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Sample records for high-angle twist grain

  1. Atomistic aspects of crack propagation along high angle grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, D.

    1997-12-31

    The author presents atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration near a high angle {Sigma} = 5 [001](210) symmetrical tilt grain boundary in NiAl. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and embedded atom (EAM) potentials. The cracks are stabilized near a Griffith condition involving the cohesive energy of the grain boundary. The atomistic configurations of the tip region are different in the presence of the high angle grain boundary than in the bulk. Three different configurations of the grain boundary were studied corresponding to different local compositions. It was found that in ordered NiAl, cracks along symmetrical tilt boundaries show a more brittle behavior for Al rich boundaries than for Ni-rich boundaries. Lattice trapping effects in grain boundary fracture were found to be more significant than in the bulk.

  2. Characterizing twist grain boundaries in BCC Nb by molecular simulation: Structure and shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zeng-Hui; Feng, Ya-Xin; Shang, Jia-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Atomic scale modeling was used to study the structure, energy and shear behaviors of (110) twist grain boundaries (TWGBs) in body-centered cubic Nb. The relation between grain boundary energy (GBE) and the twist angle θ agrees well with the Read-Shockley equation in low-angle range. At higher angles, the GBEs show no distinct trend with the variation of the twist angle or the density of coincident lattice sites. All (110) twist boundaries can be classified into two types: low-angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) and high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs). LAGBs contain a hexagonal dislocation network (HDN) which is composed of 1/2 [ 111 ], 1/2 [ 1 bar 1 bar 1 ] and [001] screw dislocations. HAGBs can be classified into three sub-types further: special boundaries with low Σ, boundaries in the vicinity of special boundaries with similar structures and ordinary HAGBs consisting of periodic patterns. Besides, a dependence of grain boundary shear response vs the twist angle over the entire twist angle range is obtained. Pure sliding behavior is found at all TWGBs. When θ < 12°, the flow stress of LAGBs is found to be correlated with the HDNs and decreases with the increasing twist angle. For ordinary HAGBs, the magnitude of flow stress is around 0.8-1.0 GPa and the twist angle has little effect on the anisotropy mobility. For special grain boundaries with low Σ, the boundary structures govern the GBEs and shear motion behavior significantly.

  3. Superplastic Constitutive Equation Including Percentage of High-Angle Grain Boundaries as a Microstructural Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Liu, F. C.; Xue, P.; Wang, D.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen Al-Mg-Sc samples with subgrain/grain sizes in the range of 1.8 to 4.9 μm were prepared through the processing methods of friction stir processing (FSP), equal-channel-angular pressing (ECAP), rolling, annealing, and combinations of the above. The percentages of high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) of these fine-grained alloys were distributed from 39 to 97 pct. The samples processed through FSP had a higher percentage of HAGBs compared to other samples. Superplasticity was achieved in all fifteen samples, but the FSP samples exhibited better superplasticity than other samples because their fine equiaxed grains, which were mostly surrounded by HAGBs, were conducive to the occurrence of grain boundary sliding (GBS) during superplastic deformation. The dominant deformation mechanism was the same for all fifteen samples, i.e., GBS controlled by grain boundary diffusion. However, the subgrains were the GBS units for the rolled or ECAP samples, which contained high percentages of unrecrystallized grains, whereas the fine grains were the GBS units for the FSP samples. Superplastic data analysis revealed that the dimensionless A in the classical constitutive equation for superplasticity of fine-grained Al alloys was not a constant, but increased with an increase in the percentage of HAGBs, demonstrating that the enhanced superplastic deformation kinetics can be ascribed to the high percentage of HAGBs. A modified superplastic constitutive equation with the percentage of HAGBs as a new microstructural parameter was established.

  4. HREM of general and twist grain boundaries.

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, K. L.; Thompson, L. J.

    1999-03-10

    The observation of atomic-scale structures of grain boundaries (GBs) via axial illumination HREM has been largely restricted to tilt GBs, due to the requirement that the electron beam be parallel to a low-index zone axis on both sides of the interface. This condition can be fulfilled for all tilt GBs with disorientation about a low-index direction. The information obtained through HREM studies in many materials has brought important insights concerning the atomic-scale structure of such boundaries. However, it is well known that tilt GBs occupy only an infinitesimally small fraction of the 5-dimensional phase space which describes the macroscopic geometry of all GBs. Therefore, although tilt GBs are very important due to their low energy, it would be useful to also study twist GBs and general GBs that contain twist and tilt components.

  5. Lamellar diblock copolymer grain boundary morphology. 1. Twist boundary characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gido, S.P.; Gunther, J.; Thomas, E.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Hoffman, D. . Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics)

    1993-08-16

    Grain boundary morphologies in poly(styrene-b-butadiene) lamellar diblock copolymers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two types of twist grain boundaries were observed in which microphase separation of the two blocks was maintained in the grain boundary region by intermaterial dividing surfaces that approximate classically known minimal surfaces. The geometry of these interfaces was demonstrated by comparing experimental TEM images with ray tracing computer simulations of the model surfaces as the projection direction was systematically varied in both the experimental and simulated images. The two morphologies observed were found to have intermaterial dividing surfaces that approximate either Scherk's first (doubly periodic) surface or a section of the right helicoid. The helicoid section boundary was observed at low twist angles, less than or equal to about 15. The Scherk surface family of boundary morphologies, which consists of a doubly periodic array of saddle surfaces, was found over the entire twist range from 0 to 90[degree]. As the twist angle approaches 0[degree] the Scherk surface grain boundary morphology is transformed into a single screw dislocation that has an intermaterial dividing surface with the geometry of a single helicoid. Direct TEM imaging of the detailed core structure of this screw dislocation is presented. These images demonstrate that in the lamellar diblock copolymer the screw dislocation core is nonsingular. This nonsingular core structure represents a radical departure from the singular core structures observed in classical studies of dislocations in atomic crystals.

  6. Nanoparticle-induced twist-grain boundary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trček, Maja; Cordoyiannis, George; Tzitzios, Vassilios; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Lelidis, Ioannis; Kutnjak, Zdravko

    2014-09-01

    By means of high-resolution ac calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy, it is demonstrated that surface-functionalized spherical CdSSe nanoparticles induce a twist-grain boundary phase when dispersed in a chiral liquid crystal. These nanoparticles can effectively stabilize the one-dimensional lattice of screw dislocations, thus establishing the twist-grain boundary order between the cholesteric and the smectic-A phases. A Landau-de Gennes-Ginzburg model is used to analyze the impact of nanoparticles on widening the temperature range of molecular organizations possessing a lattice of screw dislocations. We show that in addition to the defect-core-replacement mechanism, the saddle-splay elasticity may also play a significant role.

  7. Nanoparticle-induced twist-grain boundary phase.

    PubMed

    Trček, Maja; Cordoyiannis, George; Tzitzios, Vassilios; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Lelidis, Ioannis; Kutnjak, Zdravko

    2014-09-01

    By means of high-resolution ac calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy, it is demonstrated that surface-functionalized spherical CdSSe nanoparticles induce a twist-grain boundary phase when dispersed in a chiral liquid crystal. These nanoparticles can effectively stabilize the one-dimensional lattice of screw dislocations, thus establishing the twist-grain boundary order between the cholesteric and the smectic-A phases. A Landau-de Gennes-Ginzburg model is used to analyze the impact of nanoparticles on widening the temperature range of molecular organizations possessing a lattice of screw dislocations. We show that in addition to the defect-core-replacement mechanism, the saddle-splay elasticity may also play a significant role. PMID:25314459

  8. Defects in crystalline packings of twisted filament bundles. II. Dislocations and grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Amir; Grason, Gregory M

    2012-03-01

    Twisted and ropelike assemblies of filamentous molecules are common and vital structural elements in cells and tissues of living organisms. We study the intrinsic frustration occurring in these materials between the two-dimensional organization of filaments in cross section and out-of-plane interfilament twist in bundles. Using nonlinear continuum elasticity theory of columnar materials, we study the favorable coupling of twist-induced stresses to the presence of edge dislocations in the lattice packing of bundles, which leads to a restructuring of the ground-state order of these materials at intermediate twist. The stability of dislocations increases as both the degree of twist and lateral bundle size grow. We show that in ground states of large bundles, multiple dislocations pile up into linear arrays, radial grain boundaries, whose number and length grows with bundle twist, giving rise to a rich class of "polycrystalline" packings. PMID:22587105

  9. On the small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in Ti3AlC2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Tao; Zhan, Xun; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Tilt-dominated grain boundaries have been investigated in depth in the deformation of MAX phases. In stark contrast, another important type of grain boundaries, twist grain boundaries, have long been overlooked. Here, we report on the observation of small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in a typical MAX phase Ti3AlC2 compressed at 1200 °C, which comprise hexagonal screw dislocation networks formed by basal dislocation reactions. By first-principles investigations on atomic-scale deformation and general stacking fault energy landscapes, it is unequivocally demonstrated that the twist sub-grain boundaries are most likely located between Al and Ti4f (Ti located at the 4f Wyckoff sites of P63/mmc) layers, with breaking of the weakly bonded Al–Ti4f. The twist angle increases with the increase of deformation and is estimated to be around 0.5° for a deformation of 26%. This work may shed light on sub-grain boundaries of MAX phases, and provide fundamental information for future atomic-scale simulations. PMID:27034075

  10. On the small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in Ti3AlC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Tao; Zhan, Xun; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-04-01

    Tilt-dominated grain boundaries have been investigated in depth in the deformation of MAX phases. In stark contrast, another important type of grain boundaries, twist grain boundaries, have long been overlooked. Here, we report on the observation of small angle twist sub-grain boundaries in a typical MAX phase Ti3AlC2 compressed at 1200 °C, which comprise hexagonal screw dislocation networks formed by basal dislocation reactions. By first-principles investigations on atomic-scale deformation and general stacking fault energy landscapes, it is unequivocally demonstrated that the twist sub-grain boundaries are most likely located between Al and Ti4f (Ti located at the 4f Wyckoff sites of P63/mmc) layers, with breaking of the weakly bonded Al–Ti4f. The twist angle increases with the increase of deformation and is estimated to be around 0.5° for a deformation of 26%. This work may shed light on sub-grain boundaries of MAX phases, and provide fundamental information for future atomic-scale simulations.

  11. Molecular dynamical investigation on dislocation near twist-grain boundary of Ni under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Liang; Hsieh, Jin-Yuan; Chang, Jee-Gong; Lin, Hong-Chang; Chiang, Hsing-Jung; Huang, Huang-Kai; Hwang, Chi-Chuan

    2011-11-01

    The dislocations and the strength of a nickel bicrystal are investigated in present study. There are three kinds of crystalline orientations of the nickel bicrystal, namely (100), (110), and (111). Misfit dislocations are presented on the interface between two nickel grains when a compression process is utilized on the bicrystal. The misfit dislocations on a Ni(100) interface form a square-latticed network and those on a Ni(111) form a triangle-latticed network. When a large twist angle is applied to the Ni bicrystal, the square- and triangle-latticed unit of the misfit dislocation networks will shrink or even disappear. Thus, a plane defects distribute over the interface. If the bicrystal is compressed further, dislocations within each grain are developed from the defects on the interface between grains. The configuration of the dislocations within grains is more regular when the applied twist angle is smaller. A Ni(111) bicrystal owns the largest amount of maximal stress no matter what the twist angle is. Those of a Ni(110) bicrystal is the second and of a Ni(100) bicrystal is the smallest.

  12. Atomic structure of the Σ = 2 twist carbide grain boundary in WC-Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Sabine; Missiaen, Jean-Michel

    2013-04-01

    The Σ = 2 twist carbide grain boundary with a (10 ? 0) habit plane was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy in a WC-Co alloy. The atomic structure at the boundary was determined by comparing experimental images and simulations. It corresponds to the boundary model with the lowest energy according to atomistic calculations. Periodic monolayer interfacial steps, compensating for the parametric misfit at the boundary were studied. The displacement field around the defects was simulated and corresponds to a dislocation with a mixed character and a Burgers vectors equal to 1/6⟨ ? 2 ? 3⟩ lying in the boundary plane. Another step with a larger height and connected to a stacking fault was analyzed. It likely arises from the interaction of a matrix dislocation with the boundary. The observations suggest that the migration of Σ = 2 grain boundaries can be induced by the glide of the monolayer steps along the grain boundary.

  13. Physics and applications of novel structures with CVD graphene: edges, grain boundaries, twisted bilayers, and hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong P.

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, I will discuss experimental studies (including electronic transport, optical/Raman, and STM) of physical properties of various novel synthetic graphene structures formed in CVD graphene grown on Cu, including edges of graphene single crystals, grain boundaries between such single crystals, and twisted bilayer graphene. Such synthetic graphene structures could be used as playground to explore novel physics and engineer new functionalities in graphene based electronic devices. Furthermore, I will discuss graphene based ``hybrid'' materials combining CVD graphene with semiconductor and metallic nanostructures for potential optoelectronic and plasmonics applications.

  14. Filaments in the twist-grain-boundary smectic-A phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejček, Lubor; Novotná, Vladimíra; Glogarová, Milada

    2015-09-01

    A model of filaments of the twist-grain-boundary smectic-A phase (TGBA) arising from the homeotropic smectic-A phase and nucleating on the sample surface is proposed. The model is based on the concept of finite blocks of parallel smectic layers forming a helical structure. The blocks are surrounded by dislocation loops. The model describes the filament structure near the sample surface and the observed inclination of the filament axis with respect to the easy direction of the molecular anchoring on the surface. The model is based on the observations of filament textures of the TGBA phase in a chiral liquid crystalline compound, but can be applied for forming of TGBA filaments in any compound. The compression modulus of the compound has been estimated using such parameters as anchoring energy, estimated from the field necessary to transform the structure into the homeotropic smectic-A .

  15. Coarse-grained model and light scattering of the twist-bend nematic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamid, Shaikh; Allender, David; Selinger, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    We develop a coarse-grained version of the continuum theory for the twist-bend (TB) nematic phase of liquid crystals. In this theoretical approach, we begin with an ideal, undistorted TB phase, which has a heliconical modulation of the director field. We then calculate the elastic free energy cost of a position-dependent local rotation of the director away from the ideal state. We diagonalize this free energy density to find the eigenmodes of the system. Of these eigenmodes, the soft mode can be regarded as a smectic-like distortion of periodic planes in the TB phase; this mode has effective elastic constants for layer compression and curvature. By comparison, the hard mode involves director variations away from the optimum cone angle. This calculation leads to a prediction for light scattering from the TB nematic phase. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR-1409658.

  16. Interaction of run-in edge dislocations with twist grain boundaries in Al-a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, S.; Naveen Kumar, N.; Samal, M. K.; Chavan, V. M.; Patel, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundaries play an important role in outlining the mechanical properties of crystalline materials. They act as sites for absorption/nucleation of dislocations, which are the main carriers of plastic deformation. In view of this, the interactions between edge dislocations and twist grain boundaries-dislocation pileup, dislocation absorption and dislocation emission were explored by performing molecular dynamics simulations in face-centered cubic Al using embedded atom method. The ?1 1 0? twist grain boundaries with various misorientation angles were selected for this purpose. It was found that the misorientation angle of boundary and stress anomalies arising from repeated dislocation absorption at the grain boundaries are the important parameters in determining the ability of the boundary to emit dislocations. Complex network of dislocations results in later stages of deformation, which may have a significant effect on the mechanical properties of the material. The peculiarities of dislocation nucleation, their emission from twist grain boundaries and the ramifications of this study towards development of higher length scale material models are discussed.

  17. Uranium vacancy mobility at the Σ5 symmetric tilt and Σ5 twist grain boundaries in UO₂

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Andersson, David A.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic transport at grain boundaries in oxides dictates a number of important phenomena, from ionic conductivity to sintering to creep. For nuclear fuels, it also influences fission gas bubble nucleation and growth. Here, using a combination of atomistic calculations and object kinetic Monte Carlo (okMC) simulations, we examine the kinetic pathways associated with uranium vacancies at two model grain boundaries in UO2. The barriers for vacancy motion were calculated using the nudged elastic band method at all uranium sites at each grain boundary and were used as the basis of the okMC simulations. For both boundaries considered – a simple tilt and a simple twist boundary – the mobility of uranium vacancies is significantly higher than in the bulk. For the tilt boundary, there is clearly preferred migration along the tilt axis as opposed to in the perpendicular direction while, for the twist boundary, migration is essentially isotropic within the boundary plane. These results show that cation defect mobility in fluorite-structured materials is enhanced at certain types of grain boundaries and is dependent on the boundary structure with the tilt boundary exhibiting higher rates of migration than the twist boundary.

  18. Uranium vacancy mobility at the Σ5 symmetric tilt and Σ5 twist grain boundaries in UO₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Andersson, David A.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic transport at grain boundaries in oxides dictates a number of important phenomena, from ionic conductivity to sintering to creep. For nuclear fuels, it also influences fission gas bubble nucleation and growth. Here, using a combination of atomistic calculations and object kinetic Monte Carlo (okMC) simulations, we examine the kinetic pathways associated with uranium vacancies at two model grain boundaries in UO2. The barriers for vacancy motion were calculated using the nudged elastic band method at all uranium sites at each grain boundary and were used as the basis of the okMC simulations. For both boundaries considered – a simplemore » tilt and a simple twist boundary – the mobility of uranium vacancies is significantly higher than in the bulk. For the tilt boundary, there is clearly preferred migration along the tilt axis as opposed to in the perpendicular direction while, for the twist boundary, migration is essentially isotropic within the boundary plane. These results show that cation defect mobility in fluorite-structured materials is enhanced at certain types of grain boundaries and is dependent on the boundary structure with the tilt boundary exhibiting higher rates of migration than the twist boundary.« less

  19. Stretching and twisting of the DNA duplexes in coarse-grained dynamical models.

    PubMed

    Niewieczerzał, Szymon; Cieplak, Marek

    2009-11-25

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics models of the double-stranded DNA are proposed and compared in the context of single molecule mechanical manipulation such as twisting and various schemes of stretching-unzipping, shearing, two-strand stretching and stretching of only one strand. The models differ in the number of effective beads (between two and five) representing each nucleotide. They all show similar behaviour, but the bigger the resolution, the more details in the force patterns. The models incorporate the effective Lennard-Jones potentials in the couplings between two strands and harmonic potentials to describe the structure of a single strand. The force patterns are shown to depend on the sequence studied. In particular, both shearing and unzipping for an all-AT sequence lead to lower forces than for an all-CG sequence. The unzipping patterns and the corresponding scenario diagrams for the contact rupture events are found to reflect the sequential information if the temperature is moderate and initial transients are discarded. The derived torque-force phase diagram is found to be qualitatively consistent with experiments and all-atom simulations. PMID:21832500

  20. Stretching and twisting of the DNA duplexes in coarse-grained dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niewieczerzał, Szymon; Cieplak, Marek

    2009-11-01

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics models of the double-stranded DNA are proposed and compared in the context of single molecule mechanical manipulation such as twisting and various schemes of stretching—unzipping, shearing, two-strand stretching and stretching of only one strand. The models differ in the number of effective beads (between two and five) representing each nucleotide. They all show similar behaviour, but the bigger the resolution, the more details in the force patterns. The models incorporate the effective Lennard-Jones potentials in the couplings between two strands and harmonic potentials to describe the structure of a single strand. The force patterns are shown to depend on the sequence studied. In particular, both shearing and unzipping for an all-AT sequence lead to lower forces than for an all-CG sequence. The unzipping patterns and the corresponding scenario diagrams for the contact rupture events are found to reflect the sequential information if the temperature is moderate and initial transients are discarded. The derived torque-force phase diagram is found to be qualitatively consistent with experiments and all-atom simulations.

  1. Ab initio local energy and local stress: application to tilt and twist grain boundaries in Cu and Al.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Kohyama, Masanori; Tanaka, Shingo; Shiihara, Yoshinori

    2013-07-31

    The energy-density and stress-density schemes (Shiihara et al 2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 075441) within the projector augmented wave (PAW) method based on the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) have been applied to tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) and single vacancies in Cu and Al. Local energy and local stress at GBs and defects are obtained by integrating the energy and stress densities in each local region by the Bader integration using a recent algorithm (Yu et al 2011 J. Chem. Phys. 134 064111) as well as by the layer-by-layer integration so as to settle the gauge-dependent problem in the kinetic terms. Results are compared with those by the fuzzy-Voronoi integration and by the embedded atom method (EAM). The features of local energy and local stress at GBs and vacancies depend on the bonding nature of each material. Valence electrons in Al mainly located in the interatomic regions show remarkable response to structural disorder as significant valence charge redistribution or bond reconstruction, often leading to long-range variations of charges, energies and stresses, quite differently from d electrons in Cu mainly located near nuclei. All these features can be well represented by our local energy and local stress. The EAM potential for Al does not reproduce correct local energy or local stress, while the EAM potential for Cu provides satisfactory results. PMID:23835349

  2. X-29 high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishmael, Stephen D.; Smith, Rogers E.; Purifoy, Dana D.; Womer, Rodney K.

    1990-01-01

    Flight test program highlights are discussed for the X-29 high angle-of-attack (AOA) aircraft. The AOA envelope extended from 10 to 66 deg; the X-29 exhibited precise pitch control, allowing AOA to be maintained within 1 deg during stabilized points as well as permitting rapid recoveries from all AOAs. Attention is given to controllability degradation above 40-deg AOA due to asymmetric yawing moments. The use of this aircraft as a fundamental research tool which complements analytical methods is powerfully justified by the obviation of scaling effects.

  3. The development of high angle deformation boundaries and local orientations in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    High angle boundaries and their local surroundings are important for all aspects of recrystallization including nucleation, growth and texture formation. They are thus important for processing of aluminum alloys. Deformation induced high angle boundaries have been observed and quantitatively characterized using transmission electron microscopy in aluminum following rolling to large reductions. The distribution of local orientations between individual dislocation boundaries and their angle/axis pairs have been measured using convergent beam Kikuchi analysis and are compared to the macroscopic texture. The sequence of near neighbor orientations shows that individual grains subdivide across their thickness into three to four different texture components separated by sharp boundaries. The local orientations surrounding high angle boundaries are much more diverse than suggested by simple models and single crystal studies. The origins for these high angle boundaries are suggested and discussed.

  4. Grain boundary motion and grain rotation in aluminum bicrystals: recent experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodov, D. A.; Barrales-Mora, L. A.; Brandenburg, J.-E.

    2015-08-01

    The results of experimental and computational efforts over recent years to study the motion of geometrically different grain boundaries and grain rotation under various driving forces are briefly reviewed. Novel in-situ measuring techniques based on orientation contrast imaging and applied simulation techniques are described. The experimental results obtained on specially grown aluminum bicrystals are presented and discussed. Particularly, the faceting and migration behavior of low angle grain boundaries under the curvature force is addressed. In contrast to the pure tilt boundaries, which remained flat/faceted and immobile during annealing at elevated temperatures, mixed tilt-twist boundaries readily assumed a curved shape and steadily moved under the capillary force. Computational analysis revealed that this behavior is due to the inclinational anisotropy of grain boundary energy, which in turn depends on boundary geometry. The shape evolution and shrinkage kinetics of cylindrical grains with different tilt and mixed boundaries were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The mobility of low angle <100> boundaries with misorientation angles higher than 10°, obtained by both the experiments and simulations, was found not to differ from that of the high angle boundaries, but decreases essentially with further decrease of misorientation. The shape evolution of the embedded grains in simulations was found to relate directly to results of the energy computations. Further simulation results revealed that the shrinkage of grains with pure tilt boundaries is accompanied by grain rotation. In contrast, grains with the tilt-twist boundaries composed of dislocations with the mixed edge-screw character do not rotate during their shrinkage. Stress driven boundary migration in aluminium bicrystals was observed to be coupled to a tangential translation of the grains. The activation enthalpy of high angle boundary migration was found to vary non-monotonically with

  5. Light's twist

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, Miles

    2014-01-01

    That light travels in straight lines is a statement of the obvious. However, the energy and momentum flow within light beams can twist to form vortices such as eddies in a stream. These twists carry angular momentum, which can make microscopic objects spin, be used to encode extra information in communication systems, enable the design of novel imaging systems and allow new tests of quantum mechanics. PMID:25484612

  6. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  7. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  8. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  9. Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) Through-Focus Imaging for Three-Dimensional Atomic Analysis of Bismuth Segregation on Copper [001]/33° Twist Bicrystal Grain Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Wade, Charles Austin; McLean, Mark J; Vinci, Richard P; Watanabe, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) through-focus imaging (TFI) has been used to determine the three-dimensional atomic structure of Bi segregation-induced brittle Cu grain boundaries (GBs). With TFI, it is possible to observe single Bi atom distributions along Cu [001] twist GBs using an aberration-corrected STEM operating at 200 kV. The depth resolution is ~5 nm. Specimens with GBs intentionally inclined with respect to the microscope's optic axis were used to investigate Bi segregant atom distributions along and through the Cu GB. It was found that Bi atoms exist at most once per Cu unit cell along the GB, meaning that no continuous GB film is present. Therefore, the reduced fracture toughness of this particular Bi-doped Cu boundary would not be caused by fracture of Bi-Bi bonds. PMID:27145975

  10. Twisted baskets.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Keith; Pratumyot, Yaowalak; Polen, Shane; Hardin, Alex M; Dalkilic, Erdin; Dastan, Arif; Badjić, Jovica D

    2015-02-23

    A preparative procedure for obtaining a pair of twisted molecular baskets, each comprising a chiral framework with either right ((P)-1syn) or left ((M)-1syn) sense of twist and six ester groups at the rim has been developed and optimized. The racemic (P/M)-1syn can be obtained in three synthetic steps from accessible starting materials. The resolution of (P/M)-1syn is accomplished by its transesterification with (1R,2S,5R)-(-)-menthol in the presence of a Ti(IV) catalyst to give diastereomeric 8(P) and 8(M). It was found that dendritic-like cavitands 8(P) and 8(M), in CD2Cl2, undergo self-inclusion ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) with a menthol moiety occupying the cavity of each host. Importantly, the degree of inclusion of the menthol group was ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) found to be greater in the case of 8(P) than 8(M). Accordingly, it is suggested that different folding characteristic of 8(P) and 8(M) ought to affect the physicochemical characteristics of the hosts to permit their effective separation by column chromatography. The absolute configuration of 8(P)/8(M), encompassing right- and left-handed "cups", was determined with the exciton chirality method and also verified in silico (DFT: B3LYP/TZVP). Finally, the twisted baskets are strongly fluorescent due to three naphthalene chromophores, having a high fluorescence quantum yield within the rigid framework of 8(P)/8(M). PMID:25604262

  11. Generalizing twisted gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Duenas-Vidal, Alvaro; Vazquez-Mozo, Miguel A.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the twisting of gauge symmetry in noncommutative gauge theories and show how this can be generalized to a whole continuous family of twisted gauge invariances. The physical relevance of these twisted invariances is discussed.

  12. Formalism for the calculation of local elastic constants at grain boundaries by means of atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, M. D.; Wolf, D.; Lutsko, J. F.; Phillpot, S. R.

    1990-03-01

    A new formalism for use in atomistic simulations to calculate the full local elastic-constant tensor in terms of local stresses and strains is presented. Results of simulations on a high-angle (001) twist grain boundary are illustrated, using both a Lennard-Jones potential for Cu and an embedded-atom potential for Au. The two conceptionally rather different potentials show similar anomalies in all elastic constants, confined to within a few lattice planes of the grain boundary, with an especially dramatic reduction in the resistance to shear parallel to the grain-boundary plane. It is found that the primary cause of the anomalies is the atomic disorder near the grain boundary, as evidenced by the slice-by-slice radial distribution functions for the inhomogeneous interface system.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of impurities in nanocrystalline diamond grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, M.; Zapol, P.; Frauenheim, T.; Gruen, D. M.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2000-01-12

    Nanocrystalline diamond films grown on Si substrates at 800 C from hydrogen-poor plasmas have a number of highly desirable mechanical and electronic properties. Impurities were found by SIMS measurements to be uniformly distributed throughout the thickness of the films at a level of 10{sup 17}--10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. It is likely that the impurities are located at the grain boundaries, which play a crucial role in controlling important characteristics of the films, such as electrical conductivity and electron emission. Density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) molecular dynamics simulations were performed for diamond light-energy high-angle (100) twist grain boundaries with impurities such as N, Si and H.

  14. Aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Grafton, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to, and a broad overiew of, the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack are provided. Items include: (1) some important fundamental phenomena which determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack; (2) static and dynamic aerodynamic characteristics near the stall; (3) aerodynamics of the spin; (4) test techniques used in stall/spin studies; (5) applications of aerodynamic data to problems in flight dynamics in the stall/spin area; and (6) the outlook for future research in the area. Although stalling and spinning are flight dynamic problems of importance to all aircraft, including general aviation aircraft, commercial transports, and military airplanes, emphasis is placed on military configurations and the principle aerodynamic factors which influence the stability and control of such vehicles at high angles of attack.

  15. [Twisted noses].

    PubMed

    Thomassin, J-M; Radulesco, T; Bardot, J

    2014-12-01

    Correction of a twisted or crooked nose can be very complex and require the use of a broad range of surgical techniques. Patient needs are often mixed--aesthetic and functional--particularly in post-trauma cases. The quality of postoperative breathing is therefore as important as correction of the nasal deviation. Extracorporeal septoplasty or spreader grafts are very effective not only in correction of the nasal pyramid deformation, but also in resolution of functional respiratory issues. Reconstruction and proper support of the septum are necessary components for a straight nose. Aesthetic deformation can be difficult to correct owing to the memory of the bone and cartilage. Although minor deformations can be corrected with simple techniques, a more aggressive procedure is often necessary in the most complex cases. Despite attempts to correct deformation thanks to the various techniques described here, a postoperative deviation can persist. Preoperative discussion is very important and enables the surgeon to explain to the patient that it is very difficult to obtain a perfectly straight nose. PMID:25174875

  16. Twisted supersymmetry: Twisted symmetry versus renormalizability

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrijevic, Marija; Nikolic, Biljana; Radovanovic, Voja

    2011-03-15

    We discuss a deformation of superspace based on a Hermitian twist. The twist implies a *-product that is noncommutative, Hermitian and finite when expanded in a power series of the deformation parameter. The Leibniz rule for the twisted supersymmetry transformations is deformed. A minimal deformation of the Wess-Zumino action is proposed and its renormalizability properties are discussed. There is no tadpole contribution, but the two-point function diverges. We speculate that the deformed Leibniz rule, or more generally the twisted symmetry, interferes with renormalizability properties of the model. We discuss different possibilities to render a renormalizable model.

  17. High-angle-of-attack aerodynamics - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the military and civil technical communities have undertaken numerous studies of the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of advanced airplane and missile configurations. The method of approach and the design methodology employed have necessarily been experimental and exploratory in nature, due to the complex nature of separated flows. However, despite the relatively poor definition of many of the key aerodynamic phenomena involved for high-alpha conditions, some generic guidelines for design consideration have been identified. The present paper summarizes some of the more important lessons learned in the area of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics with examples of a number of key concepts and with particular emphasis on high-alpha stability and control characteristics of high performance aircraft. Topics covered in the discussion include the impact of design evolution, forebody flows, control of separated flows, configuration effects, aerodynamic controls, wind-tunnel flight correlation, and recent NASA research activities.

  18. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  19. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND MICROSTRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF PURE C-AXIS TWIST Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} BICRYSTAL JUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    TSAY,Y.; LI,Q.; ZHU,Y.; SUENAGA,M.; GU,G.D.; KOSHIZUKA,N.

    1998-07-18

    Bulk Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi2212) bicrystals containing a single high quality [001] twist grain boundary junction were prepared in order to investigate the orbital symmetry of the superconducting order parameter in highly anisotropic Bi-based high temperature superconductors. The misorientation angles of the bicrystals ranged from 0 to 180{degree}. The microstructure in the vicinity of the junction was characterized using high-resolution, nano-probe analytical microscopy. The authors found that some high angle twist junctions were able to carry a critical current density similar to their constituent single crystals. These results cannot be interpreted in terms of a pure d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}}-wave order parameter for superconducting Bi2212.

  20. Electromagnetic and microstructural properties of pure c-axis twist Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} bicrystal junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, Y.N.; Li, Q.; Zhu, Y.; Suenaga, M.; Gu, G.D.; Koshizuka, N.

    1998-08-01

    Bulk Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi2212) bicrystals containing a single high quality [001] twist grain boundary junction were prepared in order to investigate the orbital symmetry of the superconducting order parameter in highly anisotropic Bi-based high temperature superconductors. The misorientation angles of the bicrystals ranged from 0 to 180{degree}. The microstructure in the vicinity of the junction was characterized using high-resolution, nano-probe analytical microscopy. The authors found that some high angle twist junctions were able to carry a critical current density similar to their constituent single crystals. These results cannot be interpreted in terms of a pure d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}}-wave order parameter for superconducting Bi2212.

  1. The twisted top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Morrison, P. J.

    2001-05-01

    We describe a new type of top, the twisted top, obtained by appending a cocycle to the Lie-Poisson bracket for the charged heavy top, thus breaking its semidirect product structure. The twisted top has an integrable case that corresponds to the Lagrange (symmetric) top. We give a canonical description of the twisted top in terms of Euler angles. We also show by a numerical calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent that the Kovalevskaya case of the twisted top is chaotic.

  2. A high angle of attack inviscid shuttle orbiter computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1992-01-01

    As a preliminary step toward predicting the leeside thermal environment for winged reentry vehicles at flight conditions, a computational solution for the flow about the Shuttle Orbiter at wind tunnel conditions was made using a point-implicit, finite volume scheme known as the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA). The surface pressures resulting from the computational solution are compared with wind tunnel data. The results indicate that the dominant inviscid flow features are being accurately predicted on the leeside of the Shuttle Orbiter at a moderately high angle of attack.

  3. Twist within a somersault.

    PubMed

    Mikl, Joanne; Rye, David C

    2016-02-01

    The twisting somersault is a key skill in diving and gymnastics. The components of twist and somersault are defined with respect to anatomical axes, and combinations of multiples of half rotations of twist and somersault define specific twisting somersault skills. To achieve a twisting somersault skill twist must be continuous; otherwise oscillations in twist while somersaulting may be observed. The posture-dependent inertial properties of the athlete and the initial conditions determine if continuous or oscillating twist is observed. The paper derives equations for the amount of somersault required per half twist, or per twist oscillation, without making assumptions about the relative magnitudes of the moments of inertia. From these equations the skills achievable may be determined. The error associated with the common assumption that the medial and transverse principal moments of inertia are equal is explored. It is concluded that the error grows as the number of twists per somersault decreases, when the medial and transverse moments of inertia diverge, and when the longitudinal moment of inertia approaches either the medial or transverse moment of inertia. Inertial property data for an example athlete are used to illustrate the various rotational states that can occur. PMID:26583967

  4. Simulation of xenon, uranium vacancy and interstitial diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Nerikar, Pankaj; Vyas, Shyam; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2014-10-31

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations 1, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO2 have been derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO2 ( Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary),as derived from atomistic calculations. All models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  5. Reynolds Number Effects at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Banks, Daniel W.; Hall, Robert M.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lessons learned from comparisons between ground-based tests and flight measurements for the high-angle-of-attack programs on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), the X-29 forward-swept wing aircraft, and the X-31 enhanced fighter maneuverability aircraft are presented. On all three vehicles, Reynolds number effects were evident on the forebodies at high angles of attack. The correlation between flight and wind tunnel forebody pressure distributions for the F-18 HARV were improved by using twin longitudinal grit strips on the forebody of the wind-tunnel model. Pressure distributions obtained on the X-29 wind-tunnel model at flight Reynolds numbers showed excellent correlation with the flight data up to alpha = 50 deg. Above (alpha = 50 deg. the pressure distributions for both flight and wind tunnel became asymmetric and showed poorer agreement, possibly because of the different surface finish of the model and aircraft. The detrimental effect of a very sharp nose apex was demonstrated on the X-31 aircraft. Grit strips on the forebody of the X-31 reduced the randomness but increased the magnitude of the asymmetry. Nose strakes were required to reduce the forebody yawing moment asymmetries and the grit strips on the flight test noseboom improved the aircraft handling qualities.

  6. Mesoscale mechanics of twisting carbon nanotube yarns.

    PubMed

    Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-03-12

    Fabricating continuous macroscopic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns with mechanical properties close to individual CNTs remains a major challenge. Spinning CNT fibers and ribbons for enhancing the weak interactions between the nanotubes is a simple and efficient method for fabricating high-strength and tough continuous yarns. Here we investigate the mesoscale mechanics of twisting CNT yarns using full atomistic and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, considering concurrent mechanisms at multiple length-scales. To investigate the mechanical response of such a complex structure without losing insights into the molecular mechanism, we applied a multiscale strategy. The full atomistic results are used for training a coarse grained model for studying larger systems consisting of several CNTs. The mesoscopic model parameters are updated as a function of the twist angle, based on the full atomistic results, in order to incorporate the atomistic scale deformation mechanisms in larger scale simulations. By bridging across two length scales, our model is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical behavior of twisted yarns while the atomistic level deformations in individual nanotubes are integrated into the model by updating the parameters. Our results focused on studying a bundle of close packed nanotubes provide novel mechanistic insights into the spinning of CNTs. Our simulations reveal how twisting a bundle of CNTs improves the shear interaction between the nanotubes up to a certain level due to increasing the interaction surface. Furthermore, twisting the bundle weakens the intertube interactions due to excessive deformation in the cross sections of individual CNTs in the bundle. PMID:25732328

  7. Mesoscale mechanics of twisting carbon nanotube yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabricating continuous macroscopic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns with mechanical properties close to individual CNTs remains a major challenge. Spinning CNT fibers and ribbons for enhancing the weak interactions between the nanotubes is a simple and efficient method for fabricating high-strength and tough continuous yarns. Here we investigate the mesoscale mechanics of twisting CNT yarns using full atomistic and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, considering concurrent mechanisms at multiple length-scales. To investigate the mechanical response of such a complex structure without losing insights into the molecular mechanism, we applied a multiscale strategy. The full atomistic results are used for training a coarse grained model for studying larger systems consisting of several CNTs. The mesoscopic model parameters are updated as a function of the twist angle, based on the full atomistic results, in order to incorporate the atomistic scale deformation mechanisms in larger scale simulations. By bridging across two length scales, our model is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical behavior of twisted yarns while the atomistic level deformations in individual nanotubes are integrated into the model by updating the parameters. Our results focused on studying a bundle of close packed nanotubes provide novel mechanistic insights into the spinning of CNTs. Our simulations reveal how twisting a bundle of CNTs improves the shear interaction between the nanotubes up to a certain level due to increasing the interaction surface. Furthermore, twisting the bundle weakens the intertube interactions due to excessive deformation in the cross sections of individual CNTs in the bundle.

  8. Forebody tangential blowing for control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, I.; Rock, S.; Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study to determine if the use of tangential leading edge blowing over the forebody could produce effective and practical control of the F-18 HARV aircraft at high angles of attack was conducted. A simplified model of the F-18 configuration using a vortex-lattice model was developed to obtain a better understanding of basic aerodynamic coupling effects and the influence of forebody circulation on lifting surface behavior. The effect of tangential blowing was estimated using existing wind tunnel data on normal forebody blowing and analytical studies of tangential blowing over conical forebodies. Incorporation of forebody blowing into the flight control system was investigated by adding this additional yaw control and sideforce generating actuator into the existing F-18 HARV simulation model. A control law was synthesized using LQG design methods that would schedule blowing rates as a function of vehicle sideslip, angle of attack, and roll and yaw rates.

  9. Buffeting of NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Dowell, Earl

    2014-11-01

    Buffeting is a fluid instability caused by flow separation or shock wave oscillations in the flow around a bluff body. Typically there is a dominant frequency of these flow oscillations called Strouhal or buffeting frequency. In prior work several researchers at Duke University have noted the analogy between the classic Von Karman Vortex Street behind a bluff body and the flow oscillations that occur for flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil at sufficiently large angle of attack. Lock-in is found for certain combinations of airfoil oscillation (pitching motion) frequencies and amplitudes when the frequency of the airfoil motion is sufficiently close to the buffeting frequency. The goal of this paper is to explore the flow around a static and an oscillating airfoil at high angle of attack by developing a method for computing buffet response. Simulation results are compared with experimental data. Conditions for the onset of buffeting and lock-in of a NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack are determined. Effects of several parameters on lift coefficient and flow response frequency are studied including Reynolds number, angle of attack and blockage ratio of the airfoil size to the wind tunnel dimensions. Also more detailed flow field characteristics are determined. For a static airfoil, a universal Strouhal number scaling has been found for angles of attack from 30° to 90°, where the flow around airfoil is fully separated. For an oscillating airfoil, conditions for lock-in are discussed. Differences between the lock-in case and the unlocked case are also studied. The second affiliation: Duke University.

  10. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, F.; Sun, X.; Khaleel, M. A.; Horstemeyer, M. F.

    2012-02-01

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained ≈170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 Å of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-Σ grain boundaries (e.g., the Σ3{112} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and Σ designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have ≈80% more grain boundary sites per area and ≈300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 Å versus 10-11 Å for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  11. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Horstemeyer, Mark

    2012-02-10

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained {approx}170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 {angstrom} of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-{Sigma} grain boundaries (e.g., the {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and {Sigma} designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have {approx}80% more grain boundary sites per area and {approx}300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 {angstrom} versus 10-11 {angstrom} for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  12. Apollo 11 Launched Via Saturn V Rocket - High Angle View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle produced a holocaust of flames as it rose from its pad at Launch complex 39. The 363 foot tall, 6,400,000 pound rocket hurled the spacecraft into Earth parking orbit and then placed it on the trajectory to the moon. This high angle view of the launch was provided by a `fisheye' camera mounted on the launch tower. The Saturn V was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard the spacecraft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  13. X-31 Demonstrating High Angle of Attack - Herbst Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall

  14. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  15. Twisted Quantum Toroidal Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Liu, Rongjia

    2014-09-01

    We construct a principally graded quantum loop algebra for the Kac-Moody algebra. As a special case a twisted analog of the quantum toroidal algebra is obtained together with the quantum Serre relations.

  16. Twisted Radio Waves and Twisted Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Nevels, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    We present and analyze a gedanken experiment and show that the assumption that an antenna operating at a single frequency can transmit more than two independent information channels to the far field violates the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Transmission of a large number of channels, each associated with an angular momenta ‘twisted wave’ mode, to the far field in free space is therefore not possible. PMID:23424647

  17. Mesozoic pre-thrusting high-angle faults and stratigraphic variations, Plomosa Mountains, W. Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, S.M.; Spencer, J.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Three contrasting stratigraphic assemblages characterize fault-bounded terranes in the Southern Plomosa Mtns. (1) The Six Price sequence (SPS) consists of Proterozoic coarse-grained granitoid overlain by Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata. (2) The Apache Wash sequence consists of a basal mega-breccia and conglomerate unit overlain by sandstone in a fining-upward sequence. Paleozoic blocks in the mega-breccia include a Cambrian Muav-like lithology not present in the SPS Paleozoic section. The thickness and clast size in conglomerate associated with the mega-breccia increases the S suggesting a source in that direction. (3) The Crystal Hill sequence consists of strata correlated with the lower McCoy Mountains Formation deposited across a previously tilted unconformity between Jurassic volcanic rocks and the Proterozoic Scadden Mountain quartz monzonite. The lower McCoy Mountain Formation consists of basal quartz-arenite that grades up into fine-grained volcanic-lithic sandstones, and then into lithic-feldspathic sandstone and locally conglomerate, forming a coarsening-upward sequence. Because the Apache Wash sequence is cut by the Poorman thrust, the breccias at its base are not related to the Poorman thrust. Derivation of these creccias entirely from the SPS Paleozoic section is precluded by the presence of the Muav-lithology blocks; their source is not exposed. Thrusting in the area, correlated with deformation in the Maria Fold and Thrust Belt, was preceded by faulting to produce the megabreccias, tilting, and formation of NW-trending high-angle fault one of which forms the major lithotectonic boundary in the range.

  18. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO₂

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO₂ have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO₂ (Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  19. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO₂ have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model formore » the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO₂ (Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.« less

  20. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO2 have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO2 (Σ 5 tilt, Σ 5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of general aviation at high angle of attack with the propeller slipstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuo, N.; Hirano, S.

    1986-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the FA-300 business aircraft at high angle of attack with the propeller stream are described. The FA-300 offers two types, FA-300-700 for 340 HP, and -710 for 450 Hp of the engine. The effects of the propeller slipstream on the high angle of the attack are discussed.

  2. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  3. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  4. Twisted Yangians of small rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Nicolas; Regelskis, Vidas; Wendlandt, Curtis

    2016-04-01

    We study quantized enveloping algebras called twisted Yangians associated with the symmetric pairs of types CI, BDI, and DIII (in Cartan's classification) when the rank is small. We establish isomorphisms between these twisted Yangians and the well known Olshanskii's twisted Yangians of types AI and AII, and also with the Molev-Ragoucy reflection algebras associated with symmetric pairs of type AIII. We also construct isomorphisms with twisted Yangians in Drinfeld's original presentation.

  5. A Transformation Called "Twist"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The transformations found in secondary mathematics curriculum are typically limited to stretches and translations (e.g., ACARA, 2010). Advanced students may find the transformation, twist, to be of further interest. As most available resources are written for professional-level readers, this article is intended to be an introduction accessible to…

  6. An Atomistic Modeling Study of Alloying Element Impurity Element, and Transmutation Products on the cohesion of A Nickel E5 {l_brace}001{r_brace} Twist Grain Boundary

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young Jr.; R. Najafabadi; W. Strohmayer; D.G. Baldrey; B. Hamm; J. Harris; J. Sticht; E. Wimmer

    2003-06-16

    Atomistic modeling methods were employed to investigate the effects of impurity elements on the metallurgy, irradiation embrittlement, and environmentally assisted cracking of nickel-base alloys exposed to nuclear environments. Calculations were performed via ab initio atomistic modeling methods to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the results. A Griffith-type fracture criterion was used to quantitatively assess the effect of elements or element pairs on the grain boundary cohesive strength. In order of most embrittling to most strengthening, the elements are ranked as: He, Li, S, H, C, Zr, P, Fe, Mn, Nb, Cr, and B. Helium is strongly embrittling (-2.04 eV/atom lowering of the Griffith energy), phosphorus has little effect on the grain boundary (0.1 eV/atom), and boron offers appreciable strengthening (1.03 eV/atom increase in the Griffith energy). Calculations for pairs of elements (H-Li, H-B, H-C, H-P, and H-S) show little interaction on the grain boundary cohesive energy, so that for the conditions studied, linear superposition of elemental effects is a good approximation. These calculations help explain metallurgical effects (e.g. why boron can strengthen grain boundaries), irradiation embrittlement (e.g. how boron transmutation results in grain boundary embrittlement), as well as how grain boundary impurity elements can affect environmentally assisted cracking (i.e. low temperature crack propagation and stress corrosion cracking) of nickel-base alloys.

  7. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1998-02-05

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectivensss of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbinite complex through u se of hydraulically fractgured horizontal of high-angle wells. TGhe combinaton of a horizontal or high-angle weoo and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

  8. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-08

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically-fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angled well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thininterbedded layers and the well bore.

  9. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1998-05-29

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal end of a protruding turbidite complex through use of hydraulically fractured horizontal of high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the well bore.

  10. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Laue, M.L.

    1999-11-01

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

  11. Twisted aspirin crystals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Rohl, Andrew L; Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Banded spherulites of aspirin have been crystallized from the melt in the presence of salicylic acid either generated from aspirin decomposition or added deliberately (2.6-35.9 mol %). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and optical polarimetry show that the spherulites are composed of helicoidal crystallites twisted along the <010> growth directions. Mueller matrix imaging reveals radial oscillations in not only linear birefringence, but also circular birefringence, whose origin is explained through slight (∼1.3°) but systematic splaying of individual lamellae in the film. Strain associated with the replacement of aspirin molecules by salicylic acid molecules in the crystal structure is computed to be large enough to work as the driving force for the twisting of crystallites. PMID:23425247

  12. Twisted Split Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Yuval; Harnik, Roni; Perez, Gilad; Schwartz, MatthewD.; Surujon, Ze'ev

    2004-07-30

    The observed flavor structure of the standard model arises naturally in ''split fermion'' models which localize fermions at different places in an extra dimension. It has, until now, been assumed that the bulk masses for such fermions can be chosen to be flavor diagonal simultaneously at every point in the extra dimension, with all the flavor violation coming from the Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. We consider the more natural possibility in which the bulk masses cannot be simultaneously diagonalized, that is, that they are twisted in flavor space. We show that, in general, this does not disturb the natural generation of hierarchies in the flavor parameters. Moreover, it is conceivable that all the flavor mixing and CP-violation in the standard model may come only from twisting, with the five-dimensional Yukawa couplings taken to be universal.

  13. Twisted Split Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Y

    2004-07-24

    The observed flavor structure of the standard model arises naturally in ''split fermion'' models which localize fermions at different places in an extra dimension. It has, until now, been assumed that the bulk masses for such fermions can be chosen to be flavor diagonal simultaneously at every point in the extra dimension, with all the flavor violation coming from the Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. We consider the more natural possibility in which the bulk masses cannot be simultaneously diagonalized, that is, that they are twisted in flavor space. We show that, in general, this does not disturb the natural generation of hierarchies in the flavor parameters. Moreover, it is conceivable that all the flavor mixing and CP-violation in the standard model may come only from twisting, with the five-dimensional Yukawa couplings taken to be universal.

  14. Twisting of sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C. H.; Thuillier, S.; Manach, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Twisting of metallic sheets is one particular mode of springback that occurs after drawing of elongated parts, i.e. with one dimension much larger than the two others. In this study, a dedicated device for drawing of elongated part with a U-shaped section has been designed on purpose, in order to obtain reproducible data. Very thin metallic sheet, of thickness 0.15 mm, has been used, so that the maximum length of the part is 100 mm. Two different orientations of the part with respect to the tools have been chosen: either aligned with the tools, or purposefully misaligned by 2°. Several samples were drawn for each configuration, leading to the conclusion that almost no twisting occurs in the first case whereas a significant one can be measured for the second one. In a second step, 2D and 3D numerical simulations within the implicit framework for drawing and springback were carried out. A mixed hardening law associated to von Mises yield criterion represents accurately the mechanical behavior of the material. This paper highlights a comparison of numerical predictions with experiments, e.g. the final shape of the part and the twisting parameter.

  15. Twist planet drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A planetary gear system includes a sun gear coupled to an annular ring gear through a plurality of twist-planet gears, a speeder gear, and a ground structure having an internal ring gear. Each planet gear includes a solid gear having a first half portion in the form of a spur gear which includes vertical gear teeth and a second half portion in the form of a spur gear which includes helical gear teeth that are offset from the vertical gear teeth and which contact helical gear teeth on the speeder gear and helical gear teeth on the outer ring gear. One half of the twist planet gears are preloaded downward, while the other half are preloaded upwards, each one alternating with the other so that each one twists in a motion opposite to its neighbor when rotated until each planet gear seats against the sun gear, the outer ring gear, the speeder gear, and the inner ring gear. The resulting configuration is an improved stiff anti-backlash gear system.

  16. Special Grain Boundaries in Ultrafine-Grained Tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, O. V.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Sadanov, E. V.; Starchenko, I. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Mikhailovskij, I. M.

    2016-07-01

    Field ion microscopy and computer simulation were used for the study of an atomic structure high-angle grain boundary in hard-drawn ultrafine-grained tungsten wire. These boundaries with special misorientations are beyond the scope of the coincident site lattice model. It was demonstrated that the special non-coincident grain boundaries are the plane-matching boundaries, and rigid-body displacements of adjacent nanograins are normal to the <110> misorientation axis. The vectors of rigid-body translations of grains are described by broad asymmetric statistical distribution. Mathematical modeling showed that special incommensurate boundaries with one grain oriented along the {211} plane have comparatively high cohesive energies. The grain-boundary dislocations ½<110> were revealed and studied at the line of local mismatch of {110} atomic planes of adjacent grains.

  17. Special Grain Boundaries in Ultrafine-Grained Tungsten.

    PubMed

    Dudka, O V; Ksenofontov, V A; Sadanov, E V; Starchenko, I V; Mazilova, T I; Mikhailovskij, I M

    2016-12-01

    Field ion microscopy and computer simulation were used for the study of an atomic structure high-angle grain boundary in hard-drawn ultrafine-grained tungsten wire. These boundaries with special misorientations are beyond the scope of the coincident site lattice model. It was demonstrated that the special non-coincident grain boundaries are the plane-matching boundaries, and rigid-body displacements of adjacent nanograins are normal to the <110> misorientation axis. The vectors of rigid-body translations of grains are described by broad asymmetric statistical distribution. Mathematical modeling showed that special incommensurate boundaries with one grain oriented along the {211} plane have comparatively high cohesive energies. The grain-boundary dislocations ½<110> were revealed and studied at the line of local mismatch of {110} atomic planes of adjacent grains. PMID:27416905

  18. Grain and subgrain boundaries in ultrafine-grained materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saxl, Ivan; Kalousova, Anna; Ilucova, Lucia; Sklenicka, Vaclav

    2009-10-15

    The attractive metallographic electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method is used to describe the effect of the number N of passes on the subgrain and grain structures of pure aluminium and copper processed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). The remarkable feature of the aluminium structure is the lack of high angle boundaries after a low number (N = 2, 4) of passes and this remains preserved even after a relatively long annealing time. On the other hand, the boundary structure of copper is relatively stable and high angle boundaries always prevail.

  19. The control of twisting somersaults.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, Maurice R; Hiley, Michael J

    2014-04-11

    In the takeoff and early flight phase of a twisting somersault, joint coordination is based on feed-forward control whereas in the late stages of the flight phase configuration adjustments are made using feedback control to ensure accurate completion of the movement and appropriate landing orientation. The aim of this study was to use a computer simulation model of aerial movement to investigate the extent to which arm and hip movements can control twist and somersault rotation in the flight phase of a twisting somersault. Two mechanisms were considered for the control of twist in simulated target trampoline movements with flight times of 1.4s. In the first case a single symmetrical arm adduction correction was made using delayed feedback control based on the difference between the twist rate in a perturbed simulation and the twist rate in a target movement comprising a forward somersault with 1½ twists. Final corrections were made using symmetrical arm abduction and hip flexion to adjust the twist and somersault angles. In the second case continual asymmetrical arm adduction/abduction adjustments were used to remove the tilt from a perturbed full twisting backward somersault using delayed feedback control based on twist angle and angular velocity. The first method was able to cope with perturbations to a forward somersault with 1½ twists providing the feedback time delay was less than 200 ms. The second method was able to correct a perturbed full twisting backward somersault providing the feedback time delay was less than 125 ms. PMID:24576588

  20. Flight test of the X-29A at high angle of attack: Flight dynamics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Clarke, Robert; Burken, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has flight tested two X-29A aircraft at low and high angles of attack. The high-angle-of-attack tests evaluate the feasibility of integrated X-29A technologies. More specific objectives focus on evaluating the high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, defining multiaxis controllability limits, and determining the maximum pitch-pointing capability. A pilot-selectable gain system allows examination of tradeoffs in airplane stability and maneuverability. Basic fighter maneuvers provide qualitative evaluation. Bank angle captures permit qualitative data analysis. This paper discusses the design goals and approach for high-angle-of-attack control laws and provides results from the envelope expansion and handling qualities testing at intermediate angles of attack. Comparisons of the flight test results to the predictions are made where appropriate. The pitch rate command structure of the longitudinal control system is shown to be a valid design for high-angle-of-attack control laws. Flight test results show that wing rock amplitude was overpredicted and aileron and rudder effectiveness were underpredicted. Flight tests show the X-29A airplane to be a good aircraft up to 40 deg angle of attack.

  1. Abnormal grain growth in Ni-5at.%W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Belde, M.; Barrales Mora, L.; de Boer, N.; Gilges, S.; Klöwer, J.; Gottstein, G.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of abnormally large grains in textured Ni-5at.%W substrates for high-temperature superconductors deteriorates the sharp texture of these materials and thus has to be avoided. Therefore the growth of abnormal grains is investigated and how it is influenced by the grain orientation and the annealing atmosphere. Texture measurements and grain growth simulations show that the grain orientation only matters so far that a high-angle grain boundary exists between an abnormally growing grain and the Cube-orientated matrix grains. The annealing atmosphere has a large influence on abnormal grain growth which is attributed to the differences in oxygen partial pressure.

  2. High angle of attack flying qualities criteria for longitudinal rate command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David J.; Citurs, Kevin D.; Davidson, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate flying qualities requirements of alternate pitch command systems for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack. Flying qualities design guidelines have already been developed for angle of attack command systems at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, so this research fills a similar need for rate command systems. Flying qualities tasks that require post-stall maneuvering were tested during piloted simulations in the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Manned Air Combat Simulation facility. A generic fighter aircraft model was used to test angle of attack rate and pitch rate command systems for longitudinal gross acquisition and tracking tasks at high angle of attack. A wide range of longitudinal dynamic variations were tested at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack. Pilot comments, Cooper-Harper ratings, and pilot induced oscillation ratings were taken from five pilots from NASA, USN, CAF, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. This data was used to form longitudinal design guidelines for rate command systems at high angle of attack. These criteria provide control law design guidance for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack, low speed flight conditions. Additional time history analyses were conducted using the longitudinal gross acquisition data to look at potential agility measures of merit and correlate agility usage to flying qualities boundaries. This paper presents an overview of this research.

  3. Perversions with a twist.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro E S; Trigueiros, Joao L; Trindade, Ana C; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-01-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light. PMID:27025549

  4. Perversions with a twist

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Pedro E. S.; Trigueiros, Joao L.; Trindade, Ana C.; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G.; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-01-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light. PMID:27025549

  5. Perversions with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pedro E. S.; Trigueiros, Joao L.; Trindade, Ana C.; Simoes, Ricardo; Dias, Ricardo G.; Godinho, Maria Helena; de Abreu, Fernao Vistulo

    2016-03-01

    Perversions connecting two helices with symmetric handedness are a common occurrence in nature, for example in tendrils. These defects can be found in our day life decorating ribbon gifts or when plants use tendrils to attach to a support. Perversions arise when clamped elastic filaments coil into a helical shape but have to conserve zero overall twist. We investigate whether other types of perversions exist and if they display different properties. Here we show mathematically and experimentally that a continuous range of different perversions can exist and present different geometries. Experimentally, different perversions were generated using micro electrospun fibres. Our experimental results also confirm that these perversions behave differently upon release and adopt different final configurations. These results also demonstrate that it is possible to control on demand the formation and shape of microfilaments, in particular, of electrospun fibres by using ultraviolet light.

  6. NanoARPES of twisted bilayer graphene on SiC: absence of velocity renormalization for small angles

    PubMed Central

    Razado-Colambo, I.; Avila, J.; Nys, J.-P.; Chen, C.; Wallart, X.; Asensio, M.-C.; Vignaud, D.

    2016-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) on SiC(000) grown by Si flux-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with nanometric spatial resolution. STM images revealed a wide distribution of twist angles between the two graphene layers. The electronic structure recorded in single TBG grains showed two closely-spaced Dirac π bands associated to the two stacked layers with respective twist angles in the range 1–3°. The renormalization of velocity predicted in previous theoretical calculations for small twist angles was not observed. PMID:27264791

  7. NanoARPES of twisted bilayer graphene on SiC: absence of velocity renormalization for small angles.

    PubMed

    Razado-Colambo, I; Avila, J; Nys, J-P; Chen, C; Wallart, X; Asensio, M-C; Vignaud, D

    2016-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) on SiC(000) grown by Si flux-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with nanometric spatial resolution. STM images revealed a wide distribution of twist angles between the two graphene layers. The electronic structure recorded in single TBG grains showed two closely-spaced Dirac π bands associated to the two stacked layers with respective twist angles in the range 1-3°. The renormalization of velocity predicted in previous theoretical calculations for small twist angles was not observed. PMID:27264791

  8. NanoARPES of twisted bilayer graphene on SiC: absence of velocity renormalization for small angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razado-Colambo, I.; Avila, J.; Nys, J.-P.; Chen, C.; Wallart, X.; Asensio, M.-C.; Vignaud, D.

    2016-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) on SiC(000) grown by Si flux-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with nanometric spatial resolution. STM images revealed a wide distribution of twist angles between the two graphene layers. The electronic structure recorded in single TBG grains showed two closely-spaced Dirac π bands associated to the two stacked layers with respective twist angles in the range 1–3°. The renormalization of velocity predicted in previous theoretical calculations for small twist angles was not observed.

  9. Coarse-grained modelling of supercoiled RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matek, Christian; Šulc, Petr; Randisi, Ferdinando; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the behaviour of double-stranded RNA under twist and tension using oxRNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Introducing explicit salt-dependence into the model allows us to directly compare our results to data from recent single-molecule experiments. The model reproduces extension curves as a function of twist and stretching force, including the buckling transition and the behaviour of plectoneme structures. For negative supercoiling, we predict denaturation bubble formation in plectoneme end-loops, suggesting preferential plectoneme localisation in weak base sequences. OxRNA exhibits a positive twist-stretch coupling constant, in agreement with recent experimental observations.

  10. Improved Inversion of High-Angle Ray Data in Crosshole GPR Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, J.; Knight, R.

    2005-05-01

    Over the past decade, crosshole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomography has become an important tool for the estimation of subsurface moisture content. In order to produce the highest resolution images possible with this technique, raypaths covering a wide range of angles between the boreholes are required. In practice, however, including high-angle ray data in crosshole GPR inversions often results in poor data fitting and tomographic images with obvious artifacts. As a result, high-angle ray data are usually discarded prior to inverting. This produces stable tomographic images, but with limited horizontal resolution that impacts the use of such images for estimating hydrologic properties. We have found that the incompatibility of high-angle ray data in crosshole GPR tomography can be largely explained by the finite length of the borehole radar antennas. Whereas tomographic inversions treat the antennas as point sources and receivers, in reality the antenna length is often a significant fraction of the borehole separation. At high angles, we have found that first arrival energy can often represent coupling between the tips of the antennas, and not between their centers as is presently assumed. This results in significant geometrical errors in the inversion of high-angle data. The effect is most significant for small borehole separations. We present a means of dealing with high-angle rays in crosshole GPR tomography so that all available data can be incorporated into the inversion process. First, we obtain a starting velocity model from an aperture-limited subset of the available travel time picks. Next, we construct nine different tomographic kernel matrices that represent coupling between all primary radiation points along the antennas (i.e., the antenna centers and tips). Using these kernels, we then determine which coupling path arrives first for each transmitter/receiver configuration in the entire data set. From this information, we construct a new

  11. Twist Helicity in Classical Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental work has demonstrated that a partial measure of fluid Helicity (the sum of linking and writhing of vortex tubes) is conserved even as those vortices undergo topology changing reconnections. Measuring the total Helicity, however, requires additional information about how the vortex lines are locally twisted inside the vortex core. To bridge this gap, we have developed a novel technique for experimentally measuring twist Helicity. Using this method, we are able to measure the production and eventual decay of twist for a variety of vortex evolutions. Remarkably, we observe twist dynamics capable of conserving total Helicity even in the presence of rapidly changing writhe. This work was supported by the NSF MRSEC shared facilities at the University of Chicago (DMR-0820054) and an NSF CAREER award (DMR-1351506). W.T.M.I. further acknowledges support from the A.P. Sloan Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  12. Twisting of the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Theory and models indicate that the IMF causes the magnetotail to produce an observable twist, predicting that the torque should bring the north lobe south of the GSM xy plane on one flank of the magnetotail, and the south lobe north of the plane on the other flank. In this paper, ISEE-3 geotail observations are compared with simultaneously made IMP 8 IMF observations supplemented by inferred IMF B(y) polarities to demonstrate the IMF-induced magnetotail twist. The results indicate that twisting is the single most important factor accounting for observations of the north lobe south of the GSM xy plane and the south lobe north of the plane. The value of the observed magnetotail twist about its aberrated axis is about 18 deg.

  13. Reconfigurable flight control for high angle of attack fighter aircraft, with wind tunnel study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Bilal Ahmed

    In this work we studied Reconfigurable Flight Control Systems to achieve acceptable performance of a fighter aircraft, even in the event of wing damage to the aircraft at low speeds and high angle of attack, which is typical of many combat maneuvers. Equations of motion for the damaged aircraft were derived, which helped in building simulators. A new methodology combining experimental and numerical aerodynamic prediction was proposed and implemented. For this a wind-tunnel study of a similar configuration was carried out to study the aerodynamics at low speeds and high angle of attack. A baseline control system for undamaged aircraft was developed, and finally a reconfigurable flight control scheme was implemented to keep the aircraft flyable even after the damage.

  14. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-30

    The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  15. Exploratory investigation of deflectable forebody strakes for high angle of attack yaw control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Murri, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    A deflectable strake concept was investigated on a conical forebody to evaluate its yaw control potential at high angles of attack. In exploratory low-speed tunnel tests using a generic delta wing fighter configuration, antisymmetrically deflected strakes provided useful levels of yaw power at angles of attack when the conventional rudder became totally degraded. Symmetrical strakes prevented side force development at high angles of attack, and provided pitch control through symmetrical deflection. The strake performance was sensitive to its circumferential position on the forebody due to varying interaction of strake vortices with the wing and vertical tail. The low Reynolds number results of this study provided a favorable initial validation of the concept, subject to verification in regard to scale effects.

  16. Loops: Twisting and Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    Loop-like structures are the fundamental magnetic building blocks of the solar atmosphere. Recent space-based EUV and X-ray satellite observations (from Yohkoh SOHO and TRACE) have challenged the view that these features are simply static gravitationally stratified plasma pipes. Rather it is now surmised that each loop may consist of a bundle of fine plasma threads that are twisted around one another and can brighten independently. This invited review will outline the latest developments in ""untangling"" the topology of these features through three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modelling and how their properties are being deduced through spectroscopic observations coupled to theoretical scaling laws. In particular recent interest has centred on how the observed thermal profile along loops can be employed as a tool to diagnose any localised energy input to the structure and hence constrain the presence of a particular coronal heating mechanism. The dynamic nature of loops will be highlighted and the implications of superior resolution plasma thread observations (whether spatial temporal or spectral) from future space missions (SolarB STEREO SDO and Solar Orbiter) will be discussed.

  17. Twisting Neutron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry

    Most waves encountered in nature can be given a ``twist'', so that their phase winds around an axis parallel to the direction of wave propagation. Such waves are said to possess orbital angular momentum (OAM). For quantum particles such as photons, atoms, and electrons, this corresponds to the particle wavefunction having angular momentum of Lℏ along its propagation axis. Controlled generation and detection of OAM states of photons began in the 1990s, sparking considerable interest in applications of OAM in light and matter waves. OAM states of photons have found diverse applications such as broadband data multiplexing, massive quantum entanglement, optical trapping, microscopy, quantum state determination and teleportation, and interferometry. OAM states of electron beams have been used to rotate nanoparticles, determine the chirality of crystals and for magnetic microscopy. Here I discuss the first demonstration of OAM control of neutrons. Using neutron interferometry with a spatially incoherent input beam, we show the addition and conservation of quantum angular momenta, entanglement between quantum path and OAM degrees of freedom. Neutron-based quantum information science heretofore limited to spin, path, and energy degrees of freedom, now has access to another quantized variable, and OAM modalities of light, x-ray, and electron beams are extended to a massive, penetrating neutral particle. The methods of neutron phase imprinting demonstrated here expand the toolbox available for development of phase-sensitive techniques of neutron imaging. Financial support provided by the NSERC Create and Discovery programs, CERC and the NIST Quantum Information Program is acknowledged.

  18. An Overview of the RTO Symposium on Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2002-01-01

    In May of 2001 the Research and Technology Organization (RTO) sponsored a symposium on Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack aerodynamics. Forty-six papers, organized into nine sessions, addressed computational and experimental studies of vortex flows pertinent to both aircraft and maritime applications. The studies also ranged from fundamental fluids investigations to flight test results. Selected highlights are included in this paper to provide a perspective toward the scope of the full symposium.

  19. Pitch control margin at high angle of attack - Quantitative requirements (flight test correlation with simulation predictions)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackey, J.; Hadfield, C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent mishaps and incidents on Class IV aircraft have shown a need for establishing quantitative longitudinal high angle of attack (AOA) pitch control margin design guidelines for future aircraft. NASA Langley Research Center has conducted a series of simulation tests to define these design guidelines. Flight test results have confirmed the simulation studies in that pilot rating of high AOA nose-down recoveries were based on the short-term response interval in the forms of pitch acceleration and rate.

  20. High angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of crescent and elliptic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Static longitudinal and lateral-directional forces and moments were measured for elliptic- and crescent-wing models at high angles-of-attack in the NASA Langley 14 by 22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel. The forces and moments were obtained for an angle-of-attack range including stall and post-stall conditions at a Reynolds number based on the average wing chord of about 1.8 million. Flow-visualization photographs using a mixture of oil and titanium-dioxide were also taken for several incidence angles. The force and moment data and the flow-visualization results indicated that the crescent wing model with its highly swept tips produced much better high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics than the elliptic model. Leading-edge separation-induced vortex flow over the highly swept tips of the crescent wing is thought to produce this improved behavior at high angles-of-attack. The unique planform design could result in safer and more efficient low-speed airplanes.

  1. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-10-30

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well.

  2. High-angle-of-attack yawing moment asymmetry of the X-31 aircraft from flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.

    1994-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries led to position saturations of the thrust vector vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some of the dynamic stability axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. This slowed the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion and resulted in maneuver restrictions. Several aerodynamic modifications were made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. A method for determining the yawing moment asymmetry from flight data was developed and an analysis of the various configuration changes completed. The baseline aircraft were found to have significant asymmetries above 45 deg angle of attack with the largest asymmetry typically occurring around 60 deg angle of attack. Applying symmetrical boundary layer transition strips along the forebody sides increased the magnitude of the asymmetry and widened the angle-of-attack range over which the largest asymmetry acted. Installing longitudinal forebody strakes and rounding the sharp nose of the aircraft caused the yawing moment asymmetry magnitude to be reduced. The transition strips and strakes made the asymmetry characteristic of the aircraft more repeatable than the clean forebody configuration. Although no geometric differences between the aircraft were known, ship 2 consistently had larger yawing moment asymmetries than ship 1.

  3. Linear parameter-varying control of an F-16 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bei

    To improve the aircraft capability at high angle of attack and expand the flight envelope, advanced linear parameter-varying (LPV) control methodologies are studied in this thesis with particular applications of actuator saturation control and switching control. A standard two-step LPV antiwindup control scheme and a systematic switching LPV control approach are derived, and the advantages of LPV control techniques are demonstrated through nonlinear simulations of an F-16 longitudinal autopilot control system. The aerodynamic surface saturation is one of the major issues of flight control in the high angle of attack region. The incorporated unconventional actuators such as thrust vectoring can provide additional control power, but may have a potentially significant pay-off. The proposed LPV antiwindup control scheme is advantageous from the implementation standpoint because it can be thought of as an augmented control algorithm to the existing control system. Moreover, the synthesis condition for an antiwindup compensator is formulated as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem and can be solved efficiently. By treating the input saturation as a sector bounded nonlinearity with a tight sector bound, the synthesized antiwindup compensator can stabilize the open-loop exponentially unstable systems. The LPV antiwindup control scheme is applied to the nonlinear F-16 longitudinal model, and compared with the thrust vectoring control approach. The simulation results show that the LPV antiwindup compensator improves the flight quality, and offers advantages over thrust vectoring in a high angle of attack region. For a thrust vectoring augmented aircraft, the actuator sets may be different at low and high angles of attack. Also due to different control objectives, a single controller may not exist over a wide angle of attack region. The proposed switching LPV control approach based on multiple parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions provides a flexible design

  4. The transient roll moment response due to forebody tangential blowing at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Jonathan Kwokching

    The sustained ability for controlled flight at high angles of attack is desirable for future aircraft. For combat aircraft, enhancing maneuverability is important to increasing its survivability. For future supersonic commercial aircraft, an increase in lift at high angles of attack leads to improved performance during take-offs and landing, and a reduction in noise pollution. However, nonlinear and unsteady phenomena, such as flow separation and vortex shedding dominate the aerodynamics in the high angle of attack regime. These phenomena cause the onset of lateral loads and decrease the effectiveness of conventional control surfaces. For conventional aircraft, controlled flight at high angle of attack is difficult or unfeasible without augmented means of control and a good understanding of their impact on vehicle characteristics and dynamics. The injection of thin sheets of air tangentially to the forebody of the vehicle has been found to be an extremely promising method for augmenting the control of a flight vehicle at high angles of attack. Forebody Tangential Blowing (FTB) allows the flow structure to be altered in a rational manner and increase the controllability of the vehicle under these flight conditions. The feasibility of using FTB to control the roll-yaw motion of flight vehicles has been demonstrated. Existing knowledge of FTB's nonlinear impact on the aerodynamic moment responses is limited. Currently available dynamic models predict the general trends in the behavior but do not capture important transient effects that dominate the responses when small amounts of blowing is used. These transients can be large in comparison to the steady-state values. This thesis summarizes the experimental and theoretical results of an investigation into the transient effects of Forebody Tangential Blowing. The relationship between the aerodynamic roll moment, vortical flowfield, and blowing strength is examined to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics of

  5. Aerodynamic damping of blade flap motions at high angles of attack

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.C.

    1995-09-01

    The YawDyn computer code is used to calculate the aerodynamic damping for a typical teetering rotor configuration. The code has been modified to calculate the net work done by aerodynamic forces in one complete rotor revolution. All cases were run for a teetering rotor similar to the ESI-80 with a specified teeter angle motion in order to isolate the aerodynamic effects from the inertial and gravitational loads. Effects of nonlinear static stall, dynamic stall, dynamic inflow, and delayed static stall due to rotation stability of flap motions in high winds. Contributions of the various steady and unsteady aerodynamic effects are presented for two airfoils: the LS(1) and the NREL Thin Airfoil Family (S805A, S806, S807). Teeter stability is compared for a blade with 10{degree} of linear twist and a blade with optimum aerodynamic twist.

  6. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  7. Frictional controls on high-angle reverse faulting during compressional basin inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Alder, S.; Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.

    2015-12-01

    Large normal faults are often reactivated as high-angle reverse faults during compressional basin inversion. Prevailing models to explain steep reverse slip call upon significant fluid overpressure. Though such models are consistent with some seismological data and field observations from incipient (low-displacement) reverse faults, they remain largely untested in the case of basin-scale faults. We present field and experimental data from the >200 km long Moonlight Fault Zone in New Zealand, an Oligocene basin-bounding normal fault that reactivated in the Miocene as a high-angle reverse fault (present dip angle 65°-75°). Excellent exposures of the fault zone exhumed from c. 4-8 km depth are found in creek sections along the entire strike length. Wall rocks are mainly quartz-albite-muscovite-chlorite schists with a strong foliation that is everywhere sub-parallel to the Moonlight Fault (i.e. dip angle 65°-75°). Although the overall structure of the fault zone changes significantly along strike in response to wall rock composition, the <5 metre thick fault core everywhere contains interconnected layers of foliated cataclasite rich in authigenically-grown chlorite and muscovite/illite. Microstructural evidence suggests deformation in the fault core by a combination of cataclasis, frictional slip along phyllosilicate seams and dissolution-precipitation. Single-direct and double-direct friction experiments were performed with the BRAVA apparatus (INGV, Rome) on saturated wafers (e.g. with intact foliation) of foliated cataclasite at normal stresses up to 75 MPa. The foliated cataclasites have a friction coefficient of <0.25 and negligible frictional healing. In combination with dissolution-precipitation mechanisms, a friction coefficient of <0.25 can account for slip on high-angle reverse faults if accompanied by only moderately high fluid pressures. Our results indicate that friction may be equally as important as fluid pressure during compressional basin inversion.

  8. Quantitative high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Rumyana V.

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been widely used for characterization of materials; to identify micro- and nano-structures within a sample and to analyze crystal and defect structures. High-angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM imaging using atomic number (Z) contrast has proven capable of resolving atomic structures with better than 2 A lateral resolution. In this work, the HAADF STEM imaging mode is used in combination with multislice simulations. This combination is applied to the investigation of the temperature dependence of the intensity collected by the HAADF detector in silicon, and to convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) to measure the degree of chemical order in intermetallic nanoparticles. The experimental and simulation results on the high-angle scattering of 300 keV electrons in crystalline silicon provide a new contribution to the understanding of the temperature dependence of the HAADF intensity. In the case of 300 keV, the average high-angle scattered intensity slightly decreases as the temperature increases from 100 K to 300 K, and this is different from the temperature dependence at 100 keV and 200 keV where HAADF intensity increases with temperature, as had been previously reported by other workers. The L10 class of hard magnetic materials has attracted continuous attention as a candidate for high-density magnetic recording media, as this phase is known to have large magnetocrystalline anisotropy, with magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, Ku, strongly dependent on the long-range chemical order parameter, S. A new method is developed to assess the degree of chemical order in small FePt L1 0 nanoparticles by implementing a CBED diffraction technique. Unexpectedly, the degree of order of individual particles is highly variable and not a simple function of particle size or sample composition. The particle-to-particle variability observed is an important new aspect to the understanding of phase transformations in

  9. High-angle reverse faults, fluid-pressure cycling, and mesothermal gold-quartz deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.; Robert, Francois; Poulsen, K. Howard

    1988-06-01

    Many mesothermal gold-quartz deposits are localized along high-angle reverse or reverse-oblique shear zones within greenstone belt terrains. Characteristically, these fault-hosted vein deposits exhibit a mixed "brittle-ductile" style of deformation (discrete shears and vein fractures as well as a schistose shear-zone fabric) developed under greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. Many of the vein systems are of considerable vertical extent (>2 km); they include steeply dipping fault veins (lenticular veins subparallel to the shear-zone schistosity) and, in some cases, associated flats (subhorizontal extensional veins). Textures of both vein sets record histories of incremental deposition. We infer that the vein sets developed near the roofs of active metamorphic/magmatic systems and represent the roots of brittle, high-angle reverse fault systems extending upward through the seismogenic regime. Friction theory and field relations suggest that the high-angle reverse faults acted as valves, promoting cyclic fluctuations in fluid pressure from supralithostatic to hydrostatic values. Because of their unfavorable orientation in the prevailing stress field, reactivation of the faults could only occur when fluid pressure exceeded the lithostatic load. Seismogenic fault failure then created fracture permeability within the rupture zone, allowing sudden draining of the geopressured reservoir at depth. Incremental opening of flats is attributed to the prefailure stage of supralithostatic fluid pressures; deposition within fault veins is attributed to the immediate postfailure discharge phase. Hydrothermal self-sealing leads to reaccumulation of fluid pressure and a repetition of the cycle. Mutual crosscutting relations between the two vein sets are a natural consequence of the cyclicity of the process. Abrupt fluid-pressure fluctuations from this fault-valve behavior of reverse faults seem likely to be integral to the mineralizing process at this

  10. ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Laue

    2001-09-28

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

  11. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  12. Experimental investigation of the high angle of attack characteristics of a high performance general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. F.; Yip, L. P.; Perkins, J. N.; Vess, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Scale model wind tunnel tests and full scale flight tests have been conducted for the Questair Venture general aviation aircraft configuration in order to investigate its high angle-of-attack aerodynamics. Attention is given to the formulation of a wing leading-edge modification capable of enhancing stall departure characteristics. This modification, which involved both outboard wing leading-edge droop and two chordwise leading-edge slots, is found to produce almost no wing-rock tendency when tested on a wind tunnel free-to-roll apparatus; in the full-scale aircraft, the modification yielded gentle, controllable stall characteristics with little cruise and climb performance penalty.

  13. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  14. Side-force alleviation on slender, pointed forebodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    A new device was proposed for alleviating high angle-of-attack side force on slender, pointed forebodies. A symmetrical pair of separation strips in the form of helical ridges are applied to the forebody to disrupt the primary lee-side vortices and thereby avoid the instability that produces vortex asymmetry. Preliminary wind tunnel tests at Mach 0.3 and Reynolds no. 5,250,000 on a variety of forebody configurations and on a wing-body combination at angles of attack up to 56 degrees, demonstrated the effectiveness of the device.

  15. Influence of SiC grain boundary character on fission product transport in irradiated TRISO fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo, T. M.; van Rooyen, I. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the fission product precipitates at silicon carbide grain boundaries from an irradiated TRISO particle were identified and correlated with the associated grain boundary characteristics. Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope provided the crystallographic information needed to identify grain boundary misorientation and boundary type (i.e., low angle, random high angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related). The silicon carbide layer was found to be composed mainly of twin boundaries and small fractions of random high angle and low angle grain boundaries. Most fission products were found at random, high-angle grain boundaries, with small fractions at low-angle and CSL-related grain boundaries. Palladium (Pd) was found at all types of grain boundaries while Pd-uranium and Pd-silver precipitates were only associated with CSL-related and random, high-angle grain boundaries. Precipitates containing only Ag were found only at random, high-angle grain boundaries, but not at low angle or CSL-related grain boundaries.

  16. Helical nanofilaments of bent-core liquid crystals with a second twist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Diorio, N; Lavrentovich, O D; Jákli, A

    2014-01-01

    The B4 phase of bent-core liquid crystals has been shown to be an assembly of twisted layers stacked to form helical nanofilaments. Interestingly, some of them have structural colours that cannot be explained by the nanofilaments alone. Here cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy observations on 40-120 nm films of four bent-core liquid crystal materials show that the filaments are present even in contact with a carbon substrate with only minor deformation, thus representing bulk properties. We find that the subsequent arrays of nanofilaments are not parallel to each other, but rotate by an angle of 35-40° with respect to each other. This doubly twisted structure can explain the structural colour. Being principally different from the packing of molecules in the twist grain boundary and blue phases, the double-twist structure of helical nanofilaments expands the rich word of nanostructured organic materials. PMID:24548912

  17. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamics of high-angle-of-attack maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.; Tobak, M.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current state of aerodynamic mathematical modeling for aircraft motions at high angles of attack. The mathematical model serves to define a set of characteristic motions from whose known aerodynamic responses the aerodynamic response to an arbitrary high angle-of-attack flight maneuver can be predicted. Means are explored of obtaining stability parameter information in terms of the characteristic motions, whether by wind-tunnel experiments, computational methods, or by parameter-identification methods applied to flight-test data. A rationale is presented for selecting and verifying the aerodynamic mathematical model at the lowest necessary level of complexity. Experimental results describing the wing-rock phenomenon are shown to be accommodated within the most recent mathematical model by admitting the existence of aerodynamic hysteresis in the steady-state variation of the rolling moment with roll angle. Interpretation of the experimental results in terms of bifurcation theory reveals the general conditions under which aerodynamic hysteresis must exist.

  18. Full-scale high angle-of-attack tests of an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Lanser, Wendy R.; James, Kevin D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of high angle-of-attack tests of a full-scale F/A-18 in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. A production aircraft was tested over an angle-of-attack range of 18 to 50 deg and at wind speeds of up to 100 knots. These tests had three primary test objectives. Pneumatic and mechanical forebody flow control devices were tested at full-scale and shown to produce significant yawing moments for lateral control of the aircraft at high angles of attack. Mass flow requirements for the pneumatic system were found to scale with freestream density and speed rather than freestream dynamic pressure. Detailed measurements of the pressures buffeting the vertical tail were made and spatial variations in the buffeting frequency were found. The LEX fence was found to have a significant effect on the frequency distribution on the outboard surface of the vertical fin. In addition to the above measurements, an extensive set of data was acquired for the validation of computational fluid dynamics codes and for comparison with flight test and small-scale wind tunnel test results.

  19. Shear veins observed within anisotropic fabric at high angles to the maximum compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Remitti, Francesca; Sibson, Richard H.

    2010-07-01

    Some faults seem to slip at unusually high angles (>45°) relative to the orientation of the greatest principal compressive stress. This implies that these faults are extremely weak compared with the surrounding rock. Laboratory friction experiments and theoretical models suggest that the weakness may result from slip on a pre-existing frictionally weak surface, weakening from chemical reactions, elevated fluid pressure or dissolution-precipitation creep. Here we describe shear veins within the Chrystalls Beach accretionary mélange, New Zealand. The mélange is a highly sheared assemblage of relatively competent rock within a cleaved, anisotropic mudstone matrix. The orientation of the shear veins-compared with the direction of hydrothermal extension veins that formed contemporaneously-indicates that they were active at an angle of 80°+/-5° to the greatest principal compressive stress. We show that the shear veins developed incrementally along the cleavage planes of the matrix. Thus, we suggest that episodic slip was facilitated by the anisotropic internal fabric, in a fluid-overpressured, heterogeneous shear zone. A similar mechanism may accommodate shear at high angles to the greatest principal compressive stress in a range of tectonic settings. We therefore conclude that incremental slip along a pre-existing planar fabric, coupled to high fluid pressure and dissolution-precipitation creep, may explain active slip on severely misoriented faults.

  20. Specialized drilling systems set new world records in high-angle holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.L.; Schwab, G.A.

    1984-02-01

    Sound well planning and carefully chosen drilling systems have proved successful in completing two high-angle holes through troublesome formations in the Gippsland basin offshore Victoria, Australia. Located about 60 miles (97 km) out in the Bass Strait, Mackerel Wells A-14 and A-16 set new records for being the longest horizontal displacement wells drilled to an angle of up to 72/sup 0/ (1.26 rad) to the vertical. Both wells are producing oil from a previously fault-isolated reservoir southwest of the platform. The use of invert oil emulsion and aluminum drill pipe represented a significant change from normal Bass Strait drilling operations. This, in conjunction with tightly controlled angle buildup and directional control, ensured that the projected well paths were achieved. Completion procedures peculiar to highly deviated holes also were employed to bring the wells on stream successfully. A ''controlled activity'' oil-continuous mud system was chosen to alleviate problems associated with shale hydration and to increase wellbore lubricity. Rig modifications for cuttings disposal were essential before mud systems could be changed over. In combination with aluminum drill pipe for reduced string weight (Well A-16), the oil mud helped minimize torque, drag, and wall-sticking tendencies. With similar drilling systems and well-planned completion techniques, the drilling of high-angle holes will play a vital role in deepwater development.

  1. Method for estimating the aerodynamic coefficients of wind turbine blades at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beans, E. W.; Jakubowski, G. S.

    1983-12-01

    The method is based on the hypothesis that at high angles of attack the force on an airfoil is produced by the deflection of the fluid across the lower surface. It is also hypothesized that all airfoils behave the same regardless of shape and that the effects of circulation and skin friction are small. It is pointed out that the expression for the force N normal to the airfoil due to momentum exchange can be written in terms of the component parallel to the flow (drag) and the component perpendicular to the flow (lift). A comparison of estimated values with measured values and generally accepted data indicates that the method given here estimates coefficients which are low. It is thought that the difference may derive from the persistence of circulation at high angles of attack. Low estimates are not seen as a serious limitation to the designer of wind turbines. Owing to the fifth power diameter relation, the effect of a low estimate of performance on the inner portion of the blade is minimized.

  2. "Oliver Twist": A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashion, Carol; Fischer, Diana

    This teacher's guide for public television's 3-part adaptation of Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist" provides information that will help enrich students' viewing of the series, whether or not they read the novel. The guide includes a wide range of discussion and activity ideas; there is also a series Web site and a list of Web resources.…

  3. The electronic structure of grain boundaries in Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, E.C.; Gonis, A. ); Zhang, X.G. )

    1990-11-01

    We present first-principles calculations of the electronic structure of Nb grain boundaries. These are the first such calculations for a bcc metal using the real-space multiple-scattering theory (RSMST). Local densities of states near a {Sigma}5 twist grain boundary are compared to those for bulk Nb. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Aerodynamic characteristics of two general aviation canard configurations at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Yip, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests of two propeller driven canard general aviation aircraft models at high angles of attack are reported. Both tractor and pusher prop configurations were examined. Angles of attack of -6 to 40 deg were used with the pusher model at Re of 1,600,000, and from -30 to 90 deg and Re of 550,000 for the tractor model. The tests showed that the canard would stall long before the wing and produce a nose-down tendency, thus effectively keeping the aircraft out of the stall regime. However, a sequence of pilot actions or design factors such as the airfoils, relative geometry of the canard and wing, the propeller location and the center of gravity location could introduce a wide variance in stall characteristics from one aircraft to another.

  5. Apollo 11 Launched Via the Saturn V Rocket-High Angle View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first lunar landing mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle produced a holocaust of flames as it rose from its pad at Launch complex 39. The 363 foot tall, 6,400,000 pound rocket hurled the spacecraft into Earth parking orbit and then placed it on the trajectory to the moon for man's first lunar landing. This high angle view of the launch was provided by a `fisheye' camera mounted on the launch tower. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  6. Modelling high angle wave instability and the generation of large scale shoreline sand waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Niels; Falqués, Albert; Ribas, Francesca

    2010-05-01

    Sandy coasts are dynamic systems, shaped by the continuous interaction between hydrodynamics and morphology. On a large time and spacial scale it is commonly assumed that the diffusive action of alongshore wave driven sediment transport dominates and maintains a stable and straight shoreline. Ashton et. al. (2001) however showed with a cellular model that for high angle off-shore wave incidence a coastline can be unstable and that shoreline sand waves can develop due to the feedback of shoreline changes into the wave field. These shoreline undulations can migrate and merge to form large scale capes and spits. Falqués and Calvete (2005) confirmed the mechanism of shoreline instability and shoreline sand wave formation with a linear stability analysis. They found a typical wavelength in the range 4-15 km and a characteristic growth time of a few years. Both studies however have there limitations. Ashton et. al. (2001) assume rectilinear depth contours and an infinite cross-shore extent of shoreline changes in the bathymetry. The linear stability analysis by Falqués and Calvete (2005) can only be applied for small amplitude shoreline changes. Both studies neglect cross-shore dynamics as bathymetric changes associated to shoreline changes are assumed to be instantaneous. In the current study, a nonlinear morphodynamic model is used. In this model the bathymetric lines are curvilinear and the cross-shore extent of shoreline changes in the bathymetry is dynamic due to the introduction of cross-shore dynamics. The cross-shore dynamics are parameterized by assuming a relaxation to an equilibrium cross-shore profile. The relaxation is controlled by a diffusivity which is proportional to wave energy dissipation. The new model is equivalent to N-lines models but applies sediment conservation like 2DH models instead of just moving contour lines. The main objective of this study is to extend the work of Falqués and Calvete (2005) and to study in more detail the mechanism of

  7. High-angle-of-attack stability and control improvements for the EA-6B Prowler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Frank L.; Hahne, David E.; Masiello, Matthew F.; Gato, William

    1987-01-01

    The factors involved in high-angle-of-attack directional divergence phenomena for the EA-6B ECM aircraft have been investigated in NASA-Langley wind tunnel facilities in order to evaluate airframe modifications which would eliminate or delay such divergence to angles-of-attack farther removed from the operational flight envelope of the aircraft. The results obtained indicate that an adverse sidewash at the aft fuselage and vertical tail location is responsible for the directional stability loss, and that the sidewash is due to a vortex system generated by the fuselage-wing juncture. Modifications encompassing a wing inboard leading edge droop, a wing glove strake, and a vertical fin extension, have significantly alleviated the stability problem.

  8. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons.

    PubMed

    Argentero, G; Mangler, C; Kotakoski, J; Eder, F R; Meyer, J C

    2015-04-01

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate that the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number. PMID:25522869

  9. A review of some Reynolds number effects related to bodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    A review of some effects of Reynolds number on selected aerodynamic characteristics of two- and three-dimensional bodies of various cross sections in relation to fuselages at high angles of attack at subsonic and transonic speeds is presented. Emphasis is placed on the Reynolds number ranges above the subcritical and angles of attack where lee side vortex flow or unsteady wake type flows predominate. Lists of references, arranged in subject categories, are presented with emphasis on those which include data over a reasonable Reynolds number range. Selected Reynolds number data representative of various aerodynamic flows around bodies are presented and analyzed and some effects of these flows on fuselage aerodynamic parameters are discussed.

  10. A study of roll attractor and wing rock of delta wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjana, T.; Rao, D. M.; Pamadi, Bandu N.

    1993-01-01

    Wing rock is a high angle of attack dynamic phenomenon of limited cycle motion predominantly in roll. The wing rock is one of the limitations to combat effectiveness of the fighter aircraft. Roll Attractor is the steady state or equilibrium trim angle (phi(sub trim)) attained by the free-to-roll model, held at some angle of attack, and released form rest at a given initial roll (bank) angle (phi(sub O)). Multiple roll attractors are attained at different trim angles depending on initial roll angle. The test facility (Vigyan's low speed wind tunnel) and experimental work is presented here along with mathematical modelling of roll attractor phenomenon and analysis and comparison of predictions with experimental data.

  11. Use of piloted simulation for high-angle-of-attack agility research and design criteria development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The application of piloted simulations in the development of advanced fighter aircraft is reviewed in the context of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). The HATP combines wind-tunnel experiments, computational aerodynamics, piloted simulations, and flight tests on a modified F-18 testbed aircraft and utilizes the experience and facilities of several NASA centers. Consideration is given to the role of simulation in the overall research process, simulation capabilities and software requirements, simulation flexibility and fidelity, evaluation maneuvers, the role of simulator pilots in evaluations, the analysis of simulation results, flight validation of maneuvers and rating approaches, and the use of simulations to define design criteria. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and flow charts are included.

  12. Atomic-resolution incoherent high-angle annular dark field STEM images of Si(011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kotaka, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Hashimoto, I.; Shiojiri, M.

    2001-02-01

    Characteristic atomic-resolution incoherent high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of [011]-orientated Si have been experimentally obtained by a through-focal series. Artificial bright spots appear at positions where no atomic columns exist along the electron beam, in some experimental images. Image simulation, based on the Bloch wave description by the Bethe method, reproduces the through-focal experimental images. It is shown that atomic-resolution HAADF STEM images, which are greatly influenced by the Bloch wave field depending on the incident electron beam probe, cannot always be interpreted intuitively as the projected atomic images. It is also found that the atomic-resolution HAADF STEM images can be simply explained using the relations to the probe functions without the need for complex dynamical simulations.

  13. Numerical simulation of vortical flow over an elliptical-body missile at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, R. N.; Adams, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical solutions to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are given for the flow about an elliptical body missile (3:1 ellipse) at a Mach number of 2.5 and a unit Reynolds number of 6.56 x 10 to the 6th/m. At high angles of attack, the flow is dominated by large-scale free vortices which occur in the lee-side flow field due to crossflow boundary-layer separation. Emphasis is focused on the accurate prediction of the lee-side vortical flow. Solutions are presented for both symmetric and asymmetric (body rolled 45 deg) configurations at 10 deg and 20 deg angle of attack. The computed results are compared with experimental surface pressure coefficients and vapor-screen photographs. Excellent agreement is obtained in all cases.

  14. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Karel H W; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-17

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures. PMID:27367396

  15. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bos, Karel H. W.; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D.; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures.

  16. Simulating Effects of High Angle of Attack on Turbofan Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Claus, Russell W.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A method of investigating the effects of high angle of attack (AOA) flight on turbofan engine performance is presented. The methodology involves combining a suite of diverse simulation tools. Three-dimensional, steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is used to model the change in performance of a commercial aircraft-type inlet and fan geometry due to various levels of AOA. Parallel compressor theory is then applied to assimilate the CFD data with a zero-dimensional, nonlinear, dynamic turbofan engine model. The combined model shows that high AOA operation degrades fan performance and, thus, negatively impacts compressor stability margins and engine thrust. In addition, the engine response to high AOA conditions is shown to be highly dependent upon the type of control system employed.

  17. Preliminary results from an airdata enhancement algorithm with application to high-angle-of-attack flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique was developed to improve the fidelity of airdata measurements during dynamic maneuvering. This technique is particularly useful for airdata measured during flight at high angular rates and high angles of attack. To support this research, flight tests using the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility. A Kalman filter was used to combine information from research airdata, linear accelerometers, angular rate gyros, and attitude gyros to determine better estimates of airdata quantities such as angle of attack, angle of sideslip, airspeed, and altitude. The state and observation equations used by the Kalman filter are briefly developed and it is shown how the state and measurement covariance matrices were determined from flight data. Flight data are used to show the results of the technique and these results are compared to an independent measurement source. This technique is applicable to both postflight and real-time processing of data.

  18. Optimization of lateral-directional dynamics for an aircraft operating at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, S. A.; Garrard, William L., Jr.; Enns, Dale F.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the control laws for the lateral-directional dynamics of a supermaneuverable aircraft is analyzed with a view to reducing the levels of lateral acceleration and sideslip, which are encountered during aggressive rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. The analysis uses a linearized model of the lateral-directional dynamics and thus H-free-flow techniques can be applied. It is shown that trade-offs exist between simultaneously minimizing lateral acceleration measured at the pilot's station, ny(p), minimizing sideslip and minimizing tracking errors between the roll-rate about the velocity vector and its command. The paper concludes that a significant reduction in ny(p) is only attainable by compromising the roll-rate performance.

  19. Flight validation of ground-based assessment for control power requirements at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Ross, Holly M.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.; Abbott, Troy D.

    1994-01-01

    A review is presented in viewgraph format of an ongoing NASA/U.S. Navy study to determine control power requirements at high angles of attack for the next generation high-performance aircraft. This paper focuses on recent flight test activities using the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which are intended to validate results of previous ground-based simulation studies. The purpose of this study is discussed, and the overall program structure, approach, and objectives are described. Results from two areas of investigation are presented: (1) nose-down control power requirements and (2) lateral-directional control power requirements. Selected results which illustrate issues and challenges that are being addressed in the study are discussed including test methodology, comparisons between simulation and flight, and general lessons learned.

  20. High-angle light scattering to determine the optical fiber core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świrniak, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to discuss the possibility of non-invasive sizing of a step-index optical fiber with the use of a beam of light of low temporal coherence. For this purpose we examine the angular profile of light scattered from the fiber at a high angle. The scattered pattern comprises chiefly two coupled, twin rainbows and depends on the fiber physical characteristics, i.e. its dimensions, shape, and refractive index profile. In order to find a causal link between the scattering pattern and the fiber morphology, a spectral analysis (Fast Fourier Transform, FFT) is performed over the scattering intensity. From the spectral data, the core diameter of a step-index optical fiber is extracted inversely.

  1. Exploratory studies of actuated forebody strakes for yaw control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Rao, Dhanvada M.

    1987-01-01

    Wind-tunnel studies have been conducted to evaluate the potential of actuated forebody strakes to provide increased levels of yaw control on fighter aircraft at extremely high angles of attack where conventional aerodynamic controls are ineffective. The studies involved low-speed wind-tunnel tests of actuated forebody strake concepts applied to a generic fighter model and included circumferential pressure and flow visualization surveys on an isolated forebody. Results showed that the actuated forebody strake concept can provide high levels of yaw control over wide ranges of angle-of-attack and sideslip. However, when lifting surfaces were placed in close proximity to the forebody/strake combination, significant interaction effects occurred which reduced the yaw control effectiveness of the strakes and induced coupled rolling and pitching moments.

  2. Endothelial TWIST1 Promotes Pathological Ocular Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Sun, Ye; Gong, Yan; Fu, Zhongjie; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine T.; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pathological neovessel formation impacts many blinding vascular eye diseases. Identification of molecular signatures distinguishing pathological neovascularization from normal quiescent vessels is critical for developing new interventions. Twist-related protein 1 (TWIST1) is a transcription factor important in tumor and pulmonary angiogenesis. This study investigated the potential role of TWIST1 in modulating pathological ocular angiogenesis in mice. Methods. Twist1 expression and localization were analyzed in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Pathological ocular angiogenesis in Tie2-driven conditional Twist1 knockout mice were evaluated in both OIR and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization models. In addition, the effects of TWIST1 on angiogenesis and endothelial cell function were analyzed in sprouting assays of aortic rings and choroidal explants isolated from Twist1 knockout mice, and in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells treated with TWIST1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results. TWIST1 is highly enriched in pathological neovessels in OIR retinas. Conditional Tie2-driven depletion of Twist1 significantly suppressed pathological neovessels in OIR without impacting developmental retinal angiogenesis. In a laser-induced choroidal neovascularization model, Twist1 deficiency also resulted in significantly smaller lesions with decreased vascular leakage. In addition, loss of Twist1 significantly decreased vascular sprouting in both aortic ring and choroid explants. Knockdown of TWIST1 in endothelial cells led to dampened expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and decreased endothelial cell proliferation. Conclusions. Our study suggests that TWIST1 is a novel regulator of pathologic ocular angiogenesis and may represent a new molecular target for developing potential therapeutic treatments to suppress pathological neovascularization in vascular eye diseases. PMID:25414194

  3. Renormalization constants for 2-twist operators in twisted mass QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, C.; Constantinou, M.; Panagopoulos, H.; Stylianou, F.; Korzec, T.

    2011-01-01

    Perturbative and nonperturbative results on the renormalization constants of the fermion field and the twist-2 fermion bilinears are presented with emphasis on the nonperturbative evaluation of the one-derivative twist-2 vector and axial-vector operators. Nonperturbative results are obtained using the twisted mass Wilson fermion formulation employing two degenerate dynamical quarks and the tree-level Symanzik improved gluon action. The simulations have been performed for pion masses in the range of about 450-260 MeV and at three values of the lattice spacing a corresponding to {beta}=3.9, 4.05, 4.20. Subtraction of O(a{sup 2}) terms is carried out by performing the perturbative evaluation of these operators at 1-loop and up to O(a{sup 2}). The renormalization conditions are defined in the RI{sup '}-MOM scheme, for both perturbative and nonperturbative results. The renormalization factors, obtained for different values of the renormalization scale, are evolved perturbatively to a reference scale set by the inverse of the lattice spacing. In addition, they are translated to MS at 2 GeV using 3-loop perturbative results for the conversion factors.

  4. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘polarization twist’, which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  5. Higher level twisted Zhu algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Ekeren, Jethro van

    2011-05-15

    The study of twisted representations of graded vertex algebras is important for understanding orbifold models in conformal field theory. In this paper, we consider the general setup of a vertex algebra V, graded by {Gamma}/Z for some subgroup {Gamma} of R containing Z, and with a Hamiltonian operator H having real (but not necessarily integer) eigenvalues. We construct the directed system of twisted level p Zhu algebras Zhu{sub p,{Gamma}}(V), and we prove the following theorems: For each p, there is a bijection between the irreducible Zhu{sub p,{Gamma}}(V)-modules and the irreducible {Gamma}-twisted positive energy V-modules, and V is ({Gamma}, H)-rational if and only if all its Zhu algebras Zhu{sub p,{Gamma}}(V) are finite dimensional and semisimple. The main novelty is the removal of the assumption of integer eigenvalues for H. We provide an explicit description of the level p Zhu algebras of a universal enveloping vertex algebra, in particular of the Virasoro vertex algebra Vir{sup c} and the universal affine Kac-Moody vertex algebra V{sup k}(g) at non-critical level. We also compute the inverse limits of these directed systems of algebras.

  6. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  7. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-09-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid.

  8. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  9. Analysis of twisted supercharge families on product manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harju, Antti J.

    2015-04-01

    Twisted supercharge families on product manifolds 𝕋 × M have been applied in the analysis of the odd twisted K-theory. We shall suspend these families to the even twisted K-theory and solve their twisted families index problem. This is applied to give analytic representatives of the twisted K-theory classes on tori—including all the torsion classes.

  10. The Twist Limit for Bipolar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Gary, Allen

    2008-01-01

    We present new evidence that further supports the standard idea that active regions are emerged magnetic-flux-rope omega loops. When the axial magnetic twist of a cylindrical flux rope exceeds a critical amount, the flux rope becomes unstable to kinking, and the excess axial twist is converted into writhe twist by the kinking. This suggests that, if active regions are emerged omega loops, then (1) no active region should have magnetic twist much above the limit set by kinking, (2) active regions having twist near the limit should often arise from kinked omega loops, and (3) since active regions having large delta sunspots are outstandingly twisted, these arise from kinked omega loops and should have twist near the limit for kinking. From each of 36 vector magnetograms of bipolar active regions, we have measured (1) the total flux of the vertical field above 100 G, (2) the area covered by this flux, and (3) the net electric current that arches over the polarity inversion line. These three quantities yield an estimate of the axial magnetic twist in a simple model cylindrical flux rope that corresponds to the top of the active region s hypothetical omega loop prior to emergence. In all 36 cases, the estimated twist is below the critical limit for kinking. The 11 most twisted active regions (1) have estimated twist within a factor of approx.3 of the limit, and (2) include all of our 6 active regions having large delta sunspots. Thus, our observed twist limit for bipolar active regions is in good accord with active regions being emerged omega loops.

  11. Twisted Logarithmic Modules of Vertex Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakalov, Bojko

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by logarithmic conformal field theory and Gromov-Witten theory, we introduce a notion of a twisted module of a vertex algebra under an arbitrary (not necessarily semisimple) automorphism. Its main feature is that the twisted fields involve the logarithm of the formal variable. We develop the theory of such twisted modules and, in particular, derive a Borcherds identity and commutator formula for them. We investigate in detail the examples of affine and Heisenberg vertex algebras.

  12. Actuator and aerodynamic modeling for high-angle-of-attack aeroservoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate prediction of airframe/actuation coupling is required by the imposing demands of modern flight control systems. In particular, for agility enhancement at high angle of attack and low dynamic pressure, structural integration characteristics such as hinge moments, effective actuator stiffness, and airframe/control surface damping can have a significant effect on stability predictions. Actuator responses are customarily represented with low-order transfer functions matched to actuator test data, and control surface stiffness is often modeled as a linear spring. The inclusion of the physical properties of actuation and its installation on the airframe is therefore addressed using detailed actuator models which consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation. The aeroservoelastic analysis procedure is described in which the actuators are modeled as detailed high-order transfer functions and as approximate low-order transfer functions. The impacts of unsteady aerodynamic modeling on aeroservoelastic stability are also investigated by varying the order of approximation, or number of aerodynamic lag states, in the analysis. Test data from a thrust-vectoring configuration of an F/A-l8 aircraft are compared to predictions to determine the effects on accuracy as a function of modeling complexity.

  13. Multiaxis aircraft control power from thrust vectoring at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Mason, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive research programs conducted at the Langley Research Center have shown that thrust vectoring can be provided by multifunction (nonaxisymmetric) nozzles. Most of this research has been conducted on pitch vectoring at both static and forward flight conditions. Recent efforts have been aimed at evaluating yaw vectoring concepts at static (wind off) conditions. This paper summarizes results for three different twin-engine fighter configurations tested over a Mach number range of 0.15 to 2.47 at angles of attack up to 35 deg. The objective of these investigations was to determine the multiaxis control power characteristics provided by thrust vectoring. All three configurations employed two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles which provided pitch vectoring by differential deflection of the upper and lower nozzle divergent flaps. Three different means of yaw vectoring were tested: (1) a translating nozzle sidewall; (2) yaw flaps located in the nozzle sidewalls; and (3) canted nozzles. These investigations were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel and the Lewis 10x10-Foot Supersonic Tunnel. Longitudinal and direction control power from thrust vectoring was greater than that provided by aerodynamic control effectors at low speed or at high angles of attack.

  14. A preliminary look at techniques used to obtain airdata from flight at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    Flight research at high angles of attack has posed new problems for airdata measurements. New sensors and techniques for measuring the standard airdata quantities of static pressure, dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip were subsequently developed. The ongoing airdata research supporting NASA's F-18 high alpha research program is updated. Included are the techniques used and the preliminary results. The F-18 aircraft was flown with three research airdata systems: a standard airdata probe on the right wingtip, a self-aligning airdata probe on the left wingtip, and a flush airdata system on the nose cone. The primary research goal was to obtain steady-state calibrations for each airdata system up to an angle of attack of 50 deg. This goal was accomplished and preliminary accuracies of the three airdata systems were assessed and are presented. An effort to improve the fidelity of the airdata measurements during dynamic maneuvering is also discussed. This involved enhancement of the aerodynamic data with data obtained from linear accelerometers, rate gyros, and attitude gyros. Preliminary results of this technique are presented.

  15. A system for testing airdata probes at high angles of attack using a ground vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geenen, Robert J.; Moulton, Bryan J.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A system to calibrate airdata probes at angles of attack between 0 and 90 deg was developed and tested at the NASA Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility. This system used a test fixture mounted to the roof of a ground vehicle and included an onboard instrumentation and data acquisition system for measuring pressures and flow angles. The data could be easily transferred to the facility mainframe computer for further analysis. The system was designed to provide convenient and inexpensive airdata probe calibrations for projects which require airdata at high angles of attack, such as the F-18 High Alpha Research Program. This type of probe was tested to 90 deg angle of attack in a wind tunnel and using the ground vehicle system. The results of both tests are in close agreement. An airdata probe with a swiveling pilot-static tube was also calibrated with the ground vehicle system. This paper presents the results of these tests and gives a detailed description of the test system.

  16. Aerodynamic Loads on Tails at High Angles of Attack and Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.; Spahr, J. R.

    1957-01-01

    Results are presented for the loads and moments acting on the individual tail surfaces of a body-tail combination over a wide range of angles of attack and sideslip. The effects of forebody length and panel-panel interference on the characteristics are included. It is shown that large nonlinear variations in these loads and moments, which occur at some combinations of angle of attack and sideslip, cannot be predicted by low-angle theory. A relatively simple, but general, theoretical method for calculating these load and moment characteristics is described, and the results from this method are found to be in good agreement with experiment provided the initial positions of the forebody vortices are known. It is shown that a simple application of slender-body theory can be used to predict the side loads due to sideslip that are contributed by a vertical tail on a wide variety of wing-body-tail combinations at low angles of attack. For several configurations, changes are indicated which reduced the vertical-tail loads per unit yawing moment of each complete configuration at large angles of attack. Some results are presented on the effect of high angle of attack on the induced-flow field and tail loads due to a wing at supersonic speed.

  17. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible. PMID:27391526

  18. Actuator and aerodynamic modeling for high-angle-of-attack aeroservoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate prediction of airframe/actuation coupling is required by the imposing demands of modern flight control systems. In particular, for agility enhancement at high angle of attack and low dynamic pressure, structural integration characteristics such as hinge moments, effective actuator stiffness, and airframe/control surface damping can have a significant effect on stability predictions. Actuator responses are customarily represented with low-order transfer functions matched to actuator test data, and control surface stiffness is often modeled as a linear spring. The inclusion of the physical properties of actuation and its installation on the airframe is therefore addressed in this paper using detailed actuator models which consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation. The aeroservoelastic analysis procedure is described in which the actuators are modeled as detailed high-order transfer functions and as approximate low-order transfer functions. The impacts of unsteady aerodynamic modeling on aeroservoelastic stability are also investigated in this paper by varying the order of approximation, or number of aerodynamic lag states, in the analysis. Test data from a thrust-vectoring configuration of an F/A-18 aircraft are compared to predictions to determine the effects on accuracy as a function of modeling complexity.

  19. A Tail Buffet Loads Prediction Method for Aircraft at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.; Moses, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft designers commit significant resources to the design of aircraft in meeting performance goals. Despite fulfilling traditional design requirements, many fighter aircraft have encountered buffet loads when demonstrating their high angle-of-attack maneuver capabilities. As a result, during test or initial production phases of fighter development programs, many new designs are impacted, usually in a detrimental way, by resulting in reassessing designs or limiting full mission capability. These troublesome experiences usually stem from overlooking or completely ignoring the effects of buffet during the design phase of aircraft. Perhaps additional requirements are necessary that addresses effects of buffet in achieving best aircraft performance in fulfilling mission goals. This paper describes a reliable, fairly simple, but quite general buffet loads analysis method to use in the initial design phases of fighter-aircraft development. The method is very similar to the random gust load analysis that is now commonly available in a commercial code, which this analysis capability is based, with some key modifications. The paper describes the theory and the implementation of the methodology. The method is demonstrated on a JSF prototype example problem. The demonstration also serves as a validation of the method, since, in the paper, the analysis is shown to nearly match the flight data. In addition, the paper demonstrates how the analysis method can be used to assess candidate design concepts in determining a satisfactory final aircraft configuration.

  20. Technical Evaluation Report, Part A - Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2003-01-01

    A symposium entitled Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack was held in Loen, Norway, from May 7 through May 11, 2001. The Applied Vehicle Technology (AVT) panel, under the auspices of the Research and Technology Organization (RTO), sponsored this symposium. Forty-eight papers, organized into nine sessions, addressed computational and experimental studies of vortex flows pertinent to both aircraft and maritime applications. The studies also ranged from fundamental fluids investigations to flight test results, and significant results were contributed from a broad range of countries. The principal emphasis of this symposium was on "the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on military vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads." It was further observed by the program committee that "separation- induced vortex flows are an important part of the design and off-design performance of conventional fighter aircraft and new conventional or unconventional manned or unmanned advanced vehicle designs (UAVs, manned aircraft, missiles, space planes, ground-based vehicles, and ships)." The nine sessions addressed the following topics: vortical flows on wings and bodies, experimental techniques for vortical flows, numerical simulations of vortical flows, vortex stability and breakdown, vortex flows in maritime applications, vortex interactions and control, vortex dynamics, flight testing, and vehicle design. The purpose of this paper is to provide brief reviews of these papers along with some synthesizing perspectives toward future vortex flow research opportunities. The paper includes the symposium program. (15 refs.)

  1. Longitudinal-control design approach for high-angle-of-attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.; Proffitt, Melissa S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a control synthesis methodology that emphasizes a variable-gain output feedback technique that is applied to the longitudinal channel of a high-angle-of-attack aircraft. The aircraft is a modified F/A-18 aircraft with thrust-vectored controls. The flight regime covers a range up to a Mach number of 0.7; an altitude range from 15,000 to 35,000 ft; and an angle-of-attack (alpha) range up to 70 deg, which is deep into the poststall region. A brief overview is given of the variable-gain mathematical formulation as well as a description of the discrete control structure used for the feedback controller. This paper also presents an approximate design procedure with relationships for the optimal weights for the selected feedback control structure. These weights are selected to meet control design guidelines for high-alpha flight controls. Those guidelines that apply to the longitudinal-control design are also summarized. A unique approach is presented for the feed-forward command generator to obtain smooth transitions between load factor and alpha commands. Finally, representative linear analysis results and nonlinear batch simulation results are provided.

  2. Parameter identification for X-31A at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, S.; Rohlf, D.; Plaetschke, Ermin

    1994-01-01

    The U.S./German experimental aircraft X-31A was designed and constructed to demonstrate enhanced fighter maneuverability. Post-stall maneuvering is enabled by applying new technologies such as high angle of attack aerodynamics and flight control system integrated thrust vectoring. Two demonstrator aircraft have been built by the main contractors, Rockwell International and Deutsche Aerospace (formerly MBB). Flight testing started in October 1990 and before the end of 1992 both aircraft had accomplished a significant number of flights covering the entire AoA regime from about -5 to 70 deg. Throughout the envelope expansion, DLR Institute of Flight Mechanics conducted parameter identification (PID) to determine the aerodynamic parameters of the aircraft from flight test data and to compare the results to the predictions from the aerodynamic dataset (ADS). The application of system identification to high AoA / post-stall flight data raises some major problems, which are discussed in this paper. Results from both longitudinal and lateral-directional motion will be presented.

  3. Implications of scale effect for the prediction of high angle of attack aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, C. D.; Krus, P.; Jouannet, C.

    2005-04-01

    Scale effect is of significance in all experimental aerodynamics testing. At high angles of attack such issues as Reynolds and Mach number scaling are further complicated by the presence of complex, unsteady separated flow structures. The understanding and quantification of such flow effects remains a substantial challenge to the combat aircraft designer. The challenge, especially during conceptual and preliminary design stages, is to obtain sufficiently accurate information to make relevant design decisions, addressing potential weaknesses before proceeding to detail design. The focus in the present review is on the application of the water tunnel in such cases. The combination of qualitative and quantitative data obtainable from the water tunnel provides a useful complement to other tools during the early design stages. The effect of Reynolds number in particular is however critical; and appreciation of its effects are critical to the effective use of such a tool. It is shown however that for certain configurations such effects can be small in comparison to other experimental effects.

  4. Experimental study of effects of forebody geometry on high angle of attack static and dynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, J. M.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    A series of low speed wind tunnel tests on a generic fighter model with a cylindrical fuselage were made to investigate the effects of forebody shape on static and dynamic lateral/directional stability. Five forebodies, including a chine nose of unconventional cross-sectional shape, were tested. Conventional force tests were conducted to determine static stability characteristics and single degree-of-freedom free-to-roll tests were used to study the wing rock susceptibility of the model with the various forebodies. Flow visualization data were obtained to aid in analysis of the complex flow phenomena involved. The results show that forebody cross-sectional shape can strongly effect both static and dynamic (roll) stability at high angles of attack. Large variations in stability were obtained for the various forebody geometries. These characteristics result from the impact of cross-sectional shape on forebody vortex development, the behavior of the vortices at sideslip conditions, and their interaction with the wing and empennage flow fields.

  5. Vortex force generation of an impulsively started wing at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiang; Wang, Fuxin; Liu, Hong; Qin, Suyang; Xiang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    A wing at high angle of attack (AoA) impulsively started from rest is a fundamental motion employed by insects during flight. Previous studies have almost solely focused on the lift enhancement by the leading-edge vortex (LEV). However, the influences of the starting vortex and secondary vortex on both the lift and drag generation have been less studied. In this paper, the vorticity fields for three AoAs of 45°, 58.5° and 72° are obtained numerically. The roles of the LEV, starting vortex and secondary vortex in generating the lift and drag are quantitatively studied using the vorticity moment theory. It is revealed that the LEV provides positive lift whereas the starting vortex and secondary vortex provide negative lift during the whole motion. The negative lift produced by the starting vortex or secondary vortex is not trivial and cannot be ignored. Regarding the drag, the LEV reduces the total drag whereas the starting vortex, the secondary vortex increases the total drag. As the AoA increases, the drag resulting from the starting vortex increases quickly and comprises almost all the total drag for the AoA of 72°. The relations between the motion of the vortical structures and the forces are also investigated. Financial support from the State Key Development Program of Basic Research of China (2014CB744802) is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. DVCS amplitude with kinematical twist-3 terms

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, A.V.; Weiss, C.

    2000-08-01

    The authors compute the amplitude of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) using the calculus of QCD string operators in coordinate representation. To restore the electromagnetic gauge invariance (transversality) of the twist-2 amplitude they include the operators of twist-3 which appear as total derivatives of twist-2 operators. The results are equivalent to a Wandzura-Wilczek approximation for twist-3 skewed parton distributions. They find that this approximation gives a finite result for the amplitude of a longitudinally polarized virtual photon, while the amplitude for transverse polarization is divergent, i.e., factorization breaks down in this term.

  7. Application of piloted simulation to high-angle-of-attack flight-dynamics research for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1992-01-01

    The use of piloted simulation at Langley Research Center as part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), which was created to provide concepts and methods for the design of advanced fighter aircraft, is reviewed. A major research activity within this program is the development of the design processes required to take advantage of the benefits of advanced control concepts for high angle of attack agility. Fundamental methodologies associated with the effective use of piloted simulation for this research are described, particularly those relating to the test techniques, validation of the test results, and design guideline/criteria development.

  8. Application of Piloted Simulation to High-Angle-of-Attack Flight-Dynamics Research for Fighter Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of piloted simulation at Langley Research Center as part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), which was created to provide concepts and methods for the design of advanced fighter aircraft. A major research activity within this program is the development of the design processes required to take advantage of the benefits of advanced control concepts for high-angle-of-attack agility. Fundamental methodologies associated with the effective use of piloted simulation for this research are described, particularly those relating to the test techniques, validation of the test results, and design guideline/criteria development.

  9. Development of a preliminary high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control requirement for high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Luat T.; Foster, John V.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements for high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control for advanced high-performance aircraft are discussed. Background information on fundamental factors that influence and, to a large extent, determine the high angle-of-attack nose-down control requirement is briefly reviewed. Guidelines currently proposed by other sources which attempt to define these requirements are discussed. A requirement based on NASA analysis of the characteristics of existing relaxed static stability (RSS) aircraft is presented. This analysis could provide the basis for a preliminary design guide.

  10. Development of high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control margin design guidelines for combat aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A broad research program to identify maneuvering requirements for advanced fighters and the corresponding design criteria to aid in making critical design tradeoffs is being conducted under the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). As part of this activity, NASA and the U.S. Navy are conducting cooperative research to develop high-angle-of-attack control margin requirements. This paper will summarize the status of this program. Following some background information, the simulation study conducted to develop a set of preliminary guidelines for nose-down pitch control is reviewed, and the results of some very limited flight tests are described.

  11. Identification of an unsteady aerodynamic model up to high angle of attack regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yigang

    1997-12-01

    those from references, a state-space model is developed to describe the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics up to the high angle of attack regime. A nondimensional coordinate is introduced as the state variable describing the flow separation or vortex burst. First-order differential equation is used to govern the dynamics of flow separation or vortex bursting through this state variable. To be valid for general configurations, Taylor series expansions in terms of the input variables are used in the determination of aerodynamic characteristics, resembling the current approach of the stability derivatives. However, these derivatives are longer constant. They are dependent on the state variable of flow separation or vortex burst. In this way, the changes in stability derivatives with the angle of attack are included dynamically. The performance of the model is then validated by the wind-tunnel measurements of an NACA 0015 airfoil, a 70sp° delta wing and, finally two F-18 aircraft configurations. The results obtained show that within the framework of the proposed model, it is possible to obtain good agreement with different unsteady wind tunnel data in high angle-of-attack regime.

  12. A demonstration of passive blade twist control using extension-twist coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, R. C.; Nixon, M. W.; Wilbur, M. L.; Singleton, J. D.; Mirick, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of passive blade twist control using an extension-twist-coupled composite rotor blade design has been demonstrated. A set of low-twist model-scale helicopter rotor blades has been manufactured from existing molds with the objective of demonstrating this control concept. Hover testing of the set of blades demonstrated maximum twist changes of 5.24 deg for the ballasted blade configuration, and 2.54 deg for the unballasted configurations in the atmospheric test condition. These results compared well with those obtained from a detailed FEM analysis of the rotor blade. Aerodynamic-induced effects on the blade elastic twist were found to be minimal.

  13. Twisting Graphene into Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kit, Oleg O.; Tallinen, Tuomas; Mahadevan, L.; Timonen, Jussi; Koskinen, Pekka

    2012-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes are usually described as being rolled up from graphene sheets; this process, however, have never been realized experimentally. We showed that graphene can indeed be transformed into nanotube by twisting [1]. Further, we showed that tube formation can be well-explained within classical theory of elasticity---in fact the very mechanism of tube formation can be observed by twisting a strap from one's backpack (try now!). Furthermore, we showed that nanotube chirality may not only be predicted, but can also be controlled externally. The quantum molecular dynamic simulations at T=300K were achieved thanks to the revised periodic boundary conditions (RPBC) approach [2-3]. The structures similar to simulated have been recently observed experimentally [4]. This novel rote for nanotube formation opens new opportunities in nanomaterial manipulation not restricted to carbon alone. In the presentation, I will describe tube formation, as well as outline the easy and efficient technique for distorted nanostructures simulation, the RPBC approach. [4pt] [1] O. O. Kit et al. arXiv:1108.0048[0pt] [2] P. Koskinen & O. O. Kit PRL 105, 106401 (2010)[0pt] [3] O. O. Kit, L. Pastewka, P. Koskinen PRB 84, 155431 (2011)[0pt] [4] A. Chuvilin et al. Nature Materials 10, 687 (2011)

  14. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantino, Nicolas; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2016-03-01

    Topological order in two-dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations—anyons—and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization—termed symmetry enriched topological order. When the global symmetry group G, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors—i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon—one can imagine a local version of the action of G around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with the second cohomology group {H}2(G,{{ A }}{{abelian}}) being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group G possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of G, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic ‘twist’ defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele (2014 Phys. Rev. B 90 184418), we construct a wide class of exactly-solvable models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  15. Twisting of glycosidic bonds by hydrolases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patterns of scissile bond twisting have been found in crystal structures of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that are complexed with substrates and inhibitors. To estimate the increased potential energy in the substrates that results from this twisting, we have plotted torsion angles for the scissile bond...

  16. STOUT SMEARING FOR TWISTED FERMIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOLZ,W.; JANSEN, K.; McNEILE, C.; MONTVAY, I.; RICHARDS, C.; URBACH, C.; WENGER, U.

    2007-07-30

    The effect of Stout smearing is investigated in numerical simulations with twisted mass Wilson quarks. The phase transition near zero quark mass is studied on 12{sup 3} x 24, 16{sup 3} x 32 and 24{sup 3} x 48 lattices at lattice spacings a {approx_equal} 0.1-0.125 fm. The phase structure of Wilson fermions with twisted mass ({mu}) has been investigated in [1,2]. As it is explained there, the observed first order phase transition limits the minimal pion mass which can be reached in simulations at a given lattice spacing: m{sub k}{sup min} {approx_equal} {theta}(a). The phase structure is schematically depicted in the left panel of Fig. I . The phase transition can be observed in simulations with twisted mass fermions, for instance, as a ''jump'' or even metastabilities in the average plaquette value as a function of the hopping parameter ({kappa}). One possibility to weaken the phase transition and therefore allow for lighter pion masses at a given lattice spacing is to use an improved gauge action like the DBW2, Iwasaki, or tree-level Symanzik (tlSym) improved gauge action instead of the simple Wilson gauge action. This has been successfully demonstrated in [3,4,5]. Here we report on our attempts to use a smeared gauge field in the fermion lattice Dirac operator to further reduce the strength of the phase transition. This is relevant in simulations with N{sub f} = 2 + 1 + 1 (u,d,s,c) quark flavors [6] where the first order phase transition becomes stronger compared to N{sub f} = 2 simulations. The main impact of the above mentioned improved gauge actions on the gauge fields occurring in simulations is to suppress short range fluctuations (''dislocations'') and the associated ''exceptionally small'' eigenvalues of the fermion matrix. The same effect is expected from smearing the gauge field links in the fermion action. The cumulated effect of the improved gauge action and smeared links should allow for a smaller pion mass at a given lattice spacing and volume. Our

  17. Comparison of X-31 Flight and Ground-Based Yawing Moment Asymmetries at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.; Croom, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries caused position saturations of the thrust-vectoring vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some stability-axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. The two test aircraft had different asymmetry characteristics, and ship two has asymmetries that vary as a function of Reynolds number. Several aerodynamic modifications have been made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. These modifications include adding transition strips on the forebody and noseboom, using two different length strakes, and increasing nose bluntness. Ultimately, a combination of forebody strakes, nose blunting, and noseboom transition strips reduced the yawing moment asymmetry enough to fully expand the high-angle-of-attack envelope. Analysis of the X-31 flight data is reviewed and compared to wind-tunnel and water-tunnel measurements. Several lessons learned are outlined regarding high-angle-of-attack configuration design and ground testing.

  18. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Effect of grain orientation on mechanical properties and thermomechanical response of Sn-based solder interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hongtao; Yan, Bingbing; Yang, Ming; Ma, Xin; Li, Mingyu

    2013-11-15

    The thermomechanical response of Sn-based solder interconnects with differently oriented grains was investigated by electron backscattered diffraction technique under thermal cycling and thermal shock testing in this study. The results showed that deformation and cracking of solder interconnects have a close relationship with the unique characteristics of grain orientation and boundaries in each solder interconnect, and deformation was frequently confined within the high-angle grain boundaries. The micro Vickers hardness testing results showed that the hardness varied significantly depending on the grain orientation and structure, and deformation twins can be induced around the indents by the indentation testing. - Highlights: • Thermomechanical response shows a close relationship with the grain structure. • Deformation was frequently confined within the high-angle grain boundaries. • Different grain orientations exhibit different hardness. • Deformation twins can be induced around the indents in SAC105 solder interconnects.

  1. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; Pinner, David

    2016-03-01

    Folded supersymmetry ( f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. These models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.

  2. Block Copolymers with a Twist

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, R.; Chiang, Y; Chen, C; Wang, H; Hasegawa, H; Akasaka, S; Thomas, E; Burger, C; Hsiao, B

    2009-01-01

    Chiral block copolymers (BCPs*) comprising chiral entities were designed to fabricate helical architectures (i.e., twisted morphologies) from self-assembly. A new helical phase (H*) with P622 symmetry was discovered in the self-assembly of poly(styrene)-b-poly(l-lactide) (PS-PLLA) BCPs*. Hexagonally packed, interdigitated PLLA helical microdomains in a PS matrix were directly visualized by electron tomography. The phase diagram of the PS-PLLA BCPs* was also established. Phase transitions from the H* phase to the stable cylinder and gyroid phases were found after long-time annealing, suggesting that the H* is a long-lived metastable phase. In contrast to racemic poly(styrene)-b-poly(d,l-lactide) BCPs, chiral interaction significantly enhances the incompatibility between achiral PS and chiral PLLA blocks in the PS-PLLA BCPs* and can be estimated through the determination of the interaction parameter.

  3. A demonstration of passive blade twist control using extension-twist coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Nixon, Mark W.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Mirick, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    The results from a study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of extension-twist coupling are presented. A set of low twist model-scale helicopter rotor blades was manufactured with a view towards demonstrating the passive blade twist control concept. Hover testing of the blades was conducted to measure the change in blade twist as a function of rotor speed. The blades were spun through the 0-800 rpm range, with a corresponding sweep of collective pitch to determine the effect on the blade elastic twist. Hover data were obtained for both a ballasted and unballasted blade configuration in atmospheric conditions, where maximum twist changes of 2.54 and 5.24 degrees were respectively observed. These results compared well with those from a finite element analysis of the blade, which yielded maximum twists of 3.01 and 5.61 degrees for the unballasted and ballasted blade configurations, respectively. The aerodynamic-induced effects on the blade elastic twist, determined by testing a ballasted blade configuration in a near-vacuum condition, were found to be minimal with a maximum twist difference of 0.17 degrees observed between the two test environments. The effect of collective pitch sweep on the elastic twist was minimal.

  4. Cable twisting due to atmospheric icing

    SciTech Connect

    McComber, P.; Druez, J.; Savadjiev, K.

    1995-12-31

    Samples of ice accretions collected on cables of overhead transmission lines have shown evidence of twisting of the cable during atmospheric icing. Previous work has attributed cable twisting to the torque created by the weight of an eccentric ice shape and by wind forces. However, testing of stranded cables and conductors has shown that such cables also twist when there is a change in tension in the cable span. This phenomenon is related to the interaction of the different strand layers under tension. When a cable is subjected to atmospheric icing, cable tension increases and this type of twisting should also be considered. In order to determine how the two types of twisting would compare on transmission lines, a numerical simulation was made using characteristics of a typical 35-mm stranded conductor. The twist angle was computed as a function of cable span, sag to span ratio and increasing ice loads. The simulation shows that for transmission lines, twisting due to varying tension will be significant. Since cable tension is influenced by wind speed and ambient temperature as well as ice load, this phenomenon, unless prevented, results in ice accretion more circular in shape and hence eventually in larger ice loads.

  5. Simulating Topological Defects in Twisted Fiber Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruss, Isaac R.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2012-02-01

    Twisted bundles are a common motif found in naturally occurring structures of self-assembled fibers, such as collagen and fibrin. By understanding the general principles governing such organizations, new synthetic materials--from the nano to the macroscale--may also be realized. Recently, continuum elasticity theory has been applied to describe generic twisted fiber bundles. This has revealed a relation between a bundle's twist and the presence of topological defects in the cross-sectional packing of the fibers. Here we employ numerical simulations to examine this interdependence. We model a bundle's cross-section as beads confined to a plane. The interactions between beads is governed by a modified Lennard-Jones potential that accounts for the effects of twist. We observe configurations that range from perfect hexagonal packing for cases of no twist, to defect populated structures above a critical amount of twist. For small bundles of less than ˜100 beads, there exists a discrete spectrum of energy ground states corresponding to integer numbers of five-fold disclinations. For larger bundles, we hope to uncover what types of defect arrangements effectively screen the stresses caused by twist, and compare these to current predictions of the internal organization of collagen fibrils.

  6. DYNAMICS OF STRONGLY TWISTED RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Parfrey, Kyle; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hui, Lam

    2013-09-10

    Magnetar magnetospheres are believed to be strongly twisted due to shearing of the stellar crust by internal magnetic stresses. We present time-dependent axisymmetric simulations showing in detail the evolution of relativistic force-free magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. When the twist amplitude is small, the magnetosphere moves quasi-statically through a sequence of equilibria of increasing free energy. At some twist amplitude the magnetosphere becomes tearing-mode unstable to forming a resistive current sheet, initiating large-scale magnetic reconnection in which a significant fraction of the magnetic free energy can be dissipated. This ''critical'' twist angle is insensitive to the resistive length scale. Rapid shearing temporarily stabilizes the magnetosphere beyond the critical angle, allowing the magnetosphere of a rapidly differentially rotating star to store and dissipate more free energy. In addition to these effects, shearing the surface of a rotating star increases the spindown torque applied to the star. If shearing is much slower than rotation, the resulting spikes in spindown rate can occur on timescales anywhere from the long twisting timescale to the stellar spin period or shorter, depending both on the stellar shear distribution and the existing distribution of magnetospheric twists. A model in which energy is stored in the magnetosphere and released by a magnetospheric instability therefore predicts large changes in the measured spindown rate before soft gamma repeater giant flares.

  7. High-angle faults control the geometry and morphology of the Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Nixon, Casey; Duclaux, Guillaume; Gawthorpe, Robert; McNeill, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The Corinth Rift is one of the most actively extending basins on Earth, with modern-day GPS extension rates of up to 15 mm/yr. The structure of the onshore and offshore parts of the rift has been intensely studied, however controversy remains as to the geometry of faults at depth. The rift has long been described as experiencing low-angle (< 30°) active faulting. The presence of an active low-angle detachment has been proposed from an interpreted cloud of microseismicity dipping at 12-20° at depths of 8-11 km. In contrast, others suggest that this microseismicity marks the brittle-ductile transition or that any detachment is incipient, and that low-angle faulting is not required to explain extension across the rift. This has led to an alternative interpretation where faults remain dipping at angles of 45-60°, as observed onshore, to the brittle-ductile transition depth. Other interpretations from seismic reflection data suggest that faults may be non-planar, being high angle at shallow depths (< ~3 km) and then shallowing in dip to 25-45° at greater depths. One observation that the various fault models must be able to honour is the long-term vertical deformation pattern and geomorphology across the Corinth Rift such as: high uplift rates along the southern margin (1-2 mm/yr); offshore basement descending to depths of 3 km; and a northern margin that is generally stable or subsiding. We compute the surface uplift and subsidence for faults of different geometries to assess which deep fault geometries can best recreate the first-order vertical deformation characteristics of the Corinth Rift. Slip rates appropriate for southern margin faults have been applied to model the deformation field over timescales of 1 Ma. We use PyLith, an open-source finite-element code for quasi-static viscoelastic simulations of crustal deformation. We model the uplift and subsidence fields associated with the following fault geometries: i) planar faults with dips of 45-60° that sole

  8. Large-Vortex Capture by a Wing at Very High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. M.; Wu, J. Z.; Denny, G. A.; Lu, X. Y.

    1996-01-01

    In generating the lift on a wing, the static stall is a severe barrier. As the angle of attack, alpha, increases to the stall angle, alpha(sub stall) the flow separation point on the upper surface of the wing moves to the leading edge, so that on a two-dimensional airfoil or a large-aspect-ratio wing, the lift abruptly drops to a very low level. Therefore, the first generation of aeronautical flow type, i.e., the attached steady flow, has been limited to alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Owing to the obvious importance in applications, therefore, a great effort has been made in the past two decades to enlarge the range of usable angles of attack by various flow controls for a large-aspect-ratio wing. Basically, relevant works fall into two categories. The first category is usually refereed to as separation control, which concentrates on partially separated flow at alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Since the first experimental study of Collins and Zelenevitz, there has been ample literature showing that a partially separated flow can be turned to almost fully attached by flow controls, so that the lift is recovered and the stall is delayed (for a recent work see Seifert et al.). It has been well established that, in this category, unsteady controls are much more effective than steady ones and can be realized at a very low power-input level (Wu et al.; Seifert et al.). The second and more ambitious category of relevant efforts is the post-stall lift enhancement. Its possibility roots at the existence of a second lift peak at a very high angle of attack. In fact, As alpha further increases from alpha(sub stall), the completely separated flow develops and gradually becomes a bluff-body flow. This flow gives a normal force to the airfoil with a lift component, which reaches a peak at a maximum utilizable angle of attack, alpha(sub m) approx.= 40 deg. This second peak is of the same level as the first lift peak at alpha(sub stall). Meanwhile, the drag is also quickly

  9. Search for Mechanically-Induced Grain Morphology Changes in Oxygen Free Electrolytic (OFE) Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Jennifer; /SLAC

    2006-08-18

    The deformation of the microscopic, pure metal grains (0.1 to > 1 millimeter) in the copper cells of accelerator structures decreases the power handling capabilities of the structures. The extent of deformation caused by mechanical fabrication damage is the focus of this study. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of a bonded test stack of six accelerating cells at magnifications of 30, 100, 1000 were taken before simulated mechanical damage was done. After a 2{sup o}-3{sup o} twist was manually applied to the test stack, the cells were cut apart and SEM imaged separately at the same set magnifications (30, 100, and 1000), to examine any effects of the mechanical stress. Images of the cells after the twist were compared to the images of the stack end (cell 60) before the twist. Despite immense radial damage to the end cell from the process of twisting, SEM imaging showed no change in grain morphology from images taken before the damage: copper grains retained shape and the voids at the grain boundaries stay put. Likewise, the inner cells of the test stack showed similar grain consistency to that of the end cell before the twist was applied. Hence, there is no mechanical deformation observed on grains in the aperture disk, either for radial stress or for rotational stress. Furthermore, the high malleability of copper apparently absorbed stress and strain very well without deforming the grain structure in the surface.

  10. Low-energy, Mobile Grain Boundaries in Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangli; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The strong basal texture that is commonly developed during the rolling of magnesium alloy and can even increase during annealing motivates atomic-level study of dislocation structures of both <0001> tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) in Magnesium. Both symmetrical tilt and twist GBs over the entire range of rotation angles θ between 0° and 60° are found to have an ordered atomic structure and can be described with grain boundary dislocation models. In particular, 30° tilt and twist GBs are corresponding to energy minima. The 30° tilt GB is characterized with an array of Shockley partial dislocations bp:-bp on every basal plane and the 30° twist GB is characterized with a stacking faulted structure. More interesting, molecular dynamics simulations explored that both 30° tilt and twist GBs are highly mobile associated with collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations. This could be responsible for the formation of the strong basal texture and a significant number of 30° misorientation GBs in Mg alloy during grain growth. PMID:26891595

  11. Low-energy, Mobile Grain Boundaries in Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangli; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The strong basal texture that is commonly developed during the rolling of magnesium alloy and can even increase during annealing motivates atomic-level study of dislocation structures of both <0001> tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) in Magnesium. Both symmetrical tilt and twist GBs over the entire range of rotation angles θ between 0° and 60° are found to have an ordered atomic structure and can be described with grain boundary dislocation models. In particular, 30° tilt and twist GBs are corresponding to energy minima. The 30° tilt GB is characterized with an array of Shockley partial dislocations bp:-bp on every basal plane and the 30° twist GB is characterized with a stacking faulted structure. More interesting, molecular dynamics simulations explored that both 30° tilt and twist GBs are highly mobile associated with collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations. This could be responsible for the formation of the strong basal texture and a significant number of 30° misorientation GBs in Mg alloy during grain growth. PMID:26891595

  12. Low-energy, Mobile Grain Boundaries in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangli; Wang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    The strong basal texture that is commonly developed during the rolling of magnesium alloy and can even increase during annealing motivates atomic-level study of dislocation structures of both <0001> tilt and twist grain boundaries (GBs) in Magnesium. Both symmetrical tilt and twist GBs over the entire range of rotation angles θ between 0° and 60° are found to have an ordered atomic structure and can be described with grain boundary dislocation models. In particular, 30° tilt and twist GBs are corresponding to energy minima. The 30° tilt GB is characterized with an array of Shockley partial dislocations bp:-bp on every basal plane and the 30° twist GB is characterized with a stacking faulted structure. More interesting, molecular dynamics simulations explored that both 30° tilt and twist GBs are highly mobile associated with collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations. This could be responsible for the formation of the strong basal texture and a significant number of 30° misorientation GBs in Mg alloy during grain growth.

  13. Twisted spectral geometry for the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinetti, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    In noncommutative geometry, the spectral triple of a manifold does not generate bosonic fields, for fluctuations of the Dirac operator vanish. A Connes-Moscovici twist forces the commutative algebra to be multiplied by matrices. Keeping the space of spinors untouched, twisted-fluctuations then yield perturbations of the spin connection. Applied to the spectral triple of the Standard Model, a similar twist yields the scalar field needed to stabilize the vacuum and to make the computation of the Higgs mass compatible with its experimental value.

  14. Nanomechanical Energy Storage in Twisted Nanotube Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, David; Fthenakis, Zacharias G.; Seifert, Gotthard; Tománek, David

    2012-12-01

    We determine the deformation energetics and energy density of twisted carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes that effectively constitute a torsional spring. Using ab initio and parametrized density functional calculations, we identify structural changes in these systems and determine their elastic limits. The deformation energy of twisted nanotube ropes contains contributions associated not only with twisting but also with stretching, bending, and compression of individual nanotubes. We quantify these energy contributions and show that their relative role changes with the number of nanotubes in the rope.

  15. Study on grain boundary character and strain distribution of intergranular cracking in the CGHAZ of T23 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Y.J.; Lu, H. Yu, C.; Xu, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Intergranular reheat cracking in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone of T23 steel was produced by strain to fracture tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermal–mechanical simulator. Then the grain boundary character, as well as the strain distribution after reheat crack propagation, was studied by electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results showed that incoherent Σ3 boundaries were seldom found on the prior austenite grain boundaries. Therefore, only the type of random high-angle boundaries played a crucial role in the intergranular cracking. Microstructurally cavities and small cracks were preferentially initiated from high-angle grain boundaries. Low-angle grain boundaries and high-angle ones with misorientation angles less than 15° were more resistant to the cracking. More importantly, the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries increased with the plastic strain induced by both temperature gradient and stress in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone, which contributed to the crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, the strain distributions in the vicinity of cavities and cracks revealed the accommodation processes of plastic deformation during stress relaxation. It also reflected the strength differences between grain interior and grain boundary at different heat-treated temperatures, which had a large influence on the cracking mechanism. - Highlights: • The coincidence site lattice boundaries play little role in the reheat cracking. • Cavity and crack occur at high-angle grain boundaries rather than low-angle ones. • The strain leads low-angle grain boundaries to transform to high-angle ones. • Strain distribution differs for cavity and crack zones at different temperatures.

  16. Twist1 Is Essential for Tooth Morphogenesis and Odontoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tian; Huang, Yanyu; Wang, Suzhen; Zhang, Hua; Dechow, Paul C; Wang, Xiaofang; Qin, Chunlin; Shi, Bing; D'Souza, Rena N; Lu, Yongbo

    2015-12-01

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix-containing transcription factor that is expressed in the dental mesenchyme during the early stages of tooth development. To better delineate its roles in tooth development, we generated Twist1 conditional knockout embryos (Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl)) by breeding Twist1 floxed mice (Twist1(fl/fl)) with Twist2-Cre recombinase knockin mice (Twist2(Cre) (/+)). The Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) embryos formed smaller tooth germs and abnormal cusps during early tooth morphogenesis. Molecular and histological analyses showed that the developing molars of the Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) embryos had reduced cell proliferation and expression of fibroblast growth factors 3, 4, 9, and 10 and FGF receptors 1 and 2 in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme. In addition, 3-week-old renal capsular transplants of embryonic day 18.5 Twist2(Cre) (/+);Twist1(fl/fl) molars showed malformed crowns and cusps with defective crown dentin and enamel. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the implanted mutant molars had defects in odontoblast differentiation and delayed ameloblast differentiation. Furthermore, in vitro ChIP assays demonstrated that Twist1 was able to bind to a specific region of the Fgf10 promoter. In conclusion, our findings suggest that Twist1 plays crucial roles in regulating tooth development and that it may exert its functions through the FGF signaling pathway. PMID:26487719

  17. Wind-tunnel research comparing lateral control devices, particularly at high angles of attack VI : skewed ailerons on rectangular wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Harris, Thomas A

    1934-01-01

    This report covers the sixth of a series of investigations in which various lateral control devices are compared with particular reference to their effectiveness at high angles of attack. The present report deals with flap-type ailerons hinged about axes having an angle with respect to the leading and trailing edges of the wing. Tests were made on four different skewed ailerons, including two different angles of skew and two sizes of ailerons. At the high angles of attack, all the skewed ailerons tested were slightly inferior with respect to rolling and yawing moments to straight ailerons having the same span and average chord. Computations indicate that the skewed ailerons are also inferior with respect to hinge moments.

  18. Investigation of Model Wake Blockage Effects at High Angles of Attack in Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, Lih-Shyng; Chuang, Shu-Hao

    To improve the fidelity of measured aerodynamic characteristics at high angle of attack for modern jet fighters, this paper examines the model wake blockage effect. The wake blockage effect in a 2.2×3.1 m low-speed wind tunnel is investigated by analyzing drag and wall pressure measurements. Circular flat plates of different sizes are used to simulate a test model at high angles of attack. The present analysis results in simple formulas for corrections of model wake blockage effect. To verify the present correction formula, the NASA TP-1803 model is force-tested in the tunnel. The corrected test data agree well with the NASA TP-1803 data.

  19. Simultaneous investigation of magnetoresistance (MR) and twisted angle of twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Ju; Manzo, Julio; Kim, Kyung Ho; Park, Min; Baek, Seung Jae; Kholin, Dmitry; Lee, Min Woo; Choi, Eun Sang; Jeong, Dae Hong; Yurgens, August; Drndic, Maria; Johnson, Alan; Park, Yung Woo

    2013-03-01

    We have measured magnetoresistance (MR) and twisted angle of twisted bilayer graphene, simultaneously. Twisted angle was measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction experiment on SiNx substrate. We performed Raman spectroscopy experiment and observed enhanced G mode which results from double resonance scattering process near van Hove singularity (vHs). MR shows superposition of two Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) oscillations and is analyzed by Landau fan diagram.

  20. AEROX: Computer program for transonic aircraft aerodynamics to high angles of attack. Volume 1: Aerodynamic methods and program users' guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The AEROX program estimates lift, induced-drag and pitching moments to high angles (typ. 60 deg) for wings and for wingbody combinations with or without an aft horizontal tail. Minimum drag coefficients are not estimated, but may be input for inclusion in the total aerodynamic parameters which are output in listed and plotted formats. The theory, users' guide, test cases, and program listing are presented.

  1. Flutter Clearance of the F-18 High-angle-of-attack Research Vehicle with Experimental Wingtip Instrumentation Pods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    1989-01-01

    An F-18 aircraft was modified with wingtip instrumentation pods for use in NASA's high-angle-of-attack research program. Ground vibration and flight flutter testing were performed to clear an acceptable flight envelope for the aircraft. Flight test utilized atmospheric turbulence for structural excitation; the aircraft displayed no adverse aeroelastic trends within the envelope tested. The data presented in this report include mode shapes from the ground vibration and estimates of frequency and damping as a function of Mach number.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, R.; Tao, X. M.; Xu, B. G.

    2016-04-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System

    PubMed Central

    Yin, R.; Tao, X. M.; Xu, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters. PMID:27079187

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System.

    PubMed

    Yin, R; Tao, X M; Xu, B G

    2016-01-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters. PMID:27079187

  5. Status of the validation of high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control margin design guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Wilson, R. J.; Lackey, James B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of results obtained to date in an ongoing cooperative research program between NASA and the U.S. Navy to develop design criteria for high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control for combat aircraft. A fundamental design consideration for aircraft incorporating relaxed static stability in pitch is the level of stability which achieves a proper balance between high-speed performance considerations and low-speed requirements for maneuvering at high angles of attack. A comprehensive data base of piloted simulation results was generated for parametric variations of critical parameters affecting nose-down control capability. The results showed a strong correlation of pilot rating to the short-term pitch response for nose-down commands applied at high-angle-of-attack conditions. Using these data, candidate design guidelines and flight demonstration requirements were defined. Full-scale flight testing to validate the research methodology and proposed guidelines is in progress, some preliminary results of which are reviewed.

  6. Status of the Validation of High-Angle-Of-Attack Nose-Down Pitch Control Margin Design Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Wilson, R. Joe; Lackey, James B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of results obtained to date in an ongoing cooperative research program between NASA and the U.S. Navy to develop design criteria for high-angle-of-attack nose- down pitch control for combat aircraft. A fundamental design consideration for aircraft incorporating relaxed static stability in pitch is the level of stability which achieves a proper balance between high- speed performance considerations and low-speed requirements for maneuvering at high angles of attack. A comprehensive data base of piloted simulation results was generated for parametric variations of critical parameters affecting nose-down control capability. The results showed a strong correlation of pilot rating to the short-term pitch response for nose-down commands applied at high- angle-of-attack conditions. Using these data, candidate design guidelines and flight demonstration requirements were defined. Full- scale flight testing to validate the research methodology and proposed guidelines is in progress, some preliminary results of which are reviewed.

  7. Deformed and twisted black holes with NUTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtouš, Pavel; Kubizňák, David; Frolov, Valeri P.; Kolář, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    We construct a new class of vacuum black hole solutions whose geometry is deformed and twisted by the presence of NUT charges. The solutions are obtained by ‘unspinning’ the general Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes, effectively switching off some of their rotation parameters. The resulting geometry has a structure of warped space with the Kerr-like Lorentzian part warped to a Euclidean metric of a deformed and/or twisted sphere, with the deformation and twist characterized by the ‘Euclidean NUT’ parameters. In the absence of NUTs, the solution reduces to a well known Kerr-(A)dS black hole with several rotations switched off. New geometries inherit the original symmetry of the Kerr-NUT-(A)dS family, namely, they possess the full Killing tower of hidden and explicit symmetries. As expected, for vanishing NUT, twist, and deformation parameters, the symmetry is further enlarged.

  8. New twisted intermetallic compound superconductor: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.; Brown, G. V.; Laurence, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Method for processing Nb3Sn and other intermetallic compound superconductors produces a twisted, stabilized wire or tube which can be used to wind electromagnetics, armatures, rotors, and field windings for motors and generators as well as other magnetic devices.

  9. Theory of twisted nonuniformly heated bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shorr, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    Nonlineary distributed stresses in twisted nonuniformly heated bars of arbitrary cross section are calculated taking into account various elasticity parameters. The approximate theory is shown to be sufficiently general and accurate by comparison with experimental data.

  10. Grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990--February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: Study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  11. Means for controlling aerodynamically induced twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A control mechanism which provides active compensation for aerodynamically induced twist deformation of high aspect ratio wings consists of a torque tube, internal to each wing and rigidly attached near the tip of each wing, which is moved by an actuator located in the aircraft fuselage. As changes in the aerodynamic loads on the wings occur the torque tube is rotated to compensate for the induced wing twist.

  12. Twisted Cucurbit[n]urils.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Qiu, Sheng-Chao; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Kai; Huang, Ying; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Yingjie; Li, Feng; Zhang, Yun-Qian; Xue, Sai-Feng; Zhu, Qian-Jiang; Tao, Zhu; Lindoy, Leonard F; Wei, Gang

    2016-08-19

    Two new twisted cucurbiturils, cucurbit[13]uril (tQ[13]) and cucurbit[15]uril (tQ[15]), have been synthesized and separated, and their structures have been confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry together with the X-ray structures of two new complexes, {Dy(H2O)4Cd(H2O)4tQ[13]}·2.5[CdCl4]·65H2O and {Cd0.5(H2O)2tQ[15]}·[CdCl4]·47H2O. tQ[15] is the largest cucurbit[n]uril (Q[n]) in the Q[n] family reported to date. The X-ray diffraction studies of both complexes indicated that these large tQ[n]s effectively exhibit two different cavities-a central cavity and two side cavities. Preliminary host-guest behavior by each of the new systems was investigated by NMR studies. PMID:27499014

  13. Bubble Divergences from Twisted Cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Smerlak, Matteo

    2012-06-01

    We consider a class of lattice topological field theories, among which are the weak-coupling limit of 2d Yang-Mills theory and 3d Riemannian quantum gravity, whose dynamical variables are flat discrete connections with compact structure group on a cell 2-complex. In these models, it is known that the path integral measure is ill-defined because of a phenomenon known as `bubble divergences'. In this paper, we extend recent results of the authors to the cases where these divergences cannot be understood in terms of cellular cohomology. We introduce in its place the relevant twisted cohomology, and use it to compute the divergence degree of the partition function. We also relate its dominant part to the Reidemeister torsion of the complex, thereby generalizing previous results of Barrett and Naish-Guzman. The main limitation to our approach is the presence of singularities in the representation variety of the fundamental group of the complex; we illustrate this issue in the well-known case of two-dimensional manifolds.

  14. Interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    There are few aspects of interstellar grains that can be unambiguously defined. Very little can be said that is independent of models or presuppositions; hence issues are raised and questions categorized, rather than providing definitive answers. The questions are issues fall into three general areas; the general physical and chemical nature of the grains; the processes by which they are formed and destroyed; and future observational approaches.

  15. Rheology of a Twist-bend Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salili, Seyyed Muhammad; Kim, Chanjoong; Sprunt, Samuel; Gleeson, James; Parri, Owain; Jakli, Antal; Kim Lab Team; Merck Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    First detailed flow shear alignment studies and rheological measurements in the twist-bend nematic (Ntb) liquid crystalline phase of odd numbered flexible dimer molecules is presented. It is found that the Ntb phase is strongly shear-thinning. At shear stresses below 1 Pa the apparent viscosity of the Ntb phase is 1000 times larger than in the nematic phase. At stresses above 10 Pa the Ntb viscosity drops by two orders of magnitude and the material exhibits Newtonian fluid behavior. The results are consistent with the behavior of a system with pseudo-layer structure with layer spacing determined by the heliconical pitch. From the measurements of dynamic modulus we estimate the compression modulus of the pseudo-layers to be B ~ 2 kPa this value is discussed within the context of a simple theoretical model based upon a coarse-grained elastic free energy. www.jakligroup.com.

  16. Fluctuation Modes of a Twist-Bend Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsouzi, Z.; Shamid, S. M.; Borshch, V.; Challa, P. K.; Baldwin, A. R.; Tamba, M. G.; Welch, C.; Mehl, G. H.; Gleeson, J. T.; Jakli, A.; Lavrentovich, O. D.; Allender, D. W.; Selinger, J. V.; Sprunt, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report a dynamic light-scattering study of the fluctuation modes in a thermotropic liquid crystalline mixture of monomer and dimer compounds that exhibits the twist-bend nematic (NTB ) phase. The results reveal a spectrum of overdamped fluctuations that includes two nonhydrodynamic modes and one hydrodynamic mode in the NTB phase, and a single nonhydrodynamic mode plus two hydrodynamic modes (the usual nematic optic axis or director fluctuations) in the higher temperature, uniaxial nematic phase. The properties of these fluctuations and the conditions for their observation are comprehensively explained by a Landau-de Gennes expansion of the free-energy density in terms of heliconical director and helical polarization fields that characterize the NTB structure, with the latter serving as the primary order parameter. A "coarse-graining" approximation simplifies the theoretical analysis and enables us to demonstrate quantitative agreement between the calculated and experimentally determined temperature dependence of the mode relaxation rates.

  17. Exotic Twisted Equivariant Cohomology of Loop Spaces, Twisted Bismut-Chern Character and T-Duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Mathai, Varghese

    2015-07-01

    We define exotic twisted - equivariant cohomology for the loop space LZ of a smooth manifold Z via the invariant differential forms on LZ with coefficients in the (typically non-flat) holonomy line bundle of a gerbe, with differential an equivariantly flat superconnection. We introduce the twisted Bismut-Chern character form, a loop space refinement of the twisted Chern character form in Bouwknegt et al. (Commun Math Phys 228:17-49, 2002) and Mathai and Stevenson (Commun Math Phys 236:161-186, 2003), which represents classes in the completed periodic exotic twisted -equivariant cohomology of LZ.We establish a localisation theorem for the completed periodic exotic twisted -equivariant cohomology for loop spaces and apply it to establish T-duality in a background flux in type II String Theory from a loop space perspective.

  18. A twist of insight - the role of Twist-family bHLH factors in development

    PubMed Central

    BARNES, RALSTON M.; FIRULLI, ANTHONY B.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Twist-family of bHLH proteins play a pivotal role in a number of essential developmental programs. Twist-family bHLH proteins function by dimerizing with other bHLH members and binding to cis- regulatory elements, called E-boxes. While Twist-family members may simply exhibit a preference in terms of high-affinity binding partners, a complex, multilevel cascade of regulation creates a dynamic role for these bHLH proteins. We summarize in this review information on each Twist-family member concerning expression pattern, function, regulation, downstream targets, and interactions with other bHLH proteins. Additionally, we focus on the phospho-regulatory mechanisms that tightly control posttranslational modification of Twist-family member bHLH proteins. PMID:19378251

  19. High angle of attack control law development for a free-flight wind tunnel model using direct eigenstructure assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, Thomas R.; Boland, Joseph R.; Hahne, David E.

    1991-01-01

    Flight-control laws are developed for a wind-tunnel aircraft model flying at a high angle of attack by using a synthesis technique called direct eigenstructure assignment. The method employs flight guidelines and control-power constraints to develop the control laws, and gain schedules and nonlinear feedback compensation provide a framework for considering the nonlinear nature of the attack angle. Linear and nonlinear evaluations show that the control laws are effective, a conclusion that is further confirmed by a scale model used for free-flight testing.

  20. Survey of needs and capabilities for wind tunnel testing of dynamic stability of aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlik-Ruckemann, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey was conducted relative to future requirements for dynamic stability information for such aerospace vehicles as the space shuttle and advanced high performance military aircraft. High-angle-of-attack and high-Reynolds number conditions were emphasized. A review was made of the wind-tunnel capabilities in North America for measuring dynamic stability derivatives, revealing an almost total lack of capabilities that could satisfy these requirements. Recommendations are made regarding equipment that should be constructed to remedy this situation. A description is given of some of the more advanced existing capabilities, which can be used to at least partly satisfy immediate demands.

  1. Grain boundary diffusion in olivine (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, K.; Dohmen, R.

    2013-12-01

    . Grain boundary diffusion perpendicular to the dislocation lines of the small angle grain boundaries proved to be about an order of magnitude faster than volume diffusion, whereas diffusion in high angle grain boundaries is several orders of magnitude faster. We will discuss the variation of element diffusion rates with grain boundary orientation and the temperature- and/or time-induced transition from one diffusion regime to the next regime. This is done using time series experiments and two-dimensional grain boundary diffusion simulations. Finally, we will debate the differences between our data and other data sets that result from different experimental setups, conditions and analyses.

  2. Twist transition of nematic hyperbolic hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    James, Richard; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2014-04-01

    Stability of an idealized hyperbolic hedgehog in a nematic liquid crystal against a twist transition is investigated by extending the methodology of Rüdinger and Stark [Liq. Cryst. 26, 753 (1999)], where the hedgehog is confined between two concentric spheres. In the ideal hyperbolic-hedgehog the molecular orientation is assumed to rotate proportionally with respect to the inclination angle, θ (and in the opposite sense). However, when splay, k11, and bend, k33, moduli differ this proportionality is lost and the liquid crystal deforms relative to the ideal with bend and splay. Although slight, these deformations are shown to significantly shift the transition if k11/k33 is small. By increasing the degree of confinement the twist transition can be inhibited, a characteristic both hyperbolic and radial hedgehogs have in common. The twist transition of a hyperbolic defect that accompanies a particle is found to be well predicted by the earlier stability analysis of a thick shell. PMID:24827263

  3. Method of fabricating a twisted composite superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Coles, W. D.; Laurence, J. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method of producing a twisted, stabilized wire or tube superconductor which can be used to wind electromagnets, armatures, rotors, field windings for motors and generators, and other magnetic devices which use a solenoid, toroidal, or other type winding is reported. At least one groove is formed along the length of a wire substrate which is then twisted into a helix and a layer of intermetallic superconducting material is formed in the groove. This layer can be formed by depositing the desired intermetallic compound into the groove or by diffusing one component of the superconductor into the groove formed in a substrate composed of the other component. The superconductor prepared by this method comprises a non-superconductor wire twisted into the shape of a helix, having at least one groove containing a layer of superconductor material along the length of the wire.

  4. Evaluation of High-Angle-of-Attack Handling Qualities for the X-31A Using Standard Evaluation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Bosworth, John T.

    1996-01-01

    The X-31A aircraft gross-acquisition and fine-tracking handling qualities have been evaluated using standard evaluation maneuvers developed by Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The emphasis of the testing is in the angle-of-attack range between 30 deg and 70 deg. Longitudinal gross-acquisition handling qualities results show borderline Level 1/Level 2 performance. Lateral gross-acquisition testing results in Level 1/Level 2 ratings below 45 deg angle of attack, degrading into Level 3 as angle of attack increases. The fine-tracking performance in both longitudinal and lateral axes also receives Level 1 ratings near 30 deg angle of attack, with the ratings tending towards Level 3 at angles of attack greater than 50 deg. These ratings do not match the expectations from the extensive close-in combat testing where the X-31A aircraft demonstrated fair to good handling qualities maneuvering for high angles of attack. This paper presents the results of the high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight testing of the X-31A aircraft. Discussion of the preparation for the maneuvers, the pilot ratings, and selected pilot comments are included. Evaluation of the results is made in conjunction with existing Neal-Smith, bandwidth, Smith-Geddes, and military specifications.

  5. Evaluation of High-Angle-of-Attack Handling Qualities for the X-31A Using Standard Evaluation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Bosworth, John T.

    1997-01-01

    The X-31A aircraft gross-acquisition and fine-tracking handling qualities have been evaluated using standard evaluation maneuvers developed by Wright Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base. The emphasis of the testing is in the angle-of-attack range between 30 deg. and 70 deg. Longitudinal gross-acquisition handling qualities results show borderline Level l/Level 2 performance. Lateral gross-acquisition testing results in Level l/Level 2 ratings below 45 deg. angle of attack, degrading into Level 3 as angle of attack increases. The fine tracking performance in both longitudinal and lateral axes also receives Level 1 ratings near 30 deg. angle of attack, with the ratings tending towards Level 3 at angles of attack greater than 50 deg. These ratings do not match the expectations from the extensive close-in combat testing where the X-31A aircraft demonstrated fair to good handling qualities maneuvering for high angles of attack. This paper presents the results of the high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight testing of the X-31A aircraft. Discussion of the preparation for the maneuvers, the pilot ratings, and selected pilot comments are included. Evaluation of the results is made in conjunction with existing Neal Smith, bandwidth, Smith-Geddes, and military specifications.

  6. Experimental study of effects of forebody geometry on high angle of attack static and dynamic stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, J. M.; Murri, D. G.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    A series of low-speed wind tunnel tests on a generic airplane model with a cylindrical fuselage were made to investigate the effects of forebody shape and fitness ratio, and fuselage/wing proximity on static and dynamic lateral/directional stability. In addition, some preliminary testing to determine the effectiveness of deflectable forebody strakes for high angle of attack yaw control was conducted. During the stability investigation, 11 forebodies were tested including three different cross-sectional shapes with fineness ratios of 2, 3, and 4. In addition, the wing was tested at two longitudinal positions to provide a substantial variation in forebody/wing proximity. Conventional force tests were conducted to determine static stability characteristics, and single-degree-of-freedom free-to-roll tests were conducted to study the wing rock characteristics of the model with the various forebodies. Flow visualization data were obtained to aid in the analysis of the complex flow phenomena involved. The results show that the forebody cross-sectional shape and fineness ratio and forebody/wing proximity can strongly affect both static and dynamic (roll) stability at high angles of attack. These characteristics result from the impact of these factors on forebody vortex development, the behavior of the vortices in sideslip, and their interaction with the wing flow field. Preliminary results from the deflectable strake investigation indicated that forebody flow control using this concept can provide very large yaw control moments at stall and post-stall angles of attack.

  7. Computerized simulation of grain boundary character in a superplastic aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    McNelley, T.R.; Perez-Prado, M.T.

    2000-07-01

    High-angle grain boundaries are generally deemed necessary for superplasticity in metals. In polycrystalline materials the grain boundary character must be described in terms of a probability distribution rather than by a single parameter, and little has been reported on the relationship between this distribution and fine-grain superplasticity. For aluminum alloys that exhibit continuous recrystallization the results of computer-aided electron backscatter diffraction analysis have shown that bimodal grain boundary disorientation distributions are present in as-processed material and persist during subsequent annealing. Such distributions may be simulated by computer methods based on a model of the microstructure which assumes that deformation banding occurs during deformation processing. High-angle boundaries ({ge} 30{degree}) develop in association with deformation banding while boundaries of lower disorientation (< 30{degree}) develop by dislocation reaction within the bands. Improved understanding of the grain boundary types associated with various microstructural transformation mechanisms will aid the design of processes to produce superplastic microstructures.

  8. Twisted bi-layer graphene: microscopic rainbows.

    PubMed

    Campos-Delgado, J; Algara-Siller, G; Santos, C N; Kaiser, U; Raskin, J-P

    2013-10-11

    Blue, pink, and yellow colorations appear from twisted bi-layer graphene (tBLG) when transferred to a SiO2 /Si substrate (SiO2 = 100 nm-thick). Raman and electron microscope studies reveal that these colorations appear for twist angles in the 9-15° range. Optical contrast simulations confirm that the observed colorations are related to the angle-dependent electronic properties of tBLG combined with the reflection that results from the layered structure tBLG/100 nm-thick SiO2 /Si. PMID:23606323

  9. Twist1-induced invadopodia formation promotes tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.; Lwin, Thinzar M.; Chang, Andrew T.; Kim, Jihoon; Danis, Etienne; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Yang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Twist1 transcription factor is known to promote tumor metastasis and induce Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Here, we report that Twist1 is capable of promoting the formation of invadopodia, specialized membrane protrusions for extracellular matrix degradation. Twist1 induces PDGFRα expression, which in turn activates Src, to promote invadopodia formation. We show that Twist1 and PDGFRα are central mediators of invadopodia formation in response to various EMT-inducing signals. Induction of PDGFRα and invadopodia is essential for Twist1 to promote tumor metastasis. Consistent with PDGFRα being a direct transcriptional target of Twist1, coexpression of Twist1 and PDGFRα predicts poor survival in breast tumor patients. Therefore, invadopodia-mediated matrix degradation is a key function of Twist1 in promoting tumor metastasis. PMID:21397860

  10. Chern-Weil Construction for Twisted K-Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomi, Kiyonori; Terashima, Yuji

    2010-10-01

    We give a finite-dimensional and geometric construction of a Chern character for twisted K-theory, introducing a notion of connection on a twisted vectorial bundle which can be considered as a finite-dimensional approximation of a twisted family of Fredholm operators. Our construction is applicable to the case of any classes giving the twisting, and agrees with the Chern character of bundle gerbe modules in the case of torsion classes.

  11. Grain Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Our fundamental knowledge of interstellar grain composition has grown substantially during the past two decades thanks to significant advances in two areas: astronomical infrared spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics. The opening of the mid-infrared, the spectral range from 4000-400 cm(sup -1) (2.5-25 microns), to spectroscopic study has been critical to this progress because spectroscopy in this region reveals more about a materials molecular composition and structure than any other physical property. Infrared spectra which are diagnostic of interstellar grain composition fall into two categories: absorption spectra of the dense and diffuse interstellar media, and emission spectra from UV-Vis rich dusty regions. The former will be presented in some detail, with the latter only very briefly mentioned. This paper summarized what we have learned from these spectra and presents 'doorway' references into the literature. Detailed reviews of many aspects of interstellar dust are given.

  12. Improvements to tilt rotor performance through passive blade twist control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1988-01-01

    A passive blade twist control is presented in which the twist distribution of a tilt rotor blade is elastically changed as a function of rotor speed. The elastic twist deformation is used to achieve two different blade twist distributions corresponding to the two rotor speeds used on conventional tilt rotors in hover and forward flight. By changing the blade twist distribution, the aerodynamic performance can be improved in both modes of flight. The concept presented obtains a change in twist distribution with extension-twist-coupled composite blade structure. This investigation first determines the linear twists which are optimum for each flight mode. Based on the optimum linear twist distributions, three extension-twist-coupled blade designs are developed using coupled-beam and laminate analyses integrated with an optimization analysis. The designs are optimized for maximum twist deformation subject to material strength limitations. The aerodynamic performances of the final designs are determined which show that the passive blade twist control concept is viable, and can enhance conventional tilt rotor performance.

  13. Structural Dependence of Grain Boundary Resistivity in Copper Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Kenik, Edward A; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Li, An-Ping; Meyer III, Harry M; Nicholson, Don M; Radhakrishnan, Bala; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2011-01-01

    We report the direct measurement of individual grain boundary (GB) resistances and the critical role of GB structure in the increased resistivity in copper nanowires. By measuring both intra- and inter-grain resistance with a four-probe scanning tunneling microscope, large resistance jumps are revealed owing to successive scattering across high-angle random GBs, while the resistance changes at twin and other coincidence boundaries are negligibly small. The impurity distributions in the nanowires are characterized in correlating to the microstructures. The resistance of high symmetry coincidence GBs and the impurity contributions are then calculated using a first-principle method which confirms that the coincidence GBs have orders of magnitude smaller resistance than the high-angle random GBs.

  14. The Physics of Somersaulting and Twisting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1980-01-01

    This is a discussion of the conservation of angular momentum of the human body engaged in somersaults and twists. The principle is also applied to a cat turning over in midair. The events occur in the absence of torques. Application of the maneuvers are suggested for astronauts. (SA)

  15. Supramolecular sensing: Enzyme activity with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabilino, David B.

    2015-04-01

    A supramolecular polymer comprising stacked artificial chromophores to which zinc(II) complexes are appended is able to respond to enzymatic hydrolysis in aqueous solution. The assembly of molecules can twist reversibly and quickly in response to changes in the type of adenosine phosphate present.

  16. Scattering of twisted relativistic electrons by atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbo, V.; Ivanov, I. P.; Fritzsche, S.; Seipt, D.; Surzhykov, A.

    2015-07-01

    The Mott scattering of high-energetic twisted electrons by atoms is investigated within the framework of the first Born approximation and Dirac's relativistic equation. Special emphasis is placed on the angular distribution and longitudinal polarization of the scattered electrons. In order to evaluate these angular and polarization properties we consider two experimental setups in which the twisted electron beam collides with either a single well-localized atom or macroscopic atomic target. Detailed relativistic calculations have been performed for both setups and for the electrons with kinetic energy from 10 to 1000 keV. The results of these calculations indicate that the emission pattern and polarization of outgoing electrons differ significantly from the scattering of plane-wave electrons and can be very sensitive to the parameters of the incident twisted beam. In particular, it is shown that the angular- and polarization-sensitive Mott measurements may reveal valuable information about both the transverse and longitudinal components of the linear momentum and the projection of the total angular momentum of twisted electron states. Thus, the Mott scattering emerges as a diagnostic tool for the relativistic vortex beams.

  17. Self-Portraits with a Twist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarco, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art activity on self-portraiture inspired by artist Tim Hawkinson. Hawkinson created a sculpture titled "Emoter" in which his face, moved by motors, twisted and contorted based on random signals from a TV. This art activity incorporates technology into the art room, brings the work of practicing artists alive, and is a…

  18. Twisted Cyclic Cohomology and Modular Fredholm Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Adam; Sitarz, Andrzej; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-07-01

    Connes and Cuntz showed in [Comm. Math. Phys. 114 (1988), 515-526] that suitable cyclic cocycles can be represented as Chern characters of finitely summable semifinite Fredholm modules. We show an analogous result in twisted cyclic cohomology using Chern characters of modular Fredholm modules. We present examples of modular Fredholm modules arising from Podleś spheres and from SUq(2).

  19. Twisted Pair Of Insulated Wires Senses Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.; Stephens, James B.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of electronic moisture sensor to low levels of moisture increased by new electrode configuration. Moisture-sensing circuit described in "Low-Cost Humidity Sensor" (NPO-16544). New twisted pair of wires takes place of flat-plate capacitor in circuit. Configuration allows for thermal expansion and contraction of polymer while maintaining nearly constant area of contact between polymer and wires.

  20. Experimental study of the effects of Reynolds number on high angle of attack aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies during rotary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, H.; Ralston, J.; Dickes, E.

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Defense Research Agency (United Kingdom) have ongoing experimental research programs in rotary-flow aerodynamics. A cooperative effort between the two agencies is currently underway to collect an extensive database for the development of high angle of attack computational methods to predict the effects of Reynolds number on the forebody flowfield at dynamic conditions, as well as to study the use of low Reynolds number data for the evaluation of high Reynolds number characteristics. Rotary balance experiments, including force and moment and surface pressure measurements, were conducted on circular and rectangular aftbodies with hemispherical and ogive noses at the Bedford and Farnborough wind tunnel facilities in the United Kingdom. The bodies were tested at 60 and 90 deg angle of attack for a wide range of Reynolds numbers in order to observe the effects of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow separation on the forebody characteristics when rolling about the velocity vector.

  1. A study of prediction methods for the high angle-of-attack aerodynamics of straight wings and fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, O. J.; Mendenhall, M. R.; Perkins, S. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Work is described dealing with two areas which are dominated by the nonlinear effects of vortex flows. The first area concerns the stall/spin characteristics of a general aviation wing with a modified leading edge. The second area concerns the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of high performance military aircraft. For each area, the governing phenomena are described as identified with the aid of existing experimental data. Existing analytical methods are reviewed, and the most promising method for each area used to perform some preliminary calculations. Based on these results, the strengths and weaknesses of the methods are defined, and research programs recommended to improve the methods as a result of better understanding of the flow mechanisms involved.

  2. In-flight flow visualization characteristics of the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Delfrate, John H.; Richwine, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface and off-surface flow visualization techniques were used to visualize the 3-D separated flows on the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack. Results near the alpha = 25 to 26 deg and alpha = 45 to 49 deg are presented. Both the forebody and leading edge extension (LEX) vortex cores and breakdown locations were visualized using smoke. Forebody and LEX vortex separation lines on the surface were defined using an emitted fluid technique. A laminar separation bubble was also detected on the nose cone using the emitted fluid technique and was similar to that observed in the wind tunnel test, but not as extensive. Regions of attached, separated, and vortical flow were noted on the wing and the leading edge flap using tufts and flow cones, and compared well with limited wind tunnel results.

  3. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jack Y.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed. PMID:26206489

  4. Operator constraints for twist-3 functions and Lorentz invariance properties of twist-3 observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Koichi; Koike, Yuji; Metz, Andreas; Pitonyak, Daniel; Schlegel, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the behavior under Lorentz transformations of perturbative coefficient functions in a collinear twist-3 formalism relevant for high-energy observables including transverse polarization of hadrons. We argue that those perturbative coefficient functions can, a priori, acquire quite different yet Lorentz-invariant forms in various frames. This somewhat surprising difference can be traced back to a general dependence of the perturbative coefficient functions on light cone vectors which are introduced by the twist-3 factorization formulas and which are frame-dependent. One can remove this spurious frame dependence by invoking so-called Lorentz invariance relations (LIRs) between twist-3 parton correlation functions. Some of those relations for twist-3 distribution functions were discussed in the literature before. In this paper we derive the corresponding LIRs for twist-3 fragmentation functions. We explicitly demonstrate that these LIRs remove the light cone vector dependence by considering transverse spin observables in the single-inclusive production of hadrons in lepton-nucleon collisions, ℓN →h X . With the LIRs in hand, we also show that twist-3 observables in general can be written solely in terms of three-parton correlation functions.

  5. Operator constraints for twist-3 functions and Lorentz invariance properties of twist-3 observables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanazawa, Koichi; Pitonyak, Daniel; Koike, Yuji; Metz, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the behavior under Lorentz transformations of perturbative coefficient functions in a collinear twist-3 formalism relevant for high-energy observables including transverse polarization of hadrons. We argue that those perturbative coefficient functions can, a priori, acquire quite different yet Lorentz-invariant forms in various frames. This somewhat surprising difference can be traced back to a general dependence of the perturbative coefficient functions on light cone vectors which are introduced by the twist-3 factorization formulas and which are frame-dependent. One can remove this spurious frame dependence by invoking so-called Lorentz invariance relations (LIRs) between twist-3 parton correlation functions. Some of those relationsmore » for twist-3 distribution functions were discussed in the literature before. In this paper we derive the corresponding LIRs for twist-3 fragmentation functions. We explicitly demonstrate that these LIRs remove the light cone vector dependence by considering transverse spin observables in the single-inclusive production of hadrons in lepton-nucleon collisions, ℓN→hX. Furthermore, with the LIRs in hand, we also show that twist-3 observables in general can be written solely in terms of three-parton correlation functions.« less

  6. Interstellar grains within interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst K.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    Five interstellar graphite spherules extracted from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite are studied. The isotopic and elemental compositions of individual particles are investigated with the help of an ion microprobe, and this analysis is augmented with structural studies of ultrathin sections of the grain interiors by transmission electron microscopy. As a result, the following procedure for the formation of the interstellar graphite spherule bearing TiC crystals is inferred: (1) high-temperature nucleation and rapid growth of the graphitic carbon spherule in the atmosphere of a carbon-rich star, (2) nucleation and growth of TiC crystals during continued growth of the graphitic spherule and the accretion of TiC onto the spherule, (3) quenching of the graphite growth process by depletion of C or by isolation of the spherule before other grain types could condense.

  7. Torque correlation length and stochastic twist dynamics of DNA.

    PubMed

    Banigan, Edward J; Marko, John F

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a short correlation length for torque in twisting-stiff biomolecules, which is necessary for the physical property that torque fluctuations be finite in amplitude. We develop a nonequilibrium theory of dynamics of DNA twisting which predicts two crossover time scales for temporal torque correlations in single-molecule experiments. Bending fluctuations can be included, and at linear order we find that they do not affect the twist dynamics. However, twist fluctuations affect bending, and we predict the spatial inhomogeneity of twist, torque, and buckling arising in nonequilibrium "rotor-bead" experiments. PMID:25019813

  8. The Strength-Grain Size Relationship in Ultrafine-Grained Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, N.; Langdon, Terence G.

    2016-04-01

    Metals processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) techniques, such as equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) and high-pressure torsion (HPT), generally have submicrometer grain sizes. Consequently, they exhibit high strength as expected on the basis of the Hall-Petch (H-P) relationship. Examples of this behavior are discussed using experimental data for Ti, Al, and Ni. These materials typically have grain sizes greater than ~50 nm where softening is not expected. An increase in strength is usually accompanied by a decrease in ductility. However, both high strength and high ductility may be achieved simultaneously by imposing high strain to obtain ultrafine-grain sizes and high fractions of high-angle grain boundaries. This facilitates grain boundary sliding, and an example is presented for a cast Al-7 pct Si alloy processed by HPT. In some materials, SPD may result in a weakening even with a very fine grain size, and this is due to microstructural changes during processing. Examples are presented for an Al-7034 alloy processed by ECAP and a Zn-22 pct Al alloy processed by HPT. In some SPD-processed materials, it is possible that grain boundary segregation and other features are present leading to higher strengths than predicted by the H-P relationship.

  9. The prediction of pressure distributions on an arrow-wing configuration including the effect of camber, twist, and a wing fin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, P. J.; Manro, M. E.; Kulfan, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of an arrow wing body configuration consisting of flat, twisted, and cambered twisted wings were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 2.50 to provide an experimental data base for comparison with theoretical methods. A variety of leading and trailing edge control surface deflections were included in these tests, and in addition, the cambered twisted wing was tested with an outboard vertical fin to determine its effect on wing and control surface loads. Theory experiment comparisons show that current state of the art linear and nonlinear attached flow methods were adequate at small angles of attack typical of cruise conditions. The incremental effects of outboard fin, wing twist, and wing camber are most accurately predicted by the advanced panel method PANAIR. Results of the advanced panel separated flow method, obtained with an early version of the program, show promise that accurate detailed pressure predictions may soon be possible for an aeroelasticity deformed wing at high angles of attack.

  10. Characterization of Creep-Damaged Grain Boundaries of Alloy 617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Field, David P.

    2013-11-01

    Intergranular cracking and void nucleation occur over extended periods of time in alloy 617 when subjected to stress at high temperatures. Damage occurs inhomogeneously with some boundaries suffering failure, while others are seemingly immune to creep. Crack propagation associated with grain size, and grain boundary character was investigated to determine which types of grain boundaries are susceptible to damage and which are more resistant. Electron backscatter diffraction and a stereological approach to obtain the five-parameter grain boundary distribution were used to measure the proportions of each type of boundary in the initial and damaged structures. The samples were crept at 1273.15 K (1000 °C) at 25 MPa until fracture. It was found that in addition to low-angle and coherent twin boundaries, other low index boundary plane grain boundaries with twist character are relatively resistant to creep.