experimental studies (including electronic transport, optical/Raman, and STM) of physical properties of various novel synthetic graphene structures formed in CVD graphene grown on Cu, including edges of graphene single crystals, grain boundaries between such single crystals, and twisted bilayer graphene. Such synthetic graphene structures could be used as playground to explore novel physics and engineer new functionalities in graphene based electronic devices. Furthermore, I will discuss graphene based ``hybrid'' materials combining CVD graphene with semiconductor and metallic nanostructures for potential optoelectronic and plasmonics applications.

  14. Filaments in the twist-grain-boundary smectic-A phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejček, Lubor; Novotná, Vladimíra; Glogarová, Milada

    2015-09-01

    A model of filaments of the twist-grain-boundary smectic-A phase (TGBA) arising from the homeotropic smectic-A phase and nucleating on the sample surface is proposed. The model is based on the concept of finite blocks of parallel smectic layers forming a helical structure. The blocks are surrounded by dislocation loops. The model describes the filament structure near the sample surface and the observed inclination of the filament axis with respect to the easy direction of the molecular anchoring on the surface. The model is based on the observations of filament textures of the TGBA phase in a chiral liquid crystalline compound, but can be applied for forming of TGBA filaments in any compound. The compression modulus of the compound has been estimated using such parameters as anchoring energy, estimated from the field necessary to transform the structure into the homeotropic smectic-A .

  15. Coarse-grained model and light scattering of the twist-bend nematic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamid, Shaikh; Allender, David; Selinger, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    We develop a coarse-grained version of the continuum theory for the twist-bend (TB) nematic phase of liquid crystals. In this theoretical approach, we begin with an ideal, undistorted TB phase, which has a heliconical modulation of the director field. We then calculate the elastic free energy cost of a position-dependent local rotation of the director away from the ideal state. We diagonalize this free energy density to find the eigenmodes of the system. Of these eigenmodes, the soft mode can be regarded as a smectic-like distortion of periodic planes in the TB phase; this mode has effective elastic constants for layer compression and curvature. By comparison, the hard mode involves director variations away from the optimum cone angle. This calculation leads to a prediction for light scattering from the TB nematic phase. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR-1409658.

  16. Interaction of run-in edge dislocations with twist grain boundaries in Al-a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, S.; Naveen Kumar, N.; Samal, M. K.; Chavan, V. M.; Patel, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundaries play an important role in outlining the mechanical properties of crystalline materials. They act as sites for absorption/nucleation of dislocations, which are the main carriers of plastic deformation. In view of this, the interactions between edge dislocations and twist grain boundaries-dislocation pileup, dislocation absorption and dislocation emission were explored by performing molecular dynamics simulations in face-centered cubic Al using embedded atom method. The ?1 1 0? twist grain boundaries with various misorientation angles were selected for this purpose. It was found that the misorientation angle of boundary and stress anomalies arising from repeated dislocation absorption at the grain boundaries are the important parameters in determining the ability of the boundary to emit dislocations. Complex network of dislocations results in later stages of deformation, which may have a significant effect on the mechanical properties of the material. The peculiarities of dislocation nucleation, their emission from twist grain boundaries and the ramifications of this study towards development of higher length scale material models are discussed.

  17. Uranium vacancy mobility at the Σ5 symmetric tilt and Σ5 twist grain boundaries in UO₂

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Andersson, David A.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic transport at grain boundaries in oxides dictates a number of important phenomena, from ionic conductivity to sintering to creep. For nuclear fuels, it also influences fission gas bubble nucleation and growth. Here, using a combination of atomistic calculations and object kinetic Monte Carlo (okMC) simulations, we examine the kinetic pathways associated with uranium vacancies at two model grain boundaries in UO2. The barriers for vacancy motion were calculated using the nudged elastic band method at all uranium sites at each grain boundary and were used as the basis of the okMC simulations. For both boundaries considered – a simple tilt and a simple twist boundary – the mobility of uranium vacancies is significantly higher than in the bulk. For the tilt boundary, there is clearly preferred migration along the tilt axis as opposed to in the perpendicular direction while, for the twist boundary, migration is essentially isotropic within the boundary plane. These results show that cation defect mobility in fluorite-structured materials is enhanced at certain types of grain boundaries and is dependent on the boundary structure with the tilt boundary exhibiting higher rates of migration than the twist boundary.

  18. Uranium vacancy mobility at the Σ5 symmetric tilt and Σ5 twist grain boundaries in UO₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Andersson, David A.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic transport at grain boundaries in oxides dictates a number of important phenomena, from ionic conductivity to sintering to creep. For nuclear fuels, it also influences fission gas bubble nucleation and growth. Here, using a combination of atomistic calculations and object kinetic Monte Carlo (okMC) simulations, we examine the kinetic pathways associated with uranium vacancies at two model grain boundaries in UO2. The barriers for vacancy motion were calculated using the nudged elastic band method at all uranium sites at each grain boundary and were used as the basis of the okMC simulations. For both boundaries considered – a simplemore » tilt and a simple twist boundary – the mobility of uranium vacancies is significantly higher than in the bulk. For the tilt boundary, there is clearly preferred migration along the tilt axis as opposed to in the perpendicular direction while, for the twist boundary, migration is essentially isotropic within the boundary plane. These results show that cation defect mobility in fluorite-structured materials is enhanced at certain types of grain boundaries and is dependent on the boundary structure with the tilt boundary exhibiting higher rates of migration than the twist boundary.« less

  19. Stretching and twisting of the DNA duplexes in coarse-grained dynamical models.

    PubMed

    Niewieczerzał, Szymon; Cieplak, Marek

    2009-11-25

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics models of the double-stranded DNA are proposed and compared in the context of single molecule mechanical manipulation such as twisting and various schemes of stretching-unzipping, shearing, two-strand stretching and stretching of only one strand. The models differ in the number of effective beads (between two and five) representing each nucleotide. They all show similar behaviour, but the bigger the resolution, the more details in the force patterns. The models incorporate the effective Lennard-Jones potentials in the couplings between two strands and harmonic potentials to describe the structure of a single strand. The force patterns are shown to depend on the sequence studied. In particular, both shearing and unzipping for an all-AT sequence lead to lower forces than for an all-CG sequence. The unzipping patterns and the corresponding scenario diagrams for the contact rupture events are found to reflect the sequential information if the temperature is moderate and initial transients are discarded. The derived torque-force phase diagram is found to be qualitatively consistent with experiments and all-atom simulations. PMID:21832500

  20. Stretching and twisting of the DNA duplexes in coarse-grained dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niewieczerzał, Szymon; Cieplak, Marek

    2009-11-01

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics models of the double-stranded DNA are proposed and compared in the context of single molecule mechanical manipulation such as twisting and various schemes of stretching—unzipping, shearing, two-strand stretching and stretching of only one strand. The models differ in the number of effective beads (between two and five) representing each nucleotide. They all show similar behaviour, but the bigger the resolution, the more details in the force patterns. The models incorporate the effective Lennard-Jones potentials in the couplings between two strands and harmonic potentials to describe the structure of a single strand. The force patterns are shown to depend on the sequence studied. In particular, both shearing and unzipping for an all-AT sequence lead to lower forces than for an all-CG sequence. The unzipping patterns and the corresponding scenario diagrams for the contact rupture events are found to reflect the sequential information if the temperature is moderate and initial transients are discarded. The derived torque-force phase diagram is found to be qualitatively consistent with experiments and all-atom simulations.

  1. Ab initio local energy and local stress: application to tilt and twist grain boundaries in Cu and Al.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Kohyama, Masanori; Tanaka, Shingo; Shiihara, Yoshinori

    2013-07-31

    The energy-density and stress-density schemes (Shiihara et al 2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 075441) within the projector augmented wave (PAW) method based on the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) have been applied to tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) and single vacancies in Cu and Al. Local energy and local stress at GBs and defects are obtained by integrating the energy and stress densities in each local region by the Bader integration using a recent algorithm (Yu et al 2011 J. Chem. Phys. 134 064111) as well as by the layer-by-layer integration so as to settle the gauge-dependent problem in the kinetic terms. Results are compared with those by the fuzzy-Voronoi integration and by the embedded atom method (EAM). The features of local energy and local stress at GBs and vacancies depend on the bonding nature of each material. Valence electrons in Al mainly located in the interatomic regions show remarkable response to structural disorder as significant valence charge redistribution or bond reconstruction, often leading to long-range variations of charges, energies and stresses, quite differently from d electrons in Cu mainly located near nuclei. All these features can be well represented by our local energy and local stress. The EAM potential for Al does not reproduce correct local energy or local stress, while the EAM potential for Cu provides satisfactory results. PMID:23835349

  2. X-29 high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishmael, Stephen D.; Smith, Rogers E.; Purifoy, Dana D.; Womer, Rodney K.

    1990-01-01

    Flight test program highlights are discussed for the X-29 high angle-of-attack (AOA) aircraft. The AOA envelope extended from 10 to 66 deg; the X-29 exhibited precise pitch control, allowing AOA to be maintained within 1 deg during stabilized points as well as permitting rapid recoveries from all AOAs. Attention is given to controllability degradation above 40-deg AOA due to asymmetric yawing moments. The use of this aircraft as a fundamental research tool which complements analytical methods is powerfully justified by the obviation of scaling effects.

  3. The development of high angle deformation boundaries and local orientations in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    High angle boundaries and their local surroundings are important for all aspects of recrystallization including nucleation, growth and texture formation. They are thus important for processing of aluminum alloys. Deformation induced high angle boundaries have been observed and quantitatively characterized using transmission electron microscopy in aluminum following rolling to large reductions. The distribution of local orientations between individual dislocation boundaries and their angle/axis pairs have been measured using convergent beam Kikuchi analysis and are compared to the macroscopic texture. The sequence of near neighbor orientations shows that individual grains subdivide across their thickness into three to four different texture components separated by sharp boundaries. The local orientations surrounding high angle boundaries are much more diverse than suggested by simple models and single crystal studies. The origins for these high angle boundaries are suggested and discussed.

  4. Grain boundary motion and grain rotation in aluminum bicrystals: recent experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodov, D. A.; Barrales-Mora, L. A.; Brandenburg, J.-E.

    2015-08-01

    The results of experimental and computational efforts over recent years to study the motion of geometrically different grain boundaries and grain rotation under various driving forces are briefly reviewed. Novel in-situ measuring techniques based on orientation contrast imaging and applied simulation techniques are described. The experimental results obtained on specially grown aluminum bicrystals are presented and discussed. Particularly, the faceting and migration behavior of low angle grain boundaries under the curvature force is addressed. In contrast to the pure tilt boundaries, which remained flat/faceted and immobile during annealing at elevated temperatures, mixed tilt-twist boundaries readily assumed a curved shape and steadily moved under the capillary force. Computational analysis revealed that this behavior is due to the inclinational anisotropy of grain boundary energy, which in turn depends on boundary geometry. The shape evolution and shrinkage kinetics of cylindrical grains with different tilt and mixed boundaries were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The mobility of low angle <100> boundaries with misorientation angles higher than 10°, obtained by both the experiments and simulations, was found not to differ from that of the high angle boundaries, but decreases essentially with further decrease of misorientation. The shape evolution of the embedded grains in simulations was found to relate directly to results of the energy computations. Further simulation results revealed that the shrinkage of grains with pure tilt boundaries is accompanied by grain rotation. In contrast, grains with the tilt-twist boundaries composed of dislocations with the mixed edge-screw character do not rotate during their shrinkage. Stress driven boundary migration in aluminium bicrystals was observed to be coupled to a tangential translation of the grains. The activation enthalpy of high angle boundary migration was found to vary non-monotonically with

  5. Light's twist

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, Miles

    2014-01-01

    That light travels in straight lines is a statement of the obvious. However, the energy and momentum flow within light beams can twist to form vortices such as eddies in a stream. These twists carry angular momentum, which can make microscopic objects spin, be used to encode extra information in communication systems, enable the design of novel imaging systems and allow new tests of quantum mechanics. PMID:25484612

  6. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  7. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  8. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  9. Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) Through-Focus Imaging for Three-Dimensional Atomic Analysis of Bismuth Segregation on Copper [001]/33° Twist Bicrystal Grain Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Wade, Charles Austin; McLean, Mark J; Vinci, Richard P; Watanabe, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) through-focus imaging (TFI) has been used to determine the three-dimensional atomic structure of Bi segregation-induced brittle Cu grain boundaries (GBs). With TFI, it is possible to observe single Bi atom distributions along Cu [001] twist GBs using an aberration-corrected STEM operating at 200 kV. The depth resolution is ~5 nm. Specimens with GBs intentionally inclined with respect to the microscope's optic axis were used to investigate Bi segregant atom distributions along and through the Cu GB. It was found that Bi atoms exist at most once per Cu unit cell along the GB, meaning that no continuous GB film is present. Therefore, the reduced fracture toughness of this particular Bi-doped Cu boundary would not be caused by fracture of Bi-Bi bonds. PMID:27145975

  10. Twisted baskets.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Keith; Pratumyot, Yaowalak; Polen, Shane; Hardin, Alex M; Dalkilic, Erdin; Dastan, Arif; Badjić, Jovica D

    2015-02-23

    A preparative procedure for obtaining a pair of twisted molecular baskets, each comprising a chiral framework with either right ((P)-1syn) or left ((M)-1syn) sense of twist and six ester groups at the rim has been developed and optimized. The racemic (P/M)-1syn can be obtained in three synthetic steps from accessible starting materials. The resolution of (P/M)-1syn is accomplished by its transesterification with (1R,2S,5R)-(-)-menthol in the presence of a Ti(IV) catalyst to give diastereomeric 8(P) and 8(M). It was found that dendritic-like cavitands 8(P) and 8(M), in CD2Cl2, undergo self-inclusion ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) with a menthol moiety occupying the cavity of each host. Importantly, the degree of inclusion of the menthol group was ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) found to be greater in the case of 8(P) than 8(M). Accordingly, it is suggested that different folding characteristic of 8(P) and 8(M) ought to affect the physicochemical characteristics of the hosts to permit their effective separation by column chromatography. The absolute configuration of 8(P)/8(M), encompassing right- and left-handed "cups", was determined with the exciton chirality method and also verified in silico (DFT: B3LYP/TZVP). Finally, the twisted baskets are strongly fluorescent due to three naphthalene chromophores, having a high fluorescence quantum yield within the rigid framework of 8(P)/8(M). PMID:25604262

  11. Generalizing twisted gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Duenas-Vidal, Alvaro; Vazquez-Mozo, Miguel A.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the twisting of gauge symmetry in noncommutative gauge theories and show how this can be generalized to a whole continuous family of twisted gauge invariances. The physical relevance of these twisted invariances is discussed.

  12. Formalism for the calculation of local elastic constants at grain boundaries by means of atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, M. D.; Wolf, D.; Lutsko, J. F.; Phillpot, S. R.

    1990-03-01

    A new formalism for use in atomistic simulations to calculate the full local elastic-constant tensor in terms of local stresses and strains is presented. Results of simulations on a high-angle (001) twist grain boundary are illustrated, using both a Lennard-Jones potential for Cu and an embedded-atom potential for Au. The two conceptionally rather different potentials show similar anomalies in all elastic constants, confined to within a few lattice planes of the grain boundary, with an especially dramatic reduction in the resistance to shear parallel to the grain-boundary plane. It is found that the primary cause of the anomalies is the atomic disorder near the grain boundary, as evidenced by the slice-by-slice radial distribution functions for the inhomogeneous interface system.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of impurities in nanocrystalline diamond grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, M.; Zapol, P.; Frauenheim, T.; Gruen, D. M.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2000-01-12

    Nanocrystalline diamond films grown on Si substrates at 800 C from hydrogen-poor plasmas have a number of highly desirable mechanical and electronic properties. Impurities were found by SIMS measurements to be uniformly distributed throughout the thickness of the films at a level of 10{sup 17}--10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. It is likely that the impurities are located at the grain boundaries, which play a crucial role in controlling important characteristics of the films, such as electrical conductivity and electron emission. Density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) molecular dynamics simulations were performed for diamond light-energy high-angle (100) twist grain boundaries with impurities such as N, Si and H.

  14. Aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Grafton, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to, and a broad overiew of, the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack are provided. Items include: (1) some important fundamental phenomena which determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack; (2) static and dynamic aerodynamic characteristics near the stall; (3) aerodynamics of the spin; (4) test techniques used in stall/spin studies; (5) applications of aerodynamic data to problems in flight dynamics in the stall/spin area; and (6) the outlook for future research in the area. Although stalling and spinning are flight dynamic problems of importance to all aircraft, including general aviation aircraft, commercial transports, and military airplanes, emphasis is placed on military configurations and the principle aerodynamic factors which influence the stability and control of such vehicles at high angles of attack.

  15. [Twisted noses].

    PubMed

    Thomassin, J-M; Radulesco, T; Bardot, J

    2014-12-01

    Correction of a twisted or crooked nose can be very complex and require the use of a broad range of surgical techniques. Patient needs are often mixed--aesthetic and functional--particularly in post-trauma cases. The quality of postoperative breathing is therefore as important as correction of the nasal deviation. Extracorporeal septoplasty or spreader grafts are very effective not only in correction of the nasal pyramid deformation, but also in resolution of functional respiratory issues. Reconstruction and proper support of the septum are necessary components for a straight nose. Aesthetic deformation can be difficult to correct owing to the memory of the bone and cartilage. Although minor deformations can be corrected with simple techniques, a more aggressive procedure is often necessary in the most complex cases. Despite attempts to correct deformation thanks to the various techniques described here, a postoperative deviation can persist. Preoperative discussion is very important and enables the surgeon to explain to the patient that it is very difficult to obtain a perfectly straight nose. PMID:25174875

  16. Twisted supersymmetry: Twisted symmetry versus renormalizability

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrijevic, Marija; Nikolic, Biljana; Radovanovic, Voja

    2011-03-15

    We discuss a deformation of superspace based on a Hermitian twist. The twist implies a *-product that is noncommutative, Hermitian and finite when expanded in a power series of the deformation parameter. The Leibniz rule for the twisted supersymmetry transformations is deformed. A minimal deformation of the Wess-Zumino action is proposed and its renormalizability properties are discussed. There is no tadpole contribution, but the two-point function diverges. We speculate that the deformed Leibniz rule, or more generally the twisted symmetry, interferes with renormalizability properties of the model. We discuss different possibilities to render a renormalizable model.

  17. High-angle-of-attack aerodynamics - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the military and civil technical communities have undertaken numerous studies of the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of advanced airplane and missile configurations. The method of approach and the design methodology employed have necessarily been experimental and exploratory in nature, due to the complex nature of separated flows. However, despite the relatively poor definition of many of the key aerodynamic phenomena involved for high-alpha conditions, some generic guidelines for design consideration have been identified. The present paper summarizes some of the more important lessons learned in the area of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics with examples of a number of key concepts and with particular emphasis on high-alpha stability and control characteristics of high performance aircraft. Topics covered in the discussion include the impact of design evolution, forebody flows, control of separated flows, configuration effects, aerodynamic controls, wind-tunnel flight correlation, and recent NASA research activities.

  18. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  19. Electromagnetic and microstructural properties of pure c-axis twist Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} bicrystal junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, Y.N.; Li, Q.; Zhu, Y.; Suenaga, M.; Gu, G.D.; Koshizuka, N.

    1998-08-01

    Bulk Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi2212) bicrystals containing a single high quality [001] twist grain boundary junction were prepared in order to investigate the orbital symmetry of the superconducting order parameter in highly anisotropic Bi-based high temperature superconductors. The misorientation angles of the bicrystals ranged from 0 to 180{degree}. The microstructure in the vicinity of the junction was characterized using high-resolution, nano-probe analytical microscopy. The authors found that some high angle twist junctions were able to carry a critical current density similar to their constituent single crystals. These results cannot be interpreted in terms of a pure d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}}-wave order parameter for superconducting Bi2212.

  20. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND MICROSTRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF PURE C-AXIS TWIST Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} BICRYSTAL JUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    TSAY,Y.; LI,Q.; ZHU,Y.; SUENAGA,M.; GU,G.D.; KOSHIZUKA,N.

    1998-07-18

    Bulk Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi2212) bicrystals containing a single high quality [001] twist grain boundary junction were prepared in order to investigate the orbital symmetry of the superconducting order parameter in highly anisotropic Bi-based high temperature superconductors. The misorientation angles of the bicrystals ranged from 0 to 180{degree}. The microstructure in the vicinity of the junction was characterized using high-resolution, nano-probe analytical microscopy. The authors found that some high angle twist junctions were able to carry a critical current density similar to their constituent single crystals. These results cannot be interpreted in terms of a pure d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}}-wave order parameter for superconducting Bi2212.

  1. The twisted top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Morrison, P. J.

    2001-05-01

    We describe a new type of top, the twisted top, obtained by appending a cocycle to the Lie-Poisson bracket for the charged heavy top, thus breaking its semidirect product structure. The twisted top has an integrable case that corresponds to the Lagrange (symmetric) top. We give a canonical description of the twisted top in terms of Euler angles. We also show by a numerical calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent that the Kovalevskaya case of the twisted top is chaotic.

  2. A high angle of attack inviscid shuttle orbiter computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1992-01-01

    As a preliminary step toward predicting the leeside thermal environment for winged reentry vehicles at flight conditions, a computational solution for the flow about the Shuttle Orbiter at wind tunnel conditions was made using a point-implicit, finite volume scheme known as the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA). The surface pressures resulting from the computational solution are compared with wind tunnel data. The results indicate that the dominant inviscid flow features are being accurately predicted on the leeside of the Shuttle Orbiter at a moderately high angle of attack.

  3. Twist within a somersault.

    PubMed

    Mikl, Joanne; Rye, David C

    2016-02-01

    The twisting somersault is a key skill in diving and gymnastics. The components of twist and somersault are defined with respect to anatomical axes, and combinations of multiples of half rotations of twist and somersault define specific twisting somersault skills. To achieve a twisting somersault skill twist must be continuous; otherwise oscillations in twist while somersaulting may be observed. The posture-dependent inertial properties of the athlete and the initial conditions determine if continuous or oscillating twist is observed. The paper derives equations for the amount of somersault required per half twist, or per twist oscillation, without making assumptions about the relative magnitudes of the moments of inertia. From these equations the skills achievable may be determined. The error associated with the common assumption that the medial and transverse principal moments of inertia are equal is explored. It is concluded that the error grows as the number of twists per somersault decreases, when the medial and transverse moments of inertia diverge, and when the longitudinal moment of inertia approaches either the medial or transverse moment of inertia. Inertial property data for an example athlete are used to illustrate the various rotational states that can occur. PMID:26583967

  4. Simulation of xenon, uranium vacancy and interstitial diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Nerikar, Pankaj; Vyas, Shyam; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2014-10-31

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations 1, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO2 have been derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO2 ( Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary),as derived from atomistic calculations. All models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  5. Reynolds Number Effects at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Banks, Daniel W.; Hall, Robert M.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lessons learned from comparisons between ground-based tests and flight measurements for the high-angle-of-attack programs on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), the X-29 forward-swept wing aircraft, and the X-31 enhanced fighter maneuverability aircraft are presented. On all three vehicles, Reynolds number effects were evident on the forebodies at high angles of attack. The correlation between flight and wind tunnel forebody pressure distributions for the F-18 HARV were improved by using twin longitudinal grit strips on the forebody of the wind-tunnel model. Pressure distributions obtained on the X-29 wind-tunnel model at flight Reynolds numbers showed excellent correlation with the flight data up to alpha = 50 deg. Above (alpha = 50 deg. the pressure distributions for both flight and wind tunnel became asymmetric and showed poorer agreement, possibly because of the different surface finish of the model and aircraft. The detrimental effect of a very sharp nose apex was demonstrated on the X-31 aircraft. Grit strips on the forebody of the X-31 reduced the randomness but increased the magnitude of the asymmetry. Nose strakes were required to reduce the forebody yawing moment asymmetries and the grit strips on the flight test noseboom improved the aircraft handling qualities.

  6. Mesoscale mechanics of twisting carbon nanotube yarns.

    PubMed

    Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-03-12

    Fabricating continuous macroscopic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns with mechanical properties close to individual CNTs remains a major challenge. Spinning CNT fibers and ribbons for enhancing the weak interactions between the nanotubes is a simple and efficient method for fabricating high-strength and tough continuous yarns. Here we investigate the mesoscale mechanics of twisting CNT yarns using full atomistic and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, considering concurrent mechanisms at multiple length-scales. To investigate the mechanical response of such a complex structure without losing insights into the molecular mechanism, we applied a multiscale strategy. The full atomistic results are used for training a coarse grained model for studying larger systems consisting of several CNTs. The mesoscopic model parameters are updated as a function of the twist angle, based on the full atomistic results, in order to incorporate the atomistic scale deformation mechanisms in larger scale simulations. By bridging across two length scales, our model is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical behavior of twisted yarns while the atomistic level deformations in individual nanotubes are integrated into the model by updating the parameters. Our results focused on studying a bundle of close packed nanotubes provide novel mechanistic insights into the spinning of CNTs. Our simulations reveal how twisting a bundle of CNTs improves the shear interaction between the nanotubes up to a certain level due to increasing the interaction surface. Furthermore, twisting the bundle weakens the intertube interactions due to excessive deformation in the cross sections of individual CNTs in the bundle. PMID:25732328

  7. Mesoscale mechanics of twisting carbon nanotube yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabricating continuous macroscopic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns with mechanical properties close to individual CNTs remains a major challenge. Spinning CNT fibers and ribbons for enhancing the weak interactions between the nanotubes is a simple and efficient method for fabricating high-strength and tough continuous yarns. Here we investigate the mesoscale mechanics of twisting CNT yarns using full atomistic and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, considering concurrent mechanisms at multiple length-scales. To investigate the mechanical response of such a complex structure without losing insights into the molecular mechanism, we applied a multiscale strategy. The full atomistic results are used for training a coarse grained model for studying larger systems consisting of several CNTs. The mesoscopic model parameters are updated as a function of the twist angle, based on the full atomistic results, in order to incorporate the atomistic scale deformation mechanisms in larger scale simulations. By bridging across two length scales, our model is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical behavior of twisted yarns while the atomistic level deformations in individual nanotubes are integrated into the model by updating the parameters. Our results focused on studying a bundle of close packed nanotubes provide novel mechanistic insights into the spinning of CNTs. Our simulations reveal how twisting a bundle of CNTs improves the shear interaction between the nanotubes up to a certain level due to increasing the interaction surface. Furthermore, twisting the bundle weakens the intertube interactions due to excessive deformation in the cross sections of individual CNTs in the bundle.

  8. Forebody tangential blowing for control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, I.; Rock, S.; Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study to determine if the use of tangential leading edge blowing over the forebody could produce effective and practical control of the F-18 HARV aircraft at high angles of attack was conducted. A simplified model of the F-18 configuration using a vortex-lattice model was developed to obtain a better understanding of basic aerodynamic coupling effects and the influence of forebody circulation on lifting surface behavior. The effect of tangential blowing was estimated using existing wind tunnel data on normal forebody blowing and analytical studies of tangential blowing over conical forebodies. Incorporation of forebody blowing into the flight control system was investigated by adding this additional yaw control and sideforce generating actuator into the existing F-18 HARV simulation model. A control law was synthesized using LQG design methods that would schedule blowing rates as a function of vehicle sideslip, angle of attack, and roll and yaw rates.

  9. Buffeting of NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Dowell, Earl

    2014-11-01

    Buffeting is a fluid instability caused by flow separation or shock wave oscillations in the flow around a bluff body. Typically there is a dominant frequency of these flow oscillations called Strouhal or buffeting frequency. In prior work several researchers at Duke University have noted the analogy between the classic Von Karman Vortex Street behind a bluff body and the flow oscillations that occur for flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil at sufficiently large angle of attack. Lock-in is found for certain combinations of airfoil oscillation (pitching motion) frequencies and amplitudes when the frequency of the airfoil motion is sufficiently close to the buffeting frequency. The goal of this paper is to explore the flow around a static and an oscillating airfoil at high angle of attack by developing a method for computing buffet response. Simulation results are compared with experimental data. Conditions for the onset of buffeting and lock-in of a NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack are determined. Effects of several parameters on lift coefficient and flow response frequency are studied including Reynolds number, angle of attack and blockage ratio of the airfoil size to the wind tunnel dimensions. Also more detailed flow field characteristics are determined. For a static airfoil, a universal Strouhal number scaling has been found for angles of attack from 30° to 90°, where the flow around airfoil is fully separated. For an oscillating airfoil, conditions for lock-in are discussed. Differences between the lock-in case and the unlocked case are also studied. The second affiliation: Duke University.

  10. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, F.; Sun, X.; Khaleel, M. A.; Horstemeyer, M. F.

    2012-02-01

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained ≈170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 Å of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-Σ grain boundaries (e.g., the Σ3{112} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and Σ designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have ≈80% more grain boundary sites per area and ≈300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 Å versus 10-11 Å for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  11. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Horstemeyer, Mark

    2012-02-10

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained {approx}170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 {angstrom} of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-{Sigma} grain boundaries (e.g., the {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and {Sigma} designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have {approx}80% more grain boundary sites per area and {approx}300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 {angstrom} versus 10-11 {angstrom} for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  12. Apollo 11 Launched Via Saturn V Rocket - High Angle View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle produced a holocaust of flames as it rose from its pad at Launch complex 39. The 363 foot tall, 6,400,000 pound rocket hurled the spacecraft into Earth parking orbit and then placed it on the trajectory to the moon. This high angle view of the launch was provided by a `fisheye' camera mounted on the launch tower. The Saturn V was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard the spacecraft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  13. X-31 Demonstrating High Angle of Attack - Herbst Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall

  14. Twisted Quantum Toroidal Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Liu, Rongjia

    2014-09-01

    We construct a principally graded quantum loop algebra for the Kac-Moody algebra. As a special case a twisted analog of the quantum toroidal algebra is obtained together with the quantum Serre relations.

  15. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  16. Twisted Radio Waves and Twisted Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Nevels, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    We present and analyze a gedanken experiment and show that the assumption that an antenna operating at a single frequency can transmit more than two independent information channels to the far field violates the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Transmission of a large number of channels, each associated with an angular momenta ‘twisted wave’ mode, to the far field in free space is therefore not possible. PMID:23424647

  17. Mesozoic pre-thrusting high-angle faults and stratigraphic variations, Plomosa Mountains, W. Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, S.M.; Spencer, J.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Three contrasting stratigraphic assemblages characterize fault-bounded terranes in the Southern Plomosa Mtns. (1) The Six Price sequence (SPS) consists of Proterozoic coarse-grained granitoid overlain by Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata. (2) The Apache Wash sequence consists of a basal mega-breccia and conglomerate unit overlain by sandstone in a fining-upward sequence. Paleozoic blocks in the mega-breccia include a Cambrian Muav-like lithology not present in the SPS Paleozoic section. The thickness and clast size in conglomerate associated with the mega-breccia increases the S suggesting a source in that direction. (3) The Crystal Hill sequence consists of strata correlated with the lower McCoy Mountains Formation deposited across a previously tilted unconformity between Jurassic volcanic rocks and the Proterozoic Scadden Mountain quartz monzonite. The lower McCoy Mountain Formation consists of basal quartz-arenite that grades up into fine-grained volcanic-lithic sandstones, and then into lithic-feldspathic sandstone and locally conglomerate, forming a coarsening-upward sequence. Because the Apache Wash sequence is cut by the Poorman thrust, the breccias at its base are not related to the Poorman thrust. Derivation of these creccias entirely from the SPS Paleozoic section is precluded by the presence of the Muav-lithology blocks; their source is not exposed. Thrusting in the area, correlated with deformation in the Maria Fold and Thrust Belt, was preceded by faulting to produce the megabreccias, tilting, and formation of NW-trending high-angle fault one of which forms the major lithotectonic boundary in the range.

  18. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO₂

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO₂ have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO₂ (Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  19. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO₂ have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model formore » the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO₂ (Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.« less

  20. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO2 have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO2 (Σ 5 tilt, Σ 5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of general aviation at high angle of attack with the propeller slipstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuo, N.; Hirano, S.

    1986-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the FA-300 business aircraft at high angle of attack with the propeller stream are described. The FA-300 offers two types, FA-300-700 for 340 HP, and -710 for 450 Hp of the engine. The effects of the propeller slipstream on the high angle of the attack are discussed.

  2. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  3. Twisted Yangians of small rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Nicolas; Regelskis, Vidas; Wendlandt, Curtis

    2016-04-01

    We study quantized enveloping algebras called twisted Yangians associated with the symmetric pairs of types CI, BDI, and DIII (in Cartan's classification) when the rank is small. We establish isomorphisms between these twisted Yangians and the well known Olshanskii's twisted Yangians of types AI and AII, and also with the Molev-Ragoucy reflection algebras associated with symmetric pairs of type AIII. We also construct isomorphisms with twisted Yangians in Drinfeld's original presentation.

  4. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  5. A Transformation Called "Twist"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The transformations found in secondary mathematics curriculum are typically limited to stretches and translations (e.g., ACARA, 2010). Advanced students may find the transformation, twist, to be of further interest. As most available resources are written for professional-level readers, this article is intended to be an introduction accessible to…

  6. An Atomistic Modeling Study of Alloying Element Impurity Element, and Transmutation Products on the cohesion of A Nickel E5 {l_brace}001{r_brace} Twist Grain Boundary

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young Jr.; R. Najafabadi; W. Strohmayer; D.G. Baldrey; B. Hamm; J. Harris; J. Sticht; E. Wimmer

    2003-06-16

    Atomistic modeling methods were employed to investigate the effects of impurity elements on the metallurgy, irradiation embrittlement, and environmentally assisted cracking of nickel-base alloys exposed to nuclear environments. Calculations were performed via ab initio atomistic modeling methods to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the results. A Griffith-type fracture criterion was used to quantitatively assess the effect of elements or element pairs on the grain boundary cohesive strength. In order of most embrittling to most strengthening, the elements are ranked as: He, Li, S, H, C, Zr, P, Fe, Mn, Nb, Cr, and B. Helium is strongly embrittling (-2.04 eV/atom lowering of the Griffith energy), phosphorus has little effect on the grain boundary (0.1 eV/atom), and boron offers appreciable strengthening (1.03 eV/atom increase in the Griffith energy). Calculations for pairs of elements (H-Li, H-B, H-C, H-P, and H-S) show little interaction on the grain boundary cohesive energy, so that for the conditions studied, linear superposition of elemental effects is a good approximation. These calculations help explain metallurgical effects (e.g. why boron can strengthen grain boundaries), irradiation embrittlement (e.g. how boron transmutation results in grain boundary embrittlement), as well as how grain boundary impurity elements can affect environmentally assisted cracking (i.e. low temperature crack propagation and stress corrosion cracking) of nickel-base alloys.

  7. Twisted aspirin crystals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Rohl, Andrew L; Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Banded spherulites of aspirin have been crystallized from the melt in the presence of salicylic acid either generated from aspirin decomposition or added deliberately (2.6-35.9 mol %). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and optical polarimetry show that the spherulites are composed of helicoidal crystallites twisted along the <010> growth directions. Mueller matrix imaging reveals radial oscillations in not only linear birefringence, but also circular birefringence, whose origin is explained through slight (∼1.3°) but systematic splaying of individual lamellae in the film. Strain associated with the replacement of aspirin molecules by salicylic acid molecules in the crystal structure is computed to be large enough to work as the driving force for the twisting of crystallites. PMID:23425247

  8. Twisted Split Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Yuval; Harnik, Roni; Perez, Gilad; Schwartz, MatthewD.; Surujon, Ze'ev

    2004-07-30

    The observed flavor structure of the standard model arises naturally in ''split fermion'' models which localize fermions at different places in an extra dimension. It has, until now, been assumed that the bulk masses for such fermions can be chosen to be flavor diagonal simultaneously at every point in the extra dimension, with all the flavor violation coming from the Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. We consider the more natural possibility in which the bulk masses cannot be simultaneously diagonalized, that is, that they are twisted in flavor space. We show that, in general, this does not disturb the natural generation of hierarchies in the flavor parameters. Moreover, it is conceivable that all the flavor mixing and CP-violation in the standard model may come only from twisting, with the five-dimensional Yukawa couplings taken to be universal.

  9. Twisted Split Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Y

    2004-07-24

    The observed flavor structure of the standard model arises naturally in ''split fermion'' models which localize fermions at different places in an extra dimension. It has, until now, been assumed that the bulk masses for such fermions can be chosen to be flavor diagonal simultaneously at every point in the extra dimension, with all the flavor violation coming from the Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. We consider the more natural possibility in which the bulk masses cannot be simultaneously diagonalized, that is, that they are twisted in flavor space. We show that, in general, this does not disturb the natural generation of hierarchies in the flavor parameters. Moreover, it is conceivable that all the flavor mixing and CP-violation in the standard model may come only from twisting, with the five-dimensional Yukawa couplings taken to be universal.

  10. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1998-02-05

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectivensss of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbinite complex through u se of hydraulically fractgured horizontal of high-angle wells. TGhe combinaton of a horizontal or high-angle weoo and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

  11. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-08

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically-fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angled well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thininterbedded layers and the well bore.

  12. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1998-05-29

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal end of a protruding turbidite complex through use of hydraulically fractured horizontal of high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the well bore.

  13. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Laue, M.L.

    1999-11-01

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

  14. Twisting of sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C. H.; Thuillier, S.; Manach, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Twisting of metallic sheets is one particular mode of springback that occurs after drawing of elongated parts, i.e. with one dimension much larger than the two others. In this study, a dedicated device for drawing of elongated part with a U-shaped section has been designed on purpose, in order to obtain reproducible data. Very thin metallic sheet, of thickness 0.15 mm, has been used, so that the maximum length of the part is 100 mm. Two different orientations of the part with respect to the tools have been chosen: either aligned with the tools, or purposefully misaligned by 2°. Several samples were drawn for each configuration, leading to the conclusion that almost no twisting occurs in the first case whereas a significant one can be measured for the second one. In a second step, 2D and 3D numerical simulations within the implicit framework for drawing and springback were carried out. A mixed hardening law associated to von Mises yield criterion represents accurately the mechanical behavior of the material. This paper highlights a comparison of numerical predictions with experiments, e.g. the final shape of the part and the twisting parameter.

  15. Twist planet drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A planetary gear system includes a sun gear coupled to an annular ring gear through a plurality of twist-planet gears, a speeder gear, and a ground structure having an internal ring gear. Each planet gear includes a solid gear having a first half portion in the form of a spur gear which includes vertical gear teeth and a second half portion in the form of a spur gear which includes helical gear teeth that are offset from the vertical gear teeth and which contact helical gear teeth on the speeder gear and helical gear teeth on the outer ring gear. One half of the twist planet gears are preloaded downward, while the other half are preloaded upwards, each one alternating with the other so that each one twists in a motion opposite to its neighbor when rotated until each planet gear seats against the sun gear, the outer ring gear, the speeder gear, and the inner ring gear. The resulting configuration is an improved stiff anti-backlash gear system.

  16. Special Grain Boundaries in Ultrafine-Grained Tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, O. V.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Sadanov, E. V.; Starchenko, I. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Mikhailovskij, I. M.

    2016-07-01

    Field ion microscopy and computer simulation were used for the study of an atomic structure high-angle grain boundary in hard-drawn ultrafine-grained tungsten wire. These boundaries with special misorientations are beyond the scope of the coincident site lattice model. It was demonstrated that the special non-coincident grain boundaries are the plane-matching boundaries, and rigid-body displacements of adjacent nanograins are normal to the <110> misorientation axis. The vectors of rigid-body translations of grains are described by broad asymmetric statistical distribution. Mathematical modeling showed that special incommensurate boundaries with one grain oriented along the {211} plane have comparatively high cohesive energies. The grain-boundary dislocations ½<110> were revealed and studied at the line of local mismatch of {110} atomic planes of adjacent grains.

  17. Special Grain Boundaries in Ultrafine-Grained Tungsten.

    PubMed

    Dudka, O V; Ksenofontov, V A; Sadanov, E V; Starchenko, I V; Mazilova, T I; Mikhailovskij, I M

    2016-12-01

    Field ion microscopy and computer simulation were used for the study of an atomic structure high-angle grain boundary in hard-drawn ultrafine-grained tungsten wire. These boundaries with special misorientations are beyond the scope of the coincident site lattice model. It was demonstrated that the special non-coincident grain boundaries are the plane-matching boundaries, and rigid-body displacements of adjacent nanograins are normal to the <110> misorientation axis. The vectors of rigid-body translations of grains are described by broad asymmetric statistical distribution. Mathematical modeling showed that special incommensurate boundaries with one grain oriented along the {211} plane have comparatively high cohesive energies. The grain-boundary dislocations ½<110> were revealed and studied at the line of local mismatch of {110} atomic planes of adjacent grains. PMID:27416905

  18. Grain and subgrain boundaries in ultrafine-grained materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saxl, Ivan; Kalousova, Anna; Ilucova, Lucia; Sklenicka, Vaclav

    2009-10-15

    The attractive metallographic electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method is used to describe the effect of the number N of passes on the subgrain and grain structures of pure aluminium and copper processed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). The remarkable feature of the aluminium structure is the lack of high angle boundaries after a low number (N = 2, 4) of passes and this remains preserved even after a relatively long annealing time. On the other hand, the boundary structure of copper is relatively stable and high angle boundaries always prevail.

  19. The control of twisting somersaults.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, Maurice R; Hiley, Michael J

    2014-04-11

    In the takeoff and early flight phase of a twisting somersault, joint coordination is based on feed-forward control whereas in the late stages of the flight phase configuration adjustments are made using feedback control to ensure accurate completion of the movement and appropriate landing orientation. The aim of this study was to use a computer simulation model of aerial movement to investigate the extent to which arm and hip movements can control twist and somersault rotation in the flight phase of a twisting somersault. Two mechanisms were considered for the control of twist in simulated target trampoline movements with flight times of 1.4s. In the first case a single symmetrical arm adduction correction was made using delayed feedback control based on the difference between the twist rate in a perturbed simulation and the twist rate in a target movement comprising a forward somersault with 1½ twists. Final corrections were made using symmetrical arm abduction and hip flexion to adjust the twist and somersault angles. In the second case continual asymmetrical arm adduction/abduction adjustments were used to remove the tilt from a perturbed full twisting backward somersault using delayed feedback control based on twist angle and angular velocity. The first method was able to cope with perturbations to a forward somersault with 1½ twists providing the feedback time delay was less than 200 ms. The second method was able to correct a perturbed full twisting backward somersault providing the feedback time delay was less than 125 ms. PMID:24576588

  20. Flight test of the X-29A at high angle of attack: Flight dynamics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Clarke, Robert; Burken, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has flight tested two X-29A aircraft at low and high angles of attack. The high-angle-of-attack tests evaluate the feasibility of integrated X-29A technologies. More specific objectives focus on evaluating the high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, defining multiaxis controllability limits, and determining the maximum pitch-pointing capability. A pilot-selectable gain system allows examination of tradeoffs in airplane stability and maneuverability. Basic fighter maneuvers provide qualitative evaluation. Bank angle captures permit qualitative data analysis. This paper discusses the design goals and approach for high-angle-of-attack control laws and provides results from the envelope expansion and handling qualities testing at intermediate angles of attack. Comparisons of the flight test results to the predictions are made where appropriate. The pitch rate command structure of the longitudinal control system is shown to be a valid design for high-angle-of-attack control laws. Flight test results show that wing rock amplitude was overpredicted and aileron and rudder effectiveness were underpredicted. Flight tests show the X-29A airplane to be a good aircraft up to 40 deg angle of attack.

  1. Abnormal grain growth in Ni-5at.%W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Belde, M.; Barrales Mora, L.; de Boer, N.; Gilges, S.; Klöwer, J.; Gottstein, G.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of abnormally large grains in textured Ni-5at.%W substrates for high-temperature superconductors deteriorates the sharp texture of these materials and thus has to be avoided. Therefore the growth of abnormal grains is investigated and how it is influenced by the grain orientation and the annealing atmosphere. Texture measurements and grain growth simulations show that the grain orientation only matters so far that a high-angle grain boundary exists between an abnormally growing grain and the Cube-orientated matrix grains. The annealing atmosphere has a large influence on abnormal grain growth which is attributed to the differences in oxygen partial pressure.

  2. High angle of attack flying qualities criteria for longitudinal rate command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David J.; Citurs, Kevin D.; Davidson, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate flying qualities requirements of alternate pitch command systems for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack. Flying qualities design guidelines have already been developed for angle of attack command systems at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, so this research fills a similar need for rate command systems. Flying qualities tasks that require post-stall maneuvering were tested during piloted simulations in the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Manned Air Combat Simulation facility. A generic fighter aircraft model was used to test angle of attack rate and pitch rate command systems for longitudinal gross acquisition and tracking tasks at high angle of attack. A wide range of longitudinal dynamic variations were tested at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack. Pilot comments, Cooper-Harper ratings, and pilot induced oscillation ratings were taken from five pilots from NASA, USN, CAF, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. This data was used to form longitudinal design guidelines for rate command systems at high angle of attack. These criteria provide control law design guidance for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack, low speed flight conditions. Additional time history analyses were conducted using the longitudinal gross acquisition data to look at potential agility measures of merit and correlate agility usage to flying qualities boundaries. This paper presents an overview of this research.

  3. Perversions with a twist

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Pedro E. S.; Trigueiros, Joao L.; Trindade, Ana C.; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G.; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-01-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light. PMID:27025549

  4. Perversions with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pedro E. S.; Trigueiros, Joao L.; Trindade, Ana C.; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G.; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-03-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light.

  5. Perversions with a twist.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro E S; Trigueiros, Joao L; Trindade, Ana C; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-01-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light. PMID:27025549

  6. NanoARPES of twisted bilayer graphene on SiC: absence of velocity renormalization for small angles

    PubMed Central

    Razado-Colambo, I.; Avila, J.; Nys, J.-P.; Chen, C.; Wallart, X.; Asensio, M.-C.; Vignaud, D.

    2016-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) on SiC(000) grown by Si flux-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with nanometric spatial resolution. STM images revealed a wide distribution of twist angles between the two graphene layers. The electronic structure recorded in single TBG grains showed two closely-spaced Dirac π bands associated to the two stacked layers with respective twist angles in the range 1–3°. The renormalization of velocity predicted in previous theoretical calculations for small twist angles was not observed. PMID:27264791

  7. NanoARPES of twisted bilayer graphene on SiC: absence of velocity renormalization for small angles.

    PubMed

    Razado-Colambo, I; Avila, J; Nys, J-P; Chen, C; Wallart, X; Asensio, M-C; Vignaud, D

    2016-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) on SiC(000) grown by Si flux-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with nanometric spatial resolution. STM images revealed a wide distribution of twist angles between the two graphene layers. The electronic structure recorded in single TBG grains showed two closely-spaced Dirac π bands associated to the two stacked layers with respective twist angles in the range 1-3°. The renormalization of velocity predicted in previous theoretical calculations for small twist angles was not observed. PMID:27264791

  8. NanoARPES of twisted bilayer graphene on SiC: absence of velocity renormalization for small angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razado-Colambo, I.; Avila, J.; Nys, J.-P.; Chen, C.; Wallart, X.; Asensio, M.-C.; Vignaud, D.

    2016-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) on SiC(000) grown by Si flux-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with nanometric spatial resolution. STM images revealed a wide distribution of twist angles between the two graphene layers. The electronic structure recorded in single TBG grains showed two closely-spaced Dirac π bands associated to the two stacked layers with respective twist angles in the range 1–3°. The renormalization of velocity predicted in previous theoretical calculations for small twist angles was not observed.

  9. Coarse-grained modelling of supercoiled RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matek, Christian; Šulc, Petr; Randisi, Ferdinando; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the behaviour of double-stranded RNA under twist and tension using oxRNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Introducing explicit salt-dependence into the model allows us to directly compare our results to data from recent single-molecule experiments. The model reproduces extension curves as a function of twist and stretching force, including the buckling transition and the behaviour of plectoneme structures. For negative supercoiling, we predict denaturation bubble formation in plectoneme end-loops, suggesting preferential plectoneme localisation in weak base sequences. OxRNA exhibits a positive twist-stretch coupling constant, in agreement with recent experimental observations.

  10. Improved Inversion of High-Angle Ray Data in Crosshole GPR Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, J.; Knight, R.

    2005-05-01

    Over the past decade, crosshole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomography has become an important tool for the estimation of subsurface moisture content. In order to produce the highest resolution images possible with this technique, raypaths covering a wide range of angles between the boreholes are required. In practice, however, including high-angle ray data in crosshole GPR inversions often results in poor data fitting and tomographic images with obvious artifacts. As a result, high-angle ray data are usually discarded prior to inverting. This produces stable tomographic images, but with limited horizontal resolution that impacts the use of such images for estimating hydrologic properties. We have found that the incompatibility of high-angle ray data in crosshole GPR tomography can be largely explained by the finite length of the borehole radar antennas. Whereas tomographic inversions treat the antennas as point sources and receivers, in reality the antenna length is often a significant fraction of the borehole separation. At high angles, we have found that first arrival energy can often represent coupling between the tips of the antennas, and not between their centers as is presently assumed. This results in significant geometrical errors in the inversion of high-angle data. The effect is most significant for small borehole separations. We present a means of dealing with high-angle rays in crosshole GPR tomography so that all available data can be incorporated into the inversion process. First, we obtain a starting velocity model from an aperture-limited subset of the available travel time picks. Next, we construct nine different tomographic kernel matrices that represent coupling between all primary radiation points along the antennas (i.e., the antenna centers and tips). Using these kernels, we then determine which coupling path arrives first for each transmitter/receiver configuration in the entire data set. From this information, we construct a new

  11. Twist Helicity in Classical Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental work has demonstrated that a partial measure of fluid Helicity (the sum of linking and writhing of vortex tubes) is conserved even as those vortices undergo topology changing reconnections. Measuring the total Helicity, however, requires additional information about how the vortex lines are locally twisted inside the vortex core. To bridge this gap, we have developed a novel technique for experimentally measuring twist Helicity. Using this method, we are able to measure the production and eventual decay of twist for a variety of vortex evolutions. Remarkably, we observe twist dynamics capable of conserving total Helicity even in the presence of rapidly changing writhe. This work was supported by the NSF MRSEC shared facilities at the University of Chicago (DMR-0820054) and an NSF CAREER award (DMR-1351506). W.T.M.I. further acknowledges support from the A.P. Sloan Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  12. Twisting of the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Theory and models indicate that the IMF causes the magnetotail to produce an observable twist, predicting that the torque should bring the north lobe south of the GSM xy plane on one flank of the magnetotail, and the south lobe north of the plane on the other flank. In this paper, ISEE-3 geotail observations are compared with simultaneously made IMP 8 IMF observations supplemented by inferred IMF B(y) polarities to demonstrate the IMF-induced magnetotail twist. The results indicate that twisting is the single most important factor accounting for observations of the north lobe south of the GSM xy plane and the south lobe north of the plane. The value of the observed magnetotail twist about its aberrated axis is about 18 deg.

  13. Loops: Twisting and Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    Loop-like structures are the fundamental magnetic building blocks of the solar atmosphere. Recent space-based EUV and X-ray satellite observations (from Yohkoh SOHO and TRACE) have challenged the view that these features are simply static gravitationally stratified plasma pipes. Rather it is now surmised that each loop may consist of a bundle of fine plasma threads that are twisted around one another and can brighten independently. This invited review will outline the latest developments in ""untangling"" the topology of these features through three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modelling and how their properties are being deduced through spectroscopic observations coupled to theoretical scaling laws. In particular recent interest has centred on how the observed thermal profile along loops can be employed as a tool to diagnose any localised energy input to the structure and hence constrain the presence of a particular coronal heating mechanism. The dynamic nature of loops will be highlighted and the implications of superior resolution plasma thread observations (whether spatial temporal or spectral) from future space missions (SolarB STEREO SDO and Solar Orbiter) will be discussed.

  14. Twisting Neutron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry

    Most waves encountered in nature can be given a ``twist'', so that their phase winds around an axis parallel to the direction of wave propagation. Such waves are said to possess orbital angular momentum (OAM). For quantum particles such as photons, atoms, and electrons, this corresponds to the particle wavefunction having angular momentum of Lℏ along its propagation axis. Controlled generation and detection of OAM states of photons began in the 1990s, sparking considerable interest in applications of OAM in light and matter waves. OAM states of photons have found diverse applications such as broadband data multiplexing, massive quantum entanglement, optical trapping, microscopy, quantum state determination and teleportation, and interferometry. OAM states of electron beams have been used to rotate nanoparticles, determine the chirality of crystals and for magnetic microscopy. Here I discuss the first demonstration of OAM control of neutrons. Using neutron interferometry with a spatially incoherent input beam, we show the addition and conservation of quantum angular momenta, entanglement between quantum path and OAM degrees of freedom. Neutron-based quantum information science heretofore limited to spin, path, and energy degrees of freedom, now has access to another quantized variable, and OAM modalities of light, x-ray, and electron beams are extended to a massive, penetrating neutral particle. The methods of neutron phase imprinting demonstrated here expand the toolbox available for development of phase-sensitive techniques of neutron imaging. Financial support provided by the NSERC Create and Discovery programs, CERC and the NIST Quantum Information Program is acknowledged.

  15. Reconfigurable flight control for high angle of attack fighter aircraft, with wind tunnel study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Bilal Ahmed

    In this work we studied Reconfigurable Flight Control Systems to achieve acceptable performance of a fighter aircraft, even in the event of wing damage to the aircraft at low speeds and high angle of attack, which is typical of many combat maneuvers. Equations of motion for the damaged aircraft were derived, which helped in building simulators. A new methodology combining experimental and numerical aerodynamic prediction was proposed and implemented. For this a wind-tunnel study of a similar configuration was carried out to study the aerodynamics at low speeds and high angle of attack. A baseline control system for undamaged aircraft was developed, and finally a reconfigurable flight control scheme was implemented to keep the aircraft flyable even after the damage.

  16. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-30

    The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  17. Exploratory investigation of deflectable forebody strakes for high angle of attack yaw control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Murri, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    A deflectable strake concept was investigated on a conical forebody to evaluate its yaw control potential at high angles of attack. In exploratory low-speed tunnel tests using a generic delta wing fighter configuration, antisymmetrically deflected strakes provided useful levels of yaw power at angles of attack when the conventional rudder became totally degraded. Symmetrical strakes prevented side force development at high angles of attack, and provided pitch control through symmetrical deflection. The strake performance was sensitive to its circumferential position on the forebody due to varying interaction of strake vortices with the wing and vertical tail. The low Reynolds number results of this study provided a favorable initial validation of the concept, subject to verification in regard to scale effects.

  18. An Overview of the RTO Symposium on Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2002-01-01

    In May of 2001 the Research and Technology Organization (RTO) sponsored a symposium on Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack aerodynamics. Forty-six papers, organized into nine sessions, addressed computational and experimental studies of vortex flows pertinent to both aircraft and maritime applications. The studies also ranged from fundamental fluids investigations to flight test results. Selected highlights are included in this paper to provide a perspective toward the scope of the full symposium.

  19. Pitch control margin at high angle of attack - Quantitative requirements (flight test correlation with simulation predictions)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackey, J.; Hadfield, C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent mishaps and incidents on Class IV aircraft have shown a need for establishing quantitative longitudinal high angle of attack (AOA) pitch control margin design guidelines for future aircraft. NASA Langley Research Center has conducted a series of simulation tests to define these design guidelines. Flight test results have confirmed the simulation studies in that pilot rating of high AOA nose-down recoveries were based on the short-term response interval in the forms of pitch acceleration and rate.

  20. High angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of crescent and elliptic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Static longitudinal and lateral-directional forces and moments were measured for elliptic- and crescent-wing models at high angles-of-attack in the NASA Langley 14 by 22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel. The forces and moments were obtained for an angle-of-attack range including stall and post-stall conditions at a Reynolds number based on the average wing chord of about 1.8 million. Flow-visualization photographs using a mixture of oil and titanium-dioxide were also taken for several incidence angles. The force and moment data and the flow-visualization results indicated that the crescent wing model with its highly swept tips produced much better high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics than the elliptic model. Leading-edge separation-induced vortex flow over the highly swept tips of the crescent wing is thought to produce this improved behavior at high angles-of-attack. The unique planform design could result in safer and more efficient low-speed airplanes.

  1. High-angle-of-attack yawing moment asymmetry of the X-31 aircraft from flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.

    1994-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries led to position saturations of the thrust vector vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some of the dynamic stability axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. This slowed the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion and resulted in maneuver restrictions. Several aerodynamic modifications were made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. A method for determining the yawing moment asymmetry from flight data was developed and an analysis of the various configuration changes completed. The baseline aircraft were found to have significant asymmetries above 45 deg angle of attack with the largest asymmetry typically occurring around 60 deg angle of attack. Applying symmetrical boundary layer transition strips along the forebody sides increased the magnitude of the asymmetry and widened the angle-of-attack range over which the largest asymmetry acted. Installing longitudinal forebody strakes and rounding the sharp nose of the aircraft caused the yawing moment asymmetry magnitude to be reduced. The transition strips and strakes made the asymmetry characteristic of the aircraft more repeatable than the clean forebody configuration. Although no geometric differences between the aircraft were known, ship 2 consistently had larger yawing moment asymmetries than ship 1.

  2. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-10-30

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well.

  3. Linear parameter-varying control of an F-16 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bei

    To improve the aircraft capability at high angle of attack and expand the flight envelope, advanced linear parameter-varying (LPV) control methodologies are studied in this thesis with particular applications of actuator saturation control and switching control. A standard two-step LPV antiwindup control scheme and a systematic switching LPV control approach are derived, and the advantages of LPV control techniques are demonstrated through nonlinear simulations of an F-16 longitudinal autopilot control system. The aerodynamic surface saturation is one of the major issues of flight control in the high angle of attack region. The incorporated unconventional actuators such as thrust vectoring can provide additional control power, but may have a potentially significant pay-off. The proposed LPV antiwindup control scheme is advantageous from the implementation standpoint because it can be thought of as an augmented control algorithm to the existing control system. Moreover, the synthesis condition for an antiwindup compensator is formulated as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem and can be solved efficiently. By treating the input saturation as a sector bounded nonlinearity with a tight sector bound, the synthesized antiwindup compensator can stabilize the open-loop exponentially unstable systems. The LPV antiwindup control scheme is applied to the nonlinear F-16 longitudinal model, and compared with the thrust vectoring control approach. The simulation results show that the LPV antiwindup compensator improves the flight quality, and offers advantages over thrust vectoring in a high angle of attack region. For a thrust vectoring augmented aircraft, the actuator sets may be different at low and high angles of attack. Also due to different control objectives, a single controller may not exist over a wide angle of attack region. The proposed switching LPV control approach based on multiple parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions provides a flexible design

  4. The transient roll moment response due to forebody tangential blowing at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Jonathan Kwokching

    The sustained ability for controlled flight at high angles of attack is desirable for future aircraft. For combat aircraft, enhancing maneuverability is important to increasing its survivability. For future supersonic commercial aircraft, an increase in lift at high angles of attack leads to improved performance during take-offs and landing, and a reduction in noise pollution. However, nonlinear and unsteady phenomena, such as flow separation and vortex shedding dominate the aerodynamics in the high angle of attack regime. These phenomena cause the onset of lateral loads and decrease the effectiveness of conventional control surfaces. For conventional aircraft, controlled flight at high angle of attack is difficult or unfeasible without augmented means of control and a good understanding of their impact on vehicle characteristics and dynamics. The injection of thin sheets of air tangentially to the forebody of the vehicle has been found to be an extremely promising method for augmenting the control of a flight vehicle at high angles of attack. Forebody Tangential Blowing (FTB) allows the flow structure to be altered in a rational manner and increase the controllability of the vehicle under these flight conditions. The feasibility of using FTB to control the roll-yaw motion of flight vehicles has been demonstrated. Existing knowledge of FTB's nonlinear impact on the aerodynamic moment responses is limited. Currently available dynamic models predict the general trends in the behavior but do not capture important transient effects that dominate the responses when small amounts of blowing is used. These transients can be large in comparison to the steady-state values. This thesis summarizes the experimental and theoretical results of an investigation into the transient effects of Forebody Tangential Blowing. The relationship between the aerodynamic roll moment, vortical flowfield, and blowing strength is examined to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics of

  5. Aerodynamic damping of blade flap motions at high angles of attack

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.C.

    1995-09-01

    The YawDyn computer code is used to calculate the aerodynamic damping for a typical teetering rotor configuration. The code has been modified to calculate the net work done by aerodynamic forces in one complete rotor revolution. All cases were run for a teetering rotor similar to the ESI-80 with a specified teeter angle motion in order to isolate the aerodynamic effects from the inertial and gravitational loads. Effects of nonlinear static stall, dynamic stall, dynamic inflow, and delayed static stall due to rotation stability of flap motions in high winds. Contributions of the various steady and unsteady aerodynamic effects are presented for two airfoils: the LS(1) and the NREL Thin Airfoil Family (S805A, S806, S807). Teeter stability is compared for a blade with 10{degree} of linear twist and a blade with optimum aerodynamic twist.

  6. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  7. Frictional controls on high-angle reverse faulting during compressional basin inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Alder, S.; Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.

    2015-12-01

    Large normal faults are often reactivated as high-angle reverse faults during compressional basin inversion. Prevailing models to explain steep reverse slip call upon significant fluid overpressure. Though such models are consistent with some seismological data and field observations from incipient (low-displacement) reverse faults, they remain largely untested in the case of basin-scale faults. We present field and experimental data from the >200 km long Moonlight Fault Zone in New Zealand, an Oligocene basin-bounding normal fault that reactivated in the Miocene as a high-angle reverse fault (present dip angle 65°-75°). Excellent exposures of the fault zone exhumed from c. 4-8 km depth are found in creek sections along the entire strike length. Wall rocks are mainly quartz-albite-muscovite-chlorite schists with a strong foliation that is everywhere sub-parallel to the Moonlight Fault (i.e. dip angle 65°-75°). Although the overall structure of the fault zone changes significantly along strike in response to wall rock composition, the <5 metre thick fault core everywhere contains interconnected layers of foliated cataclasite rich in authigenically-grown chlorite and muscovite/illite. Microstructural evidence suggests deformation in the fault core by a combination of cataclasis, frictional slip along phyllosilicate seams and dissolution-precipitation. Single-direct and double-direct friction experiments were performed with the BRAVA apparatus (INGV, Rome) on saturated wafers (e.g. with intact foliation) of foliated cataclasite at normal stresses up to 75 MPa. The foliated cataclasites have a friction coefficient of <0.25 and negligible frictional healing. In combination with dissolution-precipitation mechanisms, a friction coefficient of <0.25 can account for slip on high-angle reverse faults if accompanied by only moderately high fluid pressures. Our results indicate that friction may be equally as important as fluid pressure during compressional basin inversion.

  8. Quantitative high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Rumyana V.

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been widely used for characterization of materials; to identify micro- and nano-structures within a sample and to analyze crystal and defect structures. High-angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM imaging using atomic number (Z) contrast has proven capable of resolving atomic structures with better than 2 A lateral resolution. In this work, the HAADF STEM imaging mode is used in combination with multislice simulations. This combination is applied to the investigation of the temperature dependence of the intensity collected by the HAADF detector in silicon, and to convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) to measure the degree of chemical order in intermetallic nanoparticles. The experimental and simulation results on the high-angle scattering of 300 keV electrons in crystalline silicon provide a new contribution to the understanding of the temperature dependence of the HAADF intensity. In the case of 300 keV, the average high-angle scattered intensity slightly decreases as the temperature increases from 100 K to 300 K, and this is different from the temperature dependence at 100 keV and 200 keV where HAADF intensity increases with temperature, as had been previously reported by other workers. The L10 class of hard magnetic materials has attracted continuous attention as a candidate for high-density magnetic recording media, as this phase is known to have large magnetocrystalline anisotropy, with magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, Ku, strongly dependent on the long-range chemical order parameter, S. A new method is developed to assess the degree of chemical order in small FePt L1 0 nanoparticles by implementing a CBED diffraction technique. Unexpectedly, the degree of order of individual particles is highly variable and not a simple function of particle size or sample composition. The particle-to-particle variability observed is an important new aspect to the understanding of phase transformations in

  9. High-angle reverse faults, fluid-pressure cycling, and mesothermal gold-quartz deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.; Robert, Francois; Poulsen, K. Howard

    1988-06-01

    Many mesothermal gold-quartz deposits are localized along high-angle reverse or reverse-oblique shear zones within greenstone belt terrains. Characteristically, these fault-hosted vein deposits exhibit a mixed "brittle-ductile" style of deformation (discrete shears and vein fractures as well as a schistose shear-zone fabric) developed under greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. Many of the vein systems are of considerable vertical extent (>2 km); they include steeply dipping fault veins (lenticular veins subparallel to the shear-zone schistosity) and, in some cases, associated flats (subhorizontal extensional veins). Textures of both vein sets record histories of incremental deposition. We infer that the vein sets developed near the roofs of active metamorphic/magmatic systems and represent the roots of brittle, high-angle reverse fault systems extending upward through the seismogenic regime. Friction theory and field relations suggest that the high-angle reverse faults acted as valves, promoting cyclic fluctuations in fluid pressure from supralithostatic to hydrostatic values. Because of their unfavorable orientation in the prevailing stress field, reactivation of the faults could only occur when fluid pressure exceeded the lithostatic load. Seismogenic fault failure then created fracture permeability within the rupture zone, allowing sudden draining of the geopressured reservoir at depth. Incremental opening of flats is attributed to the prefailure stage of supralithostatic fluid pressures; deposition within fault veins is attributed to the immediate postfailure discharge phase. Hydrothermal self-sealing leads to reaccumulation of fluid pressure and a repetition of the cycle. Mutual crosscutting relations between the two vein sets are a natural consequence of the cyclicity of the process. Abrupt fluid-pressure fluctuations from this fault-valve behavior of reverse faults seem likely to be integral to the mineralizing process at this

  10. ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    2001-09-28

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

  11. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  12. Side-force alleviation on slender, pointed forebodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    A new device was proposed for alleviating high angle-of-attack side force on slender, pointed forebodies. A symmetrical pair of separation strips in the form of helical ridges are applied to the forebody to disrupt the primary lee-side vortices and thereby avoid the instability that produces vortex asymmetry. Preliminary wind tunnel tests at Mach 0.3 and Reynolds no. 5,250,000 on a variety of forebody configurations and on a wing-body combination at angles of attack up to 56 degrees, demonstrated the effectiveness of the device.

  13. Experimental investigation of the high angle of attack characteristics of a high performance general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. F.; Yip, L. P.; Perkins, J. N.; Vess, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Scale model wind tunnel tests and full scale flight tests have been conducted for the Questair Venture general aviation aircraft configuration in order to investigate its high angle-of-attack aerodynamics. Attention is given to the formulation of a wing leading-edge modification capable of enhancing stall departure characteristics. This modification, which involved both outboard wing leading-edge droop and two chordwise leading-edge slots, is found to produce almost no wing-rock tendency when tested on a wind tunnel free-to-roll apparatus; in the full-scale aircraft, the modification yielded gentle, controllable stall characteristics with little cruise and climb performance penalty.

  14. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  15. Influence of SiC grain boundary character on fission product transport in irradiated TRISO fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo, T. M.; van Rooyen, I. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the fission product precipitates at silicon carbide grain boundaries from an irradiated TRISO particle were identified and correlated with the associated grain boundary characteristics. Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope provided the crystallographic information needed to identify grain boundary misorientation and boundary type (i.e., low angle, random high angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related). The silicon carbide layer was found to be composed mainly of twin boundaries and small fractions of random high angle and low angle grain boundaries. Most fission products were found at random, high-angle grain boundaries, with small fractions at low-angle and CSL-related grain boundaries. Palladium (Pd) was found at all types of grain boundaries while Pd-uranium and Pd-silver precipitates were only associated with CSL-related and random, high-angle grain boundaries. Precipitates containing only Ag were found only at random, high-angle grain boundaries, but not at low angle or CSL-related grain boundaries.

  16. Helical nanofilaments of bent-core liquid crystals with a second twist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Diorio, N; Lavrentovich, O D; Jákli, A

    2014-01-01

    The B4 phase of bent-core liquid crystals has been shown to be an assembly of twisted layers stacked to form helical nanofilaments. Interestingly, some of them have structural colours that cannot be explained by the nanofilaments alone. Here cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy observations on 40-120 nm films of four bent-core liquid crystal materials show that the filaments are present even in contact with a carbon substrate with only minor deformation, thus representing bulk properties. We find that the subsequent arrays of nanofilaments are not parallel to each other, but rotate by an angle of 35-40° with respect to each other. This doubly twisted structure can explain the structural colour. Being principally different from the packing of molecules in the twist grain boundary and blue phases, the double-twist structure of helical nanofilaments expands the rich word of nanostructured organic materials. PMID:24548912

  17. Full-scale high angle-of-attack tests of an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Lanser, Wendy R.; James, Kevin D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of high angle-of-attack tests of a full-scale F/A-18 in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. A production aircraft was tested over an angle-of-attack range of 18 to 50 deg and at wind speeds of up to 100 knots. These tests had three primary test objectives. Pneumatic and mechanical forebody flow control devices were tested at full-scale and shown to produce significant yawing moments for lateral control of the aircraft at high angles of attack. Mass flow requirements for the pneumatic system were found to scale with freestream density and speed rather than freestream dynamic pressure. Detailed measurements of the pressures buffeting the vertical tail were made and spatial variations in the buffeting frequency were found. The LEX fence was found to have a significant effect on the frequency distribution on the outboard surface of the vertical fin. In addition to the above measurements, an extensive set of data was acquired for the validation of computational fluid dynamics codes and for comparison with flight test and small-scale wind tunnel test results.

  18. Shear veins observed within anisotropic fabric at high angles to the maximum compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Remitti, Francesca; Sibson, Richard H.

    2010-07-01

    Some faults seem to slip at unusually high angles (>45°) relative to the orientation of the greatest principal compressive stress. This implies that these faults are extremely weak compared with the surrounding rock. Laboratory friction experiments and theoretical models suggest that the weakness may result from slip on a pre-existing frictionally weak surface, weakening from chemical reactions, elevated fluid pressure or dissolution-precipitation creep. Here we describe shear veins within the Chrystalls Beach accretionary mélange, New Zealand. The mélange is a highly sheared assemblage of relatively competent rock within a cleaved, anisotropic mudstone matrix. The orientation of the shear veins-compared with the direction of hydrothermal extension veins that formed contemporaneously-indicates that they were active at an angle of 80°+/-5° to the greatest principal compressive stress. We show that the shear veins developed incrementally along the cleavage planes of the matrix. Thus, we suggest that episodic slip was facilitated by the anisotropic internal fabric, in a fluid-overpressured, heterogeneous shear zone. A similar mechanism may accommodate shear at high angles to the greatest principal compressive stress in a range of tectonic settings. We therefore conclude that incremental slip along a pre-existing planar fabric, coupled to high fluid pressure and dissolution-precipitation creep, may explain active slip on severely misoriented faults.

  19. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamics of high-angle-of-attack maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.; Tobak, M.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current state of aerodynamic mathematical modeling for aircraft motions at high angles of attack. The mathematical model serves to define a set of characteristic motions from whose known aerodynamic responses the aerodynamic response to an arbitrary high angle-of-attack flight maneuver can be predicted. Means are explored of obtaining stability parameter information in terms of the characteristic motions, whether by wind-tunnel experiments, computational methods, or by parameter-identification methods applied to flight-test data. A rationale is presented for selecting and verifying the aerodynamic mathematical model at the lowest necessary level of complexity. Experimental results describing the wing-rock phenomenon are shown to be accommodated within the most recent mathematical model by admitting the existence of aerodynamic hysteresis in the steady-state variation of the rolling moment with roll angle. Interpretation of the experimental results in terms of bifurcation theory reveals the general conditions under which aerodynamic hysteresis must exist.

  20. Specialized drilling systems set new world records in high-angle holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.L.; Schwab, G.A.

    1984-02-01

    Sound well planning and carefully chosen drilling systems have proved successful in completing two high-angle holes through troublesome formations in the Gippsland basin offshore Victoria, Australia. Located about 60 miles (97 km) out in the Bass Strait, Mackerel Wells A-14 and A-16 set new records for being the longest horizontal displacement wells drilled to an angle of up to 72/sup 0/ (1.26 rad) to the vertical. Both wells are producing oil from a previously fault-isolated reservoir southwest of the platform. The use of invert oil emulsion and aluminum drill pipe represented a significant change from normal Bass Strait drilling operations. This, in conjunction with tightly controlled angle buildup and directional control, ensured that the projected well paths were achieved. Completion procedures peculiar to highly deviated holes also were employed to bring the wells on stream successfully. A ''controlled activity'' oil-continuous mud system was chosen to alleviate problems associated with shale hydration and to increase wellbore lubricity. Rig modifications for cuttings disposal were essential before mud systems could be changed over. In combination with aluminum drill pipe for reduced string weight (Well A-16), the oil mud helped minimize torque, drag, and wall-sticking tendencies. With similar drilling systems and well-planned completion techniques, the drilling of high-angle holes will play a vital role in deepwater development.

  1. Method for estimating the aerodynamic coefficients of wind turbine blades at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beans, E. W.; Jakubowski, G. S.

    1983-12-01

    The method is based on the hypothesis that at high angles of attack the force on an airfoil is produced by the deflection of the fluid across the lower surface. It is also hypothesized that all airfoils behave the same regardless of shape and that the effects of circulation and skin friction are small. It is pointed out that the expression for the force N normal to the airfoil due to momentum exchange can be written in terms of the component parallel to the flow (drag) and the component perpendicular to the flow (lift). A comparison of estimated values with measured values and generally accepted data indicates that the method given here estimates coefficients which are low. It is thought that the difference may derive from the persistence of circulation at high angles of attack. Low estimates are not seen as a serious limitation to the designer of wind turbines. Owing to the fifth power diameter relation, the effect of a low estimate of performance on the inner portion of the blade is minimized.

  2. "Oliver Twist": A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashion, Carol; Fischer, Diana

    This teacher's guide for public television's 3-part adaptation of Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist" provides information that will help enrich students' viewing of the series, whether or not they read the novel. The guide includes a wide range of discussion and activity ideas; there is also a series Web site and a list of Web resources.…

  3. The electronic structure of grain boundaries in Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, E.C.; Gonis, A. ); Zhang, X.G. )

    1990-11-01

    We present first-principles calculations of the electronic structure of Nb grain boundaries. These are the first such calculations for a bcc metal using the real-space multiple-scattering theory (RSMST). Local densities of states near a {Sigma}5 twist grain boundary are compared to those for bulk Nb. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  4. A study of roll attractor and wing rock of delta wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjana, T.; Rao, D. M.; Pamadi, Bandu N.

    1993-01-01

    Wing rock is a high angle of attack dynamic phenomenon of limited cycle motion predominantly in roll. The wing rock is one of the limitations to combat effectiveness of the fighter aircraft. Roll Attractor is the steady state or equilibrium trim angle (phi(sub trim)) attained by the free-to-roll model, held at some angle of attack, and released form rest at a given initial roll (bank) angle (phi(sub O)). Multiple roll attractors are attained at different trim angles depending on initial roll angle. The test facility (Vigyan's low speed wind tunnel) and experimental work is presented here along with mathematical modelling of roll attractor phenomenon and analysis and comparison of predictions with experimental data.

  5. Use of piloted simulation for high-angle-of-attack agility research and design criteria development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The application of piloted simulations in the development of advanced fighter aircraft is reviewed in the context of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). The HATP combines wind-tunnel experiments, computational aerodynamics, piloted simulations, and flight tests on a modified F-18 testbed aircraft and utilizes the experience and facilities of several NASA centers. Consideration is given to the role of simulation in the overall research process, simulation capabilities and software requirements, simulation flexibility and fidelity, evaluation maneuvers, the role of simulator pilots in evaluations, the analysis of simulation results, flight validation of maneuvers and rating approaches, and the use of simulations to define design criteria. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and flow charts are included.

  6. Atomic-resolution incoherent high-angle annular dark field STEM images of Si(011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kotaka, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Hashimoto, I.; Shiojiri, M.

    2001-02-01

    Characteristic atomic-resolution incoherent high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of [011]-orientated Si have been experimentally obtained by a through-focal series. Artificial bright spots appear at positions where no atomic columns exist along the electron beam, in some experimental images. Image simulation, based on the Bloch wave description by the Bethe method, reproduces the through-focal experimental images. It is shown that atomic-resolution HAADF STEM images, which are greatly influenced by the Bloch wave field depending on the incident electron beam probe, cannot always be interpreted intuitively as the projected atomic images. It is also found that the atomic-resolution HAADF STEM images can be simply explained using the relations to the probe functions without the need for complex dynamical simulations.

  7. Numerical simulation of vortical flow over an elliptical-body missile at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, R. N.; Adams, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical solutions to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are given for the flow about an elliptical body missile (3:1 ellipse) at a Mach number of 2.5 and a unit Reynolds number of 6.56 x 10 to the 6th/m. At high angles of attack, the flow is dominated by large-scale free vortices which occur in the lee-side flow field due to crossflow boundary-layer separation. Emphasis is focused on the accurate prediction of the lee-side vortical flow. Solutions are presented for both symmetric and asymmetric (body rolled 45 deg) configurations at 10 deg and 20 deg angle of attack. The computed results are compared with experimental surface pressure coefficients and vapor-screen photographs. Excellent agreement is obtained in all cases.

  8. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Karel H W; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-17

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures. PMID:27367396

  9. Modelling high angle wave instability and the generation of large scale shoreline sand waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Niels; Falqués, Albert; Ribas, Francesca

    2010-05-01

    Sandy coasts are dynamic systems, shaped by the continuous interaction between hydrodynamics and morphology. On a large time and spacial scale it is commonly assumed that the diffusive action of alongshore wave driven sediment transport dominates and maintains a stable and straight shoreline. Ashton et. al. (2001) however showed with a cellular model that for high angle off-shore wave incidence a coastline can be unstable and that shoreline sand waves can develop due to the feedback of shoreline changes into the wave field. These shoreline undulations can migrate and merge to form large scale capes and spits. Falqués and Calvete (2005) confirmed the mechanism of shoreline instability and shoreline sand wave formation with a linear stability analysis. They found a typical wavelength in the range 4-15 km and a characteristic growth time of a few years. Both studies however have there limitations. Ashton et. al. (2001) assume rectilinear depth contours and an infinite cross-shore extent of shoreline changes in the bathymetry. The linear stability analysis by Falqués and Calvete (2005) can only be applied for small amplitude shoreline changes. Both studies neglect cross-shore dynamics as bathymetric changes associated to shoreline changes are assumed to be instantaneous. In the current study, a nonlinear morphodynamic model is used. In this model the bathymetric lines are curvilinear and the cross-shore extent of shoreline changes in the bathymetry is dynamic due to the introduction of cross-shore dynamics. The cross-shore dynamics are parameterized by assuming a relaxation to an equilibrium cross-shore profile. The relaxation is controlled by a diffusivity which is proportional to wave energy dissipation. The new model is equivalent to N-lines models but applies sediment conservation like 2DH models instead of just moving contour lines. The main objective of this study is to extend the work of Falqués and Calvete (2005) and to study in more detail the mechanism of

  10. High-angle-of-attack stability and control improvements for the EA-6B Prowler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Frank L.; Hahne, David E.; Masiello, Matthew F.; Gato, William

    1987-01-01

    The factors involved in high-angle-of-attack directional divergence phenomena for the EA-6B ECM aircraft have been investigated in NASA-Langley wind tunnel facilities in order to evaluate airframe modifications which would eliminate or delay such divergence to angles-of-attack farther removed from the operational flight envelope of the aircraft. The results obtained indicate that an adverse sidewash at the aft fuselage and vertical tail location is responsible for the directional stability loss, and that the sidewash is due to a vortex system generated by the fuselage-wing juncture. Modifications encompassing a wing inboard leading edge droop, a wing glove strake, and a vertical fin extension, have significantly alleviated the stability problem.

  11. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons.

    PubMed

    Argentero, G; Mangler, C; Kotakoski, J; Eder, F R; Meyer, J C

    2015-04-01

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate that the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number. PMID:25522869

  12. Preliminary results from an airdata enhancement algorithm with application to high-angle-of-attack flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique was developed to improve the fidelity of airdata measurements during dynamic maneuvering. This technique is particularly useful for airdata measured during flight at high angular rates and high angles of attack. To support this research, flight tests using the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility. A Kalman filter was used to combine information from research airdata, linear accelerometers, angular rate gyros, and attitude gyros to determine better estimates of airdata quantities such as angle of attack, angle of sideslip, airspeed, and altitude. The state and observation equations used by the Kalman filter are briefly developed and it is shown how the state and measurement covariance matrices were determined from flight data. Flight data are used to show the results of the technique and these results are compared to an independent measurement source. This technique is applicable to both postflight and real-time processing of data.

  13. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bos, Karel H. W.; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D.; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures.

  14. Simulating Effects of High Angle of Attack on Turbofan Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Claus, Russell W.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A method of investigating the effects of high angle of attack (AOA) flight on turbofan engine performance is presented. The methodology involves combining a suite of diverse simulation tools. Three-dimensional, steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is used to model the change in performance of a commercial aircraft-type inlet and fan geometry due to various levels of AOA. Parallel compressor theory is then applied to assimilate the CFD data with a zero-dimensional, nonlinear, dynamic turbofan engine model. The combined model shows that high AOA operation degrades fan performance and, thus, negatively impacts compressor stability margins and engine thrust. In addition, the engine response to high AOA conditions is shown to be highly dependent upon the type of control system employed.

  15. Apollo 11 Launched Via the Saturn V Rocket-High Angle View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first lunar landing mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle produced a holocaust of flames as it rose from its pad at Launch complex 39. The 363 foot tall, 6,400,000 pound rocket hurled the spacecraft into Earth parking orbit and then placed it on the trajectory to the moon for man's first lunar landing. This high angle view of the launch was provided by a `fisheye' camera mounted on the launch tower. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of two general aviation canard configurations at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Yip, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests of two propeller driven canard general aviation aircraft models at high angles of attack are reported. Both tractor and pusher prop configurations were examined. Angles of attack of -6 to 40 deg were used with the pusher model at Re of 1,600,000, and from -30 to 90 deg and Re of 550,000 for the tractor model. The tests showed that the canard would stall long before the wing and produce a nose-down tendency, thus effectively keeping the aircraft out of the stall regime. However, a sequence of pilot actions or design factors such as the airfoils, relative geometry of the canard and wing, the propeller location and the center of gravity location could introduce a wide variance in stall characteristics from one aircraft to another.

  17. A review of some Reynolds number effects related to bodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    A review of some effects of Reynolds number on selected aerodynamic characteristics of two- and three-dimensional bodies of various cross sections in relation to fuselages at high angles of attack at subsonic and transonic speeds is presented. Emphasis is placed on the Reynolds number ranges above the subcritical and angles of attack where lee side vortex flow or unsteady wake type flows predominate. Lists of references, arranged in subject categories, are presented with emphasis on those which include data over a reasonable Reynolds number range. Selected Reynolds number data representative of various aerodynamic flows around bodies are presented and analyzed and some effects of these flows on fuselage aerodynamic parameters are discussed.

  18. Optimization of lateral-directional dynamics for an aircraft operating at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, S. A.; Garrard, William L., Jr.; Enns, Dale F.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the control laws for the lateral-directional dynamics of a supermaneuverable aircraft is analyzed with a view to reducing the levels of lateral acceleration and sideslip, which are encountered during aggressive rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. The analysis uses a linearized model of the lateral-directional dynamics and thus H-free-flow techniques can be applied. It is shown that trade-offs exist between simultaneously minimizing lateral acceleration measured at the pilot's station, ny(p), minimizing sideslip and minimizing tracking errors between the roll-rate about the velocity vector and its command. The paper concludes that a significant reduction in ny(p) is only attainable by compromising the roll-rate performance.

  19. Flight validation of ground-based assessment for control power requirements at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Ross, Holly M.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.; Abbott, Troy D.

    1994-01-01

    A review is presented in viewgraph format of an ongoing NASA/U.S. Navy study to determine control power requirements at high angles of attack for the next generation high-performance aircraft. This paper focuses on recent flight test activities using the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which are intended to validate results of previous ground-based simulation studies. The purpose of this study is discussed, and the overall program structure, approach, and objectives are described. Results from two areas of investigation are presented: (1) nose-down control power requirements and (2) lateral-directional control power requirements. Selected results which illustrate issues and challenges that are being addressed in the study are discussed including test methodology, comparisons between simulation and flight, and general lessons learned.

  20. High-angle light scattering to determine the optical fiber core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świrniak, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to discuss the possibility of non-invasive sizing of a step-index optical fiber with the use of a beam of light of low temporal coherence. For this purpose we examine the angular profile of light scattered from the fiber at a high angle. The scattered pattern comprises chiefly two coupled, twin rainbows and depends on the fiber physical characteristics, i.e. its dimensions, shape, and refractive index profile. In order to find a causal link between the scattering pattern and the fiber morphology, a spectral analysis (Fast Fourier Transform, FFT) is performed over the scattering intensity. From the spectral data, the core diameter of a step-index optical fiber is extracted inversely.

  1. Exploratory studies of actuated forebody strakes for yaw control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Rao, Dhanvada M.

    1987-01-01

    Wind-tunnel studies have been conducted to evaluate the potential of actuated forebody strakes to provide increased levels of yaw control on fighter aircraft at extremely high angles of attack where conventional aerodynamic controls are ineffective. The studies involved low-speed wind-tunnel tests of actuated forebody strake concepts applied to a generic fighter model and included circumferential pressure and flow visualization surveys on an isolated forebody. Results showed that the actuated forebody strake concept can provide high levels of yaw control over wide ranges of angle-of-attack and sideslip. However, when lifting surfaces were placed in close proximity to the forebody/strake combination, significant interaction effects occurred which reduced the yaw control effectiveness of the strakes and induced coupled rolling and pitching moments.

  2. Endothelial TWIST1 Promotes Pathological Ocular Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Sun, Ye; Gong, Yan; Fu, Zhongjie; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine T.; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pathological neovessel formation impacts many blinding vascular eye diseases. Identification of molecular signatures distinguishing pathological neovascularization from normal quiescent vessels is critical for developing new interventions. Twist-related protein 1 (TWIST1) is a transcription factor important in tumor and pulmonary angiogenesis. This study investigated the potential role of TWIST1 in modulating pathological ocular angiogenesis in mice. Methods. Twist1 expression and localization were analyzed in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Pathological ocular angiogenesis in Tie2-driven conditional Twist1 knockout mice were evaluated in both OIR and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization models. In addition, the effects of TWIST1 on angiogenesis and endothelial cell function were analyzed in sprouting assays of aortic rings and choroidal explants isolated from Twist1 knockout mice, and in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells treated with TWIST1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results. TWIST1 is highly enriched in pathological neovessels in OIR retinas. Conditional Tie2-driven depletion of Twist1 significantly suppressed pathological neovessels in OIR without impacting developmental retinal angiogenesis. In a laser-induced choroidal neovascularization model, Twist1 deficiency also resulted in significantly smaller lesions with decreased vascular leakage. In addition, loss of Twist1 significantly decreased vascular sprouting in both aortic ring and choroid explants. Knockdown of TWIST1 in endothelial cells led to dampened expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and decreased endothelial cell proliferation. Conclusions. Our study suggests that TWIST1 is a novel regulator of pathologic ocular angiogenesis and may represent a new molecular target for developing potential therapeutic treatments to suppress pathological neovascularization in vascular eye diseases. PMID:25414194

  3. Renormalization constants for 2-twist operators in twisted mass QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, C.; Constantinou, M.; Panagopoulos, H.; Stylianou, F.; Korzec, T.

    2011-01-01

    Perturbative and nonperturbative results on the renormalization constants of the fermion field and the twist-2 fermion bilinears are presented with emphasis on the nonperturbative evaluation of the one-derivative twist-2 vector and axial-vector operators. Nonperturbative results are obtained using the twisted mass Wilson fermion formulation employing two degenerate dynamical quarks and the tree-level Symanzik improved gluon action. The simulations have been performed for pion masses in the range of about 450-260 MeV and at three values of the lattice spacing a corresponding to {beta}=3.9, 4.05, 4.20. Subtraction of O(a{sup 2}) terms is carried out by performing the perturbative evaluation of these operators at 1-loop and up to O(a{sup 2}). The renormalization conditions are defined in the RI{sup '}-MOM scheme, for both perturbative and nonperturbative results. The renormalization factors, obtained for different values of the renormalization scale, are evolved perturbatively to a reference scale set by the inverse of the lattice spacing. In addition, they are translated to MS at 2 GeV using 3-loop perturbative results for the conversion factors.

  4. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘polarization twist’, which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  5. Higher level twisted Zhu algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Ekeren, Jethro van

    2011-05-15

    The study of twisted representations of graded vertex algebras is important for understanding orbifold models in conformal field theory. In this paper, we consider the general setup of a vertex algebra V, graded by {Gamma}/Z for some subgroup {Gamma} of R containing Z, and with a Hamiltonian operator H having real (but not necessarily integer) eigenvalues. We construct the directed system of twisted level p Zhu algebras Zhu{sub p,{Gamma}}(V), and we prove the following theorems: For each p, there is a bijection between the irreducible Zhu{sub p,{Gamma}}(V)-modules and the irreducible {Gamma}-twisted positive energy V-modules, and V is ({Gamma}, H)-rational if and only if all its Zhu algebras Zhu{sub p,{Gamma}}(V) are finite dimensional and semisimple. The main novelty is the removal of the assumption of integer eigenvalues for H. We provide an explicit description of the level p Zhu algebras of a universal enveloping vertex algebra, in particular of the Virasoro vertex algebra Vir{sup c} and the universal affine Kac-Moody vertex algebra V{sup k}(g) at non-critical level. We also compute the inverse limits of these directed systems of algebras.

  6. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-09-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid.

  7. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  8. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  9. Analysis of twisted supercharge families on product manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harju, Antti J.

    2015-04-01

    Twisted supercharge families on product manifolds 𝕋 × M have been applied in the analysis of the odd twisted K-theory. We shall suspend these families to the even twisted K-theory and solve their twisted families index problem. This is applied to give analytic representatives of the twisted K-theory classes on tori—including all the torsion classes.

  10. Twisted Logarithmic Modules of Vertex Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakalov, Bojko

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by logarithmic conformal field theory and Gromov-Witten theory, we introduce a notion of a twisted module of a vertex algebra under an arbitrary (not necessarily semisimple) automorphism. Its main feature is that the twisted fields involve the logarithm of the formal variable. We develop the theory of such twisted modules and, in particular, derive a Borcherds identity and commutator formula for them. We investigate in detail the examples of affine and Heisenberg vertex algebras.

  11. The Twist Limit for Bipolar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Gary, Allen

    2008-01-01

    We present new evidence that further supports the standard idea that active regions are emerged magnetic-flux-rope omega loops. When the axial magnetic twist of a cylindrical flux rope exceeds a critical amount, the flux rope becomes unstable to kinking, and the excess axial twist is converted into writhe twist by the kinking. This suggests that, if active regions are emerged omega loops, then (1) no active region should have magnetic twist much above the limit set by kinking, (2) active regions having twist near the limit should often arise from kinked omega loops, and (3) since active regions having large delta sunspots are outstandingly twisted, these arise from kinked omega loops and should have twist near the limit for kinking. From each of 36 vector magnetograms of bipolar active regions, we have measured (1) the total flux of the vertical field above 100 G, (2) the area covered by this flux, and (3) the net electric current that arches over the polarity inversion line. These three quantities yield an estimate of the axial magnetic twist in a simple model cylindrical flux rope that corresponds to the top of the active region s hypothetical omega loop prior to emergence. In all 36 cases, the estimated twist is below the critical limit for kinking. The 11 most twisted active regions (1) have estimated twist within a factor of approx.3 of the limit, and (2) include all of our 6 active regions having large delta sunspots. Thus, our observed twist limit for bipolar active regions is in good accord with active regions being emerged omega loops.

  12. Actuator and aerodynamic modeling for high-angle-of-attack aeroservoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate prediction of airframe/actuation coupling is required by the imposing demands of modern flight control systems. In particular, for agility enhancement at high angle of attack and low dynamic pressure, structural integration characteristics such as hinge moments, effective actuator stiffness, and airframe/control surface damping can have a significant effect on stability predictions. Actuator responses are customarily represented with low-order transfer functions matched to actuator test data, and control surface stiffness is often modeled as a linear spring. The inclusion of the physical properties of actuation and its installation on the airframe is therefore addressed in this paper using detailed actuator models which consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation. The aeroservoelastic analysis procedure is described in which the actuators are modeled as detailed high-order transfer functions and as approximate low-order transfer functions. The impacts of unsteady aerodynamic modeling on aeroservoelastic stability are also investigated in this paper by varying the order of approximation, or number of aerodynamic lag states, in the analysis. Test data from a thrust-vectoring configuration of an F/A-18 aircraft are compared to predictions to determine the effects on accuracy as a function of modeling complexity.

  13. A Tail Buffet Loads Prediction Method for Aircraft at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.; Moses, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft designers commit significant resources to the design of aircraft in meeting performance goals. Despite fulfilling traditional design requirements, many fighter aircraft have encountered buffet loads when demonstrating their high angle-of-attack maneuver capabilities. As a result, during test or initial production phases of fighter development programs, many new designs are impacted, usually in a detrimental way, by resulting in reassessing designs or limiting full mission capability. These troublesome experiences usually stem from overlooking or completely ignoring the effects of buffet during the design phase of aircraft. Perhaps additional requirements are necessary that addresses effects of buffet in achieving best aircraft performance in fulfilling mission goals. This paper describes a reliable, fairly simple, but quite general buffet loads analysis method to use in the initial design phases of fighter-aircraft development. The method is very similar to the random gust load analysis that is now commonly available in a commercial code, which this analysis capability is based, with some key modifications. The paper describes the theory and the implementation of the methodology. The method is demonstrated on a JSF prototype example problem. The demonstration also serves as a validation of the method, since, in the paper, the analysis is shown to nearly match the flight data. In addition, the paper demonstrates how the analysis method can be used to assess candidate design concepts in determining a satisfactory final aircraft configuration.

  14. Technical Evaluation Report, Part A - Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2003-01-01

    A symposium entitled Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack was held in Loen, Norway, from May 7 through May 11, 2001. The Applied Vehicle Technology (AVT) panel, under the auspices of the Research and Technology Organization (RTO), sponsored this symposium. Forty-eight papers, organized into nine sessions, addressed computational and experimental studies of vortex flows pertinent to both aircraft and maritime applications. The studies also ranged from fundamental fluids investigations to flight test results, and significant results were contributed from a broad range of countries. The principal emphasis of this symposium was on "the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on military vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads." It was further observed by the program committee that "separation- induced vortex flows are an important part of the design and off-design performance of conventional fighter aircraft and new conventional or unconventional manned or unmanned advanced vehicle designs (UAVs, manned aircraft, missiles, space planes, ground-based vehicles, and ships)." The nine sessions addressed the following topics: vortical flows on wings and bodies, experimental techniques for vortical flows, numerical simulations of vortical flows, vortex stability and breakdown, vortex flows in maritime applications, vortex interactions and control, vortex dynamics, flight testing, and vehicle design. The purpose of this paper is to provide brief reviews of these papers along with some synthesizing perspectives toward future vortex flow research opportunities. The paper includes the symposium program. (15 refs.)

  15. Longitudinal-control design approach for high-angle-of-attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.; Proffitt, Melissa S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a control synthesis methodology that emphasizes a variable-gain output feedback technique that is applied to the longitudinal channel of a high-angle-of-attack aircraft. The aircraft is a modified F/A-18 aircraft with thrust-vectored controls. The flight regime covers a range up to a Mach number of 0.7; an altitude range from 15,000 to 35,000 ft; and an angle-of-attack (alpha) range up to 70 deg, which is deep into the poststall region. A brief overview is given of the variable-gain mathematical formulation as well as a description of the discrete control structure used for the feedback controller. This paper also presents an approximate design procedure with relationships for the optimal weights for the selected feedback control structure. These weights are selected to meet control design guidelines for high-alpha flight controls. Those guidelines that apply to the longitudinal-control design are also summarized. A unique approach is presented for the feed-forward command generator to obtain smooth transitions between load factor and alpha commands. Finally, representative linear analysis results and nonlinear batch simulation results are provided.

  16. Multiaxis aircraft control power from thrust vectoring at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Mason, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive research programs conducted at the Langley Research Center have shown that thrust vectoring can be provided by multifunction (nonaxisymmetric) nozzles. Most of this research has been conducted on pitch vectoring at both static and forward flight conditions. Recent efforts have been aimed at evaluating yaw vectoring concepts at static (wind off) conditions. This paper summarizes results for three different twin-engine fighter configurations tested over a Mach number range of 0.15 to 2.47 at angles of attack up to 35 deg. The objective of these investigations was to determine the multiaxis control power characteristics provided by thrust vectoring. All three configurations employed two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles which provided pitch vectoring by differential deflection of the upper and lower nozzle divergent flaps. Three different means of yaw vectoring were tested: (1) a translating nozzle sidewall; (2) yaw flaps located in the nozzle sidewalls; and (3) canted nozzles. These investigations were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel and the Lewis 10x10-Foot Supersonic Tunnel. Longitudinal and direction control power from thrust vectoring was greater than that provided by aerodynamic control effectors at low speed or at high angles of attack.

  17. A preliminary look at techniques used to obtain airdata from flight at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    Flight research at high angles of attack has posed new problems for airdata measurements. New sensors and techniques for measuring the standard airdata quantities of static pressure, dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip were subsequently developed. The ongoing airdata research supporting NASA's F-18 high alpha research program is updated. Included are the techniques used and the preliminary results. The F-18 aircraft was flown with three research airdata systems: a standard airdata probe on the right wingtip, a self-aligning airdata probe on the left wingtip, and a flush airdata system on the nose cone. The primary research goal was to obtain steady-state calibrations for each airdata system up to an angle of attack of 50 deg. This goal was accomplished and preliminary accuracies of the three airdata systems were assessed and are presented. An effort to improve the fidelity of the airdata measurements during dynamic maneuvering is also discussed. This involved enhancement of the aerodynamic data with data obtained from linear accelerometers, rate gyros, and attitude gyros. Preliminary results of this technique are presented.

  18. A system for testing airdata probes at high angles of attack using a ground vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geenen, Robert J.; Moulton, Bryan J.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A system to calibrate airdata probes at angles of attack between 0 and 90 deg was developed and tested at the NASA Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility. This system used a test fixture mounted to the roof of a ground vehicle and included an onboard instrumentation and data acquisition system for measuring pressures and flow angles. The data could be easily transferred to the facility mainframe computer for further analysis. The system was designed to provide convenient and inexpensive airdata probe calibrations for projects which require airdata at high angles of attack, such as the F-18 High Alpha Research Program. This type of probe was tested to 90 deg angle of attack in a wind tunnel and using the ground vehicle system. The results of both tests are in close agreement. An airdata probe with a swiveling pilot-static tube was also calibrated with the ground vehicle system. This paper presents the results of these tests and gives a detailed description of the test system.

  19. Aerodynamic Loads on Tails at High Angles of Attack and Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.; Spahr, J. R.

    1957-01-01

    Results are presented for the loads and moments acting on the individual tail surfaces of a body-tail combination over a wide range of angles of attack and sideslip. The effects of forebody length and panel-panel interference on the characteristics are included. It is shown that large nonlinear variations in these loads and moments, which occur at some combinations of angle of attack and sideslip, cannot be predicted by low-angle theory. A relatively simple, but general, theoretical method for calculating these load and moment characteristics is described, and the results from this method are found to be in good agreement with experiment provided the initial positions of the forebody vortices are known. It is shown that a simple application of slender-body theory can be used to predict the side loads due to sideslip that are contributed by a vertical tail on a wide variety of wing-body-tail combinations at low angles of attack. For several configurations, changes are indicated which reduced the vertical-tail loads per unit yawing moment of each complete configuration at large angles of attack. Some results are presented on the effect of high angle of attack on the induced-flow field and tail loads due to a wing at supersonic speed.

  20. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible. PMID:27391526

  1. Vortex force generation of an impulsively started wing at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiang; Wang, Fuxin; Liu, Hong; Qin, Suyang; Xiang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    A wing at high angle of attack (AoA) impulsively started from rest is a fundamental motion employed by insects during flight. Previous studies have almost solely focused on the lift enhancement by the leading-edge vortex (LEV). However, the influences of the starting vortex and secondary vortex on both the lift and drag generation have been less studied. In this paper, the vorticity fields for three AoAs of 45°, 58.5° and 72° are obtained numerically. The roles of the LEV, starting vortex and secondary vortex in generating the lift and drag are quantitatively studied using the vorticity moment theory. It is revealed that the LEV provides positive lift whereas the starting vortex and secondary vortex provide negative lift during the whole motion. The negative lift produced by the starting vortex or secondary vortex is not trivial and cannot be ignored. Regarding the drag, the LEV reduces the total drag whereas the starting vortex, the secondary vortex increases the total drag. As the AoA increases, the drag resulting from the starting vortex increases quickly and comprises almost all the total drag for the AoA of 72°. The relations between the motion of the vortical structures and the forces are also investigated. Financial support from the State Key Development Program of Basic Research of China (2014CB744802) is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Experimental study of effects of forebody geometry on high angle of attack static and dynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, J. M.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    A series of low speed wind tunnel tests on a generic fighter model with a cylindrical fuselage were made to investigate the effects of forebody shape on static and dynamic lateral/directional stability. Five forebodies, including a chine nose of unconventional cross-sectional shape, were tested. Conventional force tests were conducted to determine static stability characteristics and single degree-of-freedom free-to-roll tests were used to study the wing rock susceptibility of the model with the various forebodies. Flow visualization data were obtained to aid in analysis of the complex flow phenomena involved. The results show that forebody cross-sectional shape can strongly effect both static and dynamic (roll) stability at high angles of attack. Large variations in stability were obtained for the various forebody geometries. These characteristics result from the impact of cross-sectional shape on forebody vortex development, the behavior of the vortices at sideslip conditions, and their interaction with the wing and empennage flow fields.

  3. Parameter identification for X-31A at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, S.; Rohlf, D.; Plaetschke, Ermin

    1994-01-01

    The U.S./German experimental aircraft X-31A was designed and constructed to demonstrate enhanced fighter maneuverability. Post-stall maneuvering is enabled by applying new technologies such as high angle of attack aerodynamics and flight control system integrated thrust vectoring. Two demonstrator aircraft have been built by the main contractors, Rockwell International and Deutsche Aerospace (formerly MBB). Flight testing started in October 1990 and before the end of 1992 both aircraft had accomplished a significant number of flights covering the entire AoA regime from about -5 to 70 deg. Throughout the envelope expansion, DLR Institute of Flight Mechanics conducted parameter identification (PID) to determine the aerodynamic parameters of the aircraft from flight test data and to compare the results to the predictions from the aerodynamic dataset (ADS). The application of system identification to high AoA / post-stall flight data raises some major problems, which are discussed in this paper. Results from both longitudinal and lateral-directional motion will be presented.

  4. Actuator and aerodynamic modeling for high-angle-of-attack aeroservoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate prediction of airframe/actuation coupling is required by the imposing demands of modern flight control systems. In particular, for agility enhancement at high angle of attack and low dynamic pressure, structural integration characteristics such as hinge moments, effective actuator stiffness, and airframe/control surface damping can have a significant effect on stability predictions. Actuator responses are customarily represented with low-order transfer functions matched to actuator test data, and control surface stiffness is often modeled as a linear spring. The inclusion of the physical properties of actuation and its installation on the airframe is therefore addressed using detailed actuator models which consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation. The aeroservoelastic analysis procedure is described in which the actuators are modeled as detailed high-order transfer functions and as approximate low-order transfer functions. The impacts of unsteady aerodynamic modeling on aeroservoelastic stability are also investigated by varying the order of approximation, or number of aerodynamic lag states, in the analysis. Test data from a thrust-vectoring configuration of an F/A-l8 aircraft are compared to predictions to determine the effects on accuracy as a function of modeling complexity.

  5. Implications of scale effect for the prediction of high angle of attack aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, C. D.; Krus, P.; Jouannet, C.

    2005-04-01

    Scale effect is of significance in all experimental aerodynamics testing. At high angles of attack such issues as Reynolds and Mach number scaling are further complicated by the presence of complex, unsteady separated flow structures. The understanding and quantification of such flow effects remains a substantial challenge to the combat aircraft designer. The challenge, especially during conceptual and preliminary design stages, is to obtain sufficiently accurate information to make relevant design decisions, addressing potential weaknesses before proceeding to detail design. The focus in the present review is on the application of the water tunnel in such cases. The combination of qualitative and quantitative data obtainable from the water tunnel provides a useful complement to other tools during the early design stages. The effect of Reynolds number in particular is however critical; and appreciation of its effects are critical to the effective use of such a tool. It is shown however that for certain configurations such effects can be small in comparison to other experimental effects.

  6. DVCS amplitude with kinematical twist-3 terms

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, A.V.; Weiss, C.

    2000-08-01

    The authors compute the amplitude of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) using the calculus of QCD string operators in coordinate representation. To restore the electromagnetic gauge invariance (transversality) of the twist-2 amplitude they include the operators of twist-3 which appear as total derivatives of twist-2 operators. The results are equivalent to a Wandzura-Wilczek approximation for twist-3 skewed parton distributions. They find that this approximation gives a finite result for the amplitude of a longitudinally polarized virtual photon, while the amplitude for transverse polarization is divergent, i.e., factorization breaks down in this term.

  7. Application of piloted simulation to high-angle-of-attack flight-dynamics research for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1992-01-01

    The use of piloted simulation at Langley Research Center as part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), which was created to provide concepts and methods for the design of advanced fighter aircraft, is reviewed. A major research activity within this program is the development of the design processes required to take advantage of the benefits of advanced control concepts for high angle of attack agility. Fundamental methodologies associated with the effective use of piloted simulation for this research are described, particularly those relating to the test techniques, validation of the test results, and design guideline/criteria development.

  8. Application of Piloted Simulation to High-Angle-of-Attack Flight-Dynamics Research for Fighter Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of piloted simulation at Langley Research Center as part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), which was created to provide concepts and methods for the design of advanced fighter aircraft. A major research activity within this program is the development of the design processes required to take advantage of the benefits of advanced control concepts for high-angle-of-attack agility. Fundamental methodologies associated with the effective use of piloted simulation for this research are described, particularly those relating to the test techniques, validation of the test results, and design guideline/criteria development.

  9. Development of a preliminary high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control requirement for high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Luat T.; Foster, John V.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements for high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control for advanced high-performance aircraft are discussed. Background information on fundamental factors that influence and, to a large extent, determine the high angle-of-attack nose-down control requirement is briefly reviewed. Guidelines currently proposed by other sources which attempt to define these requirements are discussed. A requirement based on NASA analysis of the characteristics of existing relaxed static stability (RSS) aircraft is presented. This analysis could provide the basis for a preliminary design guide.

  10. Development of high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control margin design guidelines for combat aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A broad research program to identify maneuvering requirements for advanced fighters and the corresponding design criteria to aid in making critical design tradeoffs is being conducted under the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). As part of this activity, NASA and the U.S. Navy are conducting cooperative research to develop high-angle-of-attack control margin requirements. This paper will summarize the status of this program. Following some background information, the simulation study conducted to develop a set of preliminary guidelines for nose-down pitch control is reviewed, and the results of some very limited flight tests are described.

  11. Identification of an unsteady aerodynamic model up to high angle of attack regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yigang

    1997-12-01

    those from references, a state-space model is developed to describe the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics up to the high angle of attack regime. A nondimensional coordinate is introduced as the state variable describing the flow separation or vortex burst. First-order differential equation is used to govern the dynamics of flow separation or vortex bursting through this state variable. To be valid for general configurations, Taylor series expansions in terms of the input variables are used in the determination of aerodynamic characteristics, resembling the current approach of the stability derivatives. However, these derivatives are longer constant. They are dependent on the state variable of flow separation or vortex burst. In this way, the changes in stability derivatives with the angle of attack are included dynamically. The performance of the model is then validated by the wind-tunnel measurements of an NACA 0015 airfoil, a 70sp° delta wing and, finally two F-18 aircraft configurations. The results obtained show that within the framework of the proposed model, it is possible to obtain good agreement with different unsteady wind tunnel data in high angle-of-attack regime.

  12. A demonstration of passive blade twist control using extension-twist coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, R. C.; Nixon, M. W.; Wilbur, M. L.; Singleton, J. D.; Mirick, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of passive blade twist control using an extension-twist-coupled composite rotor blade design has been demonstrated. A set of low-twist model-scale helicopter rotor blades has been manufactured from existing molds with the objective of demonstrating this control concept. Hover testing of the set of blades demonstrated maximum twist changes of 5.24 deg for the ballasted blade configuration, and 2.54 deg for the unballasted configurations in the atmospheric test condition. These results compared well with those obtained from a detailed FEM analysis of the rotor blade. Aerodynamic-induced effects on the blade elastic twist were found to be minimal.

  13. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantino, Nicolas; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2016-03-01

    Topological order in two-dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations—anyons—and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization—termed symmetry enriched topological order. When the global symmetry group G, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors—i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon—one can imagine a local version of the action of G around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with the second cohomology group {H}2(G,{{ A }}{{abelian}}) being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group G possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of G, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic ‘twist’ defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele (2014 Phys. Rev. B 90 184418), we construct a wide class of exactly-solvable models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  14. Twisting Graphene into Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kit, Oleg O.; Tallinen, Tuomas; Mahadevan, L.; Timonen, Jussi; Koskinen, Pekka

    2012-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes are usually described as being rolled up from graphene sheets; this process, however, have never been realized experimentally. We showed that graphene can indeed be transformed into nanotube by twisting [1]. Further, we showed that tube formation can be well-explained within classical theory of elasticity---in fact the very mechanism of tube formation can be observed by twisting a strap from one's backpack (try now!). Furthermore, we showed that nanotube chirality may not only be predicted, but can also be controlled externally. The quantum molecular dynamic simulations at T=300K were achieved thanks to the revised periodic boundary conditions (RPBC) approach [2-3]. The structures similar to simulated have been recently observed experimentally [4]. This novel rote for nanotube formation opens new opportunities in nanomaterial manipulation not restricted to carbon alone. In the presentation, I will describe tube formation, as well as outline the easy and efficient technique for distorted nanostructures simulation, the RPBC approach. [4pt] [1] O. O. Kit et al. arXiv:1108.0048[0pt] [2] P. Koskinen & O. O. Kit PRL 105, 106401 (2010)[0pt] [3] O. O. Kit, L. Pastewka, P. Koskinen PRB 84, 155431 (2011)[0pt] [4] A. Chuvilin et al. Nature Materials 10, 687 (2011)

  15. Twisting of glycosidic bonds by hydrolases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patterns of scissile bond twisting have been found in crystal structures of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that are complexed with substrates and inhibitors. To estimate the increased potential energy in the substrates that results from this twisting, we have plotted torsion angles for the scissile bond...

  16. STOUT SMEARING FOR TWISTED FERMIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOLZ,W.; JANSEN, K.; McNEILE, C.; MONTVAY, I.; RICHARDS, C.; URBACH, C.; WENGER, U.

    2007-07-30

    The effect of Stout smearing is investigated in numerical simulations with twisted mass Wilson quarks. The phase transition near zero quark mass is studied on 12{sup 3} x 24, 16{sup 3} x 32 and 24{sup 3} x 48 lattices at lattice spacings a {approx_equal} 0.1-0.125 fm. The phase structure of Wilson fermions with twisted mass ({mu}) has been investigated in [1,2]. As it is explained there, the observed first order phase transition limits the minimal pion mass which can be reached in simulations at a given lattice spacing: m{sub k}{sup min} {approx_equal} {theta}(a). The phase structure is schematically depicted in the left panel of Fig. I . The phase transition can be observed in simulations with twisted mass fermions, for instance, as a ''jump'' or even metastabilities in the average plaquette value as a function of the hopping parameter ({kappa}). One possibility to weaken the phase transition and therefore allow for lighter pion masses at a given lattice spacing is to use an improved gauge action like the DBW2, Iwasaki, or tree-level Symanzik (tlSym) improved gauge action instead of the simple Wilson gauge action. This has been successfully demonstrated in [3,4,5]. Here we report on our attempts to use a smeared gauge field in the fermion lattice Dirac operator to further reduce the strength of the phase transition. This is relevant in simulations with N{sub f} = 2 + 1 + 1 (u,d,s,c) quark flavors [6] where the first order phase transition becomes stronger compared to N{sub f} = 2 simulations. The main impact of the above mentioned improved gauge actions on the gauge fields occurring in simulations is to suppress short range fluctuations (''dislocations'') and the associated ''exceptionally small'' eigenvalues of the fermion matrix. The same effect is expected from smearing the gauge field links in the fermion action. The cumulated effect of the improved gauge action and smeared links should allow for a smaller pion mass at a given lattice spacing and volume. Our

  17. Comparison of X-31 Flight and Ground-Based Yawing Moment Asymmetries at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.; Croom, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries caused position saturations of the thrust-vectoring vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some stability-axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. The two test aircraft had different asymmetry characteristics, and ship two has asymmetries that vary as a function of Reynolds number. Several aerodynamic modifications have been made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. These modifications include adding transition strips on the forebody and noseboom, using two different length strakes, and increasing nose bluntness. Ultimately, a combination of forebody strakes, nose blunting, and noseboom transition strips reduced the yawing moment asymmetry enough to fully expand the high-angle-of-attack envelope. Analysis of the X-31 flight data is reviewed and compared to wind-tunnel and water-tunnel measurements. Several lessons learned are outlined regarding high-angle-of-attack configuration design and ground testing.

  18. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Effect of grain orientation on mechanical properties and thermomechanical response of Sn-based solder interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hongtao; Yan, Bingbing; Yang, Ming; Ma, Xin; Li, Mingyu

    2013-11-15

    The thermomechanical response of Sn-based solder interconnects with differently oriented grains was investigated by electron backscattered diffraction technique under thermal cycling and thermal shock testing in this study. The results showed that deformation and cracking of solder interconnects have a close relationship with the unique characteristics of grain orientation and boundaries in each solder interconnect, and deformation was frequently confined within the high-angle grain boundaries. The micro Vickers hardness testing results showed that the hardness varied significantly depending on the grain orientation and structure, and deformation twins can be induced around the indents by the indentation testing. - Highlights: • Thermomechanical response shows a close relationship with the grain structure. • Deformation was frequently confined within the high-angle grain boundaries. • Different grain orientations exhibit different hardness. • Deformation twins can be induced around the indents in SAC105 solder interconnects.

  1. Block Copolymers with a Twist

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, R.; Chiang, Y; Chen, C; Wang, H; Hasegawa, H; Akasaka, S; Thomas, E; Burger, C; Hsiao, B

    2009-01-01

    Chiral block copolymers (BCPs*) comprising chiral entities were designed to fabricate helical architectures (i.e., twisted morphologies) from self-assembly. A new helical phase (H*) with P622 symmetry was discovered in the self-assembly of poly(styrene)-b-poly(l-lactide) (PS-PLLA) BCPs*. Hexagonally packed, interdigitated PLLA helical microdomains in a PS matrix were directly visualized by electron tomography. The phase diagram of the PS-PLLA BCPs* was also established. Phase transitions from the H* phase to the stable cylinder and gyroid phases were found after long-time annealing, suggesting that the H* is a long-lived metastable phase. In contrast to racemic poly(styrene)-b-poly(d,l-lactide) BCPs, chiral interaction significantly enhances the incompatibility between achiral PS and chiral PLLA blocks in the PS-PLLA BCPs* and can be estimated through the determination of the interaction parameter.

  2. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; Pinner, David

    2016-03-01

    Folded supersymmetry ( f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. These models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.

  3. A demonstration of passive blade twist control using extension-twist coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Nixon, Mark W.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Mirick, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    The results from a study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of extension-twist coupling are presented. A set of low twist model-scale helicopter rotor blades was manufactured with a view towards demonstrating the passive blade twist control concept. Hover testing of the blades was conducted to measure the change in blade twist as a function of rotor speed. The blades were spun through the 0-800 rpm range, with a corresponding sweep of collective pitch to determine the effect on the blade elastic twist. Hover data were obtained for both a ballasted and unballasted blade configuration in atmospheric conditions, where maximum twist changes of 2.54 and 5.24 degrees were respectively observed. These results compared well with those from a finite element analysis of the blade, which yielded maximum twists of 3.01 and 5.61 degrees for the unballasted and ballasted blade configurations, respectively. The aerodynamic-induced effects on the blade elastic twist, determined by testing a ballasted blade configuration in a near-vacuum condition, were found to be minimal with a maximum twist difference of 0.17 degrees observed between the two test environments. The effect of collective pitch sweep on the elastic twist was minimal.

  4. Cable twisting due to atmospheric icing

    SciTech Connect

    McComber, P.; Druez, J.; Savadjiev, K.

    1995-12-31

    Samples of ice accretions collected on cables of overhead transmission lines have shown evidence of twisting of the cable during atmospheric icing. Previous work has attributed cable twisting to the torque created by the weight of an eccentric ice shape and by wind forces. However, testing of stranded cables and conductors has shown that such cables also twist when there is a change in tension in the cable span. This phenomenon is related to the interaction of the different strand layers under tension. When a cable is subjected to atmospheric icing, cable tension increases and this type of twisting should also be considered. In order to determine how the two types of twisting would compare on transmission lines, a numerical simulation was made using characteristics of a typical 35-mm stranded conductor. The twist angle was computed as a function of cable span, sag to span ratio and increasing ice loads. The simulation shows that for transmission lines, twisting due to varying tension will be significant. Since cable tension is influenced by wind speed and ambient temperature as well as ice load, this phenomenon, unless prevented, results in ice accretion more circular in shape and hence eventually in larger ice loads.

  5. Simulating Topological Defects in Twisted Fiber Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruss, Isaac R.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2012-02-01

    Twisted bundles are a common motif found in naturally occurring structures of self-assembled fibers, such as collagen and fibrin. By understanding the general principles governing such organizations, new synthetic materials--from the nano to the macroscale--may also be realized. Recently, continuum elasticity theory has been applied to describe generic twisted fiber bundles. This has revealed a relation between a bundle's twist and the presence of topological defects in the cross-sectional packing of the fibers. Here we employ numerical simulations to examine this interdependence. We model a bundle's cross-section as beads confined to a plane. The interactions between beads is governed by a modified Lennard-Jones potential that accounts for the effects of twist. We observe configurations that range from perfect hexagonal packing for cases of no twist, to defect populated structures above a critical amount of twist. For small bundles of less than ˜100 beads, there exists a discrete spectrum of energy ground states corresponding to integer numbers of five-fold disclinations. For larger bundles, we hope to uncover what types of defect arrangements effectively screen the stresses caused by twist, and compare these to current predictions of the internal organization of collagen fibrils.

  6. DYNAMICS OF STRONGLY TWISTED RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Parfrey, Kyle; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hui, Lam

    2013-09-10

    Magnetar magnetospheres are believed to be strongly twisted due to shearing of the stellar crust by internal magnetic stresses. We present time-dependent axisymmetric simulations showing in detail the evolution of relativistic force-free magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. When the twist amplitude is small, the magnetosphere moves quasi-statically through a sequence of equilibria of increasing free energy. At some twist amplitude the magnetosphere becomes tearing-mode unstable to forming a resistive current sheet, initiating large-scale magnetic reconnection in which a significant fraction of the magnetic free energy can be dissipated. This ''critical'' twist angle is insensitive to the resistive length scale. Rapid shearing temporarily stabilizes the magnetosphere beyond the critical angle, allowing the magnetosphere of a rapidly differentially rotating star to store and dissipate more free energy. In addition to these effects, shearing the surface of a rotating star increases the spindown torque applied to the star. If shearing is much slower than rotation, the resulting spikes in spindown rate can occur on timescales anywhere from the long twisting timescale to the stellar spin period or shorter, depending both on the stellar shear distribution and the existing distribution of magnetospheric twists. A model in which energy is stored in the magnetosphere and released by a magnetospheric instability therefore predicts large changes in the measured spindown rate before soft gamma repeater giant flares.

  7. Large-Vortex Capture by a Wing at Very High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. M.; Wu, J. Z.; Denny, G. A.; Lu, X. Y.

    1996-01-01

    In generating the lift on a wing, the static stall is a severe barrier. As the angle of attack, alpha, increases to the stall angle, alpha(sub stall) the flow separation point on the upper surface of the wing moves to the leading edge, so that on a two-dimensional airfoil or a large-aspect-ratio wing, the lift abruptly drops to a very low level. Therefore, the first generation of aeronautical flow type, i.e., the attached steady flow, has been limited to alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Owing to the obvious importance in applications, therefore, a great effort has been made in the past two decades to enlarge the range of usable angles of attack by various flow controls for a large-aspect-ratio wing. Basically, relevant works fall into two categories. The first category is usually refereed to as separation control, which concentrates on partially separated flow at alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Since the first experimental study of Collins and Zelenevitz, there has been ample literature showing that a partially separated flow can be turned to almost fully attached by flow controls, so that the lift is recovered and the stall is delayed (for a recent work see Seifert et al.). It has been well established that, in this category, unsteady controls are much more effective than steady ones and can be realized at a very low power-input level (Wu et al.; Seifert et al.). The second and more ambitious category of relevant efforts is the post-stall lift enhancement. Its possibility roots at the existence of a second lift peak at a very high angle of attack. In fact, As alpha further increases from alpha(sub stall), the completely separated flow develops and gradually becomes a bluff-body flow. This flow gives a normal force to the airfoil with a lift component, which reaches a peak at a maximum utilizable angle of attack, alpha(sub m) approx.= 40 deg. This second peak is of the same level as the first lift peak at alpha(sub stall). Meanwhile, the drag is also quickly

  8. High-angle faults control the geometry and morphology of the Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Nixon, Casey; Duclaux, Guillaume; Gawthorpe, Robert; McNeill, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The Corinth Rift is one of the most actively extending basins on Earth, with modern-day GPS extension rates of up to 15 mm/yr. The structure of the onshore and offshore parts of the rift has been intensely studied, however controversy remains as to the geometry of faults at depth. The rift has long been described as experiencing low-angle (< 30°) active faulting. The presence of an active low-angle detachment has been proposed from an interpreted cloud of microseismicity dipping at 12-20° at depths of 8-11 km. In contrast, others suggest that this microseismicity marks the brittle-ductile transition or that any detachment is incipient, and that low-angle faulting is not required to explain extension across the rift. This has led to an alternative interpretation where faults remain dipping at angles of 45-60°, as observed onshore, to the brittle-ductile transition depth. Other interpretations from seismic reflection data suggest that faults may be non-planar, being high angle at shallow depths (< ~3 km) and then shallowing in dip to 25-45° at greater depths. One observation that the various fault models must be able to honour is the long-term vertical deformation pattern and geomorphology across the Corinth Rift such as: high uplift rates along the southern margin (1-2 mm/yr); offshore basement descending to depths of 3 km; and a northern margin that is generally stable or subsiding. We compute the surface uplift and subsidence for faults of different geometries to assess which deep fault geometries can best recreate the first-order vertical deformation characteristics of the Corinth Rift. Slip rates appropriate for southern margin faults have been applied to model the deformation field over timescales of 1 Ma. We use PyLith, an open-source finite-element code for quasi-static viscoelastic simulations of crustal deformation. We model the uplift and subsidence fields associated with the following fault geometries: i) planar faults with dips of 45-60° that sole

  9. Search for Mechanically-Induced Grain Morphology Changes in Oxygen Free Electrolytic (OFE) Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Jennifer; /SLAC

    2006-08-18

    The deformation of the microscopic, pure metal grains (0.1 to > 1 millimeter) in the copper cells of accelerator structures decreases the power handling capabilities of the structures. The extent of deformation caused by mechanical fabrication damage is the focus of this study. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of a bonded test stack of six accelerating cells at magnifications of 30, 100, 1000 were taken before simulated mechanical damage was done. After a 2{sup o}-3{sup o} twist was manually applied to the test stack, the cells were cut apart and SEM imaged separately at the same set magnifications (30, 100, and 1000), to examine any effects of the mechanical stress. Images of the cells after the twist were compared to the images of the stack end (cell 60) before the twist. Despite immense radial damage to the end cell from the process of twisting, SEM imaging showed no change in grain morphology from images taken before the damage: copper grains retained shape and the voids at the grain boundaries stay put. Likewise, the inner cells of the test stack showed similar grain consistency to that of the end cell before the twist was applied. Hence, there is no mechanical deformation observed on grains in the aperture disk, either for radial stress or for rotational stress. Furthermore, the high malleability of copper apparently absorbed stress and strain very well without deforming the grain structure in the surface.

  10. Nanomechanical Energy Storage in Twisted Nanotube Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, David; Fthenakis, Zacharias G.; Seifert, Gotthard; Tománek, David

    2012-12-01

    We determine the deformation energetics and energy density of twisted carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes that effectively constitute a torsional spring. Using ab initio and parametrized density functional calculations, we identify structural changes in these systems and determine their elastic limits. The deformation energy of twisted nanotube ropes contains contributions associated not only with twisting but also with stretching, bending, and compression of individual nanotubes. We quantify these energy contributions and show that their relative role changes with the number of nanotubes in the rope.

  11. Twisted spectral geometry for the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinetti, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    In noncommutative geometry, the spectral triple of a manifold does not generate bosonic fields, for fluctuations of the Dirac operator vanish. A Connes-Moscovici twist forces the commutative algebra to be multiplied by matrices. Keeping the space of spinors untouched, twisted-fluctuations then yield perturbations of the spin connection. Applied to the spectral triple of the Standard Model, a similar twist yields the scalar field needed to stabilize the vacuum and to make the computation of the Higgs mass compatible with its experimental value.

  12. Low-energy, Mobile Grain Boundaries in Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangli; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The strong basal texture that is commonly developed during the rolling of magnesium alloy and can even increase during annealing motivates atomic-level study of dislocation structures of both <0001> tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) in Magnesium. Both symmetrical tilt and twist GBs over the entire range of rotation angles θ between 0° and 60° are found to have an ordered atomic structure and can be described with grain boundary dislocation models. In particular, 30° tilt and twist GBs are corresponding to energy minima. The 30° tilt GB is characterized with an array of Shockley partial dislocations bp:-bp on every basal plane and the 30° twist GB is characterized with a stacking faulted structure. More interesting, molecular dynamics simulations explored that both 30° tilt and twist GBs are highly mobile associated with collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations. This could be responsible for the formation of the strong basal texture and a significant number of 30° misorientation GBs in Mg alloy during grain growth. PMID:26891595

  13. Low-energy, Mobile Grain Boundaries in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangli; Wang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    The strong basal texture that is commonly developed during the rolling of magnesium alloy and can even increase during annealing motivates atomic-level study of dislocation structures of both <0001> tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) in Magnesium. Both symmetrical tilt and twist GBs over the entire range of rotation angles θ between 0° and 60° are found to have an ordered atomic structure and can be described with grain boundary dislocation models. In particular, 30° tilt and twist GBs are corresponding to energy minima. The 30° tilt GB is characterized with an array of Shockley partial dislocations bp:-bp on every basal plane and the 30° twist GB is characterized with a stacking faulted structure. More interesting, molecular dynamics simulations explored that both 30° tilt and twist GBs are highly mobile associated with collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations. This could be responsible for the formation of the strong basal texture and a significant number of 30° misorientation GBs in Mg alloy during grain growth.

  14. Low-energy, Mobile Grain Boundaries in Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangli; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The strong basal texture that is commonly developed during the rolling of magnesium alloy and can even increase during annealing motivates atomic-level study of dislocation structures of both <0001> tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) in Magnesium. Both symmetrical tilt and twist GBs over the entire range of rotation angles θ between 0° and 60° are found to have an ordered atomic structure and can be described with grain boundary dislocation models. In particular, 30° tilt and twist GBs are corresponding to energy minima. The 30° tilt GB is characterized with an array of Shockley partial dislocations bp:-bp on every basal plane and the 30° twist GB is characterized with a stacking faulted structure. More interesting, molecular dynamics simulations explored that both 30° tilt and twist GBs are highly mobile associated with collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations. This could be responsible for the formation of the strong basal texture and a significant number of 30° misorientation GBs in Mg alloy during grain growth. PMID:26891595

  15. Study on grain boundary character and strain distribution of intergranular cracking in the CGHAZ of T23 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Y.J.; Lu, H. Yu, C.; Xu, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Intergranular reheat cracking in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone of T23 steel was produced by strain to fracture tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermal–mechanical simulator. Then the grain boundary character, as well as the strain distribution after reheat crack propagation, was studied by electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results showed that incoherent Σ3 boundaries were seldom found on the prior austenite grain boundaries. Therefore, only the type of random high-angle boundaries played a crucial role in the intergranular cracking. Microstructurally cavities and small cracks were preferentially initiated from high-angle grain boundaries. Low-angle grain boundaries and high-angle ones with misorientation angles less than 15° were more resistant to the cracking. More importantly, the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries increased with the plastic strain induced by both temperature gradient and stress in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone, which contributed to the crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, the strain distributions in the vicinity of cavities and cracks revealed the accommodation processes of plastic deformation during stress relaxation. It also reflected the strength differences between grain interior and grain boundary at different heat-treated temperatures, which had a large influence on the cracking mechanism. - Highlights: • The coincidence site lattice boundaries play little role in the reheat cracking. • Cavity and crack occur at high-angle grain boundaries rather than low-angle ones. • The strain leads low-angle grain boundaries to transform to high-angle ones. • Strain distribution differs for cavity and crack zones at different temperatures.

  16. Twist1 Is Essential for Tooth Morphogenesis and Odontoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tian; Huang, Yanyu; Wang, Suzhen; Zhang, Hua; Dechow, Paul C; Wang, Xiaofang; Qin, Chunlin; Shi, Bing; D'Souza, Rena N; Lu, Yongbo

    2015-12-01

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix-containing transcription factor that is expressed in the dental mesenchyme during the early stages of tooth development. To better delineate its roles in tooth development, we generated Twist1 conditional knockout embryos (Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl)) by breeding Twist1 floxed mice (Twist1(fl/fl)) with Twist2-Cre recombinase knockin mice (Twist2(Cre) (/+)). The Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) embryos formed smaller tooth germs and abnormal cusps during early tooth morphogenesis. Molecular and histological analyses showed that the developing molars of the Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) embryos had reduced cell proliferation and expression of fibroblast growth factors 3, 4, 9, and 10 and FGF receptors 1 and 2 in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme. In addition, 3-week-old renal capsular transplants of embryonic day 18.5 Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) molars showed malformed crowns and cusps with defective crown dentin and enamel. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the implanted mutant molars had defects in odontoblast differentiation and delayed ameloblast differentiation. Furthermore, in vitro ChIP assays demonstrated that Twist1 was able to bind to a specific region of the Fgf10 promoter. In conclusion, our findings suggest that Twist1 plays crucial roles in regulating tooth development and that it may exert its functions through the FGF signaling pathway. PMID:26487719

  17. Wind-tunnel research comparing lateral control devices, particularly at high angles of attack VI : skewed ailerons on rectangular wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Harris, Thomas A

    1934-01-01

    This report covers the sixth of a series of investigations in which various lateral control devices are compared with particular reference to their effectiveness at high angles of attack. The present report deals with flap-type ailerons hinged about axes having an angle with respect to the leading and trailing edges of the wing. Tests were made on four different skewed ailerons, including two different angles of skew and two sizes of ailerons. At the high angles of attack, all the skewed ailerons tested were slightly inferior with respect to rolling and yawing moments to straight ailerons having the same span and average chord. Computations indicate that the skewed ailerons are also inferior with respect to hinge moments.

  18. Investigation of Model Wake Blockage Effects at High Angles of Attack in Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, Lih-Shyng; Chuang, Shu-Hao

    To improve the fidelity of measured aerodynamic characteristics at high angle of attack for modern jet fighters, this paper examines the model wake blockage effect. The wake blockage effect in a 2.2×3.1 m low-speed wind tunnel is investigated by analyzing drag and wall pressure measurements. Circular flat plates of different sizes are used to simulate a test model at high angles of attack. The present analysis results in simple formulas for corrections of model wake blockage effect. To verify the present correction formula, the NASA TP-1803 model is force-tested in the tunnel. The corrected test data agree well with the NASA TP-1803 data.

  19. Simultaneous investigation of magnetoresistance (MR) and twisted angle of twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Ju; Manzo, Julio; Kim, Kyung Ho; Park, Min; Baek, Seung Jae; Kholin, Dmitry; Lee, Min Woo; Choi, Eun Sang; Jeong, Dae Hong; Yurgens, August; Drndic, Maria; Johnson, Alan; Park, Yung Woo

    2013-03-01

    We have measured magnetoresistance (MR) and twisted angle of twisted bilayer graphene, simultaneously. Twisted angle was measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction experiment on SiNx substrate. We performed Raman spectroscopy experiment and observed enhanced G mode which results from double resonance scattering process near van Hove singularity (vHs). MR shows superposition of two Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) oscillations and is analyzed by Landau fan diagram.

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System

    PubMed Central

    Yin, R.; Tao, X. M.; Xu, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters. PMID:27079187

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, R.; Tao, X. M.; Xu, B. G.

    2016-04-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System.

    PubMed

    Yin, R; Tao, X M; Xu, B G

    2016-01-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters. PMID:27079187

  3. AEROX: Computer program for transonic aircraft aerodynamics to high angles of attack. Volume 1: Aerodynamic methods and program users' guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The AEROX program estimates lift, induced-drag and pitching moments to high angles (typ. 60 deg) for wings and for wingbody combinations with or without an aft horizontal tail. Minimum drag coefficients are not estimated, but may be input for inclusion in the total aerodynamic parameters which are output in listed and plotted formats. The theory, users' guide, test cases, and program listing are presented.

  4. Flutter Clearance of the F-18 High-angle-of-attack Research Vehicle with Experimental Wingtip Instrumentation Pods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    1989-01-01

    An F-18 aircraft was modified with wingtip instrumentation pods for use in NASA's high-angle-of-attack research program. Ground vibration and flight flutter testing were performed to clear an acceptable flight envelope for the aircraft. Flight test utilized atmospheric turbulence for structural excitation; the aircraft displayed no adverse aeroelastic trends within the envelope tested. The data presented in this report include mode shapes from the ground vibration and estimates of frequency and damping as a function of Mach number.

  5. Status of the validation of high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control margin design guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Wilson, R. J.; Lackey, James B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of results obtained to date in an ongoing cooperative research program between NASA and the U.S. Navy to develop design criteria for high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control for combat aircraft. A fundamental design consideration for aircraft incorporating relaxed static stability in pitch is the level of stability which achieves a proper balance between high-speed performance considerations and low-speed requirements for maneuvering at high angles of attack. A comprehensive data base of piloted simulation results was generated for parametric variations of critical parameters affecting nose-down control capability. The results showed a strong correlation of pilot rating to the short-term pitch response for nose-down commands applied at high-angle-of-attack conditions. Using these data, candidate design guidelines and flight demonstration requirements were defined. Full-scale flight testing to validate the research methodology and proposed guidelines is in progress, some preliminary results of which are reviewed.

  6. Status of the Validation of High-Angle-Of-Attack Nose-Down Pitch Control Margin Design Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Wilson, R. Joe; Lackey, James B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of results obtained to date in an ongoing cooperative research program between NASA and the U.S. Navy to develop design criteria for high-angle-of-attack nose- down pitch control for combat aircraft. A fundamental design consideration for aircraft incorporating relaxed static stability in pitch is the level of stability which achieves a proper balance between high- speed performance considerations and low-speed requirements for maneuvering at high angles of attack. A comprehensive data base of piloted simulation results was generated for parametric variations of critical parameters affecting nose-down control capability. The results showed a strong correlation of pilot rating to the short-term pitch response for nose-down commands applied at high- angle-of-attack conditions. Using these data, candidate design guidelines and flight demonstration requirements were defined. Full- scale flight testing to validate the research methodology and proposed guidelines is in progress, some preliminary results of which are reviewed.

  7. Deformed and twisted black holes with NUTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtouš, Pavel; Kubizňák, David; Frolov, Valeri P.; Kolář, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    We construct a new class of vacuum black hole solutions whose geometry is deformed and twisted by the presence of NUT charges. The solutions are obtained by ‘unspinning’ the general Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes, effectively switching off some of their rotation parameters. The resulting geometry has a structure of warped space with the Kerr-like Lorentzian part warped to a Euclidean metric of a deformed and/or twisted sphere, with the deformation and twist characterized by the ‘Euclidean NUT’ parameters. In the absence of NUTs, the solution reduces to a well known Kerr-(A)dS black hole with several rotations switched off. New geometries inherit the original symmetry of the Kerr-NUT-(A)dS family, namely, they possess the full Killing tower of hidden and explicit symmetries. As expected, for vanishing NUT, twist, and deformation parameters, the symmetry is further enlarged.

  8. New twisted intermetallic compound superconductor: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.; Brown, G. V.; Laurence, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Method for processing Nb3Sn and other intermetallic compound superconductors produces a twisted, stabilized wire or tube which can be used to wind electromagnetics, armatures, rotors, and field windings for motors and generators as well as other magnetic devices.

  9. Theory of twisted nonuniformly heated bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shorr, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    Nonlineary distributed stresses in twisted nonuniformly heated bars of arbitrary cross section are calculated taking into account various elasticity parameters. The approximate theory is shown to be sufficiently general and accurate by comparison with experimental data.

  10. Grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990--February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: Study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  11. Means for controlling aerodynamically induced twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A control mechanism which provides active compensation for aerodynamically induced twist deformation of high aspect ratio wings consists of a torque tube, internal to each wing and rigidly attached near the tip of each wing, which is moved by an actuator located in the aircraft fuselage. As changes in the aerodynamic loads on the wings occur the torque tube is rotated to compensate for the induced wing twist.

  12. Twisted Cucurbit[n]urils.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Qiu, Sheng-Chao; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Kai; Huang, Ying; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Yingjie; Li, Feng; Zhang, Yun-Qian; Xue, Sai-Feng; Zhu, Qian-Jiang; Tao, Zhu; Lindoy, Leonard F; Wei, Gang

    2016-08-19

    Two new twisted cucurbiturils, cucurbit[13]uril (tQ[13]) and cucurbit[15]uril (tQ[15]), have been synthesized and separated, and their structures have been confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry together with the X-ray structures of two new complexes, {Dy(H2O)4Cd(H2O)4tQ[13]}·2.5[CdCl4]·65H2O and {Cd0.5(H2O)2tQ[15]}·[CdCl4]·47H2O. tQ[15] is the largest cucurbit[n]uril (Q[n]) in the Q[n] family reported to date. The X-ray diffraction studies of both complexes indicated that these large tQ[n]s effectively exhibit two different cavities-a central cavity and two side cavities. Preliminary host-guest behavior by each of the new systems was investigated by NMR studies. PMID:27499014

  13. Bubble Divergences from Twisted Cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Smerlak, Matteo

    2012-06-01

    We consider a class of lattice topological field theories, among which are the weak-coupling limit of 2d Yang-Mills theory and 3d Riemannian quantum gravity, whose dynamical variables are flat discrete connections with compact structure group on a cell 2-complex. In these models, it is known that the path integral measure is ill-defined because of a phenomenon known as `bubble divergences'. In this paper, we extend recent results of the authors to the cases where these divergences cannot be understood in terms of cellular cohomology. We introduce in its place the relevant twisted cohomology, and use it to compute the divergence degree of the partition function. We also relate its dominant part to the Reidemeister torsion of the complex, thereby generalizing previous results of Barrett and Naish-Guzman. The main limitation to our approach is the presence of singularities in the representation variety of the fundamental group of the complex; we illustrate this issue in the well-known case of two-dimensional manifolds.

  14. Interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    There are few aspects of interstellar grains that can be unambiguously defined. Very little can be said that is independent of models or presuppositions; hence issues are raised and questions categorized, rather than providing definitive answers. The questions are issues fall into three general areas; the general physical and chemical nature of the grains; the processes by which they are formed and destroyed; and future observational approaches.

  15. Rheology of a Twist-bend Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salili, Seyyed Muhammad; Kim, Chanjoong; Sprunt, Samuel; Gleeson, James; Parri, Owain; Jakli, Antal; Kim Lab Team; Merck Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    First detailed flow shear alignment studies and rheological measurements in the twist-bend nematic (Ntb) liquid crystalline phase of odd numbered flexible dimer molecules is presented. It is found that the Ntb phase is strongly shear-thinning. At shear stresses below 1 Pa the apparent viscosity of the Ntb phase is 1000 times larger than in the nematic phase. At stresses above 10 Pa the Ntb viscosity drops by two orders of magnitude and the material exhibits Newtonian fluid behavior. The results are consistent with the behavior of a system with pseudo-layer structure with layer spacing determined by the heliconical pitch. From the measurements of dynamic modulus we estimate the compression modulus of the pseudo-layers to be B ~ 2 kPa this value is discussed within the context of a simple theoretical model based upon a coarse-grained elastic free energy. www.jakligroup.com.

  16. Fluctuation Modes of a Twist-Bend Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsouzi, Z.; Shamid, S. M.; Borshch, V.; Challa, P. K.; Baldwin, A. R.; Tamba, M. G.; Welch, C.; Mehl, G. H.; Gleeson, J. T.; Jakli, A.; Lavrentovich, O. D.; Allender, D. W.; Selinger, J. V.; Sprunt, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report a dynamic light-scattering study of the fluctuation modes in a thermotropic liquid crystalline mixture of monomer and dimer compounds that exhibits the twist-bend nematic (NTB ) phase. The results reveal a spectrum of overdamped fluctuations that includes two nonhydrodynamic modes and one hydrodynamic mode in the NTB phase, and a single nonhydrodynamic mode plus two hydrodynamic modes (the usual nematic optic axis or director fluctuations) in the higher temperature, uniaxial nematic phase. The properties of these fluctuations and the conditions for their observation are comprehensively explained by a Landau-de Gennes expansion of the free-energy density in terms of heliconical director and helical polarization fields that characterize the NTB structure, with the latter serving as the primary order parameter. A "coarse-graining" approximation simplifies the theoretical analysis and enables us to demonstrate quantitative agreement between the calculated and experimentally determined temperature dependence of the mode relaxation rates.

  17. Exotic Twisted Equivariant Cohomology of Loop Spaces, Twisted Bismut-Chern Character and T-Duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Mathai, Varghese

    2015-07-01

    We define exotic twisted - equivariant cohomology for the loop space LZ of a smooth manifold Z via the invariant differential forms on LZ with coefficients in the (typically non-flat) holonomy line bundle of a gerbe, with differential an equivariantly flat superconnection. We introduce the twisted Bismut-Chern character form, a loop space refinement of the twisted Chern character form in Bouwknegt et al. (Commun Math Phys 228:17-49, 2002) and Mathai and Stevenson (Commun Math Phys 236:161-186, 2003), which represents classes in the completed periodic exotic twisted -equivariant cohomology of LZ.We establish a localisation theorem for the completed periodic exotic twisted -equivariant cohomology for loop spaces and apply it to establish T-duality in a background flux in type II String Theory from a loop space perspective.

  18. A twist of insight - the role of Twist-family bHLH factors in development

    PubMed Central

    BARNES, RALSTON M.; FIRULLI, ANTHONY B.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Twist-family of bHLH proteins play a pivotal role in a number of essential developmental programs. Twist-family bHLH proteins function by dimerizing with other bHLH members and binding to cis- regulatory elements, called E-boxes. While Twist-family members may simply exhibit a preference in terms of high-affinity binding partners, a complex, multilevel cascade of regulation creates a dynamic role for these bHLH proteins. We summarize in this review information on each Twist-family member concerning expression pattern, function, regulation, downstream targets, and interactions with other bHLH proteins. Additionally, we focus on the phospho-regulatory mechanisms that tightly control posttranslational modification of Twist-family member bHLH proteins. PMID:19378251

  19. High angle of attack control law development for a free-flight wind tunnel model using direct eigenstructure assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, Thomas R.; Boland, Joseph R.; Hahne, David E.

    1991-01-01

    Flight-control laws are developed for a wind-tunnel aircraft model flying at a high angle of attack by using a synthesis technique called direct eigenstructure assignment. The method employs flight guidelines and control-power constraints to develop the control laws, and gain schedules and nonlinear feedback compensation provide a framework for considering the nonlinear nature of the attack angle. Linear and nonlinear evaluations show that the control laws are effective, a conclusion that is further confirmed by a scale model used for free-flight testing.

  20. Survey of needs and capabilities for wind tunnel testing of dynamic stability of aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlik-Ruckemann, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey was conducted relative to future requirements for dynamic stability information for such aerospace vehicles as the space shuttle and advanced high performance military aircraft. High-angle-of-attack and high-Reynolds number conditions were emphasized. A review was made of the wind-tunnel capabilities in North America for measuring dynamic stability derivatives, revealing an almost total lack of capabilities that could satisfy these requirements. Recommendations are made regarding equipment that should be constructed to remedy this situation. A description is given of some of the more advanced existing capabilities, which can be used to at least partly satisfy immediate demands.

  1. Grain boundary diffusion in olivine (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, K.; Dohmen, R.

    2013-12-01

    . Grain boundary diffusion perpendicular to the dislocation lines of the small angle grain boundaries proved to be about an order of magnitude faster than volume diffusion, whereas diffusion in high angle grain boundaries is several orders of magnitude faster. We will discuss the variation of element diffusion rates with grain boundary orientation and the temperature- and/or time-induced transition from one diffusion regime to the next regime. This is done using time series experiments and two-dimensional grain boundary diffusion simulations. Finally, we will debate the differences between our data and other data sets that result from different experimental setups, conditions and analyses.

  2. Method of fabricating a twisted composite superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Coles, W. D.; Laurence, J. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method of producing a twisted, stabilized wire or tube superconductor which can be used to wind electromagnets, armatures, rotors, field windings for motors and generators, and other magnetic devices which use a solenoid, toroidal, or other type winding is reported. At least one groove is formed along the length of a wire substrate which is then twisted into a helix and a layer of intermetallic superconducting material is formed in the groove. This layer can be formed by depositing the desired intermetallic compound into the groove or by diffusing one component of the superconductor into the groove formed in a substrate composed of the other component. The superconductor prepared by this method comprises a non-superconductor wire twisted into the shape of a helix, having at least one groove containing a layer of superconductor material along the length of the wire.

  3. Twist transition of nematic hyperbolic hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    James, Richard; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2014-04-01

    Stability of an idealized hyperbolic hedgehog in a nematic liquid crystal against a twist transition is investigated by extending the methodology of Rüdinger and Stark [Liq. Cryst. 26, 753 (1999)], where the hedgehog is confined between two concentric spheres. In the ideal hyperbolic-hedgehog the molecular orientation is assumed to rotate proportionally with respect to the inclination angle, θ (and in the opposite sense). However, when splay, k11, and bend, k33, moduli differ this proportionality is lost and the liquid crystal deforms relative to the ideal with bend and splay. Although slight, these deformations are shown to significantly shift the transition if k11/k33 is small. By increasing the degree of confinement the twist transition can be inhibited, a characteristic both hyperbolic and radial hedgehogs have in common. The twist transition of a hyperbolic defect that accompanies a particle is found to be well predicted by the earlier stability analysis of a thick shell. PMID:24827263

  4. Evaluation of High-Angle-of-Attack Handling Qualities for the X-31A Using Standard Evaluation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Bosworth, John T.

    1997-01-01

    The X-31A aircraft gross-acquisition and fine-tracking handling qualities have been evaluated using standard evaluation maneuvers developed by Wright Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base. The emphasis of the testing is in the angle-of-attack range between 30 deg. and 70 deg. Longitudinal gross-acquisition handling qualities results show borderline Level l/Level 2 performance. Lateral gross-acquisition testing results in Level l/Level 2 ratings below 45 deg. angle of attack, degrading into Level 3 as angle of attack increases. The fine tracking performance in both longitudinal and lateral axes also receives Level 1 ratings near 30 deg. angle of attack, with the ratings tending towards Level 3 at angles of attack greater than 50 deg. These ratings do not match the expectations from the extensive close-in combat testing where the X-31A aircraft demonstrated fair to good handling qualities maneuvering for high angles of attack. This paper presents the results of the high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight testing of the X-31A aircraft. Discussion of the preparation for the maneuvers, the pilot ratings, and selected pilot comments are included. Evaluation of the results is made in conjunction with existing Neal Smith, bandwidth, Smith-Geddes, and military specifications.

  5. Experimental study of effects of forebody geometry on high angle of attack static and dynamic stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, J. M.; Murri, D. G.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    A series of low-speed wind tunnel tests on a generic airplane model with a cylindrical fuselage were made to investigate the effects of forebody shape and fitness ratio, and fuselage/wing proximity on static and dynamic lateral/directional stability. In addition, some preliminary testing to determine the effectiveness of deflectable forebody strakes for high angle of attack yaw control was conducted. During the stability investigation, 11 forebodies were tested including three different cross-sectional shapes with fineness ratios of 2, 3, and 4. In addition, the wing was tested at two longitudinal positions to provide a substantial variation in forebody/wing proximity. Conventional force tests were conducted to determine static stability characteristics, and single-degree-of-freedom free-to-roll tests were conducted to study the wing rock characteristics of the model with the various forebodies. Flow visualization data were obtained to aid in the analysis of the complex flow phenomena involved. The results show that the forebody cross-sectional shape and fineness ratio and forebody/wing proximity can strongly affect both static and dynamic (roll) stability at high angles of attack. These characteristics result from the impact of these factors on forebody vortex development, the behavior of the vortices in sideslip, and their interaction with the wing flow field. Preliminary results from the deflectable strake investigation indicated that forebody flow control using this concept can provide very large yaw control moments at stall and post-stall angles of attack.

  6. Evaluation of High-Angle-of-Attack Handling Qualities for the X-31A Using Standard Evaluation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Bosworth, John T.

    1996-01-01

    The X-31A aircraft gross-acquisition and fine-tracking handling qualities have been evaluated using standard evaluation maneuvers developed by Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The emphasis of the testing is in the angle-of-attack range between 30 deg and 70 deg. Longitudinal gross-acquisition handling qualities results show borderline Level 1/Level 2 performance. Lateral gross-acquisition testing results in Level 1/Level 2 ratings below 45 deg angle of attack, degrading into Level 3 as angle of attack increases. The fine-tracking performance in both longitudinal and lateral axes also receives Level 1 ratings near 30 deg angle of attack, with the ratings tending towards Level 3 at angles of attack greater than 50 deg. These ratings do not match the expectations from the extensive close-in combat testing where the X-31A aircraft demonstrated fair to good handling qualities maneuvering for high angles of attack. This paper presents the results of the high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight testing of the X-31A aircraft. Discussion of the preparation for the maneuvers, the pilot ratings, and selected pilot comments are included. Evaluation of the results is made in conjunction with existing Neal-Smith, bandwidth, Smith-Geddes, and military specifications.

  7. Computerized simulation of grain boundary character in a superplastic aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    McNelley, T.R.; Perez-Prado, M.T.

    2000-07-01

    High-angle grain boundaries are generally deemed necessary for superplasticity in metals. In polycrystalline materials the grain boundary character must be described in terms of a probability distribution rather than by a single parameter, and little has been reported on the relationship between this distribution and fine-grain superplasticity. For aluminum alloys that exhibit continuous recrystallization the results of computer-aided electron backscatter diffraction analysis have shown that bimodal grain boundary disorientation distributions are present in as-processed material and persist during subsequent annealing. Such distributions may be simulated by computer methods based on a model of the microstructure which assumes that deformation banding occurs during deformation processing. High-angle boundaries ({ge} 30{degree}) develop in association with deformation banding while boundaries of lower disorientation (< 30{degree}) develop by dislocation reaction within the bands. Improved understanding of the grain boundary types associated with various microstructural transformation mechanisms will aid the design of processes to produce superplastic microstructures.

  8. Twisted bi-layer graphene: microscopic rainbows.

    PubMed

    Campos-Delgado, J; Algara-Siller, G; Santos, C N; Kaiser, U; Raskin, J-P

    2013-10-11

    Blue, pink, and yellow colorations appear from twisted bi-layer graphene (tBLG) when transferred to a SiO2 /Si substrate (SiO2 = 100 nm-thick). Raman and electron microscope studies reveal that these colorations appear for twist angles in the 9-15° range. Optical contrast simulations confirm that the observed colorations are related to the angle-dependent electronic properties of tBLG combined with the reflection that results from the layered structure tBLG/100 nm-thick SiO2 /Si. PMID:23606323

  9. Twist1-induced invadopodia formation promotes tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.; Lwin, Thinzar M.; Chang, Andrew T.; Kim, Jihoon; Danis, Etienne; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Yang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Twist1 transcription factor is known to promote tumor metastasis and induce Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Here, we report that Twist1 is capable of promoting the formation of invadopodia, specialized membrane protrusions for extracellular matrix degradation. Twist1 induces PDGFRα expression, which in turn activates Src, to promote invadopodia formation. We show that Twist1 and PDGFRα are central mediators of invadopodia formation in response to various EMT-inducing signals. Induction of PDGFRα and invadopodia is essential for Twist1 to promote tumor metastasis. Consistent with PDGFRα being a direct transcriptional target of Twist1, coexpression of Twist1 and PDGFRα predicts poor survival in breast tumor patients. Therefore, invadopodia-mediated matrix degradation is a key function of Twist1 in promoting tumor metastasis. PMID:21397860

  10. Chern-Weil Construction for Twisted K-Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomi, Kiyonori; Terashima, Yuji

    2010-10-01

    We give a finite-dimensional and geometric construction of a Chern character for twisted K-theory, introducing a notion of connection on a twisted vectorial bundle which can be considered as a finite-dimensional approximation of a twisted family of Fredholm operators. Our construction is applicable to the case of any classes giving the twisting, and agrees with the Chern character of bundle gerbe modules in the case of torsion classes.

  11. Grain Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Our fundamental knowledge of interstellar grain composition has grown substantially during the past two decades thanks to significant advances in two areas: astronomical infrared spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics. The opening of the mid-infrared, the spectral range from 4000-400 cm(sup -1) (2.5-25 microns), to spectroscopic study has been critical to this progress because spectroscopy in this region reveals more about a materials molecular composition and structure than any other physical property. Infrared spectra which are diagnostic of interstellar grain composition fall into two categories: absorption spectra of the dense and diffuse interstellar media, and emission spectra from UV-Vis rich dusty regions. The former will be presented in some detail, with the latter only very briefly mentioned. This paper summarized what we have learned from these spectra and presents 'doorway' references into the literature. Detailed reviews of many aspects of interstellar dust are given.

  12. Improvements to tilt rotor performance through passive blade twist control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1988-01-01

    A passive blade twist control is presented in which the twist distribution of a tilt rotor blade is elastically changed as a function of rotor speed. The elastic twist deformation is used to achieve two different blade twist distributions corresponding to the two rotor speeds used on conventional tilt rotors in hover and forward flight. By changing the blade twist distribution, the aerodynamic performance can be improved in both modes of flight. The concept presented obtains a change in twist distribution with extension-twist-coupled composite blade structure. This investigation first determines the linear twists which are optimum for each flight mode. Based on the optimum linear twist distributions, three extension-twist-coupled blade designs are developed using coupled-beam and laminate analyses integrated with an optimization analysis. The designs are optimized for maximum twist deformation subject to material strength limitations. The aerodynamic performances of the final designs are determined which show that the passive blade twist control concept is viable, and can enhance conventional tilt rotor performance.

  13. Scattering of twisted relativistic electrons by atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbo, V.; Ivanov, I. P.; Fritzsche, S.; Seipt, D.; Surzhykov, A.

    2015-07-01

    The Mott scattering of high-energetic twisted electrons by atoms is investigated within the framework of the first Born approximation and Dirac's relativistic equation. Special emphasis is placed on the angular distribution and longitudinal polarization of the scattered electrons. In order to evaluate these angular and polarization properties we consider two experimental setups in which the twisted electron beam collides with either a single well-localized atom or macroscopic atomic target. Detailed relativistic calculations have been performed for both setups and for the electrons with kinetic energy from 10 to 1000 keV. The results of these calculations indicate that the emission pattern and polarization of outgoing electrons differ significantly from the scattering of plane-wave electrons and can be very sensitive to the parameters of the incident twisted beam. In particular, it is shown that the angular- and polarization-sensitive Mott measurements may reveal valuable information about both the transverse and longitudinal components of the linear momentum and the projection of the total angular momentum of twisted electron states. Thus, the Mott scattering emerges as a diagnostic tool for the relativistic vortex beams.

  14. Self-Portraits with a Twist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarco, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art activity on self-portraiture inspired by artist Tim Hawkinson. Hawkinson created a sculpture titled "Emoter" in which his face, moved by motors, twisted and contorted based on random signals from a TV. This art activity incorporates technology into the art room, brings the work of practicing artists alive, and is a…

  15. Supramolecular sensing: Enzyme activity with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabilino, David B.

    2015-04-01

    A supramolecular polymer comprising stacked artificial chromophores to which zinc(II) complexes are appended is able to respond to enzymatic hydrolysis in aqueous solution. The assembly of molecules can twist reversibly and quickly in response to changes in the type of adenosine phosphate present.

  16. Twisted Cyclic Cohomology and Modular Fredholm Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Adam; Sitarz, Andrzej; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-07-01

    Connes and Cuntz showed in [Comm. Math. Phys. 114 (1988), 515-526] that suitable cyclic cocycles can be represented as Chern characters of finitely summable semifinite Fredholm modules. We show an analogous result in twisted cyclic cohomology using Chern characters of modular Fredholm modules. We present examples of modular Fredholm modules arising from Podleś spheres and from SUq(2).

  17. Twisted Pair Of Insulated Wires Senses Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.; Stephens, James B.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of electronic moisture sensor to low levels of moisture increased by new electrode configuration. Moisture-sensing circuit described in "Low-Cost Humidity Sensor" (NPO-16544). New twisted pair of wires takes place of flat-plate capacitor in circuit. Configuration allows for thermal expansion and contraction of polymer while maintaining nearly constant area of contact between polymer and wires.

  18. The Physics of Somersaulting and Twisting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1980-01-01

    This is a discussion of the conservation of angular momentum of the human body engaged in somersaults and twists. The principle is also applied to a cat turning over in midair. The events occur in the absence of torques. Application of the maneuvers are suggested for astronauts. (SA)

  19. Structural Dependence of Grain Boundary Resistivity in Copper Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Kenik, Edward A; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Li, An-Ping; Meyer III, Harry M; Nicholson, Don M; Radhakrishnan, Bala; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2011-01-01

    We report the direct measurement of individual grain boundary (GB) resistances and the critical role of GB structure in the increased resistivity in copper nanowires. By measuring both intra- and inter-grain resistance with a four-probe scanning tunneling microscope, large resistance jumps are revealed owing to successive scattering across high-angle random GBs, while the resistance changes at twin and other coincidence boundaries are negligibly small. The impurity distributions in the nanowires are characterized in correlating to the microstructures. The resistance of high symmetry coincidence GBs and the impurity contributions are then calculated using a first-principle method which confirms that the coincidence GBs have orders of magnitude smaller resistance than the high-angle random GBs.

  20. Experimental study of the effects of Reynolds number on high angle of attack aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies during rotary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, H.; Ralston, J.; Dickes, E.

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Defense Research Agency (United Kingdom) have ongoing experimental research programs in rotary-flow aerodynamics. A cooperative effort between the two agencies is currently underway to collect an extensive database for the development of high angle of attack computational methods to predict the effects of Reynolds number on the forebody flowfield at dynamic conditions, as well as to study the use of low Reynolds number data for the evaluation of high Reynolds number characteristics. Rotary balance experiments, including force and moment and surface pressure measurements, were conducted on circular and rectangular aftbodies with hemispherical and ogive noses at the Bedford and Farnborough wind tunnel facilities in the United Kingdom. The bodies were tested at 60 and 90 deg angle of attack for a wide range of Reynolds numbers in order to observe the effects of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow separation on the forebody characteristics when rolling about the velocity vector.

  1. In-flight flow visualization characteristics of the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Delfrate, John H.; Richwine, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface and off-surface flow visualization techniques were used to visualize the 3-D separated flows on the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack. Results near the alpha = 25 to 26 deg and alpha = 45 to 49 deg are presented. Both the forebody and leading edge extension (LEX) vortex cores and breakdown locations were visualized using smoke. Forebody and LEX vortex separation lines on the surface were defined using an emitted fluid technique. A laminar separation bubble was also detected on the nose cone using the emitted fluid technique and was similar to that observed in the wind tunnel test, but not as extensive. Regions of attached, separated, and vortical flow were noted on the wing and the leading edge flap using tufts and flow cones, and compared well with limited wind tunnel results.

  2. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jack Y.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed. PMID:26206489

  3. A study of prediction methods for the high angle-of-attack aerodynamics of straight wings and fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, O. J.; Mendenhall, M. R.; Perkins, S. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Work is described dealing with two areas which are dominated by the nonlinear effects of vortex flows. The first area concerns the stall/spin characteristics of a general aviation wing with a modified leading edge. The second area concerns the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of high performance military aircraft. For each area, the governing phenomena are described as identified with the aid of existing experimental data. Existing analytical methods are reviewed, and the most promising method for each area used to perform some preliminary calculations. Based on these results, the strengths and weaknesses of the methods are defined, and research programs recommended to improve the methods as a result of better understanding of the flow mechanisms involved.

  4. Operator constraints for twist-3 functions and Lorentz invariance properties of twist-3 observables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanazawa, Koichi; Pitonyak, Daniel; Koike, Yuji; Metz, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the behavior under Lorentz transformations of perturbative coefficient functions in a collinear twist-3 formalism relevant for high-energy observables including transverse polarization of hadrons. We argue that those perturbative coefficient functions can, a priori, acquire quite different yet Lorentz-invariant forms in various frames. This somewhat surprising difference can be traced back to a general dependence of the perturbative coefficient functions on light cone vectors which are introduced by the twist-3 factorization formulas and which are frame-dependent. One can remove this spurious frame dependence by invoking so-called Lorentz invariance relations (LIRs) between twist-3 parton correlation functions. Some of those relationsmore » for twist-3 distribution functions were discussed in the literature before. In this paper we derive the corresponding LIRs for twist-3 fragmentation functions. We explicitly demonstrate that these LIRs remove the light cone vector dependence by considering transverse spin observables in the single-inclusive production of hadrons in lepton-nucleon collisions, ℓN→hX. Furthermore, with the LIRs in hand, we also show that twist-3 observables in general can be written solely in terms of three-parton correlation functions.« less

  5. Operator constraints for twist-3 functions and Lorentz invariance properties of twist-3 observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Koichi; Koike, Yuji; Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schlegel, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the behavior under Lorentz transformations of perturbative coefficient functions in a collinear twist-3 formalism relevant for high-energy observables including transverse polarization of hadrons. We argue that those perturbative coefficient functions can, a priori, acquire quite different yet Lorentz-invariant forms in various frames. This somewhat surprising difference can be traced back to a general dependence of the perturbative coefficient functions on light cone vectors which are introduced by the twist-3 factorization formulas and which are frame-dependent. One can remove this spurious frame dependence by invoking so-called Lorentz invariance relations (LIRs) between twist-3 parton correlation functions. Some of those relations for twist-3 distribution functions were discussed in the literature before. In this paper we derive the corresponding LIRs for twist-3 fragmentation functions. We explicitly demonstrate that these LIRs remove the light cone vector dependence by considering transverse spin observables in the single-inclusive production of hadrons in lepton-nucleon collisions, ℓN →h X . With the LIRs in hand, we also show that twist-3 observables in general can be written solely in terms of three-parton correlation functions.

  6. Interstellar grains within interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst K.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    Five interstellar graphite spherules extracted from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite are studied. The isotopic and elemental compositions of individual particles are investigated with the help of an ion microprobe, and this analysis is augmented with structural studies of ultrathin sections of the grain interiors by transmission electron microscopy. As a result, the following procedure for the formation of the interstellar graphite spherule bearing TiC crystals is inferred: (1) high-temperature nucleation and rapid growth of the graphitic carbon spherule in the atmosphere of a carbon-rich star, (2) nucleation and growth of TiC crystals during continued growth of the graphitic spherule and the accretion of TiC onto the spherule, (3) quenching of the graphite growth process by depletion of C or by isolation of the spherule before other grain types could condense.

  7. Torque correlation length and stochastic twist dynamics of DNA.

    PubMed

    Banigan, Edward J; Marko, John F

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a short correlation length for torque in twisting-stiff biomolecules, which is necessary for the physical property that torque fluctuations be finite in amplitude. We develop a nonequilibrium theory of dynamics of DNA twisting which predicts two crossover time scales for temporal torque correlations in single-molecule experiments. Bending fluctuations can be included, and at linear order we find that they do not affect the twist dynamics. However, twist fluctuations affect bending, and we predict the spatial inhomogeneity of twist, torque, and buckling arising in nonequilibrium "rotor-bead" experiments. PMID:25019813

  8. The Strength-Grain Size Relationship in Ultrafine-Grained Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, N.; Langdon, Terence G.

    2016-04-01

    Metals processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) techniques, such as equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) and high-pressure torsion (HPT), generally have submicrometer grain sizes. Consequently, they exhibit high strength as expected on the basis of the Hall-Petch (H-P) relationship. Examples of this behavior are discussed using experimental data for Ti, Al, and Ni. These materials typically have grain sizes greater than ~50 nm where softening is not expected. An increase in strength is usually accompanied by a decrease in ductility. However, both high strength and high ductility may be achieved simultaneously by imposing high strain to obtain ultrafine-grain sizes and high fractions of high-angle grain boundaries. This facilitates grain boundary sliding, and an example is presented for a cast Al-7 pct Si alloy processed by HPT. In some materials, SPD may result in a weakening even with a very fine grain size, and this is due to microstructural changes during processing. Examples are presented for an Al-7034 alloy processed by ECAP and a Zn-22 pct Al alloy processed by HPT. In some SPD-processed materials, it is possible that grain boundary segregation and other features are present leading to higher strengths than predicted by the H-P relationship.

  9. The prediction of pressure distributions on an arrow-wing configuration including the effect of camber, twist, and a wing fin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, P. J.; Manro, M. E.; Kulfan, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of an arrow wing body configuration consisting of flat, twisted, and cambered twisted wings were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 2.50 to provide an experimental data base for comparison with theoretical methods. A variety of leading and trailing edge control surface deflections were included in these tests, and in addition, the cambered twisted wing was tested with an outboard vertical fin to determine its effect on wing and control surface loads. Theory experiment comparisons show that current state of the art linear and nonlinear attached flow methods were adequate at small angles of attack typical of cruise conditions. The incremental effects of outboard fin, wing twist, and wing camber are most accurately predicted by the advanced panel method PANAIR. Results of the advanced panel separated flow method, obtained with an early version of the program, show promise that accurate detailed pressure predictions may soon be possible for an aeroelasticity deformed wing at high angles of attack.

  10. Twisted, multifilament Nb3Sn superconductive ribbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of superconductor stabilization has resulted in the successful application of the concepts of filamentary structure and conductor twist to Nb3Sn ribbon. The Nb3Sn is formed in parallel, helical paths, which are continuous around the ribbon. Short lengths (12-18cm) of 1.27 cm wide superconductive ribbon were produced. The filamentary and twist characteristics are incorporated in the ribbon by means of an inert mask formed on the ribbon surface early in the fabrication process. Diffusion reaction of the niobium and tin is prevented at the filament boundaries. Described are the conductor methods of fabrication, and test results obtained. The technology required to adapt the processes for the production of long lengths of ribbon is available.

  11. TWISTING, RECONNECTING MAGNETOSPHERES AND MAGNETAR SPINDOWN

    SciTech Connect

    Parfrey, Kyle; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hui, Lam

    2012-07-20

    We present the first simulations of evolving, strongly twisted magnetar magnetospheres. Slow shearing of the magnetar crust is seen to lead to a series of magnetospheric expansion and reconnection events, corresponding to X-ray flares and bursts. The axisymmetric simulations include rotation of the neutron star and the magnetic wind through the light cylinder. We study how the increasing twist affects the spindown rate of the star, finding that a dramatic increase in spindown occurs. Particularly spectacular are explosive events caused by the sudden opening of large amounts of overtwisted magnetic flux, which may be associated with the observed giant flares. These events are accompanied by a short period of ultrastrong spindown, resulting in an abrupt increase in spin period, such as was observed in the giant flare of SGR 1900+14.

  12. Terahertz conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xingquan; Shang, Jingzhi; Leaw, Jianing; Luo, Zhiqiang; Luo, Liyan; La-o-Vorakiat, Chan; Cheng, Liang; Cheong, S A; Su, Haibin; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yanpeng; Loh, Kian Ping; Castro Neto, A H; Yu, Ting; Chia, Elbert E M

    2013-02-01

    Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the real part of optical conductivity [σ(1)(ω)] of twisted bilayer graphene was obtained at different temperatures (10-300 K) in the frequency range 0.3-3 THz. On top of a Drude-like response, we see a strong peak in σ(1)(ω) at ~2.7 THz. We analyze the overall Drude-like response using a disorder-dependent (unitary scattering) model, then attribute the peak at 2.7 THz to an enhanced density of states at that energy, which is caused by the presence of a van Hove singularity arising from a commensurate twisting of the two graphene layers. PMID:23432306

  13. A Pentacene with a 144 Twist

    SciTech Connect

    Lu,J.; Ho, D.; Vogelaar, N.; Krami, C.; Pascal, R.

    2004-01-01

    9, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22-Hexaphenyltetrabenzo[a, c, l, n]pentacene (1) was prepared by the reaction of 1, 3-diphenylphenanthro[9, 10-c]furan with the bisaryne equivalent generated from 1, 2, 4, 5-tetrabromo-3, 6-diphenylbenzene in the presence of n-butyllithium, followed by deoxygenation of the double adduct with low-valent titanium. The X-ray structure of 1 shows it to be the most highly twisted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon known, with an end-to-end twist of 143.6 degrees. Compound 1 was resolved by chromatography on a chiral support, and the pure enantiomers have specific rotations in excess of 7000 degrees, but the molecule racemizes slowly at 25 C (t{sub 1/2} = 9.3 h, {Delta}G{sup {double_dagger}}{sub rac} = 23.8 kcal/mol).

  14. Characterization of Creep-Damaged Grain Boundaries of Alloy 617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Field, David P.

    2013-11-01

    Intergranular cracking and void nucleation occur over extended periods of time in alloy 617 when subjected to stress at high temperatures. Damage occurs inhomogeneously with some boundaries suffering failure, while others are seemingly immune to creep. Crack propagation associated with grain size, and grain boundary character was investigated to determine which types of grain boundaries are susceptible to damage and which are more resistant. Electron backscatter diffraction and a stereological approach to obtain the five-parameter grain boundary distribution were used to measure the proportions of each type of boundary in the initial and damaged structures. The samples were crept at 1273.15 K (1000 °C) at 25 MPa until fracture. It was found that in addition to low-angle and coherent twin boundaries, other low index boundary plane grain boundaries with twist character are relatively resistant to creep.

  15. Ferromagnetic nanoparticles suspensions in twisted nematic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cîrtoaje, Cristina; Petrescu, Emil; Stan, Cristina; Creangă, Dorina

    2016-05-01

    Ferromagnetic nanoparticles insertions in nematic liquid crystals (NLC) in twisted configuration are studied and a theoretical model is proposed to explain the results. Experimental observation revealed that nanoparticles tend to overcrowd in long strings parallel to the rubbing direction of the alignment substrate of the LC cell. Their behavior under external field was studied and their interaction with their nematic host is described using elastic continuum theory.

  16. TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Vörös, Zoltán; Narita, Yasuhito; Bruno, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic flux tubes in the solar wind can be twisted as they are transported from the solar surface, where the tubes are twisted due to photospheric motions. It is suggested that the twisted magnetic tubes can be detected as the variation of total (thermal+magnetic) pressure during their passage through the observing satellite. We show that the total pressure of several observed twisted tubes resembles the theoretically expected profile. The twist of the isolated magnetic tube may explain the observed abrupt changes of magnetic field direction at tube walls. We have also found some evidence that the flux tube walls can be associated with local heating of the plasma and elevated proton and electron temperatures. For the tubes aligned with the Parker spiral, the twist angle can be estimated from the change of magnetic field direction. Stability analysis of twisted tubes shows that the critical twist angle of the tube with a homogeneous twist is 70°, but the angle can further decrease due to the motion of the tube with respect to the solar wind stream. The tubes with a stronger twist are unstable to the kink instability, therefore they probably cannot reach 1 AU.

  17. Twisted bilayer graphene with interlayer potential asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Pilkyung; Son, Young-Woo; Koshino, Mikito

    A twisted stack of two graphene layers (twisted bilayer graphene) exhibits an extremely long potential period arising from the moiré interference between the layers. We investigate the band structure and optical absorption spectrum of twisted bilayer graphenes with changing interlayer bias and Fermi energy simultaneously. We show that the interlayer bias lifts the degeneracy of the superlattice Dirac point, while the amount of the Dirac point shift is significantly suppressed in small rotation angles, and even becomes opposite to the applied bias, by the interlayer interaction. In addition, we show that the spectroscopic features are highly sensitive to the interlayer bias and the Fermi energy, and widely tunable by the external field effect. P.M. acknowledges the support of NYU Shanghai and the NYU-ECNU Institute of Physics at NYU Shanghai. Y.-W.S. was supported by the NRF of Korea grant funded by the MSIP. M.K. was funded by JSPS Grantin-Aid for Scientific Research.

  18. Twist transition of nematic hyperbolic hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Richard; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2014-04-01

    Stability of an idealized hyperbolic hedgehog in a nematic liquid crystal against a twist transition is investigated by extending the methodology of Rüdinger and Stark [Liq. Cryst. 26, 753 (1999), 10.1080/026782999204840], where the hedgehog is confined between two concentric spheres. In the ideal hyperbolic-hedgehog the molecular orientation is assumed to rotate proportionally with respect to the inclination angle, θ (and in the opposite sense). However, when splay, k11, and bend, k33, moduli differ this proportionality is lost and the liquid crystal deforms relative to the ideal with bend and splay. Although slight, these deformations are shown to significantly shift the transition if k11/k33 is small. By increasing the degree of confinement the twist transition can be inhibited, a characteristic both hyperbolic and radial hedgehogs have in common. The twist transition of a hyperbolic defect that accompanies a particle is found to be well predicted by the earlier stability analysis of a thick shell.

  19. Significance of Heterogeneous Twist2 Expression in Human Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yubin; Zhang, Nini; Xu, Jinfei; Ding, Zhijie; Zong, Rongrong; Liu, Zuguo

    2012-01-01

    Background Twist2 (Dermo1) has been shown to mediate the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to promote tumor invasion and even metastasis. However, the involvement of EMT in breast cancer progression is highly debated, partially due to clinical observations showing that the majority of human breast carcinoma metastases express E-cadherin and maintain their epithelial morphology. The molecular mechanism by which Twist2 participates in EMT of breast cancer in vivo remains poorly understood. Methods We examined Twist2 expression pattern in human breast carcinomas by western blot and tissue microarray, and analyzed Twist2 cellular localization by confocal microscopy, cell fractionation and other approaches. Results Twist2 expression was significantly increased in breast cancer. Cytoplasmic Twist2 positive cancer cells expressing E-cadherin on the cellular membrane were mainly located at tumor center of primary carcinomas and lymph metastases, while cancer cells with nuclear Twist2 clearly showed loss of E-cadherin and were detected at the invasive front in ductal breast carcinomas. In addition, ectopically stable-expressed Twist2 was found to localize in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Collectively, these data indicate that upregulation of cytoplasmic Twist2 is correlated with tumor histological type and tumor metastasis in human breast cancers. Conclusion The differential cellular distribution of Twist2 may be associated with tumor progression. The cytoplasmic Twist2 in cancer cells at tumor center of primary carcinomas and lymph metastases contributes to the maintenance of epithelial cancer characteristics expressing E-cadherin in a noninvasive state, while the nuclear Twist2 at the cancer invasion front activates EMT to deprive epithelial property of neoplastic cells, thus facilitating invasion and metastasis. These findings suggest that heterogeneous expression of Twist2 in tumors may have a functional link to tumor progression. PMID:23133563

  20. High-angle reverse faulting in northern New Brunswick, Canada, and its implications for fluid pressure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    The 1982 Miramichi earthquake sequence in northern New Brunswick included four shocks in the magnitude range, 5.7 > m, > 5.0, and extensive aftershock activity. Rupturing occurred within granitic terrain on a pair of NNE—SSW-striking, opposite-facing, high-angle reverse faults which converge at the mainshock focal depth of ≈7 km. It seems probable that the earthquake sequence involved the reactivation under horizontal compression of an existing set of steep normal faults, perhaps derived from Mesozoic rifting of the Atlantic continental margin. The symmetry of the V-shaped profile of faults in WNW—ESE section suggests that the maximum principal compressive stress (σ 1) during reactivation was subhorizontal and the least principal stress (σ 3) was subvertical, so that the reactivation angle between σ 1 and the faults corresponded to the 50-65° dip of the faults. Stress analysis of the conditions for frictional reactivation of existing cohesionless faults shows that pore-fluid pressures approaching or exceeding lithostatic values are required for reshear at such high reactivation angles, with the implication that the earthquake sequence was triggered by locally elevated fluid pressure. While the source and composition of the inferred high pressure fluids are uncertain, a mixed H 2O—CO 2 fluid of mantle origin seems most likely.

  1. Experimental Investigations of the Initial Growth of Flow Asymmetries over a Slender Body of Revolution at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yiding; Yuan, Huijing; Lee, Cunbiao

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the initial growth of flow asymmetries over a slender body of revolution at high angles of attack with natural and disturbed noses. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to investigate the flow field around the body. The experimental results show that initially different amplitudes of unsteady disturbances near the tip are established owing to the tip imperfections. These unsteady disturbances experience a super-exponential growth near the tip and continue to grow exponentially due to linear instabilities. Attachment of a piece to the tip brings a larger initial difference and extends the super-exponential growth region. Thus, the disturbance amplitudes and their differences are larger for the disturbed case than for the natural case before reaching the neutral point of linear instability. The amplified disturbances lead to different instability vortex strengths in the separated shear layers, which feed continuously into the two primary concentrated vortices. As a result, the primary vortex strengths differ which result in the initial vortex asymmetry. The experiment results demonstrate that the initial flow asymmetry arises from an asymmetric development of the boundary layer instability.

  2. In-flight flow visualization results from the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, John H.; Saltzman, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques were used on the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack to study the vortical flow off the forebody and the surface flow on the wing and tail. The forebody vortex system was studied because asymmetries in the vortex system were suspected of inducing uncommanded yawing moments at zero sideslip. Smoke enabled visualization of the vortex system and correlation of its orientation with flight yawing moment data. Good agreement was found between vortex system asymmetries and the occurrence of yawing moments. Surface flow on the forward-swept wing of the X-29A was studied using tufts and flow cones. As angle of attack increased, separated flow initiated at the root and spread outboard encompassing the full wing by 30 deg angle of attack. In general, the progression of the separated flow correlated well with subscale model lift data. Surface flow on the vertical tail was also studied using tufts and flow cones. As angle of attack increased, separated flow initiated at the root and spread upward. The area of separated flow on the vertical tail at angles of attack greater than 20 deg correlated well with the marked decrease in aircraft directional stability.

  3. PIV-based estimation of unsteady loads on a flat plate at high angle of attack using momentum equation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guissart, Amandine; Bernal, Luis; Dimitriadis, Gregorios; Terrapon, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    The direct measurement of loads with force balance can become challenging when the forces are small or when the body is moving. An alternative is the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) velocity fields to indirectly obtain the aerodynamic coefficients. This can be done by the use of control volume approaches which lead to the integration of velocities, and other fields deriving from them, on a contour surrounding the studied body and its supporting surface. This work exposes and discusses results obtained with two different methods: the direct use of the integral formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations and the so-called Noca's method. The latter is a reformulation of the integral Navier-Stokes equations in order to get rid of the pressure. Results obtained using the two methods are compared and the influence of different parameters is discussed. The methods are applied to PIV data obtained from water channel testing for the flow around a 16:1 plate. Two cases are considered: a static plate at high angle of attack and a large amplitude imposed pitching motion. Two-dimensional PIV velocity fields are used to compute the aerodynamic forces. Direct measurements of dynamic loads are also carried out in order to assess the quality of the indirectly calculated coefficients.

  4. Experimental investigations of the initial growth of flow asymmetries over a slender body of revolution at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yiding; Yuan, Huijing; Lee, Cunbiao

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the initial growth of flow asymmetries over a slender body of revolution at high angles of attack with natural and disturbed noses. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry was used to investigate the flow field around the body. The experimental results show that initially different amplitudes of unsteady disturbances near the tip are established owing to the tip imperfections. These unsteady disturbances experience a super-exponential growth near the tip and continue to grow exponentially due to linear instabilities. Attachment of a piece to the tip brings a larger initial difference and extends the super-exponential growth region. Thus, the disturbance amplitudes and their differences are larger for the disturbed case than for the natural case before reaching the neutral point of linear instability. The amplified disturbances lead to different instability vortex strengths in the separated shear layers, which feed continuously into the two primary concentrated vortices. As a result, the primary vortex strengths differ, which result in the initial vortex asymmetry. The experiment results demonstrate that the initial flow asymmetry arises from an asymmetric development of the boundary layer instability.

  5. High angle-of-attack aerodynamics of a strake-canard-wing V/STOL fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, D. A.; Schreiner, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    High angle-of-attack aerodynamic data are analyzed for a strake-canard-wing V/STOL fighter configuration. The configuration represents a twin-engine supersonic V/STOL fighter aircraft which uses four longitudinal thrust-augmenting ejectors to provide vertical lift. The data were obtained in tests of a 9.39 percent scale model of the configuration in the NASA Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel, at a Mach number of 0.2. Trimmed aerodynamic characteristics, longitudinal control power, longitudinal and lateral/directional stability, and effects of alternate strake and canard configurations are analyzed. The configuration could not be trimmed (power-off) above 12 deg angle of attack because of the limited pitch control power and the high degree of longitudinal instability (28 percent) at this Mach number. Aerodynamic center location was found to be controllable by varying strake size and canard location without significantly affecting lift and drag. These configuration variations had relatively little effect on the lateral/directional stability up to 10 deg angle of attack.

  6. Numerical simulation by TVD schemes of complex shock reflections from airfoils at high angle of attack. [Total Variation Diminishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Young J.; Yee, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    The shock-capturing capability of total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes is demonstrated for a more realistic complex shock-diffraction problem for which the experimental data are available. Second-order explicit upwind and symmetric TVD schemes are used to solve the time-dependent Euler equations of gas dynamics for the interaction of a blast wave with an airfoil at high angle-of-attack. The test cases considered are a time-dependent moving curved-shock wave and a contant moving planar-shock wave impinging at an angle-of-attack 30 deg on a NACA 0018 airfoil. Good agreement is obtained between isopycnic contours computed by the TVD schemes and those from experimental interferograms. No drastic difference in flow-field structure is found between the curved- and planar-shock wave cases, except for a difference in density level near the lower surface of the airfoil. Computation for cases with higher shock Mach numbers is also possible. Numerical experiments show that the symmetric TVD scheme is less sensitive to the boundary conditions treatment than the upwind scheme.

  7. Design optimization for active twist rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Ji Won

    This dissertation introduces the process of optimizing active twist rotor blades in the presence of embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. Optimum design of active twist blades is a complex task, since it involves a rich design space with tightly coupled design variables. The study presents the development of an optimization framework for active helicopter rotor blade cross-sectional design. This optimization framework allows for exploring a rich and highly nonlinear design space in order to optimize the active twist rotor blades. Different analytical components are combined in the framework: cross-sectional analysis (UM/VABS), an automated mesh generator, a beam solver (DYMORE), a three-dimensional local strain recovery module, and a gradient based optimizer within MATLAB. Through the mathematical optimization problem, the static twist actuation performance of a blade is maximized while satisfying a series of blade constraints. These constraints are associated with locations of the center of gravity and elastic axis, blade mass per unit span, fundamental rotating blade frequencies, and the blade strength based on local three-dimensional strain fields under worst loading conditions. Through pre-processing, limitations of the proposed process have been studied. When limitations were detected, resolution strategies were proposed. These include mesh overlapping, element distortion, trailing edge tab modeling, electrode modeling and foam implementation of the mesh generator, and the initial point sensibility of the current optimization scheme. Examples demonstrate the effectiveness of this process. Optimization studies were performed on the NASA/Army/MIT ATR blade case. Even though that design was built and shown significant impact in vibration reduction, the proposed optimization process showed that the design could be improved significantly. The second example, based on a model scale of the AH-64D Apache blade, emphasized the capability of this framework to

  8. Low-speed wind-tunnel study of the high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a cranked-arrow-wing fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafton, S. B.

    1984-01-01

    The low-speed, high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a fighter configuration incorporating a cranked arrow wing were investigated in the Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel as part of a NASA/General Dynamics cooperative research program to investigate the application of advanced wing designs to combat aircraft. Tests were conducted on a baseline configuration and on several modified configurations. The results show that the baseline configuration exhibited a high level of maximum lift but displayed undesirable longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics at high angles of attack. Various wing modifications were made which improved the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics of the configuration at high angles of attack. However, most of the modifications were detrimental to maximum lift.

  9. Modeling and Characterization of Texture Evolution in Twist Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, Marat I.; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Beygelzimer, Yan; Prilepo, Denis; Gusar, Yuri; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-03-01

    Twist extrusion (TE) is a severe plastic deformation method with a potential for commercialization. Deformation during the TE process is non-uniform and non-monotonic, which is expected to result in significant and non-trivial microstructural changes in metallic materials. In this study, texture evolution during TE of pre-textured copper was investigated. Experimental characterization of textures after various numbers of passes demonstrated that TE can be used for producing uniformly weak textures in pre-textured copper. Crystal plasticity simulations were found to run into the problem known as strain reversal texture. In particular, crystal plasticity simulations predicted the return of initial texture upon strain reversal in the first pass of TE, whereas the experimental texture was not reversed and had components related to simple shear. Grain refinement, imperfect strain reversal, and material asymmetry are proposed to be responsible for the occurrence of strain reversal texture in TE. Effects of the non-random initial texture on the microstructure and texture evolution are also discussed.

  10. Thermally induced twist in graphite-epoxy tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Rousseau, C. Q.; Tompkins, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses an analytical and experimental study to investigate the thermally induced twist in laminated angle-ply graphite-epoxy tubes. Attention is focused on balanced laminates which, contrary to intuition, exhibit twist when the temperature is changed. The twisting is due to the fact that a lamina with ( a + phi) orientation and a lamina with (a - phi) orientation must be at slightly different radial positions in the twist. The lamina with the greater radial position determines the sense of the twist. Classical lamination theory does not predict this phenomenon, and so as more sophisticated theory must be employed. This paper outlines such as theory, which is based on an generalized plane-deformation elasticity analysis, and presents experimental data to confirm the predictions of the theory. A brief description of the experimental apparatus and procedure used to measure twist is presented.

  11. Measuring mechanical strain and twist using helical photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaoming; Wong, Gordon K L; Weiss, Thomas; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-15

    Solid-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a permanent helical twist exhibits dips in its transmission spectrum at certain wavelengths. These are associated with the formation of orbital angular momentum states in the cladding. Here we investigate the tuning of these states with mechanical torque and axial tension. The dip wavelengths are found to scale linearly with both axial strain and mechanical twist rate. Analysis shows that the tension-induced shift in resonance wavelength is determined both by the photoelastic effect and by the change in twist rate, while the torsion-induced wavelength shift depends only on the change in twist rate. Twisted PCF can act as an effective optically monitored torque-tension transducer, twist sensor, or strain gauge. PMID:24322268

  12. Twisted rudder for reducing fuel-oil consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hun; Choi, Jung-Eun; Choi, Bong-Jun; Chung, Seok-Ho

    2014-09-01

    Three twisted rudders fit for large container ships have been developed; 1) the Z-twisted rudder that is an asymmetry type taking into consideration incoming flow angles of the propeller slipstream, 2) the ZB-twisted rudder with a rudder bulb added onto the Z-twisted rudder, and 3) the ZB-F twisted rudder with a rudder fin attached to the ZB-twisted rudder. The twisted rudders have been designed computationally with the hydrodynamic characteristics in a self-propulsion condition in mind. The governing equation is the Navier-Stokes equations in an unsteady turbulent flow. The turbulence model applied is the Reynolds stress. The calculation was carried out in towing and self-propulsion conditions. The sliding mesh technique was employed to simulate the flow around the propeller. The speed performances of the ship with the twisted rudders were verified through model tests in a towing tank. The twisted versions showed greater performance driven by increased hull efficiency from less thrust deduction fraction and more effective wake fraction and decreased propeller rotating speed

  13. Craniofacial shape variation in Twist1+/- mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Trish E; Weinberg, Seth M; Khaksarfard, Kameron; Howie, R Nicole; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Yu, Jack C; Cray, James J

    2014-05-01

    Craniosynostosis (CS) is a relatively common birth defect resulting from the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. Human genetic studies have identified several genes in association with CS. One such gene that has been implicated in both syndromic (Saethre-Chotzen syndrome) and nonsyndromic forms of CS in humans is TWIST1. In this study, a heterozygous Twist1 knock out (Twist1(+/-) ) mouse model was used to study the craniofacial shape changes associated with the partial loss of function. A geometric morphometric approach was used to analyze landmark data derived from microcomputed tomography scans to compare craniofacial shape between 17 Twist1(+/-) mice and 26 of their Twist1(+/+) (wild type) littermate controls at 15 days of age. The results show that despite the purported wide variation in synostotic severity, Twist1(+/-) mice have a consistent pattern of craniofacial dysmorphology affecting all major regions of the skull. Similar to Saethre-Chotzen, the calvarium is acrocephalic and wide with an overall brachycephalic shape. Mutant mice also exhibited a shortened cranial base and a wider and shorted face, consistent with coronal CS associated phenotypes. The results suggest that these differences are at least partially the direct result of the Twist1 haploinsufficiency on the developing craniofacial skeleton. This study provides a quantitative phenotype complement to the developmental and molecular genetic research previously done on Twist1. These results can be used to generate further hypotheses about the effect of Twist1 and premature suture fusion on the entire craniofacial skeleton. PMID:24585549

  14. Bound states on the lattice with partially twisted boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agadjanov, D.; Guo, F.-K.; Ríos, G.; Rusetsky, A.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to study the nature of exotic hadrons by determining the wave function renormalization constant Z from lattice simulations. It is shown that, instead of studying the volume-dependence of the spectrum, one may investigate the dependence of the spectrum on the twisting angle, imposing twisted boundary conditions on the fermion fields on the lattice. In certain cases, e.g., the case of the DK bound state which is addressed in detail, it is demonstrated that the partial twisting is equivalent to the full twisting up to exponentially small corrections.

  15. Modelling of Nonthermal Microwave Emission from Twisted Magnetic Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Microwave gyrosynchrotron radio emission generated by nonthermal electrons in twisted magnetic loops is modelled using the recently developed simulation tool GX Simulator. We consider isotropic and anisotropic pitch-angle distributions. The main scope of the work is to understand the impact of a twisted magnetic field topology on radio emission maps. We have found that nonthermal electrons inside twisted magnetic loops produce gyrosynchrotron radio emission with a particular polarisation distribution. The polarisation sign inversion line is inclined relatively to the axis of the loop. The radio emission source is more compact in the case of a less twisted loop, assuming an anisotropic pitch-angle distribution of nonthermal electrons.

  16. Modelling of Nonthermal Microwave Emission from Twisted Magnetic Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Microwave gyrosynchrotron radio emission generated by nonthermal electrons in twisted magnetic loops is modelled using the recently developed simulation tool GX Simulator. We consider isotropic and anisotropic pitch-angle distributions. The main scope of the work is to understand the impact of a twisted magnetic field topology on radio emission maps. We have found that nonthermal electrons inside twisted magnetic loops produce gyrosynchrotron radio emission with a particular polarisation distribution. The polarisation sign inversion line is inclined relatively to the axis of the loop. The radio emission source is more compact in the case of a less twisted loop, assuming an anisotropic pitch-angle distribution of nonthermal electrons.

  17. Whole Grains and Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... fiber. Some examples of refined grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Most refined grains are enriched , which means that ... grains. Some examples of enriched grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Eating whole grains provides important health benefits: Many ...

  18. Mechanical properties and radiation tolerance of ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cheng

    Austenitic stainless steels are commonly used in nuclear reactors and have been considered as potential structural materials in fusion reactors due to their excellent corrosion resistance, good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, but their relatively low yield strength and poor radiation tolerance hinder their applications in high dose radiation environments. High angle grain boundaries have long been postulated as sinks for radiation-induced defects, such as bubbles, voids, and dislocation loops. Here we provide experimental evidence that high angle grain boundaries can effectively remove radiation-induced defects. The equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) technique was used to produce ultrafine grained Fe-Cr-Ni alloy. Mechanical properties of the alloy were studied at elevated temperature by tensile tests and in situ neutron scattering measurements. Enhanced dynamic recovery process at elevated temperature due to dislocation climb lowers the strain hardening rate and ductility of ultrafine grained Fe-Cr-Ni alloy. Thermal stability of the ultrafine grained Fe-Cr-Ni alloy was examined by ex situ annealing and in situ heating within a transmission electron microscope. Abnormal grain growth at 827 K (600°C) is attributed to deformation-induced martensite, located at the triple junctions of grains. Helium ion irradiation studies on Fe-Cr-Ni alloy show that the density of He bubbles, dislocation loops, as well as irradiation hardening are reduced by grain refinement. In addition, we provide direct evidence, via in situ Kr ion irradiation within a transmission electron microscope, that high angle grain boundaries in nanocrystalline Ni can effectively absorb irradiation-induced dislocation loops and segments. The density and size of dislocation loops in irradiated nanocrystalline Ni were merely half of those in irradiated coarse grained Ni. The results imply that irradiation tolerance in bulk metals can be effectively enhanced by microstructure

  19. Twisting and Writhing with George Ellery Hale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    2013-06-01

    Early in his productive career in astronomy, George Ellery Hale developed innovative solar instrumentation that allowed him to make narrow-band images. Among the solar phenomena he discovered were sunspot vortices, which he attributed to storms akin to cyclones in our own atmosphere. Using the concept of magnetic helicity, physicists and mathematicians describe the topology of magnetic fields, including twisting and writhing. Our contemporary understanding of Hale's vortices as a consequence of large-scale twist in sunspot magnetic fields hinges on a key property of helicity: conservation. I will describe the critical role that this property plays, when applied to twist and writhe, in a fundamental aspect of global solar magnetism: the hemispheric and solar cycle dependences of active region electric currents with respect to magnetic fields. With the advent of unbroken sequences of high-resolution magnetic images, such as those presently available from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on Solar Dynamics Observatory, the flux of magnetic helicity through the photosphere can be observed quantitatively. As magnetic flux tubes buoy up through the convection zone, buffeted and shredded by turbulence, they break up into fragments by repeated random bifurcation. We track these rising flux fragments in the photosphere, and calculate the flux of energy and magnetic helicity there. Using a quantitative model of coronal currents, we also track connections between these fragments to calculate the energy and magnetic helicity stored at topological interfaces that are in some ways analogous to the storage of stress at faults in the Earth's crust. Comparison of these values to solar flares and interplanetary coronal mass ejections implies that this is the primary storage mechanism for energy and magnetic helicity released in those phenomena, and suggests a useful tool for quantitative prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  20. Twisted geometries, twistors, and conformal transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lângvik, Miklos; Speziale, Simone

    2016-07-01

    The twisted geometries of spin network states are described by simple twistors, isomorphic to null twistors with a timelike direction singled out. The isomorphism depends on the Immirzi parameter γ and reduces to the identity for γ =∞ . Using this twistorial representation, we study the action of the conformal group SU(2,2) on the classical phase space of loop quantum gravity, described by twisted geometry. The generators of translations and conformal boosts do not preserve the geometric structure, whereas the dilatation generator does. It corresponds to a one-parameter family of embeddings of T*SL(2,C) in twistor space, and its action preserves the intrinsic geometry while changing the extrinsic one—that is the boosts among polyhedra. We discuss the implication of this action from a dynamical point of view and compare it with a discretization of the dilatation generator of the continuum phase space, given by the Lie derivative of the group character. At leading order in the continuum limit, the latter reproduces the same transformation of the extrinsic geometry, while also rescaling the areas and volumes and preserving the angles associated with the intrinsic geometry. Away from the continuum limit, its action has an interesting nonlinear structure but is in general incompatible with the closure constraint needed for the geometric interpretation. As a side result, we compute the precise relation between the extrinsic geometry used in twisted geometries and the one defined in the gauge-invariant parametrization by Dittrich and Ryan and show that the secondary simplicity constraints they posited coincide with those dynamically derived in the toy model of [Classical Quantum Gravity 32, 195015 (2015)].

  1. Colloidal entanglement in highly twisted chiral nematic colloids: twisted loops, Hopf links, and trefoil knots.

    PubMed

    Jampani, V S R; Škarabot, M; Ravnik, M; Čopar, S; Žumer, S; Muševič, I

    2011-09-01

    The topology and geometry of closed defect loops is studied in chiral nematic colloids with variable chirality. The colloidal particles with perpendicular surface anchoring of liquid crystalline molecules are inserted in a twisted nematic cell with the thickness that is only slightly larger than the diameter of the colloidal particle. The total twist of the chiral nematic structure in cells with parallel boundary conditions is set to 0, π, 2π, and 3π, respectively. We use the laser tweezers to discern the number and the topology of the -1/2 defect loops entangling colloidal particles. For a single colloidal particle, we observe that a single defect loop is winding around the particle, with the winding pattern being more complex in cells with higher total twist. We observe that colloidal dimers and colloidal clusters are always entangled by one or several -1/2 defect loops. For colloidal pairs in π-twisted cells, we identify at least 17 different entangled structures, some of them exhibiting linked defect loops-Hopf link. Colloidal entanglement is even richer with a higher number of colloidal particles, where we observe not only linked, but also colloidal clusters knotted into the trefoil knot. The experiments are in good agreement with numerical modeling using Landau-de Gennes theory coupled with geometrical and topological considerations using the method of tetrahedral rotation. PMID:22060386

  2. Superlubricity in quasicrystalline twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Elad; Duerig, Urs

    2016-05-01

    The unique atomic positions in quasicrystals lead to peculiar self-similarity and fractal-like structural morphology. Accordingly, many of the material properties are supposed to manifest exceptional characteristics. In this Rapid Communication, we explain through numerical simulations the fundamental and peculiar aspects of quasicrystals wearless friction manifested in a 30° twisted bilayer graphene system. In particular, the sliding force exhibits a fractal structure with distinct area correlations due to the natural mixture between both periodic and aperiodic lateral modulations. In addition, zero power scaling of the sliding force with respect to the contact area is demonstrated for a geometric sequence of dodecagonal elements.

  3. Berry phase transition in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Johannes C.; Smirnov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Hennrik; Haug, Rolf J.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic dispersion of a graphene bilayer is highly dependent on rotational mismatch between layers and can be further manipulated by electrical gating. This allows for an unprecedented control over electronic properties and opens up the possibility of flexible band structure engineering. Here we present novel magnetotransport data in a twisted bilayer, crossing the energetic border between decoupled monolayers and coupled bilayer. In addition a transition in Berry phase between π and 2π is observed at intermediate magnetic fields. Analysis of Fermi velocities and gate induced charge carrier densities suggests an important role of strong layer asymmetry for the observed phenomena.

  4. Non-destructive identification of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengyun; Wang, Bo; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    The non-destructive identification of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) is essential to various applications in the optical information processing. Here, we propose and demonstrate experimentally an efficient method to identify non-destructively the OAM by using a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Our schemes are applicable not only to the case with integer charges, but also to optical vortices with noninteger charges. Our Letter presents the first experimental demonstration of the non-destructive identification of twisted light with integer or noninteger topological charges, which has potential applications in the OAM-based data transmission for optical communications. PMID:27192290

  5. Bounds on tensor wave and twisted inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Sudhakar; Sami, M.; Ward, John

    2010-11-01

    We study the bounds on tensor wave in a class of twisted inflation models, where D(4+2k)-branes are wrapped on cycles in the compact manifold and wrap the Kaluza-Klein direction in the corresponding effective field theory. While the lower bound is found to be analogous to that in type IIB models of brane inflation, the upper bound turns out to be significantly different. This is argued for a range of values for the parameter gsM satisfying the self-consistency relation and the WMAP data. Further, we observe that the wrapped D8-brane appears to be the most attractive from a cosmological perspective.

  6. Modes of a twisted optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Habraken, Steven J. M.; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2007-03-15

    An astigmatic optical resonator consists of two astigmatic mirrors facing each other. The resonator is twisted when the symmetry axes of the mirrors are nonparallel. We present an algebraic method to obtain the complete set of the paraxial eigenmodes of such a resonator. Basic ingredients are the complex eigenvectors of the four-dimensional transfer matrix that describes the transformation of a ray of light over a roundtrip of the resonator. The relation between the fundamental mode and the higher-order modes is expressed in terms of raising operators in the spirit of the ladder operators of the quantum harmonic oscillator.

  7. Surgical Treatment of the Twisted Nose.

    PubMed

    Menger, Dirk Jan

    2016-01-01

    The twisted nose is a challenging procedure in rhinoplasty. The goal of surgery is to realign the nasal skeleton to create symmetry in the face and restore nasal patency. Key in the surgical procedure is that all structures of the nasal skeleton be dissected free, mobilized, repositioned, and stabilized. Important surgical steps are intermediate osteotomies on the contralateral side of the deviation for the upper nasal third; for the mid nasal third, a unilateral spreader graft or splint on the nondeviated side, and for the lower nasal third, fixation of the caudal septum to the anterior nasal spine. PMID:26616698

  8. Strain mapping in nanocrystalline grains simulated by phase field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yaolin; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Tang, Sai; Liu, Feng; Zhou, Yaohe

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the phase field crystal (PFC) model has been confirmed as a good candidate to describe grain boundary (GB) structures and their nearby atomic arrangement. To further understand the mechanical behaviours of nanocrystalline materials, strain fields near GBs need to be quantitatively characterized. Using the strain mapping technique of geometric phase approach (GPA), we have conducted strain mapping across the GBs in nanocrystalline grains simulated by the PFC model. The results demonstrate that the application of GPA in strain mapping of low and high angles GBs as well as polycrystalline grains simulated by the PFC model is very successful. The results also show that the strain field around the dislocation in a very low angle GB is quantitatively consistent with the anisotropic elastic theory of dislocations. Moreover, the difference between low angle GBs and high angle GBs is revealed by the strain analysis in terms of the strain contour shape and the structural GB width.

  9. Incrementally Developed `Dilational Hydro-Shears' Forming at High Angles to σ1 in Foliated Mélange Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Remitti, F.; Sibson, R. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Chrystalls Beach accretionary mélange, New Zealand, contains an extensive fault-fracture mesh, in which mutually cross-cutting, incrementally developed, subhorizontal slickenfibre shear veins and subvertical extension veins intersect at an oblique angle of ~80° (Fig. 1). Slickenfibre shear veins commonly have multiple internal stylolitic slip surfaces subparallel to ubiquitous cleavage in pelitic mélange matrix, macroscopic `crack-seal' textures, and dissolution selvages along the vein margins. Stylolites, internal slip surfaces, and the long axes of elongate crystals within slickenfibre shear veins are inclined at a low angle (<15°) to the vein margin. Where shear and extension veins intersect, crystal fibres within the extension vein are parallel to elongate crystals within slickenfibres. The two kinematic vein types therefore had the same crystal-growth direction and are inferred to have formed contemporaneously in the same stress field. Thus field and microstructural observations suggest that slickenfibre-coated shear surfaces in the Chrystalls Beach mélange were active at ~80° to σ1, despite the constraint from Coulomb mechanics that new-forming faults, in cohesive, low porosity rocks, should lie at an angle θi = 45° - φ/2 to σ1. The slickenfibres appear to have formed by reactivation of subhorizontal weak planes (e.g. stylolites parallel to cleavage) which act as micro-transforms linking subvertical extension fractures opening parallel to σ3. This requires Pf > σ3 and low differential stress depending on the frictional resistance on the stylolites, and allows for shear failure at high angle to σ1 in fluid overpressured heterogeneous shear zones. The reshear conditions are similar to the extensional hydrofracture criterion, but low tensile strength, low intrinsic cohesion, and localised elevated shear strain controlled by material heterogeneities and anisotropy, create a situation where shear occurs essentially by extension under local

  10. Incoherent interlayer conduction in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngwook; Nam, S.-G.; Lee, H.-J.; Kim, Jun Sung; Yun, H.; Lee, S. W.; Son, M.; Choi, H. C.; Lee, D. S.; Kim, D. C.; Seo, S.

    2014-03-01

    Coherent motion of the electrons in the Bloch states often breaks down for the interlayer conduction in layered materials where the interlayer coupling is significantly reduced by e.g. large interlayer separation. Here, we report complete suppression of coherent conduction in twisted bilayer graphene even with an atomic length scale of layer separation. The interlayer conduction were investigated using a cross junction of monolayer graphene layers. The interlayer resistivity is much higher than the c-axis resistivity of Bernal-stacked graphite and exhibits strong dependence on temperature as well as on external electric fields. These results suggest that the graphene layers are significantly decoupled by rotation, and the incoherent electron tunneling is the main interlayer conduction channel. In this regime, the interlayer conduction is determined by the overlap of the Dirac Fermi surfaces (FS) from each layer. The angle dependence of the interlayer resistivity is found to be relatively strong at low temperatures, while it becomes moderate and monotonous at high temperatures. This demonstrates the importance of phonon-mediated conduction at high temperatures, which enhances the overlap between the momentum-mismatched FS's in twisted bilayer graphene.

  11. Holographic generation of highly twisted electron beams.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Mafakheri, Erfan; Frabboni, Stefano; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W

    2015-01-23

    Free electrons can possess an intrinsic orbital angular momentum, similar to those in an electron cloud, upon free-space propagation. The wave front corresponding to the electron's wave function forms a helical structure with a number of twists given by the angular speed. Beams with a high number of twists are of particular interest because they carry a high magnetic moment about the propagation axis. Among several different techniques, electron holography seems to be a promising approach to shape a conventional electron beam into a helical form with large values of angular momentum. Here, we propose and manufacture a nanofabricated phase hologram for generating a beam of this kind with an orbital angular momentum up to 200ℏ. Based on a novel technique the value of orbital angular momentum of the generated beam is measured and then compared with simulations. Our work, apart from the technological achievements, may lead to a way of generating electron beams with a high quanta of magnetic moment along the propagation direction and, thus, may be used in the study of the magnetic properties of materials and for manipulating nanoparticles. PMID:25659003

  12. Needleless electrospinning with twisted wire spinneret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holopainen, Jani; Penttinen, Toni; Santala, Eero; Ritala, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    A needleless electrospinning setup named ‘Needleless Twisted Wire Electrospinning’ was developed. The polymer solution is electrospun from the surface of a twisted wire set to a high voltage and collected on a cylindrical collector around the wire. Multiple Taylor cones are simultaneously self-formed on the downward flowing solution. The system is robust and simple with no moving parts aside from the syringe pump used to transport the solution to the top of the wire. The structure and process parameters of the setup and the results on the preparation of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioglass fibers with the setup are presented. PVP fiber sheets with areas of 40 × 120 cm2 and masses up to 1.15 g were prepared. High production rates of 5.23 g h-1 and 1.40 g h-1 were achieved for PVP and HA respectively. The major limiting factor of the setup is drying of the polymer solution on the wire during the electrospinning process which will eventually force to interrupt the process for cleaning of the wire. Possible solutions to this problem and other ways to develop the setup are discussed. The presented system provides a simple way to increase the production rate and area of fiber sheet as compared with the conventional needle electrospinning.

  13. Action for twisted self-duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunster, Claudio; Henneaux, Marc

    2011-06-01

    One may write the Maxwell equations in terms of two gauge potentials, one electric and one magnetic, by demanding that their field strengths should be dual to each other. This requirement is the condition of twisted self-duality. It can be extended to p-forms in spacetime of D dimensions, and it survives the introduction of a variety of couplings among forms of different rank, and also to spinor and scalar fields, which emerge naturally from supergravity. In this paper we provide a systematic derivation of the action principle, whose equations of motion are the condition of twisted self-duality. The derivation starts from the standard Maxwell action, extended to include the aforementioned couplings, and proceeds via the Hamiltonian formalism through the resolution of Gauss’s law. In the pure Maxwell case we recover in this way an action that had been postulated by other authors, through an ansatz based on an action given earlier by us for untwisted self-duality. When Chern-Simons couplings are included, our action is, however, new. The derivation from the standard extended Maxwell action implies of course that the theory is Lorentz invariant and can be locally coupled to gravity. Nevertheless we include a direct compact Hamiltonian proof of these properties, which is based on the surface-deformation algebra. The symmetry in the dependence of the action on the electric and magnetic variables is manifest, since they appear as canonical conjugates. Spacetime covariance, although present, is not manifest.

  14. How the embryonic brain tube twists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi; Guo, Qiaohang; Forsch, Nickolas; Taber, Larry

    2014-03-01

    During early development, the tubular brain of the chick embryo undergoes a combination of progressive ventral bending and rightward torsion. This deformation is one of the major organ-level symmetry-breaking events in development. Available evidence suggests that bending is caused by differential growth, but the mechanism for torsion remains poorly understood. Since the heart almost always loops in the same direction that the brain twists, researchers have speculated that heart looping affects the direction of brain torsion. However, direct evidence is virtually nonexistent, nor is the mechanical origin of such torsion understood. In our study, experimental perturbations show that the bending and torsional deformations in the brain are coupled and that the vitelline membrane applies an external load necessary for torsion to occur. In addition, the asymmetry of the looping heart gives rise to the chirality of the twisted brain. A computational model is used to interpret these findings. Our work clarifies the mechanical origins of brain torsion and the associated left-right asymmetry, reminiscent of D'Arcy Thompson's view of biological form as ``diagram of forces''.

  15. Strong CP, Flavor, and Twisted Split Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Perez, Gilad; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Shirman, Yuri

    2004-11-10

    We present a natural solution to the strong CP problem in the context of split fermions. By assuming CP is spontaneously broken in the bulk, a weak CKM phase is created in the standard model due to a twisting in flavor space of the bulk fermion wavefunctions. But the strong CP phase remains zero, being essentially protected by parity in the bulk and CP on the branes. As always in models of spontaneous CP breaking, radiative corrections to theta bar from the standard model are tiny, but even higher dimension operators are not that dangerous. The twisting phenomenon was recently shown to be generic, and not to interfere with the way that split fermions naturally weaves small numbers into the standard model. It follows that out approach to strong CP is compatible with flavor, and we sketch a comprehensive model. We also look at deconstructed version of this setup which provides a viable 4D model of spontaneous CP breaking which is not in the Nelson-Barr class.

  16. Dynamic response of active twist rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sang Joon; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2001-02-01

    Dynamic characteristics of active twist rotor (ATR) blades are investigated analytically and experimentally in this paper. The ATR system is intended for vibration and potentially for noise reductions in helicopters through individual blade control. An aeroelastic model is developed to identify frequency response characteristics of the ATR blade with integral, generally anisotropic, strain actuators embedded in its composite construction. An ATR prototype blade was designed and manufactured to experimentally study the vibration reduction capabilities of such systems. Several bench and hover tests were conducted and those results are presented and discussed here. Selected results on sensitivity of the ATR system to collective setting (i.e. blade loading), blade rpm (i.e. centrifugal force and blade station velocity), and media density (i.e. altitude) are presented. They indicated that the twist actuation authority of the ATR blade is independent of the collective setting up to approximately 10P, and dependent on rotational speed and altitude near the torsional resonance frequency due to its dependency on the aerodynamic damping. The proposed model captures very well the physics and sensitivities to selected test parameters of the ATR system. The numerical result of the blade torsional loads show an average error of 20% in magnitude and virtually no difference in phase for the blade frequency response. Overall, the active blade model is in very good agreement with the experiments and can be used to analyze and design future active helicopter blade systems.

  17. Terahertz conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Elbert E. M.; Zou, Xingquan; Shang, Jingzhi; Leaw, Jianing; Luo, Zhiqiang; Luo, Liyan; Cheong, Siew Ann; Su, Haibin; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Castro Neto, A. H.; Yu, Ting

    2013-03-01

    Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the real part of optical conductivity [σ1 (ω) ] of twisted bilayer graphene was obtained at different temperatures (10 - 300 K) in the frequency range 0.3 - 3 THz. On top of a Drude-like response, we see a strong and narrow peak in σ1 (ω) at ~2.7 THz. We analyze the overall Drude-like response using a disorder-dependent (unitary scattering) model, then attribute the peak at 2.7 THz to an enhanced density of states at that energy, that is caused by the presence of van Hove singularities arising from a commensurate twisting of the two graphene layers. Singapore MOE AcRF Tier 2 (ARC 23/08), NRF-CRP (NRF-CRP4-2008-04), NNSA of the U.S. DOE at LANL (DE-AC52-06NA25396), LANL LDRD Program, NRF-CRP (R-144-000-295-281), DOE DE-FG02-08ER46512, ONR MURI N00014-09-1-1063.

  18. Microstructural Features Leading to Enhanced Resistance to Grain Boundary Creep Cracking in ALLVAC 718Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Hayes, Robert W.; Mills, Michael J.; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2010-02-01

    This study focuses on the microstructural features that enhance the resistance of ALLVAC 718Plus to grain boundary creep cracking during testing of samples at 704 °C in both dry and moist air. Fully recrystallized structures were found to be susceptible to brittle grain boundary cracking in both environments. Detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructural characterization reveals features that are believed to lead to resistance to grain boundary cracking in the resistant microstructures. It is suggested that dislocation substructures found within the grains of resistant structures compete with the high-angle grain boundaries for oxygen, thereby reducing the concentration of oxygen on the grain boundaries and subsequent embrittlement. In addition, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) misorientation maps reveal that special boundaries ( i.e., Σ3 boundaries) resist cracking. This is in agreement with previous findings on the superalloy INCONEL 718. Furthermore, it is observed that cracks propagate along high-angle boundaries. This study also shows that in this case, the presence of delta phase at the grain boundaries does not by itself produce materials that are resistant to grain boundary cracking.

  19. Twisted K-Theory and Finite-Dimensional Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomi, Kiyonori

    2010-03-01

    We provide a finite-dimensional model of the twisted K-group twisted by any degree three integral cohomology class of a CW complex. One key to the model is Furuta’s generalized vector bundle, and the other is a finite-dimensional approximation of Fredholm operators.

  20. Heat transfer and fluid friction in bundles of twisted tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyubenko, B. V.; Dreitser, G. A.

    1986-06-01

    The results of heat-transfer and friction studies in bundles of twisted tubes and rods with spiral wire-wrap spacers are analyzed, and recommendations are given for calculating the heat-transfer coefficient in heat exchangers using twisted tubes.

  1. Beyond the classical Rayleigh limit with twisted light.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2012-07-01

    It is shown that twisted stochastic light can serve as illumination that may produce images with a resolution overcoming the Rayleigh limit by an order of magnitude. This finding is illustrated for an isoplanatic axially symmetric system with low angular aperture and twisted scalar Gaussian Schell-model illumination. PMID:22743466

  2. The Structure of Olivine Grain Boundaries Inferred from Transient and Steady State Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faul, U.; Jackson, I.

    2015-12-01

    A consensus has not been reached regarding the structure of general, high angle grain boundaries in olivine. Published high resolution transmission electron microscope images show either abutting lattice planes of the grains on either side of the boundary, or a distinct grain boundary region, about 1 nm wide, that is more disordered than the grain interiors. However, agreement exists that grain boundary region is enriched in olivine trace elements such as Ti, Ca and Al. These analytical methods can not resolve the thickness of this region. The properties of grain boundaries can be interrogated by experimentation, but the interpretation of the experimental results is tied to microphysical models. Models for diffusion creep predict a square grain size dependence for diffusion through grain interiors, and a cubic grain size dependence for diffusion along grain boundaries. Experimental observations for polycrystalline, Fe-bearing olivine are best fit with a cubic grain size dependence, indicating diffusion along grain boundaries. Similarly, models for small strain, transient creep predict that time-dependent, recoverable deformation involves diffusion along grain boundaries. For this process the models predict a linear grain size dependence. Forced torsional oscillation experiments can be employed to investigate the transient creep behaviour over a range of frequencies, temperatures and grain sizes. The observed grain size dependence for the same materials used for conventional, large strain deformation experiments is near linear, indicating diffusionally assisted grain boundary sliding. Both transient and steady state deformation therefore implicate diffusion along grain boundaries as the rate-controlling mechanism. Diffusion and viscous sliding along grain boundaries imply that they are a separate phase with a less ordered structure, consistent with their interpretation as a (narrow) region that is distinct from grain interiors. This region likely also accommodates

  3. Landau damping of Langmuir twisted waves with kappa distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif Aman-ur-Rehman; Mahmood, Shahzad

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic theory of Landau damping of Langmuir twisted modes is investigated in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are considered to be decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode function defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to obtain the weak damping rates of the Langmuir twisted waves in a nonthermal plasma. The strong damping effects of the Langmuir twisted waves at wavelengths approaching Debye length are also obtained by using an exact numerical method and are illustrated graphically. The damping rates of the planar Langmuir waves are found to be larger than the twisted Langmuir waves in plasmas which shows opposite behavior as depicted in Fig. 3 by J. T. Mendoça [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112113 (2012)].

  4. A twisted disk equation that describes warped galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, K.

    1994-01-01

    Warped H1 gas layers in the outer regions of spiral galaxies usually display a noticeably twisted structure. This structure is thought to arise primarily as a result of differential precession in the H1 disk as it settles toward a 'preferred orientation' in an underlying dark halo potential well that is not spherically symmetric. In an attempt to better understand the structure and evolution of these twisted, warped disk structures, we have utilized the 'twist-equation' formalism. Specifically, we have generalized the twist equation to allow the treatment of non-Keplerian disks and from it have derived the steady-state structure of twisted disks that develop from free precession in a nonspherical, logarithmic halo potential. This generalized equation can also be used to examine the time-evolutionary behavior of warped galaxy disks.

  5. Landau damping of Langmuir twisted waves with kappa distributed electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Kashif; Aman-ur-Rehman, Mahmood, Shahzad

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic theory of Landau damping of Langmuir twisted modes is investigated in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are considered to be decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode function defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to obtain the weak damping rates of the Langmuir twisted waves in a nonthermal plasma. The strong damping effects of the Langmuir twisted waves at wavelengths approaching Debye length are also obtained by using an exact numerical method and are illustrated graphically. The damping rates of the planar Langmuir waves are found to be larger than the twisted Langmuir waves in plasmas which shows opposite behavior as depicted in Fig. 3 by J. T. Mendoça [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112113 (2012)].

  6. Acoustic Aspects of Active-Twist Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2002-01-01

    The use of an Active Twist Rotor system to provide both vibration reduction and performance enhancement has been explored in recent analytical and experimental studies. Effects of active-twist control on rotor noise, however, had not been determined. During a recent wind tunnel test of an active-twist rotor system, a set of acoustic measurements were obtained to assess the effects of active-twist control on noise produced by the rotor, especially blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. It was found that for rotor operating conditions where BVI noise is dominant, active-twist control provided a reduction in BVI noise level. This BVI noise reduction was almost, but not quite, as large as that obtained in a similar test using HHC. However, vibration levels were usually adversely affected at operating conditions favoring minimum BVI noise. Conversely, operating conditions favoring minimum vibration levels affected BVI noise levels, but not always adversely.

  7. Colloquium: Geometry and optimal packing of twisted columns and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2015-04-01

    This Colloquium presents recent progress in understanding constraints and consequences of close-packing geometry of filamentous or columnar materials possessing nontrivial textures, focusing, in particular, on the common motifs of twisted and toroidal structures. The mathematical framework is presented that relates spacing between linelike, filamentous elements to their backbone orientations, highlighting the explicit connection between the interfilament metric properties and the geometry of non-Euclidean surfaces. The consequences of the hidden connection between packing in twisted filament bundles and packing on positively curved surfaces, like the Thomson problem, are demonstrated for the defect-riddled ground states of physical models of twisted filament bundles. The connection between the "ideal" geometry of fibrations of curved three-dimensional space, including the Hopf fibration, and the non-Euclidean constraints of filament packing in twisted and toroidal bundles is presented, with a focus on the broader dependence of metric geometry on the simultaneous twisting and folding of multifilament bundles.

  8. Improve sensitization and corrosion resistance of an Al-Mg alloy by optimization of grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jianfeng; Heckman, Nathan M; Velasco, Leonardo; Hodge, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    The sensitization and subsequent intergranular corrosion of Al-5.3 wt.% Mg alloy has been shown to be an important factor in stress corrosion cracking of Al-Mg alloys. Understanding sensitization requires the review of grain boundary character on the precipitation process which can assist in developing and designing alloys with improved corrosion resistance. This study shows that the degree of precipitation in Al-Mg alloy is dependent on grain boundary misorientation angle, adjacent grain boundary planes and grain boundary types. The results show that the misorientation angle is the most important factor influencing precipitation in grain boundaries of the Al-Mg alloy. Low angle grain boundaries (≤15°) have better immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. High angle grain boundaries (>15°) are vulnerable to grain boundary acid attack. Grain boundaries with adjacent plane orientations near to {100} have potential for immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. This work shows that low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) coincident site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries have thinner β precipitates. Modified nitric acid mass loss test and polarization test demonstrated that the global corrosion resistance of sputtered Al-Mg alloy is enhanced. This may be attributed to the increased fractions of low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) CSL grain boundaries after sputtering. PMID:27230299

  9. Improve sensitization and corrosion resistance of an Al-Mg alloy by optimization of grain boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jianfeng; Heckman, Nathan M.; Velasco, Leonardo; Hodge, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    The sensitization and subsequent intergranular corrosion of Al-5.3 wt.% Mg alloy has been shown to be an important factor in stress corrosion cracking of Al-Mg alloys. Understanding sensitization requires the review of grain boundary character on the precipitation process which can assist in developing and designing alloys with improved corrosion resistance. This study shows that the degree of precipitation in Al-Mg alloy is dependent on grain boundary misorientation angle, adjacent grain boundary planes and grain boundary types. The results show that the misorientation angle is the most important factor influencing precipitation in grain boundaries of the Al-Mg alloy. Low angle grain boundaries (≤15°) have better immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. High angle grain boundaries (>15°) are vulnerable to grain boundary acid attack. Grain boundaries with adjacent plane orientations near to {100} have potential for immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. This work shows that low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) coincident site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries have thinner β precipitates. Modified nitric acid mass loss test and polarization test demonstrated that the global corrosion resistance of sputtered Al-Mg alloy is enhanced. This may be attributed to the increased fractions of low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) CSL grain boundaries after sputtering. PMID:27230299

  10. Improve sensitization and corrosion resistance of an Al-Mg alloy by optimization of grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianfeng; Heckman, Nathan M.; Velasco, Leonardo; Hodge, Andrea M.

    2016-05-01

    The sensitization and subsequent intergranular corrosion of Al-5.3 wt.% Mg alloy has been shown to be an important factor in stress corrosion cracking of Al-Mg alloys. Understanding sensitization requires the review of grain boundary character on the precipitation process which can assist in developing and designing alloys with improved corrosion resistance. This study shows that the degree of precipitation in Al-Mg alloy is dependent on grain boundary misorientation angle, adjacent grain boundary planes and grain boundary types. The results show that the misorientation angle is the most important factor influencing precipitation in grain boundaries of the Al-Mg alloy. Low angle grain boundaries (≤15°) have better immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. High angle grain boundaries (>15°) are vulnerable to grain boundary acid attack. Grain boundaries with adjacent plane orientations near to {100} have potential for immunity to precipitation and grain boundary acid attack. This work shows that low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) coincident site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries have thinner β precipitates. Modified nitric acid mass loss test and polarization test demonstrated that the global corrosion resistance of sputtered Al-Mg alloy is enhanced. This may be attributed to the increased fractions of low Σ (Σ ≤ 29) CSL grain boundaries after sputtering.

  11. Aeromechanical Evaluation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Joon W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Hoffman, Frauke; van der Wall, Berend G.; Kim, Do-Hyung; Jung, Sung N.; You, Young H.; Tanabe, Yasutada; Bailly, Joelle; Lienard, Caroline; Delrieux, Yves

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor (STAR) was made to assess potential benefits of the current active twist rotor concept for performance improvement, vibration reduction, and noise alleviation. The STAR rotor is a 40% Mach-scaled, Bo105 rotor with an articulated flap-lag hinge at 3.5%R and no pre-cone. The 0-5 per rev active twist harmonic inputs were applied for various flight conditions including hover, descent, moderate to high speed level flights, and slowed rotor high advance ratio. For the analysis, the STAR partners used multiple codes including CAMRAD II, S4, HOST, rFlow3D, elsA, and their associated software. At the high thrust level in hover, the 0 per rev active twist with 80% amplitude increased figure of merit (FM) by 0.01-0.02 relative to the baseline. In descent, the largest BVI noise reduction was on the order of 2 to 5 dB at the 3 per rev active twist. In the high speed case (mu = 0.35), the 2 per rev actuation was found to be the most effective in achieving a power reduction as well as a vibration reduction. At the 2 per rev active twist, total power was reduced by 0.65% at the 60 deg active twist phase, and vibration was reduced by 47.6% at the 45 deg active twist phase. The use of the 2 per rev active twist appears effective for vibration reduction. In the high advance ratio case (mu = 0.70), the 0 per rev actuation appeared to have negligible impact on performance improvement. In summary, computational simulations successfully demonstrated that the current active twist concept provided a significant reduction of the maximum BVI noise in descent, a significant reduction of the vibration in the high speed case, a small improvement on rotor performance in hover, and a negligible impact on rotor performance in forward flight.

  12. Twist1 activity thresholds define multiple functions in limb development

    PubMed Central

    Krawchuk, Dayana; Weiner, Shoshana J.; Chen, You-Tzung; Lu, Benson; Costantini, Frank; Behringer, Richard R.; Laufer, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Summary The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist1 is essential for normal limb development. Twist1−/− embryos die at midgestation. However, studies on early limb buds found that Twist1−/− mutant limb mesenchyme has an impaired response to FGF signaling from the apical ectodermal ridge, which disrupts the feedback loop between the mesenchyme and AER, and reduces and shifts anteriorly Shh expression in the zone of polarizing activity. We have combined Twist1 null, hypomorph and conditional alleles to generate a Twist1 allelic series that survives to birth. As Twist1 activity is reduced, limb skeletal defects progress from preaxial polydactyly to girdle reduction combined with hypoplasia, aplasia or mirror symmetry of all limb segments. With reduced Twist1 activity there is striking and progressive upregulation of ectopic Shh expression in the anterior of the limb, combined with an anterior shift in the posterior Shh domain, which is expressed at normal intensity, and loss of the posterior AER. Consequently limb outgrowth is initially impaired, before an ectopic anterior Shh domain expands the AER, promoting additional growth and repatterning. Reducing the dosage of FGF targets of the Etv gene family, which are known repressors of Shh expression in the anterior limb mesenchyme, strongly enhances the anterior skeletal phenotype. Conversely this and other phenotypes are suppressed by reducing the dosage of the Twist1 antagonist Hand2. Our data support a model whereby multiple Twist1 activity thresholds contribute to early limb bud patterning, and suggest how particular combinations of skeletal defects result from differing amounts of Twist1 activity. PMID:20732316

  13. Ultrafine Grain Formation in a Ti-6Al-4V Alloy by Thermomechanical Processing of a Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Qi; Hodgson, Peter D.; Beladi, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    In the current study, ultrafine equiaxed grains with a size of 150 to 800 nm were successfully produced in a Ti-6Al-4V alloy through thermomechanical processing of a martensitic starting microstructure. This was achieved through a novel mechanism of grain refinement consisting of several concurrent processes. This involves the development of substructure in the lath interiors at an early stage of deformation, which progressed into small high-angle segments with increasing strain. Consequently, the microstructure was gradually transformed to an equiaxed ultrafine grained structure, mostly surrounded by high-angle grain boundaries, through continuous dynamic recrystallization. Simultaneously, the supersaturated martensite was decomposed during deformation, leading to the progressive formation of beta phase, mainly nucleated on the intervariant lath boundaries.

  14. Grain Grading and Handling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendleman, Matt; Legacy, James

    This publication provides an introduction to grain grading and handling for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in five chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the jobs performed at a grain elevator and of the techniques used to grade grain. The first chapter introduces the grain industry and…

  15. Grain Handling and Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Troy G.; Minor, John

    This text for a secondary- or postecondary-level course in grain handling and storage contains ten chapters. Chapter titles are (1) Introduction to Grain Handling and Storage, (2) Elevator Safety, (3) Grain Grading and Seed Identification, (4) Moisture Control, (5) Insect and Rodent Control, (6) Grain Inventory Control, (7) Elevator Maintenance,…

  16. Do twisted laser beams evoke nuclear hyperpolarization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. B.; Andrews, D. L.; Rohrbach, A.; Gohn-Kreuz, C.; Shatokhin, V. N.; Kiselev, V. G.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J.-B.

    2016-07-01

    The hyperpolarization of nuclear spins promises great advances in chemical analysis and medical diagnosis by substantially increasing the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Current methods to produce a hyperpolarized sample, however, are arduous, time-consuming or costly and require elaborate equipment. Recently, a much simpler approach was introduced that holds the potential, if harnessed appropriately, to revolutionize the production of hyperpolarized spins. It was reported that high levels of hyperpolarization in nuclear spins can be created by irradiation with a laser beam carrying orbital angular momentum (twisted light). Aside from these initial reports however, no further experimental verification has been presented. In addition, this effect has so far evaded a critical theoretical examination. In this contribution, we present the first independent attempt to reproduce the effect. We exposed a sample of immersion oil or a fluorocarbon liquid that was placed within a low-field NMR spectrometer to Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel laser beams at a wavelength of 514.5 nm and various topological charges. We acquired 1H and 19F NMR free induction decay data, either during or alternating with the irradiation that was parallel to B0. We observed an irregular increase in NMR signal in experiments where the sample was exposed to beams with higher values of the topological charge. However, at no time did the effect reach statistical significance of 95%. Given the measured sensitivity of our setup, we estimate that a possible effect did not exceed a hyperpolarization (at 5 mT) of 0.14-6%, depending on the assumed hyperpolarized volume. It should be noted though, that there were some differences between our setup and the previous implementation of the experiment, which may have inhibited the full incidence of this effect. To approach a theoretical description of this effect, we considered the interaction of an electron with a plane wave, which is known to be

  17. Do twisted laser beams evoke nuclear hyperpolarization?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A B; Andrews, D L; Rohrbach, A; Gohn-Kreuz, C; Shatokhin, V N; Kiselev, V G; Hennig, J; von Elverfeldt, D; Hövener, J-B

    2016-07-01

    The hyperpolarization of nuclear spins promises great advances in chemical analysis and medical diagnosis by substantially increasing the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Current methods to produce a hyperpolarized sample, however, are arduous, time-consuming or costly and require elaborate equipment. Recently, a much simpler approach was introduced that holds the potential, if harnessed appropriately, to revolutionize the production of hyperpolarized spins. It was reported that high levels of hyperpolarization in nuclear spins can be created by irradiation with a laser beam carrying orbital angular momentum (twisted light). Aside from these initial reports however, no further experimental verification has been presented. In addition, this effect has so far evaded a critical theoretical examination. In this contribution, we present the first independent attempt to reproduce the effect. We exposed a sample of immersion oil or a fluorocarbon liquid that was placed within a low-field NMR spectrometer to Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel laser beams at a wavelength of 514.5nm and various topological charges. We acquired (1)H and (19)F NMR free induction decay data, either during or alternating with the irradiation that was parallel to B0. We observed an irregular increase in NMR signal in experiments where the sample was exposed to beams with higher values of the topological charge. However, at no time did the effect reach statistical significance of 95%. Given the measured sensitivity of our setup, we estimate that a possible effect did not exceed a hyperpolarization (at 5mT) of 0.14-6%, depending on the assumed hyperpolarized volume. It should be noted though, that there were some differences between our setup and the previous implementation of the experiment, which may have inhibited the full incidence of this effect. To approach a theoretical description of this effect, we considered the interaction of an electron with a plane wave, which is known to be

  18. Grain refinement during primary breakdown of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Mataya, M.C.; Robinson, M.L.; Chang, D.; Weis, M.J.; Edwards, G.R.; Matlock, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    Grain refinement during primary breakdown of a production size alloy 718 ingot was investigated by compression testing of cylindrical specimens taken from various locations in the ingot cross section. Deformation was applied over a temperature range of 900 to 1150/sup 0/C, at strain rates from 0.1s/sup -1/ to 1.0s/sup -1/, and to strains of 0.25 to 1.0. Variations in grain morphology and orientation had a pronounced effect on the deformed sample geometry but little effect on recrystallization. Recrystallization was observed to nucleate at primary particles and high angle grain boundaries. Static recrystallization rather than dynamic recrystallization was the mechanism responsible for refinement of the coarse cast structure. The cycle time for one pass was identified as the criticl processing variable with respect to microstructural evolution for a set of deformation conditions typically used during breakdown by radial forging. 10 refs., 18 figs.

  19. Identification and characterization of a twist ortholog in the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii reveals mesodermal expression of Pdu-twist.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Schaub, Christoph; Wolfstetter, Georg; Dorresteijn, Adriaan

    2013-09-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor twist plays a key role during mesoderm development in Bilateria. In this study, we identified a twist ortholog in the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii and analyze its expression during larval development, postlarval growth up to the adult stage, and caudal regeneration after amputation of posterior segments. At late larval stages, Pdu-twist is expressed in the mesodermal anlagen and in developing muscles. During adulthood and caudal regeneration, Pdu-twist is expressed in the posterior growth zone, in mesodermal cells within the newly forming segments and budding parapodia. Our results indicate that Pdu-twist is involved in mesoderm formation during larval development, posterior growth, and caudal regeneration. PMID:23817621

  20. Optical Twist Induced by Plasmonic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Neng; Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2016-06-01

    Harvesting light for optical torque is of significant importance, owing to its ability to rotate nano- or micro-objects. Nevertheless, applying a strong optical torque remains a challenging task: angular momentum must conserve but light is limited. A simple argument shows the tendency for two objects with strong mutual scattering or light exchange to exhibit a conspicuously enhanced optical torque without large extinction or absorption cross section. The torque on each object is almost equal but opposite, which we called optical twist. The effect is quite significant for plasmonic particle cluster, but can also be observed in structures with other morphologies. Such approach exhibits an unprecedentedly large torque to light extinction or absorption ratio, enabling limited light to exert a relatively large torque without severe heating. Our work contributes to the understanding of optical torque and introduces a novel way to manipulate the internal degrees of freedom of a structured particle cluster.

  1. Twists and turns: a scientific journey.

    PubMed

    Tilghman, Shirley M

    2014-01-01

    In this perspective I look back on the twists and turns that influenced the direction of my scientific career over the past 40 years. From my early ambition to be a chemist to my training in Philadelphia and Bethesda as a molecular biologist, I benefited enormously from generous and valuable mentoring. In my independent career in Philadelphia and Princeton, I was motivated by a keen interest in the changes in gene expression that direct the development of the mammalian embryo and inspired by the creativity and energy of my students, fellows, and research staff. After twelve years as President of Princeton University, I have happily returned to the faculty of the Department of Molecular Biology. PMID:25288111

  2. Twisting of light around rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, Fabrizio; Thidé, Bo; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel; Anzolin, Gabriele

    2011-03-01

    Kerr black holes are among the most intriguing predictions of Einstein's general relativity theory. These rotating massive astrophysical objects drag and intermix their surrounding space and time, deflecting and phase-modifying light emitted near them. We have found that this leads to a new relativistic effect that imprints orbital angular momentum on such light. Numerical experiments, based on the integration of the null geodesic equations of light from orbiting point-like sources in the Kerr black hole equatorial plane to an asymptotic observer, indeed identify the phase change and wavefront warping and predict the associated light-beam orbital angular momentum spectra. Setting up the best existing telescopes properly, it should be possible to detect and measure this twisted light, thus allowing a direct observational demonstration of the existence of rotating black holes. As non-rotating objects are more an exception than a rule in the Universe, our findings are of fundamental importance.

  3. The twisted diversion: a paralyzing complication

    PubMed Central

    Hiew, Kenneth; Glendinning, Richard; Parr, Nigel; Kumar, Manal

    2013-01-01

    Ileal conduit remains a widely used urinary diversion performed after radical cystectomy. However, complications of ileal conduits remain an important concern in urological surgery. We report a rare case of an ileal conduit stricture, which can have grim complications if unobserved during the operation. Following an initial operation of radical cystectomy and ileal conduit formation in France in 2011, an 80-year-old male travelled back to the UK after 4 months of general weakness and limb paralysis. Initial blood test shows life-threatening hyperkalemia and worsened renal function. Subsequent ultrasound KUB scan and loopogram revealed obstructive uropathy. The initial management includes intravenous antibiotics and bilateral nephrostomies were inserted to aid diversion of urine. A thorough surgical exploration revealed a twisted, fibrous mesenteric band adhered to the proximal part of the ileal conduit. Only one case report of ileal conduit stenosis was described many years after the procedure. PMID:24963928

  4. Optical Twist Induced by Plasmonic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Neng; Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Harvesting light for optical torque is of significant importance, owing to its ability to rotate nano- or micro-objects. Nevertheless, applying a strong optical torque remains a challenging task: angular momentum must conserve but light is limited. A simple argument shows the tendency for two objects with strong mutual scattering or light exchange to exhibit a conspicuously enhanced optical torque without large extinction or absorption cross section. The torque on each object is almost equal but opposite, which we called optical twist. The effect is quite significant for plasmonic particle cluster, but can also be observed in structures with other morphologies. Such approach exhibits an unprecedentedly large torque to light extinction or absorption ratio, enabling limited light to exert a relatively large torque without severe heating. Our work contributes to the understanding of optical torque and introduces a novel way to manipulate the internal degrees of freedom of a structured particle cluster. PMID:27291860

  5. Bounds on tensor wave and twisted inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Sudhakar; Sami, M.; Ward, John

    2010-11-15

    We study the bounds on tensor wave in a class of twisted inflation models, where D(4+2k)-branes are wrapped on cycles in the compact manifold and wrap the Kaluza-Klein direction in the corresponding effective field theory. While the lower bound is found to be analogous to that in type IIB models of brane inflation, the upper bound turns out to be significantly different. This is argued for a range of values for the parameter g{sub s}M satisfying the self-consistency relation and the WMAP data. Further, we observe that the wrapped D8-brane appears to be the most attractive from a cosmological perspective.

  6. Optical Twist Induced by Plasmonic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Neng; Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Harvesting light for optical torque is of significant importance, owing to its ability to rotate nano- or micro-objects. Nevertheless, applying a strong optical torque remains a challenging task: angular momentum must conserve but light is limited. A simple argument shows the tendency for two objects with strong mutual scattering or light exchange to exhibit a conspicuously enhanced optical torque without large extinction or absorption cross section. The torque on each object is almost equal but opposite, which we called optical twist. The effect is quite significant for plasmonic particle cluster, but can also be observed in structures with other morphologies. Such approach exhibits an unprecedentedly large torque to light extinction or absorption ratio, enabling limited light to exert a relatively large torque without severe heating. Our work contributes to the understanding of optical torque and introduces a novel way to manipulate the internal degrees of freedom of a structured particle cluster. PMID:27291860

  7. Twisting algebraically special solutions in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi de Freitas, Gabriel; Godazgar, Mahdi; Reall, Harvey S.

    2016-05-01

    We determine the general form of the solutions of the five-dimensional vacuum Einstein equations with cosmological constant for which (i) the Weyl tensor is everywhere type II or more special in the null alignment classification of Coley et al, and (ii) the 3 × 3 matrix encoding the expansion, shear and twist of the aligned null direction has rank 2. The dependence of the solution on two coordinates is determined explicitly, so the Einstein equation reduces to PDEs in the three remaining coordinates, just as for four-dimensional (4d) algebraically special solutions. The solutions fall into several families. One of these consists of warped products of 4d algebraically special solutions. The others are new.

  8. The Twisting Jet from the Vela Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teter, M. A.; Pavlov, G. G.; Sanwal, D.; Kargaltsev, O.

    2002-05-01

    Observations of the Vela pulsar-wind nebula (PWN) with Chandra have revealed a long, thin filament -- an extension of the pulsar's jet beyond the bright outer arc confining the PWN in the direction of the pulsar's proper motion. This curved external jet terminates in a region of enhanced emission (a blob) at a distance of about 100'' (0.15 pc) from the pulsar, larger than the size of the PWN. The shape of the jet and its brightness are seen to vary on a timescale as short as a few days, its remote parts move in the sky plane with apparent velocities of up to 0.2 c. The X-ray spectrum of the external jet, including the termination blob, shows no spectral features. It is well described by a power-law model with a photon-index of γ ~= 1.2 (slightly harder than the average spectrum of the PWN, γ ~= 1.5). This indicates that the jet's radiation is due to synchrotron emission of relativistic particles in a magnetic field. The fact that the jet remains confined, although it twists at large distances from the pulsar, suggests a self-confining structure of its magnetic field. The varying shape and intensity of this stream of relativistic particles can be associated with varying local conditions in the Vela SNR and/or large-scale MHD instabilities and internal variations of the magnetic field within the jet. We will present a movie with a sequence of 12 Chandra images over past two years, demonstrating the structure of the twisting jet, and discuss various interpretations of these observations. The work was partially supported by SAO grant GO2-3091X and NASA grant NAG5-10865.

  9. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Annual report, September 28, 1995--September 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeyer, B.L.

    1997-09-01

    The digital fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economic to develop using verticle wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional verticle wells while maintaining verticle communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three verticle wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  10. Wind-tunnel static and free-flight investigation of high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a model of the EA-6B airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Hahne, David E.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel and the Langley 12-Foot Low-Speed Tunnel to identify factors contributing to a directional divergence at high angles of attack for the EA-6B airplane. The study consisted of static wind-tunnel tests, smoke and tuft flow-visualization tests, and free-flight tests of a 1/8.5-scale model of the airplane. The results of the investigation indicate that the directional divergence of the airplane is brought about by a loss of directional stability and effective dihedral at high angles of attack. Several modifications were tested that significantly alleviate the stability problem. The results of the free-flight study show that the modified configuration exhibits good dynamic stability characteristics and could be flown at angles of attack significantly higher than those of the unmodified configuration.

  11. Large-scale wind-tunnel investigation of a close-coupled canard-delta-wing fighter model through high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, F.; Koenig, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained through very high angles of attack from a large-scale, subsonic wind-tunnel test of a close-coupled canard-delta-wing fighter model are analyzed. The canard delays wing leading-edge vortex breakdown, even for angles of attack at which the canard is completely stalled. A vortex-lattice method was applied which gave good predictions of lift and pitching moment up to an angle of attack of about 20 deg, where vortex-breakdown effects on performance become significant. Pitch-control inputs generally retain full effectiveness up to the angle of attack of maximum lift, beyond which, effectiveness drops off rapidly. A high-angle-of-attack prediction method gives good estimates of lift and drag for the completely stalled aircraft. Roll asymmetry observed at zero sideslip is apparently caused by an asymmetry in the model support structure.

  12. Geometry and crystallographic configuration of grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Jan; Weikusat, Ilka; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Binder, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Ice cores provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental mechanisms which control the internal flow of ice sheets. Different kinds of deformation processes acting on the micro-scale are responsible for the viscoplastic behavior on large scale. Careful interpretation of microstructural features such as grain size, shape, lattice orientation and the occurrence of subgrain boundaries can help us to follow these processes and to improve our understanding of ice rheology. Polarized light microscopy experienced a quick development in the last decade. A new generation of automatic fabric analyzers enables to measure c-axis orientations in µm-resolution. This high amount and quality of fabric data motivates to apply digital-image-processing routines (DIP) for the recognition and quantification of microstructural patterns. Here we present a study on grain boundaries based on the acquisition of more than 700 fabric images recorded along the NEEM ice core (Greenland). Geometrical characteristics of grain boundaries are studied as well as their cross-sectional orientations in relation to the c-axis orientations of the corresponding adjacent grains. We could follow the evolution from the initial N-type and P-type low-angle boundaries (Weikusat et al., 2011) to high angle boundaries during rotation recrystallization. In agreement with some previous studies we confirm that the established three-stage-recrystallization model may be an oversimplification. According to our results, rotation recrystallization as well as grain boundary migration are actually present in all depths with varying intensities at NEEM. I. Weikusat, A. Miyamoto, S. H. Faria, S. Kipfstuhl, N. Azuma, and T. Hondoh: Subgrain boundaries in Antarctic ice quantified by X-ray Laue diffraction. J. Glaciol., 57(201):85-94, 2011. doi: 10013/epic.36402.

  13. Simulation study of twisted crystal growth in organic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Alta; Haataja, Mikko

    2015-10-01

    Many polymer and organic small-molecule thin films crystallize with microstructures that twist or curve in a regular manner as crystal growth proceeds. Here we present a phase-field model that energetically favors twisting of the three-dimensional crystalline orientation about and along particular axes, allowing morphologies such as banded spherulites, curved dendrites, and "s"- or "c"-shaped needle crystals to be simulated. When twisting about the fast-growing crystalline axis is energetically favored and spherulitic growth conditions are imposed, crystallization occurs in the form of banded spherulites composed of radially oriented twisted crystalline fibers. Due to the lack of symmetry, twisting along the normal growth direction leads to heterochiral banded spherulites with opposite twist handedness in each half of the spherulite. When twisting is instead favored about the axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate and along the normal growth direction under diffusion-limited single-crystalline growth conditions, crystallization occurs in the form of curved dendrites with uniformly rotating branches. We show that the rate at which the branches curve affects not only the morphology but also the overall kinetics of crystallization, as the total crystallized area at a given time is maximized for a finite turning rate.

  14. Simulation study of twisted crystal growth in organic thin films.

    PubMed

    Fang, Alta; Haataja, Mikko

    2015-10-01

    Many polymer and organic small-molecule thin films crystallize with microstructures that twist or curve in a regular manner as crystal growth proceeds. Here we present a phase-field model that energetically favors twisting of the three-dimensional crystalline orientation about and along particular axes, allowing morphologies such as banded spherulites, curved dendrites, and "s"- or "c"-shaped needle crystals to be simulated. When twisting about the fast-growing crystalline axis is energetically favored and spherulitic growth conditions are imposed, crystallization occurs in the form of banded spherulites composed of radially oriented twisted crystalline fibers. Due to the lack of symmetry, twisting along the normal growth direction leads to heterochiral banded spherulites with opposite twist handedness in each half of the spherulite. When twisting is instead favored about the axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate and along the normal growth direction under diffusion-limited single-crystalline growth conditions, crystallization occurs in the form of curved dendrites with uniformly rotating branches. We show that the rate at which the branches curve affects not only the morphology but also the overall kinetics of crystallization, as the total crystallized area at a given time is maximized for a finite turning rate. PMID:26565254

  15. The Small C-terminal Domain Phosphatase 1 Inhibits Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Dephosphorylating Ser(P)68-Twist1 to Accelerate Twist1 Protein Degradation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Fu, Junjiang; Shen, Tao; Lin, Xia; Liao, Lan; Feng, Xin-Hua; Xu, Jianming

    2016-05-27

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that strongly promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. The MAPK-phosphorylated Twist1 on its serine 68 (Ser(P)(68)-Twist1) has a significantly enhanced stability and function to drive cancer cell invasion and metastasis. However, the phosphatase that dephosphorylates Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and destabilizes Twist1 has not been identified and characterized. In this study, we screened a serine/threonine phosphatase cDNA expression library in HEK293T cells with ectopically coexpressed Twist1. We found that the small C-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (SCP1) specifically dephosphorylates Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 in both cell-free reactions and living cells. SCP1 uses its amino acid residues 43-63 to interact with the N terminus of Twist1. Increased SCP1 expression in cells decreased Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and total Twist1 proteins, whereas knockdown of SCP1 increased Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and total Twist1 proteins. Furthermore, the levels of SCP1 are negatively correlated with Twist1 protein levels in several cancer cell lines. SCP1-dephosphorylated Twist1 undergoes fast degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Importantly, an increase in SCP1 expression in breast cancer cells with either endogenous or ectopically expressed Twist1 largely inhibits the Twist1-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype and the migration and invasion capabilities of these cells. These results indicate that SCP1 is the phosphatase that counterregulates the MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of Ser(68)-Twist1. Thus, an increase in SCP1 expression and activity may be a useful strategy for eliminating the detrimental roles of Twist1 in cancer cells. PMID:26975371

  16. Aerodynamic Design Study of an Advanced Active Twist Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    An Advanced Active Twist Rotor (AATR) is currently being developed by the U.S. Army Vehicle Technology Directorate at NASA Langley Research Center. As a part of this effort, an analytical study was conducted to determine the impact of blade geometry on active-twist performance and, based on those findings, propose a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR. The process began by creating a baseline design which combined the dynamic design of the original Active Twist Rotor and the aerodynamic design of a high lift rotor concept. The baseline model was used to conduct a series of parametric studies to examine the effect of linear blade twist and blade tip sweep, droop, and taper on active-twist performance. Rotor power requirements and hub vibration were also examined at flight conditions ranging from hover to advance ratio = 0.40. A total of 108 candidate designs were analyzed using the second-generation version of the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD II) code. The study concluded that the vibration reduction capabilities of a rotor utilizing controlled, strain-induced twisting are enhanced through the incorporation of blade tip sweep, droop, and taper into the blade design, while they are degraded by increasing the nose-down linear blade twist. Based on the analysis of rotor power, hub vibration, and active-twist response, a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR consisting of a blade with approximately 10 degrees of linear blade twist and a blade tip design with 30 degree sweep, 10 degree droop, and 2.5:1 taper ratio over the outer five percent of the blade is proposed.

  17. Simulator study of the effectiveness of an automatic control system designed to improve the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of a fighter airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, W. P.; Nguyen, L. T.; Vangunst, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation was conducted to study the effectiveness of some automatic control system features designed to improve the stability and control characteristics of fighter airplanes at high angles of attack. These features include an angle-of-attack limiter, a normal-acceleration limiter, an aileron-rudder interconnect, and a stability-axis yaw damper. The study was based on a current lightweight fighter prototype. The aerodynamic data used in the simulation were measured on a 0.15-scale model at low Reynolds number and low subsonic Mach number. The simulation was conducted on the Langley differential maneuvering simulator, and the evaluation involved representative combat maneuvering. Results of the investigation show the fully augmented airplane to be quite stable and maneuverable throughout the operational angle-of-attack range. The angle-of-attack/normal-acceleration limiting feature of the pitch control system is found to be a necessity to avoid angle-of-attack excursions at high angles of attack. The aileron-rudder interconnect system is shown to be very effective in making the airplane departure resistant while the stability-axis yaw damper provided improved high-angle-of-attack roll performance with a minimum of sideslip excursions.

  18. Quantum communication through a spin ring with twisted boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Jin, B.-Q.; Korepin, V. E.

    2005-08-01

    We investigate quantum communication between the sites of a spin ring with twisted boundary conditions. Such boundary conditions can be achieved by a magnetic flux through the ring. We find that a nonzero twist can improve communication through finite odd-numbered rings and enable high-fidelity multiparty quantum communication through spin rings (working near perfectly for rings of five and seven spins). We show that in certain cases, the twist results in the complete blockage of quantum-information flow to a certain site of the ring. This effect can be exploited to interface and entangle a flux qubit and a spin qubit without embedding the latter in a magnetic field.

  19. Twist-4 effects in electroproduction: Canonical operators and coefficient functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, R. L.; Soldate, M.

    1982-07-01

    The interpretation of observed scaling violations in leptoproduction is complicated by the possible presence of significant higher-twist effects. We refine the machinery of the operator-product expansion sufficiently for a study of twist-4 effects. In particular, we introduce and review the advantages of a special, "canonical" basis. We demonstrate that the canonical basis is adequate for the necessary twist-4 perturbative calculations, and calculate the operators' tree-level coefficient functions in electroproduction. Our results establish a framework within which careful analysis of more accurate data can provide information regarding correlations among the constituents of the proton.

  20. Assembly and Folding of Twisted Baskets in Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Pratumyot, Yaowalak; Chen, Shigui; Hu, Lei; Polen, Shane M; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2016-09-01

    A synthetic method for obtaining enantiopure and twisted baskets of type (P)-3 is described. These chiral cavitands were found to fold quinoline gates, at the rim of their twisted platform, in acetonitrile and give molecular capsules that assemble into large unilamellar vesicles. In a less polar dichloromethane, however, cup-shaped (P)-3 packed into vesicles but with the quinoline gates in an unfolded orientation. The ability of twisted baskets to form functional nanostructured materials could be of interest for building stereoselective sensors and catalysts. PMID:27513214

  1. Twisting of nanowires induced by anisotropic surface stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Shan; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Wang, Gang-Feng; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2008-05-01

    Many natural and synthetic quasi-one-dimensional materials are of helical or twisting shape and understanding the physical mechanisms underlying the asymmetric shape is of both theoretical and technological significances. In this letter, we pointed out that anisotropic surface stresses present as a possible reason for the formation of some micro-/nanohelices. Using Gurtin's theory of surface elasticity, we quantitatively investigated the twisting deformation of nanowires due to anisotropic surface stresses. The present model can also elucidate the formation of some other helical materials at micro- and nanoscales, e.g., twisting lamellae in polymer spherulites, spiraled bacteria, and flagella.

  2. Twisted transition of one bit written by trapezoidal single pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengbin; Yuan, Zhimin; Taslim, Sumitro Joyo; Yu, Shengkai; Liu, Bo

    This paper investigates bits transition shift written by a trapezoid single pole at a large skew angle. This work uses the even harmonic ripple effect to modulate the demagnetization field and observe the transition shape clearly. Experiment results indicate that the trapezoid single pole can produce a twisted transition at a large skew angle. This phenomenon is mainly due to the low-frequency data overwriting on the media. The twisted transition will limit the recording density in the perpendicular recording. Simulation work was completed to validate our experiment results. It suggests that the structure of single pole should be further improved to solve the twisted transition generated by the trapezoid single pole.

  3. Twisted conformal algebra related to κ -Minkowski space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meljanac, Stjepan; Pachoł, Anna; Pikutić, Danijel

    2015-11-01

    Twisted deformations of the conformal symmetry in the Hopf algebraic framework are constructed. The first one is obtained by a Jordanian twist built up from dilatation and momenta generators. The second is the lightlike κ -deformation of the Poincaré algebra extended to the conformal algebra, obtained by a twist corresponding to the extended Jordanian r -matrix. The κ -Minkowski spacetime is covariant quantum space under both of these deformations. The extension of the conformal algebra by the noncommutative coordinates is presented in two cases. The differential realizations for κ -Minkowski coordinates, as well as their left-right dual counterparts, are also included.

  4. Stability of spiral wave vortex filaments with phase twists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Keeyeol; Ott, Edward; Guzdar, Parvez N.; Gabbay, Michael

    1998-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the stability of a straight vortex filament with phase twist described by the three-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE). The results of the linear stability analysis show that the straight filament is stable in a limited region of the two parameter space of the CGLE. The stable region is dependent on the phase twist imposed on the filament and shrinks in size as the phase twist is increased. It is also shown numerically that the nonlinear evolution of an unstable initial straight filament can lead to a helical filament.

  5. A Computational Investigation of Random Angle Grain Boundaries for CdTe Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurma, Christopher; Chan, Maria; Klie, Robert; Sivananthan, Sivalingam; DOE Bridge Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Grain boundaries (GB) in poly-CdTe solar cells play an important role in species diffusion, segregation, defect formation, and carrier recombination. Many studies on GBs in CdTe focus on either entire grain-boundary networks found in complete poly-CdTe devices, those exhibiting high symmetry such as the coincident site lattice (CSL) or symmetric tilt or twist, or on very small scale Scanning-Tunneling Electron Microscopse (STEM) viewable interfaces and dislocations. The topic of this talk is a comprehensive survey of the grain boundary parameter space regardless of the degree of symmetry found and whether the STEM channeling condition is satisfied. Our survey encompasses both near-CSL or vicinal grain boundaries decorated with nearby dislocations, as well as mixed tilt and twist interfaces with all possible symmetrically inequivalent grain boundary planes. Atomistic calculations using a Stillinger-Weber potential will be presented on a large representative sample of random-angle GBs. Trends in interfacial energies and atomistic structures as a function of tilt/twist/displacement parameters will be investigated. First principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations will be performed on a subset of these GBs to reveal their electronic structures and their implications towards PV performance. DoE Sunshot program contract DOE DEEE005956. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the USDoE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. The Heterodimeric TWIST1-E12 Complex Drives the Oncogenic Potential of TWIST1 in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jacqueroud, Laurent; Bouard, Charlotte; Richard, Geoffrey; Payen, Léa; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Spicer, Douglas B; Caramel, Julie; Collin, Guillaume; Puisieux, Alain; Tissier, Agnès; Ansieau, Stéphane

    2016-05-01

    The TWIST1 embryonic transcription factor displays biphasic functions during the course of carcinogenesis. It facilitates the escape of cells from oncogene-induced fail-safe programs (senescence, apoptosis) and their consequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, it promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and the initiation of the metastatic spread of cancer cells. Interestingly, cancer cells recurrently remain dependent on TWIST1 for their survival and/or proliferation, making TWIST1 their Achilles' heel. TWIST1 has been reported to form either homodimeric or heterodimeric complexes mainly in association with the E bHLH class I proteins. These complexes display distinct, sometimes even antagonistic, functions during development and unequal prometastatic functions in prostate cancer cells. Using a tethered dimer strategy, we successively assessed the ability of TWIST1 dimers to cooperate with an activated version of RAS in human mammary epithelial cell transformation, to provide mice with the ability to spontaneously develop breast tumors, and lastly to maintain a senescence program at a latent state in several breast cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that the TWIST1-E12 complex, unlike the homodimer, is an oncogenic form of TWIST1 in mammary epithelial cells and that efficient binding of both partners is a prerequisite for its activity. The detection of the heterodimer in human premalignant lesions by a proximity ligation assay, at a stage preceding the initiation of the metastatic cascade, is coherent with such an oncogenic function. TWIST1-E protein heterodimeric complexes may thus constitute the main active forms of TWIST1 with regard to senescence inhibition over the time course of breast tumorigenesis. PMID:27237323

  7. Renormalization of quark propagator, vertex functions, and twist-2 operators from twisted-mass lattice QCD at Nf=4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossier, Benoît.; Brinet, Mariane; Guichon, Pierre; Morénas, Vincent; Pène, Olivier; Rodríguez-Quintero, Jose; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2015-06-01

    We present a precise nonperturbative determination of the renormalization constants in the mass independent RI'-MOM scheme. The lattice implementation uses the Iwasaki gauge action and four degenerate dynamical twisted-mass fermions. The gauge configurations are provided by the ETM Collaboration. Renormalization constants for scalar, pseudoscalar, vector and axial operators, as well as the quark propagator renormalization, are computed at three different values of the lattice spacing, two volumes and several twisted-mass parameters. The method we developed allows for a precise cross-check of the running, thanks to the particular proper treatment of hypercubic artifacts. Results for the twist-2 operator O44 are also presented.

  8. Twist effect and sensing of few mode polymer fibre Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Binbin; Luo, Yanhua; Bhowmik, Kishore; Rajan, Ginu; Ji, Minning; Wen, Jianxiang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-01-01

    For the development of the twist sensor based on few mode polymer optical fibre (POF) gratings, we investigated the twist effect of few mode (FM) POF Bragg gratings with large twist, and found the twist effect on reflection is highly mode dependent-insignificant on the fundamental mode and considerable on higher order modes, which seems closely related to the symmetry of modal field. In addition, Bragg wavelengths of both the fundamental mode and higher modes red-shift with the twisting and blue-shift with the twist releasing, and they almost display the similar response trend without any mode dependence. Further analysis found that the red-shift of the Bragg wavelength should be attributed to the redistribution of the pre-strain applied upon the POF, activated by twist. Finally, based on the reflection response to the twist, one kind of twist sensing scheme with few mode POF gratings has been demonstrated, showing great potential as a twist sensor.

  9. Strain softening mechanism at meso scale during micro-compression in an ultrafine-grained pure copper

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jie; Li, Jianwei; Shan, Debin; Guo, Bin

    2015-09-15

    Strain softening behavior has been found at meso scale using micro-compression testing in an ultrafine-grained (UFG) pure copper by comparison with the typical strain hardening in conventional coarse-grained (CG) material. Microstructural observations show that grain size remains nearly the same including the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries during micro-compression in UFG pure copper. The Kernel average misorientation(KAM) distribution measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), as a statistical method, is applied to qualitatively evaluate dislocation density in the interior of the grains. It is suggested that the deformation mechanisms are dominated by grain boundary sliding and grain rotation accompanied by dislocation slip in UFG pure copper, which demonstrates that the strain softening behavior is primarily caused by dislocation annihilation during micro-compression.

  10. The control of non-twisting somersaults using configuration changes.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, M R; Mikulcik, E C

    1996-10-01

    Theoretical analyses have shown that rotations of a rigid body about the principal axis corresponding to the intermediate principal moment of inertia are unstable. This poses a potential problem for gymnasts who perform double somersaults without twist in a layout configuration. A computer simulation model is used to investigate configurational strategies for controlling such movements. It is shown that the build up of twist is not reduced by abduction of the arms but can be controlled by adopting a configuration with sufficient body flexion. For somersaults with a straight body, control in the form of asymmetrical arm abduction accelerations, based upon twist angular velocity and angular acceleration, is capable of preventing a build up of twist providing that the feedback time delay is less than a quarter somersault. PMID:8884479

  11. Quarks with Twisted Boundary Conditions in the Epsilon Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mehen; Brian C. Tiburzi

    2005-05-01

    We study the effects of twisted boundary conditions on the quark fields in the epsilon regime of chiral perturbation theory. We consider the SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} chiral theory with non-degenerate quarks and the SU(3){sub L} x SU(3){sub R} chiral theory with massless up and down quarks and massive strange quarks. The partition function and condensate are derived for each theory. Because flavor-neutral Goldstone bosons are unaffected by twisted boundary conditions chiral symmetry is still restored in finite volumes. The dependence of the condensate on the twisting parameters can be used to extract the pion decay constant from simulations in the epsilon regime. The relative contribution to the partition function from sectors of different topological charge is numerically insensitive to twisted boundary conditions.

  12. Applying twisted boundary conditions for few-body nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körber, Christopher; Luu, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We describe and implement twisted boundary conditions for the deuteron and triton systems within finite volumes using the nuclear lattice EFT formalism. We investigate the finite-volume dependence of these systems with different twist angles. We demonstrate how various finite-volume information can be used to improve calculations of binding energies in such a framework. Our results suggests that with appropriate twisting of boundaries, infinite-volume binding energies can be reliably extracted from calculations using modest volume sizes with cubic length L ≈8 -14 fm. Of particular importance is our derivation and numerical verification of three-body analogs of "i-periodic" twist angles that eliminate the leading-order finite-volume effects to the three-body binding energy.

  13. DNA Twist Stability Changes with Magnesium(2 + ) Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekmans, Onno D.; King, Graeme A.; Stephens, Greg J.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2016-06-01

    To understand DNA elasticity at high forces (F >30 pN ), its helical nature must be taken into account, as a coupling between twist and stretch. The prevailing model, the wormlike chain, was previously extended to include this twist-stretch coupling. Motivated by DNA's charged nature, and the known effects of ionic charges on its elasticity, we set out to systematically measure the impact of buffer ionic conditions on twist-stretch coupling. After developing a robust fitting approach, we show, using our new data set, that DNA's helical twist is stabilized at high concentrations of the magnesium divalent cation. DNA's persistence length and stretch modulus are, on the other hand, relatively insensitive to the applied range of ionic strengths.

  14. 6. DETAIL OF GUSSET WITH CURVE ANGLE IRON AND TWISTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF GUSSET WITH CURVE ANGLE IRON AND TWISTED STRIPS, FORMING SUN RAY PATTERN. LATTICE RAILING AT LOWER RIGHT. - River Road Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek in Spring Creek Township, Hallton, Elk County, PA

  15. 14. DETAIL OF GUSSET WITH CURVE ANGLE IRON AND TWISTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF GUSSET WITH CURVE ANGLE IRON AND TWISTED STRIPS, FORMING SUN RAY PATTERN. LATTICE RAILING AT LOWER RIGHT. - River Road Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek in Spring Creek Township, Hallton, Elk County, PA

  16. Determination of Elastic Twist in Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, F.; Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Andrews, B.

    2006-06-01

    This report presents the results of a project at the Alternative Energy Institute (AEI) which measured and calculated the elastic twist of three representative composite horizontal-axis blades: Carter 300, Gougeon ESI 54, and UTRC 8 kW.

  17. Solar Material Twists on Sun’s Surface

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar material twists above the sun’s surface in this close-up captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on June 7-8, 2016, showcasing the turbulence caused by combative magnetic forces on the ...

  18. Light Front Wave Function for Hadrons with Arbitrary Twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Alfredo; Schmidt, Ivan; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2016-07-01

    We present a phenomenological light-front wave function for hadrons with arbitrary twist dimension (mesons, baryons and multiquark states), which gives the correct scaling behavior of structure functions and form factors. Some examples of his uses are presented.

  19. Transmission characteristics of a twisted nematic liquid-crystal layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinberg, J.; Jacobson, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    An approximate analytical expression is calculated for the transmission of thin twisted nematic layers situated between a polarizer/analyzer pair. The approximation assumes that the twist angle of the nematic liquid crystal is smaller than the maximum retardation of the cell. The direction of the incident light is assumed to be parallel to the normal of the electrode. This configuration is analyzed for a general arrangement of polarizer and analyzer; the general result is evaluated for the case of the polarizer parallel and analyzer perpendicular to the liquid-crystal optical axis on the input and output electrodes, respectively. The results show that in the case of a thin twisted nematic layer the transmission depends on the thickness of the layer, on the birefringence of the liquid crystal, and on the wavelength of the light. This is a departure from the well-known independence of the transmission on these parameters for a thick twisted nematic layer.

  20. Light Front Wave Function for Hadrons with Arbitrary Twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Alfredo; Schmidt, Ivan; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2016-05-01

    We present a phenomenological light-front wave function for hadrons with arbitrary twist dimension (mesons, baryons and multiquark states), which gives the correct scaling behavior of structure functions and form factors. Some examples of his uses are presented.

  1. Magneto-Acoustic Waves in Compressible Magnetically Twisted Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, Robert; Fedun, Viktor

    2010-05-01

    The oscillatory modes of a magnetically twisted compressible flux tube embedded in a compressible magnetic environment are investigated in cylindrical geometry. Solutions to the governing equations to linear wave perturbations are derived in terms of Whittaker’s functions. A general dispersion equation is obtained in terms of Kummer’s functions for the approximation of weak and uniform internal twist, which is a good initial working model for flux tubes in solar applications. The sausage, kink and fluting modes are examined by means of the derived exact dispersion equation. The solutions of this general dispersion equation are found numerically under plasma conditions representative of the solar photosphere and corona. Solutions for the phase speed of the allowed eigenmodes are obtained for a range of wavenumbers and varying magnetic twist. Our results generalise previous classical and widely applied studies of MHD waves and oscillations in magnetic loops without a magnetic twist. Potential applications to solar magneto-seismology are discussed.

  2. Effect of flow twisting on hydraulic resistance and heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, V. Ya.; Makarov, N. A.

    1989-02-01

    On the basis of dimensional analysis through a differentiated approach to the dimensions of length we have obtained formulas for the effect of flow twisting in a circular tube on the hydraulic resistance and exchange of heat.

  3. Packing with a twist: from Wrinkles to Scrolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrolli, Arshad; Chopin, Julien

    2012-02-01

    We discuss an experimental investigation of a thin elastic sheet in the form of a ribbon with clamped boundary conditions at both ends which is then subjected to a twist by rotating the ends through a prescribed angle. We find that a wrinkling instability appears even at a small twist angle which depends on the aspect ratio of the ribbon, its bending modulus and initial tension. Using x-ray tomography, we show that the pattern of this first instability has an impact on the folding at larger twist angles which can result in ordered configurations including Fermat scrolls. Still further twisting results in a highly compressive packing as in wringing a towel without application of direct radial compression. Implications for developing yarns with novel mechanical and transport properties [Lima, et al., Science 331, 51 (2011)] will be discussed.

  4. Whittaker modules for the twisted Heisenberg-Virasoro algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Dong; Wu Yuezhu; Zhu Linsheng

    2010-02-15

    We define Whittaker modules for the twisted Heisenberg-Virasoro algebra and obtain several results from the classical setting, including a classification of simple Whittaker modules by central characters.

  5. Randomized Grain Boundary Liquid Crystal Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Wang, H.; Li, M.; Glaser, M.; Maclennan, J.; Clark, N.

    2012-02-01

    The formation of macroscopic, chiral domains, in the B4 and dark conglomerate phases, for example, is a feature of bent-core liquid crystals resulting from the interplay of chirality, molecular bend and molecular tilt. We report a new, chiral phase observed in a hockey stick-like liquid crystal molecule. This phase appears below a smectic A phase and cools to a crystal phase. TEM images of the free surface of the chiral phase show hundreds of randomly oriented smectic blocks several hundred nanometers in size, similar to those seen in the twist grain boundary (TGB) phase. However, in contrast to the TGB phase, these blocks are randomly oriented. The characteristic defects in this phase are revealed by freeze-fracture TEM images. We will show how these defects mediate the randomized orientation and discuss the intrinsic mechanism driving the formation of this phase. This work is supported by NSF MRSEC Grant DMR0820579 and NSF Grant DMR0606528.

  6. Grain Boundary Character Distribution of TLM Titanium Alloy During Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, X. F.; Zhao, Y. Q.; Jia, Z. Q.; Zhang, Y. S.; Li, B.

    2016-06-01

    The grain boundary character distribution of TLM titanium alloy (with a nominal chemical composition of Ti-3Zr-2Sn-3Mo-25Nb) was studied under the deformation condition with different strain rates and compression reductions. The experimental results showed that the evolution and character distribution of grain boundaries structure during deformation were both related to grain boundary coupling, sliding, migration, and the grain rotating in nature. In TLM titanium alloy, the type of grain boundaries under different deformation condition included high-angle boundaries, low-angle boundaries, and the CSL boundaries of Σ3, Σ13, Σ29, and Σ39. Under the strain rate of 1 s-1, the numbers of grain boundaries with misorientation angle of 3°, 30°, and 60° all decreased obviously with the increasing compression reduction to 4.5%, comparing to those obtained under the strain rate of 0.001 s-1. Under the strain rate of 1 s-1, the numbers of Σ29 boundaries greatly increased with the compression reductions of 3 to 4.5% comparing to those obtained under the strain rate of 0.001 s-1, and the numbers of Σ3 boundaries increased firstly and then stabilized with the compression reduction increasing from 0 to 4%, while the numbers of Σ39 boundaries decreased with the compression reduction increasing to 4.5%.

  7. Non-geometric fluxes, quasi-Hopf twist deformations, and nonassociative quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Mylonas, Dionysios Szabo, Richard J.; Schupp, Peter

    2014-12-15

    We analyse the symmetries underlying nonassociative deformations of geometry in non-geometric R-flux compactifications which arise via T-duality from closed strings with constant geometric fluxes. Starting from the non-abelian Lie algebra of translations and Bopp shifts in phase space, together with a suitable cochain twist, we construct the quasi-Hopf algebra of symmetries that deforms the algebra of functions and the exterior differential calculus in the phase space description of nonassociative R-space. In this setting, nonassociativity is characterised by the associator 3-cocycle which controls non-coassociativity of the quasi-Hopf algebra. We use abelian 2-cocycle twists to construct maps between the dynamical nonassociative star product and a family of associative star products parametrized by constant momentum surfaces in phase space. We define a suitable integration on these nonassociative spaces and find that the usual cyclicity of associative noncommutative deformations is replaced by weaker notions of 2-cyclicity and 3-cyclicity. Using this star product quantization on phase space together with 3-cyclicity, we formulate a consistent version of nonassociative quantum mechanics, in which we calculate the expectation values of area and volume operators, and find coarse-graining of the string background due to the R-flux.

  8. High-Precision Twist-Controlled Bilayer and Trilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Dong; Xin, Wei; Jiang, Wen-Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Chen, Yongsheng; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Twist-controlled bilayer graphene (tBLG) and double-twisted trilayer graphene (DTTG) with high precision are fabricated and their controllable optoelectronic properties are investigated for the first time. The successful fabrication of tBLG and DTTG with designated θ provides an attractive starting point for systematic studies of interlayer coupling in misoriented few-layer graphene systems with well-defined geometry. PMID:26822255

  9. Twist-4 effects and Q2 dependence of diffractive DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, M.; Genovese, M.; Nikolaev, N. N.; Pronyaev, A. V.; Zakharov, B. G.

    1998-03-01

    In this letter we report the direct perturbative QCD evaluation of twist-4 effects in diffractive DIS. They are large and have a strong impact on the Q2 dependence of diffractive structure functions at large β. Based on the AGK rules, we comment on the possible contribution from diffractive higher twists to ~1/Q2 corrections to proton structure function at small x. These corrections to the longitudinal structure function FL may be particularly large.

  10. Calculations of helical twisting powers from intermolecular torques.

    PubMed

    Earl, David J; Wilson, Mark R

    2004-05-22

    We present a Monte Carlo molecular simulation method that calculates the helical twisting power of a chiral molecule by sampling intermolecular torques. The approach is applied to an achiral nematic liquid crystalline system, composed of Gay-Berne particles, that is doped with chiral molecules. Calculations are presented for six chiral dopant molecules and the results show a good correlation with the sign and magnitude of experimentally determined helical twisting powers. PMID:15267981

  11. Extracting DNA Twist Rigidity from Experimental Supercoiling Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, Sébastien

    2004-11-01

    We use an elastic rod model with contact to study the extension versus rotation diagrams of single supercoiled DNA molecules. We reproduce quantitatively the supercoiling response of overtwisted DNA and, using experimental data, we obtain an estimate of the effective supercoiling radius and of the twist rigidity of B-DNA. We find that the twist rigidity of DNA seems to vary widely with the nature and concentration of the salt buffer in which it is immersed.

  12. Active-Twist Rotor Control Applications for UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Wilkie, W. Keats

    2004-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in active-twist rotor control is discussed using representative examples from analytical and experimental studies, and the application to rotary-wing UAVs is considered. Topics include vibration and noise reduction, rotor performance improvement, active blade tracking, stability augmentation, and rotor blade de-icing. A review of the current status of piezoelectric fiber composite actuator technology, the class of piezoelectric actuators implemented in active-twist rotor systems, is included.

  13. Topological Twisted Sigma Model with H-flux Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Wu-yen

    2006-08-18

    In this paper we revisit the topological twisted sigma model with H-flux. We explicitly expand and then twist the worldsheet Lagrangian for bi-Hermitian geometry. we show that the resulting action consists of a BRST exact term and pullback terms, which only depend on one of the two generalized complex structures and the B-field. We then discuss the topological feature of the model.

  14. Marketing Farm Grain Crops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridenour, Harlan E.

    This vocational agriculture curriculum on grain marketing contains three parts: teacher guide, student manual, and student workbook. All three are coordinated and cross-referenced. The course is designed to give students of grain marketing a thorough background in the subject and provide practical help in developing grain marketing strategies for…

  15. Grain structure and composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chapter 4 covers general information about structure and composition of cereal grains as well as the unique features of each cereal grain. Cereal grains are the fruits of cultivated grasses and members of Gramineae family. The fruit of a cereal is botanically known as caryopsis, featured by fusion...

  16. Twist-induced Magnetosphere Reconfiguration for Intermittent Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong; Tong, Hao

    2016-08-01

    We propose that the magnetosphere reconfiguration induced by magnetic twists in the closed field line region can account for the mode switching of intermittent pulsars. We carefully investigate the properties of axisymmetric force-free pulsar magnetospheres with magnetic twists in closed field line regions around the polar caps. The magnetosphere with twisted closed lines leads to enhanced spin-down rates. The enhancement in spin-down rate depends on the size of the region with twisted closed lines. Typically, it is increased by a factor of ∼2, which is consistent with the intermittent pulsars’ spin-down behavior during the “off” and “on” states. We find that there is a threshold of maximal twist angle {{Δ }}{φ }{{thres}}∼ 1. The magnetosphere is stable only if the closed line twist angle is less than {{Δ }}{φ }{{thres}}. Beyond this value, the magnetosphere becomes unstable and gets untwisted. The spin-down rate would reduce to its off-state value. The quasi-periodicity in spin-down rate change can be explained by long-term activities in the star’s crust and the untwisting induced by MHD instability. The estimated duration of on-state is about 1 week, consistent with observations. Due to the MHD instability, there exists an upper limit for the spin-down ratio (f∼ 3) between the on-state and the off-state, if the Y-point remains at the light cylinder.

  17. Twist-induced Magnetosphere Reconfiguration for Intermittent Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong; Tong, Hao

    2016-08-01

    We propose that the magnetosphere reconfiguration induced by magnetic twists in the closed field line region can account for the mode switching of intermittent pulsars. We carefully investigate the properties of axisymmetric force-free pulsar magnetospheres with magnetic twists in closed field line regions around the polar caps. The magnetosphere with twisted closed lines leads to enhanced spin-down rates. The enhancement in spin-down rate depends on the size of the region with twisted closed lines. Typically, it is increased by a factor of ˜2, which is consistent with the intermittent pulsars’ spin-down behavior during the “off” and “on” states. We find that there is a threshold of maximal twist angle {{Δ }}{φ }{{thres}}˜ 1. The magnetosphere is stable only if the closed line twist angle is less than {{Δ }}{φ }{{thres}}. Beyond this value, the magnetosphere becomes unstable and gets untwisted. The spin-down rate would reduce to its off-state value. The quasi-periodicity in spin-down rate change can be explained by long-term activities in the star’s crust and the untwisting induced by MHD instability. The estimated duration of on-state is about 1 week, consistent with observations. Due to the MHD instability, there exists an upper limit for the spin-down ratio (f˜ 3) between the on-state and the off-state, if the Y-point remains at the light cylinder.

  18. TWIST1 and BMI1 in Cancer Metastasis and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hong; Du, Peizhun; Ge, Zongyu; Jin, Yiting; Ding, Di; Liu, Xiuping; Zou, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Increasing evidences revealed that cancer cells with the characteristics of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) or cancer stem cells (CSC) have high ability of progression, invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance. TWIST1 and BMI1 are crucial transcription factors required for EMT and CSC. Both TWIST1 and BMI1 are up-regulated in various cancers and have a positive correlation with poor prognosis. Although recent results showed that the two molecules function in promoting cancer metastasis and chemoresistance respectively, the correlation of TWIST1 and BMI1 is not well understood. Methods In this review, we summarize recent advance in cancer research focus on TWIST1 and BMI1 in cancer metastasis and chemoresistance, and emphasize the possible link between EMT and CSC. Results Further investigation of TWIST1 and BMI1 cooperately promote CSC proliferation due to EMT-associated effect will help to understand the mechanism of tumor cells metastasis and chemoresistance. Conclusions TWIST1 and BMI1 in cancer cells will be effective targets for treating chemoresistant metastatic lesions. PMID:27326250

  19. Grain and grain boundary characters in surface layer of untreated and plasma nitrocarburized 18Ni maraging steel with nanocrystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, M. F.; Wu, Y. Q.; Liu, R. L.

    2013-05-01

    The nanocrystallized 18Ni maraging steel was plasma nitrocarburized at 460 °C for 4 h in a mixture gas of N2, H2 and C2H5OH. The surface phase compositions of the specimens were analyzed using X-ray diffractometer. The grain shape and size, and grain boundaries in the subsurface layers of the samples were characterized by electron backscattering diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the nitrocarburized layers are composed of α-Fe, γ‧-Fe4N and FeN0.049 phases. Most α-Fe and γ‧-Fe4N grains show in columnar shape. The major and minor axes of some α-Fe grains are elongated and shortened after nitrocarburizing, respectively. In the subsurface layers of the untreated and nitrocarburized specimens, the average areas of γ‧-Fe4N and α-Fe grains both with a dimension of nanometer are 0.395 μm2 and 0.397 μm2, respectively. The γ‧-Fe4N grain boundaries are mainly high angle boundaries with a very small fraction of low angle boundaries. Coincidence site lattice boundaries in the subsurface layer of the untreated specimen are composed mainly of Σ3, Σ11 and Σ13b, and their fraction decreases after nitrocarburizing.

  20. Resonant Raman spectroscopy of twisted multilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhang, Xin; Ijäs, Mari; Han, Wen-Peng; Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Li, Xiao-Li; Jiang, De-Sheng; Ferrari, Andrea C; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional crystals can be combined to form various hybrids and heterostructures, creating materials on demand with properties determined by the interlayer interaction. This is the case even for a single material, where multilayer stacks with different relative orientation have different optical and electronic properties. Probing and understanding the interface coupling is thus of primary importance for fundamental science and applications. Here we study twisted multilayer graphene flakes with multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy. We find a significant intensity enhancement of the interlayer coupling modes (C peaks) due to resonance with new optically allowed electronic transitions, determined by the relative orientation of the layers. The interlayer coupling results in a Davydov splitting of the C peak in systems consisting of two equivalent graphene multilayers. This allows us to directly quantify the interlayer interaction, which is much smaller compared with Bernal-stacked interfaces. This paves the way to the use of Raman spectroscopy to uncover the interface coupling of two-dimensional hybrids and heterostructures. PMID:25382099

  1. Flow around a helically twisted elliptic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woojin; Lee, Jungil; Choi, Haecheon

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we conduct unsteady three-dimensional simulations of flows around a helically twisted elliptic (HTE) cylinder at the Reynolds numbers of 100 and 3900, based on the free-stream velocity and square root of the product of the lengths of its major and minor axes. A parametric study is conducted for Re = 100 by varying the aspect ratio (AR) of the elliptic cross section and the helical spanwise wavelength (λ). Depending on the values of AR and λ, the flow in the wake contains the characteristic wavelengths of λ, 2λ, 6λ, or even longer than 60λ, showing a wide diversity of flows in the wake due to the shape change. The drag on the optimal (i.e., having lowest drag) HTE cylinder (AR = 1.3 and λ = 3.5d) is lower by 18% than that of the circular cylinder, and its lift fluctuations are zero owing to complete suppression of vortex shedding in the wake. This optimal HTE configuration reduces the drag by 23% for Re = 3900 where the wake is turbulent, showing that the HTE cylinder reduces the mean drag and lift fluctuations for both laminar and turbulent flows.

  2. Probing the Twisted Structure of Sickle Hemoglobin Fibers via Particle Simulations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Li, Xuejin; Vekilov, Peter G; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-05-10

    Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin (HbS) is the primary pathogenic event of sickle cell disease. For insight into the nature of the HbS polymer fiber formation, we develop a particle model-resembling a coarse-grained molecular model-constructed to match the intermolecular contacts between HbS molecules. We demonstrate that the particle model predicts the formation of HbS polymer fibers by attachment of monomers to rough fiber ends and the growth rate increases linearly with HbS concentration. We show that the characteristic 14-molecule fiber cross section is preserved during growth. We also correlate the asymmetry of the contact sites on the HbS molecular surface with the structure of the polymer fiber composed of seven helically twisted double strands. Finally, we show that the same asymmetry mediates the mechanical and structural properties of the HbS polymer fiber. PMID:27166816

  3. Artery Remodeling Under Axial Twist in Three Days Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Liang; Xiao, Yangming; Voorhees, Andrew; Qi, Ying-Xin; Jiang, Zong-Lai; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-08-01

    Arteries often endure axial twist due to body movement and surgical procedures, but how arteries remodel under axial twist remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate early stage arterial wall remodeling under axial twist. Porcine carotid arteries were twisted axially and maintained for three days in ex vivo organ culture systems while the pressure and flow remained the same as untwisted controls. Cell proliferation, internal elastic lamina (IEL) fenestrae shape and size, endothelial cell (EC) morphology and orientation, as well as the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) were quantified using immunohistochemistry staining and immunoblotting. Our results demonstrated that cell proliferation in both the intima and media were significantly higher in the twisted arteries compared to the controls. The cell proliferation in the intima increased from 1.33 ± 0.21% to 7.63 ± 1.89%, and in the media from 1.93 ± 0.84% to 8.27 ± 2.92% (p < 0.05). IEL fenestrae total area decreased from 26.07 ± 2.13% to 14.74 ± 0.61% and average size decreased from 169.03 ± 18.85 μm(2) to 80.14 ± 1.96 μm(2) (p < 0.01), but aspect ratio increased in the twist group from 2.39 ± 0.15 to 2.83 ± 0.29 (p < 0.05). MMP-2 expression significantly increased (p < 0.05) while MMP-9 and TIMP-2 showed no significant difference in the twist group. The ECs in the twisted arteries were significantly elongated compared to the controls after three days. The angle between the major axis of the ECs and blood flow direction under twist was 7.46 ± 2.44 degrees after 3 days organ culture, a decrease from the initial 15.58 ± 1.29 degrees. These results demonstrate that axial twist can stimulate artery remodeling. These findings complement our understanding of arterial wall remodeling under mechanical stress resulting from pressure and flow variations. PMID:25503524

  4. Test data report: Low speed wind tunnel tests of a full scale, fixed geometry inlet, with engine, at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shain, W. M.

    1976-01-01

    A full scale inlet test was to be done in the NASA-ARC 40' X 80' WT to demonstrate satisfactory inlet performance at high angles of attack. The inlet was designed to match a Hamilton-Standard 55 inch, variable pitch fan, driven by a Lycoming T55-L-11A gas generator. The test was installed in the wind tunnel on two separate occasions, but mechanical failures in the fan drive gear box early in each period terminated testing. A detailed description is included of the Model, installation, instrumentation and data reduction procedures.

  5. Exploratory low-speed wind-tunnel study of concepts designed to improve aircraft stability and control at high angles of attack. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of concepts to improve the high angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a high performance aircraft was conducted. The effect of vertical tail geometry on stability and the effectiveness of several conventional and unusual control concepts was determined. These results were obtained over a large angle-of-attack range. Vertical tail location, cant angle and leading edge sweep could influence both longitudinal and lateral-directional stability. The control concepts tested were found to be effective and to provide control into the post stall angle-of-attack region.

  6. Boron concentration profiling by high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy in homoepitaxial δ-doped diamond layers

    SciTech Connect

    Araújo, D.; Alegre, M. P.; Piñero, J. C.; Fiori, A.; Bustarret, E.; Jomard, F.

    2013-07-22

    To develop further diamond related devices, the concentration and spatial location of dopants should be controlled down to the nanometer scale. Scanning transmission electron microscopy using the high angle annular dark field mode is shown to be sensitive to boron doping in diamond epilayers. An analytical procedure is described, whereby local boron concentrations above 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} were quantitatively derived down to nanometer resolution from the signal dependence on thickness and boron content. Experimental boron local doping profiles measured on diamond p{sup −}/p{sup ++}/p{sup −} multilayers are compared to macroscopic profiles obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry, avoiding reported artefacts.

  7. Exploratory investigation of the effects of vortex bursting on the high angle-of-attack lateral-directional stability characteristics of highly-swept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. L., Jr.; Grafton, S. B.; Yip, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    A recent low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of highly-swept wings has shown that vortex breakdown at high angles of attack can cause large destabilizing effects on static lateral-directional stability characteristics, and that the destabilizing effects of vortex breakdown can be greatly aggravated by model support strut interference effects. The present paper discusses these effects based on the results of static force tests of several highly-swept wing configurations for different wind-tunnel strut setup arrangements. Also included in the paper are photographs obtained during tuft-, smoke-, and helium-bubble flow visualization studies to indicate wing flow behavior patterns

  8. Imaging of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and observations of GaN-based violet laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Shiojiri, M; Saijo, H

    2006-09-01

    The first part of this paper is devoted to physics, to explain high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging and to interpret why HAADF-STEM imaging is incoherent, instructing a strict definition of interference and coherence of electron waves. Next, we present our recent investigations of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells and AlGaN/GaN strained-layer superlattice claddings in GaN-based violet laser diodes, which have been performed by HAADF-STEM and high-resolution field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy. PMID:17059523

  9. High angle-of-attack characteristics of three-surface fighter aircraft. [canard-wing-horizontal tail configuration for greater stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, M. A.; Grafton, S. B.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program aimed at providing information on the high angle-of-attack characteristics of three-surface fighter concepts incorporating a close-coupled canard, an investigation is being conducted on two specific configurations based on the F-18 and F-15 designs. The study configurations are being subjected to a wide range of tests including wind-tunnel tests, dynamic model tests, and piloted simulation. This paper summarizes the results obtained to date in this study. High-alpha results in the areas of static stability, damping, and control characteristics are reviewed and some of the more significant aerodynamic phenomena are identified.

  10. Performance of twist-coupled blades on variable speed rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.; Laino, D.J.

    1999-12-07

    The load mitigation and energy capture characteristics of twist-coupled HAWT blades that are mounted on a variable speed rotor are investigated in this paper. These blades are designed to twist toward feather as they bend with pretwist set to achieve a desirable twist distribution at rated power. For this investigation, the ADAMS-WT software has been modified to include blade models with bending-twist coupling. Using twist-coupled and uncoupled models, the ADAMS software is exercised for steady wind environments to generate C{sub p} curves at a number of operating speeds to compare the efficiencies of the two models. The ADAMS software is also used to generate the response of a twist-coupled variable speed rotor to a spectrum of stochastic wind time series. This spectrum contains time series with two mean wind speeds at two turbulence levels. Power control is achieved by imposing a reactive torque on the low speed shaft proportional to the RPM squared with the coefficient specified so that the rotor operates at peak efficiency in the linear aerodynamic range, and by limiting the maximum RPM to take advantage of the stall controlled nature of the rotor. Fatigue calculations are done for the generated load histories using a range of material exponents that represent materials from welded steel to aluminum to composites, and results are compared with the damage computed for the rotor without twist-coupling. Results indicate that significant reductions in damage are achieved across the spectrum of applied wind loading without any degradation in power production.

  11. Extension-twist coupling optimization in composite rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Serkan

    2005-07-01

    For optimal rotor performance in a tiltrotor aircraft the difference in the inflow and the rotor speeds between the hover and cruise flight modes suggests different blade twist and chord distributions. The blade twist rates in current tiltrotor applications are defined based upon a compromise between the figure of merit in hover and propeller efficiency in airplane mode. However, when each operation mode is considered separately the optimum blade distributions are found to be considerably different. Passive blade twist control, which uses the inherent variation in centrifugal forces on a rotor blade to achieve optimum blade twist distributions in each flight mode through the use of extension-twist coupled composite rotor blades, has been considered for performance improvement of tiltrotor aircraft over the last two decades. The challenge for this concept is to achieve the desired twisting deformations in the rotor blade without altering the aeroelastic characteristics of the vehicle. A concept referred to as the sliding mass concept is proposed in this work in order to increase the twist change with rotor speed for a closed-cell composite rotor blade cross-section to practical levels for performance improvement in a tiltrotor aircraft. The concept is based on load path changes for the centrifugal forces by utilizing non-structural masses readily available on a conventional blade, such as the leading edge balancing mass. A multilevel optimization technique based on the simulated annealing method is applied to improve the performance of the XV15 tiltrotor aircraft. A cross-sectional analysis tool, VABS together with a multibody dynamics code, DYMORE are integrated into the optimization process. The optimization results revealed significant improvements in the power requirement in hover while preserving cruise efficiency. It is also shown that about 21% of the improvement is provided through the sliding mass concept pointing to the additional flexibility the concept

  12. An unexpected twist in viral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-04-14

    Lambda-like double-stranded (ds) DNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm of pressure during genome packaging. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids requires the formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Although various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage. Here we present a procapsid X-ray structure at 3.65 {angstrom} resolution, termed prohead II, of the lambda-like bacteriophage HK97, the mature capsid structure of which was previously solved to 3.44 {angstrom}. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrate that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and -sheet regions. We also identified subunit interactions at each three-fold axis of the capsid that are maintained throughout maturation. The interactions sustain capsid integrity during subunit refolding and provide a fixed hinge from which subunits undergo rotational and translational motions during maturation. Previously published calorimetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90 kJ mol{sup -1} of energy. We propose that the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic

  13. An Unexpected Twist in Viral Capsid Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Lambda-like dsDNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm. of pressure during genome packaging1. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids is unlikely to form in a single assembly step, therefore requiring formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Though various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage that undergoes large scale conformational changes. We present a procapsid x-ray structure at 3.65Å resolution, termed Prohead II, of the lambda like bacteriophage HK97, whose mature capsid structure was previously solved to 3.44 Å2. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrates that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and β-sheet regions. We have also discovered conserved subunit interactions at each 3-fold of the virus capsid, from which capsid subunits maintain their integrity during refolding, facilitating the rotational and translational motions of maturation. Calormetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90KJ/mol of energy3. We propose the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic maturation process likely present in many ds

  14. Flight-Determined Subsonic Longitudinal Stability and Control Derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) with Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1997-01-01

    The subsonic longitudinal stability and control derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from dynamic flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. The technique uses the linearized aircraft equations of motion in their continuous/discrete form and accounts for state and measurement noise as well as thrust-vectoring effects. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics over the aircraft, particularly at high angles of attack. Thrust vectoring was implemented using electrohydraulically-actuated nozzle postexit vanes and a specialized research flight control system. During maneuvers, a control system feature provided independent aerodynamic control surface inputs and independent thrust-vectoring vane inputs, thereby eliminating correlations between the aircraft states and controls. Substantial variations in control excitation and dynamic response were exhibited for maneuvers conducted at different angles of attack. Opposing vane interactions caused most thrust-vectoring inputs to experience some exhaust plume interference and thus reduced effectiveness. The estimated stability and control derivatives are plotted, and a discussion relates them to predicted values and maneuver quality.

  15. Wind-tunnel investigation to determine the low speed yawing stability derivatives of a twin jet fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Newsom, W. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the low-speed yawing stability derivatives of a twin-jet fighter airplane model at high angles of attack. Tests were performed in a low-speed tunnel utilizing variable-curvature walls to simulate pure yawing motion. The results of the study showed that at angles of attack below the stall the yawing derivatives were essentially independent of the yawing velocity and sideslip angle. However, at angles of attack above the stall some nonlinear variations were present and the derivatives were strongly dependent upon sideslip angle. The results also showed that the rolling moment due to yawing was primarily due to the wing-fuselage combination, and that at angles of attack below the stall both the vertical and horizontal tails produced significant contributions to the damping in yaw. Additionally, the tests showed that the use of the forced-oscillation data to represent the yawing stability derivatives is questionable, at high angles of attack, due to large effects arising from the acceleration in sideslip derivatives.

  16. Evaluation of Gritting Strategies for High Angle of Attack Using Wind Tunnel and Flight Test Data for the F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Erickson, Gary E.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Banks, Daniel W.; Fisher, David F.

    1998-01-01

    A subsonic study of high-angle-of-attack gritting strategies was undertaken with a 0.06-scale model of the F/A-18, which was assumed to be typical of airplanes with smooth-sided forebodies. This study was conducted in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel and was intended to more accurately simulate flight boundary layer characteristics on the model in the wind tunnel than would be possible by using classical, low-angle-of-attack gritting on the fuselage. Six-component force and moment data were taken with an internally mounted strain-gauge balance, while pressure data were acquired by using electronically scanned pressure transducers. Data were taken at zero sideslip over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg to 40 deg and, at selected angles of attack, over sideslip angles from -10 deg to 10 deg. Free-stream Mach number was fixed at 0.30, which resulted in a Reynolds number, based on mean aerodynamic chord, of 1.4 x 10(exp 6). Pressure data measured over the forebody and leading-edge extensions are compared to similar pressure data taken by a related NASA flight research program by using a specially instrumented F/A-18, the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). Preliminary guidelines for high-angle-of-attack gritting strategies are given.

  17. Wind-tunnel research comparing lateral control devices, particularly at high angles of attack V : spoilers and ailerons on rectangular wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Shortal, Joseph A

    1933-01-01

    This report covers the fifth of a series of systematic investigations in which lateral control devices are compared with particular reference to their effectiveness at high angles of attack. The present report deals with tests of spoilers and ordinary ailerons on rectangular Clark y wing models. In an effort to obtain satisfactory control throughout the entire angle-of-attack range that can be maintained in flight, various spoilers were tested in combination with two sizes of previously tested ordinary ailerons - one of average proportions and the other short and wide. In addition, one large spoiler was tested alone. It was found that when ailerons and spoilers are used together the full effect of both is not obtained if the spoilers are located directly in front of the ailerons. With the proper combination of spoiler and aileron, however, it is possible to obtain satisfactory rolling control up to high angles of attack (15 degrees to 20 degrees), together with favorable yawing moments and small control forces. A moderate amount of rolling control with favorable yawing moments and small control forces was obtained with the large spoiler alone.

  18. Joints at high angles to normal fault strike: an explanation using 3-D numerical models of fault-perturbed stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Aydin, Atilla; Pollard, David D.

    2000-01-01

    Structural methods based on homogeneous stress states predict that joints growing in an extending crust form with strike orientations identical to normal faults. However, we document a field example where the strikes of genetically related normal faults and joints are almost mutually perpendicular. Field relationships allowed us to constrain the fracture sequence and tectonic environment for fault and joint growth. We hypothesize that fault slip can perturb the surrounding stress field in a manner that controls the orientations of induced secondary structures. Numerical models were used to examine the stress field around normal faults, taking into consideration the effects of 3-D fault shape, geometrical arrangement of overlapping faults, and a range of stress states. The calculated perturbed stress fields around model normal faults indicate that it is possible for joints to form at high angles to fault strike. Such joint growth may occur at the lateral tips of an isolated fault, but is most likely in a relay zone between overlapping faults. However, the angle between joints and faults is also influenced by the remote stress state, and is particularly sensitive to the ratio of fault-parallel to fault-perpendicular stress. As this ratio increases, joints can propagate away from faults at increasingly higher angles to fault strike. We conclude that the combined remote stress state and perturbed local stress field associated with overlapping fault geometries resulted in joint growth at high angles to normal fault strike at a field location in Arches National Park, Utah.

  19. Flow analysis for the nacelle of an advanced ducted propeller at high angle-of-attack and at cruise with boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, D. P.; Boldman, D. R.; Hughes, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    An axisymmetric panel code and a three dimensional Navier-Stokes code (used as an inviscid Euler code) were verified for low speed, high angle of attack flow conditions. A three dimensional Navier-Stokes code (used as an inviscid code), and an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code (used as both viscous and inviscid code) were also assessed for high Mach number cruise conditions. The boundary layer calculations were made by using the results from the panel code or Euler calculation. The panel method can predict the internal surface pressure distributions very well if no shock exists. However, only Euler and Navier-Stokes calculations can provide a good prediction of the surface static pressure distribution including the pressure rise across the shock. Because of the high CPU time required for a three dimensional Navier-Stokes calculation, only the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes calculation was considered at cruise conditions. The use of suction and tangential blowing boundary layer control to eliminate the flow separation on the internal surface was demonstrated for low free stream Mach number and high angle of attack cases. The calculation also shows that transition from laminar flow to turbulent flow on the external cowl surface can be delayed by using suction boundary layer control at cruise flow conditions. The results were compared with experimental data where possible.

  20. Twist-Induced Defects of the P-SSP7 Genome Revealed by Modeling the Cryo-EM Density

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Myers, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the consequences of assuming that DNA inside of phages can be approximated as a strongly nonlinear persistence length polymer. Recent cryo-EM experiments find a hole in the density map of P-SSP7 phage, located in the DNA segment filling the portal channel of the phage. We use experimentally derived structural constraints with coarse-grained simulation techniques to consider contrasting model interpretations of reconstructed density in the portal channel. The coarse-grained DNA models used are designed to capture the effects of torsional strain and electrostatic environment. Our simulation results are consistent with the interpretation that the vacancy or hole in the experimental density map is due to DNA strain leading to strand separation. We further demonstrate that a moderate negative twisting strain is able to account for the strand separation. This effect of nonlinear persistence length may be important in other aspects of phage DNA packing. PMID:25793549

  1. Twist-induced defects of the P-SSP7 genome revealed by modeling the cryo-EM density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Myers, Christopher G; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2015-04-16

    We consider the consequences of assuming that DNA inside of phages can be approximated as a strongly nonlinear persistence length polymer. Recent cryo-EM experiments find a hole in the density map of P-SSP7 phage, located in the DNA segment filling the portal channel of the phage. We use experimentally derived structural constraints with coarse-grained simulation techniques to consider contrasting model interpretations of reconstructed density in the portal channel. The coarse-grained DNA models used are designed to capture the effects of torsional strain and electrostatic environment. Our simulation results are consistent with the interpretation that the vacancy or hole in the experimental density map is due to DNA strain leading to strand separation. We further demonstrate that a moderate negative twisting strain is able to account for the strand separation. This effect of nonlinear persistence length may be important in other aspects of phage DNA packing. PMID:25793549

  2. Extension-twist coupling of composite circular tubes with application to tilt rotor blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1987-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine if twist deformation required for the design of full-scale extension-twist-coupled tilt-rotor blades can be achieved within material design limit loads, and to demonstrate the accuracy of a coupled-beam analysis in predicting twist deformations. Two extension-twist-coupled tilt-rotor blade designs were developed based on theoretically optimum aerodynamic twist distributions. The designs indicated a twist rate requirement of between .216 and .333 deg/in. Agreement between axial tests and analytical predictions was within 10 percent at design limit loads. Agreement between the torsion tests and predictions was within 11 percent.

  3. Non-Euclidean geometry of twisted filament bundle packing

    PubMed Central

    Bruss, Isaac R.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    Densely packed and twisted assemblies of filaments are crucial structural motifs in macroscopic materials (cables, ropes, and textiles) as well as synthetic and biological nanomaterials (fibrous proteins). We study the unique and nontrivial packing geometry of this universal material design from two perspectives. First, we show that the problem of twisted bundle packing can be mapped exactly onto the problem of disc packing on a curved surface, the geometry of which has a positive, spherical curvature close to the center of rotation and approaches the intrinsically flat geometry of a cylinder far from the bundle center. From this mapping, we find the packing of any twisted bundle is geometrically frustrated, as it makes the sixfold geometry of filament close packing impossible at the core of the fiber. This geometrical equivalence leads to a spectrum of close-packed fiber geometries, whose low symmetry (five-, four-, three-, and twofold) reflect non-Euclidean packing constraints at the bundle core. Second, we explore the ground-state structure of twisted filament assemblies formed under the influence of adhesive interactions by a computational model. Here, we find that the underlying non-Euclidean geometry of twisted fiber packing disrupts the regular lattice packing of filaments above a critical radius, proportional to the helical pitch. Above this critical radius, the ground-state packing includes the presence of between one and six excess fivefold disclinations in the cross-sectional order. PMID:22711799

  4. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R.; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene. PMID:26888259

  5. Numerical modeling of twisted stacked tape cables for magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Francesco; Zermeño, Victor M. R.; Takayasu, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    In view of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnet applications, the concept of Twisted Stacked Tape Cable (TSTC) made of HTS coated conductors is very promising because of the easy manufacturing process and of the very high tape length usage efficiency. For the use of these cables in magnet applications, where the cables carry high current while subjected to the strong magnetic field generated by the rest of the magnet, the possibility of being able to calculate in detail current and field distributions is very welcome, particularly for evaluating the cable's performance during the charge of the magnet. The numerical modeling of this kind of cable is particularly challenging because of the twisted geometry. In this paper, we use a 3-D finite element model to compute the magnetization AC losses of a twisted superconductor and current repartition among the tapes in a cable composed of four HTS coated conductor tapes. The utilized model is able to simulate not only twisted geometries, but also the contact resistance of the electrical terminations used to inject the current. The latter can importantly influence the current repartition between the tapes, especially in short samples. The model is also able to take into account the angular dependence of the critical current on the local magnetic field, whose relative orientation with respect to the tape needs to be locally evaluated as a consequence of the twisted geometry.

  6. Scaling laws of van Hove singularities in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jeil; Dasilva, Ashley; Wang, Yang; Wong, Dillon; Crommie, Michael; Adam, Shaffique; MacDonald, Allan H.

    2014-03-01

    Van Hove singularities (vHS) appear in twisted coupled bilayer graphene at saddle points in the band structure. The lowest energy vHS can be associated with the overlap between the displaced Dirac cones of the top and bottom layers, resulting in an approximately linear increase of its position in energy with increasing twist angle. This picture, which is applicable in the perturbative regime for moderately large twist angles, sees departures in the small angle limit due to non-perturbative coupling between the layers. Using a theory for twisted bilayer graphene [1] that incorporates all the relevant interlayer coupling compatible with momentum conservation of k-vectors of the top and bottom layers we explore the scaling laws of the vHS for sufficiently small twist angles and long period moire superlattices. We analyze the localization properties of their wave functions through their local density of states (LDOS) paying particular attention to the behavior of the states corresponding to higher energy van Hove singularities. We comment on our results in light of the experimental DOS and LDOS maps obtained through scanning tunneling microscopy. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation under its Fellowship program (NRF-NRFF2012-01).

  7. Simulating the pitch sensitivity of twisted nematics of patchy rods.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Štěpán; Wensink, Henricus H

    2016-06-21

    Stiff, elongated biomolecules such as filamentous viruses, DNA or cellulose nanocrystals are known to form liquid crystals often exhibiting a helical supramolecular organization. Little is known about the microscopic origin, size and handedness of the helical pitch in these, so-called cholesteric phases. Experimental observations in chiral lyotropics suggest that long-ranged chiral forces of electrostatic origin acting between the mesogens are responsible for such organization. Using large-scale computer simulation we study the sensitivity of the pitch imparted by soft microscopic helices and confirm that the helical sense is sensitive to a change of packing fraction, magnitude of the molecular pitch and amplitude of the chiral interactions. In particular, we find evidence that the cholesteric helix sense may change spontaneously upon variation of particle density, at fixed molecular chirality. These pitch inversions have been reported in recent theoretical studies but simulation evidence remains elusive. We rationalize these sudden changes in the supramolecular helical symmetry on the basis of detailed measurements of the mean-torque generated by the twisting of the helices. The simulation methodology employed does not require confining the twisted nematic in a slab geometry and allows for a simultaneous measurement of the pitch and the twist elastic constant. We find that the twist elastic constant increases almost linearly with density suggesting that twisted nematic shows no signs of anomalous stiffening due to pre-smectic fluctuations at higher packing fraction. PMID:27184814

  8. Eshelby twist and correlation effects in diffraction from nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, A.; Scardi, P.; Ryu, S.; Pugno, N. M.

    2015-04-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to model the Eshelby dislocation inside Pd and Ir nanowires and to predict the powder diffraction pattern using the Debye scattering equation. We find that the ideal dislocation solution by Eshelby is in good agreement with the observed twist angle and deviatoric strain, even though it ignores both the splitting of the Eshelby dislocation into two partials and surface stress. Surface stress plays a significant role only for nanorods with small aspect ratio (∼1:1). We also find that Wilson's prediction on the diffraction peak broadening for the Eshelby dislocation is overestimated because it ignores the fact that the Eshelby twist relaxes the deviatoric strain. Moreover, the twist loosens the correlation along the nanorod, causing additional line profile broadening, which is read by diffraction as a decrease of coherent domain size when the total twist angle is bigger than 1.5°. Overall, our findings suggest a novel way to predict and analyze the dislocations as well as the resulting strain fields in the twisted nanocrystalline rods.

  9. "Twisted Beam" SEE Observations of Ionospheric Heating from HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briczinski, S. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Han, S.-M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Scales, W. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nonlinear interactions of high power HF radio waves in the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska is the world's largest heating facility, yielding effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. New results are present from HAARP experiments using a "twisted beam" excitation mode. Analysis of twisted beam heating shows that the SEE results obtained are identical to more traditional patterns. One difference in the twisted beam mode is the heating region produced is in the shape of a ring as opposed to the more traditional "solid spot" region from a pencil beam. The ring heating pattern may be more conducive to the creation of stable artificial airglow layers because of the horizontal structure of the ring. The results of these runs include artificial layer creation and evolution as pertaining to the twisted beam pattern. The SEE measurements aid the interpretation of the twisted beam interactions in the ionosphere.

  10. Twinning and twisting of tri- and bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola; Hovden, Robert; Huang, Pinshane; Wojcik, Michal; Muller, David A; Park, Jiwoong

    2012-03-14

    The electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of bilayer and trilayer graphene vary with their structure, including the stacking order and relative twist, providing novel ways to realize useful characteristics not available to single layer graphene. However, developing controlled growth of bilayer and trilayer graphene requires efficient large-scale characterization of multilayer graphene structures. Here, we use dark-field transmission electron microscopy for rapid and accurate determination of key structural parameters (twist angle, stacking order, and interlayer spacing) of few-layer CVD graphene. We image the long-range atomic registry for oriented bilayer and trilayer graphene, find that it conforms exclusively to either Bernal or rhombohedral stacking, and determine their relative abundances. In contrast, our data on twisted multilayers suggest the absence of such long-range atomic registry. The atomic registry and its absence are consistent with the two different strain-induced deformations we observe; by tilting the samples to break mirror symmetry, we find a high density of twinned domains in oriented multilayer graphene, where multiple domains of two different stacking configurations coexist, connected by discrete twin boundaries. In contrast, individual layers in twisted regions continuously stretch and shear independently, forming elaborate Moiré patterns. These results, and the twist angle distribution in our CVD graphene, can be understood in terms of an angle-dependent interlayer potential model. PMID:22329410

  11. Observation of Low Energy Raman Modes in Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui; Chung, Ting-Fung; Delaney, Conor; Keiser, Courtney; Jauregui, Luis A.; Shand, Paul M.; Chancey, C. C.; Wang, Yanan; Bao, Jiming; Chen, Yong P.

    2013-08-01

    Two new Raman modes below 100 cm^-1 are observed in twisted bilayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The two modes are observed in a small range of twisting angle at which the intensity of the G Raman peak is strongly enhanced, indicating that these low energy modes and the G Raman mode share the same resonance enhancement mechanism, as a function of twisting angle. The 94 cm^-1 mode (measured with a 532 nm laser excitation) is assigned to the fundamental layer breathing vibration (ZO (prime) mode) mediated by the twisted bilayer graphene lattice, which lacks long-range translational symmetry. The dependence of this modes frequency and linewidth on the rotational angle can be explained by the double resonance Raman process which is different from the previously-identified Raman processes activated by twisted bilayer graphene superlattice. The dependence also reveals the strong impact of electronic-band overlaps of the two graphene layers. Another new mode at 52 cm^-1, not observed previously in the bilayer graphene system, is tentatively attributed to a torsion mode in which the bottom and top graphene layers rotate out-of-phase in the plane.

  12. A Geometric Construction of Cyclic Cocycles on Twisted Convolution Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Eitan

    2010-09-01

    In this thesis we give a construction of cyclic cocycles on convolution algebras twisted by gerbes over discrete translation groupoids. In his seminal book, Connes constructs a map from the equivariant cohomology of a manifold carrying the action of a discrete group into the periodic cyclic cohomology of the associated convolution algebra. Furthermore, for proper étale groupoids, J.-L. Tu and P. Xu provide a map between the periodic cyclic cohomology of a gerbe twisted convolution algebra and twisted cohomology groups. Our focus will be the convolution algebra with a product defined by a gerbe over a discrete translation groupoid. When the action is not proper, we cannot construct an invariant connection on the gerbe; therefore to study this algebra, we instead develop simplicial notions related to ideas of J. Dupont to construct a simplicial form representing the Dixmier-Douady class of the gerbe. Then by using a JLO formula we define a morphism from a simplicial complex twisted by this simplicial Dixmier-Douady form to the mixed bicomplex of certain matrix algebras. Finally, we define a morphism from this complex to the mixed bicomplex computing the periodic cyclic cohomology of the twisted convolution algebras.

  13. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene. PMID:26888259

  14. Ultrafast twisting dynamics of thioflavin-T: spectroscopy of the twisted intramolecular charge-transfer state.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajib; Palit, Dipak K

    2014-12-15

    Understanding the excited-state properties of thioflavin-T (ThT) has been of immense importance, because of its efficient amyloid-sensing ability related to neurodegenerative disorders. The excited-state dynamics of ThT is studied by using sub-pico- and nanosecond time-resolved transient absorption techniques as well as density functional theory (DFT)/time-dependent DFT calculations. Barrierless twisting around the central C-C bond between two aromatic moieties is the dominant process that contributes to the ultrafast dynamics of the S1 state. The spectroscopic properties of the intramolecular charge-transfer state are characterized for the first time. The energetics of the S0 and S1 states has also been correlated with the experimentally observed spectroscopic parameters and structural dynamics. A longer-lived transient state populated with a very low yield has been characterized as the triplet state. PMID:25251013

  15. Reading the Twisted Tail of NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Gerald; de Pree, Chris

    1995-12-01

    We have used the VLA A-configuration at lambda 20 cm to obtain new high-resolution (1\\farcs5) flux and polarization images of the large-scale, twisted jets in NGC 4258, a galaxy of particular interest because its nucleus houses the best observed case of an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. We have also analyzed recently archived long-exposure ROSAT PSPC spectra of the jets. We have excluded the AGN itself, which is a highly obscured, hard-spectrum X-ray source. The jets are prominent in radio synchrotron, emission-lines, and X-rays because of their strong interaction with the dense galaxy ISM. Previously, we showed from the visible emission-line spectrum (Cecil, Morse, & Veilleux 1995, ApJ, 452, 613) that the jets are convincing examples of photoionizing shocks. The 5x deeper X-ray spectrum confirms our findings (Cecil, Wilson, & De Pree 1995, ApJ, 440, 181) that the SE jet has a thermal spectrum (kT = 0.3 keV) consistent with a ~400 km s(-1) shock. However, the NW jet exhibits a harder spectrum that suggests a higher shock velocity (kT ~ 0.5 keV) and non-thermal contribution. In both cases, the extragalactic photoelectric-absorption is small. We will discuss models of the X-ray spectrum based on the MAPPINGS II code described by Dopita & Sutherland (1995, ApJ, in press). Our radio image shows striking inversion symmetry across the nucleus, with several abrupt changes in ouflow direction. It is very unlikely that these arise from localized jet/ISM deflections; they may instead reflect past feasts of the currently starved nucleus. The jets within 25'' (800 pc) radius are projected along the spin axis of the accretion disk. The new images and spectra will be combined with existing datasets, including Fabry-Perot Hα and [O III] datacubes, to better constrain the history and driving mechanism of the outflow.

  16. Wing Twist Measurements at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Wahls, Richard A.; Goad, William K.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for measuring wing twist currently in use at the National Transonic Facility is described. The technique is based upon a single camera photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate. The wing twist is found from a conformal transformation between wind-on and wind-off 2-D coordinates in the plane of rotation. The advantages and limitations of the technique as well as the rationale for selection of this particular technique are discussed. Examples are presented to illustrate run-to-run and test-to-test repeatability of the technique in air mode. Examples of wing twist in cryogenic nitrogen mode are also presented.

  17. Chiral power change upon photoisomerization in twisted nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoncelli, Sabrina; Aramendía, Pedro F.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we use the photoisomerization of azobenzenes, a phenanthrospirooxazine, and a fulgide in a twisted nematic liquid crystalline phase to change the chiral twisting power of the system. The changes are probed by the rotatory power of linearly polarized light. Time resolved and steady state experiments are carried out. The chiral change and the photoisomerization process have similar characteristic recovery times and activation energy, thus probing that the change is induced by the modification in the chemical composition of the photochromic dopant system. The amplitude of the light twisting power change correlates with the order change in the liquid crystal (LC) but not with the modification in the absorption characteristics of the system. This indicates that the driving force of the chiral change is the microscopic order modification in the LC phase that affects the helical pitch of the phase.

  18. Chiral power change upon photoisomerization in twisted nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Simoncelli, Sabrina; Aramendía, Pedro F

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we use the photoisomerization of azobenzenes, a phenanthrospirooxazine, and a fulgide in a twisted nematic liquid crystalline phase to change the chiral twisting power of the system. The changes are probed by the rotatory power of linearly polarized light. Time resolved and steady state experiments are carried out. The chiral change and the photoisomerization process have similar characteristic recovery times and activation energy, thus probing that the change is induced by the modification in the chemical composition of the photochromic dopant system. The amplitude of the light twisting power change correlates with the order change in the liquid crystal (LC) but not with the modification in the absorption characteristics of the system. This indicates that the driving force of the chiral change is the microscopic order modification in the LC phase that affects the helical pitch of the phase. PMID:25699698

  19. Phase delay of polarisation modes in elastically twisted spun fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Morshnev, Sergey K; Chamorovsky, Yury K; Vorob'ev, Igor' L

    2011-05-31

    The evolution of the phase delay between linearly polarised orthogonal modes in a spun fibre elastically twisted around its axis has been studied experimentally and theoretically using a model for a helical structure of the built-in linear birefringence axes. The phase delay is a sinusoidal function of elastic twist angle, with an amplitude and period dependent on fibre parameters: spin pitch and built-in linear birefringence beat length. It is shown that, at a known spin pitch, phase delay versus elastic twist angle data can be used to determine the beat length of built-in linear birefringence in the range 0.01 to 100 mm. The theoretical analysis results are supported by experimental data for conventional and microstructured spun fibres. (fibre optics)

  20. Chirality in block copolymer melts: mesoscopic helicity from intersegment twist.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Russell, Thomas P; Grason, Gregory M

    2013-02-01

    We study the effects of chirality at the segment scale on the thermodynamics of block copolymer melts using self-consistent field theory. In linear diblock melts where segments of one block prefer a twisted, or cholesteric, texture, we show that melt assembly is critically sensitive to the ratio of random coil size to the preferred pitch of cholesteric twist. For weakly chiral melts (large pitch), mesophases remain achiral, while below a critical value of pitch, two mesoscopically chiral phases are stable: an undulated lamellar phase and a phase of hexagonally ordered helices. We show that the nonlinear sensitivity of mesoscale chiral order to preferred pitch derives specifically from the geometric and thermodynamic coupling of the helical mesodomain shape to the twisted packing of chiral segments within the core, giving rise to a second-order cylinder-to-helix transition. PMID:23414052

  1. Nonlinear twist-kink instability of a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaidman, E. G.; Tajima, T.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional magnetoinductive particle simulations are used to demonstrate that the mechanical twisting motion applied to a magnetized plasma column induces a current aligned to the external magnetic field direction, pinches the plasma and magnetic fields, and stores the energy in poloidal magnetic fields. As the twist motion continues, the field lines locally begin to wrap around the plasma more than one revolution. A strong MHD instability sets in that is a mixture of kink and ballooning modes, releasing the magnetic energy and causing destruction of coherent column structure and flows of turbulent plasma. A similar episode ensues, exhibiting relaxation oscillations. The buildup of poloidal fields and structure and its sudden release driven by the twist motion may be a model for the solar coronal loop dynamics which exhibits a slow energy buildup with some photospheric motion and a sudden energy release by flares.

  2. DNA induced chirality and helical twist in achiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Alfred; Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel

    A small quantity of DNA sample (Deoxyribonucleic acid -cellulose double-stranded from calf thymus DNA in lyophilized powder form) was doped in an achiral liquid crystal (LC), and the mixture was found to exhibit a weak degree of chirality. The induced chirality in the LC was probed by means of the electroclinic effect in the LC's smectic-A phase, which showed significant pretransitional behavior on approaching the smectic- A-smectic- C transition temperature from above. The same DNA was doped in an achiral nematic LC and the mixture was found to exhibit an average mechanical twist over macroscopic dimensions. The double-stranded DNA-induced chiral pitch length P was determined by measuring the radius of curvature of reverse twist disclination lines in 90o nematic twist cells. In the LC +DNA mixture, the LC's benzene rings interact with the nucleobases of the DNA through π - π stacking, which induces a molecular conformational deracemization in the LC.

  3. The electrohydrodynamic instability in twisted nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertrich, A.; Krekhov, A. P.; Scaldin, O. A.

    1994-02-01

    We present some experiments on electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) in nematic liquid crystals with a planar, but twisted configuration (MBBA). The threshold voltage is shown to depend only weakly on the twist angle. A theoretical analysis of the onset behaviour agrees well with the experiments. More sensitive is a secondary transition to modulation structures, which are not easily observed in untwisted geometries. A rough estimate of the secondary instability based on the behaviour of the most rapidly growing modulation mode seems to account well for the observations. Additional theoretical investigations for materials with positive dielectric anisotropy concerning the competition between the Fréedericksz transition and EHC are included. We predict the existence of a crossover codimension-2 point, which could easily be tested by variation of the twist angle.

  4. Twisted vertex algebras, bicharacter construction and boson-fermion correspondences

    SciTech Connect

    Anguelova, Iana I.

    2013-12-15

    The boson-fermion correspondences are an important phenomena on the intersection of several areas in mathematical physics: representation theory, vertex algebras and conformal field theory, integrable systems, number theory, cohomology. Two such correspondences are well known: the types A and B (and their super extensions). As a main result of this paper we present a new boson-fermion correspondence of type D-A. Further, we define a new concept of twisted vertex algebra of order N, which generalizes super vertex algebra. We develop the bicharacter construction which we use for constructing classes of examples of twisted vertex algebras, as well as for deriving formulas for the operator product expansions, analytic continuations, and normal ordered products. By using the underlying Hopf algebra structure we prove general bicharacter formulas for the vacuum expectation values for two important groups of examples. We show that the correspondences of types B, C, and D-A are isomorphisms of twisted vertex algebras.

  5. First Principles Study of Bismuth Films at Transition Metal Grain Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qin; Widom, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments suggest that Bi impurities segregate to form bilayer films on Ni and Cu grain boundaries but do not segregate in Fe. To explain these phenomena, we study the total energies of Bi films on transition metal (TM) Σ3(111) and Σ5(012) grain boundaries (GBs) using density functional theory. Our results agree with the observed stabilities. We propose a model to predict Bi bilayer stability at Ni GBs which suggests that Bi bilayer is not thermodynamically stable on low energy (111) twist CSL GBs but is stable in most (100) twist CSL GBs. We investigated the interaction and bonding character between Bi and TMs to explain the differences among TMs based on localization of orbitals and magnetism. Financial support from the ONR-MURI under the grant NO. N00014-11-1-0678 is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Origins of GEMS Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Walker, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth s stratosphere contain high abundances of submicrometer amorphous silicates known as GEMS grains. From their birth as condensates in the outflows of oxygen-rich evolved stars, processing in interstellar space, and incorporation into disks around new stars, amorphous silicates predominate in most astrophysical environments. Amorphous silicates were a major building block of our Solar System and are prominent in infrared spectra of comets. Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) thought to derive from comets contain abundant amorphous silicates known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains. GEMS grains have been proposed to be isotopically and chemically homogenized interstellar amorphous silicate dust. We evaluated this hypothesis through coordinated chemical and isotopic analyses of GEMS grains in a suite of IDPs to constrain their origins. GEMS grains show order of magnitude variations in Mg, Fe, Ca, and S abundances. GEMS grains do not match the average element abundances inferred for ISM dust containing on average, too little Mg, Fe, and Ca, and too much S. GEMS grains have complementary compositions to the crystalline components in IDPs suggesting that they formed from the same reservoir. We did not observe any unequivocal microstructural or chemical evidence that GEMS grains experienced prolonged exposure to radiation. We identified four GEMS grains having O isotopic compositions that point to origins in red giant branch or asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae. Based on their O isotopic compositions, we estimate that 1-6% of GEMS grains are surviving circumstellar grains. The remaining 94-99% of GEMS grains have O isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from terrestrial materials and carbonaceous chondrites. These isotopically solar GEMS grains either formed in the Solar System or were completely homogenized in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the

  7. "Twisted Beam" SEE Observations of Ionospheric Heating from HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briczinski, S. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Pedersen, T. R.; Rodriguez, S.; SanAntonio, G.

    2012-12-01

    High power HF radio waves exciting the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaksa is the world's largest heating facility, providing effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. Experiments performed at HAARP have allowed researchers to study many non-linear effects of wave-plasma interactions. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) is of interest to the ionospheric community for its diagnostic purposes. Typical SEE experiments at HAARP have focused on characterizing the parametric decay of the electromagnetic pump wave into several different wave modes such as upper and lower hybrid, ion acoustic, ion-Bernstein and electron-Bernstein. These production modes have been extensively studied at HAARP using traditional beam heating patterns and SEE detection. New results are present from HAARP experiments using a "twisted beam" excitation mode. Unlike traditional heating beams used at HAARP or other heating facilities, the twisted beam attempts to impart orbital angular momentum (OAM) into the heating region. Analysis of twisted beam heating shows that the SEE results obtained are nearly identical to the modes without OAM. One difference in the twisted beam mode is the heating region produced is in the shape of a ring as opposed to the more traditional "solid spot" region. The ring heating pattern may be more conducive to the creation of artificial airglow layers. The results of these runs include artificial layer creation and evolution as pertaining to the twisted beam pattern. The SEE measurements aid the interpretation of the twisted beam interactions in the ionosphere.

  8. Vibrational analyses of cracked pre-twisted blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. W.; Jeng, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element model is utilized to analyze the vibrational behavior of a pre-twisted rotating blade with a single edge crack. This model can satisfy both geometric boundary conditions and natural boundary conditions of the blade. The effects of the transverse shear deformation, rotary inertia and the pre-twisted angle are taken into account. The influences of the crack location and the crack size on natural frequencies, buckling loads and dynamic instability regions are studied. It is found that a crack has great influences on these dynamic characteristics of the rotating blade.

  9. Particle Acceleration by Magnetic Reconnection in a Twisted Coronal Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, Mykola; Browning, Philippa K.

    2011-03-01

    Photospheric motions may lead to twisted coronal magnetic fields which contain free energy that can be released by reconnection. Browning & Van der Linden suggested that such a relaxation event may be triggered by the onset of ideal kink instability. In the present work, we study the evolution of a twisted magnetic flux tube with zero net axial current following Hood et al. Based on the obtained magnetic and electric fields, proton and electron trajectories are calculated using the test-particle approach. We discuss resulting particle distributions and possible observational implications, for example, for small solar flares.

  10. κ-Deformed Phase Space, Hopf Algebroid and Twisting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurić; , Tajron; Kovačević, Domagoj; Meljanac, Stjepan

    2014-11-01

    Hopf algebroid structures on the Weyl algebra (phase space) are presented. We define the coproduct for the Weyl generators from Leibniz rule. The codomain of the coproduct is modified in order to obtain an algebra structure. We use the dual base to construct the target map and antipode. The notion of twist is analyzed for κ-deformed phase space in Hopf algebroid setting. It is outlined how the twist in the Hopf algebroid setting reproduces the full Hopf algebra structure of κ-Poincaré algebra. Several examples of realizations are worked out in details.

  11. sl{sub 2} Gaudin model with jordanian twist

    SciTech Connect

    Cirilo Antonio, N.; Manojlovic, N.

    2005-10-01

    sl{sub 2} Gaudin model with jordanian twist is studied. This system can be obtained as the semiclassical limit of the XXX spin chain deformed by the jordanian twist. The appropriate creation operators that yield the Bethe states of the Gaudin model and consequently its spectrum are defined. Their commutation relations with the generators of the corresponding loop algebra as well as with the generating function of integrals of motion are given. The inner products and norms of Bethe states and the relation to the solutions of the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations are discussed.

  12. Electrically Induced Twist in Smectic Liquid-Crystalline Elastomers.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Naciri, Jawad; Ratna, B R; Selinger, Robin L B; Selinger, Jonathan V

    2016-07-01

    As an approach for electrically controllable actuators, we prepare elastomers of chiral smectic-A liquid crystals, which have an electroclinic effect, i.e., molecular tilt induced by an applied electric field. Surprisingly, our experiments find that an electric field causes a rapid and reversible twisting of the film out of the plane, with a helical sense that depends on the sign of the field. To explain this twist, we develop a continuum elastic theory based on an asymmetry between the front and back of the film. We further present finite-element simulations, which show the dynamic shape change. PMID:27096378

  13. Twisting all the way: From classical mechanics to quantum fields

    SciTech Connect

    Aschieri, Paolo

    2008-01-15

    We discuss the effects that a noncommutative geometry induced by a Drinfeld twist has on physical theories. We systematically deform all products and symmetries of the theory. We discuss noncommutative classical mechanics, in particular its deformed Poisson bracket and hence time evolution and symmetries. The twisting is then extended to classical fields, and then to the main interest of this work: quantum fields. This leads to a geometric formulation of quantization on noncommutative space-time, i.e., we establish a noncommutative correspondence principle from *-Poisson brackets to * commutators. In particular commutation relations among creation and annihilation operators are deduced.

  14. Folding DNA into Twisted and Curved Nanoscale Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Hendrik; Douglas, Shawn M.; Shih, William M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to engineer complex shapes that twist and curve at the nanoscale from DNA. Through programmable self-assembly, strands of DNA are directed to form a custom-shaped bundle of tightly crosslinked double helices, arrayed in parallel to their helical axes. Targeted insertions and deletions of base pairs cause the DNA bundles to develop twist of either handedness or to curve. The degree of curvature could be quantitatively controlled, and a radius of curvature as tight as 6 nanometers was achieved. We also combined multiple curved elements to build several different types of intricate nanostructures, such as a wireframe beach ball or square-toothed gears. PMID:19661424

  15. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of Twisted Bilayer Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ting; Li, Zhenglu; Qiu, Diana Y.; Louie, Steven G.

    Using first-principles calculations, we find that the electronic structure and optical properties of bilayer black phosphorus can be modified significantly through changing the interlayer twist angle. We demonstrate the origin of these twist angle dependent effects, and connect our predicted results to experimental measurements. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR15-1508412, and the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  16. Optical Möbius strips, twisted ribbons, and the index theorem.

    PubMed

    Freund, Isaac

    2011-12-01

    The twist numbers of circular optical Möbius strips and twisted ribbons are shown to obey the index theorem under rotation of the plane of observation, and under change in the radius of the path. PMID:22139224

  17. A summary of the forebody high-angle-of-attack aerodynamics research on the F-18 and the X-29A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.; Delfrate, John H.; Fisher, David F.

    1992-01-01

    High-angle-of-attack aerodynamic studies have been conducted on both the F18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) and the X-29A aircraft. Data obtained include on- and off-surface flow visualization and static pressure measurements on the forebody. Comparisons of similar results are made between the two aircraft where possible. The forebody shapes of the two aircraft are different and the X-29A forebody flow is affected by the addition of nose strakes and a flight test noseboom. The forebody flow field of the F-18 HARV is fairly symmetric at zero sideslip and has distinct, well-defined vortices. The X-29A forebody vortices are more diffuse and are sometimes asymmetric at zero sideslip. These asymmetries correlate with observed zero-sideslip aircraft yawing moments.

  18. Preliminary results from a subsonic high-angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system - Design, calibration, algorithm development, and flight test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Larson, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was installed and flight-tested on the F-18 high alpha research vehicle. This paper discusses the airdata algorithm development and composite results expressed as airdata parameter estimates and describes the HI-FADS system hardware, calibration techniques, and algorithm development. An independent empirical verification was performed over a large portion of the subsonic flight envelope. Test points were obtained for Mach numbers from 0.15 to 0.94 and angles of attack from -8.0 to 55.0 deg. Angles of sideslip ranged from -15.0 to 15.0 deg, and test altitudes ranged from 18,000 to 40,000 ft. The HI-FADS system gave excellent results over the entire subsonic Mach number range up to 55 deg angle of attack. The internal pneumatic frequency response of the system is accurate to beyond 10 Hz.

  19. Atomic scale high-angle annular dark field STEM analysis of the N configuration in dilute nitrides of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, M.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Morgan, D. G.; Gonzalez, D.; Pizarro, J.; Yanez, A.; Galindo, P.; Garcia, R.; Du, Mao-Hua; Zhang, S. B.; Hopkinson, M.; Browning, N. D.

    2009-01-01

    While high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) has been successfully used for the analysis of heavy atoms in a lighter matrix, the detection of light atoms in a heavy matrix remains challenging. In this paper, we show that the combination of first-principles total-energy calculations with aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM experimental and simulated images can be used to overcome this problem. The application of this methodology to the analysis of dilute nitrides of GaAs points to the existence of a major proportion of (2N{sub As})nn in the alloy, which is a relatively stable configuration in GaAsN as revealed by our energetic calculations. Our study has allowed us to shed light in the effect of the local distortion of the lattice due to different configuration of atoms in HAADF-STEM imaging.

  20. Coexistence of low-angle normal and high-angle strike- to oblique-slip faults during Late Miocene mineralization in eastern Elba Island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotta, Domenico; Brogi, Andrea; Meccheri, Marco; Dini, Andrea; Bianco, Caterina; Ruggieri, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we deal with the kinematic and chronological relationships among low angle normal faults and high angle strike- to oblique-slip faults in an exhumed mineralized area, where shear veins and minor associated structures filled with the same mineral assemblage has been interpreted as indicators of coeval fault activities. The study area is located in the eastern Elba Island, where a mineralized late Miocene-early Pliocene low-angle normal fault (Zuccale fault) and high-angle strike- to oblique-slip faults extensively crop out, the latter giving rise to the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone. The field study highlighted that: (a) the damage zones of both fault sets are mineralized by syn-kinematic tourmaline, graphite, Fe-oxides and/or Fe-oxyhydroxides shear veins, thus indicating their coeval activity during the hydrothermal event (5.9-5.4 Ma); (b) the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone is constituted by a network of fractures, whose geometry and kinematics display the evolution of a NE-trending left-lateral oblique-slip transtensional shear zone; (c) its internal architecture is defined by tourmaline and Fe-oxides and/or Fe-oxyhydroxides mineralized veins, framed in the same kinematic field characterizing the Zuccale fault evolution; for this reason, the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone is interpreted as a transfer zone active during the low-angle fault activity; (d) the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone played the role of a significant normal fault during the Late Pliocene-Pleistocene, therefore favouring the deepening of the Tyrrhenian Basin with respect to the uplift and exhumation of the mid-crustal rocks of the Elba Island. It is finally argued that the interaction between the low-angle normal fault and the almost vertical shear zone determined an increase of permeability, favouring the mineralizing fluid flow during the hydrothermal stage and, reasonably, the previous emplacement of the Porto Azzurro magmatic body.

  1. Side forces on forebodies at high angles of attack and Mach numbers from 0.1 to 0.7: two tangent ogives, paraboloid and cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, E. R.; Chapman, G. T.; Taleghani, J.; Cohen, L.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Ames 12-Foot Wind Tunnel to determine the subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of four forebodies at high angles of attack. The forebodies tested were a tangent ogive with fineness ratio of 5, a paraboloid with fineness ratio of 3.5, a 20 deg cone, and a tangent ogive with an elliptic cross section. The investigation included the effects of nose bluntness and boundary-layer trips. The tangent-ogive forebody was also tested in the presence of a short afterbody and with the afterbody attached. Static longitudinal and lateral/directional stability data were obtained. The investigation was conducted to investigate the existence of large side forces and yawing moments at high angles of attack and zero sideslip. It was found that all of the forebodies experience steady side forces that start at angles of attack of from 20 deg to 35 deg and exist to as high as 80 deg, depending on forebody shape. The side is as large as 1.6 times the normal force and is generally repeatable with increasing and decreasing angle of attack and, also, from test to test. The side force is very sensitive to the nature of the boundary layer, as indicated by large changes with boundary trips. The maximum side force caries considerably with Reynolds number and tends to decrease with increasing Mach number. The direction of the side force is sensitive to the body geometry near the nose. The angle of attack of onset of side force is not strongly influenced by Reynolds number or Mach number but varies with forebody shape. Maximum normal force often occurs at angles of attack near 60 deg. The effect of the elliptic cross section is to reduce the angle of onset by about 10 deg compared to that of an equivalent circular forebody with the same fineness ratio. The short afterbody reduces the angle of onset by about 5 deg.

  2. Tamoxifen Inhibits ER-negative Breast Cancer Cell Invasion and Metastasis by Accelerating Twist1 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Gang; He, Jianjun; Yu, Yang; Xu, Yixiang; Yu, Xiaobin; Martinez, Jarrod; Lonard, David M.; Xu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Twist1 is a transcription factor driving epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Mice with germ-line Twist1 knockout are embryonic lethal, while adult mice with inducible Twist1 knockout have no obvious health problems, suggesting that Twist1 is a viable therapeutic target for the inhibition of invasion and metastasis of breast cancer in adult patients. In this study, we expressed a luciferase protein or a Twist1-luciferase fusion protein in HeLa cells as part of a high throughput system to screen 1280 compounds in the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) from Sigma-Aldrich for their effects on Twist1 protein expression. One of the most interesting compounds identified is tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator used to treat ER-positive breast cancer. Tamoxifen treatment significantly accelerated Twist1 degradation in multiple cell lines including HEK293 human kidney cells, 4T1 and 168FARN mouse mammary tumor cells with either ectopically or endogenously expressed Twist1. Tamoxifen-induced Twist1 degradation could be blocked by the MG132 proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that tamoxifen induces Twist1 degradation through the ubiquitination-proteasome pathway. However, tamoxifen-induced Twist1 degradation was independent of Twist1 mRNA expression, estrogen signaling and MAPK-mediated Twist1 phosphorylation in these cells. Importantly, tamoxifen also significantly inhibited invasive behavior in Matrigel and lung metastasis in SCID-bg mice of ER-negative 4T1 mammary tumor cells, which depend on endogenous Twist1 to invade and metastasize. These results indicate that tamoxifen can significantly accelerate Twist1 degradation to suppress cancer cell invasion and metastasis, suggesting that tamoxifen can be used not only to treat ER-positive breast cancers but also to reduce Twist1-mediated invasion and metastasis in ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:25892968

  3. Tamoxifen inhibits ER-negative breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis by accelerating Twist1 degradation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gang; He, Jianjun; Yu, Yang; Xu, Yixiang; Yu, Xiaobin; Martinez, Jarrod; Lonard, David M; Xu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Twist1 is a transcription factor driving epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Mice with germ-line Twist1 knockout are embryonic lethal, while adult mice with inducible Twist1 knockout have no obvious health problems, suggesting that Twist1 is a viable therapeutic target for the inhibition of invasion and metastasis of breast cancer in adult patients. In this study, we expressed a luciferase protein or a Twist1-luciferase fusion protein in HeLa cells as part of a high throughput system to screen 1280 compounds in the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) from Sigma-Aldrich for their effects on Twist1 protein expression. One of the most interesting compounds identified is tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator used to treat ER-positive breast cancer. Tamoxifen treatment significantly accelerated Twist1 degradation in multiple cell lines including HEK293 human kidney cells, 4T1 and 168FARN mouse mammary tumor cells with either ectopically or endogenously expressed Twist1. Tamoxifen-induced Twist1 degradation could be blocked by the MG132 proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that tamoxifen induces Twist1 degradation through the ubiquitination-proteasome pathway. However, tamoxifen-induced Twist1 degradation was independent of Twist1 mRNA expression, estrogen signaling and MAPK-mediated Twist1 phosphorylation in these cells. Importantly, tamoxifen also significantly inhibited invasive behavior in Matrigel and lung metastasis in SCID-bg mice of ER-negative 4T1 mammary tumor cells, which depend on endogenous Twist1 to invade and metastasize. These results indicate that tamoxifen can significantly accelerate Twist1 degradation to suppress cancer cell invasion and metastasis, suggesting that tamoxifen can be used not only to treat ER-positive breast cancers but also to reduce Twist1-mediated invasion and metastasis in ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:25892968

  4. On the space of connections having non-trivial twisted harmonic spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Bei, Francesco; Waterstraat, Nils

    2015-09-15

    We consider Dirac operators on odd-dimensional compact spin manifolds which are twisted by a product bundle. We show that the space of connections on the twisting bundle which yields an invertible operator has infinitely many connected components if the untwisted Dirac operator is invertible and the dimension of the twisting bundle is sufficiently large.

  5. Twisting failure of centrally loaded open-section columns in the elastic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kappus, Robert

    1938-01-01

    In the following report a complete theory of twisting failure by the energy method is developed, based on substantially the same assumptions as those employed by Wagner and Bleich. Problems treated in detail are: the stress and strain condition under St. Venant twist and in twist with axial constraint; the concept of shear center and the energy method for problems of elastic stability.

  6. Detection of insects in grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detecting insects hidden inside kernels of grain is important to grain buyers because internal infestations can result in insect fragments in products made from the grain, or, if the grain is stored before use, the insect population can increase and damage the grain further. In a study in the Unite...

  7. Correlation between grain boundary misorientation and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation behaviors in a wrought Ni-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Bin; Jiang, Li; Hu, Rui; Li, Qi

    2013-04-15

    The correlation between the grain boundary misorientation and the precipitation behaviors of intergranular M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides in a wrought Ni–Cr–W superalloy was investigated by using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. It was observed that the grain boundaries with a misorientation angle less than 20°, as well as all coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries, are immune to precipitation of the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides; in contrast, the random high-angle grain boundaries with a misorientation angle of 20°–40° provide preferential precipitation sites of the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at the random high-angle grain boundaries with a higher misorientation angle of 55°–60°/[2 2 3] turn to retard precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides owing to their nature like the Σ3 grain boundaries and retard the precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. The low-angle and certain random grain boundary segments induced by twins were found to interrupt the precipitation of the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides along the high-angle grain boundaries. - Highlights: ► The low angle grain boundaries and CSL boundaries are immune to precipitation. ► M23C6 precipitate preferentially at random grain boundaries within 20°–40°. ► Some certain random grain boundary segments interrupt M23C6 precipitation.

  8. Late Miocene termination of tectonic activity on the detachment in the Alaşehir Rift, Western Anatolia: Depositional records of the Göbekli Formation and high-angle cross-cutting faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Fatih

    2016-04-01

    Western Anatolia is a well-known province of continental extension in the world. Most distinctive structural elements of the region are E-W trending grabens. The Alaşehir Rift/Graben is an asymmetric rift/graben trending E-W between Ahmetli and Turgutlu in its western part and continues eastwardly in a NW-SE direction to Alaşehir (Philadelphia in ancient Greek). The stratigraphy of the region consists of metamorphic rocks of the Menderes Massif (Paleozoic-lower Cenozoic) and the syn-extensional Salihli granitoid (middle Miocene) forming the basement unit and overlying sedimentary cover rocks of Neogene-Quaternary. These rocks are cut and deformed by the Karadut detachment fault and various low-angle normal faults (antithetic and synthetic faults of the Karadut detachment fault), which are also cut by various younger high-angle normal faults. It is possible to observe two continuous sequences of different time intervals in that Miocene deposits of the first rifting phase are covered by Plio-Quaternary sediments of second rifting phase with a "break-up" unconformity. In lower levels of a measured stratigraphic section (583 m) of the Göbekli formation which has lower age of late Miocene and upper age of early Pliocene, the presence of angular to sub-angular clasts of the blocks and conglomerates suggests alluvial-fun origin during an initial stage of deposition. Existence of normal-reverse graded, cross-bedding, pebble imbrications in layers of the pebbly sandstone demonstrates fluvial environment in following levels of the sequence. Existence of lenses and normal graded conglomerates in pebbly sandstones and fine grained sandstones strata evidences a low energy environment. Observed siltstone-claystone intercalations on the middle levels of the sequence indicate an environment with low dipping morphology to be formed as flat plains during this period. In the uppermost levels of the sequence, existence of the pebble imbrications inside pebbly sandstones overlying

  9. Processing, mechanical behavior and biocompatibility of ultrafine grained zirconium fabricated by accumulative roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ling

    The aim of this study is to produce large quantities of bulk zirconium with an ultrafine grained microstructure and with enhanced properties. Accumulative roll bonding (ARB), a severe plastic deformation technique based on rolling, is chosen due to its availability in industrial environment. The texture, microstructure and mechanical behavior of bulk ultrafine grained (ufg) Zr fabricated by accumulative roll bonding is investigated by electron backscatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and mechanical testing. A reasonably homogeneous and equiaxed ufg structure, with a large fraction of high angle boundaries (HABs, ˜70%), can be obtained in Zr after only two ARB cycles. The average grain size, counting only HABs (theta>15°), is 400 nm. (Sub)grain size is equal to 320 nm. The yield stress and ultimate tensile stress (UTS) values are nearly double those from conventionally processed Zr with only a slight loss of ductility. Optimum processing conditions include large thickness reductions per pass (˜75%), which enhance grain refinement, and a rolling temperature (T ˜ 0.3Tm) at which a sufficient number of slip modes are activated, with an absence of significant grain growth. Grain refinement takes place by geometrical thinning and grain subdivision by the formation of geometrically necessary boundaries. The formation of equiaxed grains by geometric dynamic recrystallization is facilitated by enhanced diffusion due to adabatic heating. Optical microscopy examination and shear testing suggest accepted bonding quality compared to that achieved in materials processed by diffusion bonding and that obtained in other ARB studies. Biocompatibility of ultrafine grained Zr processed by large strain rolling is studied by evaluating the behavior of human osteoblast cells. It is suggested that ultrafine grained Zr has a similar good biocompatibility as Ti6Al4V alloy and conventional Zr with a large grain size have. The improved mechanical properties together with

  10. Design studies for twist-coupled wind turbine blades.

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia, Ulyses; Locke, James

    2004-06-01

    This study presents results obtained for four hybrid designs of the Northern Power Systems (NPS) 9.2-meter prototype version of the ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade. The ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade was designed and developed by TPI composites. The baseline design uses e-glass unidirectional fibers in combination with {+-}45-degree and random mat layers for the skin and spar cap. This project involves developing structural finite element models of the baseline design and carbon hybrid designs with and without twist-bend coupling. All designs were evaluated for a unit load condition and two extreme wind conditions. The unit load condition was used to evaluate the static deflection, twist and twist-coupling parameter. Maximum deflections and strains were determined for the extreme wind conditions. Linear and nonlinear buckling loads were determined for a tip load condition. The results indicate that carbon fibers can be used to produce twist-coupled designs with comparable deflections, strains and buckling loads to the e-glass baseline.

  11. Twisting singular solutions of Betheʼs equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomechie, Rafael I.; Wang, Chunguang

    2014-12-01

    The Bethe equations for the periodic XXX and XXZ spin chains admit singular solutions, for which the corresponding eigenvalues and eigenvectors are ill-defined. We use a twist regularization to derive conditions for such singular solutions to be physical, in which case they correspond to genuine eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian.

  12. Twisting of thin walled columns perfectly restrained at one end

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazzarino, Lucio

    1938-01-01

    Proceeding from the basic assumptions of the Batho-Bredt theory on twisting failure of thin-walled columns, the discrepancies most frequently encountered are analyzed. A generalized approximate method is suggested for the determination of the disturbances in the stress condition of the column, induced by the constrained warping in one of the end sections.

  13. Twisted Landau damping rates in multi-component dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Bukhari, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2016-03-01

    Keeping in view the kinetic treatment for plasma particles, the electrostatic twisted dust-acoustic (DA) and dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) waves are investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized multi-component dusty plasma, whose constituents are the electrons, singly ionized positive ions, and negatively charged massive dust particulates. With this background, the Vlasov-Poisson equations are coupled together to derive a generalized dielectric constant by utilizing the Laguerre-Gaussian perturbed distribution function and electrostatic potential in the paraxial limit. The dispersion and damping rates of twisted DA and DIA waves are analyzed with finite orbital angular momentum states in a multi-component dusty plasma. Significant modifications concerning the real wave frequencies and damping rates appeared with varying twisted dimensionless parameter and dust concentration. In particular, it is shown that dust concentration enhances the phase speed of the DIA waves in contrary to DA waves, whereas the impact of twisted parameter reduces the frequencies of both DA and DIA waves. The results should be useful for the understanding of particle transport and trapping phenomena caused by wave excitation in laboratory dusty plasmas.

  14. Energy conservation in false twist texturing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, T.J.; Kimrey, H.D.; Seyam, A.M.; Kaufman, F.; El-Shiekh, A.

    1981-04-01

    The feasibility of using heating techniques other than contact electric heating to heat filament yarns during the False Twist Texturing Process is investigated. Laser, microwave, and infrared radiation heating are investigated. A summary of a paper, A Study of Microwave Texturing of Polyester Yarns, is included in the publication. (MCW)

  15. Stability of coupled tearing and twisting modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    A dispersion relation is derived for resistive modes of arbitrary parity in a tokamak plasma. At low mode amplitude, tearing and twisting modes which have nonideal MHD behavior at only one rational surface at a time in the plasma are decoupled via sheared rotation and diamagnetic flows. At higher amplitude, more unstable {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes develop which have nonideal behavior simultaneously at many surfaces. Such modes possess tearing parity layers at some of the nonideal surfaces, and twisting parity layers at others, but mixed parity layers are generally disallowed. At low mode number, {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes are likely to have tearing parity layers at all of the nonideal surfaces in a very low-{beta} plasma, but twisting parity layers become more probable as the plasma {beta} is increased. At high mode number, unstable twisting modes which exceed a critical amplitude drive conventional magnetic island chains on alternate rational surfaces, to form an interlocking structure in which the O-points and X-points of neighboring chains line up.

  16. Photoelectric Effect for Twist-deformed Space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daszkiewicz, M.

    In this article, we investigate the impact of twisted space-time on the photoelectric effect, i.e., we derive the $\\theta$-deformed threshold frequency. In such a way we indicate that the space-time noncommutativity strongly enhances the photoelectric process.

  17. Mechanical Motion of Chiral Azobenzene Crystals with Twisting upon Photoirradiation.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takuya; Fujisawa, Juri; Shiro, Motoo; Koshima, Hideko; Asahi, Toru

    2016-06-01

    The photomechanical motion of chiral crystals of trans-azobenzene derivatives with an (S)- and (R)-phenylethylamide group was investigated and compared with a racemic crystal. Changes in the UV/Vis absorption spectra of the powdered crystals before and after UV irradiation were measured by using an optical waveguide spectrometer, showing that the lifetime of the cis-to-trans thermal back-isomerization of the chiral crystals was faster than that of the racemic crystals. Upon UV irradiation, a long plate-like chiral microcrystal bent away from the light source with a twisting motion. A square-like chiral microcrystal curled toward the light with some twisting. Reversible bending of a rod-like chiral microcrystal was repeatable over twenty-five cycles. In contrast, bending of a plate-like racemic microcrystal was small. A possible mechanism for the bending and twisting motion was discussed based on the optimized cis conformer determined by using calculations, showing that the bending motion with twisting is caused by elongation along the b axis and shrinkage along the a axis. PMID:27097760

  18. Would You Rather (WYR), with a Sexual Health Twist!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Brittany; McNeill, Elisa Beth; Wilson, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Would You Rather (WYR), with a Sexual Health Twist! teaching technique uses two youth games, "Would you rather…" and Twister®, to actively engage students in developing decision-making skills regarding human sexuality. Utilizing the "Would you rather" choices, the teacher provides a short scenario with two difficult choices.…

  19. Action at hooked or twisted-hooked DNA juxtapositions rationalizes unlinking preference of type-2 topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhirong; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Chan, Hue Sun

    2010-07-30

    The mathematical basis of the hypothesis that type-2 topoisomerases recognize and act at specific DNA juxtapositions has been investigated by coarse-grained lattice polymer models, showing that selective segment passages at hooked juxtapositions can result in dramatic reductions in catenane and knot populations. The lattice modeling approach is here extended to account for the narrowing of variance of linking number (Lk) of DNA circles by type-2 topoisomerases. In general, the steady-state variance of Lk resulting from selective segment passages at a specific juxtaposition geometry j is inversely proportional to the average linking number, Lk(j), of circles with the given juxtaposition. Based on this formulation, we demonstrate that selective segment passages at hooked juxtapositions reduce the variance of Lk. The dependence of this effect on model DNA circle size is remarkably similar to that observed experimentally for type-2 topoisomerases, which appear to be less capable in narrowing Lk variance for small DNA circles than for larger DNA circles. This behavior is rationalized by a substantial cancellation of writhe in small circles with hook-like juxtapositions. During our simulations, we uncovered a twisted variation of the hooked juxtaposition that has an even more dramatic effect on Lk variance narrowing than the hooked juxtaposition. For an extended set of juxtapositions, we detected a significant correlation between the Lk narrowing potential and the logarithmic decatenating and unknotting potentials for a given juxtaposition, a trend reminiscent of scaling relations observed with experimental measurements on type-2 topoisomerases from a variety of organisms. The consistent agreement between theory and experiment argues for type-2 topoisomerase action at hooked or twisted-hooked DNA juxtapositions. PMID:20460130

  20. Structure-Function Studies of the bHLH Phosphorylation Domain of TWIST1 in Prostate Cancer Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Gajula, Rajendra P.; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Williams, Russell D.; Nugent, Katriana; Kato, Yoshinori; Wang, Hailun; Malek, Reem; Taparra, Kekoa; Cades, Jessica; Annadanam, Anvesh; Yoon, A-Rum; Fertig, Elana; Firulli, Beth A.; Mazzacurati, Lucia; Burns, Timothy F.; Firulli, Anthony B.; An, Steven S.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2015-01-01

    The TWIST1 gene has diverse roles in development and pathologic diseases such as cancer. TWIST1 is a dimeric basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor existing as TWIST1-TWIST1 or TWIST1-E12/47. TWIST1 partner choice and DNA binding can be influenced during development by phosphorylation of Thr125 and Ser127 of the Thr-Gln-Ser (TQS) motif within the bHLH of TWIST1. The significance of these TWIST1 phosphorylation sites for metastasis is unknown. We created stable isogenic prostate cancer cell lines overexpressing TWIST1 wild-type, phospho-mutants, and tethered versions. We assessed these isogenic lines using assays that mimic stages of cancer metastasis. In vitro assays suggested the phospho-mimetic Twist1-DQD mutation could confer cellular properties associated with pro-metastatic behavior. The hypo-phosphorylation mimic Twist1-AQA mutation displayed reduced pro-metastatic activity compared to wild-type TWIST1 in vitro, suggesting that phosphorylation of the TWIST1 TQS motif was necessary for pro-metastatic functions. In vivo analysis demonstrates that the Twist1-AQA mutation exhibits reduced capacity to contribute to metastasis, whereas the expression of the Twist1-DQD mutation exhibits proficient metastatic potential. Tethered TWIST1-E12 heterodimers phenocopied the Twist1-DQD mutation for many in vitro assays, suggesting that TWIST1 phosphorylation may result in heterodimerization in prostate cancer cells. Lastly, the dual phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor BEZ235 strongly attenuated TWIST1-induced migration that was dependent on the TQS motif. TWIST1 TQS phosphorylation state determines the intensity of TWIST1-induced pro-metastatic ability in prostate cancer cells, which may be partly explained mechanistically by TWIST1 dimeric partner choice. PMID:25622896

  1. All About the Grains Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Grains Group? Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain is ... bulgur (cracked wheat), oatmeal, whole cornmeal, and brown rice. Refined grains have been milled, a process that ...

  2. Misorientation-angle-dependent electrical transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Perello, David J; Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have unique atomic defect structures and band dispersion relations that depend on the inter-domain misorientation angle. Here, we explore misorientation angle-dependent electrical transport at grain boundaries in monolayer MoS2 by correlating the atomic defect structures of measured devices analysed with transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that grain boundaries are primarily composed of 5-7 dislocation cores with periodicity and additional complex defects formed at high angles, obeying the classical low-angle theory for angles <22°. The inter-domain mobility is minimized for angles <9° and increases nonlinearly by two orders of magnitude before saturating at ∼ 16 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) around misorientation angle ≈ 20°. This trend is explained via grain-boundary electrostatic barriers estimated from density functional calculations and experimental tunnelling barrier heights, which are ≈ 0.5 eV at low angles and ≈ 0.15 eV at high angles (≥ 20°). PMID:26813605

  3. Damage Susceptibility of Grain Boundaries in HT9 Steel Subjected to High-Temperature Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Zhe; Field, David P.

    2012-10-01

    HT9 steel is an attractive ferritic/martensitic steel that is used in components of nuclear and fossil power plants because of its high strength and good swelling resistance. Specific phenomena (such as segregation, voiding, cracking, etc.) are prevalent along grain boundaries since these interfaces act as efficient sources for vacancies. The accumulation of vacancies in grain boundaries may result in intergranular fracture. In this study, HT9 steel was subjected to creep tests at elevated temperature (about 0.5 T m) and two different creep conditions (where creep lifetimes were about 100 and about 1000 hours, respectively). The grain boundaries in HT9 steel after creep tests were studied by the use of scanning electron microscopy in order to establish the relationship between the grain boundary structure and creep damage. Images and data obtained using electron backscatter diffraction reveal a high susceptibility of high-angle boundaries to creep cavitation, as expected. In addition, the Σ3 boundaries are also susceptible to damage under these conditions at a similar or even higher rate as compared with random high-angle boundaries.

  4. Ultrafine-Grain Structure Formation in an Al-Mg-Sc Alloy During Warm ECAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitdikov, Oleg; Avtokratova, Elena; Sakai, Taku; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2013-02-01

    Microstructural evolution taking place during equal-channel angular pressing was studied in a commercial Al-6Mg-0.3Sc alloy at 523 K (250 °C) (~0.5 T m). The structural changes are mainly associated with development of microshear bands (MSBs) that are continuously formed by strain accumulation and microstructural heterogeneities in each pass, which result in fragmentation of coarse original grains. New ultrafine grains (UFGs) with moderate-to-high angle boundary misorientations are concurrently evolved in the interiors of MSBs accompanied by rigid body rotation at medium-to-large strains. Such strain-induced grain refinement process occurs very slowly and incompletely in the present heavily alloyed Al alloy, leading to formation of a mixed microstructure, i.e., the UFGs in colony and some weakly misoriented fragments of original grains. The microstructure evolved at ɛ ≈ 12 is characterized by a bimodal crystallite size distribution with two peaks at d 1 ≈ 0.2 to 0.3 μm and d 2 ≈ 0.6 to 0.7 μm, and the fraction of high angle boundaries of about 0.35 ± 0.05. The main factors promoting dynamic formation of UFGs and the effects of thermal processes on it during severe plastic deformation are discussed in detail.

  5. Misorientation-angle-dependent electrical transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Perello, David J.; Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have unique atomic defect structures and band dispersion relations that depend on the inter-domain misorientation angle. Here, we explore misorientation angle-dependent electrical transport at grain boundaries in monolayer MoS2 by correlating the atomic defect structures of measured devices analysed with transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that grain boundaries are primarily composed of 5-7 dislocation cores with periodicity and additional complex defects formed at high angles, obeying the classical low-angle theory for angles <22°. The inter-domain mobility is minimized for angles <9° and increases nonlinearly by two orders of magnitude before saturating at ~16 cm2 V-1 s-1 around misorientation angle~20°. This trend is explained via grain-boundary electrostatic barriers estimated from density functional calculations and experimental tunnelling barrier heights, which are ~0.5 eV at low angles and ~0.15 eV at high angles (>=20°).

  6. Misorientation-angle-dependent electrical transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Perello, David J.; Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have unique atomic defect structures and band dispersion relations that depend on the inter-domain misorientation angle. Here, we explore misorientation angle-dependent electrical transport at grain boundaries in monolayer MoS2 by correlating the atomic defect structures of measured devices analysed with transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that grain boundaries are primarily composed of 5–7 dislocation cores with periodicity and additional complex defects formed at high angles, obeying the classical low-angle theory for angles <22°. The inter-domain mobility is minimized for angles <9° and increases nonlinearly by two orders of magnitude before saturating at ∼16 cm2 V−1 s−1 around misorientation angle≈20°. This trend is explained via grain-boundary electrostatic barriers estimated from density functional calculations and experimental tunnelling barrier heights, which are ≈0.5 eV at low angles and ≈0.15 eV at high angles (≥20°). PMID:26813605

  7. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantlymore » random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.« less

  8. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    SciTech Connect

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantly random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.

  9. Grain Boundary Character Distributions in Nanocrystalline Metals Produced by Different Processing Routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bober, David B.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Kumar, Mukul; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantly random high angle (73 pct). These grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.

  10. Circumstellar grain formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draine, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Dust formation around cool giant and supergiant stars is examined in terms of grain formulation. Optical properties of small clusters, molecular physics of cluster nucleation and growth, circumstellar mass flows, and their application to alpha Ori are discussed.

  11. Presolar Grains in Indarch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Nittler, L. R.; Swan, P. D.; Walker, R. M.

    1995-09-01

    We report results for the EH(4) Indarch. Earlier work [1] found 20 micrometers clumps of sub-micron SiC whose presolar nature was inferred from step-wise combustion, noble gas [2], and ion probe isotopic measurements. Our results indicate that the clumps were an artifact of sample preparation. Our sample was first cleaned using 6N HCl, and water and isopropanol rinses, then powdered and reacted with HCl-HF/HCl, KOH, and H3BO3-HCl/HCl giving a C-rich residue 1.14 wt.% of the original. X-ray mapping showed SiC grains and 5x as many Si3N4 grains, but no fine-grained clumps. Large (6 micrometers to 20 micrometers) C-rich spheroids were also present. The sample was further treated with KOH/HNO3 and NH3H2O; attempts to do density-separates were unsuccessful. An aliquot was treated with perchloric acid and separated into <1 micrometers and >1 micrometer fractions. SEM-EDS measurements of 73 (<1 micrometer) grains showed 44 SiC, 19 Si3N4, 4 C only, and 6 C with minor Si (both the C and Si in these particles are isotopically normal). A similar distribution of species was found for 37 (>1 micrometer) grains with the addition of 2 spinel and one Al2O3 grains. The whole rock concentration of SiC was 5.8 ppm, higher than previous determinations [1,3,9]. Confirming earlier suggestions [1,2], we find that SiC in Indarch is much finer-grained than in Murchison; about 2/3 of the mass is in grains <=0.3 micrometers compared to only about 4% for Murchison. This may represent size-sorting in the nebula or selective destruction of fine-grained material. Ion probe measurements of 22 (1-3 micrometers) grains gave isotopic results in the range previously measured for Murchison SiCs [4]. Several normal Si3N4 grains (>1 micron) were measured; probably exsolution products similar to those in Qingzhen [7]. Ion mapping was used to search for presolar oxide grains using previously developed techniques [5]. Seven candidate grains out of ~1000 were found. Multiple imaging confirmed an ^(16)O/^(18

  12. Intrinsically chiral aromaticity. Rules incorporating linking number, twist, and writhe for higher-twist Möbius annulenes.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Shay M; Rzepa, Henry S

    2008-06-18

    The geometries of coiled annulenes belonging to the chiral C2 and D(n) (n = 2,7) point groups are defined by two chiral indices, W(r) and T(w), respectively (writhe and twist), which sum to give an overall integer linking number, L(k) (the Cãlugãreanu-White-Fuller theorem). While the value of L(k) can been equated with single-twist (L(k) = 1pi), double-twist (L(k) = 2), and higher-order (L(k) > 2) twisted (Möbius-Listing) annulenes, we suggest that the correct Huckel molecular-orbital treatment is to use T(w) specifically in the 2p(pi)-2p(pi) overlap correction first suggested by Heilbronner, rather than L(k). Quantitatively, because many of these systems project much of the finite value of T(w) into W(r), a simple mechanism exists to increase the pi-electron resonance stabilization beyond what simple Heilbronner theory predicts. Examples of a diverse set of such chiral annulenes are dissected into W(r) and T(w) contributions, which reveals that those with the minimum value of T(w) are associated with the greater delocalized stability. PMID:18505260

  13. Optical angular properties of twisted-nematic liquid-crystal cells with twist angles of less than 90 degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stephen

    1996-05-01

    I analyze the optical angular properties of twisted-nematic liquid-crystal cells that operate in the normally white mode with twist angles of less than 90 degrees. It is demonstrated that, although a reduction of the twist angle produces an increase in the asymmetry of the birefringence generated by a single cell when in the active phase, the positioning of two cells such that the face-to-face rub directions are crossed gives rise to a large amount of cell compensation, giving an enhanced field of view. The effect of the polarizer arrangement is investigated, and it is shown that the configuration required in order to maximize the overall optical transmittance when in the inactive phase also maintains the asymmetry displayed by the single cell when stimulated by voltages lying below that of the saturation voltage. Although employment of this polarizer design together with a lowering of the twist angle degrades cell contrast, a fast optical shutter from the light to the dark state based on a double-cell construction possessing improved optical angular properties is introduced. Such systems find applications in automatically darkening welding filter visors for which it is critical to combine both a fast response time to the protective state together with a large viewing cone.

  14. Desorption from interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, A.; Jura, M.; Omont, A.

    1985-01-01

    Different desorption mechanisms from interstellar grains are considered to resolve the conflict between the observed presence of gaseous species in molecular clouds and their expected depletion onto grains. The physics of desorption is discussed with particular reference to the process of grain heating and the specific heat of the dust material. Impulsive heating by X-rays and cosmic rays is addressed. Spot heating of the grains by cosmic rays and how this can lead to desorption of mantles from very large grains is considered. It is concluded that CO depletion on grains will be small in regions with A(V) less than five from the cloud surface and n(H) less than 10,000, in agreement with observations and in contrast to expectations from pure thermal equilibrium. Even in very dense and obscured regions and in the absence of internal ultraviolet sources, the classical evaporation of CO or N2 and O2-rich mantles by cosmic rays is important.

  15. Formation Evaluation of High-Angle and Horizontal (HA/HZ) Well: 1990s' Issues, 2000s'Learnings, and 2010s' Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillot, Philippe; Mendoza, Alberto; Zhou, Jinjuan; Mardon, Duncan; Wertanen, Scott; Passey, Quinn

    2010-05-01

    The 1990s can be seen retrospectively as "the decade of the horizontal well," because it was during this period that sharper seismic imaging, new drilling technology and reliable geosteering were recognized as leading to increased hydrocarbon production from extended-reach wells with correspondingly lower unit costs. Subsequent advances in logging-while-drilling and in the deployment of wireline tools in the 2000s have allowed horizontal-well data broadly to match vertical-well databases in terms of the achievable range of along-hole measurements. However, tool environmental corrections in horizontal wells are more complex, particularly because of the 3D manifestations of differential invasion (of water-base mud filtrate) and of formation heterogeneity. The technological advances in data acquisition have widened still further the gap between our ability to measure along hole and our ability to interpret the resulting log data. Indeed, even with current logging technology, it may not be possible to evaluate accurately some of the parameters we wish to quantify. The interpretation of environmentally-corrected, horizontal-well logs can be far more difficult than for corresponding logs in vertical or even relatively high-angle wells. The situation is compounded by dipping beds and by undulating well trajectories. An overriding issue is the nature and scale of formation anisotropy, especially that which relates to formation resistivity. After having introduced industry-recognized issues related to formation evaluation in high-angle/ horizontal (HA/HZ) wells, this paper reviews current academic and industry research efforts to develop methods for faster modeling and inversion of tool response in more complex geometries and more realistic formations. A workflow that combines azimuthal nuclear and scalar resisistivity logging-while-drilling (LWD) logs to construct a common subsurface model is illustrated. Data include standard LWD triple-combo logs of wells with an

  16. TWIST1 Integrates Endothelial Responses to Flow in Vascular Dysfunction and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Marwa M.; Kim, Hyejeong Rosemary; Xing, Rouyu; Hsiao, Sarah; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Feng, Shuang; Bowden, Neil P.; Maguire, Richard; Ariaans, Markus; Francis, Sheila E.; Weinberg, Peter D.; van der Heiden, Kim; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Chico, Timothy J.A.; Ridger, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Blood flow–induced shear stress controls endothelial cell (EC) physiology during atherosclerosis via transcriptional mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The mechanosensitive transcription factor TWIST is expressed during embryogenesis, but its role in EC responses to shear stress and focal atherosclerosis is unknown. Objective: To investigate whether TWIST regulates endothelial responses to shear stress during vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis and compare TWIST function in vascular development and disease. Methods and Results: The expression and function of TWIST1 was studied in EC in both developing vasculature and during the initiation of atherosclerosis. In zebrafish, twist was expressed in early embryonic vasculature where it promoted angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In adult porcine and murine arteries, TWIST1 was expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions as evidenced by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and en face staining. Moreover, studies of experimental murine carotid arteries and cultured EC revealed that TWIST1 was induced by low shear stress via a GATA4-dependent transcriptional mechanism. Gene silencing in cultured EC and EC-specific genetic deletion in mice demonstrated that TWIST1 promoted atherosclerosis by inducing inflammation and enhancing EC proliferation associated with vascular leakiness. Conclusions: TWIST expression promotes developmental angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In addition to its role in development, TWIST is expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions of adult arteries where it promotes atherosclerosis by inducing EC proliferation and inflammation. Thus, pleiotropic functions of TWIST control vascular disease and development. PMID:27245171

  17. Twist1 induces CCL2 and recruits macrophages to promote angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Low-Marchelli, Janine M.; Ardi, Veronica C.; Vizcarra, Edward A.; van Rooijen, Nico; Quigley, James P.; Yang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor Twist1 induces Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and extracellular matrix degradation to promote tumor metastasis. Although Twist1 also plays a role in embryonic vascular development and tumor angiogenesis, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes are not as well understood. Here, we report a novel function for Twist1 in modifying the tumor microenvironment to promote progression. We found that expression of Twist1 in human mammary epithelial cells potently promoted angiogenesis. Surprisingly, Twist1 expression did not increase the secretion of the common pro-angiogenic factors VEGF and bFGF, but rather induced expression of the macrophage chemoattractant CCL2. Attenuation of endogenous Twist1 in vivo blocked macrophage recruitment and angiogenesis, whereas exogenous CCL2 rescued the ability of tumor cells lacking Twist1 to attract macrophages and promote angiogenesis. Macrophage recruitment also was essential for the ability of Twist1-expressing cells to elicit a strong angiogenic response. Together, our findings show how Twist1 recruits stromal macrophages through CCL2 induction to promote angiogenesis and tumor progression. Since Twist1 expression has been associated with poor survival in many human cancers, this finding suggests that anti-CCL2 therapy may offer a rational strategy to treat Twist1-positive metastatic cancers. PMID:23329645

  18. The Effect of Tip Geometry on Active-Twist Rotor Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric examination of the effect of tip geometry on active-twist rotor system response is conducted. Tip geometry parameters considered include sweep, taper, anhedral, nonlinear twist, and the associated radial initiation location for each of these variables. A detailed study of the individual effect of each parameter on active-twist response is presented, and an assessment offered of the effect of combining multiple tip shape parameters. Tip sweep is shown to have the greatest affect on active-twist response, significantly decreasing the response available. Tip taper and anhedral are shown to increase moderately the active-twist response, while nonlinear twist is shown to have a minimal effect. A candidate tip shape that provides active-twist response equivalent to or greater than a rectangular planform blade is presented.

  19. Unique CCT repeats mediate transcription of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkuma, Mizue; Funato, Noriko; Higashihori, Norihisa; Murakami, Masanori; Ohyama, Kimie; Nakamura, Masataka . E-mail: naka.gene@cmn.tmd.ac.jp

    2007-01-26

    TWIST1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, plays critical roles in embryo development, cancer metastasis and mesenchymal progenitor differentiation. Little is known about transcriptional regulation of TWIST1 expression. Here we identified DNA sequences responsible for TWIST1 expression in mesenchymal lineage cell lines. Reporter assays with TWIST1 promoter mutants defined the -102 to -74 sequences that are essential for TWIST1 expression in human and mouse mesenchymal cell lines. Tandem repeats of CCT, but not putative CREB and NF-{kappa}B sites in the sequences substantially supported activity of the TWIST1 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that the DNA sequences with the CCT repeats formed complexes with nuclear factors, containing, at least, Sp1 and Sp3. These results suggest critical implication of the CCT repeats in association with Sp1 and Sp3 factors in sustaining expression of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cells.

  20. Mutations within Helix I of Twist1 Result in Distinct Limb Defects and Variation of DNA-Binding Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Firulli, Beth A.; Redick, Bradley A.; Conway, Simon J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2008-01-01

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor that plays an important role in limb development. Haploinsufficiency of Twist1 results in polydactyly via the inability of Twist1 to antagonistically regulate the related factor Hand2. The mechanism modulating Twist1-Hand2 antagonism is via phosphoregulation of conserved threonine and serine residues in helix I of the bHLH domain. Phosphoregulation alters the dimerization affinities for both proteins. Here we show that the expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants result in distinct limb phenotypes in mice. In addition to dimer regulation, Twist1 phosphoregulation affects the DNA-binding affinities of Twist1 in a partner dependent and cis-element dependent manner. In order to gain a better understanding of the specific Twist1 transcriptional complexes that function during limb morphogensis, we employ a series of Twist1-tethered dimers that include the known Twist1 partners, E12 and Hand2, as well as a tethered Twist1 homodimer. We show that these dimers behave in a manner similar to monomerically expressed bHLH factors and result in distinct limb phenotypes that correlate well with those observed from the limb expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants. Taken together, this study shows that the Twist1 dimer affinity for a given partner can modulate the DNA binding affinity and that Twist1 dimer choice determines phenotypic outcome during limb development. PMID:17652084

  1. Effects of fuselage forebody geometry on low-speed lateral-directional characteristics of twin-tail fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, P. C.; Gilbert, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    Low-speed, static wind-tunnel tests were conducted to explore the effects of fighter fuselage forebody geometry on lateral-directional characteristics at high angles of attack and to provide data for general design procedures. Effects of eight different forebody configurations and several add-on devices (e.g., nose strakes, boundary-layer trip wires, and nose booms) were investigated. Tests showed that forebody design features such as fineness ratio, cross-sectional shape, and add-on devices can have a significant influence on both lateral-directional and longitudinal aerodynamic stability. Several of the forebodies produced both lateral-directional symmetry and strong favorable changes in lateral-directional stability. However, the same results also indicated that such forebody designs can produce significant reductions in longitudinal stability near maximum lift and can significantly change the influence of other configuration variables. The addition of devices to highly tailored forebody designs also can significantly degrade the stability improvements provided by the clean forebody.

  2. Enhanced oil recovery utilizing high-angle wells in the Frontier Formation, Badger Basin Field, Park County, Wyoming. Final report for the period October 1992--October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.P.; Fortmann, R.G.

    1994-12-01

    Badger Basin Field, discovered in 1931, produces at stripper rates from low-permeability fractured sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation. Only 15% of the estimated 25 million barrels of oil originally in-place will be produced from the twenty-two attempted vertical completions. This project will increase recoverable reserves through a better understanding of the reservoir and factors which control production. Characterization of the reservoir has been accomplished through an integrated engineering, geological and geophysical approach. Production data, drilling and completion techniques, and relative location of wells on the anticline were reviewed and related to productivity. Literature was reviewed for interpretations on preferred flow directions on anticlinal structures. A structure map of the producing Frontier reservoir was constructed. Porosity development and its relationship to fracture networks was examined petrographically. Fractures in core were described and oriented using paleomagnetic techniques. Azimuths of fractures in outcrop were compared to fracture azimuths measured in the core. A 17 square-mile 3D seismic survey was designed, acquired and processed. Interpretation is being performed on a Sun workstation using Landmark Graphics software. Time-structure and amplitude-distribution maps will be constructed on three Frontier horizons. A location for a high-angle well will be chosen. The slant/horizontal test will be drilled and completed to increase recovery of reserves. Transfer of successful technologies will be accomplished by technical publications and presentations, and access to project materials, data, and field facilities.

  3. Three-dimensional shapes and distribution of FePd nanoparticles observed by electron tomography using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazuhisa; Aoyagi, Kenta; Konno, Toyohiko J.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied three-dimensional shapes and distribution of FePd nanoparticles, prepared by electron beam deposition and postdeposition annealing, by means of single-axis tilt tomography using atomic number contrasts obtained by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Particle size, shape, and locations were reconstructed by weighted backprojection (WBP), as well as by simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). We have also estimated the particle size by simple extrapolation of tilt-series original data sets, which proved to be quite powerful. The results of the two algorithms for reconstruction have been compared quantitatively with those obtained by the extrapolation method and those independently reported by electron holography. It was found that the reconstructed intensity map by WBP contains a small amount of dotlike artifacts, which do not exist in the results by SIRT, and that the particle surface obtained by WBP is rougher than that by SIRT. We demonstrate, on the other hand, that WBP yields a better estimation of the particle size in the z direction than SIRT does, most likely due to the presence of a "missing wedge" in the original data set.

  4. The effects of pressure sensor acoustics on airdata derived from a High-angle-of-attack Flush Airdata Sensing (HI-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of a nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was verified for quasi-steady flight conditions up to 55 deg angle of attack during the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) Program. The system is a matrix of nine pressure ports arranged in annular rings on the aircraft nose. The complete airdata set is estimated using nonlinear regression. Satisfactory frequency response was verified to the system Nyquist frequency (12.5 Hz). The effects of acoustical distortions within the individual pressure sensors of the nonintrusive pressure matrix on overall system performance are addressed. To quantify these effects, a frequency-response model describing the dynamics of acoustical distortion is developed and simple design criteria are derived. The model adjusts measured HI-FADS pressure data for the acoustical distortion and quantifies the effects of internal sensor geometries on system performance. Analysis results indicate that sensor frequency response characteristics very greatly with altitude, thus it is difficult to select satisfactory sensor geometry for all altitudes. The solution used presample filtering to eliminate resonance effects, and short pneumatic tubing sections to reduce lag effects. Without presample signal conditioning the system designer must use the pneumatic transmission line to attenuate the resonances and accept the resulting altitude variability.

  5. Preliminary results from a subsonic high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system: Design, calibration, and flight test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Larson, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was installed and flight-tested on the F-18 high alpha research flight vehicle. The system is a matrix of 25 pressure orifices in concentric circles on the nose of the vehicle. The orifices determine angles of attack and sideslip, Mach number, and pressure altitude. Pressure was transmitted from the orifices to an electronically scanned pressure module by lines of pneumatic tubing. The HI-FADS system was calibrated and demonstrated using dutch roll flight maneuvers covering large Mach, angle-of-attack, and sideslip ranges. Reference airdata for system calibration were generated by a minimum variance estimation technique blending measurements from two wingtip airdata booms with inertial velocities, aircraft angular rates and attitudes, precision radar tracking, and meteorological analyses. The pressure orifice calibration was based on identifying empirical adjustments to modified Newtonian flow on a hemisphere. Calibration results are presented. Flight test results used all 25 orifices or used a subset of 9 orifices. Under moderate maneuvering conditions, the HI-FADS system gave excellent results over the entire subsonic Mach number range up to 55 deg angle of attack. The internal pneumatic frequency response of the system is accurate to beyond 10 Hz. Aerodynamic lags in the aircraft flow field caused some performance degradation during heavy maneuvering.

  6. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  7. Film grain synthesis and its application to re-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schallauer, Peter; Mörzinger, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Digital film restoration and special effects compositing require more and more automatic procedures for movie regraining. Missing or inhomogeneous grain decreases perceived quality. For the purpose of grain synthesis an existing texture synthesis algorithm has been evaluated and optimized. We show that this algorithm can produce synthetic grain which is perceptually similar to a given grain template, which has high spatial and temporal variation and which can be applied to multi-spectral images. Furthermore a re-grain application framework is proposed, which synthesises based on an input grain template artificial grain and composites this together with the original image content. Due to its modular approach this framework supports manual as well as automatic re-graining applications. Two example applications are presented, one for re-graining an entire movie and one for fully automatic re-graining of image regions produced by restoration algorithms. Low computational cost of the proposed algorithms allows application in industrial grade software.

  8. Formation of Highly Misoriented Fragments at Hot Band Grain Boundaries During Cold Rolling of Interstitial-Free Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrin, Nasima; Quadir, Md. Zakaria; Ferry, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The deformation heterogeneities that form in the vicinity of prior hot band grain boundaries in a 75 pct cold-rolled interstitial-free steel have been investigated by 3D electron backscatter diffraction. Grain boundary-affected regions occupy a large fraction of the overall material volume. The coexistence of several features, such as steep orientation gradients up to 5 deg/ μm, high-angle boundary networks, and thin, elongated grain boundary fragments, has confirmed the highly complex nature of these regions. Most notably, these thin boundary fragments were found to be significantly misoriented from any of the deformed grains immediately adjacent to the boundary. Overall, grain boundary regions adopt the so-called `deformation banding' mode of deformations on both the micro ( e.g., steep gradients)- and nano ( e.g., thin fragments)-length scales. Grain boundary structures comprise the essential features to act as preferred sites for recrystallization. The discovery of numerous thin grain boundary fragments in the deformation microstructure provides a plausible explanation for the origin of recrystallized grains with orientations other than those found within the adjoining deformed grains in the vicinity of grain boundaries; this phenomenon has been commonly observed in texture data for many years but remained unexplained.

  9. Cooled highly twisted airfoil for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kildea, R.J.

    1988-04-19

    This patent describes a cooled highly twisted airfoil for use in a gas turbine engine. The airfoil has a first cooling air cavity adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil, and a second cooling air cavity, separated from the first cavity by a wall. The second cavity provides cooling air to the first cavity by means of cooling holes provided in the wall. The improvement is characterized by: the wall comprising an integrally formed, continuous warped wall, defined as a surface of revolution about an axis, the axis determined such that the axis intersects the plane of a section close to a desired centerline of a series of impingement holes aligned in opposition to the leading edge, whereby cooling air is directed relatively precisely to the leading edge of the highly twisted airfoil through the impingement holes.

  10. Twisted kinks, Dirac transparent systems, and Darboux transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, F.; Jakubský, V.

    2014-12-01

    Darboux transformations are employed in construction and analysis of Dirac Hamiltonians with pseudoscalar potentials. By this method, we build a four-parameter class of reflectionless systems. Their potentials correspond to the composition of complex kinks, also known as twisted kinks, that play an important role in the 1 +1 Gross-Neveu and Nambu-Jona-Lasinio field theories. The twisted kinks turn out to be multisolitonic solutions of the integrable Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur hierarchy. Consequently, all the spectral properties of the Dirac reflectionless systems are reflected in a nontrivial conserved quantity, which can be expressed in a simple way in terms of Darboux transformations. We show that the four-parameter pseudoscalar systems reduce to well-known models for specific choices of the parameters. An associated class of transparent nonrelativistic models described by a matrix Schrödinger Hamiltonian is studied and the rich algebraic structure of their integrals of motion is discussed.

  11. Partially coherent twisted states in arrays of coupled phase oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, Oleh E.; Wolfrum, Matthias; Laing, Carlo R.

    2014-06-15

    We consider a one-dimensional array of phase oscillators with non-local coupling and a Lorentzian distribution of natural frequencies. The primary objects of interest are partially coherent states that are uniformly “twisted” in space. To analyze these, we take the continuum limit, perform an Ott/Antonsen reduction, integrate over the natural frequencies, and study the resulting spatio-temporal system on an unbounded domain. We show that these twisted states and their stability can be calculated explicitly. We find that stable twisted states with different wave numbers appear for increasing coupling strength in the well-known Eckhaus scenario. Simulations of finite arrays of oscillators show good agreement with results of the analysis of the infinite system.

  12. Particle acceleration by magnetic reconnection in unstable twisted coronal loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, Mykola; Browning, Philippa; Vekstein, Grigory

    Photospheric motions may result in twisting of a coronal loop magnetic field. Such a field configuration contains free energy that may be released by reconnection with the magnetic field relaxing to the linear force-free configuration. Browning & Van der Linden (2003) suggested that such a relaxation event may be triggered by onset of ideal kink instability. In the present work we study the evolution of a twisted magnetic fluxtube with zero net ax-ial current following Browning et al. (2008). Further, proton and electron trajectories are investigated using the test-particle approach consistently with the time-dependent reconnec-tion model. We discuss temporal evolution of proton and electron energy spectra and possible observational implications.

  13. Twist-three at five loops, Bethe ansatz and wrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaria, Matteo; Forini, Valentina; Łukowski, Tomasz; Zieme, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    We present a formula for the five-loop anomalous dimension of Script N = 4 SYM twist-three operators in the fraktur sfraktur l(2) sector. We obtain its asymptotic part from the Bethe Ansatz and finite volume corrections from the generalized Lüscher formalism, considering scattering processes of spin chain magnons with virtual particles that travel along the cylinder. The complete result respects the expected large spin scaling properties and passes non-trivial tests including reciprocity constraints. We analyze the pole structure and find agreement with a conjectured resummation formula. In analogy with the twist-two anomalous dimension at four-loops wrapping effects are of order (log2M/M2) for large values of the spin.

  14. Evolution of interlayer coupling in twisted molybdenum disulfide bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaihui; Zhang, Liming; Cao, Ting; Jin, Chenhao; Qiu, Diana; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex; Yang, Peidong; Louie, Steve G.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Van der Waals coupling is emerging as a powerful method to engineer physical properties of atomically thin two-dimensional materials. In coupled graphene-graphene and graphene-boron nitride layers, interesting physical phenomena ranging from Fermi velocity renormalization to Hofstadter’s butterfly pattern have been demonstrated. Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides, another family of two-dimensional-layered semiconductors, can show distinct coupling phenomena. Here we demonstrate the evolution of interlayer coupling with twist angles in as-grown molybdenum disulfide bilayers. We find that the indirect bandgap size varies appreciably with the stacking configuration: it shows the largest redshift for AA- and AB-stacked bilayers, and a significantly smaller but constant redshift for all other twist angles. Our observations, together with ab initio calculations, reveal that this evolution of interlayer coupling originates from the repulsive steric effects that leads to different interlayer separations between the two molybdenum disulfide layers in different stacking configurations.

  15. Nonsnaking doubly diffusive convectons and the twist instability

    SciTech Connect

    Beaume, Cédric Knobloch, Edgar; Bergeon, Alain

    2013-11-15

    Doubly diffusive convection in a three-dimensional horizontally extended domain with a square cross section in the vertical is considered. The fluid motion is driven by horizontal temperature and concentration differences in the transverse direction. When the buoyancy ratio N = −1 and the Rayleigh number is increased the conduction state loses stability to a subcritical, almost two-dimensional roll structure localized in the longitudinal direction. This structure exhibits abrupt growth in length near a particular value of the Rayleigh number but does not snake. Prior to this filling transition the structure becomes unstable to a secondary twist instability generating a pair of stationary, spatially localized zigzag states. In contrast to the primary branch these states snake as they grow in extent and eventually fill the whole domain. The origin of the twist instability and the properties of the resulting localized structures are investigated for both periodic and no-slip boundary conditions in the extended direction.

  16. Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-02-01

    Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

  17. Single crystal plasticity with bend-twist modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhodary, Khalil I.; Bakr, Mohamed A.

    2015-06-01

    In this work a formulation is proposed and computationally implemented for rate dependent single crystal plasticity, which incorporates plastic bend-twist modes that arise from dislocation density based poly-slip mechanisms. The formulation makes use of higher order continuum theory and may be viewed as a generalized micromechanics model. The formulation is then linked to the burgers and Nye tensors, showing how their material rates are derivable from a newly proposed third-rank tensor Λp, which incorporates a crystallographic description of bend-twist plasticity through selectable slip-system level constitutive laws. A simple three-dimensional explicit finite element implementation is outlined and employed in three simulations: (a) bi-crystal bending; (b) tension on a notched single crystal; and (c) the large compression of a microstructure to induce the plastic buckling of secondary phases. All simulation are transient, for computational expediency. The results shed light on the physics resulting from dynamic inhomogeneous plastic deformation.

  18. Twisted Single Crystals of Meta-Aromatic Polyamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, D. P.; Martin, D. C.

    1996-03-01

    The morphology of single crystals of the aromatic polyamide poly(metaphenylene isophthalamide) (MPDI or Nomex) was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The single crystals of MPDI were slowly grown from 0.1 weight percent solution. MPDI forms elongated crystals which aggregate together to form highly regular twisted helical bundles. The repeat periods of the helices typically range from 240 nm to 1000 nm and the bundle diameters vary from 36 nm to 120 nm. The angle between the edge of the crystal and the bundle axis varies from 40 to 65 degrees. The regular twisting evidently arises from a bending moment induced by the triclinic symmetry of the MPDI unit cell and the lamellar geometry of the chain-folded single crystal.

  19. Formation of chiral branched nanowires by the Eshelby Twist.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Peng, Hailin; Marshall, A F; Barnett, D M; Nix, W D; Cui, Yi

    2008-08-01

    Manipulating the morphology of inorganic nanostructures, such as their chirality and branching structure, has been actively pursued as a means of controlling their electrical, optical and mechanical properties. Notable examples of chiral inorganic nanostructures include carbon nanotubes, gold multishell nanowires, mesoporous nanowires and helical nanowires. Branched nanostructures have also been studied and been shown to have interesting properties for energy harvesting and nanoelectronics. Combining both chiral and branching motifs into nanostructures might provide new materials properties. Here we show a chiral branched PbSe nanowire structure, which is formed by a vapour-liquid-solid branching from a central nanowire with an axial screw dislocation. The chirality is caused by the elastic strain of the axial screw dislocation, which produces a corresponding Eshelby Twist in the nanowires. In addition to opening up new opportunities for tailoring the properties of nanomaterials, these chiral branched nanowires also provide a direct visualization of the Eshelby Twist. PMID:18685634

  20. Stability of short wavelength tearing and twisting modes

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1998-09-22

    The stability and mutual interaction of tearing and twisting modes in a torus is governed by matrices that generalize the well-known {Delta}{prime} stability index. The diagonal elements of these matrices determine the intrinsic stability of modes that reconnect the magnetic field at a single resonant surface. The off-diagonal elements indicate the strength of the coupling between the different modes. The author shows how the elements of these matrices can be evaluated, in the limit of short wavelength, from the free energy driving radially extended ballooning modes. The author applies the results by calculating the tearing and twisting {Delta}{prime} for a model high-beta equilibrium with circular flux surfaces.