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Sample records for high-efficiency fusion power

  1. Fusion blanket for high-efficiency power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Usher, J.L.; Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Taussig, R.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperature (500/sup 0/C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project two-zone blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO/sub 2/ interior (cooled by Ar) utilizing Li/sub 2/O for tritium breeding. In this design, approx. 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum Ar temperature is 2230/sup 0/C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case.

  2. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  3. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  4. High efficiency solar photovoltaic power module concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1978-01-01

    The investigation of a preliminary concept for high efficiency solar power generation in space is presented. The concept was a synergistic combination of spectral splitting, tailored bandgap cells, high concentration ratios, and cool cell areas.

  5. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  6. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  7. High efficiency low cost solar cell power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Blocker, W.

    1978-01-01

    A concept for generating high-efficiency, low-cost, solar-cell power is outlined with reference to solar cell parameters, optical concentrators, and thermal control procedures. A design for a 12.5-kw power module for space operation is discussed noting the optical system, spectrum splitter, light conversion system, cell cooling, power conditioner, and tracking mechanism. It is found that for an unconcentrated array, efficiency approaches 60% when ten or more bandgaps are used. For a 12-band system, a computer program distributed bandgaps for maximum efficiency and equal cell currents. Rigid materials and thin films have been proposed for optical components and prisms, gratings, and dichroic mirrors have been recommended for spectrum splitting. Various radiator concepts are noted including that of Weatherston and Smith (1960) and Hedgepeth and Knapp (1978). The concept may be suitable for the Solar Power Satellite.

  8. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  9. High-Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Williams H.

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency power amplifier that operates in the S band (frequencies of the order of a few gigahertz) utilizes transistors operating under class-D bias and excitation conditions. Class-D operation has been utilized at lower frequencies, but, until now, has not been exploited in the S band. Nominally, in class D operation, a transistor is switched rapidly between "on" and "off" states so that at any given instant, it sustains either high current or high voltage, but not both at the same time. In the ideal case of zero "on" resistance, infinite "off" resistance, zero inductance and capacitance, and perfect switching, the output signal would be a perfect square wave. Relative to the traditional classes A, B, and C of amplifier operation, class D offers the potential to achieve greater power efficiency. In addition, relative to class-A amplifiers, class-D amplifiers are less likely to go into oscillation. In order to design this amplifier, it was necessary to derive mathematical models of microwave power transistors for incorporation into a larger mathematical model for computational simulation of the operation of a class-D microwave amplifier. The design incorporates state-of-the-art switching techniques applicable only in the microwave frequency range. Another major novel feature is a transmission-line power splitter/combiner designed with the help of phasing techniques to enable an approximation of a square-wave signal (which is inherently a wideband signal) to propagate through what would, if designed in a more traditional manner, behave as a more severely band-limited device (see figure). The amplifier includes an input, a driver, and a final stage. Each stage contains a pair of GaAs-based field-effect transistors biased in class D. The input signal can range from -10 to +10 dBm into a 50-ohm load. The table summarizes the performances of the three stages

  10. High Efficiency Thermoelectric Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed; Saber, Hamed; Caillat, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    The work performed and whose results presented in this report is a joint effort between the University of New Mexico s Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies (ISNPS) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. In addition to the development, design, and fabrication of skutterudites and skutterudites-based segmented unicouples this effort included conducting performance tests of these unicouples for hundreds of hours to verify theoretical predictions of the conversion efficiency. The performance predictions of these unicouples are obtained using 1-D and 3-D models developed for that purpose and for estimating the actual performance and side heat losses in the tests conducted at ISNPS. In addition to the performance tests, the development of the 1-D and 3-D models and the development of Advanced Radioisotope Power systems for Beginning-Of-Life (BOM) power of 108 We are carried out at ISNPS. The materials synthesis and fabrication of the unicouples are carried out at JPL. The research conducted at ISNPS is documented in chapters 2-5 and that conducted at JP, in documented in chapter 5. An important consideration in the design and optimization of segmented thermoelectric unicouples (STUs) is determining the relative lengths, cross-section areas, and the interfacial temperatures of the segments of the different materials in the n- and p-legs. These variables are determined using a genetic algorithm (GA) in conjunction with one-dimensional analytical model of STUs that is developed in chapter 2. Results indicated that when optimized for maximum conversion efficiency, the interfacial temperatures between various segments in a STU are close to those at the intersections of the Figure-Of-Merit (FOM), ZT, curves of the thermoelectric materials of the adjacent segments. When optimizing the STUs for maximum electrical power density, however, the interfacial temperatures are different from those at the intersections of the ZT curves, but

  11. SOLAR POWERING OF HIGH EFFICIENCY ABSORPTION CHILLER

    SciTech Connect

    Randy C. Gee

    2004-11-15

    This is the Final Report for two solar cooling projects under this Cooperative Agreement. The first solar cooling project is a roof-integrated solar cooling and heating system, called the Power Roof{trademark}, which began operation in Raleigh, North Carolina in late July 2002. This system provides 176 kW (50 ton) of solar-driven space cooling using a unique nonimaging concentrating solar collector. The measured performance of the system during its first months of operation is reported here, along with a description of the design and operation of this system. The second solar cooling system, with a 20-ton capacity, is being retrofit to a commercial office building in Charleston, South Carolina but has not yet been completed.

  12. Plasmonic energy nanofocusing for high-efficiency laser fusion ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient laser fusion ignition system consisting of metal nanoparticles or nanoshells embedded in conventional deuterated polystyrene fuel targets. The incident optical energy of the heating laser is highly concentrated around the metallic particulates randomly dispersed inside imploded targets due to the electromagnetic-field-enhancement effect by surface plasmon resonance, and thus effectively triggers nuclear-fusion chain reactions. Our preliminary calculations exhibit field enhancement factors of around 50 and 1100 for spherical Ag nanoparticles and Ag/SiO2 nanoshells, respectively, in the 1-µm band.

  13. High efficiency solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding solar cell response to pulsed laser outputs is important for the evaluation of power beaming applications. The time response of high efficiency GaAs and silicon solar cells to a 25 nS monochromatic pulse input is described. The PC-1D computer code is used to analyze the cell current during and after the pulse for various conditions.

  14. High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, H.

    1995-10-19

    An outline of the Westinghouse high-efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle is presented. The following topics are discussed: The Westinghouse SOFC pilot manufacturing facility, cell scale-up plan, pressure effects on SOFC power and efficiency, sureCell versus conventional gas turbine plants, sureCell product line for distributed power applications, 20 MW pressurized-SOFC/gas turbine power plant, 10 MW SOFC/CT power plant, sureCell plant concept design requirements, and Westinghouse SOFC market entry.

  15. Fuel Cell/Turbine Ultra High Efficiency Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein, Ghezel-Ayagh

    2001-11-06

    FuelCell Energy, INC. (FCE) is currently involved in the design of ultra high efficiency power plants under a cooperative agreement (DE-FC26-00NT40) managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as part of the DOE's Vision 21 program. Under this project, FCE is developing a fuel cell/turbine hybrid system that integrates the atmospheric pressure Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) with an unfired Brayton cycle utilizing indirect heat recovery from the power plant. Features of the DFC/T{trademark} system include: high efficiency, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, no pressurization of the fuel cell, independent operating pressure of the fuel cell and turbine, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants at much smaller sizes. Objectives of the Vision 21 Program include developing power plants that will generate electricity with net efficiencies approaching 75 percent (with natural gas), while producing sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions of less than 0.01 lb/million BTU. These goals are significant improvements over conventional power plants, which are 35-60 percent efficient and produce emissions of 0.07 to 0.3 lb/million BTU of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. The nitrogen oxide and sulfur emissions from the DFC/T system are anticipated to be better than the Vision 21 goals due to the non-combustion features of the DFC/T power plant. The expected high efficiency of the DFC/T will also result in a 40-50 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions compared to conventional power plants. To date, the R&D efforts have resulted in significant progress including proof-of-concept tests of a sub-scale power plant built around a state-of-the-art DFC stack integrated with a modified Capstone Model 330 Microturbine. The objectives of this effort are to investigate the integration aspects of the fuel cell and turbine and to obtain design information and operational data that will

  16. 2250-MHz High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Tnis paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  17. HIGH EFFICIENCY FOSSIL POWER PLANT (HEFPP) CONCEPTUALIZATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Justice

    1999-03-25

    This study confirms the feasibility of a natural gas fueled, 20 MW M-C Power integrated pressurized molten carbonate fuel cell combined in a topping cycle with a gas turbine generator plant. The high efficiency fossil power plant (HEFPP) concept has a 70% efficiency on a LHV basis. The study confirms the HEFPP has a cost advantage on a cost of electricity basis over the gas turbine based combined cycle plants in the 20 MW size range. The study also identifies the areas of further development required for the fuel cell, gas turbine generator, cathode blower, inverter, and power module vessel. The HEFPP concept offers an environmentally friendly power plant with minuscule emission levels when compared with the combined cycle power plant.

  18. High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C.; Sanderson, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

  19. High power, high efficiency diode pumped Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Yaakov; Fromzel, Viktor; Zhang, Jun; Dahan, Asaf; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Pattnaik, Radha K.; Dubinskii, Mark

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a high power high efficiency Raman fiber laser pumped directly by a laser diode module at 976 nm. 80 Watts of CW power were obtained at a wavelength of 1020 nm with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 53%. When working quasi-CW, at a duty cycle of 30%, 85 W of peak power was produced with an efficiency of 60%. A commercial graded-index (GRIN) core fiber acts as the Raman fiber in a power oscillator configuration, which includes spectral selection to prevent generation of the 2nd Stokes. In addition, significant brightness enhancement of the pump beam is attained due to the Raman gain distribution profile in the GRIN fiber. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power Raman fiber laser directly pumped by laser diodes, which also exhibits a record efficiency for such a laser. In addition, it is the highest power Raman fiber laser (regardless of pumping source) demonstrated based on a GRIN fiber.

  20. A High Efficiency PSOFC/ATS-Gas Turbine Power System

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; M.D. Moeckel; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2001-02-01

    A study is described in which the conceptual design of a hybrid power system integrating a pressurized Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell generator and the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine was developed. The Mercury{trademark} 50 was designed by Solar Turbines as part of the US. Department of Energy Advanced Turbine Systems program. The focus of the study was to develop the hybrid power system concept that principally would exhibit an attractively-low cost of electricity (COE). The inherently-high efficiency of the hybrid cycle contributes directly to achieving this objective, and by employing the efficient, power-intensive Mercury{trademark} 50, with its relatively-low installed cost, the higher-cost SOFC generator can be optimally sized such that the minimum-COE objective is achieved. The system cycle is described, major system components are specified, the system installed cost and COE are estimated, and the physical arrangement of the major system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the system design point are also presented. In addition, two bottoming cycle options are described, and estimates of their effects on overall-system performance, cost, and COE are provided.

  1. 4-GHz high-efficiency broadband FET power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, S.; Chang, C.

    1982-11-01

    The development and performance of a 4-GHz high-efficiency broadband FET power amplifier module for use in communications satellite transponders is discussed. The design, which is based on the parameters of a commercially available 7.2-mm multicell FET device, was optimized by the use of a CAD program, with broader bandwidth achieved by the addition of two open stubs to the input matching circuit. Six single-ended amplifier modules have been fabricated, tuned and tested, two being high-gain, 17.5% bandwidth designs and four being lower-gain, 25% bandwidth designs. The higher-gain modules, with a 0.5-dB bandwidth of 700 MHz (3.6 to 4.3 GHz) show a 6-dB gain and 3.23-W output power at the maximum efficiency of 48.6%, while broadband modules (0.5-dB bandwidth 900 MHz) deliver 5-W RF power at the maximum efficiency of 36%. The high-performance amplifiers may thus be used in satellite solid-state power amplifiers as replacements for traveling wave tubes.

  2. AMTEC: High efficiency static conversion for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Shirbacheh, M.

    1986-01-01

    Future manned and unmanned space missions will require reliable, high efficiency energy conversion systems. For a manned Mars mission, power levels in the range of 10 to 100 kWe will be needed. The Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Converter (AMTEC) is a direct energy conversion technology with the potential to meet these needs. The AMTEC is a thermally regenerative electrochemical device that derives its operation from the sodium ion conducting properties of beta-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). To date, an efficiency of 19%, area power density of 1 W/sq cm, and a lifetime of 10,000 hours at high temperature were demonstrated in laboratory devices. Systems studies show that projected AMTEC systems equal or surpass the performance of other static or dynamic systems in applications of 1 kWe-1 MWe. Thus, the laboratory experiments and applications studies conducted to date have shown that the AMTEC posseses great potential. In order to bring this technology to the stage where prototype units can be built and operated, several technical issues must be addressed. These include the need for long life, high power electrodes, minimization of radiative parasitic losses, and high temperature seals. In summary, the evidence shows that if AMTEC is developed, it can play a significant role in future space power applications.

  3. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil

  4. High efficiency UHF oscillator for portable battery-powered applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessendorf, K. O.

    There is a growing demand for high-frequency circuit designs which are capable of being used in portable battery-powered applications. This type of environment typically requires circuits designed for small size and minimum dc current draw. A transponder design at Sandia National Laboratories required a 430 MHz oscillator (crystal controlled) which could run off a 3 V lithium battery and have an output power of approximately 0 dbm and draw the least possible dc current (less than 4 mA was desired). Physically the oscillator height has to be less than 0.1 sq in. and occupy less than 1 sq in. surface area. Another requirement, for the first engineering prototype, was that the oscillator be made out of inexpensive, standard parts. The design was integrated onto a circuit board with the associated transponder circuitry. This paper describes a technique to make a high-efficiency 430 MHz oscillator which demonstrates efficiencies in the 10 to 12 percent range for an output of approximately 0 dbm. Data will show the frequency spectrum of the oscillator waveform and the performance of the oscillator over temperature and power supply voltage. To meet the requirements and make the design as simple as possible a 107.5 MHz (R(sub m) less than 70 ohms) Statek AT-Strip resonator was chosen. This resonator was chosen because of its small size, surface mountability, and good electrical performance. This resonator was used at series resonance in an oscillator multiplier circuit which would provide a (4X) multiplication in an efficient manner. The oscillator (first stage) is a Butler Oscillator-Multiplier (2X) which is direct coupled to a buffer transistor (second stage) and harmonic generating (2X) transistor which share bias current. The final design delivers 1 dbm at 3 V with 3.33 mA current draw. All harmonics and subharmonics are greater than 20 db down from the desired frequency.

  5. Fusion power demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.

    1983-09-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment.

  6. High-efficiency heteroepitaxial solar cells for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernon, S. M.; Tobin, S. P.; Keavney, C. J.; Wojtczuk, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental results for several technical approaches aimed at achieving highly efficient solar cells for space-power applications are reported. Efficiencies of up to 24.5 percent (170X, AM0) and 21.7 percent (1X, AM0) have been achieved with homoepitaxial GaAs p/n cells. This one-sun AM0 efficiency value is believed to be the highest reported to date. Tandem solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Ge structures have been fabricated and shown to have efficiencies up to 21.3 percent (1X, AM0), and a GaAs-on-Si cell at 15.2 percent (1X, AM0) is reported. Homoepitaxial n/p InP cells with an efficiency of 18.8 percent (1X, AM0) are also reported. The fabrication of heteroepitaxial InP solar cells with one-sun AM0 efficiency values of 9.4 percent (on GaAs) and 7.2 percent (on Si) is described.

  7. Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration sponsored the NASA Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power Workshop. The meeting was held to understand the potential of using He-3 from the moon for terrestrial fusion power production. It provided an overview, two parallel working sessions, a review of sessions, and discussions. The lunar mining session concluded that mining, beneficiation, separation, and return of He-3 from the moon would be possible but that a large scale operation and improved technology is required. The fusion power session concluded that: (1) that He-3 offers significant, possibly compelling, advantages over fusion of tritium, principally increased reactor life, reduced radioactive wastes, and high efficiency conversion, (2) that detailed assessment of the potential of the D/He-3 fuel cycle requires more information, and (3) D/He-3 fusion may be best for commercial purposes, although D/T fusion is more near term.

  8. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  9. High Efficiency Solar Power via Separated Photo and Voltaic Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Naughton

    2009-02-17

    This project demonstrates a novel nanostructured solar cell architecture capable of achieving high efficiency levels that is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture. The high efficiency will be achieved by the novel structure that separates the path of the photons from the path of the generated charge carriers. In this way, the photon path can be long for maximum light absorption, while the path for carriers can be short for maximum electronic energy harvesting. The combination of maximum light absorption coupled with maximum carrier harvesting is the basis for the expected high efficiency. The project will develop high efficiency solar cell prototypes utilizing this unique nanostructured architecture. The project addresses the fundamental limitation inherent in all current solar cell designs, and which opens a pathway to development for high efficiency solar cells at low cost. Realizing this goal will result in a levelized cost of electricity in the range of 10¢/kWh, which would achieve the long-sought goal of making photovoltaic electricity cost competitive with fossil-fuel generated electricity without any governmental subsidies. This breakthrough would spur the already rapid growth in the photovoltaic industry to an explosive pace, with significant, widespread benefit to the national economy and the nation’s energy security. The initial target of the program is to develop single-junction solar cells using ultrathin amorphous silicon with the performance approaching that of single crystal silicon cells.

  10. A highly efficient neutron time-of-flight detector for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Yamaguchi, K.; Yamagajo, T.; Nakano, T.; Kasai, T.; Urano, T.; Azechi, H.; Nakai, S.; Iida, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed the highly efficient neutron detector system MANDALA for the inertial-confinement-fusion experiment. The MANDALA system consists of 842 elements plastic scintillation detectors and data acquisition electronics. The detection level is the yield of 1.2×105 for 2.5 MeV and 1×105 for 14.1 MeV neutrons (with 100 detected hits). We have calibrated the intrinsic detection efficiencies of the detector elements using a neutron generator facility. Timing calibration and integrity test of the system were also carried out with a 60Co γ ray source. MANDALA system was applied to the implosion experiments at the GEKKO XII laser facility. The integrity test was carried out by implosion experiments.

  11. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier: From the Lab to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the beginnings of space travel, various microwave power amplifier designs have been employed. These included Class-A, -B, and -C bias arrangements. However, shared limitation of these topologies is the inherent high total consumption of input power associated with the generation of radio frequency (RF)/microwave power. The power amplifier has always been the largest drain for the limited available power on the spacecraft. Typically, the conversion efficiency of a microwave power amplifier is 10 to 20%. For a typical microwave power amplifier of 20 watts, input DC power of at least 100 watts is required. Such a large demand for input power suggests that a better method of RF/microwave power generation is required. The price paid for using a linear amplifier where high linearity is unnecessary includes higher initial and operating costs, lower DC-to-RF conversion efficiency, high power consumption, higher power dissipation and the accompanying need for higher capacity heat removal means, and an amplifier that is more prone to parasitic oscillation. The first use of a higher efficiency mode of power generation was described by Baxandall in 1959. This higher efficiency mode, Class-D, is achieved through distinct switching techniques to reduce the power losses associated with switching, conduction, and gate drive losses of a given transistor.

  12. High efficiency GaP power conversion for Betavoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Paul E.; Dinetta, Louis C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1994-01-01

    AstroPower is developing a gallium phosphide (GaP) based energy converter optimized for radio luminescent light-based power supplies. A 'two-step' or 'indirect' process is used where a phosphor is excited by radioactive decay products to produce light that is then converted to electricity by a photovoltaic energy converter. This indirect conversion of beta-radiation to electrical energy can be realized by applying recent developments in tritium based radio luminescent (RL) light sources in combination with the high conversion efficiencies that can be achieved under low illumination with low leakage, gallium phosphide based devices. This tritium to light approach is inherently safer than battery designs that incorporate high activity radionuclides because the beta particles emitted by tritium are of low average energy and are easily stopped by a thin layer of glass. GaP layers were grown by liquid phase epitaxy and p/n junction devices were fabricated and characterized for low light intensity power conversion. AstroPower has demonstrated the feasibility of the GaP based energy converter with the following key results: 23.54 percent conversion efficiency under 968 muW/sq cm 440 nm blue light, 14.59 percent conversion efficiency for 2.85 muW/sq cm 440 nm blue light, and fabrication of working 5 V array. We have also determined that at least 20 muW/sq cm optical power is available for betavoltaic power systems. Successful developments of this device is an enabling technology for low volume, safe, high voltage, milliwatt power supplies with service lifetimes in excess of 12 years.

  13. High-efficiency (6+1)x1 combiner for high power fiber lasers and amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugroschl, Dan; Park, Jongchul; Wlodawski, Mitchell; Singer, Jonathan; Kopp, Victor I.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a (6+1)x1 combiner for fiber lasers and amplifiers based on a glass fusion technology. We have combined a conventional fiber fusion technology for pump channels with a new design for a single mode signal channel, which utilizes a vanishing core technology. The approach has been developed for single channel spot size converters and pitch reducing optical fiber arrays (PROFAs). Flexibility of this technology allows a custom design to match both a single or large mode area fiber at the input and a required active fiber at the output. The technology allows two parameters, mode field diameter (MFD) and taper diameter or channel spacing to be adjusted independently resulting in low loss coupling for signal channel at input and output. Utilizing this approach we have obtained better than 0.3 dB coupling for a signal channel at 1550 nm with a standard SMF28 fiber at the input and an active fiber at the output, while using six conventional 105/125 micron fibers as pump channels operating at 974 nm efficiently coupled to a double-clad fiber. Low signal loss results in high efficiency lasing or amplification suitable for high power applications. This unique technology allows excellent coupling for the signal channel as well as for the pump channels and is amenable to even more pump channels if desired.

  14. An Integrated High Efficiency Switched Mode Laser Power Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, S. Spencer

    1987-05-01

    An ideal laser power supply should bring a capacitive storage medium to a programmable voltage level at a constant rate. This voltage level must be maintained until the laser is fired, at which time the charging source must be immune to severe transients. Considerations include efficiency, size, cost, and reliability. A switched mode charging source is described which has been in commercial production for several years, and which will transfer 5KW of average power to a value of capacitance ranging from 20 to 100nF at approximately 32KV with repetition rates to 500Hz.

  15. High-Efficiency Hall Thruster Discharge Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaquish, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Busek Company, Inc., is designing, building, and testing a new printed circuit board converter. The new converter consists of two series or parallel boards (slices) intended to power a high-voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAC) thruster or other similarly sized electric propulsion devices. The converter accepts 80- to 160-V input and generates 200- to 700-V isolated output while delivering continually adjustable 300-W to 3.5-kW power. Busek built and demonstrated one board that achieved nearly 94 percent efficiency the first time it was turned on, with projected efficiency exceeding 97 percent following timing software optimization. The board has a projected specific mass of 1.2 kg/kW, achieved through high-frequency switching. In Phase II, Busek optimized to exceed 97 percent efficiency and built a second prototype in a form factor more appropriate for flight. This converter then was integrated with a set of upgraded existing boards for powering magnets and the cathode. The program culminated with integrating the entire power processing unit and testing it on a Busek thruster and on NASA's HiVHAC thruster.

  16. High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1995-10-19

    Carbonate fuel cells developed by Energy Research Corporation, in commercial 2.85 MW size, have an efficiency of 57.9 percent. Studies of higher efficiency hybrid power cycles were conducted in cooperation with METC to identify an economically competitive system with an efficiency in excess of 65 percent. A hybrid power cycle was identified that includes a direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine and a steam cycle, which generates power at a LHV efficiency in excess of 70 percent. This new system is called a Tandem Technology Cycle (TTC). In a TTC operating on natural gas fuel, 95 percent of the fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for the reforming of the fuel, and flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell system which generates 72 percent of the power. The portion of the fuel cell anode exhaust which is not recycled, is burned and heat is transferred to the compressed air from a gas turbine, raising its temperature to 1800{degrees}F. The stream is then heated to 2000{degrees}F in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 13 percent of the power. Half the exhaust from the gas turbine flows to the anode exhaust burner, and the remainder flows to the fuel cell cathodes providing the O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the fuel cells flows to a steam system which includes a heat recovery steam generator and stages steam turbine which generates 15 percent of the TTC system power. Studies of the TTC for 200-MW and 20-MW size plants quantified performance, emissions and cost-of-electricity, and compared the characteristics of the TTC to gas turbine combined cycles. A 200-MW TTC plant has an efficiency of 72.6 percent, and is relatively insensitive to ambient temperature, but requires a heat exchanger capable of 2000{degrees}F. The estimated cost of electricity is 45.8 mills/kWhr which is not competitive with a combined cycle in installations where fuel cost is under $5.8/MMBtu.

  17. SIPHORE: Conceptual Study of a High Efficiency Neutral Beam Injector Based on Photo-detachment for Future Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Simonin, A.; Christin, L.; Esch, H. de; Garibaldi, P.; Grand, C.; Villecroze, F.; Blondel, C.; Delsart, C.; Drag, C.; Vandevraye, M.; Brillet, A.; Chaibi, W.

    2011-09-26

    An innovative high efficiency neutral beam injector concept for future fusion reactors is under investigation (simulation and R and D) between several laboratories in France, the goal being to perform a feasibility study for the neutralization of intense high energy (1 MeV) negative ion (NI) beams by photo-detachment.The objective of the proposed project is to put together the expertise of three leading groups in negative ion quantum physics, high power stabilized lasers and neutral beam injectors to perform studies of a new injector concept called SIPHORE (SIngle gap PHOto-neutralizer energy REcovery injector), based on the photo-detachment of negative ions and energy recovery of unneutralised ions; the main feature of SIPHORE being the relevance for the future Fusion reactors (DEMO), where high injector efficiency (up to 70-80%), technological simplicity and cost reduction are key issues to be addressed.The paper presents the on-going developments and simulations around this project, such as, a new concept of ion source which would fit with this injector topology and which could solve the remaining uniformity issue of the large size ion source, and, finally, the presentation of the R and D program in the laboratories (LAC, ARTEMIS) around the photo-neutralization for Siphore.

  18. High-Efficiency, Low-Weight Power Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Technology for design and fabrication of radically new type of conductioncooled high-power (25 kVA) lightweight transformer having outstanding thermal and electrical characteristics. Fulfills longstanding need for conduction-cooled transformers and magnetics with low internal thermal resistances. Development techniques limited to conductive heat transfer, since other techniques such as liquid cooling, forced liquid cooling, and evaporative cooling of transformers impractical in zero-gravity space environment. Transformer uniquely designed: mechanical structure also serves as thermal paths for conduction cooling of magnetic core and windings.

  19. Broadband linearisation of high-efficiency power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenington, Peter B.; Parsons, Kieran J.; Bennett, David W.

    1993-01-01

    A feedforward-based amplifier linearization technique is presented which is capable of yielding significant improvements in both linearity and power efficiency over conventional amplifier classes (e.g. class-A or class-AB). Theoretical and practical results are presented showing that class-C stages may be used for both the main and error amplifiers yielding practical efficiencies well in excess of 30 percent, with theoretical efficiencies of much greater than 40 percent being possible. The levels of linearity which may be achieved are required for most satellite systems, however if greater linearity is required, the technique may be used in addition to conventional pre-distortion techniques.

  20. High Efficiency Ka-Band Solid State Power Amplifier Waveguide Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    A novel Ka-band high efficiency asymmetric waveguide four-port combiner for coherent combining of two Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Solid State Power Amplifiers (SSPAs) having unequal outputs has been successfully designed, fabricated and characterized over the NASA deep space frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The measured combiner efficiency is greater than 90 percent, the return loss greater than 18 dB and input port isolation greater than 22 dB. The manufactured combiner was designed for an input power ratio of 2:1 but can be custom designed for any arbitrary power ratio. Applications considered are NASA s space communications systems needing 6 to 10 W of radio frequency (RF) power. This Technical Memorandum (TM) is an expanded version of the article recently published in Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Electronics Letters.

  1. Conversion Tower for Dispatchable Solar Power: High-Efficiency Solar-Electric Conversion Power Tower

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-11

    HEATS Project: Abengoa Solar is developing a high-efficiency solar-electric conversion tower to enable low-cost, fully dispatchable solar energy generation. Abengoa’s conversion tower utilizes new system architecture and a two-phase thermal energy storage media with an efficient supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) power cycle. The company is using a high-temperature heat-transfer fluid with a phase change in between its hot and cold operating temperature. The fluid serves as a heat storage material and is cheaper and more efficient than conventional heat-storage materials, like molten salt. It also allows the use of a high heat flux solar receiver, advanced high thermal energy density storage, and more efficient power cycles.

  2. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  3. The quest for fusion power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Steven C.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion power is one of a very few sustainable options to replace fossil fuels as the world's primary energy source. Although the conditions for fusion have been reached, much remains to be done to turn scientific success into commercial electrical power.

  4. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  5. A high efficiency C-band internally-matched harmonic tuning GaN power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Zhao, B. C.; Zheng, J. X.; Zhang, H. S.; Zheng, X. F.; Ma, X. H.; Hao, Y.; Ma, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a high efficiency C-band gallium nitride (GaN) internally-matched power amplifier (PA) is presented. This amplifier consists of 2-chips of self-developed GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with 16 mm total gate width on SiC substrate. New harmonic manipulation circuits are induced both in the input and output matching networks for high efficiency matching at fundamental and 2nd-harmonic frequency, respectively. The developed amplifier has achieved 72.1% power added efficiency (PAE) with 107.4 W output power at 5 GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this amplifier exhibits the highest PAE in C-band GaN HEMT amplifiers with over 100 W output power. Additionally, 1000 hours' aging test reveals high reliability for practical applications.

  6. Time-reversal duality of high-efficiency RF power amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Reveyrand, T; Ramos, I; Popovic, Z

    2012-12-06

    The similarity between RF power amplifiers and rectifiers is discussed. It is shown that the same high-efficiency harmonically-terminated power amplifier can be operated in a dual rectifier mode. Nonlinear simulations with a GaN HEMT transistor model show the time-reversal intrinsic voltage and current waveform relationship between a class-F amplifier and rectifier. Measurements on a class-F-1 amplifier and rectifier at 2.14 GHz demonstrate over 80% efficiency in both cases.

  7. High efficient expression of bioactive human BMP-14 in E. coli using SUMO fusion partner.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian Feng; Cui, Xian Wei; Ji, Hai Yan; Qiu, Ting; Ji, Xue Mei; Du, Ming Xian; Wu, Hai Tao; Xu, Xing Zhou; Zhang, Shuang Quan

    2011-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are cytokines from the TGF-β superfamily, with important roles during embryonic development and in the induction of bone and cartilage tissue differentiation in the adult body. In this contribution, We report here the application of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion technology to the expression and purification of human BMP-14. The fusion protein expressed in a soluble form was purified to a purity of 90% by Ni-IDA chromatography. After the SUMO-BMP14 fusion protein was cleaved by the SUMO protease at 30 °C for 1 h, the cleaved sample was re-applied to a Ni-IDA. Finally, about 45 mg recombinant hBMP-14 was obtained from 1 litre bacterial culture with no less than 95% purity. The purified hBMP-14 dimer was over 90% purity and could induce the expression of alkaline phosphatase activity in C2C12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus the SUMO-mediated peptide expression and purification system potentially could be employed for the production of other homodimeric proteins. PMID:22057545

  8. Fusion power and the environment.

    PubMed

    Flakus, F N

    1975-09-01

    Fusion reactor design concepts are being pursued in the research and development programme of various countries and studies are being undertaken on the possible environmental impact of fusion power reactors. The paper reviews and summarizes the results of such environmental impact studies. Attention is restricted to deuterium-tritium fusion reactor concepts and a preliminary environmental impact assessment is presented. The possible inventory tritium and radioactive materials in the neutron-activated blanket structure of fusion power reactors is described and potential hazards posed by this radioactive materials inventory are discussed. Non-radiological implications and accident considerations are outlined. In conclusion, various areas still awaiting further investigation and research work are identified. The paper contains 8 tables and 50 references. PMID:1212270

  9. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pulsed power offers and efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. We are pursuing two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. This paper describes recent progress in each approach and plans for future development.

  10. Electrical heating of soils using high efficiency electrode patterns and power phases

    DOEpatents

    Buettner, Harley M.

    1999-01-01

    Powerline-frequency electrical (joule) heating of soils using a high efficiency electrode configuration and power phase arrangement. The electrode configuration consists of several heating or current injection electrodes around the periphery of a volume of soil to be heated, all electrodes being connected to one phase of a multi-phase or a single-phase power system, and a return or extraction electrode or electrodes located inside the volume to be heated being connected to the remaining phases of the multi-phase power system or to the neutral side of the single-phase power source. This electrode configuration and power phase arrangement can be utilized anywhere where powerline frequency soil heating is applicable and thus has many potential uses including removal of volatile organic compounds such as gasoline and tricholorethylene (TCE) from contaminated areas.

  11. A compact high efficiency 8 kW 325 MHz power amplifier for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Jitendra Kumar; Ramarao, B. V.; Pande, Manjiri M.; Singh, P.

    2014-11-01

    A solid state RF power amplifier (SSRFPA) has been designed and developed for 8 kW RF power at 325 MHz. The work was carried out to achieve high efficiency (over 70% efficiency), high gain and compact size for the amplifier module. The sub-components of this amplifier like a 1 kW amplifier module at 325 MHz, an 8-way RF power combiner rated for 8 kW RF power and a micro-strip based power divider have been designed and developed in-house. The size of the amplifier is miniaturized by incorporating innovative design techniques and proper selection of the substrate material in the input/output matching networks. Measured power gain and conversion efficiency of the solid state RF power amplifier module at 1.06 kW output is 21.7 dB and 73.2%, respectively. A coaxial line based 8-way Wilkinson power combiner has been designed and developed. Return loss of the combiner at the output (combined) port is 26.4 dB at 325 MHz. Transmission parameters of the combiner from each input (splitting) port to output port are 9.1 dB±0.15 dB. This amplifier uses a pre-driver of 20 W and a driver amplifier of 150 W. Total power gain and efficiency of 8 kW SSRFPA have been 92.3 dB (including the driver stages) and 68.3%, respectively. The harmonic content in the RF output is less than -50 dBc for all the harmonics. Main features of this development are high power density (kW/cm3), large value for kW/module, high efficiency (68.3%) for 8 kW SSRFPA at 325 MHz and rugged operation.

  12. Volume Bragg grating narrowed high-power and highly efficient cladding-pumped Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yao, Weichao; Zhao, Chujun; Shen, Deyuan; Fan, Dianyuan

    2014-12-10

    High-power and highly efficient operation of a single-mode cladding-pumped Raman fiber laser with narrow lasing bandwidth is demonstrated. The spectral narrowing was realized by an external cavity containing a volume Bragg grating with a center wavelength of 1658 nm. A maximum output power of 10.4 W at 1658.3 nm with a spectral linewidth (FWHM) of ∼0.1  nm was obtained for the launched pump power of 18.4 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 109% with respect to the launched pump power. Lasing characteristics of free-running operation are also evaluated and discussed. PMID:25608067

  13. A high-efficiency power and data transmission system for biomedical implanted electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamici, Zoubir; Itti, Roland; Champier, Jacques

    1996-02-01

    In biomedical engineering, inductive transcutaneous links can be used for power and data transfer between external systems and implanted electronic devices. The development of a micro-telemeter having a significant implantation depth needs a high-efficiency magnetic transcutaneous link. This paper presents a new system, which uses a multi-frequency load network for transmitter coil based on the class E power amplifier. At the carrier frequency used, the resistive load is influenced by the coupling of the coils and by the variation of the implant equivalent resistance. Modulating this latter between two rails permits one to modulate the amplitude of the external transmitter current and then to transmit internal data without the use of the classical implanted emitter design. Furthermore, the fact that the modulation index depends on the coupling factor, allows one to find the external coil's correct position using a position feedback loop. A complete study of the concept of digital data transmission by impedance modulation associated with a class E power amplifier is presented. Internal data transmission using this system yields a decrease of the internal electronic circuitry bulk and constitutes a high-efficiency energizing device. A theoretical investigation shows that the efficiency of the power transfer varies between 44 and 75% within a wide range of implantation depths (20 - 40 mm).

  14. Evolution of Automotive Chopper Circuits Towards Ultra High Efficiency and Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovsky, Martin; Tsuruta, Yukinori; Kawamura, Atsuo

    Automotive industry is considered to be one of the main contributors to environmental pollution and global warming. Therefore, many car manufacturers are in near future planning to introduce hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) and pure electric vehicles (EV) to make our cars more environmentally friendly. These new vehicles require highly efficient and small power converters. In recent years, considerable improvements were made in designing such converters. In this paper, an approach based on so called Snubber Assisted Zero Voltage and Zero Current Switching topology otherwise also known as SAZZ is presented. This topology has evolved to be one of the leaders in the field of highly efficient converters with high power densities. Evolution and main features of this topology are briefly discussed. Capabilities of the topology are demonstrated on two case study prototypes based on different design approaches. The prototypes are designed to be fully bi-directional for peak power output of 30kW. Both designs reached efficiencies close to 99% in wide load range. Power densities over 40kW/litre are attainable in the same time. Combination of MOSFET technology and SAZZ topology is shown to be very beneficial to converters designed for EV applications.

  15. Polarization maintaining, high-power and high-efficiency (6+1)×1 pump/signal combiner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Victor I.; Park, Jongchul; Wlodawski, Mitchell; Singer, Jonathan; Neugroschl, Dan

    2014-03-01

    We have developed an all-glass, fusion spliceable polarization maintaining (6+1)× 1 pump/signal combiner for fiber lasers and amplifiers. We utilize an enhanced tapered fiber bundle technology for multimode pump channels and a vanishing core fiber for the single mode polarization maintaining large mode area (PLMA) signal channel. The signal channel of the combiner is optimized to match a double-clad PLMA fiber with 20 micron core and 400 micron glass cladding with 0.065 numerical aperture (NA). The multimode pump channels have 200 micron core and 240 micron cladding with NA of 0.22 designed to deliver high power 980 nm pump light. The same double-clad PLMA fiber is used as both the signal input channel and the combined output for the device. Polarization axes of the input and output PLMA fibers are aligned during the fusion splices to achieve polarization crosstalk below -20 dB. Utilizing this approach, we have achieved coupling loss of ~0.4 dB for the signal channel as measured from the input PLMA to the output PLMA at a wavelength of 1060 nm and coupling loss below 0.01 dB for all pump channels as determined from the measured temperature rise of the combiner package temperature as the optical pump power at 974 nm is increased up to 45 W. Low signal and pump losses result in high efficiency lasing or amplification at over a kW of pump power for high power applications where a single mode, high polarization extinction ratio output is required.

  16. A low-power, high-efficiency Ka-band TWTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Dayton, James A., Jr.; Palmer, Raymond W.; Force, Dale A.; Tamashiro, Rodney N.; Wilson, John F.; Dombro, Louis; Harvey, Wayne L.

    1992-03-01

    NASA has developed a new class of Ka-band TWT amplifiers (TWTAs) which achieve their high efficiency/low power performance goals by means of an advanced dynamic velocity taper (DVT). The DVT is characterized by a continuous, nonlinear reduction in helix pitch from its initial synchronous value in the output section of the TWT to near the end of the helix. Another efficiency-maximizing feature is the inclusion of a multistage depressed collector employing oxygen-free, high-conductivity Cu electrodes treated for secondary electron emission suppression by means of ion bombardment. An efficiency of 43 percent is expected to be reached.

  17. A low-power, high-efficiency Ka-band TWTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Dayton, James A., Jr.; Palmer, Raymond W.; Force, Dale A.; Tamashiro, Rodney N.; Wilson, John F.; Dombro, Louis; Harvey, Wayne L.

    1992-01-01

    NASA has developed a new class of Ka-band TWT amplifiers (TWTAs) which achieve their high efficiency/low power performance goals by means of an advanced dynamic velocity taper (DVT). The DVT is characterized by a continuous, nonlinear reduction in helix pitch from its initial synchronous value in the output section of the TWT to near the end of the helix. Another efficiency-maximizing feature is the inclusion of a multistage depressed collector employing oxygen-free, high-conductivity Cu electrodes treated for secondary electron emission suppression by means of ion bombardment. An efficiency of 43 percent is expected to be reached.

  18. Fabrication of High power, High-Efficiency Linear Array Diode Lasers by Pulse Anodic Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Qu, Yi; Bo, Baoxue

    2006-09-01

    InGaAlAs/AlGaAs/GaAs double-quantum-well (DQW) linear array diode lasers with asymmetric wide waveguide have been successfully fabricated by pulse anodic oxidation upon molecular beam epitaxy material growth. High-efficiency and high-power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) output has been realized at 808 nm wavelength. The threshold current and slope efficiency of the prepared high-fill-factor QCW devices are 24 A and 1.25 A/W, respectively, and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 51% has been achieved.

  19. Ka-Band TWT High-Efficiency Power Combiner for High-Rate Data Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee; Vaden, Karl R.; Lesny, Gary G.; Glass, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    A four-port magic-T hybrid waveguide junction serves as the central component of a high-efficiency two-way power combiner circuit for transmitting a high-rate phase-modulated digital signal at a carrier frequency in the Ka-band (between 27 and 40 GHz). This power combiner was developed to satisfy a specific requirement to efficiently combine the coherent outputs of two traveling-wavetube (TWT) amplifiers that are typically characterized by power levels on the order of 100 W or more. In this application, the use of a waveguide-based power combiner (instead of a coaxial-cable- or microstrip-based power combiner, for example) is dictated by requirements for low loss, high power-handling capability, and broadband response. Combiner efficiencies were typically 90 percent or more over both the linear and saturated output power regions of operation of the TWTs . Figure 1 depicts the basic configuration of the magic-T hybrid junction. The coherent outputs of the two TWTs enter through ports 1 and 4. As a result of the orientations of the electromagnetic fields, which also provides a needed high port-to-port isolation, of these two input signals and the interior design of the magic-T junction, the input powers are divided so as to add in phase at one output port (port 2), and to be opposite in phase and hence cancel each other at the opposite coplanar output port (port 3). The net result is that the output power at port 2 is essentially double that of the output of one TWT, minus the power lost in the magic-T hybrid junction. Optimum performance as a high-efficiency power combiner thus requires a balance of both power and phase at the input ports of the magic-T. Replicas of this two-way combiner can be arranged in a binary configuration to obtain a 2n-way (where n is an integer) combiner. For example, Figure 2 illustrates the use of three two-way combiners to combine the outputs of four TWTs.

  20. High-Efficiency Ka-Band Waveguide Two-Way Asymmetric Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Freeman, J. C.; Chevalier, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is planning a number of Space Exploration, Earth Observation and Space Science missions where Ka-band solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) could have a role. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) based SSPAs with output powers on the order of 10 W at Ka-band frequencies would be adequate to satisfy the data transmission rate requirements at the distances involved. MMICs are a type of integrated circuit fabricated on a GaAs wafer, which operates at micro wave frequencies and performs the function of signal amplification. The highest power Ka-band (31.8 to 32.3 GHz) SSPA to have flown in space had an output power of 2.6 W with an overall efficiency of 14.3 percent. This SSPA was built around discrete GaAs pHEMT (high electron mobility transistor) devices and flew aboard the Deep Space One spacecraft. State-of-the-art GaAs pHEMT-based MMIC power amplifiers (PAs) can deliver RF power at Ka-band frequencies anywhere from 3 W with a power added efficiency (PAE) of 32 percent to 6 W with a PAE of 26 percent. However, to achieve power levels higher than 6 W, the output of several MMIC PAs would need to be combined using a high-efficiency power combiner. Conventional binary waveguide power combiners, based on short-slot and magic-T circuits, require MMIC PAs with identical amplitude and phase characteristics for high combining efficiency. However, due to manufacturing process variations, the output powers of the MMIC PAs tend to be unequal, and hence the need to develop unequal power combiners. A two-way asymmetric magic-T based power combiner for MMIC power amplifiers, which can take in unequal inputs, has been successfully designed, fabricated, and characterized over NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) frequency range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The figure is a transparent view of the a sym - metric combiner that shows the 4-port configuration and the internal structure. The rod, post, and iris are positioned by design to achieve the desired asymmetric power ratio

  1. A novel power source for high-precision, highly efficient micro w-EDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shun-Tong; Chen, Chi-Hung

    2015-07-01

    The study presents the development of a novel power source for high-precision, highly efficient machining of micropart microstructures using micro wire electrical discharge machining (w-EDM). A novel power source based on a pluri resistance-capacitance (pRC) circuit that can generate a high-frequency, high-peak current with a short pulse train is proposed and designed to enhance the performance of micro w-EDM processes. Switching between transistors is precisely controlled in the designed power source to create a high-frequency short-pulse train current. Various microslot cutting tests in both aluminum and copper alloys are conducted. Experimental results demonstrate that the pRC power source creates instant spark erosion resulting in markedly less material for removal, diminishing discharge crater size, and consequently an improved surface finish. A new evaluation approach for spark erosion ability (SEA) to assess the merits of micro EDM power sources is also proposed. In addition to increasing the speed of micro w-EDM by increasing wire feed rates by 1.6 times the original feed rate, the power source is more appropriate for machining micropart microstructures since there is less thermal breaking. Satisfactory cutting of an elaborate miniature hook-shaped structure and a high-aspect ratio microstructure with a squared-pillar array also reveal that the developed pRC power source is effective, and should be very useful in the manufacture of intricate microparts.

  2. Advanced Concepts: Aneutronic Fusion Power and Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Aneutronic Fusion for In-Space thrust, power. Clean energy & potential nuclear gains. Fusion plant concepts, potential to use advanced fuels. Methods to harness ionic momentum for high Isp thrust plus direct power conversion into electricity will be presented.

  3. High-efficiency tunable yellow-orange VECSEL with an output power of 20 W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantola, Emmi; Leinonen, Tomi; Ranta, Sanna; Tavast, Miki; Guina, Mircea

    2014-03-01

    We report on the development of a high-efficiency frequency doubled vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser with an output power of 20 W and emission spectrum centered at 588 nm. The MBE-grown gain chip incorporated 10 GaInAs quantum wells and emitted in the 1180 nm range. The frequency conversion was achieved using a lithium triborate nonlinear crystal in an intra-cavity configuration. In addition to the nonlinear crystal, the V-shaped cavity also included a birefringent filter and an etalon for linewidth narrowing and wavelength tuning. The maximum optical-to-optical conversion efficiency obtained was ~28 % for 16 W of output power and the VECSEL had a tuning bandwidth of ~26 nm ranging from about 576 to 602 nm. We were also able to generate yellow pulses down to 570 ns duration by directly modulating the VECSEL's pump laser.

  4. A high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhangming, Zhu; Lianxi, Liu; Yintang, Yang; Han, Lei

    2009-02-01

    Based on the difference close-loop feedback technique and the difference pre-amp, a high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier is proposed. A rail-to-rail PWM comparator with window function has been embedded in the class-D audio power amplifier. Design results based on the CSMC 0.5 μm CMOS process show that the max efficiency is 90%, the PSRR is -75 dB, the power supply voltage range is 2.5-5.5 V, the THD+N in 1 kHz input frequency is less than 0.20%, the quiescent current in no load is 2.8 mA, and the shutdown current is 0.5 μA. The active area of the class-D audio power amplifier is about 1.47 × 1.52 mm2. With the good performance, the class-D audio power amplifier can be applied to several audio power systems.

  5. Fusion power for space propulsion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R.; Rayle, W.; Reinmann, J.

    1972-01-01

    Principles of operation, interplanetary orbit-to-orbit mission capabilities, technical problems, and environmental safeguards are examined for thermonuclear fusion propulsion systems. Two systems examined include (1) a fusion-electric concept in which kinetic energy of charged particles from the plasma is converted into electric power (for accelerating the propellant in an electrostatic thrustor) by the van de Graaf generator principle and (2) the direct fusion rocket in which energetic plasma lost from the reactor has a suitable amount of added propellant to obtain the optimum exhaust velocity. The deuterium-tritium and the deuterium/helium-3 reactions are considered as suitable candidates, and attention is given to problems of cryogenic refrigeration systems, magnet shielding, and high-energy particle extraction and guidance.

  6. High Efficiency Power Combining of Ka-Band TWTs for High Data Rate Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Vaden, K. R.; Lesny, G. G.; Glass, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    Future NASA deep space exploration missions are expected in some cases to require telecommunication systems capable of operating at very high data rates (potentially 1 Gbps or more) for the transmission back to Earth of large volumes of scientific data, which means high frequency transmitters with large bandwidth. Among the Ka band frequencies of interest are the present 500 MHz Deep Space Network (DSN) band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz and a broader band at 37-38 GHz allocated for space science [1]. The large distances and use of practical antenna sizes dictate the need for high transmitter power of up to 1 kW or more. High electrical efficiency is also a requirement. The approach investigated by NASA GRC is a novel wave guide power combiner architecture based on a hybrid magic-T junction for combining the power output from multiple TWTs [1,2]. This architecture was successfully demonstrated and is capable of both high efficiency (90-95%, depending on frequency) and high data rate transmission (up to 622 Mbps) in a two-way power combiner circuit for two different pairs of Ka band TWTs at two different frequency bands. One pair of TWTs, tested over a frequency range of 29.1 to 29.6 GHz, consisted of two 110-115W TWTs previously used in uplink data transmission evaluation terminals in the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program [1,2]. The second pair was two 100W TWTs (Boeing 999H) designed for high efficiency operation (greater than 55%) over the DSN frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz [3]. The presentation will provide a qualitative description of the wave guide circuit, results for power combining and data transmission measurements, and results of computer modeling of the magic-T and alternative hybrid junctions for improvements in efficiency and power handling capability. The power combiner results presented here are relevant not only to NASA deep space exploration missions, but also to other U.S. Government agency programs.

  7. Fusion - A potential power source

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.H. )

    1994-10-01

    Duplicating the fusion process of the sun and the stars for energy production on earth would present many difficulties. The state of matter at such temperatures--the plasma state--may be considered a gas of electrons and nuclei, so one problem is the need to confine a hot, reacting plasma. Because the plasma is an electric conductor, it is subject to magnetic forces. Thus, one approach is to confine the hot plasma by a magnetic field. Another approach is to heat the matter so rapidly that the fusion reactions take place before the matter has had time to fly apart, that is, to use inertial confinement. At the United Nations' Atoms for Peace Conference in 1958, a remarkably cooperative, international research effort began. In spite of many difficulties, substantial progress has been made. Initially, many tokamaks were built with circular cross sections. However, shaped plasmas were shown to have clear advantages. The cross sections of some of the larger ones are illustrated here. The two largest devices in the US are the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the Doublet III-D (DIII-D) at General Atomics in San Diego. The TFTR device is constructed with neutron shielding and equipped to handle the superheavy hydrogen isotope tritium, which is radioactive. This makes it possible to operate the device with the optimum fuel mixture: an equal mixture of deuterium and tritium. This mixture is optimal because the cross section for the DT reaction has by far the largest cross section of the fusion reactions mentioned above. A large effort is presently under way to design the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This is a joint effort by the European Community, Japan, Russia, and the US. Goals include the production of fusion power in excess of 1,000 MW for studying the physics of igniting plasmas, and the integrated demonstration of fusion-reactor technologies.

  8. A high efficiency and power factor, segmented linear constant current LED driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongyuan, Li; Wei, Guo; Zhangming, Zhu

    2015-04-01

    A high efficiency, high power factor, and linear constant current LED driver based on adaptive segmented linear architecture is presented. When the input voltage varied, the proposed LED driver automatically switched over LED strings according to the segmented LED voltage drop, which increased the LED lighting time. The efficiency and power factor are improved, while the system design is simplified by this control scheme. Without the usage of electrolytic capacitor and magnetic components, the proposed driver possesses advantages of smaller size, longer lifetime and lower cost over others. The proposed driver is implemented in 0.8 μm 5 V/40 V HVCMOS process, which occupies an active area of 820 × 920 μm2. The measured results show that the average value of the internal reference voltage is 500 ± 7 mV, with a standard deviation of only 4.629 mV, thus LED current can be set accurately. Under 220 V root mean square 50 Hz utility voltage and the number ratio of the three LED strings being 47 : 17 : 16, the system can realize a high power factor of 0.974 and power conversion efficiency of 93.4%. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61234002, 61322405, 61306044, 61376033).

  9. A high-efficiency power cycle in which hydrogen is compressed by absorption in metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Powell, J R; Salzano, F J; Yu, W S; Milau, J S

    1976-07-23

    A high-efficiency power cycle is proposed in which molecular hydrogen gas is used as a working fluid in a regenerative closed Brayton cycle. The hydrogen gas is compressed by an absorption-desorption cycle on metal hydride (FeTiH(x)) beds. Low-temperature solar or geothermal heat (temperature about 100 degrees C) is used for the compression process, and high-temperature fossil fuel or nuclear heat (temperature about 700 degrees C) supplies the expansion work in the turbine. Typically, about 90 percent of the high-temperature heat input is converted to electricity, while about 3 kilowatts of low-temperature heat is required per kilowatt of electrical output. PMID:17745726

  10. Silicon-Carbide Power MOSFET Performance in High Efficiency Boost Power Processing Unit for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-Carbide device technology has generated much interest in recent years. With superior thermal performance, power ratings and potential switching frequencies over its Silicon counterpart, Silicon-Carbide offers a greater possibility for high powered switching applications in extreme environment. In particular, Silicon-Carbide Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors' (MOSFETs) maturing process technology has produced a plethora of commercially available power dense, low on-state resistance devices capable of switching at high frequencies. A novel hard-switched power processing unit (PPU) is implemented utilizing Silicon-Carbide power devices. Accelerated life data is captured and assessed in conjunction with a damage accumulation model of gate oxide and drain-source junction lifetime to evaluate potential system performance at high temperature environments.

  11. High Power High Efficiency Ka-Band Power Combiners for Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    Wide-band power combining units for Ka-band are simulated for use as MMIC amplifier applications. Short-slot couplers as well as magic-tees are the basic elements for the combiners. Wide bandwidth (5 GHz) and low insertion (approx.0.2 dB) and high combining efficiencies (approx.90 percent) are obtained.

  12. High efficiency fourth-harmonic generation from nanosecond fiber master oscillator power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaodong; Steinvurzel, Paul; Rose, Todd S.; Lotshaw, William T.; Beck, Steven M.; Clemmons, James H.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate high power, deep ultraviolet (DUV) conversion to 266 nm through frequency quadrupling of a nanosecond pulse width 1064 nm fiber master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA). The MOPA system uses an Yb-doped double-clad polarization-maintaining large mode area tapered fiber as the final gain stage to generate 0.5-mJ, 10 W, 1.7- ns single mode pulses at a repetition rate of 20 kHz with measured spectral bandwidth of 10.6 GHz (40 pm), and beam qualities of Mx 2=1.07 and My 2=1.03, respectively. Using LBO and BBO crystals for the second-harmonic generation (SHG) and fourth-harmonic generation (FHG), we have achieved 375 μJ (7.5 W) and 92.5 μJ (1.85 W) at wavelengths of 532 nm and 266 nm, respectively. To the best of our knowledge these are the highest narrowband infrared, green and UV pulse energies obtained to date from a fully spliced fiber amplifier. We also demonstrate high efficiency SHG and FHG with walk-off compensated (WOC) crystal pairs and tightly focused pump beam. An SHG efficiency of 75%, FHG efficiency of 47%, and an overall efficiency of 35% from 1064 nm to 266 nm are obtained.

  13. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Shota Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-07

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  14. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-01

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  15. Progress toward achieving high power and high efficiency semipolar LEDs and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hong

    Performance of current commercially available wurtzite nitride based light-emitting diodes (LEDs), grown along the polar (0001) c-plane orientation, is limited by the presence of polarization-related electric fields inside multi-quantum wells (MQWs). The discontinuities in both spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization at the heterointerfaces result in internal electric fields in the quantum wells. These electric fields cause carrier separation [quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE)] and reduce the radiative recombination rate within the quantum wells. One approach to reduce and possibly eliminate the polarization-related effects is to grow III-nitride devices on crystal planes that are inclined with respect to the c-axis, i.e., on semipolar planes. In this dissertation, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has been employed for the homoepitaxial growth of GaN based LEDs on semipolar orientations. As a consequence of growing on high-quality bulk GaN substrates, the LEDs have significantly reduced threading dislocation and stacking fault densities, resulting in remarkable improvements in EQE and output power. High efficiency semipolar (1011) violet-blue and blue LEDs have been demonstrated without any intentional effort to enhance the light extraction from those devices. Optimizations of epitaxial structures have led to increased output power and external quantum efficiency. A silicone encapsulated single quantum well blue LED with peak wavelength of 444 nm with output power of 24.3 mW, external quantum efficiency of 43% and luminous efficacy of 75 lm/W (with phosphorescent coating) at 20 mA has been demonstrated. Polarization fields in strained (1011) and (112¯2) InGaN quantum wells have been experimentally determined through bias-dependent optical studies. Our results show that the polarization field flips its direction in semipolar InGaN quantum wells with large inclination angles (i.e. around 60°). This suggests that there exists a polarization

  16. Performance Assessment of Baseline Cells for the High Efficiency Space Power Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneidegger, Brianne T.

    2012-01-01

    The Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration (ETDD) Program High Efficiency Space Power Systems (HESPS) Project, formerly the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) Energy Storage Project is tasked with developing advanced lithium-ion cells for future NASA Exploration missions. Under this project, components under development via various in-house and contracted efforts are delivered to Saft America for scale-up and integration into cells. Progress toward meeting project goals will be measured by comparing the performance to these cells with cells of a similar format with Saft s state-of-the-art aerospace chemistry. This report discusses the results of testing performed on the first set of baseline cells delivered by Saft to the NASA Glenn Research Center. This build is a cylindrical "DD" geometry with a 10 Ah nameplate capacity. Testing is being performed to establish baseline cell performance at conditions relevant to ETDD HESPS Battery Key Performance Parameter (KPP) goals including various temperatures, rates, and cycle life conditions. Data obtained from these cells will serve as a performance baseline for future cell builds containing optimized ETDD HESPSdeveloped materials. A test plan for these cells was developed to measure cell performance against the high energy cell KPP goals. The goal for cell-level specific energy of the high energy technology is 180 Wh/kg at a C/10 discharge rate and 0 C. The cells should operate for at least 2000 cycles at 100 percent DOD with 80 percent capacity retention. Baseline DD cells delivered 152 Wh/kg at 20 C. This number decreased to 143.9 Wh/kg with a 0 C discharge. This report provides performance data and summarizes results of the testing performed on the DD cells.

  17. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  18. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the

  19. A 1.8-3 GHz-band high efficiency GaAs pHEMT power amplifier MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ge; Hongqi, Tao; Xuming, Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes an S-band wideband high efficiency power amplifier based on the Nanjing Electron Device Institute's GaAs pHEMT monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology. To realize high efficiency, the two stage power amplifier is designed with a driver ratio of 1 : 8. The low-pass filter/high-pass filter combined matching circuit is applied to the amplifier to reduce the chip size, as well as to realize the optimum impedances over a wide bandwidth for high efficiency at each stage. Biased at class AB under a drain supply voltage of 5 V, the amplifier delivers 33-34 dBm saturated output power across the frequency range of 1.8 to 3 GHz with associated power-added efficiency of 35%-45% and very flat power gain of 25-26 dB in CW mode. The size of this MMIC is very compact with 2.7 × 2.75 mm2.

  20. Triboelectric-pyroelectric-piezoelectric hybrid cell for high-efficiency energy-harvesting and self-powered sensing.

    PubMed

    Zi, Yunlong; Lin, Long; Wang, Jie; Wang, Sihong; Chen, Jun; Fan, Xing; Yang, Po-Kang; Yi, Fang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-01

    A triboelectric-pyroelectric-piezoelectric hybrid cell, consisting of a triboelectric nanogenerator and a pyroelectric-piezoelectric nanogenerator, is developed for highly efficient mechanical energy harvesting through multiple mechanisms. The excellent performance of the hybrid cell enhances the energy-harvesting efficiency significantly (by 26.2% at 1 kΩ load resistance), and enables self-powered sensing, which will lead to a variety of advanced applications. PMID:25727070

  1. Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

    2012-05-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

  2. Alternative lattice options for energy recovery in high-average-power high-efficiency free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab

    2009-03-01

    High-average-power free-electron lasers often rely on energy-recovering linacs. In a high-efficiency free electron laser, the main limitation to high average power stems from the fractional energy spread induced by the free-electron laser process. Managing beams with large fractional energy spread while simultaneously avoiding beam losses is extremely challenging and relies on intricate longitudinal phase space manipulations. In this paper we discuss a possible alternative technique that makes use of an emittance exchange between one of the transverse and the longitudinal phase spaces.

  3. A convenient high power high efficiency blue cw single frequency laser by IR diode laser doubling with PPKTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danekar, Koustubh; Khademian, Ali; Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, David

    2010-03-01

    We report on high efficiency resonant doubling to 486nm using periodically poled KTP. A stable blue power of 680 ± 5 mW was obtained using the 840 mW output power of a FBG stabilized PM fiber coupled IR semiconductor laser. This gives an overall conversion efficiency of 80% for generating blue. To obtain this result, all losses in the system were carefully studied and minimized. Using a similar cavity design replacing PPKTP with CLBO we are additionally investigating a second doubling stage for efficient UV generation to 243nm.

  4. Laser space power system for Moon: Ecological safety and high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Smakhtin, A.P.; Mosesov, S.K.

    1997-12-31

    The power supply of a space base placed on the Moon is a central problem in the development of the Moon as the nearest celestial body to the Earth. At the present time some different versions of the Moon`s base power supply with using chemical, solar, and nuclear power converters on the Moon`s surface are considered. The comparative analysis of the use of Space Power Systems which are placed in a low and a high lunar orbits and transmit electromagnetic power from the lunar orbit to the Moon`s base by the trapping of a focused electromagnetic beam is performed in this paper. From the results of this analysis it follows that such Space Power Systems may be an alternative power supply system to traditional systems and they offer few advantages over last mentioned systems in the near future. Space Power System with using solar pumped laser as means for power conversion and power transportation is particularly promising for solution to the problem of power supply of the Moon`s base.

  5. Highly efficient welding power supply. Final report, May 1, 1978-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Thommes, J M

    1980-09-01

    The results and findings of an energy efficient welding power development project are presented. The power source developed is to be used for electric arc welding processes in which 3.5 trillion Btu of energy (1978 example year) can be saved annually. The power source development incorporates the use of switch mode power supply techniques in order to convert industrial supply mains (230/460 VAC 3 phi 60 Hz) to appropriate welding voltages and currents (up to 32 volts/up to 300 amps). A series capacitor switch mode power circuit was the circuit technique chosen in order to optimize energy efficiency, costs, reliability, size/weight, and welding performance. Test results demonstrated an effective efficiency (taking into account idle power consumption) of 80 to 91% for the energy efficient power source while the conventional types of power sources tested ranged from 41 to 74% efficiency. Line power factor was also improved for the energy efficient power source. Field tests indicated additional refinements of weld process performance and power source audible noise emission reduction could be beneficial.

  6. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  7. Compound Semiconductor Devices for Low-Power High-Efficiency Radio Frequency Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Chang, P.C.; Hietala, V.M.; Sloan, L.R.

    1999-02-18

    The power consumption of Radio Frequency (RF) electronics is a significant issue for Wireless systems. Since most wireless systems are portable and thus battery operated, reductions in DC power consumption can significantly reduce the weight and/or increase the battery lifetime of the system. As transmission consumes significantly more power than reception for most Wireless applications, previous efforts have been focused on increasing the efficiency of RF power amplification. These efforts have resulted in large increases in transmit efficiencies with research-grade amplifier efficiencies approaching 100%. In this paper, they describe their efforts on reducing power consumption of reception and other small signal RF functions. Additionally, recent power efficiency measurements on InP HEMT devices for transmission are presented. This work focuses on the needs of today's typical portable Wireless systems, which operate at frequencies up to several GHz.

  8. Switching coordination of distributed dc-dc converters for highly efficient photovoltaic power plants

    DOEpatents

    Agamy, Mohammed; Elasser, Ahmed; Sabate, Juan Antonio; Galbraith, Anthony William; Harfman Todorovic, Maja

    2014-09-09

    A distributed photovoltaic (PV) power plant includes a plurality of distributed dc-dc converters. The dc-dc converters are configured to switch in coordination with one another such that at least one dc-dc converter transfers power to a common dc-bus based upon the total system power available from one or more corresponding strings of PV modules. Due to the coordinated switching of the dc-dc converters, each dc-dc converter transferring power to the common dc-bus continues to operate within its optimal efficiency range as well as to optimize the maximum power point tracking in order to increase the energy yield of the PV power plant.

  9. High efficiency Tm:YAG slab laser with hundred-watts-level output power.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pian; Jin, Lin; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Haitao; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-04-01

    We report on a hundred-watts-level high power Tm:YAG slab laser system operating at room temperature. The laser has a threshold pump power of 46.7 W, benefiting from the good mode matching of an end-pumping scheme and the excellent heat-dissipation capability of our cooling system. At 350 W of incident pump power, 100 W of output power at ∼2015  nm has been generated, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 33.6% with respect to the incident pump power and an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 28.6%. As far as we know, this is the highest optical-to-optical conversion efficiency so far achieved in a high power Tm:YAG laser system operating at a hundred-watts level. PMID:27139649

  10. High Efficiency Nuclear Power Plants using Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rarick, Richard A.; Rangarajan, Rajmohan

    2009-01-01

    An overall system analysis approach is used to propose potential conceptual designs of advanced terrestrial nuclear power plants based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) experience and utilizing Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) thermal-to-electric energy conversion technology. In particular conceptual designs for an advanced 1 GWe power plant with turbine reheat and compressor intercooling at a 950 K turbine inlet temperature (TIT), as well as near term 100 MWe demonstration plants with TITS of 950 K and 1200 K are presented. Power plant performance data were obtained for TITS ranging from 650 to 1300 K by use of a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems code which considered the interaction between major sub-systems, including the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR), heat source and heat sink heat exchangers, turbo -generator machinery, and an electric power generation and transmission system. Optional off-shore submarine installation of the power plant is a major consideration.

  11. High Efficiency Nuclear Power Plants Using Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rarick, Richard A.; Rangarajan, Rajmohan

    2009-01-01

    An overall system analysis approach is used to propose potential conceptual designs of advanced terrestrial nuclear power plants based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) experience and utilizing Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) thermal-to-electric energy conversion technology. In particular conceptual designs for an advanced 1 GWe power plant with turbine reheat and compressor intercooling at a 950 K turbine inlet temperature (TIT), as well as near term 100 MWe demonstration plants with TITs of 950 and 1200 K are presented. Power plant performance data were obtained for TITs ranging from 650 to 1300 K by use of a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems code which considered the interaction between major sub-systems, including the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR), heat source and heat sink heat exchangers, turbo-generator machinery, and an electric power generation and transmission system. Optional off-shore submarine installation of the power plant is a major consideration.

  12. A high-efficiency, low-noise power solution for a dual-channel GNSS RF receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Shi; Taishan, Mo; Jianlian, Le; Yebing, Gan; Chengyan, Ma; Tianchun, Ye

    2012-08-01

    A high-efficiency low-noise power solution for a dual-channel GNSS RF receiver is presented. The power solution involves a DC—DC buck converter and a followed low-dropout regulator (LDO). The pulse-width-modulation (PWM) control method is adopted for better noise performance. An improved low-power high-frequency PWM control circuit is proposed, which halves the average quiescent current of the buck converter to 80 μA by periodically shutting down the OTA. The size of the output stage has also been optimized to achieve high efficiency under a light load condition. In addition, a novel soft-start circuit based on a current limiter has been implemented to avoid inrush current. Fabricated with commercial 180-nm CMOS technology, the DC—DC converter achieves a peak efficiency of 93.1% under a 2 MHz working frequency. The whole receiver consumes only 20.2 mA from a 3.3 V power supply and has a noise figure of 2.5 dB.

  13. Highly efficient high power CW and Q-switched Ho:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, J.

    2015-06-01

    An efficient operation of a Ho:YLF laser pumped by a Tm-doped fibre laser is reported. The research in a continuous-wave (CW) operation was done for two crystals of the same 0.5 at.%Ho dopant concentration and with different lengths (3×3×30 mm3 and 3×3×50 mm3). For an output coupling transmission of 20% and a crystal length of 50 mm, the maximum CWoutput power of 38.9 W for 81.4 W of incident pump power, corresponding to the slope efficiency of 52.3% and optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 47.8% (determined with respect to the incident pump power) was achieved. The highest opti- cal-to-optical conversion efficiency of 70.2% with respect to the absorbed pump power was obtained. The influence of a heat-sink cooling water temperature on theCWlaser performance was studied. For a Q-switched operation the pulse repe- tition frequency (PRF) was changed from 2 to 10 kHz. The maximum average output power of 34.1 W at the PRF of 10 kHz was obtained for a 50 mm holmium crystal length. For 2 kHz PRF and 71.9 W of incident pump power, pulse energies of 13.7 mJ with a 21 ns FWHM pulse width corresponding to 652 kW peak power were recorded.

  14. The 30 kWe class high efficiency arcjet power conditioner, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, See-Pok; Britt, Edward J.; McCracken, Kevin

    1988-08-01

    A 30 kWe arcjet power conditioning unit (PCU) has been designed, built and tested, both with a solid state load and with a 30 kWe arcjet thruster. The arcjet PCU has accumulated over 40 hours full power or nearly full power operating time, and showed no sign of degradation. The measured efficiency was 94 percent, which can easily be increased to 95 percent by substitution of some recently available semiconductors. The stability of output current has been demonstrated while using current-mode, pulse-width modulation control.

  15. Highly efficient and high output power of erbium doped fiber laser in a linear cavity configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awang, N. A.; Zulkifli, M. Z.; Norizan, S. F.; Harun, S. W.; Ghani, Z. A.; Ahmad, H.

    2010-10-01

    A simple Erbium Doped Fiber Laser (EDFL) in linear cavity configuration is reported. The cavity design is based on an FBG as a back reflector, and a loop back optical circulator with an output coupler as the front reflector. Different coupling ratios of the coupler are tested and 50: 50 provides the highest coupling output power of 22.06 dBm (160.7 mW). The pump power conversion efficiency is about 95% when pumping with two pump lasers at 1460 and 1490 nm with combined pumping power of 545 mW. The laser output has a measured linewidth of 0.0179 nm.

  16. All-metal metamaterial slow-wave structure for high-power sources with high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanshuai; Duan, Zhaoyun Tang, Xianfeng; Wang, Zhanliang; Zhang, Yabin; Gong, Yubin; Feng, Jinjun

    2015-10-12

    In this paper, we have proposed a metamaterial (MTM) which is suitable for the compact high-power vacuum electron devices. For example, an S-band slow-wave structure (SWS) based on the all-metal MTMs has been studied by both simulation and experiment. The results show that this MTM SWS is very helpful to miniaturize the high-power vacuum electron devices and largely improve the output power and the electronic efficiency. The simulation model of an S-band MTM backward wave oscillator (BWO) is built, and the particle-in-cell simulated results are presented here: a 2.454 GHz signal is generated and its peak output power is 4.0 MW with a higher electronic efficiency of 31.5% relative to the conventional BWOs.

  17. Modeling of high efficiency solar cells under laser pulse for power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells have been used to convert sunlight to electrical energy for many years and also offer great potential for non-solar energy conversion applications. Their greatly improved performance under monochromatic light compared to sunlight, makes them suitable as photovoltaic (PV) receivers in laser power beaming applications. Laser beamed power to a PV array receiver could provide power to satellites, an orbital transfer vehicle, or a lunar base. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium phosphide (InP) solar cells have calculated efficiencies of more than 50 percent under continuous illumination at the optimum wavelength. Currently high power free-electron lasers are being developed which operate in pulsed conditions. Understanding cell behavior under a laser pulse is important in the selection of the solar cell material and the laser. An experiment by NAsA lewis and JPL at the AVLIS laser facility in Livermore, CA presented experimental data on cell performance under pulsed laser illumination. Reference 5 contains an overview of technical issues concerning the use of solar cells for laser power conversion, written before the experiments were performed. As the experimental results showed, the actual effects of pulsed operation are more complicated. Reference 6 discusses simulations of the output of GaAs concentrator solar cells under pulsed laser illumination. The present paper continues this work, and compares the output of Si and GaAs solar cells.

  18. High-efficiency high-power QCW diode-side-pumped zigzag Nd:YAG ceramic slab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Liu, W.; Bo, Y.; Jiang, B.; Xu, J.; Li, J.; Xu, Y.; Pan, Y.; Xu, J. L.; Feng, X.; Guo, Y.; Shen, Y.; Yang, F.; Yuan, L.; Yuan, H.; Peng, Q.; Cui, D.; Xu, Z.

    2013-04-01

    A high-efficiency high-power diode-side-pumped quasi-continuous wave (QCW) Nd:YAG ceramic slab laser using zigzag optical path was demonstrated. With an integrating sphere technique, the scattering and absorption coefficient of the ceramic slab were measured to be 0.0024 and 0.0016 cm-1 at 1,064 nm, respectively. Under a pump power of 6.69 kW, an average output power of 2.44 kW at 1,064 nm with a repetition rate of 400 Hz was achieved, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 36.5 %. As far as we know, this is the highest conversion efficiency reported for QCW side-pumped single slab Nd:YAG ceramic laser.

  19. Modeling of High Efficiency Solar Cells Under Laser Pulse for Power Beaming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells may be used as receivers for laser power beaming. To understand the behavior of solar cells when illuminated by a pulsed laser, the time response of gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells to pulsed monochromatic input has been modeled using a finite element solar cell model.

  20. Ultra Clean 1.1MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered System

    SciTech Connect

    Zurlo, James; Lueck, Steve

    2011-08-31

    Dresser, Inc. (GE Energy, Waukesha gas engines) will develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize a 1.1 Megawatt (MW) natural gas fueled combined heat and power reciprocating engine powered package. This package will feature a total efficiency > 75% and ultra low CARB permitting emissions. Our modular design will cover the 1 – 6 MW size range, and this scalable technology can be used in both smaller and larger engine powered CHP packages. To further advance one of the key advantages of reciprocating engines, the engine, generator and CHP package will be optimized for low initial and operating costs. Dresser, Inc. will leverage the knowledge gained in the DOE - ARES program. Dresser, Inc. will work with commercial, regulatory, and government entities to help break down barriers to wider deployment of CHP. The outcome of this project will be a commercially successful 1.1 MW CHP package with high electrical and total efficiency that will significantly reduce emissions compared to the current central power plant paradigm. Principal objectives by phases for Budget Period 1 include: • Phase 1 – market study to determine optimum system performance, target first cost, lifecycle cost, and creation of a detailed product specification. • Phase 2 – Refinement of the Waukesha CHP system design concepts, identification of critical characteristics, initial evaluation of technical solutions, and risk mitigation plans. Background

  1. High efficiency high power blue laser by resonant doubling in PPKTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danekar, Koustubh

    I developed a high power blue laser for use in scientific and technical applications (e.g., precision spectroscopy, semiconductor inspection, flow cytometry, etc.). It is linearly polarized, single longitudinal and single transverse mode, and a convenient fiber coupled continuous wave (cw) laser source. My technique employs external cavity frequency doubling and provides better power and beam quality than commercially available blue diode lasers. I use a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) stabilized infrared (IR) semiconductor laser source with a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coupled output. Using a custom made optical and mechanical design this output is coupled with a mode matching efficiency of 96% into the doubling cavity. With this carefully designed and optimized cavity, measurements were carried out at various fundamental input powers. A net efficiency of 81% with an output power of 680 mW at 486 nm was obtained using 840 mW of IR input. Also I report an 87.5% net efficiency in coupling of blue light from servo locked cavity into a single mode PM fiber. Thus I have demonstrated a total fiber to fiber efficiency of 71% can be achieved in our approach using periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP). To obtain these results, all losses in the system were carefully studied and minimized.

  2. High power, high efficiency, 2D laser diode arrays for pumping solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; McShea, J.C.; Bogdan, A.R.; Petheram, J.C.; Rosen, A.

    1987-11-01

    This document reports the current performance of 2D laser diode arrays operating at 770 nm and 808 nm for pumping promethium and neodymium solid state lasers, respectively. Typical power densities are in excess of 2kw/cm/sup 2/ with overall efficiencies greater than 30%.

  3. A High-Density, High-Efficiency, Isolated On-Board Vehicle Battery Charger Utilizing Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, B; Barkley, A; Cole, Z; Passmore, B; Martin, D; McNutt, TR; Lostetter, AB; Lee, JS; Shiozaki, K

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an isolated on-board vehicular battery charger that utilizes silicon carbide (SiC) power devices to achieve high density and high efficiency for application in electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid EVs (PHEVs). The proposed level 2 charger has a two-stage architecture where the first stage is a bridgeless boost ac-dc converter and the second stage is a phase-shifted full-bridge isolated dc-dc converter. The operation of both topologies is presented and the specific advantages gained through the use of SiC power devices are discussed. The design of power stage components, the packaging of the multichip power module, and the system-level packaging is presented with a primary focus on system density and a secondary focus on system efficiency. In this work, a hardware prototype is developed and a peak system efficiency of 95% is measured while operating both power stages with a switching frequency of 200 kHz. A maximum output power of 6.1 kW results in a volumetric power density of 5.0 kW/L and a gravimetric power density of 3.8 kW/kg when considering the volume and mass of the system including a case.

  4. High-Power, High-Efficiency Ka-Band Space Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczyk, Richard; Wilson, Jeffrey; Simons, Rainee; Williams, Wallace; Bhasin, Kul; Robbins, Neal; Dibb, Daniel; Menninger, William; Zhai, Xiaoling; Benton, Robert; Burdette, James

    2007-01-01

    The L-3 Communications Model 999H traveling-wave tube (TWT) has been demonstrated to generate an output power of 144 W at 60-percent overall efficiency in continuous-wave operation over the frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The best TWT heretofore commercially available for operation in the affected frequency band is characterized by an output power of only 35 W and an efficiency of 50 percent. Moreover, whereas prior TWTs are limited to single output power levels, it has been shown that the output power of the Model 999H can be varied from 54 to 144 W. A TWT is a vacuum electronic device used to amplify microwave signals. TWTs are typically used in free-space communication systems because they are capable of operating at power and efficiency levels significantly higher than those of solid-state devices. In a TWT, an electron beam is generated by an electron gun consisting of a cathode, focusing electrodes, and an anode. The electrons pass through a hole in the anode and are focused into a cylindrical beam by a stack of periodic permanent magnets and travel along the axis of an electrically conductive helix, along which propagates an electromagnetic wave that has been launched by an input signal that is to be amplified. The beam travels within the helix at a velocity close to the phase velocity of the electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field decelerates some of the electrons and accelerates others, causing the beam to become formed into electron bunches, which further interact with the electromagnetic wave in such a manner as to surrender kinetic energy to the wave, thereby amplifying the wave. The net result is to amplify the input signal by a factor of about 100,000. After the electrons have passed along the helix, they impinge on electrodes in a collector. The collector decelerates the electrons in such a manner as to recover most of the remaining kinetic energy and thereby significantly increase the power efficiency of the TWT.

  5. High-power radially polarized Yb:YAG thin-disk laser with high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Haefner, Matthias; Vogel, Moritz; Pruss, Christof; Voss, Andreas; Osten, Wolfgang; Graf, Thomas

    2011-03-14

    Radially polarized beams with an output power of 275 W, M2=2.3 and an efficiency of about 52.5% were generated from an Yb:YAG thin-disk laser. An intra-cavity circular resonant waveguide grating was used as a polarization selective mirror inside the laser cavity. We report on the design and the fabrication using a scanning beam interference lithography system and discuss the calculated and measured performances of the presented polarizing grating mirrors. PMID:21445144

  6. High-Efficiency 800 nm Multi-Layer Dielectric Gratings for High Average Power Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H T; Britten, J A; Patel, D; Brizuela, F; Rocca, J J; Menoni, C S

    2006-06-15

    We report on the design, fabrication, and performance of a 1740 l/mm multilayer dielectric diffraction grating for use with 800 nm light. At an input angle of 8{sup o} from Littrow and a wavelength from 770 to 830 nm, >90% diffraction efficiency is achieved, with peak diffraction efficiency of >97% at 800nm. We will also comment on laser damage threshold and power-handling properties.

  7. Highly efficient shielding of high-voltage underground power lines by pure iron screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, M.; Lorusso, G.; Fiorillo, F.; Roccato, P. E.; Annibale, M.

    Metallic shielding structures are often adopted to mitigate the magnetic fields generated by high-power high-voltage underground power lines. Their design calls for the assessment of the combined influence of their geometrical parameters and the properties of the employed materials. In this paper, we present the study of pure iron shielding of a three-phase power line and the related efficiency. A finite element-boundary element (FE-BE) method is applied to describe the electromagnetic behavior of the cable-enwrapping shield. This is modeled as an indefinitely long cylinder of hexagonal cross-section, obtained by longitudinal juxtaposition of two doubly bent laminations, their thickness ranging between 1 and 10 mm. The magnetic properties of the involved pure iron laminations have been experimentally obtained under three different conditions: as-received, after localized plastic deformation, after stress-relief annealing. A low-carbon steel lamination has also been considered, whose harder magnetic behavior is predicted to lead to inferior shielding properties. The strong increase of iron permeability obtained upon annealing is conducive to improved shielding effectiveness in thin lamination screens, the advantage of the related magnetic softening becoming irrelevant for sheet thickness larger than about 4 mm. Tests performed on a 42 m long archetype three-phase line, endowed with a 4 mm thick annealed pure iron shield, provide figures for the shielding effectiveness that are in close agreement with the FE-BE modeling prediction.

  8. High efficiency direct fuel cell hybrid power cycle for near term application

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C.; Sanderson, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Direct carbonate fuel cells being developed by Energy Research Corporation can generate power at an efficiency approaching 60% LHV. This unique fuel cell technology can consume natural gas and other hydrocarbon based fuels directly without requiring an external reformer, thus providing a simpler and inherently efficient power generation system. A 2 MW power plant demonstration of this technology has been initiated at an installation in the city of Santa Clara in California. A 2.85 MW commercial configuration shown in Figure 1 is presently being developed. The complete plant includes the carbonate fuel cell modules, an inverter, transformer and switchgear, a heat recovery unit and supporting instrument air and water treatment systems. The emission levels for this 2.85 MW plant are projected to be orders of magnitude below existing or proposed standards. The 30 year levelized cost of electricity, without inflation, is projected to be approximately 5{cents}/kW-h assuming capital cost for the carbonate fuel cell system of $1000/kW.

  9. Combined Heat and Power Systems Technology Development and Demonstration 370 kW High Efficiency Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-10-14

    The C370 Program was awarded in October 2010 with the ambitious goal of designing and testing the most electrically efficient recuperated microturbine engine at a rated power of less than 500 kW. The aggressive targets for electrical efficiency, emission regulatory compliance, and the estimated price point make the system state-of-the-art for microturbine engine systems. These goals will be met by designing a two stage microturbine engine identified as the low pressure spool and high pressure spool that are based on derivative hardware of Capstone’s current commercially available engines. The development and testing of the engine occurred in two phases. Phase I focused on developing a higher power and more efficient engine, that would become the low pressure spool which is based on Capstone’s C200 (200kW) engine architecture. Phase II integrated the low pressure spool created in Phase I with the high pressure spool, which is based on Capstone’s C65 (65 kW) commercially available engine. Integration of the engines, based on preliminary research, would allow the dual spool engine to provide electrical power in excess of 370 kW, with electrical efficiency approaching 42%. If both of these targets were met coupled with the overall CHP target of 85% total combined heating and electrical efficiency California Air Resources Board (CARB) level emissions, and a price target of $600 per kW, the system would represent a step change in the currently available commercial generation technology. Phase I of the C370 program required the development of the C370 low pressure spool. The goal was to increase the C200 engine power by a minimum of 25% — 250 kW — and efficiency from 32% to 37%. These increases in the C200 engine output were imperative to meet the power requirements of the engine when both spools were integrated. An additional benefit of designing and testing the C370 low pressure spool was the possibility of developing a stand-alone product for possible

  10. Fusion power: a challenge for materials science.

    PubMed

    Duffy, D M

    2010-07-28

    The selection and design of materials that will withstand the extreme conditions of a fusion power plant has been described as one of the greatest materials science challenges in history. The high particle flux, high thermal load, thermal mechanical stress and the production of transmutation elements combine to produce a uniquely hostile environment. In this paper, the materials favoured for the diverse roles in a fusion power plant are discussed, along with the experimental and modelling techniques that are used to advance the understanding of radiation damage in materials. Areas where further research is necessary are highlighted. PMID:20566513

  11. High efficiency 4H-SiC betavoltaic power sources using tritium radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; Portnoff, Samuel; Spencer, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Realization of an 18.6% efficient 4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC) large area betavoltaic power source using the radioisotope tritium is reported. A 200 nm 4H-SiC P+N junction is used to collect high-energy electrons. The electron source is a titanium tritide (TiH3x) foil, or an integrated titanium tritide region formed by the diffusion of tritium into titanium. The specific activity of the source is directly measured. Dark current measured under short circuit conditions was less than 6.1 pA/cm2. Samples measured with an external tritium foil produced an open circuit voltage of 2.09 V, short circuit current of 75.47 nA/cm2, fill factor of 0.86, and power efficiency of 18.6%. Samples measured with an integrated source produced power efficiencies of 12%. Simulations were done to determine the beta spectrum (modified by self absorption) exiting the source and the electron hole pair generation function in the 4H-SiC. The electron-hole pair generation function in 4H-SiC was modeled as a Gaussian distribution, and a closed form solution of the continuity equation was used to analyze the cell performance. The effective surface recombination velocity in our samples was found to be 105-106 cm/s. Our analysis demonstrated that the surface recombination dominates the performance of a tritium betavoltaic device but that using a thin P+N junction structure can mitigate some of the negative effects.

  12. High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

    2002-01-02

    Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power

  13. Structure of 100 W high-efficiency piezoelectric transformer for applications in power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kohei; Adachi, Kazunari; Shibamata, Yuki; Suzuki, Tsunehisa

    2016-08-01

    We propose a piezoelectric transformer comprising two identical bolt-clamped Langevin-type transducers (BLTs) and a stepped horn for its applications to high-power electronics. The transformer can realize a specified step-up voltage transformation ratio determined by the cross-sectional area ratio of the horn, both ends of which are connected to the BLTs, at a driving frequency in the vicinity of its mechanical resonance frequency. In experiments, we obtained the results predicted by finite-element analysis. The deviations of the measured resonance and driving frequencies from the numerically estimated values were 0.86 and 0.80%, respectively. At the driving frequency, the maximum efficiency was 99.2%, and a maximum output power of 100 W was obtained with an input voltage of 100 Vrms. Nevertheless, we observed unstable actions of the transformer, which can be attributed to the “jumping and dropping” phenomena, in high voltage operation. Numerical analysis suggests that the instability may be caused by the local electric field concentration in the piezoelectric elements, which occurs only when the transformer is driven by a low-output-impedance voltage source at its mechanical resonance frequency.

  14. Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-12-15

    OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study.

  15. High-efficiency power production from natural gas with carbon capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Thomas A.; Barton, Paul I.

    A unique electricity generation process uses natural gas and solid oxide fuel cells at high electrical efficiency (74%HHV) and zero atmospheric emissions. The process contains a steam reformer heat-integrated with the fuel cells to provide the heat necessary for reforming. The fuel cells are powered with H 2 and avoid carbon deposition issues. 100% CO 2 capture is achieved downstream of the fuel cells with very little energy penalty using a multi-stage flash cascade process, where high-purity water is produced as a side product. Alternative reforming techniques such as CO 2 reforming, autothermal reforming, and partial oxidation are considered. The capital and energy costs of the proposed process are considered to determine the levelized cost of electricity, which is low when compared to other similar carbon capture-enabled processes.

  16. PIC simulation of high efficiency and high power 14 vane industrial magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Sandeep; Maurya, Shivendra; Singh, V. V. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a 3D Particle in cell (PIC) simulation of a CW 2.450±0.050 GHz 10 kW industrial magnetron. The electromagnetic and PIC simulation of magnetron has been carried out using CST microwave studio andCST particle studio. A virtual prototype of 14 vane magnetron has been simulated on computer. The cold frequency of magnetron is found 2.495 GHz. The unloaded quality factor and circuit efficiency are found 1970 and 92% from electromagnetic simulation. The output power is achieved 12.4 KW for anode voltage 12.7 kV and magnetic field 2900 Gauss. The anode current is found anode current 1.22 A. The total efficiency is 78.76 %.

  17. Development of high-efficiency and high-power vertical light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Berthold; Galler, Bastian; Engl, Karl

    2014-10-01

    We provide an overview of the vertical chip technology and discuss recent improvements that have enabled (AlGaIn)N-based light-emitting diodes to further extend the range of their applications. In particular, the excellent scalability of chip size and low electric losses make related devices predestinated for use in high-power and high-luminance tasks. The evolution from standard vertical chips to the advanced chip design is described from a conceptual as well as from a performance point of view. Excellent stability data under demanding conditions are shown, which are the basis for the operation of devices in automotive applications requiring high reliability at current densities exceeding 3 A/mm2. As the vertical chip technology is not directly dependent on the substrate owing to its removal in the chip process, it is highly flexible with respect to the change of substrate materials to the very promising (111) silicon, for example.

  18. High-efficiency concentration/multi-solar-cell system for orbital power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onffroy, J. R.; Stoltzmann, D. E.; Lin, R. J. H.; Knowles, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the economic feasibility of a concentrating spectrophotovoltaic orbital electrical power generation system. In this system dichroic beam-splitting mirrors are used to divide the solar spectrum into several wavebands. Absorption of these wavebands by solar cells with matched energy bandgaps increases the cell efficiency while decreasing the amount of heat which must be rejected. The optical concentration is performed in two stages. The first concentration stage employs a Cassegrain-type telescope, resulting in a short system length. The output from this stage is directed to compound parabolic concentrators which comprise the second stage of concentration. Ideal efficiencies for one-, two-, three-, and four-cell systems were calculated under 1000 sun, AMO conditions, and optimum energy bands were determined. Realistic efficiencies were calculated for various combinations of Si, GaAs, Ge and GaP. Efficiencies of 32 to 33 percent were obtained with the multicell systems. The optimum system consists of an f/3.5 optical system, a beam splitter to divide the spectrum at 0.9 microns, and two solar cell arrays, GaAs and Si.

  19. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power for the period February 01, 2001- April 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L. C.

    2002-09-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power for the period February 01, 2001-April 30, 2002. Future nuclear reactors will operate at higher efficiencies and, therefore, at higher temperature than current reactors. High temperatures present the potential for generating hydrogen at high efficiency using a thermochemical process. Thermochemical cycles for the generation of hydrogen from water were extensively studied in the 1970s and early 1980s both in the U.S. and abroad. Since that time, thermochemical water-splitting has not been pursued in the U.S. at any significant level. In Phase 1, we reviewed and analyzed all available data to determine the process best suited to hydrogen production from the advanced nuclear reactors expected to be available in the next 20 to 30 years. The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle was selected for detailed study in Phases 2 and 3. In Phase 2, we investigated means of adapting this cycle to the heat output characteristics of an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor. In Phase 3, we are integrating the cycle and reactor into a unified hydrogen production plant. The highlight of this period was that the scheme of processing the HI/I{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O phase with phosphoric acid is being considered in addition to the reactive distillation scheme.

  20. Fusion Propulsion and Power for Future Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froning, H. D., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    There are innovative magnetic and electric confinement fusion power and propulsion system designs with potential for: vacuum specific impulses of 1500-2000 seconds with rocket engine thrust/mass ratios of 5-10 g's; environmentally favorable exhaust emissions if aneutronic fusion propellants can be used; a 2 to 3-fold reduction in the mass of hypersonic airliners and SSTO aerospace planes; a 10 to 20 fold reduction in Mars expedition mass and cost (if propellant from planetary atmospheres is used); and feasibility or in-feasibility of these systems could be confirmed with a modest applied research and exploratory development cost.

  1. The high-efficiency jets magnetically accelerated from a thin disk in powerful lobe-dominated FRII radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuang-Liang

    2014-06-10

    A maximum jet efficiency line R ∼ 25 (R = L {sub jet}/L {sub bol}), found in FRII radio galaxies by Fernandes et al., was extended to cover the full range of jet power by Punsly. Recent general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of jet formation have mainly focused on the enhancement of jet power. In this work, we suggest that the jet efficiency could be very high even for conventional jet power if the radiative efficiency of disks was much smaller. We adopt the model of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds to investigate the observational high-efficiency jets in FRII radio galaxies. It is found that the structure of a thin disk can be significantly altered by the feedback of winds. The temperature of a disk gradually decreases with increasing magnetic field; the disk density, surface density, and pressure also change enormously. The lower temperature and higher surface density in the inner disk result in the rapid decrease of radiative efficiency. Thus, the jet efficiency is greatly improved even if the jet power is conventional. Our results can explain the observations quite well. The theoretical maximum jet efficiency of R ∼ 1000 suggested by our calculations is large enough to explain all of the high jet efficiency in observations, even considering the episodic activity of jets.

  2. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  3. Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Lester M. Waganer

    2011-01-04

    Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

  4. High efficient ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks by PW-ps laser pulses for producing fusion flames in DT and HB11 of solid state density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks in the range of 1020 cm/s2 has been confirmed experimentally after this was long predicted as a non-thermal direct conversion of optical energy into plasma motion due to dominating nonlinear (ponderomotive) forces [1]. The use of laser pulses of more than PW power and ps or shorter duration can ignite a nuclear fusion flame in solid density deuterium tritium because the necessary energy flux of >108J/cm2 according to the theory of Chu [2] is available [3]. For the studies of the necessary velocities of the generated fusion flames above 1000 km/s the detailed processes can be analyzed by using the advanced genuine two-fluid hydrodynamic model [4] where it was surprising that the ignition of the fusion flame by the picosecond interaction needs a comparably long development in the nanosecond range before the thermal processes result in shock fronts similar to the Rakine-Hugoniot theory. For the evaluation of power generation the problem of lateral energy losses was studied by using very high pulsed magnetic fields. The recently produced 10 Kilotesla magnetic fields [5] are very promising for solutions.

  5. Safeguard Requirements for Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Goldston and Alexander Glaser

    2012-08-10

    Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to fissile materials can be divided into three main categories: 1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, 2) covert production and diversion of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and 3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state openly produces fissile material in violation of international agreements. The degree of risk in each of these categories is assessed, taking into account both state and non-state actors, and it is found that safeguards are required for fusion energy to be highly attractive from a non-proliferation standpoint. Specific safeguard requirements and R&D needs are outlined for each category of risk, and the technical capability of the ITER experiment, under construction, to contribute to this R&D is noted. A preliminary analysis indicates a potential legal pathway for fusion power systems to be brought under the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. "Vertical" proliferation risks associated with tritium and with the knowledge that can be gained from inertial fusion energy R&D are outlined.

  6. Opportunistic replacement of fusion power system parts

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J.A.; George, L.L.

    1981-10-26

    This paper describes a maintenance problem in a fusion power plant. The problem is to specify which life limited parts should be replaced when there is an opportunity. The objective is to minimize the cost rate of replacement parts and of maintenance actions while satisfying a power plant availability constraint. The maintenance policy is to look ahead and replace all parts that will reach their life limits within a time called a screen. Longer screens yield greater system availabilities because more parts are replaced prior to their life limits.

  7. An accelerated fusion power development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.; Baker, Charles C.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Kinkead, Susan D.

    1991-06-01

    Energy for electricity and transportation is a national issue with worldwide environmental and political implications. The world must have energy options for the next century that are not vulnerable to possible disruption for technical, environmental, public confidence, or other reasons. Growing concerns about the greenhouse effect and the safety of transporting oil may lead to reduced burning of coal and other fossil fuels, and the incidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, as well as nuclear waste storage problems, have eroded public acceptance of nuclear fission. Meeting future world energy needs will require improvements in energy efficiency and conservation. However, the world will soon need new central station power plants and increasing amounts of fuel for the transportation sector. The use of fossil fuels, and possibly even fission power, will very likely be restricted because of environmental, safety, and, eventually, supply considerations. Time is running out for policymakers. New energy technologies cannot be brought to the marketplace overnight. Decades are required to bring a new energy production technology from conception to full market penetration. With the added urgency to mitigate deleterious environmental effects of energy use, policymakers must act decisively now to establish and support vigorous energy technology development programs. The U.S. has invested 8 billion over the past 40 years in fusion research and development. If the U.S. fusion program proceeds according to its present strategy, an additional 40 years, and more money, will be expended before fusion will provide commercial electricity. Such an extended schedule is neither cost-effective nor technically necessary. It is time to launch a national venture to construct and operate a fusion power pilot plant. Such a plant could be operational within 15 years of a national commitment to proceed.

  8. Alternate applications of fusion power: development of a high-temperature blanket for synthetic-fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.A.; Mattas, R.F.; Krajcinovic, D.; DePaz, J.; Gohar, Y.

    1981-11-01

    This study has shown that utilization of the unique features of a fusion reactor can result in a novel and potentially economical method of decomposing steam into hydrogen and oxygen. Most of the power of fusion reactors is in the form of energetic neutrons. If this power could be used to produce high temperature uncontaminated steam, a large fraction of the energy needed to decomposee the steam could be supplied as thermal energy by the fusion reaction. Proposed high temperature electrolysis processes require steam temperature in excess of 1000/sup 0/C for high efficiency. The design put forth in this study details a system that can accomplish that end.

  9. Editorially Speaking - Fusion Power: Reasons for Higher Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippincott, William T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research trends in the use of laser-fusion technology in combustion chambers to eradicate energy shortages. Indicates that fusion power could be made available at a relatively low expense. (CC)

  10. High Efficiency Automatic-Power-Controlled and Gain-Clamped EDFA for Broadband Passive Optical Networking Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jyi-Lai; Wei, Shui-Ken; Lin, Chin-Yuan; Iong Li, Ssu; Huang, Chih-Chuan

    2010-04-01

    The configuration of a simple improved high efficiency automatic-power-controlled and gain-clamped EDFA (APC-GC-EDFA) for broadband passive optical networking systems (BPON) is presented here. In order to compensate the phase and amplitude variation due to the different distance between the optical line terminal (OLT) and optical network units (ONU), the APC-GC-EDFA need to be employed. A single 980 nm laser module is employed as the primary pump. To extend the bandwidth, all C-band ASE is recycled as the secondary pump to enhance the gain efficiency. An electrical feedback circuit is used as a multi-wavelength channel transmitter monitor for the automatic power control to improve the gain-flattened flatness for stable amplification. The experimental results prove that the EDFA system can provide flatter clamped gain in both C-band and L-band configurations. The gain flatness wavelength ranging from 1530 to 1610 nm is within 32.83 ± 0.64 dB, i.e. below 1.95 %. The gains are clamped at 33.85 ± 0.65 dB for the input signal power of -40 dBm to -10 dBm. The range of noise figure is between 6.37 and 6.56, which is slightly lower compared to that of unclamped amplifiers. This will be very useful for measuring the gain flatness of APC-GC-EDFA. Finally, we have also demonstrated the records of the overall simultaneous dynamics measurements for the new system stabilization. The carrier to noise ratio (CNR) is 49.5 to 50.8 dBc which is above the National Television System Committee (NTSC) standard of 43 dBc, and both composite second order (CSO) 69.2 to 71.5 dBc and composite triple beat (CTB) of 69.8 to 72.2 dBc are above 53 dBc. The recorded corresponding rise-time of 1.087 ms indicates that the system does not exhibit any overshoot of gain or ASE variation due to the signal at the beginning of the pulse.

  11. A commercial lunar helium 3 fusion power infrasructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sved, J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Miley, G. H.

    1995-01-01

    The potential scenario of a commercial aneutronic fusion power economy based on Helium 3 is reviewed with recent developments in fusion grade plasma containment considered. The Spherical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device is a type of fusion reactor with immediate commercial applications as a small non-power reactor. Further development and growth to power reactor fusion reaction rates using Deuterium and Helium 3 offers the potential practical solution to fusion power. Recovery of the lunar Helium 3 inventory for export to power utility customers will require the build-up of a cis-lunar industrial infrastructure. Space transport capacity will be obliged to grow rapidly to support several thousand tons of cargo delivery to the lunar surface per year. A highly reusable, low operations cost cis-lunar transport infrastructure and lunar surface industrial activity will be made more practical by the availability of IEC fusion power units that are intrinsically low mass and compatible with space transport.

  12. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  13. Fusion Power Program biannual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    This biannual report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the April-September 1979 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Separate abstracts were prepared for three sections. (MOW)

  14. Commercial fusion power in the next decade

    SciTech Connect

    Bussard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The tokamak is a concept first invented by the Russians in 1966, which permits the stable and efficient confinement of a hot ''plasma'' in a toroidal or ''doughnut-shaped'' magnetic ''bottle''. The tokamak configuration is the world standard for all major national fusion research programs. The RIGGATRON is a very small high-field tokamak, which employs unique thermal and mechanical designs for appropriate energy extraction. The hot and densely confined ''plasma'' gas is composed of ions of the heavy hydrogen isotopes, deuterium (D) and tritium (T) which are ''fusing together'' to form helium and neutrons. The toroidal magnetic bottle confines and contains the heavy hydrogen fuel and the helium by-product, while it permits the energetic neutrons to escape. The tokamak is a special type of magnetic bottle, and the RIGGATRON is a special type of tokamak. Work conducted to date has led to conceptual design of the first fusion test units, and to the successful development of basic materials and fabrication techniques required to assure performance and engineering integrity of these units. Simultaneously, initial specifications for the test site, electrical power supply, water cooling supply and other auxiliary sub-systems have been defined.

  15. High-efficiency grid-connected photovoltaic module integrated converter system with high-speed communication interfaces for small-scale distribution power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Woo-Young; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    2010-04-15

    This paper presents a high-efficiency grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) module integrated converter (MIC) system with reduced PV current variation. The proposed PV MIC system consists of a high-efficiency step-up DC-DC converter and a single-phase full-bridge DC-AC inverter. An active-clamping flyback converter with a voltage-doubler rectifier is proposed for the step-up DC-DC converter. The proposed step-up DC-DC converter reduces the switching losses by eliminating the reverse-recovery current of the output rectifying diodes. To reduce the PV current variation introduced by the grid-connected inverter, a PV current variation reduction method is also suggested. The suggested PV current variation reduction method reduces the PV current variation without any additional components. Moreover, for centralized power control of distributed PV MIC systems, a PV power control scheme with both a central control level and a local control level is presented. The central PV power control level controls the whole power production by sending out reference power signals to each individual PV MIC system. The proposed step-up DC-DC converter achieves a high-efficiency of 97.5% at 260 W output power to generate the DC-link voltage of 350 V from the PV voltage of 36.1 V. The PV MIC system including the DC-DC converter and the DC-AC inverter achieves a high-efficiency of 95% with the PV current ripple less than 3% variation of the rated PV current. (author)

  16. Fusion-power demonstration. [Next step beyond MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S.; Moir, R.W.; Campbell, R.B.; Botwin, R.; Clarkson, I.R.; Carpenter, T.J.

    1983-03-29

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment.

  17. Inertial fusion power plant concept of operations and maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Brad; Dunne, Mike; Kasper, Jack; Sheehan, Timothy; Lang, Dwight; Anklam, Tom; Roberts, Valerie; Mau, Derek

    2015-02-01

    Parsons and LLNL scientists and engineers performed design and engineering work for power plant pre-conceptual designs based on the anticipated laser fusion demonstrations at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Work included identifying concepts of operations and maintenance (O&M) and associated requirements relevant to fusion power plant systems analysis. A laser fusion power plant would incorporate a large process and power conversion facility with a laser system and fusion engine serving as the heat source, based in part on some of the systems and technologies advanced at NIF. Process operations would be similar in scope to those used in chemical, oil refinery, and nuclear waste processing facilities, while power conversion operations would be similar to those used in commercial thermal power plants. While some aspects of the tritium fuel cycle can be based on existing technologies, many aspects of a laser fusion power plant presents several important and unique O&M requirements that demand new solutions. For example, onsite recovery of tritium; unique remote material handling systems for use in areas with high radiation, radioactive materials, or high temperatures; a five-year fusion engine target chamber replacement cycle with other annual and multi-year cycles anticipated for major maintenance of other systems, structures, and components (SSC); and unique SSC for fusion target waste recycling streams. This paper describes fusion power plant O&M concepts and requirements, how O&M requirements could be met in design, and how basic organizational and planning issues can be addressed for a safe, reliable, economic, and feasible fusion power plant.

  18. Inertial Fusion Power Plant Concept of Operations and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T.; Knutson, B.; Dunne, A. M.; Kasper, J.; Sheehan, T.; Lang, D.; Roberts, V.; Mau, D.

    2015-01-15

    Parsons and LLNL scientists and engineers performed design and engineering work for power plant pre-conceptual designs based on the anticipated laser fusion demonstrations at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Work included identifying concepts of operations and maintenance (O&M) and associated requirements relevant to fusion power plant systems analysis. A laser fusion power plant would incorporate a large process and power conversion facility with a laser system and fusion engine serving as the heat source, based in part on some of the systems and technologies advanced at NIF. Process operations would be similar in scope to those used in chemical, oil refinery, and nuclear waste processing facilities, while power conversion operations would be similar to those used in commercial thermal power plants. While some aspects of the tritium fuel cycle can be based on existing technologies, many aspects of a laser fusion power plant presents several important and unique O&M requirements that demand new solutions. For example, onsite recovery of tritium; unique remote material handling systems for use in areas with high radiation, radioactive materials, or high temperatures; a five-year fusion engine target chamber replacement cycle with other annual and multi-year cycles anticipated for major maintenance of other systems, structures, and components (SSC); and unique SSC for fusion target waste recycling streams. This paper describes fusion power plant O&M concepts and requirements, how O&M requirements could be met in design, and how basic organizational and planning issues can be addressed for a safe, reliable, economic, and feasible fusion power plant.

  19. Advances in Tandem Mirror fusion power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.

    1986-05-20

    The Tandem Mirror exhibits several distinctive features which make the reactor embodiment of the principle very attractive: Simple low-technology linear central cell; steady-state operation; high-..beta.. operation; no driven current or disruptions; divertorless operation; direction conversion of end-loss power; low-surface heat loads; and advanced fusion fuel capability. In this paper, we examine these features in connection with two tandem mirror reactor designs, MARS and MINIMARS, and several advanced reactor concepts including the wall-stabilized reactor and the field-reversed mirror. With a novel compact end plug scheme employing octopole stabilization, MINIMARS is expressly designed for short construction times, factory-built modules, and a small (600 MWe) but economic reactor size. We have also configured the design for low radioactive afterheat and inherent/passive safety under LOCA/LOFA conditions, thereby obviating the need for expensive engineered safety systems. In contrast to the complex and expensive double-quadrupole end-cell of the MARS reactor, the compact octopole end-cell of MINIMARS enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths and considerably improves the economy of scale for small (approx.250 to 600 MWe) tandem mirror reactors. Finally, we examine the prospects for realizing the ultimate potential of the tandem mirror with regard to both innovative configurations and novel neutron energy conversion schemes, and stress that advanced fuel applications could exploit its unique reactor features.

  20. Modular control of fusion power heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, D. R.

    2012-08-24

    This work is motivated by the growing demand for auxiliary heating on small and large machines worldwide. Numerous present and planned RF experiments (EBW, Lower Hybrid, ICRF, and ECH) are increasingly complex systems. The operational challenges are indicative of a need for components of real-time control that can be implemented with a moderate amount of effort in a time- and cost-effective fashion. Such a system will improve experimental efficiency, enhance experimental quality, and expedite technological advancements. The modular architecture of this control-suite serves multiple purposes. It facilitates construction on various scales from single to multiple controller systems. It enables expandability of control from basic to complex via the addition of modules with varying functionalities. It simplifies the control implementation process by reducing layers of software and electronic development. While conceived with fusion applications in mind, this suite has the potential to serve a broad range of scientific and industrial applications. During the Phase-I research effort we established the overall feasibility of this modular control-suite concept. We developed the fundamental modules needed to implement open-loop active-control and demonstrated their use on a microwave power deposition experiment.

  1. Fusion Power Demonstrations I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    In this report we present a summary of the first phase of the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. During this first phase, we investigated two configurations, performed detailed studies of major components, and identified and examined critical issues. In addition to these design specific studies, we also assembled a mirror-systems computer code to help optimize future device designs. The two configurations that we have studied are based on the MARS magnet configuration and are labeled FPD-I and FPD-II. The FPD-I configuration employs the same magnet set used in the FY83 FPD study, whereas the FPD-II magnets are a new, much smaller set chosen to help reduce the capital cost of the system. As part of the FPD study, we also identified and explored issues critical to the construction of an Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). These issues involve subsystems or components, which because of their cost or state of technology can have a significant impact on our ability to meet FPD's mission requirements on the assumed schedule. General Dynamics and Grumman Aerospace studied two of these systems, the high-field choke coil and the halo pump/direct converter, in great detail and their findings are presented in this report.

  2. Should the US abandon efforts to develop commercial fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, W.D.; Kinter, E.E.

    1993-01-22

    This article presents viewpoints and rationale for continuing and disbanding the US efforts to develop commercial fusion power. The views of W.D. Kay, an assistant professor of political science at Northeastern University, are presented regarding - yes, abandon efforts. Meanwhile, the views of Edwin Keutes, former director of the Magnetic Fusion Program for DOE, are presented for continued development.

  3. Fusion Breeding for Sustainable, Mid Century, Carbon Free Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2015-11-01

    If ITER achieves Q ~10, it is still very far from useful fusion. The fusion power, and the driver power will allow only a small amount of power to be delivered, <~50MW for an ITER scale tokamak. It is unlikely, considering ``conservative design rules'' that tokamaks can ever be economical pure fusion power producers. Considering the status of other magnetic fusion concepts, it is also very unlikely that any alternate concept will either. Laser fusion does not seem to be constrained by any conservative design rules, but considering the failure of NIF to achhieve ignition, at this point it has many more obstacles to overcome than magnetic fusion. One way out of this dilemma is to use an ITER size tokamak, or a NIF size laser, as a fuel breeder for searate nuclear reactors. Hence ITER and NIF become ends in themselves, instead of steps to who knows what DEMO decades later. Such a tokamak can easily live within the consrtaints of conservative design rules. This has led the author to propose ``The Energy Park'' a sustainable, carbon free, economical, and environmently viable power source without prolifertion risk. It is one fusion breeder fuels 5 conventional nuclear reactors, and one fast neutron reactor burns the actinide wastes.

  4. Superstructure high efficiency photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; So, L. C.; Leburton, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel class of photovoltaic cascade structures is introduced which features multijunction upper subcells. These superstructure high efficiency photovoltaics (SHEP's) exhibit enhanced upper subcell spectral response because of the additional junctions which serve to reduce bulk recombination losses by decreasing the mean collection distance for photogenerated minority carriers. Two possible electrical configurations were studied and compared: a three-terminal scheme that allows both subcells to be operated at their individual maximum power points and a two-terminal configuration with an intercell ohmic contact for series interconnection. The three-terminal devices were found to be superior both in terms of beginning-of-life expectancy and radiation tolerance. Realistic simulations of three-terminal AlGaAs/GaAs SHEP's show that one sun AMO efficiencies in excess of 26 percent are possible.

  5. A realistic, gradual and economical approach to fusion power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szoeke, A.; Moir, R. W.

    1991-06-01

    This article describes, in broad outline, a nuclear power plant that generates power by means of repetitive, low-yield explosions in an underground chamber. Such a plant can be built in the near future by using modest extensions of existing technology, and it could be economically competitive if certain parts of the cost are controlled. This is in contrast to magnetic and inertial confinement fusion, of which the technical and economic feasibility will remain highly uncertain for the foreseeable future. Technical improvements of the envisioned plant can be introduced gradually with corresponding reductions in cost of power production. With advancing technology, an increasingly larger fraction of the power can be extracted from fusion reactions, thus providing a smooth transition to a fusion-based economy. Eventually, pure (inertial) fusion schemes could be incorporated into the power plant in a natural way, thereby shortening the time required to achieve large-scale use of fusion power, possibly by decades. This article considers both the technical aspects of this route to fusion power and the relevant issues of public policy.

  6. Issues in radioactive-waste management for fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Maninger, R.C.; Dorn, D.W.

    1982-10-12

    Analysis of recent conceptual designs reveals that commercial fusion power systems will raise issues of occupational and public health and safety. This paper focuses on radioactive wastes from fusion reactor materials activated by neutrons. The analysis shows that different selections of materials and neutronic designs can make differences in orders-of-magnitude of the kinds and amounts of radioactivity to be expected. By careful and early evaluation of the impacts of the selections on waste management, designers can produce fusion power systems with radiation from waste well below today's limits for occupational and public health and safety.

  7. Design of an Ultra-High Efficiency GaN High-Power Amplifier for SAR Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Hoffman, James

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the development of a high-power amplifier for use with a remote sensing SAR system. The amplifier is intended to meet the requirements for the Sweep-SAR technique for use in the proposed DESDynI SAR instrument. In order to optimize the amplifier design, active load-pull technique is employed to provide harmonic tuning to provide efficiency improvements. In addition, some of the techniques to overcome the challenges of load-pulling high power devices are presented. The design amplifier was measured to have 49 dBm of output power with 75% PAE, which is suitable to meet the proposed system requirements.

  8. High-Efficiency Expression of TAT-bFGF Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli and the Effect on Hypertrophic Scar Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuechao; Tian, Haishan; Tang, Lu; Zheng, Long; Zheng, Lulu; Yang, Ting; Yu, Bingjie; Wang, Zhitao; Lin, Peng; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Background Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor family that has effects on wounding healing and neuro-protection. However, it is difficult to use bFGF to treat diseases that are separated by physiological barriers, such as the dermal barrier and blood brain barrier. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve bFGF’s penetration ability, we fused the recombinant human fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF) gene with TAT. We constructed a pET3c vector that contained the recombinant bFGF gene and successfully expressed this gene in the E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) pLsS. The fusion protein was purified using CM Sepharose FF and heparin affinity chromatography. The purity of the TAT-rhbFGF was greater than 95%, as detected by SDS-PAGE. An in vitro MTT trial revealed that the modified bFGF significantly promoted the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells. The cell penetration trial and the mouse skin penetration trial demonstrated that the fusion protein had certain penetration abilities. The animal experiments confirmed that TAT-rhbFGF was effective in the treatment of the hypertrophic scars. Conclusions/Significance We have successfully expressed and purified a TAT-rhbFGF fusion protein in this study. Our results have shown that the fusion protein had a greater ability to penetrate the dermal skin layer. TAT-rhbFGF improved the physical appearance of hypertrophic scars. TAT-rhbFGF may be a potential fusion protein in the treatment of dermal disorders, including hypertrophic scar. PMID:25706539

  9. Programmable AC power supply for simulating power transient expected in fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Halimi, B.; Suh, K. Y.

    2012-07-01

    This paper focus on control engineering of the programmable AC power source which has capability to simulate power transient expected in fusion reactor. To generate the programmable power source, AC-AC power electronics converter is adopted to control the power of a set of heaters to represent the transient phenomena of heat exchangers or heat sources of a fusion reactor. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) plasma operation scenario is used as the basic reference for producing this transient power source. (authors)

  10. Evaluation of Characteristics of High Efficiency Power Generation Systems Utilizing Fermentation Gas of Simply Sorted Municipal Refuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Pyong Sik

    This paper evaluates characteristics of two kinds of power generation systems utilizing fermentation gas of municipal refuse which is generated with use of a fermentation equipment of sorted refuse from ordinary collected garbage. In evaluation, a garbage incineration plant treating refuse of 100 t/d was adopted. The two systems investigated are the following systems: (a) gas engine power generation system (Sys-GE) and (b) steam turbine power generation system with super heater of steam (Sys-SH). The characteristics of two systems have been estimated together with the conventional steam turbine power generation system (Sys-C). It has been estimated that Sys-GE and Sys-SH has 2.11 and 2.55 times greater energy saving and CO2 reduction effect compared with Sys-C, respectively.

  11. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Norman, J.H.; Price, R.J.; Porter, J.; Schuster, H.L.; Simnad, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO/sub 2/ granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO/sub 2/ granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs.

  12. High-Efficiency, Low-Voltage, Compound Semiconductor Devices for Microwave and MM-Wave Power Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, P.C.; Hietala, V.M.; Kong, W.; Sloan, Lynn R.

    1999-07-14

    Improvements in the last decade in InP materials growth, device processing techniques, characterization, and circuit design have enabled solid-state power performance through 122 GHz. Although originally targeted for low-noise and power performance at mm-wave frequencies (>30 GHz), InP HEMTs could become the preferred device for frequencies as low as 800 MHz. This investment has benefited the microwave frequency regime with higher efficiency and power densities at lower operating voltages. State-of-the-art microwave performance at lower operating voltage provides a path to smaller, lighter-weight systems in the battery operated arena of commercial and defense electronics. This paper describes an InP HEMT technology being investigated for many power and low-noise amplifier applications from UHF to W-band frequencies. Specifically the technology demonstrated 640mW/mm power density, 27 dB gain, and 84% power-added efficiency at L-band with a bias of 3.0 volts. Based on the author's literature search, this is a record efficiency at L-band with an operating voltage of less than 5 volts.

  13. Very high efficiency small nuclear gas turbine power plant concept (HTGR-GT/BC) for special applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Cavallaro, L.; Kapich, D.; Medwid, W.A.

    1984-06-01

    To meet the energy needs of special terrestrial defense installations, where a premium is placed on high plant efficiency, conceptual studies have been performed on an advanced closed-cycle gas turbine system with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as the heat source. Emphasis has been placed on system compactness and plant simplicity. A goal of plant operation for extended periods with no environmental contact had a strong influence on the design features. To realize a high plant efficiency (over 50%) for this mode of operation, a combined cycle was investigated. A primary helium Brayton power conversion system coupled with a Freon bottoming cycle was selected. Details are presented of the reactor arrangement, power conversion system, major components, installation, and performance for a compact nuclear power plant currently in a very early stage of concept definition.

  14. The neutronics studies of fusion fission hybrid power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Youqi; Wu Hongchun; Zu Tiejun; Yang Chao; Cao Liangzhi

    2012-06-19

    In this paper, a series of neutronics analysis of hybrid power reactor is proposed. The ideas of loading different fuels in a modular-type fission blanket is analyzed, fitting different level of fusion developments, i.e., the current experimental power output, the level can be obtained in the coming future and the high-power fusion reactor like ITER. The energy multiplication of fission blankets and tritium breeding ratio are evaluated as the criterion of design. The analysis is implemented based on the D-type simplified model, aiming to find a feasible 1000MWe hybrid power reactor for 5 years' lifetime. Three patterns are analyzed: 1) for the low fusion power, the reprocessed fuel is chosen. The fuel with high plutonium content is loaded to achieve large energy multiplication. 2) For the middle fusion power, the spent fuel from PWRs can be used to realize about 30 times energy multiplication. 3) For the high fusion power, the natural uranium can be directly used and about 10 times energy multiplication can be achieved.

  15. Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

    2007-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

  16. Integrated systems for pulsed-power driven inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, M. E.; Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; McBride, R. D.; Vesey, R. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Vandevender, J. P.; Waisman, E. M.; Hansen, D. L.; Owen, A. C.; Jones, J. F.; Romero, J. A.; McKenney, J.

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed power fusion concepts integrate: (i) directly-magnetically-driven fusion targets that absorb large energies (10 MJ), (ii) efficient, rep-rated driver modules, (iii) compact, scalable, integrated driver architectures, (iv) driver-to-target coupling techniques with standoff and driver protection, and (v) long lifetime fusion chambers shielded by vaporizing blankets and thick liquid walls. Large fusion yields (3-30 GJ) and low rep-rates (0.1-1 Hz) may be an attractive path for IFE. Experiments on the ZR facility are validating physics issues for magnetically driven targets. Scientific breakeven (fusion energy = fuel energy) may be possible in the next few years. Plans for system development and integration will be discussed. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. High-efficiency space-based software radio architectures & algorithms (a minimum size, weight, and power TeraOps processor)

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Mark Edward; Baker, Zachary K; Stettler, Matthew W; Pigue, Michael J; Schmierer, Eric N; Power, John F; Graham, Paul S

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos has recently completed the latest in a series of Reconfigurable Software Radios, which incorporates several key innovations in both hardware design and algorithms. Due to our focus on satellite applications, each design must extract the best size, weight, and power performance possible from the ensemble of Commodity Off-the-Shelf (COTS) parts available at the time of design. In this case we have achieved 1 TeraOps/second signal processing on a 1920 Megabit/second datastream, while using only 53 Watts mains power, 5.5 kg, and 3 liters. This processing capability enables very advanced algorithms such as our wideband RF compression scheme to operate remotely, allowing network bandwidth constrained applications to deliver previously unattainable performance.

  18. Improved power capacity in a high efficiency klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by distributed energy extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Cao, Yibing; Sun, Jun

    2013-12-07

    With the efficiency increase of a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator, the maximum axial electric field and harmonic current simultaneously appear at the end of the beam-wave interaction region, leading to a highly centralized energy exchange in the dual-cavity extractor and a very high electric field on the cavity surface. Thus, we present a method of distributed energy extraction in this kind of devices. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with the microwave power of 5.1 GW and efficiency of 70%, the maximum axial electric field is decreased from 2.26 MV/cm to 1.28 MV/cm, indicating a threefold increase in the power capacity.

  19. Criteria for practical fusion power systems: Report from the EPRI fusion panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaslow, J.; Brown, M.; Hirsch, R.; izzo, R.; McCann, J.; McCloud, D.; Muston, B.; Peterson, A.; Rosen, S.; Schneider, T.; Skrgic, P.; Snow, B.

    1994-09-01

    Electric utilities are keenly interested in the promise of fusion: large-scale electricity production anywhere, with virtually no natural resource depletion or environmental pollution. To expedite development of commercially viable fusion systems, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)—the R&D wing of the U.S. electric utility industry—recently convened a panel of top utility R&D managers and executive officers to identify the key criteria that must be met by fusion plants in order to be acceptable to utilities. The panel's findings, summarized in this report, emphasize competitive economics, positive public perception, and regulatory simplicity.

  20. Nanofluidic crystal: a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling up scheme for energy harvesting based on nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haixia; Wu, Wengang; Li, Zhihong

    2013-08-01

    The great advances in nanotechnology call for advances in miniaturized power sources for micro/nano-scale systems. Nanofluidic channels have received great attention as promising high-power-density substitutes for ion exchange membranes for use in energy harvesting from ambient ionic concentration gradient, namely reverse electrodialysis. This paper proposes the nanofluidic crystal (NFC), of packed nanoparticles in micro-meter-sized confined space, as a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting by nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis (NRED). Obtained from the self-assembly of nanoparticles in a micropore, the NFC forms an ion-selective network with enormous nanochannels due to electrical double-layer overlap in the nanoparticle interstices. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, a maximum efficiency of 42.3 ± 1.84%, a maximum power density of 2.82 ± 0.22 W m-2, and a maximum output power of 1.17 ± 0.09 nW/unit (nearly three orders of magnitude of amplification compared to other NREDs) were achieved in our prototype cell, which was prepared within 30 min. The current NFC-based prototype cell can be parallelized and cascaded to achieve the desired output power and open circuit voltage. This NFC-based scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting based on NRED is promising for the building of self-powered micro/nano-scale systems.

  1. Nanofluidic crystal: a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling up scheme for energy harvesting based on nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haixia; Wu, Wengang; Li, Zhihong

    2013-08-30

    The great advances in nanotechnology call for advances in miniaturized power sources for micro/nano-scale systems. Nanofluidic channels have received great attention as promising high-power-density substitutes for ion exchange membranes for use in energy harvesting from ambient ionic concentration gradient, namely reverse electrodialysis. This paper proposes the nanofluidic crystal (NFC), of packed nanoparticles in micro-meter-sized confined space, as a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting by nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis (NRED). Obtained from the self-assembly of nanoparticles in a micropore, the NFC forms an ion-selective network with enormous nanochannels due to electrical double-layer overlap in the nanoparticle interstices. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, a maximum efficiency of 42.3 ± 1.84%, a maximum power density of 2.82 ± 0.22 W m(-2), and a maximum output power of 1.17 ± 0.09 nW/unit (nearly three orders of magnitude of amplification compared to other NREDs) were achieved in our prototype cell, which was prepared within 30 min. The current NFC-based prototype cell can be parallelized and cascaded to achieve the desired output power and open circuit voltage. This NFC-based scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting based on NRED is promising for the building of self-powered micro/nano-scale systems. PMID:23899953

  2. Configuration and layout of the tandem mirror Fusion Power Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, I.R.; Neef, W.S.

    1983-11-30

    Studies have been performed during the past year to determine the configuration of a tandem mirror Fusion Power Demonstrator (FPD) machine capable of producing 1750 MW of fusion power. The FPD is seen as the next logical step after the Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) toward operation of a power reactor. The design of the FPD machine allows a phased construction: Phase I, a hydrogen or deuterium checkout machine; Phase 2, a DT breakeven machine; Phase 3, development of the Phase 2 machine to provide net power and act as a reactor demonstrator. These phases are essential to the development of remote handling equipment and the design of components that will ultimately be remotely handled. Phasing also permits more modes funding early in the program with some costs committed only after reaching major milestones.

  3. Very High Efficiency, Miniaturized, Long-Lived Alpha Particle Power Source Using Diamond Devices for Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth A. (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai U. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source that converts a-particle energy into electricity by coulomb collision in doped diamond films is described. Alpha particle decay from curium-244 creates electron-hole pairs by free- ing electrons and holes inside the crystal lattice in N- and P-doped diamond films. Ohmic contacts provide electrical connection to an electronic device. Due to the built-in electric field at the rectifying junction across the hT- and P-doped diamond films, the free electrons are constrained to traveling in generally one direction. This one direction then supplies electrons in a manner similar to that of a battery. The radioactive curium layer may be disposed on diamond films for even distribution of a-particle radiation. The resulting power source may be mounted on a diamond substrate that serves to insulate structures below the diamond substrate from a-particle emission. Additional insulation or isolation may be provided in order to prevent damage from a-particle collision. N-doped silicon may be used instead of N-doped diamond.

  4. Laser driven nuclear science and applications: The need of high efficiency, high power and high repetition rate Laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.

    2015-10-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is a pan European research initiative selected on the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures Roadmap that aims to close the gap between the existing laboratory-based laser driven research and international facility-grade research centre. The ELI-NP facility, one of the three ELI pillars under construction, placed in Romania and to be operational in 2018, has as core elements a couple of new generation 10 PW laser systems and a narrow bandwidth Compton backscattering gamma source with photon energies up to 19 MeV. ELI-NP will address nuclear photonics, nuclear astrophysics and quantum electrodynamics involving extreme photon fields. Prospective applications of high power laser in nuclear astrophysics, accelerator physics, in particular towards future Accelerator Driven System, as well as in nuclear photonics, for detection and characterization of nuclear material, and for nuclear medicine, will be discussed. Key issues in these research areas will be at reach with significant increase of the repetition rates and of the efficiency at the plug of the high power laser systems as proposed by the ICAN collaboration.

  5. High power millimeter wave ECRH source needs for fusion program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This document stems from the four-day Gyrotron Symposium held at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters on June 13-16, 1983, and serves as a position paper for the Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, on high-power millimeter wave source development for Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) of plasmas. It describes the fusion program needs for gyrotron as ECH sources, their current status, and desirable development strategies.

  6. Highly efficient passively Q-switched Tm,Ho:GdVO4 laser with kilowatt peak power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yanqiu; Yao, Baoquan; Liu, Wei; Cui, Zheng; Duan, Xiaoming; Ju, Youlun; Yu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    We present the experimental results on the laser characteristics of diode-pumped passively Q-switched Tm,Ho:GdVO4 and Tm,Ho:YVO4 lasers with a Cr2+:ZnS saturable absorber emitting in the 2-μm range. The Tm,Ho:GdVO4 laser exhibits better performance than the Tm,Ho:YVO4 laser. The minimum pulse duration of 32.7 ns is obtained with the pulse energy of 0.30 mJ, corresponding to the peak power of 9.1 kW. The slope efficiencies of continuous wave and passively Q-switched Tm,Ho:GdVO4 lasers are 49.9% and 36.5%, corresponding to the Q-switching efficiency of 70.2%.

  7. Continuous improvement of high-efficiency high-power 800-980nm diode lasers at Spectra-Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hanxuan; Towe, Terry; Chyr, Irving; Jin, Xu; Miller, Robert; Romero, Oscar; Liu, Daming; Brown, Denny; Truchan, Tom; Nguyen, Touyen; Crum, Trevor; Wolak, Ed; Bullock, Robert; Mott, Jeff; Harrison, James

    2009-02-01

    New-generation multi-mode 9xx mini-bars used in fiber pump modules have been developed. The epitaxial designs have been improved for lower fast-axis and slow-axis divergence, higher slope efficiency and PCE by optimizing layer structures as well as minimizing internal loss. For 915nm mini-bars with 5-mm cavity length, maximum PCE is as high as ~61% for 35W operation and remains above 59% at 45W. For 808nm, a PCE of 56% at 135W CW operation has been demonstrated with 36%-fill-factor, 3-mm-cavity-length, water-cooled bars at 50°C coolant temperature. On passive-cooled standard CS heatsinks, PCE of >51% is measured for 100W operation at 50°C heatsink temperature. Leveraging these improvements has enabled low-cost bars for high-power, high-temperature applications.

  8. High power and high efficiency kW 88x-nm multi-junction pulsed diode laser bars and arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Bai, John; Dong, Weimin; Guan, Xingguo; Zhang, Shiguo; Elim, Sandrio; Bao, Ling; Grimshaw, Mike; Devito, Mark; Kanskar, Manoj

    2014-03-01

    There is great interest in the development of high-power, high-efficiency and low cost QCW 88x-nm diode laser bars and arrays for pumping solid state lasers. We report on the development of kW 88x-nm diode laser bars that are based on a bipolar cascade design, in which multiple lasers are epitaxially grown in electrical series on a single substrate. Multiple laser junctions, each of which is based on nLight's high performance 88x-nm epitaxial design, are separated by low resistance tunnel junctions with resistance as low as 8.0x10-6 Ω-cm2. Optimization of bar geometry and wafer fabrication processes was explored for electrical and optical performance improvement in double-junction diode lasers. A QCW power of 630 W was demonstrated in a 3-mm wide mini-bar with 3-mm cavity length. Peak efficiency of 61% was measured with 200 s and 14 Hz pulses, at a heatsink temperature of 10 °C. Further power scaling was demonstrated in a 1-cm wide bar with 3-mm cavity length, where a record high peak power of 1.77 kW was measured at 1 kA drive current. Ongoing work for further power scaling includes development of triple-junction diode laser bars and double-junction bar-stack that emits < 10kW optical power.

  9. High-efficiency high-power diode laser beam shaping and focusing with constant optical-path length equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Stefano; Villoresi, Paolo

    2006-04-01

    In this work we report on a novel optical design for beam shaping and focalization of high-power diode laser bars. The goals of our study are: the increase the optical throughput of the beam shaping device with respect to standard solutions and either to enhance the irradiance on a target or to inject the laser beam into a smaller fibre than with respect to beam shaping system based on plane surfaces. The high power diode laser bars pose serious difficulties in their optical handling due to their strong difference between the two transverse axes, which induce a strong astigmatic and asymmetric output radiation. As is well known, the beam quality is very different in the two axes called slow axis and fast axis, and in particular the slow axis is composed by the superposition of several multimodal sources. The beam quality in this axis is very low (its etendue may exceed 2000 mm mrad). On the other hand, the fast axis has a very high beam quality, near diffraction limited, although with very high divergence (30°-50°). The common solution for the application of the laser radiation is a fast axis aspheric micro lens in front of the emitters, in order to achieve its collimation. Typical values of the fast axis collimated beam are 0.7mm and less than 6mrad. However, the so obtained collimated beam is poorly focusable with a standard lens, and a few methods were proposed to overcome the problem. The more relevant solutions include: the stepped mirror technique, the plane parallel mirrors pair, micro prisms array and confocal micro lens array. Each of these techniques is based on the equalization of the beam parameter product by the subdivision of the beam in the slow axis and its reshaping. For all these techniques the efficiency spans from 50% to 70%. The best focalization results allow the coupling in a fibre of 400μm diameter, with NA-0.22. The aim of this work is the design and the realization of a new device, that is considered as target the following aspects: 1

  10. Development of Technologies on Innovative-Simplified Nuclear Power Plant Using High-Efficiency Steam Injectors (9) System Outline and Endurance Test of Low-Pressure Steam Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shuichi Ohmori; Michitsugu Mori; Shoji Goto; Tadashi Narabayashi; Chikako Iwaki; Yutaka Asanuma

    2006-07-01

    A Steam Injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact compact heater. This provides SI with capability to serve also as a direct-contact feedwater heater that heats up feedwater by using extracted steam from the turbine. We are developing technology for 'Innovative Simplified Nuclear Power Plants' in order to further improve the economy and safety of nuclear power plants. Our technology development aims to significantly simplify equipment and reduce physical quantities by applying 'High-Efficiency SI', which are applicable to a wide range of operation regimes beyond the performance and applicable range of existing SIs and enables unprecedented multistage and parallel operation, to the low-pressure feedwater heaters and Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) of nuclear power plants, as well as achieve high inherent safety to prevent severe accidents by keeping the core covered with water (a Severe Accident-Free Concept). The innovative-simplified nuclear power plant consists of a simplified feedwater heating system, a passive core injection system and a passive containment cooling system. This report describes the results of the endurance and performance tests of low-pressure SIs for feedwater heaters with Jet-deaerator and core injection system. A part of this report are fruits of research which is carried out by Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), Toshiba, and 7 Universities in Japan, funded from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) of Japan as the national public research-funded program. (authors)

  11. Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) maintenance and disassembly considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Fusion Power Demonstration study is the development of a tandem mirror reactor design that follows the operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility. It is a power-producing device utilizing the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle; hence, much of its maintenance must be accomplished remotely because of neutron-induced gamma activation. This paper discusses the maintenance philosophy adopted and its impact on the device configuration and examines some of the specific requirements of scheduled and unscheduled component replacements. This work is being used for the next phase of mirror reactor concepts: the Mini-Mars reactor study.

  12. Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) maintenance and disassembly considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Sampinato, P.T.

    1985-07-01

    The Fusion Power Demonstration study is the development of a tandem mirror reactor design that follows the operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility. It is a power-producing device utilizing the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle; hence, much of its maintenance must be accomplished remotely because of neutroninduced gamma activation. This paper discusses the maintenance philosophy adopted and its impact on the device configuration and examines some of the specific requirements of scheduled and unscheduled component replacements. This work is being used for the next phase of mirror reactor concepts: the Mini-Mars reactor study.

  13. The use of water in a fusion power core

    SciTech Connect

    Tillack, M. S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Malang, S.; Rowcliffe, A. F.

    2015-02-01

    Water has both advantages and disadvantages as a coolant in conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. In the United States, water has not been chosen as a fusion power core coolant for decades. Researchers in other countries continue to adopt water in their designs, in some cases as the leading or sole candidate. In this article, we summarize the technical challenges resulting from the choice of water coolant and the differences in approach and assumptions that lead to different design decisions amongst researchers in this field.

  14. Inertial fusion with ultra-powerful lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, M.; Hammer, J.; Glinsky, M.; Kruer, W.; Wilks, S.; Woodworth, J.; Campbell, E.M.; Perry, M.D.; Mason, R.

    1993-10-01

    Ultra-high intensity lasers can be used to ignite ICF capsules with a few tens of kilojoules of light and can lead to high gain with as little as 100 kilojoules of incident laser light. We propose a scheme with three phases. First, a capsule is imploded as in the conventional approach to inertial fusion to assemble a high density fuel configuration. Second, a hole is bored through capsule corona composed of ablated material, pushing critical density close to the high density core of the capsule, by employing the ponderomotive force associated with high intensity laser light. Finally, the fuel is ignited by suprathermal electrons, produced in the high intensity laser plasma interactions, which propagate from critical density to this high density core. This paper reviews two models of energy gain in ICF capsules and explains why ultra-high intensity lasers allow access to the model producing the higher gains. This new scheme also drastically reduces the difficulty of the implosion and thereby allows lower quality fabrication and less stringent beam quality and symmetry requirements from the implosion driver. The difficulty of the fusion scheme is transferred to the technological difficulty of producing the ultra-high-intensity laser and of transporting this energy to the fuel.

  15. High-efficiency and compact semiconductor lasers with monolithically integrated switches for generation of high-power nanosecond pulses in time-of-flight (TOF) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipchenko, Sergey; Podoskin, Aleksandr; Soboleva, Olga; Zakharov, Maxim S.; Bakhvalov, Kirill; Romanovich, Dmitrii; Pikhtin, Nikita; Tarasov, Il`ya; Bagaev, Timur; Ladugin, Maxim; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr; Simakov, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    We present a new approach based on the integration of the functions of a high-efficiency current switch and a laser emitter into a single heterostructure as elements of time-of-flight (TOF) systems. The approach being developed employs the effect of an electrical bistability, which occurs in the general case in thyristor structures. We report recent results obtained in a study of the dynamic electrical and optical characteristics of the pulsed sources we developed. An effective generation of 2- to 100-ns laser pulses at a wavelength of 905 nm is demonstrated. The possibility of generating laser pulses shorter than 1 ns is considered. The maximum peak power reached values of 7 and 50 W for 10- and 100-ns pulses, respectively.

  16. High Efficiency, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Stanton

    2010-03-31

    Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with numerous

  17. Novel microfibrous composite bed reactor: high efficiency H2 production from NH3 with potential for portable fuel cell power supplies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Ye; Xue, Qingsong; Chen, Li; He, Mingyuan

    2007-01-01

    A novel microfibrous composite bed reactor was developed and was demonstrated for high efficiency hydrogen production by the decomposition of ammonia at moderate temperatures in portable fuel cell power system applications. By using a high-speed and low-cost papermaking technology combined with a subsequent sintering process, sinter-locked three-dimensional microfibrous networks consisting of approximately 3 vol% 8 microm (dia.) nickel microfibers were utilized to entrap approximately 35 vol% 100-200 microm dia. porous Al(2)O(3) support particulates. A CeO(2) promoter and active Ni component were then dispersed onto the pore surface of the entrapped Al(2)O(3) support particulates by a stepwise incipient wetness impregnation method. The microfibrous structure took advantage of a large void volume, entirely open structure, high heat/mass transfer, high permeability, good thermal stability, and unique form factors. Addition of ceria significantly promoted the low-temperature activity of Ni/Al(2)O(3) catalyst particulates incorporated into the micorfibrous structure. The use of fine particles of catalyst significantly attenuated the intraparticle mass transport limitations. As a result, the present novel microfibrous composite bed reactor provided excellent activity and structure stability in ammonia decomposition, as well as low pressure drop and high efficiency reactor design. At a 90% conversion of a 145 sccm ammonia feed rate, the microfibrous entrapped Ni/CeO(2)-Al(2)O(3) catalyst composite bed could provide a 4-fold reduction of catalytic bed volume and a 5-fold reduction of catalytic bed weight (or 9-fold reduction of catalyst dosage), while leading to a reduction of reaction temperature of 100 degrees C, compared to a packed bed with 2 mm dia. Ni/CeO(2)-Al(2)O(3) catalyst pellets. This composite bed was capable of producing roughly 22 W of hydrogen power, with an ammonia conversion of 99% at 600 degrees C in a bed volume of 0.5 cm(3) throughout a 100 h

  18. On the fusion triple product and fusion power gain of tokamak pilot plants and reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costley, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The energy confinement time of tokamak plasmas scales positively with plasma size and so it is generally expected that the fusion triple product, nTτ E, will also increase with size, and this has been part of the motivation for building devices of increasing size including ITER. Here n, T, and τ E are the ion density, ion temperature and energy confinement time respectively. However, tokamak plasmas are subject to operational limits and two important limits are a density limit and a beta limit. We show that when these limits are taken into account, nTτ E becomes almost independent of size; rather it depends mainly on the fusion power, P fus. In consequence, the fusion power gain, Q fus, a parameter closely linked to nTτ E is also independent of size. Hence, P fus and Q fus, two parameters of critical importance in reactor design, are actually tightly coupled. Further, we find that nTτ E is inversely dependent on the normalised beta, β N; an unexpected result that tends to favour lower power reactors. Our findings imply that the minimum power to achieve fusion reactor conditions is driven mainly by physics considerations, especially energy confinement, while the minimum device size is driven by technology and engineering considerations. Through dedicated R&D and parallel developments in other fields, the technology and engineering aspects are evolving in a direction to make smaller devices feasible.

  19. Lunar source of /sup 3/He for commercial fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, L.J.; Santarius, J.F.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    An analysis of astrophysical information indicates that the solar wind has deposited an abundant, easily extractable source of /sup 3/He onto the surface of the moon. Apollo lunar samples indicate that the moon's surface soil contains approx. =10/sup 9/kg of /sup 3/He. If this amount of /sup 3/He were to be used in a 50% efficient D-/sup 3/He fusion reactor, it would provide 10/sup 7/GW(electric) . yr of electrical power. The energy required to extract /sup 3/He from the lunar regolith and transport it to earth is calculated to be approx. =2400 GJ/kg. Since the D-/sup 3/He reaction produces 6 X 10/sup 5/ GJ of energy per kilogram of /sup 3/He, the energy payback ratio is approx. =250. Implications for the commercialization of D-/sup 3/He fusion reactors and for the development of fusion power are discussed.

  20. Super-X divertors and high power density fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Valanju, P. M.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S. M.; Canik, J.

    2009-05-15

    The Super-X Divertor (SXD), a robust axisymmetric redesign of the divertor magnetic geometry that can allow a fivefold increase in the core power density of toroidal fusion devices, is presented. With small changes in poloidal coils and currents for standard divertors, the SXD allows the largest divertor plate radius inside toroidal field coils. This increases the plasma-wetted area by 2-3 times over all flux-expansion-only methods (e.g., plate near main X point, plate tilting, X divertor, and snowflake), decreases parallel heat flux and hence plasma temperature at plate, and increases connection length by 2-5 times. Examples of high-power-density fusion devices enabled by SXD are discussed; the most promising near-term device is a 100 MW modular compact fusion neutron source 'battery' small enough to fit inside a conventional fission blanket.

  1. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-06-15

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles' exhaust momentum can be used directly to produce high Isp thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p-11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  2. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles "exhaust" momentum can be used directly to produce high ISP thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p- 11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  3. HIGH EFFICIENCY SYNGAS GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Copeland; Yevgenia Gershanovich; Brian Windecker

    2005-02-01

    This project investigated an efficient and low cost method of auto-thermally reforming natural gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Reforming is the highest cost step in producing products such as methanol and Fisher Tropsch liquids (i.e., gas to liquids); and reducing the cost of reforming is the key to reducing the cost of these products. Steam reforming is expensive because of the high cost of the high nickel alloy reforming tubes (i.e., indirectly fired reforming tubes). Conventional auto-thermal or Partial Oxidation (POX) reforming minimizes the size and cost of the reformers and provides a near optimum mixture of CO and hydrogen. However POX requires pure oxygen, which consumes power and significantly increases the cost to reforming. Our high efficiency process extracts oxygen from low-pressure air with novel oxygen sorbent and transfers the oxygen to a nickel-catalyzed reformer. The syngas is generated at process pressure (typically 20 to 40 bar) without nitrogen dilution and has a 1CO to 2H{sub 2} ratio that is near optimum for the subsequent production of Fisher-Tropsch liquid to liquids and other chemicals (i.e., Gas to Liquids, GTL). Our high process efficiency comes from the way we transfer the oxygen into the reformer. All of the components of the process, except for the oxygen sorbent, are commonly used in commercial practice. A process based on a longlived, regenerable, oxygen transfer sorbent could substantially reduce the cost of natural gas reforming to syngas. Lower cost syngas (CO + 2H{sub 2}) that is the feedstock for GTL would reduce the cost of GTL and for other commercial applications (e.g., methanol, other organic chemicals). The vast gas resources of Alaska's North Slope (ANS) offer more than 22 Tcf of gas and GTL production in this application alone, and could account for as much as 300,000 to 700,000 bpd for 20 to 30+ years. We developed a new sorbent, which is an essential part of the High Efficiency Oxygen Process (HOP). We tested the

  4. Simplified coupling power model for fibers fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saktioto, J.; Ali, J.; Fadhali, M.

    2009-09-01

    Fiber coupler fabrication used for an optical waveguide requires lossless power for an optimal application. The previous research coupled fibers were successfully fabricated by injecting hydrogen flow at 1 bar and fused slightly by unstable torch flame in the range of 800-1350°C. Optical parameters may vary significantly over wide range physical properties. Coupling coefficient and refractive index are estimated from the experimental result of the coupling ratio distribution from 1% to 75%. The change of geometrical fiber affects the normalized frequency V even for single mode fibers. V is derived and some parametric variations are performed on the left and right hand side of the coupling region. A partial power is modelled and derived using V, normalized lateral phase constant u, and normalized lateral attenuation constant, w through the second kind of modified Bessel function of the l order, which obeys the normal mode and normalized propagation constant b. Total power is maintained constant in order to comply with the energy conservation law. The power is integrated through V, u, and w over the pulling length of 7500 µm for 1-D. The core radius of a fiber significantly affects V and power partially at coupling region rather than wavelength and refractive index of core and cladding. This model has power phenomena in transmission and reflection for an optical switch and tunable filter.

  5. ARC: A compact, high-field, disassemblable fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Palmer, Timothy; Mangiarotti, Franco; Sierchio, Jennifer; Bonoli, Paul; Kasten, Cale; Sutherland, Derek; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Goh, Jon; Sung, Choongki; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable, Robust, Compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils with joints to allow disassembly, allowing for removal and replacement of the vacuum vessel as a single component. Inboard-launched current drive of 25 MW LHRF power and 13.6 MW ICRF power is used to provide a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing Fluorine Lithium Beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket acts as a working fluid, coolant, and tritium breeder, and minimizes the solid material that can become activated. The large temperature range over which FLiBe is liquid permits blanket operation at 800-900 K with single phase fluid cooling and allows use of a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity production in the secondary coolant loop.

  6. A fusion power plant without plasma-material interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    A steady-state fusion power plant is described which avoids the deleterious plasma-material interactions found in D-T fueled tokamaks. It is based on driven p-{sup 11}B fusion in a high-beta closed-field device, the field-reversed configuration (FRC), anchored in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT). The plasma outflow on the open magnetic-field lines is cooled by radiation in the GDT, then channeled through a magnetic nozzle, promoting 3-body recombination in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating electricity.

  7. Fusion powered human transport to Mars (UWFR94)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappellari, John; Grota, Susan; Hagedorn, David; Hirai, Yoshi; Remmel, Mark; Schmidt, Deanna; Sveum, Matt; Wandow, Helena

    1994-01-01

    In the future, two important technological dreams will have become reality: fusion will be a viable power source, and human settlement on Mars will be feasible, desirable, and even necessary. Merging these two concepts is especially attractive for the aerospace engineer because of the high specific power that will be possible with fusion (on the order 10 kW/kg). The UWFR94, a large, fusion-powered, human-transport ship, is designed to transport 100 passengers between earth and Mars in approximately thirty days. This relatively short transit time, which mitigates the need for artificial gravity, is made possible by a Polywell inertial electrostatic fusion reactor capable of 20 kW/kg. The mass of each reactor is 37 metric tons and the fuel used is (3)He-(3)He. The electricity generated drives the propulsion system, composed of nine ion thrusters and 780 tons of xenon propellant. The payload consists of three independent, identical cylinders housing the crew, and has a mass of approximately 400 tons. The aluminum cylinders' radius and length are 3 and 12 meters, respectively, with a thickness of 6 cm (15 cm in the solar flare safe rooms). Atmospheric reentry is avoided by constructing and repairing the UWFR94 in space, and by transferring crew and cargo to shuttle-like vehicles for transportation to the planet upon arrival.

  8. Perspectives of SiC-Based Ceramic Composites and Their Applications to Fusion Reactors 2.Fusion Power Reactor Designs Adopting SiC⁄SiC Composite as the Structural Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Satoshi

    SiC⁄SiC composite is a promising structural material candidate for fusion power cores and has been considered internationally in several power plant studies. It offers safety advantages arising from it slow induced radioactivity and afterheat, and the possibility of high efficiency of energy conversion through high temperature operation. The latest SiC⁄SiC-based power core design studies are summarized, and the key SiC⁄SiC parameters affecting the performance of power core components are high lighted.

  9. Modular stellarator reactor: a fusion power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Heck, F.M.; Green, L.; Karbowski, J.S.; Murphy, J.H.; Tupper, R.B.; DeLuca, R.A.; Moazed, A.

    1983-07-01

    A comparative analysis of the modular stellarator and the torsatron concepts is made based upon a steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, reactor embodiment of each concept for use as a central electric-power station. Parametric tradeoff calculations lead to the selection of four design points for an approx. 4-GWt plant based upon Alcator transport scaling in l = 2 systems of moderate aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-(0.08) and low-(0.04) beta versions of the modular stellarator and torsatron concepts. The physics basis of each design point is described together with supporting engineering and economic analyses. The primary intent of this study is the elucidation of key physics and engineering tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties with respect to the ultimate power reactor embodiment.

  10. IEC fusion: The future power and propulsion system for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Coventry, Matt; Hanson, John; Hrbud, Ivana; Miley, George H.; Nadler, Jon

    2000-01-01

    Rapid access to any point in the solar system requires advanced propulsion concepts that will provide extremely high specific impulse, low specific power, and a high thrust-to-power ratio. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion is one of many exciting concepts emerging through propulsion and power research in laboratories across the nation which will determine the future direction of space exploration. This is part of a series of papers that discuss different applications of the Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion concept for both in-space and terrestrial use. IEC will enable tremendous advances in faster travel times within the solar system. The technology is currently under investigation for proof of concept and transitioning into the first prototype units for commercial applications. In addition to use in propulsion for space applications, terrestrial applications include desalinization plants, high energy neutron sources for radioisotope generation, high flux sources for medical applications, proton sources for specialized medical applications, and tritium production. .

  11. Power Supply Reliability Estimates for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, lee; Pinna, Tonio; Petersen, Peter

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a task to analyze the operating experience data for large, pulsed power supplies used at the DIII-D tokamak. This activity supports the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project by giving fusion-specific reliability values for large power supplies that energize neutral beams and magnets. These failure rate data are necessary to perform system availability calculations and to make estimates of the frequency of safety-significant events (e.g., power supply arcs or fires) that might occur in other fusion facilities such as ITER. The analysis shows that the DIII-D data results compare well with the results of similar data analysis work that the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA) has performed on the JET tokamak and compare fairly with data from two accelerators.

  12. An Inertial-Fusion Z-Pinch Power Plant Concept

    SciTech Connect

    DERZON,MARK S.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; DEGROOT,J.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; PETERSON,P.; PETERSON,R.R.; SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; ZAMORA,ANTONIO J.

    2000-12-15

    With the promising new results of fast z-pinch technology developed at Sandia National Laboratories, we are investigating using z-pinch driven high-yield Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) as a fusion power plant energy source. These investigations have led to a novel fusion system concept based on an attempt to separate many of the difficult fusion engineering issues and a strict reliance on existing technology, or a reasonable extrapolation of existing technology, wherever possible. In this paper, we describe the main components of such a system with a focus on the fusion chamber dynamics. The concept works with all of the electrically-coupled ICF proposed fusion designs. It is proposed that a z-pinch driven ICF power system can be feasibly operated at high yields (1 to 30 GJ) with a relatively low pulse rate (0.01-0.1 Hz). To deliver the required current from the rep-rated pulse power driver to the z-pinch diode, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) and the integrated target hardware are fabricated, vacuum pumped, and aligned prior to loading for each power pulse. In this z-pinch driven system, no laser or ion beams propagate in the chamber such that the portion of the chamber outside the RTL does not need to be under vacuum. Additionally, by utilizing a graded-density solid lithium or fluorine/lithium/beryllium eutectic (FLiBe) blanket between the source and the first-wall the system can breed its own fuel absorb a large majority of the fusion energy released from each capsule and shield the first-wall from a damaging neutron flux. This neutron shielding significantly reduces the neutron energy fluence at the first-wall such that radiation damage should be minimal and will not limit the first-wall lifetime. Assuming a 4 m radius, 8 m tall cylindrical chamber design with an 80 cm thick spherical FLiBe blanket, our calculations suggest that a 20 cm thick 6061-T6 Al chamber wall will reach the equivalent uranium ore radioactivity level within 100 years after a 30

  13. High efficiency, long life terrestrial solar panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, T.; Khemthong, S.; Ling, R.; Olah, S.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a high efficiency, long life terrestrial module was completed. It utilized 256 rectangular, high efficiency solar cells to achieve high packing density and electrical output. Tooling for the fabrication of solar cells was in house and evaluation of the cell performance was begun. Based on the power output analysis, the goal of a 13% efficiency module was achievable.

  14. High-Efficiency dc/dc Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency dc/dc converter has been developed that provides commonly used voltages of plus or minus 12 Volts from an unregulated dc source of from 14 to 40 Volts. Unique features of converter are its high efficiency at low power level and ability to provide output either larger or smaller than input voltage.

  15. Personnel Safety for Future Magnetic Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Cadwallader

    2009-07-01

    The safety of personnel at existing fusion experiments is an important concern that requires diligence. Looking to the future, fusion experiments will continue to increase in power and operating time until steady state power plants are achieved; this causes increased concern for personnel safety. This paper addresses four important aspects of personnel safety in the present and extrapolates these aspects to future power plants. The four aspects are personnel exposure to ionizing radiation, chemicals, magnetic fields, and radiofrequency (RF) energy. Ionizing radiation safety is treated well for present and near-term experiments by the use of proven techniques from other nuclear endeavors. There is documentation that suggests decreasing the annual ionizing radiation exposure limits that have remained constant for several decades. Many chemicals are used in fusion research, for parts cleaning, as use as coolants, cooling water cleanliness control, lubrication, and other needs. In present fusion experiments, a typical chemical laboratory safety program, such as those instituted in most industrialized countries, is effective in protecting personnel from chemical exposures. As fusion facilities grow in complexity, the chemical safety program must transition from a laboratory scale to an industrial scale program that addresses chemical use in larger quantity. It is also noted that allowable chemical exposure concentrations for workers have decreased over time and, in some cases, now pose more stringent exposure limits than those for ionizing radiation. Allowable chemical exposure concentrations have been the fastest changing occupational exposure values in the last thirty years. The trend of more restrictive chemical exposure regulations is expected to continue into the future. Other issues of safety importance are magnetic field exposure and RF energy exposure. Magnetic field exposure limits are consensus values adopted as best practices for worker safety; a typical

  16. Very high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Allen; Kirkpatrick, Douglas; Honsberg, Christiana

    2006-08-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has initiated the Very High Efficiency Solar Cell (VHESC) program to address the critical need of the soldier for power in the field. Very High Efficiency Solar Cells for portable applications that operate at greater than 55 percent efficiency in the laboratory and 50 percent in production are being developed. We are integrating the optical design with the solar cell design, and have entered previously unoccupied design space that leads to a new architecture paradigm. An integrated team effort is now underway that requires us to invent, develop and transfer to production these new solar cells. Our approach is driven by proven quantitative models for the solar cell design, the optical design and the integration of these designs. We start with a very high performance crystalline silicon solar cell platform. Examples will be presented. Initial solar cell device results are shown for devices fabricated in geometries designed for this VHESC Program.

  17. LIFE: a sustainable solution for developing safe, clean fusion power.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Susana; Dunne, Mike; Kramer, Kevin; Anklam, Tom; Havstad, Mark; Mazuecos, Antonio Lafuente; Miles, Robin; Martinez-Frias, Joel; Deri, Bob

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California is currently in operation with the goal to demonstrate fusion energy gain for the first time in the laboratory-also referred to as "ignition." Based on these demonstration experiments, the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant is being designed at LLNL in partnership with other institutions with the goal to deliver baseload electricity from safe, secure, sustainable fusion power in a time scale that is consistent with the energy market needs. For this purpose, the LIFE design takes advantage of recent advances in diode-pumped, solid-state laser technology and adopts the paradigm of Line Replaceable Units used on the NIF to provide high levels of availability and maintainability and mitigate the need for advanced materials development. The LIFE market entry plant will demonstrate the feasibility of a closed fusion fuel cycle, including tritium breeding, extraction, processing, refueling, accountability, and safety, in a steady-state power-producing device. While many fusion plant designs require large quantities of tritium for startup and operations, a range of design choices made for the LIFE fuel cycle act to reduce the in-process tritium inventory. This paper presents an overview of the delivery plan and the preconceptual design of the LIFE facility with emphasis on the key safety design principles being adopted. In order to illustrate the favorable safety characteristics of the LIFE design, some initial accident analysis results are presented that indicate potential for a more attractive licensing regime than that of current fission reactors. PMID:23629070

  18. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  19. High efficiency magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Anand, Davinder K.; Kirk, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Research activities concerning high efficiency permanent magnet plus electromagnet (PM/EM) pancake magnetic bearings at the University of Maryland are reported. A description of the construction and working of the magnetic bearing is provided. Next, parameters needed to describe the bearing are explained. Then, methods developed for the design and testing of magnetic bearings are summarized. Finally, a new magnetic bearing which allows active torque control in the off axes directions is discussed.

  20. Regulatory aspects of fusion power-lessons from fission plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalizio, A.; Sood, S. K.; Brunnader, H.

    1993-06-01

    Experience from fission reactors has shown the regulatory process for licensing a nuclear facility to be legalistic, lengthy, unpredictable, and costly. This experience also indicates that much of the regulatory debate is focused on safety margins, that is, the smaller the safety margins the bigger the regulatory debate and the greater the amount of proof required to satisfy the regulator. Such experience suggests that caution and prudence guide the development of a regulatory regime for fusion reactors. Fusion has intrinsic safety and environmental advantages over fission, which should alleviate significantly, or even eliminate, the regulatory problems associated with fission. The absence of a criticality concern and the absence of fission products preclude a Chernobyl type accident from occurring in a fusion reactor. Although in a fusion reactor there are large inventories of radioactive products that can be mobilized, the total quantity is orders of magnitude smaller than in fission power reactors. The bulk of the radioactivity in a fusion reactor is either activation products in steel structures, or tritium fuel supplies safely stored in the form of a metal tritide in storage beds. The quantity of tritium that can be mobilized under accident conditions is much less than ten million curies. This compares very favorably with a fission product inventory greater than ten billion curies in a fission power reactor. Furthermore, in a fission reactor, all of the reactivity is contained in a steel vessel that is pressurized to about 150 atmospheres, whereas in a fusion reactor, the inventory of radioactive material is dispersed in different areas of the plant, such that it is improbable that a single event could give rise to the release of the entire inventory to the environment. These intrinsic features give fusion a significant safety and environmental advantage over fission. With such significant intrinsic safety advantages there is no a priori need to make fusion

  1. Feasibility study for an advanced coal fired heat exchanger/gas turbine topping cycle for a high efficiency power plant. Technical report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Zhao, Y.; Buggeln, R.C.; Shamroth, S.J.

    1993-04-01

    The overall objective of this project is to prove the feasibility of AFR`s concepts for a high efficiency coal-fired generating plant using the REACH/Exchanger concept to power an externally fired gas turbine. The computational REACH reactor was modeled with PCGC-2. The reactor geometry, inlet flow rates and configurations were investigated via modeling in order to get an optimum operation condition, with which a thorough coal and gas mixture and a required coal particle dispersion can both be achieved. This is to ensure the efficiencies of both coal combustion and aerodynamic cleaning. The aerodynamic cleaning effect of the tertiary air injection was modeled with CELMINT. Various injection schemes investigated show the dramatic impact of the tertiary air and the injection positions on the overall air flow pattern in the reactor which is one of the major influencing factors on the particle dispersion. It is clearly demonstrated that an optimum tertiary injection scheme with a reasonable flow rate is able to keep the heat exchange tubes from particle fouling.

  2. Fusion applications of high power millimeter wave sources

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.L.; George, T.V.

    1994-01-01

    Heating by means of high power electron cyclotron (EC) waves in the mm wavelength range is considered to be one of the most attractive approaches for heating fusion plasmas to the temperatures required to achieve ignition. EC waves have also been used to drive plasma current by using directional launch and to stabilize MHD instabilities in tokamak plasmas through localized heating or current drive. Experiments are planned on both JET and TFTR to measure the alpha particle distribution by scattering EC waves.

  3. A dual-mode highly efficient class-E stimulator controlled by a low-Q class-E power amplifier through duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Wei; Lu, Chien-Chi; Chuang, Jia-min; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Kao, Ming-Chien; Lin, Mu-Lien

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the design flow of two high-efficiency class-E amplifiers for the implantable electrical stimulation system. The implantable stimulator is a high-Q class-E driver that delivers a sine-wave pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation, which was verified to have a superior efficacy in pain relief to a square wave. The proposed duty-cycle-controlled class-E PRF driver designed with a high-Q factor has two operational modes that are able to achieve 100% DC-AC conversion, and involves only one switched series inductor and an unchanged parallel capacitor. The measured output amplitude under low-voltage (LV) mode using a 22% duty cycle was 0.98 V with 91% efficiency, and under high-voltage (HV) mode using a 47% duty cycle was 2.95 V with 92% efficiency. These modes were inductively controlled by a duty-cycle detector, which can detect the duty-cycle modulated signal generated from the external complementary low-Q class-E power amplifier (PA). The design methodology of the low-Q inductive interface for a non-50% duty cycle is presented. The experimental results exhibits that the 1.5-V PA that consumes DC power of 14.21 mW was able to deliver a 2.9-V sine wave to a 500 Ω load. The optimal 60% drain efficiency of the system from the PA to the load was obtained at a 10-mm coupling distance. PMID:23853324

  4. Homogeneous deposition-assisted synthesis of iron-nitrogen composites on graphene as highly efficient non-precious metal electrocatalysts for microbial fuel cell power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Jin, Xiao-Jun; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Liu, Hong; Huang, Yu-Ming

    2015-03-01

    This work proposed a novel strategy for synthesizing highly efficient non-precious metal oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts. Fe complexes were homogeneously deposited (HD) on graphene oxide through in situ hydrolysis of urea, followed by two-step pyrolysis under Ar and NH3 atmospheres, resulting in formation of Fe- and N-functionalized graphene (HD-FeN/G). The morphology, crystalline structure and elemental composition of HD-FeN/G were characterized. ORR activity was evaluated by using a rotary disk electrode (RDE) electrochemical system. HD improved the loading and distribution of the Fe-Nx composites on graphene. The ORR activity of the as-prepared HD-FeN/G in neutral medium was comparable to that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C and significantly superior to a FeN/G counterpart produced via traditional approach. The ORR electron transfer number of HD-FeN/G was as high as 3.83 ± 0.08, which suggested that ORR catalysis proceeds through a four-electron pathway. HD-FeN/G was used as a cathodic electrocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), and the resultant HD-FeN/G-MFC showed comparable voltage output and maximum power density to those of Pt/C-MFC. The HD-FeN/G-MFC achieved a maximum power density of 885 mW m-2, which was much higher than that of FeN/G-MFC (708 mW m-2). These findings demonstrate that HD-FeN/G produced through the novel synthesis strategy proposed in this work would be a good candidate as cathodic electrocatalyst in MFCs.

  5. High efficiency power generation from coal and wastes utilizing high temperature air combustion technology (Part 1: Performance of pebble bed gasifier for coal and wastes)

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaka, Hitoshi; Iwahashi, Takashi; Yoshida, Nobuhiro; Tsuji, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Kunio; Kiga, Takashi; Tamamushi, Fumihiro; Makino, Kenji; Oonish, Hiroshi

    1998-07-01

    A new concept of a gasifier for coal and wastes is proposed where entrained bed and fixed pebble bed are combined. Main features of this pebble bed gasifier are high efficiency molten slag capture, high efficiency gasification and compactness. Coal and RFD combustion experiments using the pebble bed gasifier demonstrated high efficiency capture and continuous extraction of molten slag as well as complete char combustion with extra ordinarily short residence time of pulverized coal and crushed RDF at the temperature level of about 1,500 C within the pebble bed. Durability tests using high temperature electric furnace has shown that high density alumna is a good candidate for pebble material.

  6. Fabrication of Very High Efficiency 5.8 GHz Power Amplifiers using AlGaN HFETs on SiC Substrates for Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gerry

    2001-01-01

    For wireless power transmission using microwave energy, very efficient conversion of the DC power into microwave power is extremely important. Class E amplifiers have the attractive feature that they can, in theory, be 100% efficient at converting, DC power to RF power. Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) semiconductor material has many advantageous properties, relative to silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and silicon carbide (SiC), such as a much larger bandgap, and the ability to form AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions. The large bandgap of AlGaN also allows for device operation at higher temperatures than could be tolerated by a smaller bandgap transistor. This could reduce the cooling requirements. While it is unlikely that the AlGaN transistors in a 5.8 GHz class E amplifier can operate efficiently at temperatures in excess of 300 or 400 C, AlGaN based amplifiers could operate at temperatures that are higher than a GaAs or Si based amplifier could tolerate. Under this program, AlGaN microwave power HFETs have been fabricated and characterized. Hybrid class E amplifiers were designed and modeled. Unfortunately, within the time frame of this program, good quality HFETs were not available from either the RSC laboratories or commercially, and so the class E amplifiers were not constructed.

  7. Advanced high efficiency concentrator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R. . Varian Research Center)

    1992-06-01

    This report describes research to develop the technology needed to demonstrate a monolithic, multijunction, two-terminal, concentrator solar cell with a terrestrial power conversion efficiency greater than 35%. Under three previous subcontracts, Varian developed many of the aspects of a technology needed to fabricate very high efficiency concentrator cells. The current project was aimed at exploiting the new understanding of high efficiency solar cells. Key results covered in this report are as follows. (1) A 1.93-eV AlGaAs/1.42-eV GaAs metal-interconnected cascade cell was manufactured with a one-sun efficiency at 27.6% at air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) global. (2) A 1.0eV InGaAs cell was fabricated on the reverse'' side of a low-doped GaAs substrate with a one-sun efficiency of 2.5% AM1.5 diffuse and a short-circuit current of 14.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Small-scale manufacturing of GaAs p/n concentrator cells was attempted and obtained an excellent yield of high-efficiency cells. (4) Grown-in tunnel junction cell interconnects that are transparent and thermally stable using C and Si dopants were developed. 10 refs.

  8. Pinch me - I'm fusing! Fusion Power - what is it? What is a z pinch? And why are z-pinches a promising fusion power technology?

    SciTech Connect

    DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-03-01

    The process of combining nuclei (the protons and neutrons inside an atomic nucleus) together with a release of kinetic energy is called fusion. This process powers the Sun, it contributes to the world stockpile of weapons of mass destruction and may one day generate safe, clean electrical power. Understanding the intricacies of fusion power, promised for 50 years, is sometimes difficult because there are a number of ways of doing it. There is hot fusion, cold fusion and con-fusion. Hot fusion is what powers suns through the conversion of mass energy to kinetic energy. Cold fusion generates con-fusion and nobody really knows what it is. Even so, no one is generating electrical power for you and me with either method. In this article the author points out some basic features of the mainstream approaches taken to hot fusion power, as well as describe why z pinches are worth pursuing as a driver for a power reactor and how it may one day generate electrical power for mankind.

  9. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-12-01

    monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.''

  10. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  11. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  12. High efficiency solar panel /HESP/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.; Gay, C.; Uno, F.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1978-01-01

    A family of high efficiency, weldable silicon solar cells, incorporating nearly every feature of advanced cell technology developed in the past four years, was produced and subjected to space qualification testing. This matrix contained both field and non-field cells ranging in thickness from 0.10 mm to 0.30 mm, and in base resistivity from nominal two to one hundred ohm-cm. Initial power outputs as high as 20 mW/sq cm (14.8% AM0 efficiency) were produced by certain cell types within the matrix.

  13. High efficiency RCCI combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splitter, Derek A.

    An experimental investigation of the pragmatic limits of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) engine efficiency was performed. The study utilized engine experiments combined with zero-dimensional modeling. Initially, simulations were used to suggest conditions of high engine efficiency with RCCI. Preliminary simulations suggested that high efficiency could be obtained by using a very dilute charge with a high compression ratio. Moreover, the preliminary simulations further suggested that with simultaneous 50% reductions in heat transfer and incomplete combustion, 60% gross thermal efficiency may be achievable with RCCI. Following the initial simulations, experiments to investigate the combustion process, fuel effects, and methods to reduce heat transfer and incomplete combustion reduction were conducted. The results demonstrated that the engine cycle and combustion process are linked, and if high efficiency is to be had, then the combustion event must be tailored to the initial cycle conditions. It was found that reductions to engine heat transfer are a key enabler to increasing engine efficiency. In addition, it was found that the piston oil jet gallery cooling in RCCI may be unnecessary, as it had a negative impact on efficiency. Without piston oil gallery cooling, it was found that RCCI was nearly adiabatic, achieving 95% of the theoretical maximum cycle efficiency (air standard Otto cycle efficiency).

  14. High Efficiency Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The specific activity was to improve the tandem junction Cell (TJC) as a high efficiency solar cell. The TJC development was to be consistent with module assembly and should contribute to the overall goals of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. During 1978, TJC efficiency improved from approximately 11 percent to approximately 16 percent (AMI). Photogenerated current densities in excess of 42 mA/sq cm were observed at AMO. Open circuit voltages as high as 0.615 V were measured at AMO. Fill factor was only 0.68 - 0.75 due to a nonoptimum metal contact design. A device model was conceived in which the solar cell is modelled as a transitor. There are virtually no interconnect or packaging factor systems and the TJC is compatible with all conventional module fabrication systems. A modification of the TJC, the Front Surface Field (FSF) cell, was also explored.

  15. Heating power feedback control for CO2 laser fusion splicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenxin; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Toshirou; Klimowych, William

    2013-02-01

    A novel feedback control method has been developed for an automated splicer using a CO2 laser as the heating element. The feedback method employs a sensor for laser beam power and CMOS cameras as sensors for fiber luminescence which is directly related to glass temperature. The CO2 laser splicer with this type of feedback system provides a consistent platform for the fiber laser and bio-medical industry for fabrication of fused glass components such as tapers, couplers, combiners, mode-field adaptors, and fusion splices. With such a closed loop feedback system, both splice loss and peak-to-peak taper ripple are greatly reduced.

  16. Net energy payback and carbon dioxide emissions from helium-3 fusion and wind electrical power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Scott William

    1998-12-01

    A net energy analysis and life cycle CO2 emission analysis is performed on a D3He- fusion power plant using lunar helium-3 and five other electricity-generating power plant technologies, including a wind, conventional coal, PWR and two DT- fusion tokamak (UWMAK-I and ARIES-RS) power plants. The energy payback ratio is the amount of electrical energy produced over the lifetime of the power plant divided by the total amount of energy required to procure the fuel, build, operate, and decommission the power plants. The analysis focused on D3He-fusion and particularly the acquisition of the helium-3 fuel from the Moon. The energy payback ratio varies widely for the six power plants with a low of 11 for a conventional coal plant to a high of 31 for a D3 He-fusion power plant. Energy payback ratios for wind (23), nuclear fission (16), ARIES-RS DT-fusion (24) and UWMAK-I DT- fusion (27) power plants all fall in between. The CO2 emissions for each power plant were calculated from the life-cycle energy' requirements data. The coal plant was responsible for the greatest emissions with 974 tonnes CO2/GWeh, followed by fission and wind (15), ARIES-RS DT-fusion (11), ARIES- 111 D3He-fusion (10) and UWMAK-I DT-fusion power plant (9).

  17. High-efficiency CARM

    SciTech Connect

    Bratman, V.L.; Kol`chugin, B.D.; Samsonov, S.V.; Volkov, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Cyclotron Autoresonance Maser (CARM) is a well-known variety of FEMs. Unlike the ubitron in which electrons move in a periodical undulator field, in the CARM the particles move along helical trajectories in a uniform magnetic field. Since it is much simpler to generate strong homogeneous magnetic fields than periodical ones for a relatively low electron energy ({Brit_pounds}{le}1-3 MeV) the period of particles` trajectories in the CARM can be sufficiently smaller than in the undulator in which, moreover, the field decreases rapidly in the transverse direction. In spite of this evident advantage, the number of papers on CARM is an order less than on ubitron, which is apparently caused by the low (not more than 10 %) CARM efficiency in experiments. At the same time, ubitrons operating in two rather complicated regimes-trapping and adiabatic deceleration of particles and combined undulator and reversed guiding fields - yielded efficiencies of 34 % and 27 %, respectively. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that high efficiency can be reached even for a simplest version of the CARM. In order to reduce sensitivity to an axial velocity spread of particles, a short interaction length where electrons underwent only 4-5 cyclotron oscillations was used in this work. Like experiments, a narrow anode outlet of a field-emission electron gun cut out the {open_quotes}most rectilinear{close_quotes} near-axis part of the electron beam. Additionally, magnetic field of a small correcting coil compensated spurious electron oscillations pumped by the anode aperture. A kicker in the form of a sloping to the axis frame with current provided a control value of rotary velocity at a small additional velocity spread. A simple cavity consisting of a cylindrical waveguide section restricted by a cut-off waveguide on the cathode side and by a Bragg reflector on the collector side was used as the CARM-oscillator microwave system.

  18. Design considerations for an inertial confinement fusion reactor power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, J.V.; Simpson, J.E.

    1981-08-10

    To further define the engineering and economic concerns for inertial confinement fusion reactors (ICR's), a conceptual design study was performed by Bechtel Group Incorporated under the direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The study examined alternatives to the LLNL HYLIFE concept and expanded the previous balance of plant design to incorporate information from recent liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) power plant studies. The majority of the effort was to incorporate present laser and target physics models into a reactor design with a low coolant flowrate and a high driver repetition rate. An example of such a design is the LLNL JADE concept. In addition to producing a power plant design for LLNL using the JADE example, Bechtel has also examined the applicability of the EAGLE (Energy Absorbing Gas Lithium Ejector) concept.

  19. Plasma Stopping Power Measurements Relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, Aaron; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hoffman, Nelson; Schmitt, Mark; Rubery, Michael; Garbett, Warren; Horsfield, Colin; Gales, Steve; Zylstra, Alex; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Petrasso, Richard; Marshall, Frederic; Batha, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments may be achieved if the alpha particle energy deposition results in a thermonuclear burn wave induced in the dense DT fuel layer surrounding the hotspot. As such, understanding the physics of particle energy loss in a plasma is of critical importance to designing ICF experiments. Experiments have validated various stopping power models under select ne and Te conditions, however there remain unexplored regimes where models predict differing rates of energy deposition. An upcoming experiment at the Omega laser facility will explore charged particle stopping in CH plastic capsule ablators across a range of plasma conditions (ne between 1024 cm-3 and 1025 cm-3 and Te on the order of hundreds of eV). Plasma conditions will be measured using x-ray and gamma ray diagnostics, while plasma stopping power will be measured using charged particle energy loss measurements. Details on the experiment and the theoretical models to be tested will be presented.

  20. Technical evaluation of major candidate blanket systems for fusion power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo; Seki, Masahiro; Minato, Akio

    1987-03-01

    The key functions required for tritium breeding blankets for a fusion power reactor are ; (1) self-sufficient tritium breeding, (2) in-situ tritium recovery and low tritium inventory, (3) high temperature cooling giving a high efficiency of electricity generation and (4) thermo-mechanical reliability and simplified remote maintenance to obtain high plant availability. Blanket performance is substantially governed by materials selection. Major options of structure/breeder/coolant/neutron multiplier materials considered for the present design study are PCA/Li/sub 2/O/H/sub 2/O/Be, Mo-alloy/Li/sub 2/O/He/Be, Mo-alloy/LiAlO/sub 2//He/Be, V-alloy/Li/Li/none, and Mo-alloy/Li/He/none. In addition, remote maintenance of blankets, tritium recovery system, heat transport and energy conversion have been investigated. In this report, technological problems and critical R and D issues for power reactor blanket development are identified and a comparison of major candidate blanket concepts is discussed in terms of the present materials data base, economic performance, prospects for future improvements, and engineering feasibility and difficulties based on the results obtained from individual design studies. improvements, and engineering feasibility and difficulties based on the results obtained from individual design studies.

  1. Current Trends of Blanket Research and Deveopment in Japan 3.Blanket Designs in Fusion Power Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagara, Akio; Enoeda, Mikio; Nishio, Satoshi; Kozaki, Yasuji

    The main functions of the blanket in fusion power reactors are basically independent of the type of magnetic fusion reactor (tokamak, helical, etc.) and inertia fusion. However, from technical point of view, many candidate designs of blanket have been proposed depending on the particular reactor concepts. Their main features are characterized for the recent typical designs, and key issues are defined.

  2. High efficiency SPS klystron design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The most likely compact configuration to realize both high efficiency and high gain is a 5-6 cavity design focused by an electromagnet. An outline of a potential klystron configuration is given. The selected power output of 70 kW CW resulted from a maximum assumed operating voltage of 40 kV. The basic klystron efficiency cannot be expected to exceed 70-75% without collector depression. Although impressive gains were achieved in raising the basic efficiency from 50% to 70% or so with a multi-stage collector, the estimated efficiency improvement due to 5-stage collector at the 75% level is only about 8% resulting in an overall efficiency of about 83%.

  3. High Efficiency Engine Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Kruiswyk

    2010-07-13

    Caterpillar's Product Development and Global Technology Division carried out a research program on waste heat recovery with support from DOE (Department of Energy) and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The objective of the program was to develop a new air management and exhaust energy recovery system that would demonstrate a minimum 10% improvement in thermal efficiency over a base heavy-duty on-highway diesel truck engine. The base engine for this program was a 2007 C15 15.2L series-turbocharged on-highway truck engine with a LPL (low-pressure loop) exhaust recirculation system. The focus of the program was on the development of high efficiency turbomachinery and a high efficiency turbocompound waste heat recovery system. The focus of each area of development was as follows: (1) For turbine stages, the focus was on investigation and development of technologies that would improve on-engine exhaust energy utilization compared to the conventional radial turbines in widespread use today. (2) For compressor stages, the focus was on investigating compressor wheel design parameters beyond the range typically utilized in production, to determine the potential efficiency benefits thereof. (3) For turbocompound, the focus was on the development of a robust bearing system that would provide higher bearing efficiencies compared to systems used in turbocompound power turbines in production. None of the turbocharger technologies investigated involved addition of moving parts, actuators, or exotic materials, thereby increasing the likelihood of a favorable cost-value tradeoff for each technology. And the turbocompound system requires less hardware addition than competing bottoming cycle technologies, making it a more attractive solution from a cost and packaging standpoint. Main outcomes of the program are as follows: (1) Two turbine technologies that demonstrated up to 6% improvement in turbine efficiency on gas stand and 1-3% improvement in thermal efficiency in

  4. High efficiency gas burner

    DOEpatents

    Schuetz, Mark A.

    1983-01-01

    A burner assembly provides for 100% premixing of fuel and air by drawing the air into at least one high velocity stream of fuel without power assist. Specifically, the nozzle assembly for injecting the fuel into a throat comprises a plurality of nozzles in a generally circular array. Preferably, swirl is imparted to the air/fuel mixture by angling the nozzles. The diffuser comprises a conical primary diffuser followed by a cusp diffuser.

  5. Advanced fusion MHD power conversion using the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Logan, B.G.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1988-10-01

    The CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept for a tokamak reactor involves the use of a high-temperature Rankine cycle in combination with microwave superheaters and nonequilibrium MHD disk generators to obtain a compact, low-capital-cost power conversion system which fits almost entirely within the reactor vault. The significant savings in the balance-of-plant costs are expected to result in much lower costs of electricity than previous concepts. This paper describes the unique features of the CFAR cycle and a high- temperature blanket designed to take advantage of it as well as the predicted performance of the MHD disk generators using mercury seeded with cesium. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. High power nd:glass laser for fusion applications.

    PubMed

    Soures, J; Kumpan, S; Hoose, J

    1974-09-01

    Experiments on laser-induced thermonuclear fusion require high brightness lasers capable of producing subnanosecond pulses with total energy content of several kilojoules. Of existing laser media, Nd:glass appears to be the best choice for meeting these criteria. In this paper we discuss the problems of designing a high power Nd:glass laser system. A detailed description of an operating two-beam system producing subnanosecond pulses with a maximum energy of 350 J per beam is presented, along with an extensive description of beam diagnostic techniques. A four beam version of this system became operational on 3 April 1974 and is now producing energies in excess of a kilojoule in subnanosecond pulses. PMID:20134633

  7. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    STARFIRE is a 1200 MWe central station fusion electric power plant that utilizes a deuterium-tritium fueled tokamak reactor as a heat source. Emphasis has been placed on developing design features which will provide for simpler assembly and maintenance, and improved safety and environmental characteristics. The major features of STARFIRE include a steady-state operating mode based on continuous rf lower-hybrid current drive and auxiliary heating, solid tritium breeder material, pressurized water cooling, limiter/vacuum system for impurity control and exhaust, high tritium burnup and low vulnerable tritium inventories, superconducting EF coils outside the superconducting TF coils, fully remote maintenance, and a low-activation shield. A comprehensive conceptual design has been developed including reactor features, support facilities and a complete balance of plant. A construction schedule and cost estimate are presented, as well as study conclusions and recommendations.

  8. Economic requirements for competitive laser fusion power production

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1985-11-15

    An economic model of a laser fusion commercial power plant is used to identify the design and operating regimes of the driver, target and reaction chamber that will result in economic competitiveness with future fission and coal plants. We find that, for a plant with a net power of 1 GW/sub e/, the cost of the driver must be less than $0.4 to 0.6 B, and the recirculating power fraction must be less than 25%. Target gain improvements at low driver energy are the most beneficial but also the most difficult to achieve. The optimal driver energy decreases with increasing target technology. The sensitivity of the cost of electricity to variations in cost and performance parameters decreases with increasing target technology. If chamber pulse rates of a few Hz can be achieved, then gains of 80 to 100 will be sufficient, and higher pulse rates do not help much. Economic competitiveness becomes more difficult with decreasing plant size. Finally, decreasing the cost of the balance of plant has the greatest beneficial effect on economic competitiveness. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Research on fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryaznevich, M. P.

    2012-06-01

    The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. "Fusion for Neutrons" (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

  10. Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power plant

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.; Latkowski, Jeffery F.; Kramer, Kevin J.

    2015-10-27

    A laser inertial-confinement fusion-fission energy power plant is described. The fusion-fission hybrid system uses inertial confinement fusion to produce neutrons from a fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium. The fusion neutrons drive a sub-critical blanket of fissile or fertile fuel. A coolant circulated through the fuel extracts heat from the fuel that is used to generate electricity. The inertial confinement fusion reaction can be implemented using central hot spot or fast ignition fusion, and direct or indirect drive. The fusion neutrons result in ultra-deep burn-up of the fuel in the fission blanket, thus enabling the burning of nuclear waste. Fuels include depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, spent nuclear fuel, thorium, and weapons grade plutonium. LIFE engines can meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the highly undesirable stockpiles of depleted uranium, spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials.

  11. Findings of the US Research Needs Workshop on the Topic of Fusion Power

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Raffray, A R; Kurtz, R J; Morley, N B; Reiersen, W T; Sharpe, P; Willms, S

    2009-09-16

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) conducted a Research Needs Workshop, referred to as ReNeW, in June 2009. The information developed at this workshop will help OFES develop a plan for US fusion research during the ITER era, roughly the next two decades. The workshop was organized in five Themes, one of which was Harnessing Fusion Power (or Fusion Power for short). The top level goal of the Fusion Power Theme was to identify the research needed to develop the knowledge to design and build, with high confidence, robust and reliable systems that can convert fusion products to useful forms of energy in a reactor environment, including a self-sufficient supply of tritium fuel. Each Theme was subsequently subdivided into Panels to address specific topics. The Fusion Power Panel topics were: fusion fuel cycle; power extraction; materials science; safety and environment; and reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability (RAMI). Here we present the key findings of the Fusion Power Theme.

  12. Thick Liquid-Walled Spheromak Magnetic Fusion Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W; Bulmer, R H; Fowler, T K; Youssef, M Z

    2002-04-08

    We assume a spheromak configuration can be made and sustained by a steady gun current, which injects particles, current and magnetic field, i.e., helicity injection. The equilibrium is calculated with an MHD equilibrium code, where an average beta of 10% is found. The toroidal current of 40 MA is sustained by an injection current of 100 kA (125 MW of gun power). The flux linking the gun is 1/1000th that of the flux in the spheromak. The geometry allows a flow of liquid, either molten salt, (flibe-Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} or flinabe-LiNaBeF{sub 4}) or liquid metal such as SnLi which protects most of the walls and structures from neutron damage. The free surface between the liquid and the burning plasma is heated by bremsstrahlung and optical radiation and neutrons from the plasma. The temperature of the free surface of the liquid is calculated and then the evaporation rate is estimated. The impurity concentration in the burning plasma is estimated and limited to a 20% reduction in the fusion power. For a high radiating edge plasma, the divertor power density of 460 MW/m{sup 2} is handled by high-speed (20 m/s), liquid jets. For low radiating edge plasmas, the divertor-power density of 1860 MW/m{sup 2} is too high to handle for flibe but possibly acceptable for SnLi with jets of 100 m/s flow speed. Calculations show the tritium breeding is adequate with enriched Li and appropriate design of the walls not covered by flowing liquid 15% of the total. We have come up with a number of problem areas needing further study to make the design self consistent and workable.

  13. High Power Density Blanket Design Study for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. H.; Zhu, Y. K.; Deng, P. Zh.

    2003-06-01

    A conceptual design study of a high power density blanket has been carried out. The Fusion Experimental Breeder, FEB, is adopted as the reference reactor. The neutron wall loading is 0.5 MW/m2. The blanket is cooled by 10 MPa helium in tube. The concept of LiPb eutectic/transuranium oxide suspension is adopted. The neutronics design is performed to provide the design basis, and it gives an energy multiplication of 37 and a flattened power density distribution with a peak value of 70 W/m3. Multiple cooling panels are introduced to reduce the peak temperature of the blanket. In spite of up to 15 cooling panels, the blanket module is calculated using the ANSYS code and analytically as well. The results are consistent with each other and can meet the thermal criteria. However, structural calculation results from ANSYS did not satisfy the criterion: The blanket structure design is then improved by using curved cooling panels to model the structure in detail. Temperature distribution is obtained using the Pro/Mechanica code. Detailed structural analyses are also done by this code. Some satisfactory results are obtained.

  14. HYLIFE-II inertial confinement: Fusion power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1990-12-14

    The HYLIFE-2 inertial fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. HYLIFE-1 used liquid lithium. HYLIFE 2 avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-1. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. Multiple chambers may be required. In addition, although not considered for HYLIFE-1, there is undoubtedly liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, especially at high repetition rates. Splash removal can be accomplished by either pulsed or oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.09 $/kW{center dot}h in constant 1988 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. High-power high-efficiency acousto-optically Q-switched rod Nd:YAG laser with 885 nm diode laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Li, F. Q.; Xu, H. Y.; Wang, Z. C.; Zong, N.; Du, S. F.; Bo, Y.; Peng, Q. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated a compact Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm with 885 nm diode-laser (LD) direct pumping. At a repetition rate of 100 kHz, an average output power of 53 W with beam quality factor M2 of 1.6 was achieved under the absorbed pump power of 122 W, corresponding to an optical-optical efficiency of 43.5% and a slope efficiency of 57.6%, respectively. The pulse width and the peak power at this output power were 112 ns and 4.74 kW, respectively.

  16. Technology Development for High Efficiency Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Deep space optical communications is a significantly more challenging operational domain than near Earth space optical communications, primarily due to effects resulting from the vastly increased range between transmitter and receiver. The NASA Game Changing Development Program Deep Space Optical Communications Project is developing four key technologies for the implementation of a high efficiency telecommunications system that will enable greater than 10X the data rate of a state-of-the-art deep space RF system (Ka-band) for similar transceiver mass and power burden on the spacecraft. These technologies are a low mass spacecraft disturbance isolation assembly, a flight qualified photon counting detector array, a high efficiency flight laser amplifier and a high efficiency photon counting detector array for the ground-based receiver.

  17. A Prospect on the Demonstration of Electric Power Production from Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Ogawa, Yuichi; Tobita, Kenji

    This paper describes a prospect toward electric power production by the Fusion energy. In the first part of the paper, a principle of TOKAMAK system which is the successful magnetic-confinement-systems for fusion reactors are shown, and then the ITER project based on TOKAMAK and the present status of ITER is reviewed. In the remainder of the paper, a roadmap for fusion energy and conceptual designs of Demonstration reactors are briefly described.

  18. High-power and highly efficient diode-cladding-pumped holmium-doped fluoride fiber laser operating at 2.94 microm.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stuart D

    2009-08-01

    A high-power diode-cladding-pumped Ho(3+), Pr(3+)-doped fluoride glass fiber laser is demonstrated. The laser produced a maximum output power of 2.5 W at a slope efficiency of 32% using diode lasers emitting at 1,150 nm. The long-emission wavelength of 2.94 microm measured at maximum pump power, which is particularly suited to medical applications, indicates that tailoring of the proportion of Pr(3+) ions can provide specific emission wavelengths while providing sufficient de-excitation of the lower laser level. PMID:19649086

  19. On the wanderings of a quantum chemist in the world of fusion power and politics

    SciTech Connect

    Monkhorst, H.J.

    2000-03-05

    Ruminations by a quantum chemist are offered on his forays into the treacherous territory of the global fusion power research community. His and a colleague's proposal for a colliding beam fusion reactor is explained. His experiences hold general lessons about the treatment an innocent scientist can expect when he challenges the entrenched modus operandi of a large scientific/engineering establishment.

  20. Channel Temperature Model for Microwave AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on SiC and Sapphire MMICs in High Power, High Efficiency SSPAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.

    2004-01-01

    A key parameter in the design trade-offs made during AlGaN/GaN HEMTs development for microwave power amplifiers is the channel temperature. An accurate determination can, in general, only be found using detailed software; however, a quick estimate is always helpful, as it speeds up the design cycle. This paper gives a simple technique to estimate the channel temperature of a generic microwave AlGaN/GaN HEMT on SiC or Sapphire, while incorporating the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. The procedure is validated by comparing its predictions with the experimentally measured temperatures in microwave devices presented in three recently published articles. The model predicts the temperature to within 5 to 10 percent of the true average channel temperature. The calculation strategy is extended to determine device temperature in power combining MMICs for solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs).

  1. Low-loss smile-insensitive external frequency-stabilization of high power diode lasers enabled by vertical designs with extremely low divergence angle and high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, Paul; Knigge, Steffen; Maaßdorf, Andre; Bugge, Frank; Hengesbach, Stefan; Witte, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter; Köhler, Bernd; Hubrich, Ralf; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens; Erbert, Götz; Traenkle, Guenther

    2013-02-01

    Broad area lasers with narrow spectra are required for many pumping applications and for wavelength beam combination. Although monolithically stabilized lasers show high performance, some applications can only be addressed with external frequency stabilization, for example when very narrow spectra are required. When conventional diode lasers with vertical far field angle, ΘV 95% ~ 45° (95% power) are stabilized using volume holographic gratings (VHGs), optical losses are introduced, limiting both efficiency and reliable output power, with the presence of any bar smile compounding the challenge. Diode lasers with designs optimized for extremely low vertical divergence (ELOD lasers) directly address these challenges. The vertical far field angle in conventional laser designs is limited by the waveguiding of the active region itself. In ELOD designs, quantum barriers are used that have low refractive index, enabling the influence of the active region to be suppressed, leading to narrow far field operation from thin vertical structures, for minimal electrical resistance and maximum power conversion efficiency. We review the design process, and show that 975 nm diode lasers with 90 μm stripes that use ELOD designs operate with ΘV 95% = 26° and reach 58% power conversion efficiency at a CW output power of 10 W. We demonstrate directly that VHG stabilized ELOD lasers have significantly lower loss and larger operation windows than conventional lasers in the collimated feedback regimes, even in the presence of significant (≥ 1 μm) bar smile. We also discuss the potential influence of ELOD designs on reliable output power and options for further performance improvement.

  2. Labs take aim at rapid-fire lasers for fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.

    1997-03-14

    By early in the next century, researchers anticipate igniting a miniature fusion reaction by blasting a hydrogen pellet with a battery of lasers. However, the massive lasers available now can`t fire at the rapid pace needed for an inertial-confinement fusion power plant. Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Naval Research Laboratory are now preparing to build lasers capable of both high power and machine gun-fast impulses. This article describes both research programs and their approaches.

  3. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S.

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  4. Tritium Breeding Blanket for a Commercial Fusion Power Plant - A System Engineering Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Wayne R.

    2014-04-14

    The goal of developing a new source of electric power based on fusion has been pursued for decades. If successful, future fusion power plants will help meet growing world-wide demand for electric power. A key feature and selling point for fusion is that its fuel supply is widely distributed globally and virtually inexhaustible. Current world-wide research on fusion energy is focused on the deuterium-tritium (DT for short) fusion reaction since it will be the easiest to achieve in terms of the conditions (e.g., temperature, density and confinement time of the DT fuel) required to produce net energy. Over the past decades countless studies have examined various concepts for TBBs for both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). At this time, the key organizations involved are government sponsored research organizations world-wide. The near-term focus of the MFE community is on the development of TBB mock-ups to be tested on the ITER tokamak currently under construction in Caderache France. TBB concepts for IFE tend to be different from MFE primarily due to significantly different operating conditions and constraints. This report focuses on longer-term commercial power plants where the key stakeholders include: electric utilities, plant owner and operator, manufacturer, regulators, utility customers, and in-plant subsystems including the heat transfer and conversion systems, fuel processing system, plant safety systems, and the monitoring control systems.

  5. Applications of high power millimeter waves in the DIII-D fusion program

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.L.

    1996-08-01

    First operation of a new generation of MW level, 110 GHz generator (gyrotron) on the DIII-D fusion experimental device has been achieved. The desire for high power, cw millimeter (mm) wave sources to support fusion research and development is just now beginning to be realized. Plasma heating and current drive with directed mm waves rely on the strong absorption achieved when the wave frequency matches the natural ``cyclotron`` frequency of electrons in a magnetic field, or its harmonics. Recent progress in fusion experiments highlights the need for control of the interior details of the hot plasma, and nun wave systems are ideally suited for this role. A brief status of fusion research is given, and the importance of mm waves in the future directions for fusion research is described. The vacuum transmission components necessary for transmitting, monitoring, and launching high power 1 10 GHz waves into a plasma have been developed at General Atomics (GA) and will be described. High power mm waves have a number of attractive technological features for fusion applications compared with other candidate plasma heating and current drive technologies. Millimeter waves can be transmitted with high power density over large distances with low losses by utilizing corrugated waveguides, so the generators can be sited remotely, facilitating maintenance and saving valuable space near the fusion device.

  6. High efficiency solar cell processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F.; Iles, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, cells made by several groups are approaching 19% efficiency. General aspects of the processing required for such cells are discussed. Most processing used for high efficiency cells is derived from space-cell or concentrator cell technology, and recent advances have been obtained from improved techniques rather than from better understanding of the limiting mechanisms. Theory and modeling are fairly well developed, and adequate to guide further asymptotic increases in performance of near conventional cells. There are several competitive cell designs with promise of higher performance ( 20%) but for these designs further improvements are required. The available cell processing technology to fabricate high efficiency cells is examined.

  7. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. Ph.; Gulden, W.; Kolbasov, B.; Louzeiro-Malaquias, A.-J.; Petti, D.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reports were presented covering a selection of topics on the safety of fusion power plants. These included a review on licensing studies developed for ITER site preparation surveying common and non-common issues (i.e. site dependent) as lessons to a broader approach for fusion power plant safety. Several fusion power plant models, spanning from accessible technology to more advanced-materials based concepts, were discussed. On the topic related to fusion-specific technology, safety studies were reported on different concepts of breeding blanket modules, tritium handling and auxiliary systems under normal and accident scenarios' operation. The testing of power plant relevant technology in ITER was also assessed in terms of normal operation and accident scenarios, and occupational doses and radioactive releases under these testings have been determined. Other specific safety issues for fusion have also been discussed such as availability and reliability of fusion power plants, dust and tritium inventories and component failure databases. This study reveals that the environmental impact of fusion power plants can be minimized through a proper selection of low activation materials and using recycling technology helping to reduce waste volume and potentially open the route for its reutilization for the nuclear sector or even its clearance into the commercial circuit. Computational codes for fusion safety have been presented in support of the many studies reported. The on-going work on establishing validation approaches aiming at improving the prediction capability of fusion codes has been supported by experimental results and new directions for development have been identified. Fusion standards are not available and fission experience is mostly used as the framework basis for licensing and target design for safe operation and occupational and environmental constraints. It has been argued that fusion can benefit if a specific fusion approach is implemented, in particular

  8. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  9. The theory of an auto-resonant field emission cathode relativistic electron accelerator for high efficiency microwave to direct current power conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A novel method of microwave power conversion to direct current is discussed that relies on a modification of well known resonant linear relativistic electron accelerator techniques. An analysis is presented that shows how, by establishing a 'slow' electromagnetic field in a waveguide, electrons liberated from an array of field emission cathodes, are resonantly accelerated to several times their rest energy, thus establishing an electric current over a large potential difference. Such an approach is not limited to the relatively low frequencies that characterize the operation of rectennas, and can, with appropriate waveguide and slow wave structure design, be employed in the 300 to 600 GHz range where much smaller transmitting and receiving antennas are needed.

  10. Development of Technologies on Innovative Simplified Nuclear Power Plant Using High-Efficiency Steam Injectors (10) Application to a Small District-Heating Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tadashi Narabayashi; Yoichiro Shimadu; Toshiiro Murase; Masatoshi Nagai; Michitsugu Mori; Shuichi Ohmori

    2006-07-01

    A steam injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact compact heater. This provides SI with capability to use as a passive ECCS pump and also as a direct-contact feedwater heater that heats up feedwater by using extracted steam from the turbine. In order to develop a high reliability passive ECCS pump and a compact feedwater heater, it is necessary to quantify the characteristics between physical properties of the flow field. We carried out experiments to observe the internal behavior of the water jet as well as measure the velocity of steam jet using a laser Doppler velocimetry. Its performance depends on the phenomena of steam condensation onto the water jet surface and heat transfer in the water jet due to turbulence on to the phase-interface. The analysis was also conducted by using a CFD code with the separate two-phase flow models. With regard to the simplified feed-water system, size of four-stage SI system is almost the same as the model SI that had done the steam and water test that pressures were same as that of current ABWR. The authors also conducted the hot water supply system test in the snow for a district heating. With regard to the SI core cooling system, the performance tests results showed that the low-pressure SI core cooling system will decrease the PCT to almost the same as the saturation temperature of the steam pressure in a pressure vessel. As it is compact equipment, SI is expected to bring about great simplification and materials-saving effects, while its simple structure ensures high reliability of its operation, thereby greatly contributing to the simplification of the power plant for not only an ABWR power plant but also a small PWR/ BWR for district heating system. (authors)