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Sample records for high-energy neutron spectra

  1. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  2. Neutron spectra and dose equivalents calculated in tissue for high-energy radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Followill, David S.

    2009-04-15

    Neutrons are by-products of high-energy radiation therapy and a source of dose to normal tissues. Thus, the presence of neutrons increases a patient's risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer. Although neutrons have been thoroughly studied in air, little research has been focused on neutrons at depths in the patient where radiosensitive structures may exist, resulting in wide variations in neutron dose equivalents between studies. In this study, we characterized properties of neutrons produced during high-energy radiation therapy as a function of their depth in tissue and for different field sizes and different source-to-surface distances (SSD). We used a previously developed Monte Carlo model of an accelerator operated at 18 MV to calculate the neutron fluences, energy spectra, quality factors, and dose equivalents in air and in tissue at depths ranging from 0.1 to 25 cm. In conjunction with the sharply decreasing dose equivalent with increased depth in tissue, the authors found that the neutron energy spectrum changed drastically as a function of depth in tissue. The neutron fluence decreased gradually as the depth increased, while the average neutron energy decreased sharply with increasing depth until a depth of approximately 7.5 cm in tissue, after which it remained nearly constant. There was minimal variation in the quality factor as a function of depth. At a given depth in tissue, the neutron dose equivalent increased slightly with increasing field size and decreasing SSD; however, the percentage depth-dose equivalent curve remained constant outside the primary photon field. Because the neutron dose equivalent, fluence, and energy spectrum changed substantially with depth in tissue, we concluded that when the neutron dose equivalent is being determined at a depth within a patient, the spectrum and quality factor used should be appropriate for depth rather than for in-air conditions. Alternately, an appropriate percent depth-dose equivalent curve should be

  3. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  4. Transport analysis of measured neutron leakage spectra from spheres as tests of evaluated high energy cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, D. D.; Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.

    1973-01-01

    Integral tests of evaluated ENDF/B high-energy cross sections have been made by comparing measured and calculated neutron leakage flux spectra from spheres of various materials. An Am-Be (alpha,n) source was used to provide fast neutrons at the center of the test spheres of Be, CH2, Pb, Nb, Mo, Ta, and W. The absolute leakage flux spectra were measured in the energy range 0.5 to 12 MeV using a calibrated NE213 liquid scintillator neutron spectrometer. Absolute calculations of the spectra were made using version 3 ENDF/B cross sections and an S sub n discrete ordinates multigroup transport code. Generally excellent agreement was obtained for Be, CH2, Pb, and Mo, and good agreement was observed for Nb although discrepancies were observed for some energy ranges. Poor comparative results, obtained for Ta and W, are attributed to unsatisfactory nonelastic cross sections. The experimental sphere leakage flux spectra are tabulated and serve as possible benchmarks for these elements against which reevaluated cross sections may be tested.

  5. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-03-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  6. Simplified method for deducing high-energy neutron spectra between 1 and 100 MeV using Foil-Activation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kasugai, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Yashima, H.; Matsumura, H.; Iwase, H.; Hirayama, H.; Mokhov, N.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Vaziri, K.; Lauten, G.; Oishi, K.; Nakamura, T.

    2011-07-01

    The Japanese and American Study of Muon Interaction and Neutron detection (JASMIN) collaboration, has been conducting shielding experiments using the Fermilab anti-proton target station (Pbar) shielding assembly. A multi-foil technique was used to measure the high energy neutron spectra, in the range of 1 to 100 MeV, for the target station shielding configuration. The neutron spectra were de-convoluted using a new fitting method. This method is based on the assumption that a neutron spectrum can be expressed as a simple sum of two exponentials. The validity of the fitting method was confirmed by comparison with the results obtained using SAND-II computer code and theoretical calculations. Finally, it was found that there are simple correlations between reaction rates and the adjustable parameters in the fitting function. (authors)

  7. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-11

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures.

  8. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Rai Ko S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning.

  9. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  10. High-energy neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Michele Rhea

    2001-12-01

    Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for the radiation protection quantity effective dose were calculated for neutrons, photons and protons with energies up to 2 GeV using the MCNPX code. The calculations were performed using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory versions of the MIRD-V male and female anthropomorphic phantoms modified to include the skin and esophagus. The latest high-energy neutron evaluated cross-section libraries and the recommendations given in ICRP Publication 60 and ICRP Publication 74 were utilized to perform the calculations. Sets of fluence-to- effective dose conversion coefficients are given for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left-lateral, right-lateral and rotational irradiation geometries. This is the first set of dose conversion coefficients over this energy range calculated for the L-LAT irradiation geometry. A unique set of high-energy neutron depth-dose benchmark experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center/Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE/WNR) complex. The experiments consisted of filtered neutron beams with energies up to 800 MeV impinging on a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 tissue-equivalent phantom. The absorbed dose was measured in the phantom at various depths with tissue-equivalent ion chambers. The phantom and the experimental set-up were modeled using MCNPX. Comparisons of the experimental and computational depth- dose distributions indicate that the absorbed dose calculated by MCNPX is within 13% for neutrons with energies up to 750 MeV. This experiment will serve as a benchmark experiment for the testing of high-energy radiation transport codes for the international radiation protection community.

  11. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinnison, James D.; Maurer, Richard H.; Roth, David R.; Haight, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene.

  12. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors.

    PubMed

    Kinnison, James D; Maurer, Richard H; Roth, David R; Haight, Robert C

    2003-02-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene. PMID:12537520

  13. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties and microstructural development of Alloy 718 irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Garner, F. A.; Hamilton, M. L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a γ '(Ni 3(Al,Ti))-γ″(Ni 3Nb) hardenable superalloy with attractive strength, and corrosion resistance. This alloy is a candidate material for use in accelerator production of tritium (APT) target and blanket applications, where it would have to withstand low-temperature irradiation by high-energy protons and spallation neutrons. The existing data base, relevant to such irradiation conditions, is very limited. Alloy 718 has therefore been exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), closely matching those expected in the APT target and blanket applications. The yield stress of Alloy 718 increases with increasing dose up to ˜0.5 dpa, and then decreases with further increase in dose. The uniform elongation, however, drastically decreases with increasing dose at very low doses (<0.5 dpa), and does not recover when the alloy later softens somewhat. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of Alloy 718 shows that superlattice spots corresponding to the age-hardening precipitate phases γ ' and γ″ are lost from the diffraction patterns for Alloy 718 by only 0.6 dpa, the lowest proton-induced dose level achieved in this experiment. Examination of samples that were neutron irradiated to doses of only ˜0.1 dpa showed that precipitates are faintly visible in diffraction patterns but are rapidly becoming invisible. It is proposed that the γ ' and γ″ first become disordered (by <0.6 dpa), but remain as solute-rich aggregates that still contribute to the hardness at relatively low dpa levels, and then are gradually dispersed at higher doses.

  14. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Sheu, R J

    2015-04-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with (252)Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing (252)Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6_8 extended-range sphere versus the 6″ standard sphere). PMID:25280480

  15. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  16. High-energy neutron dosimetry with superheated drop detectors.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, F; Agosteo, S; Sannikov, A V; Silari, M

    2002-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the response of dichlorodifluoromethane superheated drop detectors was performed in the 46-133 MeV energy range. Experiments with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were performed at the Université Catholique de Leuvain-la-Neuve, Belgium and the Svedberg Laboratory, Sweden, while tests in a broad field were performed at CERN. To determine the response of the detectors to the high-energy beams, the spectra of incident neutrons were folded over functions modelled after the cross sections for the production of heavy ions from the detector elements. The cross sections for fluorine and chlorine were produced in this work by means of the Monte Carlo high-energy transport code HADRON based on the cascade exciton model of nuclear interactions. The new response data permit the interpretation of measurements at high-energy accelerators and on high-altitude commercial flights, where a 30-50% under-response had been consistently recorded with respect to neutron dose equivalent. The introduction of a 1 cm lead shell around the detectors effectively compensates most of the response defect. PMID:12382936

  17. Microstructural origins of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of 316 L and 304 L austenitic stainless steels irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Hamilton, M. L.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    A number of candidate alloys were exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) that closely match the mixed high-energy proton/neutron spectra expected in accelerator production of tritium (APT) window and blanket applications. Austenitic stainless steels 316 L and 304 L are two of these candidate alloys possessing attractive strength and corrosion resistance for APT applications. This paper describes the dose dependence of the irradiation-induced microstructural evolution of SS 316 L and 304 L in the temperature range 30-60°C and consequent changes in mechanical properties. It was observed that the microstructural evolution during irradiation was essentially identical in the two alloys, a behavior mirrored in their changes in mechanical properties. With one expection, it was possible to correlate all changes in mechanical properties with visible microstructural features. A late-term second abrupt decrease in uniform elongation was not associated with visible microstructure, but is postulated to be a consequence of large levels of retained hydrogen measured in the specimens. In spite of large amounts of both helium and hydrogen retained, approaching 1 at.% at the highest exposures, no visible cavities were formed, indicating that the gas atoms were either in solution or in subresolvable clusters.

  18. Preliminary studies for a high energy neutron area monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, R.T.; Hsu, H.H.

    1998-12-01

    Track etch detectors were exposed to neutrons produced by a spallation target struck by a beam of 800 MeV protons. The fields were filtered by 0, 10, and 40 centimeters of polyethylene. The track etch dosimeters were exposed on a polyethylene phantom. The dosimeters were exposed bare and behind lead filters of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25 and 1.50 cm of lead with the face of the dosimeter perpendicular to the beam and bare and behind lead filters of 0.50, 1.0, and 1.5 cm of lead with angle of incidence 45{degree} and 75{degree}. Monte Carlo calculations of these experimental configurations were done using MCNP and LAHET with input from the calculated spectra. These results are compared with the experimental results to understand the basic processes involved in the production of tracks with high energy neutrons and develop a high energy neutron area monitor.

  19. Mechanical approach to the neutrons spectra collimation and detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, H.; Roshan, M. V.

    2014-11-15

    Neutrons spectra from most of known sources require being collimated for numerous applications; among them one is the Neutron Activation Analysis. High energy neutrons are collimated through a mechanical procedure as one of the most promising methods. The output energy of the neutron beam depends on the velocity of the rotating Polyethylene disks. The collimated neutrons are then measured by an innovative detection technique with high accuracy.

  20. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  1. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  2. First observations of power MOSFET burnout with high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Normand, E.; Majewski, P.P.; Wender, S.A.

    1996-12-01

    Single event burnout was seen in power MOSFETs exposed to high energy neutrons. Devices with rated voltage {ge}400 volts exhibited burnout at substantially less than the rated voltage. Tests with high energy protons gave similar results. Burnout was also seen in limited tests with lower energy protons and neutrons. Correlations with heavy-ion data are discussed. Accelerator proton data gave favorable comparisons with burnout rates measured on the APEX spacecraft. Implications for burnout at lower altitudes are also discussed.

  3. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  4. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  5. Calculations of neutron spectra after neutron neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Mitchell, G. E.; Tornow, W.; Furman, W. I.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzichka, A. Yu; Nekhaev, G. V.; Strelkov, A. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2004-09-01

    A direct neutron-neutron scattering length, ann, measurement with the goal of 3% accuracy (0.5 fm) is under preparation at the aperiodic pulsed reactor YAGUAR. A direct measurement of ann will not only help resolve conflicting results of ann by indirect means, but also in comparison to the proton-proton scattering length, app, shed light on the charge-symmetry of the nuclear force. We discuss in detail the analysis of the nn-scattering data in terms of a simple analytical expression. We also discuss calibration measurements using the time-of-flight spectra of neutrons scattered on He and Ar gases and the neutron activation technique. In particular, we calculate the neutron velocity and time-of-flight spectra after scattering neutrons on neutrons and after scattering neutrons on He and Ar atoms for the proposed experimental geometry, using a realistic neutron flux spectrum—Maxwellian plus epithermal tail. The shape of the neutron spectrum after scattering is appreciably different from the initial spectrum, due to collisions between thermal-thermal and thermal-epithermal neutrons. At the same time, the integral over the Maxwellian part of the realistic scattering spectrum differs by only about 6 per cent from that of a pure Maxwellian nn-scattering spectrum.

  6. High-energy spectra of active nuclei. 1: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaguti, G.; Bassani, L.; Caroli, E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a catalog of high-energy spectra (E is greater than or equal to 0.01 keV) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The catalog contains 209 objects (140 Seyfert galaxies, 65 quasars, and 4 objects otherwise classified), for a total of 1030 spectra. Most of the data have been collected from the literature over a period spanning more than 20 yr starting from the early 1970s up to the end of 1992. For a numbner of objects (17), EXOSAT/ME data have been extracted and analyzed, and the 27 spectra obtained have been added to the database. For each object we report individual observation spectral fit parameters using a power-law model corrected for cold gas absorption along the line of sight (photon index, 1 keV intensity and hydrogen column density), plus other relevant data. It is hoped that this database can become a useful tool for the study of the AGN phenomenon in its various aspects.

  7. ENERGY SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY NUCLEI AT HIGH ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Malinine, A.; Allison, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Barbier, L.; Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Jeon, J. A.; Minnick, S.

    2009-12-10

    We present new measurements of the energy spectra of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei from the second flight of the balloon-borne experiment Cosmic-Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM). The instrument included different particle detectors to provide redundant charge identification and measure the energy of CRs up to several hundred TeV. The measured individual energy spectra of C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe are presented up to approx10{sup 14} eV. The spectral shape looks nearly the same for these primary elements and it can be fitted to an E {sup -2.66} {sup +}- {sup 0.04} power law in energy. Moreover, a new measurement of the absolute intensity of nitrogen in the 100-800 GeV/n energy range with smaller errors than previous observations, clearly indicates a hardening of the spectrum at high energy. The relative abundance of N/O at the top of the atmosphere is measured to be 0.080 +- 0.025 (stat.)+-0.025 (sys.) at approx800 GeV/n, in good agreement with a recent result from the first CREAM flight.

  8. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  9. CREAM: High Energy Frontier of Cosmic Ray Elemental Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment was flown for 161 days in six flights over Antarctica. High energy cosmic-ray data were collected over a wide energy range from 10 (10) to 10 (15) eV at an average altitude of 38.5 km with 3.9 g/cm (2) atmospheric overburden. Cosmic-ray elements from protons (Z = 1) to iron nuclei (Z = 26) are separated with excellent charge resolution. Building on success of the balloon flights, the payload is being reconfigured for exposure on the International Space Station (ISS). This ISS-CREAM instrument is configured with the CREAM calorimeter for energy measurements, and four finely segmented Silicon Charge Detector layers for precise charge measurements. In addition, the Top and Bottom Counting Detectors (TCD and BCD) and Boronated Scintillator Detector (BSD) have been newly developed. The TCD and BCD are scintillator based segmented detectors to separate electrons from nuclei using the shower profile differences, while BSD distinguishes electrons from nuclei by detecting thermal neutrons that are dominant in nuclei induced showers. An order of magnitude increase in data collecting power is possible by utilizing the ISS to reach the highest energies practical with direct measurements. The project status including results from on-going analysis of existing data and future plans will be discussed.

  10. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  11. Micronuclei Induction in Human Fibroblasts Exposed In Vitro to Los Alamos High-Energy Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersey, Brad; Sodolak, John; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Prem; Wilkins, Richard; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility#s ICE House 30L beamline is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectra of earth#s atmosphere. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human fibroblasts in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams without degrader at an entrance dose rate of 25 mGy/hr and analyzed the micronuclei (MN) induction. The cells were also placed behind a 9.9 cm water column to study effect of shielding in the protection of neutron induced damages. It was found that the dose response in the MN frequency was linear for the samples with and without shielding and the slope of the MN yield behind the shielding was reduced by a factor of 3.5. Compared to the MN induction in human fibroblasts exposed to a gamma source at a low dose rate, the RBE was found to be 16.7 and 10.0 for the neutrons without and with 9.9 cm water shielding, respectively.

  12. Micronuclei induction in human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to Los Alamos high-energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersey, Brad; Sodolak, John; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Prem; Wilkins, Richard; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's ICE House 30L beamline is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectra of earth's atmosphere. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human fibroblasts in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams without degrader at an entrance dose rate of 25 mGy/h and analyzed the micronuclei (MN) induction. The cells were also placed behind a 9.9 cm water column to study the effect of shielding in the protection of neutron induced damages. It was found that the dose response in the MN frequency was linear for the samples with and without shielding and the slope of the MN yield behind the shielding was reduced by a factor of 3.5. Compared to the MN induction in human fibroblasts exposed to a γ source at a similar low dose rate, the RBE was found to be 16.7 and 10.0 for the neutrons without and with the 9.9 cm water shielding, respectively.

  13. NaI detector neutron activation spectra for PGNAA applications

    PubMed

    Gardner; El; Zheng; Hayden; Mayo

    2000-10-01

    When NaI detectors are used in prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis devices, they are activated by neutrons that penetrate the detector. While thermal neutron filters like boron or lithium can be used to reduce this activation, it can never be completely eliminated by this approach since high energy neutrons can penetrate the detector and thermalize inside it. This activation results in the emission of prompt gamma rays from both the I and Na and the production of the radioisotopes 128I and 24Na that subsequently decay and emit their characteristic beta particles and gamma rays. The resulting three spectra represent a background for this measurement. An experimental method for obtaining these three spectra is described and results are reported for 2" x 2", 5" x 5", 6" x 6", and 1" x 6" NaI detectors using the thermal neutron beam of the NCSU PULSTAR nuclear reactor. In addition, Monte Carlo simulation programs have been developed and used for simulating these spectra. Good results have been obtained by the Monte Carlo method for the two radioisotope spectra, and it is anticipated that good results will also be obtained for the prompt gamma-ray spectrum when the I and Na coincidence schemes are known. PMID:11003483

  14. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; Kornilov, N. V.; Lestone, J. P.; Litaize, O.; Morillon, B.; Neudecker, D.; Oberstedt, S.; Ohsawa, T.; et al

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  15. Generation of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse high intensity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-09-15

    A roadmap is suggested and demonstrated experimentally for the production of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse lasers. Investigation with a 3D Monte Carlo model has been employed to quantify the production of energetic neutrons. Numerical simulations have been performed for three nuclear reactions, d(d,n){sup 3}He, {sup 7}Li(d,n){sup 8}Be, and {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be, driven by monoenergetic ion beams. Quantitative estimates for the driver ion beam energy and number have been made and the neutron spectra and yield in the ion propagation direction have been evaluated for various incident ion energies. In order to generate neutron fluence above a detection limit of 10{sup 6} neutrons/sr, either {approx}10{sup 10} protons with energy 20-30 MeV or comparable amount of deuterons with energy 5-10 MeV are required. Experimental verification of the concept with deuterons driven by the Titan laser (peak intensity 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 9 ps, wavelength 1.05 {mu}m, and energy of 360 J) is provided with the generation of neutrons with energy of up to 18 MeV from {sup 7}Li(d,n){sup 8}Be reactions. Future research will focus on optimized schemes for ion acceleration for production of high-energy neutrons, which will involve efficient target design, laser parameter optimization, and converter material.

  16. Determining neutrino absorption spectra at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Scholten, O; Van Vliet, A R E-mail: A.R.van.Vliet@student.rug.nl

    2008-06-15

    A very efficient method for measuring the flux of ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos is through the detection of radio waves which are emitted by the particle shower in the lunar regolith. The highest acceptance is reached for radio waves in the frequency band of 100-200 MHz which can be measured with modern radio telescopes. In this work we investigate the sensitivity of this detection method to structures in the UHE neutrino spectrum caused by their absorption on the low energy relic anti-neutrino background through the Z boson resonance. The position of the absorption peak is sensitive to the neutrino mass and the redshift of the source. A new generation of low frequency digital radio telescopes will provide excellent detection capabilities for measuring these radio pulses, thus making our consideration here very timely.

  17. Relativistically correct DD and DT neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.

    2014-06-01

    We use relativistic kinematics to derive an expression for the energy spectrum of neutrons produced by fusion reactions in deuterium and deuterium-tritium thermal plasmas. The derivation does not require approximations and the obtained expression gives the exact shape of the spectrum. It is shown that the high-energy tail of the neutron spectrum is highly sensitive to the plasma temperature. Simple expressions for the plasma temperature as a function of the neutron spectrum full width at half maximum (FWHM) are given.

  18. Interpreting inertial fusion neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, David H.

    2016-03-01

    A burning laser fusion plasma produces a neutron spectrum first described by Brysk (1973 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 15 611). This and more recent work deals with the spectrum produced by a single fluid element. The distribution of temperatures and velocities in multiple fluid elements combine in any real spectrum; we derive formulas for how the neutron spectrum averages these contributions. The single element momentum spectrum is accurately Gaussian, but the multi-element spectrum exhibits higher moments. In particular, the skew and kurtosis are likely to be large enough to measure. Even the single fluid element spectrum may exhibit measurable directional anisotropy, so that instruments with different lines of sight should see different yields, mean velocities, mean temperatures, and higher moments. Finally, we briefly discuss how scattering in the imploded core modifies the neutron spectrum by changing the relative weighting of fuel regions with different temperatures and velocities.

  19. Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectra Induced by Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Parrish Alan

    Prompt fission neutron energy spectra for ^{235}U and ^{239 }Pu have been measured for fission neutron energies greater than the energy of the incident neutrons inducing fission. The measurements were undertaken to investigate the shape dependence of the fission neutron spectra upon both the incident neutron energy and the mass of the nucleus undergoing fission. Measurements were made for both nuclides at the following incident neutron energies; 0.50 MeV, 1.50 MeV, 2.50 MeV and 3.50 MeV. The data are presented either as relative yields or as ratios of a measured spectrum to the ^{235}U spectrum at 0.50 MeV. Incident neutrons were produced by the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction using a pulsed, bunched proton beam from the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Pinanski Energy Center. The neutrons were detected by a thin liquid scintillator with good time resolution capabilities; time-of-flight techniques were used for neutron energy determination; in addition pulse-shape-discrimination was used to reduce gamma-ray background levels. The measurements are compared to calculations based on the Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix to test its predictive capabilities. The data are fit by the Watt equation to determine the mean energy of the spectra, and to facilitate comparison of the results to previous measurements. The data are also compared directly to previous measurements.

  20. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  1. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, Robert Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John; Licea, Angel

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  2. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. 3: Pulse phase dependence in high energy continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Bussard, R. W.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Pulse phase-dependent spectral changes in the high energy (less than 20 keV) continuum of Hercules X-1 were observed. Cyclotron absorption of underlying continua can reproduce the observed angular dependence in the high energy cutoff. Implications of this model, which include the possibility of determining the angular separation between the line of sight and the neutron star magnetic field if the absorbing electron spectrum is known are discussed.

  3. Dose spectra from energetic particles and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan; Bancroft, Chris; Bloser, Peter; Legere, Jason; Ryan, James; Smith, Sonya; Spence, Harlan; Mazur, Joe; Zeitlin, Cary

    2013-10-01

    spectra from energetic particles and neutrons (DoSEN) are an early-stage space technology research project that combines two advanced complementary radiation detection concepts with fundamental advantages over traditional dosimetry. DoSEN measures not only the energy but also the charge distribution (including neutrons) of energetic particles that affect human (and robotic) health in a way not presently possible with current dosimeters. For heavy ions and protons, DoSEN provides a direct measurement of the lineal energy transfer (LET) spectra behind shielding material. For LET measurements, DoSEN contains stacks of thin-thick Si detectors similar in design to those used for the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation. With LET spectra, we can now directly break down the observed spectrum of radiation into its constituent heavy-ion components and through biologically based quality factors that provide not only doses and dose rates but also dose equivalents, associated rates, and even organ doses. DoSEN also measures neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV, which requires enough sensitive mass to fully absorb recoil particles that the neutrons produce. DoSEN develops the new concept of combining these independent measurements and using the coincidence of LET measurements and neutron detection to significantly reduce backgrounds in each measurement. The background suppression through the use of coincidence allows for significant reductions in size, mass, and power needed to provide measurements of dose, neutron dose, dose equivalents, LET spectra, and organ doses. Thus, we introduce the DoSEN concept: a promising low-mass instrument that detects the full spectrum of energetic particles, heavy ions, and neutrons to determine biological impact of radiation in space.

  4. Hexagonal boron nitride thin film thermal neutron detectors with high energy resolution of the reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, T. C.; Majety, S.; Grenadier, S.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2015-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is highly promising for solid-state thermal neutron detector applications due to its many outstanding physical properties, especially its very large thermal neutron capture cross-section (~3840 barns for 10B), which is several orders of magnitude larger than those of most other isotopes. The focus of the present work is to carry out studies on h-BN thin film and detector properties to lay the foundation for the development of a direct-conversion solid-state thermal neutron detector with high sensitivity. The measured carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of h-BN thin films grown on sapphire substrates is 2.83×10-7 cm2/V for electrons and holes, which is comparable to the value of about 10-7 cm2/V for GaN thin films grown on sapphire. Detectors based on h-BN thin films were fabricated and the nuclear reaction product pulse height spectra were measured. Under a bias of 20 V, very narrow individual peaks corresponding to the reaction product energies of α and Li particles as well as the sum peaks have been clearly resolved in the pulse height spectrum for the first time by a B-based direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. Our results indicate that h-BN thin film detectors possess unique advantages including small size, low weight, portability, low voltage operation and high energy resolution of specific reaction products.

  5. Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.G.; Carpenter, J.M.; Prael, R.E.

    1980-02-01

    An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

  6. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm‑2s‑1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  7. Characteristics of high-energy neutrons estimated using the radioactive spallation products of Au at the 500-MeV neutron irradiation facility of KENS.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakao, Noriaki; Wang, Qingbin; Toyoda, Akihiro; Kawai, Masayoshi; Aze, Takahiro; Fujimura, Masatsugu

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a shielding experiment of high-energy neutrons, generated from a tungsten target bombarded with primary 500-MeV protons at KENS, which penetrated through a concrete shield in the zero-degree direction. We propose a new method to evaluate the spectra of high-energy neutrons ranging from 8 to 500 MeV. Au foils were set in a concrete shield, and the reaction rates for 13 radionuclides produced by the spallation reactions on the Au targets were measured by radiochemical techniques. The experimental results were compared with those obtained by the MARS14 Monte-Carlo code. A good agreement (between them) was found for energies beyond 100 MeV. The profile of the neutron spectrum, ranging from 8 to 500 MeV, does not depend on the thickness of the concrete shield. PMID:16604584

  8. Microdosimetric spectra measurements of JANUS neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, I.R.; Williamson, F.S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron radiation from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory is being used with increasing frequency for major biological experiments. The fast neutron spectrum has a Kerma-weighted mean energy of 0.8 MeV and low gamma-ray contamination. In 1984 the JANUS fission converter plate of highly enriched uranium was replaced by one made of low-enriched uranium. We recorded microdosimetric spectra at several different positions in the high-flux irradiation room of JANUS before the change of the converter plate. Each set of measurements consisted of spectra taken at three different site diameters (0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m) and in both ''attenuator up'' and ''attenuator down'' configurations. At two conventional dosimetry reference positions, two sets of measurements were recorded. At three biological reference positions, measurements simulating several biological irradiation conditions, were taken. The dose rate at each position was estimated and compared with dose rates obtained previously by conventional dosimetry. Comparison of the different measurements showed no major change in spectra as a function of position or irradiation condition. First results from similar sets of measurements recorded after the installment of the new converter plate indicate no major change in the spectra. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r{sup 2} rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  10. Measurement of high energy neutrons via Lu(n,xn) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, E.A.; Becker, J.A.; Archer, D.E.; Younes, W.; Stoyer, M.A.; Slaughter, D.

    1997-07-01

    High energy neutrons can be assayed by the use of the nuclear diagnostic material lutetium. We are measuring the (n,xn) cross sections for natural lutetium in order to develop it as a detector material. We are applying lutetium to diagnose the high energy neutrons produced in test target/blanket systems appropriate for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. An experimental setup for measurement of neutron energy spectra in lithium with collimated 14.7 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofek, R.; Tsechanski, A.; Profio, A. E.; Shani, G.

    1989-06-01

    Neutron energy spectra in an 88 cm diameter, 88 cm long lithium tank were measured with the Ben Gurion University experimental setup. In this setup, the lithium tank is separated from the DT neutron generator by a 120 cm thick paraffin wall with a 6 cm diameter collimator through it, along the axis of the neutron generator and the lithium tank. This enables unidirectionality and monoenergeticity of the neutrons penetrating the lithium tank. A neutron energy spectrum is obtained by unfolding with the code FORIST of proton-recoil spectra measured by an NE213 liquid scintillator. The important features of the spectrometry system, comprised of the NE213 scintillator and the attached electronic system, are the high pulse shape discrimination capability of the NE213 scintillator, which enables the separation of neutron and gamma events, relatively high energy resolution, and the system linearity. Also the simultaneous measurement of the low gain and high gain proton-recoil spectra prevents a distortion of the unfolded neutron spectrum. The neutron energy spectra are absolutely normalized and internormalized to each other by an absolutely calibrated, second NE213 scintillator, placed close to the neutron generator. The measured neutron energy spectra inside the lithium tank were compared to some preliminary calculations of the spectra, carried out with the discrete-ordinates transport code DOT4.2. Both spectra are in poor agreement. These discrepancies are assigned mainly to the inadequancy of the transport calculations. Finally, the distribution of the tritium production in the lithium tank, with the same experimental configurations, was calculated with the code DOT4.2 as well. The results indicate that the collimated neutron beam configuration is inappropriate for the purpose of tritium breeding ratio measurements.

  12. High energy neutron and gamma-radiation generated during the solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Mandzhavidze, N. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of high energy neutrons and gamma rays generation in the solar conditions is considered. It is shown that due to a peculiarity of generation and propagation of neutrons corresponding solar flares should be localized at high helio-longitudes.

  13. Track Structure Model for Radial Distributions of Electron Spectra and Event Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    An analytic method is described for evaluating the average radial electron spectrum and the radial and total frequency-event spectrum for high-energy ions. For high-energy ions, indirect events make important contributions to frequency-event spectra. The method used for evaluating indirect events is to fold the radial electron spectrum with measured frequency-event spectrum for photons or electrons. The contribution from direct events is treated using a spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET). We find that high-energy heavy ions have a significantly reduced frequency-averaged final energy (yF) compared to LET, while relativistic protons have a significantly increased yF and dose-averaged lineal energy (yD) for typical site sizes used in tissue equivalent proportional counters. Such differences represent important factors in evaluating event spectra with laboratory beams, in space- flight, or in atmospheric radiation studies and in validation of radiation transport codes. The inadequacy of LET as descriptor because of deviations in values of physical quantities, such as track width, secondary electron spectrum, and yD for ions of identical LET is also discussed.

  14. Neutron productions in the fragmentation of relativistic heavy nuclei and formation of a beam of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    The production of quasimonoenergetic high-energy neutrons at zero angle (0°) in the spallation of relativistic heavy nuclei is discussed by considering the example of the interaction of lead nuclei with light target nuclei. It is shown that this process can be used to generate a beam of high-energy neutrons at existing heavy ion accelerators. At the same time, itmay lead to the appearance of a parasitic neutron beam because of the interaction of the heavy-ion beam used with beam line and experimental setup materials.

  15. Neutron techniques. [for study of high-energy particles produced in large solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Glenn M., Jr.; Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.; Evenson, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Three experimental methods are described which hold the most promise for improved energy resolution, time resolution and sensitivity in the detection of solar neutrons on satellites and/or long duration balloon flights: the neutron calorimeter, the solar neutron track chamber, and the solar neutron decay proton detector. The characteristics of the three methods as to energy range, energy resolution, time resolution, detection efficiency, and physical properties are delineated. Earlier techniques to measure the intensity of high-energy cosmic-ray neutrons at the top of the atmosphere and to search for solar neutrons are described. The past three decades of detector development has now reached the point where it is possible to make comprehensive and detailed measurements of solar neutrons on future space missions.

  16. Interaction of High-Energy Proton Beam with a Thin Target and Multiplicities of Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Demirkol, I.; Tatar, M.; Safak, M. S.; Arasoglu, A.; Tel, E.

    2007-04-23

    An important ingredient in the performance of accelerator driven systems for energy production, waste transmutation and other applications are the number of spallation neutrons produced per incident proton. The neutron multiplicities, angular and energy distributions are usually calculated using simulation codes. We have presented multiplicities of the neutrons emitted in the interaction of a high-energy proton (1500 MeV) with a thin target Pb, Bi. In this study we have used the code ISABEL to calculate multiplicities of the neutron emitted. The results obtained have been compared with the available data.

  17. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  18. Single event upset and charge collection measurements using high energy protons and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.; Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Ness, J.D.; Majewski, P.P. ); Wender, S.; Gavron, A. )

    1994-12-01

    RAMs, microcontrollers and surface barrier detectors were exposed to beams of high energy protons and neutrons to measure the induced number of upsets as well as energy deposition. The WNR facility at Los Alamos provided a neutron spectrum similar to that of the atmospheric neutrons. Its effect on devices was compared to that of protons with energies of 200, 400, 500, and 800 MeV. Measurements indicate that SEU cross sections for 400 MeV protons are similar to those induced by the atmospheric neutron spectrum.

  19. Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R; Chen, Y J; Hambsch, F J; Kornilov, N V; Lestone, J P; Litaize, O; Morillon, B; Neudecker, D; Oberstedt, S; Ohsawa, T; Smith, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides”was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei. The following technical areas were addressed: (i) experiments and uncertainty quantification (UQ): New data for neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U, 238U, and 239Pu have been measured, and older data have been compiled and reassessed. There is evidence from the experimental work of this CRP that a very small percentage of neutrons emitted in fission are actually scission neutrons; (ii) modeling: The Los Alamos model (LAM) continues to be the workhorse for PFNS evaluations. Monte Carlo models have been developed that describe the fission phenomena microscopically, but further development is needed to produce PFNS evaluations meeting the uncertainty targets; (iii) evaluation methodologies: PFNS evaluations rely on the use of the least-squares techniques for merging experimental and model data. Considerable insight was achieved on how to deal with the problem of too small uncertainties in PFNS evaluations. The importance of considering that all experimental PFNS data are “shape” data was stressed; (iv) PFNS evaluations: New evaluations, including covariance data, were generated for major actinides including 1) non-model GMA evaluations of the 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f), and 233U(nth,f) PFNS based exclusively on experimental data (0.02 ≤ E ≤ 10 MeV), which resulted in PFNS average energies E of 2.00±0.01, 2.073±0.010, and 2.030±0.013 MeV, respectively; 2) LAM evaluations of neutron-induced fission spectra on uranium and plutonium targets with improved UQ for incident energies from thermal up to 30 MeV; and 3) Point-by-Point calculations for 232Th, 234U and 237Np targets; and (v) data

  20. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: implications of Auger data for source spectra and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, R.; Berezinsky, V.; Blasi, P.

    2014-10-01

    We use a kinetic-equation approach to describe the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic ray protons and nuclei and calculate the expected spectra and mass composition at the Earth for different assumptions on the source injection spectra and chemical abundances. When compared with the spectrum, the elongation rate Xmax(E) and dispersion σ(Xmax) as observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory, several important consequences can be drawn: a) the injection spectra of nuclei must be very hard, ~ E-γ with γ~ 1- 1.6; b) the maximum energy of nuclei of charge Z in the sources must be ~ 5Z× 1018 eV, thereby not requiring acceleration to extremely high energies; c) the fit to the Auger spectrum can be obtained only at the price of adding an ad hoc light extragalactic component with a steep injection spectrum ~ E-2.7). In this sense, at the ankle EA≈ 5× 1018 eV) all the components are of extragalactic origin, thereby suggesting that the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays occurs below the ankle. Interestingly, the additional light extragalactic component postulated above compares well, in terms of spectrum and normalization, with the one recently measured by KASCADE-Grande.

  1. Sources of High-Energy Emission in the Green Pea Galaxies: New Constraints from Magellan Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Derek Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered Green Pea galaxies display extreme starburst activity and may be some of the only possible Lyman continuum emitting galaxies at low redshift. Green Peas are characterized by their unusually high [O III]/[O II] ratios, similar to the ratios observed in high-redshift galaxies. In addition, the presence of the high-energy He II 4686 line shows that the Green Peas are highly ionized. However, the origin of the He II emission in the Green Peas, and many other starburst galaxies, is still an open question. We analyze IMACS and MagE spectra from the Magellan telescopes in order to evaluate the most probable cause of this He II emission. We also analyze other properties like dust content, temperature and density, and kinematic components. Our IMACS spectra show no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features. We set upper limits on the WR populations in our sample and conclude that Wolf-Rayet stars are not a likely candidate for the He II emission. With deeper MagE spectra we investigate energetic shocks as a possible source of the He II, and move one step closer to uncovering the origin of high-energy photons in these unique starbursts.

  2. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: implications of Auger data for source spectra and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Aloisio, R.; Blasi, P.

    2014-10-01

    We use a kinetic-equation approach to describe the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic ray protons and nuclei and calculate the expected spectra and mass composition at the Earth for different assumptions on the source injection spectra and chemical abundances. When compared with the spectrum, the elongation rate X{sub max}(E) and dispersion σ(X{sub max}) as observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory, several important consequences can be drawn: a) the injection spectra of nuclei must be very hard, ∼ E{sup -γ} with γ∼ 1- 1.6; b) the maximum energy of nuclei of charge Z in the sources must be ∼ 5Z× 10{sup 18} eV, thereby not requiring acceleration to extremely high energies; c) the fit to the Auger spectrum can be obtained only at the price of adding an ad hoc light extragalactic component with a steep injection spectrum ∼ E{sup -2.7}). In this sense, at the ankle E{sub A}≈ 5× 10{sup 18} eV) all the components are of extragalactic origin, thereby suggesting that the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays occurs below the ankle. Interestingly, the additional light extragalactic component postulated above compares well, in terms of spectrum and normalization, with the one recently measured by KASCADE-Grande.

  3. Analytic expression for epithermal neutron spectra amplitudes as a function of water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Darrell

    1993-01-01

    The epithermal portion of an equilibrium neutron spectrum in a planetary body is a function of the water content of its material. The neutrons are produced at high energies but are moderated by elastic and inelastic scattering until they either are captured by surrounding nuclei or escape. We have derived an expression that explicitly shows the dependance of epithermal neutron spectra on water content. Additionally, we compared its predictions to calculations done by Boltzman transport code for infinite media for silicon, oxygen, and a possible lunar composition, and we have obtained very good agreement.

  4. Sci—Fri PM: Dosimetry—02: A Nested Neutron Spectrometer to Measure Neutron Spectra in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J; Licea, A

    2014-08-15

    During high-energy radiotherapy treatments, neutrons are produced in the head of the linac through photonuclear interactions. This has been a concern for many years as photoneutrons contribute to the accepted, yet unwanted, out-of-field doses that pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel. Presently, in-room neutron measurements are difficult and time-consuming and have traditionally been carried out using Bonner spheres with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a new detector, the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS) is tested for use in radiotherapy bunkers. The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional Bonner spheres. The NNS, operated in current mode, was used to measure the dose equivalent, average energy and energy spectrum at several positions in a radiotherapy bunker. The average energy and spectra were compared to Monte Carlo simulations while the dose equivalent was compared to bubble detector measurements. The average energies, as measured by the NNS and Monte Carlo simulations, differed by approximately 30% across the bunker. Measurements of the dose equivalent using the NNS and the bubble detectors agreed within 50% in the maze and less than 10% close to the linac head. Apart from some discrepancies at thermal energies, we also found reasonable agreement between NNS-measured and Monte Carlo-simulated spectra at a number of locations within our radiotherapy bunker. Our results demonstrate that the NNS is a suitable detector to be used in high dose-rate radiotherapy environments.

  5. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios. PMID:27337649

  6. Production of charm mesons by high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shipbaugh, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The charmed mesons D/sup /plus minus//, D/sup 0/, and D/sub s//sup /plus minus//, have been observed in neutron-nucleus collisions at the FNAL Tevatron. A sample of 134 /plus minus/ 19 events as investigated in the decay D/sup /plus minus// /yields/ D/sup 0//pi//sup /plus minus// with the subsequent decay mode D/sup 0/ /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//. The cross section per nucleon for D/sup /plus minus//, at most probable energy /radical/s = 35 GeV, was measured to be 2.11 /plus minus/ .43 (plusreverse arrowminus/.63)/mu/b/nucleon for 0.0 < x/sub f/ < 0.14 (/bar x//sub f/ = .07). The branching ratio (BR) is defined as: BR /identicalreverse arrowto/ Br(D /yields/ D/pi/) /times/ BR(D /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//). The dependence of the cross section per nucleus on number of nucleons in target was fit to a form A /sup /alpha// and it was found that /alpha/ = .96 /plusreverse arrowminus/ .17. A sample of 64 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 16 D/sub s//sup /plus minus// events was investigates for the decay D/sub s//sup /plus minus// /yields/ /phi//pi//sup /plus minus//. The differential cross section for D/sub s//sup /plus minus// production averaged over the particle and antiparticle states is: BR.(1/2)(d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup +/)/dx/sub f/ + d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup /minus//) = 2.85 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 0.80 /plusreverse arrowminus/ .86 /mu/b/nucleon at x/sub f/ = 0.175 where the first errors is statistical and the second error is systematic. The branching fraction is defined as BR /equivalentreverse arrowto/ BR(D/sub s/ /yields/ /phi//pi/), and a linear A dependence was assumed. An estimate of relative cross section is: 0.19 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 0.09 at x/sub f/ = 0. 36 refs., 43 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Production of charm mesons by high-energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shipbaugh, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The charmed mesons ED{sup *{plus minus}}, D{sup 0}, and D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} have been observed in neutron-nucleus collisions at the FNAL Tevatron. A sample of 134 {plus minus} 19 events was investigated in the decay mode D{sup *{plus minus}} {yields} D{sup 0} {pi}{sup {plus minus}} with the subsequent decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}. The cross section per nucleon for D{sup *}{plus minus}, at most probable energy {radical}s = 35 GeV, was measured to be: d{sigma}(xf)/dxf {center dot} BR = 2.11 {plus minus} .43({plus minus}63){mu}b/nucleon for 0.0 < x{sub f} < 0.14 (x{sub f} = .07). The branching ratio (BR) is defined as: BR {identical to} BR(D{sup *} {yields} D{sub {pi}}) {times} BR(D {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}). The dependence of the cross section per nucleus on number of nucleons in the target was fit to a form A{sup {alpha}} and it was found that {alpha} = .96 {plus minus} .17. A sample of 64 {plus minus} 16 D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} events was investigated for the decay D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup {plus minus}}. The differential cross section for D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} production averaged over the particle and antiparticle states is: BR {center dot} {1/2} d{sigma}D{sub s}{sup +}/dxf + d{sigma}(D{sub s}{sup {minus}}/dxf) = 2.8 {plus minus} 0.80 {plus minus} .86 {mu}b/nucleon at x{sub f} = 0.175 where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic. The branching fraction is defined as BR {identical to} BR(D{sub s} {yields} {phi}{pi}), and a linear A dependence was assumed.

  8. Delayed Neutron Energy Spectra Following Fast Fission of Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Marcel Franklin

    Delayed neutron energy spectra have been measured for six delay-time intervals following the fast fission of ^{238}U nuclei. The delay-time intervals span the range 0.17 to 10.2 seconds following initial fission while the measured spectra span neutron energies from 10 keV to 4 MeV. The experiment was performed utilizing the UMass/Lowell 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator to produce fast neutrons for inducing fission in a ^{238} U lined fission chamber. The fission fragments were flushed via a helium jet stream to a well-shielded counting room where they were deposited onto a moving tape (magnetic audio tape) and transferred to a beta-neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. By adjusting the tape speed, composite delayed neutron time-of-flight spectra were measured for several different delay-time intervals. These measurements involved beta-neutron coincidences with ^6 Li-loaded glass scintillators for neutron energies from 10 keV to 450 keV and Bicron BC 501 liquid scintillators for the neutron energy range 200 keV-4 MeV. The measured composite delayed neutron energy spectra for ^{238}U are compared to the composite spectra for ^ {235}U and ^{239} Pu, and also to composite spectra derived for ^{238}U from the ENDF/B-VI database, which is based on summation calculations of individual precursor data supplemented by theoretical estimates. The composite spectra of ^{235}U and ^{239}Pu were obtained from previous measurements of delayed neutron spectra at this laboratory. The composite spectra are also decomposed into Keepin six-group spectra and compared with those for ^{239}Pu and ^{235}U. In addition, an equilibrium spectrum has been calculated from the measured composite spectra using several different analytical techniques and is also compared with the equilibrium spectrum of ^{238}U measured in an earlier study at this laboratory.

  9. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons. PMID:21613268

  10. A diamond 14 MeV neutron energy spectrometer with high energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H; Ochiai, Kentaro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Shikata, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    A self-standing single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond was obtained using lift-off method. It was fabricated into a radiation detector and response function measurements for 14 MeV neutrons were taken at the fusion neutronics source. 1.5% of high energy resolution was obtained by using the (12)C(n, α)(9)Be reaction at an angle of 100° with the deuteron beam line. The intrinsic energy resolution, excluding energy spreading caused by neutron scattering, slowing in the target and circuit noises was 0.79%, which was also the best resolution of the diamond detector ever reported. PMID:26931845

  11. A diamond 14 MeV neutron energy spectrometer with high energy resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Ochiai, Kentaro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Shikata, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    A self-standing single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond was obtained using lift-off method. It was fabricated into a radiation detector and response function measurements for 14 MeV neutrons were taken at the fusion neutronics source. 1.5% of high energy resolution was obtained by using the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction at an angle of 100° with the deuteron beam line. The intrinsic energy resolution, excluding energy spreading caused by neutron scattering, slowing in the target and circuit noises was 0.79%, which was also the best resolution of the diamond detector ever reported.

  12. Computational Transport Modeling of High-Energy Neutrons Found in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brad; Theriot, Corey A.; Rohde, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    The high charge and high energy (HZE) particle radiation environment in space interacts with spacecraft materials and the human body to create a population of neutrons encompassing a broad kinetic energy spectrum. As an HZE ion penetrates matter, there is an increasing chance of fragmentation as penetration depth increases. When an ion fragments, secondary neutrons are released with velocities up to that of the primary ion, giving some neutrons very long penetration ranges. These secondary neutrons have a high relative biological effectiveness, are difficult to effectively shield, and can cause more biological damage than the primary ions in some scenarios. Ground-based irradiation experiments that simulate the space radiation environment must account for this spectrum of neutrons. Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS), it is possible to simulate a neutron environment that is characteristic of that found in spaceflight. Considering neutron dosimetry, the focus lies on the broad spectrum of recoil protons that are produced in biological targets. In a biological target, dose at a certain penetration depth is primarily dependent upon recoil proton tracks. The PHITS code can be used to simulate a broad-energy neutron spectrum traversing biological targets, and it account for the recoil particle population. This project focuses on modeling a neutron beamline irradiation scenario for determining dose at increasing depth in water targets. Energy-deposition events and particle fluence can be simulated by establishing cross-sectional scoring routines at different depths in a target. This type of model is useful for correlating theoretical data with actual beamline radiobiology experiments. Other work exposed human fibroblast cells to a high-energy neutron source to study micronuclei induction in cells at increasing depth behind water shielding. Those findings provide supporting data describing dose vs. depth across a water-equivalent medium. This

  13. Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Reppin, C.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays from an early design study employing Monte Carlo calculations. The response to 50 to 600 MeV solar neutrons was estimated from a simple model which did not consider secondary charged particles escaping into the veto shields. In view of numerous detections by the GRS of solar flares emitting high energy gamma rays, including at least two emitting directly detectable neutrons, the calibration of the high energy mode in the flight model has been recalculated by the use of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer codes. New results presented show that the GRS response to gamma rays above 20 MeV and to neutrons above 100 MeV is significantly lower than the earlier estimates.

  14. Neutron production from flattening filter free high energy medical linac: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, M. A.; Abolaban, F. A.; Podolyák, Z.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the problems arising from using a conventional linac at high energy (>8 MV) is the production of neutrons. One way to reduce neutron production is to remove the flattening filter (FF). The main purpose of this work was to study the effect of FF removal on neutron fluence and neutron dose equivalent inside the treatment room at different photon beam energies. Several simulations based on Monte Carlo techniques were carried out in order to calculate the neutron fluence at different locations in the treatment room from different linac energies with and without a FF. In addition, a step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) for prostate cancer was modelled using the 15 MV photon beam with and without a FF on a water phantom to calculate the neutron dose received in a full treatment. The results obtained show a significant drop-off in neutrons fluence and dose equivalent when the FF was removed. For example, the neutron fluence was decreased by 54%, 76% and 75% for 10, 15 and 18 MV, respectively. This can decrease the neutron dose to the patient as well as reduce the shielding cost of the treatment room. The neutron dose equivalent of the SnS IMRT for prostate cancer was reduced significantly by 71.3% when the FF was removed. It can be concluded that the flattening filter removal from the head of the linac could reduce the risk of causing secondary cancers and the shielding cost of radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  15. Secondary neutron spectra from modern Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linacs with multileaf collimators

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan E.; Followill, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrons are a by-product of high-energy x-ray radiation therapy (threshold for [γ,n] reactions in high-Z material ∼7 MeV). Neutron production varies depending on photon beam energy as well as on the manufacturer of the accelerator. Neutron production from modern linear accelerators (linacs) has not been extensively compared, particularly in terms of the differences in the strategies that various manufacturers have used to implement multileaf collimators (MLCs) into their linac designs. However, such information is necessary to determine neutron dose equivalents for different linacs and to calculate vault shielding requirements. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to measure the neutron spectra from the most up-to-date linacs from three manufacturers: Varian 21EX operating at 15, 18, and 20 MV, Siemens ONCOR operating at 15 and 18 MV, and Elekta Precise operating at 15 and 18 MV. Neutron production was measured by means of gold foil activation in Bonner spheres. Based on the measurements, the authors determined neutron spectra and calculated the average energy, total neutron fluence, ambient dose equivalent, and neutron source strength. The shapes of the neutron spectra did not change significantly between accelerators or even as a function of treatment energy. However, the neutron fluence, and therefore the ambient dose equivalent, did vary, increasing with increasing treatment energy. For a given nominal treatment energy, these values were always highest for the Varian linac. The current study thus offers medical physicists extensive information about the neutron production of MLC-equipped linacs currently in operation and provides them information vital for accurate comparison and prediction of neutron dose equivalents and calculation of vault shielding requirements. PMID:19810475

  16. Development of high-energy neutron imaging for use in NDE applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F; Hall, J; Logan, C; Schmid, G

    1999-06-01

    We are currently developing a high-energy (10 - 15 MeV) neutron imaging system for use in NDE applications. Our goal is to develop an imaging system capable of detecting cubic-mm-scale voids or other structural defects in heavily-shielded low-Z materials within thick sealed objects. The system will be relatively compact (suitable for use in a small laboratory) and capable of acquiring tomographic image data sets. The design of a prototype imaging detector and multi-axis staging system will be discussed and selected results from recent imaging experiments will be presented. The development of an intense, accelerator-driven neutron source suitable for use with the imaging system will also be discussed. Keywords: neutron imaging, neutron radiography, computed tomography, non-destructive inspection, neutron sources

  17. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Parkin, Don M.; Dudey, Norman D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

  18. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Biological Effects of High-Energy Neutrons Measured In Vivo Using a Vertebrate Model

    PubMed Central

    Kuhne, Wendy W.; Gersey, Brad B.; Wilkins, Richard; Wu, Honglu; Wender, Stephen A.; George, Varghese; Dynan, William S.

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of solar protons and galactic cosmic radiation with the atmosphere and other materials produces high-energy secondary neutrons from below 1 to 1000 MeV and higher. Although secondary neutrons may provide an appreciable component of the radiation dose equivalent received by space and high-altitude air travelers, the biological effects remain poorly defined, particularly in vivo in intact organisms. Here we describe the acute response of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos to a beam of high-energy spallation neutrons that mimics the energy spectrum of secondary neutrons encountered aboard spacecraft and high-altitude aircraft. To determine RBE, embryos were exposed to 0–0.5 Gy of high-energy neutron radiation or 0–15 Gy of reference γ radiation. The radiation response was measured by imaging apoptotic cells in situ in defined volumes of the embryo, an assay that provides a quantifiable, linear dose response. The slope of the dose response in the developing head, relative to reference γ radiation, indicates an RBE of 24.9 (95% CI 13.6–40.7). A higher RBE of 48.1 (95% CI 30.0–66.4) was obtained based on overall survival. A separate analysis of apoptosis in muscle showed an overall nonlinear response, with the greatest effects at doses of less than 0.3 Gy. Results of this experiment indicate that medaka are a useful model for investigating biological damage associated with high-energy neutron exposure. PMID:19772468

  20. Experimental Studies of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardet, A.; Granier, T.; Laurent, B.; Oberstedt, A.

    Prompt fission neutron spectra were measured in the reactions 238U(n,f), 235U(n,f) and 237Np(n,f) at different incident neutron energies. The neutrons were detected using a coaxial doped p-terphenyl scintillation detector in coincidence with fission fragments and their time-of-flight was recorded. The properties of the neutron detector were determined and the results are presented in this work. A preliminary neutron detection efficiency was applied to data from the neutron-induced fission of 238U at En = 5.2 MeV, leading to encouraging results.

  1. Spectra and Neutron Dosimetry Inside a PET Cyclotron Vault Room

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Mendez, Roberto; Iniguez, Maria Pilar; Marti-Climent, Joseph; Penuelas, Ivan; Barquero, Raquel

    2006-09-08

    The neutron field around a PET cyclotron was investigated during 18F radioisotope production with an 18 MeV proton beam. Pairs of thermoluminescent dosemeters, TLD600 and TLD700, were used as thermal neutron detector inside a Bonner Spheres Spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at three different positions inside the cyclotron's vault room. Neutron spectra were also determined by Monte Carlo calculations. The hardest spectrum was observed in front of cyclotron target and the softest was noticed at the antipode of target. Neutron doses derived from the measured spectra vary between 11 and 377 mSv/{mu}A-h of proton integrated current, Doses were also measured with a single-moderator remmeter, with an active thermal neutron detector, whose response in affected by the radiation field in the vault room.

  2. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Thomas, C A

    2010-10-01

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87× during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics. PMID:21034047

  3. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E. D.; Glenzer, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kilkenny, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Maddox, B. R.; Milovich, J. L.; Prasad, R. R.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Thomas, C. A.

    2010-10-15

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87x during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  4. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexley, Allie

    2016-03-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% helium-4 and 12.5% tetrafluoromethane for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. I describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of neon, as a replacement for helium-4, in the gas mixture. My discussion focuses on the advantages of neon as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. I show that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the neon mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to 20% with the helium-4 mixture.

  5. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexley, A.; Moulai, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Conrad, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% 4He and 12.5% CF4 for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. We describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of Ne, as a replacement for 4He, in the gas mixture. Our discussion focuses on the advantages of Ne as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (lesssim100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. We find that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the Ne mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to ~ 20% with the 4He mixture.

  6. Induction of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts from the Los Alamos High Energy Neutron Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The space radiation field includes a broad spectrum of high energy neutrons. Interactions between these neutrons and a spacecraft, or other material, significantly contribute to the dose equivalent for astronauts. The 15 degree beam line in the Weapons Neutron Research beam at Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center generates a neutron spectrum relatively similar to that seen in space. Human foreskin fibroblast (AG1522) samples were irradiated behind 0 to 20 cm of water equivalent shielding. The cells were exposed to either a 0.05 or 0.2 Gy entrance dose. Following irradiation, micronuclei were counted to see how the water shield affects the beam and its damage to cell nuclei. Micronuclei induction was then compared with dose equivalent data provided from a tissue equivalent proportional counter.

  7. Quantitative rescattering theory for laser-induced high-energy plateau photoelectron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangjin; Le, Anh-Thu; Morishita, Toru; Lin, C. D.

    2009-03-01

    A comprehensive quantitative rescattering (QRS) theory for describing the production of high-energy photoelectrons generated by intense laser pulses is presented. According to the QRS, the momentum distributions of these electrons can be expressed as the product of a returning electron wave packet with the elastic differential cross sections (DCS) between free electrons with the target ion. We show that the returning electron wave packets are determined mostly by the lasers only and can be obtained from the strong field approximation. The validity of the QRS model is carefully examined by checking against accurate results from the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for atomic targets within the single active electron approximation. We further show that experimental photoelectron spectra for a wide range of laser intensity and wavelength can be explained by the QRS theory, and that the DCS between electrons and target ions can be extracted from experimental photoelectron spectra. By generalizing the QRS theory to molecular targets, we discuss how few-cycle infrared lasers offer a promising tool for dynamic chemical imaging with temporal resolution of a few femtoseconds.

  8. N to K Uranium PIXE spectra obtained at the high resolution high energy PIXE setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, P. C.; Taborda, A.; Marques, J. P.; Reis, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The CTN (previous ITN) high resolution high energy (HRHE) PIXE set-up facility was set in operation on July 2008 and upgrades were being implemented until late in 2011. The study of a pure UO2 sample and the mapping of geological sample are the first results where the whole range of possibilities has been exploited, namely the possibility of obtaining simultaneous spectra covering a very wide energy range of more than 100 keV. In this paper, the N-shell to K-shell spectra of Uranium is presented and discussed, as well as the details on the characteristics and capacities of the setup, including the automated X-Y positioning systems installed in the X-Y-Z sample support unit, which allows for the possibility of making macroscopic mappings of geological samples (Chaves et al. (2013) [1]). As for the N-shell lines in the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) spectrum, due to the lack of data (Zschornack (2007) [2]), transition energies were determined using ab initio calculations assuming a closed shell U4+ electronic structure for Uranium prior to the ionisation by proton impact.

  9. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOEpatents

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  10. Radiation studies of optical interferometric modulators with fast neutrons and high energy gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Radeka, V. ); Bulmer, C.H.; Burns, W.K. )

    1991-11-01

    The possibility of using Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} and single mode fibers for nuclear particle detection and transmission in large-scale machines, such as Superconducting Super Collider, calls for a detailed radiation damage study. In this report, we present radiation studies on Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} Mach-Zehnder interferometric optical modulators with fast neutrons and high energy Gamma-rays.

  11. High-energy in-beam neutron measurements of metal-based shielding for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Björgvinsdóttir, H.; Kokai, Z.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-based shielding plays an important role in the attenuation of harmful and unwanted radiation at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. At the European Spallation Source, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, metal-based materials are planned to be used extensively as neutron guide substrates in addition to other shielding structures around neutron guides. The usage of metal-based materials in the vicinity of neutron guides however requires careful consideration in order to minimize potential background effects in a neutron instrument at the facility. Therefore, we have carried out a combined study involving high-energy neutron measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of metal-based shielding, both to validate the simulation methodology and also to investigate the benefits and drawbacks of different metal-based solutions. The measurements were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, using a 174.1 MeV neutron beam and various thicknesses of aluminum-, iron-, and copper-based shielding blocks. The results were compared to geant4 simulations and revealed excellent agreement. Our combined study highlights the particular situations where one type of metal-based solution may be preferred over another.

  12. Energy spectra of primary knock-on atoms under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. R.; Marian, J.; Sublet, J.-Ch.

    2015-12-01

    Materials subjected to neutron irradiation will suffer from a build-up of damage caused by the displacement cascades initiated by nuclear reactions. Previously, the main "measure" of this damage accumulation has been through the displacements per atom (dpa) index, which has known limitations. This paper describes a rigorous methodology to calculate the primary atomic recoil events (often called the primary knock-on atoms or PKAs) that lead to cascade damage events as a function of energy and recoiling species. A new processing code SPECTRA-PKA combines a neutron irradiation spectrum with nuclear recoil data obtained from the latest nuclear data libraries to produce PKA spectra for any material composition. Via examples of fusion relevant materials, it is shown that these PKA spectra can be complex, involving many different recoiling species, potentially differing in both proton and neutron number from the original target nuclei, including high energy recoils of light emitted particles such as α-particles and protons. The variations in PKA spectra as a function of time, neutron field, and material are explored. The application of PKA spectra to the quantification of radiation damage is exemplified using two approaches: the binary collision approximation and stochastic cluster dynamics, and the results from these different models are discussed and compared.

  13. Modeling of Neutron Spectra Based on Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovancevic, N.; Fridman, M.; Daraban, L.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Hult, M.; Lutter, G.; Marissens, G.; Stroh, H.

    Safe and economical use of nuclear energy and particularly the development of GEN-IV reactors impose a better understanding of prompt neutron emission in fission, as well as of the fission process as such. Therefore, accurate measurements of the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) are very important. In this work, we are testing the possibility to determine the PFNS by an activation method called DONA (DOsimetry and Spectroscopy using Neuron Activation) recently developed at IRMM (Wieslander et al., 2010, Lövestam et al., 2009). This type of modeling of the neutron spectra, based on the activation analysis, can provide new information about an old problem which still exists today, i.e. the discrepancy between measured integral and differential data (Capote et al., 2012). The problem is that the calculated average cross section for a certain neutron reaction, by using the differential experimental PFNS, in many cases cannot reproduce satisfactorily the integral measured cross section values. The modeling of the neutron spectra by the DONA technique was tested with the standard neutron spectrum of the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. We analyzed the sensitivity of the unfolding procedure to the initial neutron energy spectrum, the influence of the neutron scattering, the possibility of using different activation reactions and we also made an estimation of the lowest measurable neutron fluence rate.

  14. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C; Noda, Shusaku; Nelson, Ronald O; O' Donnell, John M; Devlin, Matt; Chatillon, Audrey; Granier, Thierry; Taieb, Julien; Laurent, Benoit; Belier, Gilbert; Becker, John A; Wu, Ching - Yen

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  15. High-energy response of the PRESCILA and WENDI-II neutron rem meters.

    PubMed

    Olsher, Richard H; McLean, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    WENDI-II was designed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) specifically as a wide-range rem meter, suitable for applications at particle accelerators, with response extension to 5 GeV. PRESCILA was also designed at LANL, mainly as a lightweight alternative to traditional rem meters, but has shown excellent response characteristics above 20 MeV. This Note summarises measurements performed over a span of 4 y to characterise the high-energy neutron response (>20 MeV) of these meters to several hundred million electron volts. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic beams utilised as part of this study were produced by the cyclotron facilities at the Université Catholique de Louvain (33 and 60 MeV) and the T. Svedberg Laboratory ( 46, 95, 143 and 173 MeV). In addition, measurements were also conducted at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, 800 MeV spallation neutron source, in broad energy fields with an average energy of 345 MeV. For the sake of completeness, data collected between 2.5 and 19 MeV in monoenergetic neutron fields at the German Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) facility are also included in this study. PMID:18381335

  16. Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; White, R. Allen; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Gillin, Michael T.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. Methods: We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. Results: We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. Conclusions: As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

  17. Spent-fuel photon and neutron source spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, O.W.; Alexander, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Computational activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been performed to develop appropriate data and techniques for computing the photon and neutron source spectra of spent fuel. The methods reviewed here include both the determination of spent-fuel composition and the radiation source spectra associated with these isotopic inventories.

  18. Monitor units are not predictive of neutron dose for high-energy IMRT

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the substantial increase in beam-on time of high energy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (>10 MV) techniques to deliver the same target dose compared to conventional treatment techniques, an increased dose of scatter radiation, including neutrons, is delivered to the patient. As a consequence, an increase in second malignancies may be expected in the future with the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. It is commonly assumed that the neutron dose equivalent scales with the number of monitor units. Methods Measurements of neutron dose equivalent were performed for an open and an intensity-modulated field at four positions: inside and outside of the treatment field at 0.2 cm and 15 cm depth, respectively. Results It was shown that the neutron dose equivalent, which a patient receives during an intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment, does not scale with the ratio of applied monitor units relative to an open field irradiation. Outside the treatment volume at larger depth 35% less neutron dose equivalent is delivered than expected. Conclusions The predicted increase of second cancer induction rates from intensity-modulated treatment techniques can be overestimated when the neutron dose is simply scaled with monitor units. PMID:22883384

  19. The Clatterbridge high-energy neutron therapy facility: specification and performance.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, D E; Blake, S W; Shaw, J E; Bewley, D K

    1988-01-01

    A new high-energy neutron therapy facility has been installed at the Douglas Cyclotron Centre, Clatterbridge Hospital, Merseyside, in order to extend the clinical trials of fast neutrons initiated by the Medical Research Council. The neutron beam is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 62 MeV protons. The target is isocentrically mounted with the potential for 360 degrees rotation and has a fully variable collimator. This gives a range of rectilinear field sizes from 5 cm x 5 cm to 30 cm x 30 cm. Basic neutron beam data including output, field flatness, penumbra and depth-dose data have been measured. For a 10 cm x 10 cm field, the 50% depth dose occurs at 16.2 cm in water and the output is 1.63 cGy microA-1 min-1 at the depth of dose maximum. The effectiveness of the target shielding and the neutron-induced radioactivity in the treatment head have also been measured. It is concluded that the equipment meets both the design specifications and also fully satisfies criticisms of earlier neutron therapy equipment. A full radiation survey of the centre was also carried out and it was found that radiation levels are low and present no significant hazard to staff. PMID:3126848

  20. Scaling and asymptotic properties of evaporated neutron inclusive cross sections in high energy hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galoyan, A. S.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinsky, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    New properties of the evaporated neutron ( E < 30 MeV) energy spectra in hadron-nucleus interactions have been found. Particularly, the spectra approach the asymptotic regime, namely, they weakly depend on the collision energy at momenta of projectile protons larger than 5-6 GeV/ c; the spectra for various nuclei are similar, and can be approximately described by the function A n f( E). Experimental data on neutron spectra in the case of projectile π-mesons show analogous behavior, but the statistics of the data do not allow one to draw clear conclusions. In our analysis we used ITEP experimental data on inclusive cross sections of neutrons produced in interactions of π-mesons and protons with various nuclei in the energy range from 747 MeV up to 8.1 GeV. The observed properties allow one to predict neutron yields in the nucleus-nucleus interactions at high and super high energies. Predictions for the NICA/MPD experiment at JINR are presented. It is shown that the FTF (Fritiof)-model of the Geant4 toolkit qualitatively reproduces the observed regularities. For the first time estimates of the neutron energy flows are obtained at both RHIC and LHC energies.

  1. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  2. The origin of thermal component in the transverse momentum spectra in high energy hadronic processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bylinkin, Alexander A.; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Rostovtsev, Andrei A.

    2014-12-15

    The transverse momentum spectra of hadrons produced in high energy collisions can be decomposed into two components: the exponential ("thermal") and the power ("hard") ones. Recently, the H1 Collaboration has discovered that the relative strength of these two components in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) depends drastically upon the global structure of the event - namely, the exponential component is absent in the diffractive events characterized by a rapidity gap. We discuss the possible origin of this effect and speculate that it is linked to confinement. Specifically, we argue that the thermal component is due to the effective event horizon introducedmore » by the confining string, in analogy to the Hawking-Unruh effect. In diffractive events, the t-channel exchange is color-singlet and there is no fragmenting string - so the thermal component is absent. The slope of the soft component of the hadron spectrum in this picture is determined by the saturation momentum that drives the deceleration in the color field, and thus the Hawking-Unruh temperature. We analyze the data on non-diffractive pp collisions and find that the slope of the thermal component of the hadron spectrum is indeed proportional to the saturation momentum.« less

  3. The origin of thermal component in the transverse momentum spectra in high energy hadronic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bylinkin, Alexander A.; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Rostovtsev, Andrei A.

    2014-12-15

    The transverse momentum spectra of hadrons produced in high energy collisions can be decomposed into two components: the exponential ("thermal") and the power ("hard") ones. Recently, the H1 Collaboration has discovered that the relative strength of these two components in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) depends drastically upon the global structure of the event - namely, the exponential component is absent in the diffractive events characterized by a rapidity gap. We discuss the possible origin of this effect and speculate that it is linked to confinement. Specifically, we argue that the thermal component is due to the effective event horizon introduced by the confining string, in analogy to the Hawking-Unruh effect. In diffractive events, the t-channel exchange is color-singlet and there is no fragmenting string - so the thermal component is absent. The slope of the soft component of the hadron spectrum in this picture is determined by the saturation momentum that drives the deceleration in the color field, and thus the Hawking-Unruh temperature. We analyze the data on non-diffractive pp collisions and find that the slope of the thermal component of the hadron spectrum is indeed proportional to the saturation momentum.

  4. Neutron Unfolding Code System for Calculating Neutron Flux Spectra from Activation Data of Dosimeter Foils.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1982-04-30

    Version 00 As a part of the measurement and analysis plan for the Dosimetry Experiment at the "JOYO" experimental fast reactor, neutron flux spectral analysis is performed using the NEUPAC (Neutron Unfolding Code Package) code system. NEUPAC calculates the neutron flux spectra and other integral quantities from the activation data of the dosimeter foils.

  5. Neutron Spectra and Dose Equivalent Inside Nuclear Power Reactor Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, J. M.

    1981-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine absorbed dose, dose-equivalent rates, and neutron spectra inside containment at nuclear power plants. We gratefully acknowledge funding support by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this study is: 1) measure dose-equivalent rates with various commercial types of rem meters, such as the Snoopy and Rascal, and neutron absorbed dose rates with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter 2) determine neutron spectra using the multi sphere or Bonner sphere technique and a helium-3 spectrometer 3) compare several types of personnel neutron dosimeter responses such as NTA film, polycarbonates, TLD albedo, and a recently introduced proton recoil track etch dosimeter, and CR-39. These measurements were made inside containments of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and outside containment penetrations of boiling water reactors (BWRs) operating at full power. The neutron spectral information, absorbed dose. and dose-equivalent measurements are needed for proper interpretation of instrument and personnel dosimeter responses.

  6. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  7. New Measurements of Fission Neutron Spectra at Intermediate Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethvignot, Thierry; Granier, Thierry; Haight, Robert C.; O'Donnell, John M.; Devlin, Matthew; Nelson, Ronald O.; Drosg, Roswitha

    2002-04-01

    Interest in obtaining a more detailed understanding of prompt neutron emission in fission is now high. Information on neutron-induced fission of actinides for incident-neutron energies from a few MeV to higher energies, except for data at 14 MeV is sparse. Such measurements are now possible, and the data are needed for design studies of accelerator-driven systems. Moreover, these data provide valuable information to improve our understanding of fission at high excitation energy. As a matter of fact, a theoretical effort has been pursued recently to predict the properties of prompt neutron emission in fission. They are characterized by two basic quantities, the average number of prompt neutrons emitted per fission, which is well known up to 20 MeV, and the neutron energy spectrum, which is not nearly so well known. However, it was shown for a few cases that not only the average energy but also the shape of the Fission Neutron Spectra (FNS) depend on the incident neutron energy. It is particularly interesting to investigate the change in shape of the FNS around the first, second and third chance fission where the properties of the fissioning nucleus drastically change. At the WNR white source, the FNS were measured with the FIGARO set-up, with a ^238U fission chamber as the target. Both incoming and emitted neutron energies were determined with their time of flight. Preliminary results of recorded spectra will be presented at the meeting.

  8. The Effects of Low- and High-Energy Cutoffs on Solar Flare Microwave and Hard X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microwave and hard x-ray spectra provide crucial information about energetic electrons and their environment in solar flares. These spectra are becoming better determined with the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) and the recent launch of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The proposed Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) promises even greater advances in radio observations of solar flares. Both microwave and hard x-ray spectra are sensitive to cutoffs in the electron distribution function. The determination of the high-energy cutoff from these spectra establishes the highest electron energies produced by the acceleration mechanism, while determination of the low-energy cutoff is crucial to establishing the total energy in accelerated electrons. This paper will show computations of the effects of both high- and low-energy cutoffs on microwave and hard x-ray spectra. The optically thick portion of a microwave spectrum is enhanced and smoothed by a low-energy cutoff, while a hard x-ray spectrum is flattened below the cutoff energy. A high-energy cutoff steepens the microwave spectrum and increases the wavelength at which the spectrum peaks, while the hard x-ray spectrum begins to steepen at photon energies roughly an order of magnitude below the electron cutoff energy. This work discusses how flare microwave and hard x-ray spectra can be analyzed together to determine these electron cutoff energies. This work is supported in part by the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  9. COMPTEL measurements of the omnidirectional high-energy neutron flux in near-earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Morris, D J; Aarts, H; Bennett, K; Lockwood, J A; McConnell, M L; Ryan, J M; Schonfelder, V; Steinle, H; Weidenspointner, G

    1998-01-01

    On four occasions, twice in 1991 (near solar maximum) and twice in 1994 (near solar minimum), one COMPTEL D1 detector module was used as an omnidirectional detector to measure the high-energy (> 12.8 MeV) neutron flux near an altitude of 450 km. The D1 modules are cylindrical, with radius 13.8 cm and depth 8 cm, and are filled with liquid scintillator (NE213A). The combined flux measurements can be fit reasonably well by a product of the Mt. Washington neutron monitor rate, a linear function in the spacecraft geocenter zenith angle, and an exponential function of the vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidity in which the coefficient of the rigidity is a linear function of the neutron monitor rate. When pointed at the nadir, the flux is consistent with that expected from the atmospheric neutron albedo alone. When pointed at the zenith the flux is reduced by a factor of about 0.54. Thus the production of secondary neutrons in the massive (16000 kg) Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory spacecraft is negligible. Rather, the mass of the spacecraft provides shielding from the earth albedo. PMID:11542901

  10. Apparatus, Method and Program Storage Device for Determining High-Energy Neutron/Ion Transport to a Target of Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W. (Inventor); Tripathi, Ram K. (Inventor); Badavi, Francis F. (Inventor); Cucinotta, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus, method and program storage device for determining high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest. Boundaries are defined for calculation of a high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest; the high-energy neutron/ion transport to the target of interest is calculated using numerical procedures selected to reduce local truncation error by including higher order terms and to allow absolute control of propagated error by ensuring truncation error is third order in step size, and using scaling procedures for flux coupling terms modified to improve computed results by adding a scaling factor to terms describing production of j-particles from collisions of k-particles; and the calculated high-energy neutron/ion transport is provided to modeling modules to control an effective radiation dose at the target of interest.

  11. Disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars as high-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of an accretion disk with the magnetic field of a neutron star produces large electromotive forces, which drive large conduction currents in the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit. Here we argue that such large conduction currents will cause microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere. If the minimum plasma density in the magnetosphere is relatively low is less than or aproximately 10(exp 9)/cu cm, current-driven micro-instabilities may cause relativistic double layers to form, producing voltage differences in excess of 10(exp 12) V and accelerating charged particles to very high energies. If instead the plasma density is higher (is greater than or approximately = 10(exp 9)/cu cm, twisting of the stellar magnetic field is likely to cause magnetic field reconnection. This reconnection will be relativistic, accelerating plasma in the magnetosphere to relativistic speeds and a small fraction of particles to very high energies. Interaction of these high-energy particles with X-rays, gamma-rays, and accreting plasma may produce detectable high-energy radiation.

  12. The Fascinating High-Energy World of Neutron Stars and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2006-06-01

    The past few years have witnessed a fast growth in the high-energy astrophysics community in Canada, thanks to new opportunities including the University Faculty Award (UFA) program introduced by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) to appoint promising female researchers to faculty positions in science and engineering. As a UFA fellow at the University of Manitoba, I have had the unique opportunity to contribute to the launch of a new astronomy program in the department of Physics (renamed to Physics and Astronomy). My research focuses on observational studies of neutron stars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. The study of these exotic objects helps address the physics of the extreme and probe some of the most energetic events in the Universe. I will highlight exciting discoveries in this field and some of the questions to be addressed with current and future high-energy missions.

  13. High energy excitations measured by neutron spectroscopy in FePS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, K C; Wildes, A R; Bewley, R I; Visser, D; Hicks, T J

    2009-03-01

    The quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet FePS3 has been investigated using inelastic neutron spectroscopy with the time-of-flight spectrometer HET at the ISIS spallation neutron source. In the paramagnetic regime, two clearly resolved, high energy excitations were observed in the low scattering angle detector banks at 195(5) meV and 430(10) meV. The absence of these transitions from the high angle detector banks indicates that they are likely to be due to the crystal fields and magnetic in origin. The two transitions most probably represent electronic transitions in the Fe2+ ion among the low lying crystal field and spin-orbit split levels raised from the ground state. It has not yet been determined why the energies are greater than those observed in a comparable Raman experiment.

  14. High energy excitations measured by neutron spectroscopy in FePS(3).

    PubMed

    Rule, K C; Wildes, A R; Bewley, R I; Visser, D; Hicks, T J

    2009-03-25

    The quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet FePS(3) has been investigated using inelastic neutron spectroscopy with the time-of-flight spectrometer HET at the ISIS spallation neutron source. In the paramagnetic regime, two clearly resolved, high energy excitations were observed in the low scattering angle detector banks at 195(5) meV and 430(10) meV. The absence of these transitions from the high angle detector banks indicates that they are likely to be due to the crystal fields and magnetic in origin. The two transitions most probably represent electronic transitions in the Fe(2+) ion among the low lying crystal field and spin-orbit split levels raised from the ground state. It has not yet been determined why the energies are greater than those observed in a comparable Raman experiment. PMID:21817456

  15. Neutron spectra due (13)N production in a PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Benavente, J A; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Lacerda, M A S; Fonseca, T C F; Faria, F P; da Silva, T A

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo and experimental methods have been used to characterize the neutron radiation field around PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cyclotrons. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to estimate the neutron spectra, the neutron fluence rates and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) in seven locations around a PET cyclotron during (13)N production. In order to validate these calculations, H*(10) was measured in three sites and were compared with the calculated doses. All the spectra have two peaks, one above 0.1MeV due to the evaporation neutrons and another in the thermal region due to the room-return effects. Despite the relatively large difference between the measured and calculated H*(10) for one point, the agreement was considered good, compared with that obtained for (18)F production in a previous work. PMID:25699664

  16. Backward emitted high-energy neutrons in hard reactions of p and π+ on carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, A.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Heppelmann, S.; Kawabata, T.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Piasetzky, E.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Yoshida, H.; Zhalov, D.

    2002-01-01

    Beams of protons and pions of 5.9 GeV/c were incident on a C target. Neutrons emitted into the backward hemisphere, in the laboratory system, were detected in (triple) coincidence with two emerging particles of tranverse momenta pt>0.6 GeV/c. We determined that for (46.5+/-3.7)% of the proton-induced events and for (40.8+/-4.5)% of the pion-induced events with the two high-pt particles, there is also at least one backward emitted neutron with momentum greater than 0.32 GeV/c. This observation is in sharp contrast to a well- established universal pattern from a large variety of earlier inclusive measurements with hadrons, electrons, photons, neutrinos, and antineutrinos where the probability for backward nucleon emission was in the 5 to 10 % range. We present also a measurement of the momentum spectra for the backward going neutrons. The spectra have the same universal shape observed in the inclusive reactions. We speculate that the enhanced backward neutron emission in this semi-inclusive region could be an indication for a strong dependence of the cross section on the squared total center-of-mass energy (s) and for the importance of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations.

  17. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    controlled workplace field. The CERF (CERN-EU high-energy reference field) facility is a unique example of such a field, where a number of experimental campaigns and Monte Carlo simulations have been performed over the past years. With the aim of performing this kind of workplace performance test, four different ERBSS with different degrees of validation, operated by three groups (CERN, INFN-LNF and Politecnico of Milano), were exposed in two fixed positions at CERF. Using different unfolding codes (MAXED, GRAVEL, FRUIT and FRUIT SGM), the experimental data were analyzed to provide the neutron spectra and the related dosimetric quantities. The results allow assessing the overall performance of each ERBSS and of the unfolding codes, as well as comparing the performance of three ERRCs when used in a neutron field with energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum.

  18. High-energy and thermal-neutron imaging and modeling with an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Claytor, Thomas N; Taddeucci, Terry N; Hills, Charles R; Summa, Deborah A; Davis, Anthony W; McDonald, Thomas E; Schwab, Mark J

    2004-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) operates two spallation neutron sources dedicated to research in materials science, condensed-matter physics, and fundamental and applied nuclear physics. Prior to 1995, all thermal neutron radiography at Los Alamos was done on a beam port attached to the Omega West reactor, a small 8MW research reactor used primarily for radioisotope production and prompt and delayed neutron activation analysis. After the closure of this facility, two largely independent radiography development efforts were begun at LANSCE using moderated cold and thermal neutrons from the Target-1 source and high-energy neutrons from the Target-4 source. Investigations with cold and thermal neutrons employed a neutron converter and film, a scintillation screen and CCD camera system, and a new high-resolution amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat-panel detector system. Recent work with high-energy neutrons (En > 1 MeV) has involved storage-phosphor image plates. Some comparison high-energy images were obtained with both image plates and the a-Si panel and showed equivalent image quality for approximately equal exposure times. PMID:15246402

  19. Backward emitted high-energy neutrons in hard reactions of p and π+ on carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, A.; Piasetzky, E.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Heppelmann, S.; Kawabata, T.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Yoshida, H.; Zhalov, D.

    2000-12-01

    Beams of protons and pions of 5.9 GeV/c were incident on a C target. Neutrons emitted into the back hemisphere, in the laboratory system, were detected in (triple) coincidence with two emerging pt>0.6 GeV/c particles. We present the momentum spectra of the backward going neutrons. We also integrated the spectra and determined the fraction of the hard scattering events which are in coincidence with at least one neutron emitted into the back hemisphere, with momenta above 0.32 GeV/c. Contrary to the earlier measurements which found that only a small fraction (of the order of 10%) of the total inelastic cross section for light nuclei was associated with backward going nucleons, we find that about half of the events are of this nature. We speculate that the reason for the large difference is due to the strong dependence of the hard-scattering reaction upon the total center of mass energy(s) and short range nucleon correlations in nuclei.

  20. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to high energy p(66)Be(49) neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.; Ten Haken, R.K.; Mansell, J.; Yalavarthi, S.D.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Awschalom, M.

    1985-04-01

    The risk of post irradiation myelopathy was evaluated in 76 patients followed for 1-5 years after neutron irradiation of the cervical and thoracic regions. No overt myelopathy was observed. Forty-six patients received doses (central cord dose) in excess of 10 Gy, 9 received doses in excess of 12 Gy, and 5 received doses between 13 and 17 Gy, all without any evidence of spinal cord injury. A review of available literature revealed a total of 14 patients with myelopathy, 13 of whom received doses in excess of 13 Gy delivered with relatively low energy neutrons generated by the deuteron + beryllium reaction. It is concluded from these studies that the tolerance limit for the human spinal cord irradiated with high energy (p(66)Be(49)) neutrons is close to 15 Gy, above which the risk of cord injury becomes significant. Central cord doses of 13 Gy or less appear to be well tolerated with little, if any, risk of myelopathy. These conclusions are valid for a treatment time of 4 weeks or more with two or more fractions per week (9 or more fractions). The RBE for the human spinal cord irradiated under the above conditions compared with conventionally fractionated photon therapy does not exceed 4.0.

  1. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Riva, M.; Syme, B.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-01

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  2. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Riva, M.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  3. Neutron dose and energy spectra measurements at Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Soldat, K.L.; Haggard, D.L.; Faust, L.G.; Tomeraasen, P.L.

    1987-08-01

    Because some workers have a high potential for significant neutron exposure, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to verify the accuracy of neutron dosimetry at the plant. Energy spectrum and neutron dose measurements were made at the SRP calibrations laboratory and at several other locations. The energy spectra measurements were made using multisphere or Bonner sphere spectrometers,/sup 3/He spectrometers, and NE-213 liquid scintillator spectrometers. Neutron dose equivalent determinations were made using these instruments and others specifically designed to determine dose equivalent, such as the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Survey instruments, such as the Eberline PNR-4, and the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo and track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also used. The TEPC, subjectively judged to provide the most accurate estimation of true dose equivalent, was used as the reference for comparison with other devices. 29 refs., 43 figs., 13 tabs.

  4. High Energy Cosmic Ray Electron Spectra measured from the ATIC Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment (ATIC) is specifically designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. From simulation and a CERN beam test exposure we find that the design consisting of a graphite target and an energy detection device, a totally active calorimeter of BGO scintillator, gives us sufficient information to distinguish electrons from protons up to the TeV energy range. Balloon observations were successfully carried out over Antarctica in both 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 for a total of more than 35 days. This paper presents preliminary results on the spectrum of high energy electrons observed in the first ATIC flight.

  5. Determination of Endpoint Energy and Bremsstrahlung Spectra for High-Energy Radiation-Therapy Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Danny Joe

    Few attempts have been made to experimentally determine thick-target bremsstrahlung spectra of megavoltage therapy beams. For spectral studies using the Compton scattering technique, sodium iodine (NaI) detectors with relatively poor energy resolution have been used. Other experimental techniques for determining spectra are generally not suited for a clinical environment with the inherent time and space constraints. To gather more spectral information than previously obtained in the region near the endpoint energy, the use of a high-resolution intrinsic-germanium (Ge) detector was proposed. A response function matrix was determined from experimentally obtained pulse height distributions on the multichannel analyzer. The distributions were for nine various monoenergetic sources between 280 adn 1525 keV. The response function was used to convert the measured pulse height distributions to photon flux spectra using an iterative approximation technique with a computer. Photon flux spectra from the Sagittaire Linear Accelerator were obtained at average-electron endpoint energies of 15, 20, and 25 MeV. Two spectra were measured at the 25 MeV setting; one spectrum was measured along the central axis and one spectrum at 4(DEGREES) off axis. Photon spectra were also obtained for a Van de Graaff generator at the nominal endpoint energies of 2.2, 2.35, and 2.5 MeV. The results for both the linac and the Van de Graaff generator were compared with theoretical spectra and previously measured spectra where available. Also, photon spectra from a Theratron-80 (('60)Co) unit were determined for three field sizes and for a 10 x 10 cm. field with a lucite tray or a 45(DEGREES) wedge in the beam. The resulting spectra were compared to previously measured ('60)Co spectra.

  6. Calibration of a Bonner sphere extension (BSE) for high-energy neutron spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Howell, R.M.; Burgett, E.A.; Wiegel, B.; Hertel, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent work, we constructed modular multisphere system which expands upon the design of an existing, commercially available Bonner sphere system by adding concentric shells of copper, tungsten, or lead. Our modular multisphere system is referred to as the Bonner Sphere Extension (BSE). The BSE was tested in a high energy neutron beam (thermal to 800 MeV) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and provided improvement in the measurement of the neutron spectrum in the energy regions above 20 MeV when compared to the standard BSS (Burgett, 2008 and Howell et al., 2009). However, when the initial test of the system was carried-out at LANSCE, the BSE had not yet been calibrated. Therefore the objective of the present study was to perform calibration measurements. These calibration measurements were carried out using monoenergetic neutron ISO 8529-1 reference beams at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig, Germany. The following monoenergetic reference beams were used for these experiments: 14.8 MeV, 1.2 MeV, 565 keV, and 144 keV. Response functions for the BSE were calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Code, eXtended (MCNPX). The percent difference between the measured and calculated responses was calculated for each sphere and energy. The difference between measured and calculated responses for individual spheres ranged between 7.9 % and 16.7 % and the arithmetic mean for all spheres was (10.9 ± 1.8) %. These sphere specific correction factors will be applied for all future measurements carried-out with the BSE. PMID:22888283

  7. Determination of the neutron and photon spectra of a clinical fast neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Moyers, M F; Horton, J L

    1990-01-01

    A simple technique to determine the neutron and photon spectra of a clinical fast neutron beam is described. This technique involves making narrow beam attenuation measurements with a pair of ionization chambers and an iterative fitting program to analyze the data. A method is also described for determining the first-guess neutron spectrum for input into the iterative program. The results of the analysis yield spectra suitable for use in dose calculation algorithms and dosimetry protocols. Presented here is the first-known published photon spectrum from a clinical machine. PMID:2120558

  8. Production of the D/sub s//sup +- / by high-energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shipbaugh, C.; Wiss, J.; Binkley, M.; Butler, J.; Cumalat, J.P.; Coteus, P.; DiCorato, M.; Diesburg, M.; Enagonio, J.; Filaseta, J.; and others

    1988-05-23

    We have observed the production of the D/sub s//sup +- / by a high-energy neutron beam on nuclear targets. The D/sub s//sup +- / was observed in the decay mode D/sub s//sup +- /..-->..phi..pi../sup +- /, phi..-->..K/sup +/K/sup -/. The average of the inclusive cross sections for D/sub s//sup +/ and D/sub s//sup -/ hadroproduction is measured to be B dsigmadchi/sub F/ = 2.85 +- 0.80 +- 0.86 ..mu..bnucleon at chi/sub F/ = 0.175 on the assumption of a linear A dependence, where BequivalentGAMMA(D/sub s//sup +- /..-->..phi..pi../sup +- /)GAMMA(D/sub s//sup +- /..-->..all). GAMMA(D/sub s//sup +- /..-->..all)

  9. X-ray spectra from convective photospheres of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zavlin, V.E.; Pavlov, G.G. |; Shibanov, Yu.A.; Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1996-01-17

    We present first results of modeling convective photospheres of neutron stars. We show that in photospheres composed of the light elements convection arises only at relatively low effective temperatures ({le}3 - 5 x 10{sup 4} K), whereas in the case of iron composition it arises at T{sub eff}{le} 3 x 10{sup 5}K. Convection changes the depth dependence of the photosphere temperature and the shapes of the emergent spectra. Thus, it should be taken into account for the proper interpretation of EUV/soft-X-ray observations of the thermal radiation from neutron stars.

  10. Neutron beam optimization for boron neutron capture therapy using the D-D and D-T high-energy neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Vujic, J.L.; Leung, K.N.

    2000-02-01

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of boron neutron capture therapy. Two figures-of-merit--the absorbed skin dose and the absorbed tumor dose at a given depth in the brain--are used to measure the neutron beam quality. Based on the results of this study, moderators, reflectors, and delimiters are designed and optimized to moderate the high-energy neutrons from the fusion reactions {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He and {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He down to a suitable energy spectrum. Two different computational models (MCNP and BNCT-RTPE) have been used to study the dose distribution in the brain. With the optimal beam-shaping assembly, a 1-A mixed deuteron/triton beam of energy 150 keV accelerated onto a titanium target leads to a treatment time of 1 h. The dose near the center of the brain obtained with this configuration is > 65% higher than the dose from a typical spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-produced neutron beams.

  11. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  12. Neutron Flux Spectra Determination by Multiple Foil Activation - Iterative Method.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-07-08

    Version 00 Neutron energy spectra are determined by an analysis of experimental activation detector data. As with the original CCC-112/SAND-II program, which was developed at Air Force Weapons Laboratory, this code system consists of four modules, CSTAPE, SLACTS, SLATPE, and SANDII. The first three modules pre-process the dosimetry cross sections and the trial function spectrum library. The last module, SANDII, actually performs the iterative spectrum characterization.

  13. Prompt fission neutron spectra in fast-neutron-induced fission of 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, V. V.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Capote, R.

    2015-07-01

    Prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) measurements for the neutron-induced fission of 238U are carried out at incident neutron energies of 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 MeV, respectively. The time-of-flight technique is employed to determine the energy of fission neutrons. The prompt fission neutron energy spectra so obtained are analyzed using Watt parametrization to derive the neutron multiplicity and average prompt fission neutron energy. The present experimental PFNS data are compared with the evaluated spectra taken from the ENDF/B-VII.1 library and the predictive calculations carried out using the empire-3.2 (Malta) code with built-in Los Alamos (LA) and Kornilov PFNS models. The sensitivity of the empire-3.2 LA model-calculated PFNS to the nuclear level density parameter of the average fission fragment and to the total kinetic energy is investigated. empire-3.2 LA model PFNS calculations that use Madland 2006-recommended values [D. G. Madland, Nucl. Phys. A 772, 113 (2006), 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2006.03.013] of the total kinetic energy and the level density parameter a =A /(10 ±0.5 ) compare very well to measured data at all incident neutron incident energies.

  14. Localization, time histories, and energy spectra of a new type of recurrent high-energy transient source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J.-L.; Boer, M.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Kouveliotou, C.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of a recurrent high-energy transient source which is neither a classical X-ray nor a gamma-ray burster, but whose properties are intermediate between the two, is reported. The energy spectra of 12 recurrent events are found to be soft, characterized by kT's of 34-56 keV. The time histories are short with rise and fall times as fast as about 10 ms. The source location is a 0.12 sq deg region about 10 deg from the Galactic center.

  15. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  16. Theory of High-Energy Features in the Tunneling Spectra of Quantum-Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, A. H.

    2010-11-01

    We show that the low-temperature sash features in lowest Landau-level (LLL) tunneling spectra recently discovered by Dial and Ashoori are intimately related to the discrete Haldane-pseudopotential interaction energy scales that govern fractional quantum-Hall physics. Our analysis is based on expressions for the tunneling density of states which become exact at filling factors close to ν=0 and ν=1, where the sash structure is most prominent. We comment on other aspects of LLL correlation physics that can be revealed by accurate temperature-dependent tunneling data.

  17. Theory of high-energy features in the tunneling spectra of quantum-Hall systems.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A H

    2010-11-12

    We show that the low-temperature sash features in lowest Landau-level (LLL) tunneling spectra recently discovered by Dial and Ashoori are intimately related to the discrete Haldane-pseudopotential interaction energy scales that govern fractional quantum-Hall physics. Our analysis is based on expressions for the tunneling density of states which become exact at filling factors close to ν=0 and ν=1, where the sash structure is most prominent. We comment on other aspects of LLL correlation physics that can be revealed by accurate temperature-dependent tunneling data. PMID:21231254

  18. Radiolysis in aqueous solution of dinucleoside monophosphates by high-energy electrons and fission neutrons.

    PubMed

    Vaishnav, Y N; Swenberg, C E

    1993-01-01

    The radiation chemistry in aqueous solution of the dinucleoside monophosphate d-[CpT] and its sequence isomer d-[TpC] in air or nitrogen was examined using different qualities and quantities of radiations. High-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the high-energy electron (13.2 MeV) exposure products or fission-neutron exposure products of d-[CpT] and d-[TpC]. A comparison of product profiles obtained from irradiated d-[CpT] and d-[TpC] suggests that, at relatively low radiation doses (50-250 Gy), products are formed by N-glycosidic or phosphodiester bond-cleavage, while at higher doses (500-1000 Gy) additional products were detected as a consequence of ring-modification mechanisms. The plots of radiation dose-yield and corresponding calculated G values of the released undamaged bases and nucleosides from d-[CpT] and d-[TpC] suggest a base-sequence dependence and a quality- and quantity-dependent response to ionizing radiation. Although the product quantities formed from sequence isomers were slightly different, we found no qualitative differences in the product formed at the lowest doses examined. PMID:8434108

  19. High energy X-ray spectra of cygnus XR-1 observed from OSO-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray spectra of Cygnus XR-1 were measured with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite during a period of one and one-half to three weeks in each of the years from 1975 to 1977. Observations were made when the source was both in a high state and in a low state. Typical spectra of the source between 15 and 250 keV are presented. The observed pivoting effect is consistent with two temperature accretion disk models of the X-ray emitting region. No significant break in the spectrum occurred at energies up to 150 keV. The high state as defined in the 3 to 6 keV bandwidth was found to be the higher luminosity state of the X-ray source. One transition from a low to a high state occurred during observations. The time of occurrence of this and other transitions is consistent with the hypothesis that all intensity transitions occur near periastron of the binary system, and that such transitions are caused by changes in the mass transfer rate between the primary and the accretion disk around the secondary.

  20. Dependence of Delayed-Neutron Energy Spectra on the Energy of Neutrons which Induce Fission of Uranium -235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharfuddin, Quazi

    Delayed neutron energy spectra following both fast and thermal neutron induced fission of U-235 are measured by the time-of-flight technique using beta-neutron correlations. Fast neutrons are produced via the (p,n) reaction in Li-7 using the University of Lowell 5.5 MV Van de Graaff Accelerator, whereas thermal neutrons are produced by surrounding the fission chamber and target assembly with paraffin. Fission fragments stopped in the helium atmosphere of the fission chamber are transferred by a helium jet system to a low background counting room where the composite delayed neutron energy spectra are measured as a function of time after fission. The delayed neutron energy spectra following fast fission of U-235 are compared to those resulting from thermal fission of U-235. Two mathematical methods are developed to deduce the equilibrium delayed neutron spectrum from the composite delayed neutron spectra measured as a function of delay time after fission. These methods are then applied to obtain the equilibrium delayed neutron spectrum from thermal fission of U-235. Finally, the six-group delayed neutron spectra resulting from thermal fission of U-235 are deduced from the measured composite delayed neutron spectra as a function of delay time after fission using a matrix inversion method.

  1. Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Becerra-Ferreiro, Ana María; Carrillo-Nuñez, Aureliano

    2002-08-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe were measured and their dosimetric features were calculated. Neutron spectra were measured using a multisphere neutron spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator. The 239PuBe neutron spectrum was measured in an open environment, while the 241AmBe neutron spectrum was measured in a closed environment. Gamma-ray spectra were measured using a NaI(Tl) scintillator using the same experimental conditions for both sources. The effect of measuring conditions for the 241AmBe neutron spectrum indicates the presence of epithermal and thermal neutrons. The low-resolution neutron spectra obtained with the multisphere spectrometer allows one to calculate the dosimetric features of neutron sources. At 100 cm both sources produce approximately the same count rate as that of the 4.4 MeV gamma-ray per unit of alpha emitter activity. PMID:12150274

  2. High energy cosmic ray physics with underground muons in MACRO. II. Primary spectra and composition

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Castellano, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Giglietto, N.; Guarnaccia, P.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Montaruli, T.; Raino, A.; Spinelli, P.; Cecchini, S.; Dekhissi, H.; Fantini, R.; Giacomelli, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta-Neri, A.; Patrizii, L.; Popa, V.; Serra-Lugaresi, P.; Spurio, M.; Togo, V.; Hong, J.T.; Kearns, E.; Okada, C.; Orth, C.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Barish, B.C.; Goretti, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Michael, D.G.; Nolty, R.; Peck, C.W.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C.W.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Battistoni, G.; Bilokon, H.; Bloise, C.; Carboni, M.; Chiarella, V.; Forti, C.; Iarocci, E.; Marini, A.; Patera, V.; Ronga, F.; Satta, L.; Sciubba, A.; Spinetti, M.; Valente, V.; Antolini, R.; Bosio, T.; Di Credico, A.; Grillo, A.; Gustavino, C.; Mikheyev, S.; Parlati, S.; Reynoldson, J.; Scapparone, E.; Bower, C.; Habig, A.; Hawthorne, A.; Heinz, R.; Miller, L.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; De Mitri, I.; Monacelli, P.; Bernardini, P.; Mancarella, G.; Martello, D.; Palamara, O.; Petrera, S.; Pistilli, P.; Ricciardi, M.; Surdo, A.; Baker, R.; and others

    1997-08-01

    Multimuon data from the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso have been analyzed using a new method, which allows one to estimate the primary cosmic ray fluxes. The estimated all-particle spectrum is higher and flatter than the one obtained from direct measurements but is consistent with EAS array measurements. The spectral indexes of the fitted energy spectrum are 2.56{plus_minus}0.05 for E{lt}500 TeV and 2.9{plus_minus}0.3 for E{gt}5000 TeV with a gradual change at intermediate energies. The average mass number shows little dependence on the primary energy below 1000 TeV, with a value of 10.1{plus_minus}2.5 at 100 TeV. At higher energies the best fit average mass shows a mild increase with energy, even though no definite conclusion can be reached taking into account errors. The fitted spectra cover a range from {approximately} 50 TeV up to several thousand TeV. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Absorption Features in Spectra of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, V.; Hambaryan, V.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Pavlov, G. G.; Adelsberg, M. van; Werner, K.

    2011-09-21

    The X-ray spectra of some magnetized isolated neutron stars (NSs) show absorption features with equivalent widths (EWs) of 50-200 eV, whose nature is not yet well known.To explain the prominent absorption features in the soft X-ray spectra of the highly magnetized (B{approx}10{sup 14} G) X-ray dim isolated NSs (XDINSs), we theoretically investigate different NS local surface models, including naked condensed iron surfaces and partially ionized hydrogen model atmospheres, with semi-infinite and thin atmospheres above the condensed surface. We also developed a code for computing light curves and integral emergent spectra of magnetized neutron stars with various temperature and magnetic field distributions over the NS surface. We compare the general properties of the computed and observed light curves and integral spectra for XDINS RBS 1223 and conclude that the observations can be explained by a thin hydrogen atmosphere above the condensed iron surface, while the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field component on the XDINS surface is unlikely.We suggest that the harmonically spaced absorption features in the soft X-ray spectrum of the central compact object (CCO) 1E 1207.4-5209 (hereafter 1E 1207) correspond to peaks in the energy dependence of the free-free opacity in a quantizing magnetic field, known as quantum oscillations. To explore observable properties of these quantum oscillations, we calculate models of hydrogen NS atmospheres with B{approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} G(i.e., electron cyclotron energy E{sub c,e}{approx}0.1-1 keV) and T{sub eff} = 1-3 MK. Such conditions are thought to be typical for 1E 1207. We show that observable features at the electron cyclotron harmonics with EWs {approx_equal}100-200 eV can arise due to these quantum oscillations.

  4. Testing The High-Energy Prompt Neutron Signature At Low Beam Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Scott J.; Kinlaw, Mathew T.; Hunt, Alan W.

    2011-06-01

    Prompt fission neutrons continue to be examined as a signature for detecting the presence of fissionable material. This technique exploits the neutron energy limitations inherent with photonuclear emissions from non-fissionable material, allowing prompt fission neutrons to be identified and engaged for detecting nuclear material. Prompt neutron signal measurements were acquired with bremsstrahlung endpoint energies of 6 MeV for 18 targets comprised of both fissionable and non-fissionable material; delayed neutron measurements were also collected as a reference. The {sup 238}U target was also shielded with increasing thicknesses of lead or borated polyethylene to compare the resulting detection rates of the prompt and delayed fission neutron signals.

  5. Reconsideration of the Iwasaki-Waggener iterative perturbation method for reconstructing high-energy X-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Akira; Kimura, Shigenobu; Sutoh, Kohji; Kamimura, Kazuo; Sasamori, Makoto; Seino, Morio; Komai, Fumio; Terashima, Singo; Kubota, Mamoru; Narita, Yuichiro; Hosokawa, Yoichiro; Miyazawa, Masanori

    2012-07-01

    We have reviewed applicable ranges for attenuating media and off-axis distances regarding the high-energy X-ray spectra reconstructed via the Iwasaki-Waggener iterative perturbation method for 4-20 MV X-ray beams. Sets of in-air relative transmission data used for reconstruction of spectra were calculated for low- and high-Z attenuators (acrylic and lead, respectively) by use of a functional spectral formula. More accurate sets of spectra could be reconstructed by dividing the off-axis distances of R = 0-20 cm into two series of R = 0-10 cm and R = 10-20 cm, and by taking into account the radiation attenuation and scatter in the buildup cap of the dosimeter. We also incorporated in the reconstructed spectra an adjustment factor (f (adjust) ≈ 1) that is determined by the attenuating medium, the acceleration voltage, and the set of off-axis distances. This resulted in calculated in-air relative transmission data to within ±2 % deviation for the low-Z attenuators water, acrylic, and aluminum (Al) with 0-50 cm thicknesses and R = 0-20 cm; data to within ±3 % deviation were obtained for high-Z attenuators such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), silver (Ag), tungsten (W), platinum (Pt), gold (Au), lead (Pb), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) having thicknesses of 0-10 cm and R = 0-20 cm. By taking into account the radiation attenuation and scatter in the buildup cap, we could analyze the in-air chamber response along a line perpendicular to the isocenter axis. PMID:22696171

  6. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  7. Spectra of solar proton ground level events using neutron monitor and neutron moderated detector recordings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Recordings on relativistic solar flare protons observed at Sanae, Antarctic, show that the percentage increase in counting rates of the neutron moderated detector (4NMD) is larger than the percentage increase in counting rates of the 3NM64 neutron monitor. These relative increases are described by solar proton differential spectra j sub s(P) = AP(beta). The power beta is determined for each event and the hardnesses of the temporal variations of beta, found for the ground level events (GLE) of 7 May, 1978 and 22 November, 1977.

  8. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  9. Neutron Emission Spectra from Inelastic Scattering on 58,60Ni with a White Neutron Source at FIGARO

    SciTech Connect

    Rochman, D.; Haight, R.C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Grimes, S.M.; Talou, P.

    2005-05-24

    Neutron emission spectra from inelastic neutron scattering on natural nickel at the FIGARO facility have been measured by a double time-of-flight technique. The incident neutrons are produced from the spallation source of the Weapons Neutron Research facility, and their energies are determined by time of flight. The emitted neutrons and gamma rays are detected by 16 liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. The results for incident neutron energies from 2 to 10 MeV are compared with predictions of nuclear model calculations performed with the code EMPIRE-II. Finally, the level density parameters 'a' and ''{delta}'' are extracted.

  10. Preliminary investigations of Monte Carlo Simulations of neutron energy and LET spectra for fast neutron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    No fast neutron therapy facility has been built with optimized beam quality based on a thorough understanding of the neutron spectrum and its resulting biological effectiveness. A study has been initiated to provide the information necessary for such an optimization. Monte Carlo studies will be used to simulate neutron energy spectra and LET spectra. These studies will be bench-marked with data taken at existing fast neutron therapy facilities. Results will also be compared with radiobiological studies to further support beam quality ptimization. These simulations, anchored by this data, will then be used to determine what parameters might be optimized to take full advantage of the unique LET properties of fast neutron beams. This paper will present preliminary work in generating energy and LET spectra for the Fermilab fast neutron therapy facility.

  11. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  12. Prompt fission neutron spectra of n+235U above the (n,nf) fission threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Neng-Chuan; Jia, Min; Chen, Yong-Jing; Liu, Ting-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Calculations of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) from the 235U(n, f) reaction were performed with a semi-empirical method for En = 7.0 and 14.7 MeV neutron energies. The total PFNS were obtained as a superposition of (n,xnf) pre-fission neutron spectra and post-fission spectra of neutrons which were evaporated from fission fragments, and these two kinds of spectra were taken as an expression of the evaporation spectrum. The contributions of (n,xnf) fission neutron spectra on the calculated PFNS were discussed. The results show that emission of one or two neutrons in the (n,nf) or (n,2nf) reactions influences the PFNS shape, and the neutron spectra of the (n,xnf) fission-channel are soft compared with the neutron spectra of the (n,f) fission channel. In addition, analysis of the multiple-chance fission component showed that second-chance fission dominates the PFNS with an incident neutron energy of 14.7 MeV whereas first-chance fission dominates the 7 MeV case. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205246, 91126010, U1230127, 91226102), IAEA CRP (15905), and Defense Industrial Technology Development Program (B0120110034)

  13. Particle LET spectra from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    1988-12-01

    Cumulative fractions for LET spectra were measured for particles ejected from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation. The measurements for the neutron irradiation compare well with Monte Carlo theoretical calculations. The spectra can be used to access microelectronics vulnerabilities in strategic-nuclear- weapon, space-trapped, and neutral-beam directed-energy particle environments.

  14. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multi-pinhole X-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Thomas, C A

    2010-05-11

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside hohlraums is important to the ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with the target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes, with four independent filter combinations, to image entire hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87x during the hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 30 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser plasma interactions rather than from hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  15. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser-Feshbach model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Moller, Peter; Wilson, William B

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical {beta}-delayed-neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after {beta} decay to the granddaughter residual are more accurately calculated than in previous evaluations, including all the microscopic nuclear structure information, such as a Gamow-Teller strength distribution and discrete states in the granddaughter. The calculated delayed-neutron spectra agree reasonably well with those evaluations in the ENDF decay library, which are based on experimental data. The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors.

  16. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  17. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  18. A New Facility for High-Energy Neutron-Induced Fission Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Prokofiev, A.; Carlsson, M.; Einarsson, L.; Haag, N.; Pomp, S.; Bergenwall, B.; Blomgren, J.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Mermod, P.; Oesterlund, M.; Tippawan, U.; Dangtip, S.

    2005-05-24

    A new facility is constructed for measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections in the 20-180 MeV energy region versus the np scattering cross section, which is adopted as the primary neutron standard. The advantage of the experiment compared to earlier studies is that the fission-fragment detection and the neutron-flux measurement via np scattering are performed simultaneously and at the same position in the beam, and, therefore, many sources of systematic errors cancel out. Further reduction of systematic errors is achieved due to 'embedded' determination of effective solid angle of particle detectors using {alpha}-particles from the radioactive decay of the target nuclei. The performance of the facility is illustrated by first data obtained for angular distributions of fission fragments in the 238U(n,f) reaction.

  19. The neutron component of two high-energy photon reference fields.

    PubMed

    Röttger, S; Schäler, K; Behrens, R; Nolte, R; Wissmann, F

    2007-01-01

    The 4.4 MeV photon reference field described in ISO 4037 is produced by the (12)C(p,p')(12)C (E(x) = 4.4389 MeV) reaction using a thick elemental carbon target and a proton beam with an energy of 5.7 MeV. The relative abundance of the isotope (13)C in elemental carbon is 1.10%. Therefore, the 4.4 MeV photon field is contaminated by neutrons produced by the (13)C(p,n) (13)N reaction (Q = -3.003 MeV). The ambient dose equivalent H*(10) produced by these neutrons is of the same order of magnitude as the ambient dose equivalent produced by the 4.4 MeV photons. For the calibration of dosemeters, especially those also sensitive to neutrons, the spectral fluence distribution of these neutrons has to be known in detail. On the other hand, a mixed photon/neutron field is very useful for the calibration of tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC), if this field combines a high-linear energy transfer (LET) component produced by low-energy neutrons and a low-LET component resulting from photons with about the same ambient dose equivalent and energies up to 7 MeV. Such a mixed field was produced at the PTB accelerator facility using a thin CaF(2) + (nat)C target and a 5.7 MeV proton beam. PMID:17675300

  20. (A neutron scattering experiment to study the high-energy spin dynamics of the itinerant antiferromagnet Mn sub 90 Cu sub 10 )

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1990-10-26

    The traveler performed a neutron scattering experiment to study the high-energy spin dynamics of the itinerant antiferromagnet. This experiment was conducted at a unique instrument located at the hot-neutron source at the ILL. The traveler also held various scientific discussions with ILL research staff members and visiting scientists.

  1. Evaluation of Am-Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with (α, n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured and theoretical spectra of various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. The singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis, being dominated by scattering which is highly dependent on item placement.

  2. Measurement of high-energy neutrons at ISS by SEDA-AP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, K.; Goka, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Obara, T.; Muraki, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    2011-09-01

    A new type of solar neutron detector (NEM) was launched by the space shuttle Endeavour on 16 July 2009 and it began collecting data on 25 August 2009 at the International Space Station (ISS). In this paper we introduce preliminary results obtained by the NEM.

  3. Characterisation of three high-energy photon and fast neutron reference radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Behrens, R; Röttger, S

    2008-01-01

    Three reference radiation fields for the purpose of radiation protection were characterised: (1) radiation field R-F, consisting of photons in the energy range of about 6 and 7 MeV and a small neutron contamination; (2) radiation field R-C, consisting of photons with energies of about 4.4 MeV and neutrons with energies up to 2.65 MeV; (3) radiation field R-CF, consisting of photons in the energy range of about 1 and 7 MeV and neutrons with energies about 1.5 MeV. The radiation fields R-F and R-C have previously been defined in the ISO standard 4037. Their neutron components, however, have never been described accurately in the past. The new radiation field R-CF is proposed for the first time. This radiation field can, e.g., be used to calibrate tissue-equivalent proportional counters instruments for measurements at flight altitudes. PMID:19131379

  4. High-energy astrophysics: A theoretical analysis of thermal radiation from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, James H.

    1994-01-01

    The unambiguous detection of thermal radiation from the surface of a cooling neutron star was one of the most anxiously awaited results in neutron star physics. This particular Holy Grail was found by Halpern and Holt, who used ROSAT to detect pulsed X-rays from the gamma-ray source Geminga and demonstrate that it was a neutron star, probably a radio pulsar beamed away from us. At an age of approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 5) years, Geminga is in the photon cooling era. Its surface temperature of 5.2 x 10(exp 5) K can be explained within the contexts of both the slow and fast cooling scenarios. In the slow cooling scenario, the surface temperature is too high unless the specific heat of the interior is reduced by extensive baryon pairing. In the fast cooling scenario, the surface temperature will be much too low unless the fast neutrino cooling is shut off by baryon pairing. Two other pulsars, PSR 0656+14 and PSR 1055-52, have also been detected in thermal X-rays by ROSAT. They are also in the photon cooling era. All of this research's neutron star cooling models to date have used the unmagnetized effective temperature-interior temperature relation for the outer boundary condition. Models are being improved by using published magnetic envelope calculations and assumed geometried for the surface magnetic field to determine local interior temperature-emitted flux relations for the surface of the star.

  5. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30/sup 0/ close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  6. Time gating for energy selection and scatter rejection: High-energy pulsed neutron imaging at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Alicia; Schirato, Richard; McKigney, Edward; Hunter, James; Temple, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a linear accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico that accelerates a proton beam to 800 MeV, which then produces spallation neutron beams. Flight path FP15R uses a tungsten target to generate neutrons of energy ranging from several hundred keV to ~600 MeV. The beam structure has micropulses of sub-ns width and period of 1.784 ns, and macropulses of 625 μs width and frequency of either 50 Hz or 100 Hz. This corresponds to 347 micropulses per macropulse, or 1.74 x 104 micropulses per second when operating at 50 Hz. Using a very fast, cooled ICCD camera (Princeton Instruments PI-Max 4), gated images of various objects were obtained on FP15R in January 2015. Objects imaged included blocks of lead and borated polyethylene; a tungsten sphere; and a tungsten, polyethylene, and steel cylinder. Images were obtained in 36 min or less, with some in as little as 6 min. This is novel because the gate widths (some as narrow as 10 ns) were selected to reject scatter and other signal not of interest (e.g. the gamma flash that precedes the neutron pulse), which has not been demonstrated at energies above 14 MeV. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that time gating is possible above 14MeV and is useful for selecting neutron energy and reducing scatter, thus forming clearer images. Future work (simulation and experimental) is being undertaken to improve camera shielding and system design and to precisely determine optical properties of the imaging system.

  7. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Dudkin, E. V.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.

    1995-01-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the (sup 6) Li(n.x)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

  8. Neutron dosimetry at a high-energy electron-positron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, Roberto

    Electron-positron colliders with energy of hundreds of MeV per beam have been employed for studies in the domain of nuclear and sub-nuclear physics. The typical structure of such a collider includes an LINAC, able to produce both types of particles, an accumulator ring and a main ring, whose diameter ranges from several tens to hundred meters and allows circulating particle currents of several amperes per beam. As a consequence of the interaction of the primary particles with targets, shutters, structures and barriers, a complex radiation environment is produced. This paper addresses the neutron dosimetry issues associated with the operation of such accelerators, referring in particular to the DAΦ NE complex, operative since 1997 at INFN-Frascati National Laboratory (Italy). Special attention is given to the active and passive techniques used for the spectrometric and dosimetric characterization of the workplace neutron fields, for radiation protection dosimetry purposes.

  9. An ionization chamber with Frisch grids for studies of high-energy neutron-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutin, G. A.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Eismont, V. P.; Kireev, A. V.; Condé, H.; Elmgren, K.; Olsson, N.; Renberg, P.-U.

    2001-01-01

    A gridded ionization chamber for fission fragment detection is described. The chamber has been specially designed for use at the quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p, n) neutron source at the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. The detector permits measurements of fission fragment energy and emission angle for two targets with diameter of up to 10 cm. The time response of the chamber (⩽5 ns FWHM) is adequate to apply time-of-flight discrimination against background events induced by non-peak neutrons. Results of angular anisotropy measurements for the 232Th (n, f) and 238U(n, f) reactions in the 20-160 MeV energy range are given.

  10. High-energy transients. [from weakly and strongly magnetic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1991-01-01

    The observational characteristics of X-ray bursts are reviewed and the thermonuclear-flash model is examined to assess the suitability of the model and the sources of X- and gamma-ray bursts. The profiles of X-ray bursts from five different sources are delineated, and the global analysis of nuclear burning is discussed to review th range possible X-ray burst behavior. The analysis by Fushiki and Lamb (1987) is noted for the description of regions which lie away from the steady-state cut. The discussion of cyclotron lines in gamma-ray bursts emphasizes the source GB880205, and it is shown that Raman and cyclotron resonant scattering can explain the observed positions, strengths, and widths of the dips in the spectrum. X-ray bursts are theorized to emanate from weakly magnetic neutron stars, and gamma-ray bursts are shown to be the products of strongly magnetic neutron stars.

  11. Evaluation of Neutron Component in Patients under High Energy Radiotherapy By Means of an On Line and In Vivo procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Exposito, M. R.; Palma, B. A.; Terron, J. A.; Gomez, F.; Domingo, C.; Barquero, R.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.

    2010-12-07

    The use of improved radiotherapy methods has raised the concern about second cancer induction. Epidemiological studies have shown a major incidence of secondary cancer in radiotherapy patients compared to patients subjected to another type of treatment. In this regard, it is important to determine the peripheral dose received by the patient during the treatment. While photon doses have been deeply contemplated, neutron contamination in high energy photon beams is still a subject of research and discussion. In the present work, we introduce a new procedure based on a digital device that allows real time neutron contamination evaluation. Several irradiations of an anthropomorphic phantom have been carried out in a variety of facilities and treatments. The purpose was to correlate the measurements from the digital detector with the neutron doses obtained in the phantom by Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements. A model has been designed to calculate the organ equivalent dose and risk estimates during any therapeutic session. The procedure has been used to monitor more than 1000 patients showing its applicability in clinical routine. It can be used both for inductive and retrospective studies with a reasonable uncertainty. Thus, this could provide the necessary information to complement the dosimetry of patient and estimate the treatment risk.

  12. Evaluation of Neutron Component in Patients under High Energy Radiotherapy By Means of an On Line and In Vivo procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Expósito, M. R.; Terrón, J. A.; Palma, B. A.; Gómez, F.; Domingo, C.; Barquero, R.; Sánchez-Doblado, F.

    2010-12-01

    The use of improved radiotherapy methods has raised the concern about second cancer induction. Epidemiological studies have shown a major incidence of secondary cancer in radiotherapy patients compared to patients subjected to another type of treatment. In this regard, it is important to determine the peripheral dose received by the patient during the treatment. While photon doses have been deeply contemplated, neutron contamination in high energy photon beams is still a subject of research and discussion. In the present work, we introduce a new procedure based on a digital device that allows real time neutron contamination evaluation. Several irradiations of an anthropomorphic phantom have been carried out in a variety of facilities and treatments. The purpose was to correlate the measurements from the digital detector with the neutron doses obtained in the phantom by Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements. A model has been designed to calculate the organ equivalent dose and risk estimates during any therapeutic session. The procedure has been used to monitor more than 1000 patients showing its applicability in clinical routine. It can be used both for inductive and retrospective studies with a reasonable uncertainty. Thus, this could provide the necessary information to complement the dosimetry of patient and estimate the treatment risk.

  13. Neutron spectra at two beam ports of a TRIGA Mark III reactor loaded with HEU fuel.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Hernández-Dávila, V M; Aguilar, F; Paredes, L; Rivera, T

    2014-01-01

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, one radial and another tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. Measurements were carried out with the reactor core loaded with high enriched uranium fuel. Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a (6)LiI(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 in.-diameter high-density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code. For each spectrum total flux, mean energy and ambient dose equivalent were determined. Measured spectra show fission, epithermal and thermal neutrons, being harder in the radial beam port. PMID:23746708

  14. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs.

    PubMed

    Pomp, S; Bartlett, D T; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Röttger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-10-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe. PMID:24153422

  15. Delayed-Neutron Energy Spectra for Thermal Fission of URANIUM-235.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanczyn, Robert Steven

    An experiment to measure delayed-neutron energy spectra resulting from thermal fission of U-235 has been carried out at the University of Lowell. Delayed neutrons, emitted by the radioactive fission fragments having halflives varying from 0.2 to 56 seconds, are important in the operation and control of fission reactors. In separate experiments at the University of Lowell 1-MW Fission Reactor and 5.5-MV Van de Graaff Accelerator, thermal fission was induced in a U-235 lined hemispherical fission chamber. The resulting fission fragments were transferred by a helium-jet system to a low-background counting area where composite delayed-neutron energy spectra were measured as a function of time after fission. Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique using beta-neutron correlations for timing. Two types of scintillators were used for neutron detection: Li-6 glass sensitive to neutrons in the energy range 10 - 300 keV, and plastic Pilot U sensitive to neutrons in the range 100 keV - 2.0 MeV. Spectra over the neutron energy range 0.1 - 2.0 MeV were measured for eight different time intervals after fission, each time interval containing varying contributions from the Six-Groups of delayed neutrons. Two of the eight time intervals were chosen to contain significant contributions from the shortest lived Groups 5 and 6. This work presents a brief outline of pertinent background material followed by a detailed discussion of the experimental technique and data analysis leading to final energy spectra. Measured composite energy spectra along with average energies are presented. Comparisons to spectra constructed from the Studsvik compilation are also presented.

  16. Measurement and evaluation of neutron spectra above 0.1 MeV in the JMTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi

    1983-08-01

    The evaluation of fast neutron spectra from the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) have been performed by using the critical facility of the JMTR and by a combination of the multi-foil activation method and the adjustment codes (SAND II and NEUPAC). In order to measure and evaluate the neutron spectra above 0.1 MeV, resonance detectors such as manganese, gold and copper have been used to determine the neutron flux level in the {1}/{E} region and threshold detectors such as silver, rhodium, indium, uranium, aluminum, magnesium and titanium have been used to determine the neutron flux level above 0.1 MeV. The foils for the measurement of the neutron reaction rate were separately irradiated. The 115In(n,n') 115mIn reaction is used for the monitoring of the average fast neutron flux in the irradiation period, and the slight difference of each irradiation condition was corrected. The guess spectra for the neutron spectrum adjustment were calculated by using the one-dimensional discrete-ordinates code ANISN with the slab model for the JMTR core. Some important points were concluded through the adjustment procedure of the neutron spectrum: the adjusted spectrum from 0.1 to 1 MeV depends on the accuracy of the neutron cross section data for the threshold detectors such as silver and rhodium, and also on the accuracy of these reaction rates. The ratios of neutron flux above 0.183 MeV to neutron flux above 1 MeV were calculated from the guess spectra and the adjusted spectra, and the ratios were in good agreement with each other.

  17. Russian measurements of neutron energy spectra on the Mir orbital station.

    PubMed

    Lyagushin, V I; Dudkin, V E; Potapov, Y V; Sevastianov, V D

    2001-06-01

    Results of the experiments on neutron energy spectra measurements within broad energy range from 5 x 10(-7) to 2 x 10(2) MeV aboard the Mir orbital station and equivalent neutron dose estimation are presented. Four measurement techniques were used during the experiments. The shape of spectra and their absolute values are in good agreement. According to those experiments, an equivalent neutron dose depends upon effective shielding thickness and spacecraft mass. The neutron dose mentioned is comparable with that of ionizing radiation. Neutron flux levels measured aboard the Mir station have shown that a neutron spectrometer involving broad energy range will be used within the radiation monitoring systems in manned space flights. PMID:11855413

  18. Calculation verification of the utilization of LR-0 for reference neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ján, Milčák; Michal, Košťál; Marie, Švadlenková; Michal, Koleška; Vojtěch, Rypar

    2014-11-01

    Well-defined neutron spectrum is crucial for calibration and testing of detectors for spectrometry and dosimetry purposes. As a possible source of neutrons nuclear reactors can be utilized. In reactor core most of the neutrons are originated from fission and neutron spectra is usually some form of moderated spectra of fast neutrons. The reactor LR-0 is an experimental light-water zero-power pool-type reactor originally designed for research of the VVER type reactor cores, spent-fuel storage lattices and benchmark experiments. The main reactor feature that influences the performance of experiments is the flexible arrangement of the core. Special types of the possible core arrangements on the reactor LR-0 can provide different neutron spectra in special experimental channels. These neutron spectra are modified by inserting different materials around the channel and whole core is driven by standard fuel assemblies. Fast, epithermal or thermal spectra can be simulated using graphite, H2O, D2O insertions, air, Cd foils or fuel with different enrichment.

  19. Neutron Emission Spectra from Inelastic Scattering on 58,60Ni with a White Neutron Source at FIGARO.

    SciTech Connect

    Rochman, D.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Grimes, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron emission spectra from inelastic neutron scattering on natural nickel at the FIGARO facility have been measured by a double time-of-flight technique. The incident neutrons are produced from the spallation source of the Weapons Neutron Research facility, and their energies are determined by time of flight. The emitted neutrons and gamma rays are detected by 16 liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. The results for incident neutron energies from 2 to 10 MeV are compared with predictions of nuclear model calculations performed with the code EMPIRE-II. Finally, the level density parameters 'a' and '{Delta}E' are extracted.

  20. Gamma-ray spectra from neutron capture on /sup 87/Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.E.; Becker, J.A.; Stelts, M.L.

    1981-07-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum following neutron capture on /sup 87/Sr was measured at 3 neutron energies: E/sub n/ = thermal, 2 keV, and 24 keV. Gamma rays were detected in a three-crystal Ge(Li)-NaI-NaI pair spectrometer. Gamma-ray intensities deduced from these spectra by spectral unfolding are presented.

  1. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-06-01

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of 1 /pTn at high pT . The power index n is 4-5 for jet production and is 6-10 for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest pT region in p p collisions at the LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the possible dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole pT region at central rapidity in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power indices of UA1 and ATLAS jet spectra over an extended pT region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX collaborations in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that may be cast into a single-particle nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution. Because of such a connection, the nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution may be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high-energy p p and p p ¯ collisions.

  2. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  3. Characterization of neutron-irradiated HT-UPS steel by high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Li, Meimei

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the first measurement of neutron-irradiated microstructure using far-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (FF-HEDM) in a high-temperature ultrafine-precipitate-strengthened (HT-UPS) austenitic stainless steel. Grain center of mass, grain size distribution, crystallographic orientation (texture), diffraction spot broadening and lattice constant distributions of individual grains were obtained for samples in three different conditions: non-irradiated, neutron-irradiated (3dpa/500 °C), and irradiated + annealed (3dpa/500 °C + 600 °C/1 h). It was found that irradiation caused significant increase in grain-level diffraction spot broadening, modified the texture, reduced the grain-averaged lattice constant, but had nearly no effect on the average grain size and grain size distribution, as well as the grain size-dependent lattice constant variations. Post-irradiation annealing largely reversed the irradiation effects on texture and average lattice constant, but inadequately restored the microstrain.

  4. Possible high-energy neutrino and photon signals from gravitational wave bursts due to double neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2013-08-01

    As the technology of gravitational-wave and neutrino detectors becomes increasingly mature, a multimessenger era of astronomy is ushered in. Advanced gravitational-wave detectors are close to making a ground-breaking discovery of gravitational-wave bursts (GWBs) associated with mergers of double neutron stars (NS-NS). It is essential to study the possible electromagnetic and neutrino emission counterparts of these GWBs. Recent observations and numerical simulations suggest that at least a fraction of NS-NS mergers may leave behind a massive millisecond magnetar as the merger product. Here we show that protons accelerated in the forward shock powered by a magnetar wind pushing the ejecta launched during the merger process would interact with photons generated in the dissipating magnetar wind and emit high-energy neutrinos and photons. We estimate the typical energy and fluence of the neutrinos from such a scenario. We find that ˜PeV neutrinos could be emitted from the shock front as long as the ejecta could be accelerated to a relativistic speed. The diffuse neutrino flux from these events, even under the most optimistic scenarios, is too low to account for the two events announced by the IceCube Collaboration, but it is only slightly lower than the diffuse flux of GRBs, making it an important candidate for the diffuse background of ˜PeV neutrinos. The neutron-pion decay of these events make them a moderate contributor to the sub-TeV gamma-ray diffuse background.

  5. Laser-driven high-energy-density deuterium and tritium ions for neutron production in a double-cone configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Zhu, Qing-Jun; Yin, Yan; Ma, Yan-Yun

    2015-12-01

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate laser-driven ion acceleration and compression from a thin DT foil in a double-cone configuration. By using two counterpropagating laser pulses, it is shown that a double-cone structure can effectively guide, focus, and strengthen the incident laser pulses, resulting in the enhanced acceleration and compression of D+ and T+. Due to the ion Coulomb repulsion and the effective screening from the external laser electric fields, the transverse diffusion of ions is significantly suppressed. Finally, the peak energy density of the compressed ions exceeds 2.73 × 1016 J/m3, which is about five orders of magnitude higher than the threshold for high energy density physics, 1011 J/m3. Under this condition, DT fusion reactions are initiated and the neutron production rate per volume is estimated to be as high as 7.473 × 1035/m3 s according to Monte Carlo simulations. It is much higher than that of the traditional large neutron sources, which may facilitate many potential applications.

  6. Laser-driven high-energy-density deuterium and tritium ions for neutron production in a double-cone configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhu, Qing-Jun

    2015-12-15

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate laser-driven ion acceleration and compression from a thin DT foil in a double-cone configuration. By using two counterpropagating laser pulses, it is shown that a double-cone structure can effectively guide, focus, and strengthen the incident laser pulses, resulting in the enhanced acceleration and compression of D{sup +} and T{sup +}. Due to the ion Coulomb repulsion and the effective screening from the external laser electric fields, the transverse diffusion of ions is significantly suppressed. Finally, the peak energy density of the compressed ions exceeds 2.73 × 10{sup 16 }J/m{sup 3}, which is about five orders of magnitude higher than the threshold for high energy density physics, 10{sup 11 }J/m{sup 3}. Under this condition, DT fusion reactions are initiated and the neutron production rate per volume is estimated to be as high as 7.473 × 10{sup 35}/m{sup 3} s according to Monte Carlo simulations. It is much higher than that of the traditional large neutron sources, which may facilitate many potential applications.

  7. Production of the SIGMA(0)(C) and SIGMA(++)(C) by High Energy Neutrons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladbury, Raymond Llewellyn, Jr.

    We present the first observation of hadroproduction of the Sigma_sp{c}{++ } and Sigma_sp{c }{0}, decaying into Lambda _{c}pi. The daughter Lambda_{c} is observed in the decay modes pKpi and pK _{s}pipi. The Experiment was conducted at a broadband neutron beam in the Proton East area of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. A two-magnet multiparticle spectrometer equipped with proportional wire chambers and a high resolution MWPC vertex detector was used to momentum analyze charged particles produced in the interactions of neutrons on targets of beryllium, silicon and tungsten. Particles were identified using three Cerenkov counters. The beam energy for each event was reconstructed using hadronic and electromagnetic calorimetry. The mass differences delta m_ {Sigma_sp{c}{++}- Lambda_{c}}, delta m_{Sigma_sp{c }{0}-Lambda_{c}} and delta m_{Sigma _sp{c}{++}-Sigma_sp {c}{0}} are measured and found to be 166.4 +/-.3 +/- 2.0 MeV/c^2, 178.5 +/-.3 +/- 2.5MeV/c ^2 and -12.1 +/- .4 +/- 2.8MeV/c^2 . This last value is larger in magnitude than the predictions of most theoretical calculations. We also report measurements of particle to antiparticle ratios, x_{f} dependence, A dependence, and p_{t} dependence of the production cross sections. The total production cross sections of the Sigma_sp{c} {0} and Sigma_sp {c}{++} are calculated, assuming {dsigmaover dx_{f }} ~ (1 -x)^4, linear atomic weight dependence, B(Lambda_{c} to pKpi) =.022, and symmetric production of particle and antiparticle. From this, and the value of sigma cdot B( Lambda_{c} to pK_sp{s}{0} pipi), calculated under the same assumptions, we calculate the ratio of branching fractions {B(Lambda_{c} to p| K^{0}pipi)}over {B(Lambda_{c}to pKpi) }. We conclude that the level of charm production indicated by our measurements is substantially higher than that predicted by first order gluon-gluon fusion.

  8. Analysis of primary damage in silicon carbide under fusion and fission neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daxi; Zang, Hang; Zhang, Peng; Xi, Jianqi; Li, Tao; Ma, Li; He, Chaohui

    2014-12-01

    Irradiation parameters on primary damage states of SiC are evaluated and compared for the first wall of ITER under deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) operation, the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and high flux isotope reactor (HFIR). With the same neutron fluence, the studied fusion spectra produce more damage and much higher gas production than the fission spectra. Due to comparable gas production and similar weighted primary recoil spectra, HFIR is considered suitable to simulate the neutron irradiation in an HTGR. In contrast to the significant differences between the weighted primary recoil spectra of the fission and the fusion spectra, the weighted secondary recoil spectra of HFIR and HTGR match those of DD and DT, indicating that displacement cascades by the fission and the fusion irradiation are similar when the damage distribution among damaged regions by secondary recoils is taken into account.

  9. Measurements of high energy neutrons penetrated through iron shields using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Nakao, N.; Nunomiya, T.; Nakamura, T.; Fukumura, A.; Takada, M.

    2002-11-01

    Neutron energy spectra penetrated through iron shields were measured using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator which have been newly developed by our group at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Neutrons were generated by bombarding 400 MeV/nucleon C ion on a thick (stopping-length) copper target. The neutron spectra in the energy range from 20 to 800 MeV were obtained through the FORIST unfolding code with their response functions and compared with the MCNPX calculations combined with the LA150 cross section library. The neutron fluence measured by the NE213 detector was simulated by the track length estimator in the MCNPX, and evaluated the contribution of the room-scattered neutrons. The calculations are in fairly good agreement with the measurements. Neutron fluence attenuation lengths were obtained from the experimental results and the calculation.

  10. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, I.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Bem, P.

    2010-10-15

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  11. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Ďuran, I; Bolshakova, I; Viererbl, L; Sentkerestiová, J; Holyaka, R; Lahodová, Z; Bém, P

    2010-10-01

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10(16) cm(-2) was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum. PMID:21033987

  12. Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz

    2008-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

  13. SOURCES: a code for calculating (alpha,n), spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron sources and spectra.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W B; Perry, R T; Charlton, W S; Parish, T A; Shores, E F

    2005-01-01

    SOURCES is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from (alpha,n) reactions, spontaneous fission and delayed neutron emission owing to the decay of radionuclides in homogeneous media, interface problems and three-region interface problems. The code is also capable of calculating the neutron production rates due to (alpha,n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of alpha particles incident on a slab of target material. The (alpha,n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the centre-of-mass system with a library of 107 nuclide decay alpha-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated (alpha,n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional alpha particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. Spontaneous fission sources and spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching and Watt spectrum parameters for 44 actinides. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code outputs the magnitude and spectra of the resultant neutron sources. It also provides an analysis of the contributions to that source by each nuclide in the problem. PMID:16381695

  14. Applicability of self-activation of an NaI scintillator for measurement of photo-neutrons around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Yahiro, Eriko; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Fukunaga, Junichi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Hosono, Makoto; Itoh, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of the activation of an NaI scintillator for neutron monitoring at a clinical linac was investigated experimentally. Thermal neutron fluence rates are derived by measurement of the I-128 activity generated in an NaI scintillator irradiated by neutrons; β-rays from I-128 are detected efficiently by the NaI scintillator. In order to verify the validity of this method for neutron measurement, we irradiated an NaI scintillator at a research reactor, and the neutron fluence rate was estimated. The method was then applied to neutron measurement at a 10-MV linac (Varian Clinac 21EX), and the neutron fluence rate was estimated at the isocenter and at 30 cm from the isocenter. When the scintillator was irradiated directly by high-energy X-rays, the production of I-126 was observed due to photo-nuclear reactions, in addition to the generation of I-128 and Na-24. From the results obtained by these measurements, it was found that the neutron measurement by activation of an NaI scintillator has a great advantage in estimates of a low neutron fluence rate by use of a quick measurement following a short-time irradiation. Also, the future application of this method to quasi real-time monitoring of neutrons during patient treatments at a radiotherapy facility is discussed, as well as the method of evaluation of the neutron dose. PMID:25404493

  15. Calculations of neutron flux spectra induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Chandler, K. C.; Barish, J.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the neutron flux induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic protons and alpha particles at solar minimum for a geomagnetic latitude of 42 N. Neutron flux spectra were calculated using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods, and various comparisons with experimental data are presented. The magnitude and shape of the calculated neutron-leakage spectrum at the particular latitude considered support the theory that the cosmic-ray-albedo-neutron-decay mechanism is the source of the protons and electrons trapped in the Van Allen belts.

  16. EUV/soft x-ray spectra for low B neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, R.W.; Rajagopal, M.; Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1995-05-23

    Recent ROSAT and EUVE detections of spin-powered neutron stars suggest that many emit ``thermal`` radiation, peaking in the EUV/soft X-ray band. These data constrain the neutron stars` thermal history, but interpretation requires comparison with model atmosphere computations, since emergent spectra depend strongly on the surface composition and magnetic field. As recent opacity computations show substantial change to absorption cross sections at neutron star photospheric conditions, we report here on new model atmosphere computations employing such data. The results are compared with magnetic atmosphere models and applied to PSR J0437-4715, a low field neutron star.

  17. EUV/soft x-ray spectra for low B neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Rajagopal, Mohan; Rogers, Forrest J.; Iglesias, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent ROSAT and EUVE detections of spin-powered neutron stars suggest that many emit 'thermal' radiation, peaking in the EUV/soft X-ray band. These data constrain the neutron stars' thermal history, but interpretation requires comparison with model atmosphere computations, since emergent spectra depend strongly on the surface composition and magnetic field. As recent opacity computations show substantial change to absorption cross sections at neutron star photospheric conditions, we report here on new model atmosphere computations employing such data. The results are compared with magnetic atmosphere models and applied to PSR J0437-4715, a low field neutron star.

  18. Neutron spectra from beam-target reactions in dense Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.

    2015-10-01

    The energy spectrum of neutrons emitted by a range of deuterium and deuterium-tritium Z-pinch devices is investigated computationally using a hybrid kinetic-MHD model. 3D MHD simulations are used to model the implosion, stagnation, and break-up of dense plasma focus devices at currents of 70 kA, 500 kA, and 2 MA and also a 15 MA gas puff. Instabilities in the MHD simulations generate large electric and magnetic fields, which accelerate ions during the stagnation and break-up phases. A kinetic model is used to calculate the trajectories of these ions and the neutron spectra produced due to the interaction of these ions with the background plasma. It is found that these beam-target neutron spectra are sensitive to the electric and magnetic fields at stagnation resulting in significant differences in the spectra emitted by each device. Most notably, magnetization of the accelerated ions causes the beam-target spectra to be isotropic for the gas puff simulations. It is also shown that beam-target spectra can have a peak intensity located at a lower energy than the peak intensity of a thermonuclear spectrum. A number of other differences in the shapes of beam-target and thermonuclear spectra are also observed for each device. Finally, significant differences between the shapes of beam-target DD and DT neutron spectra, due to differences in the reaction cross-sections, are illustrated.

  19. Neutron spectra from beam-target reactions in dense Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbe, B. Chittenden, J.

    2015-10-15

    The energy spectrum of neutrons emitted by a range of deuterium and deuterium-tritium Z-pinch devices is investigated computationally using a hybrid kinetic-MHD model. 3D MHD simulations are used to model the implosion, stagnation, and break-up of dense plasma focus devices at currents of 70 kA, 500 kA, and 2 MA and also a 15 MA gas puff. Instabilities in the MHD simulations generate large electric and magnetic fields, which accelerate ions during the stagnation and break-up phases. A kinetic model is used to calculate the trajectories of these ions and the neutron spectra produced due to the interaction of these ions with the background plasma. It is found that these beam-target neutron spectra are sensitive to the electric and magnetic fields at stagnation resulting in significant differences in the spectra emitted by each device. Most notably, magnetization of the accelerated ions causes the beam-target spectra to be isotropic for the gas puff simulations. It is also shown that beam-target spectra can have a peak intensity located at a lower energy than the peak intensity of a thermonuclear spectrum. A number of other differences in the shapes of beam-target and thermonuclear spectra are also observed for each device. Finally, significant differences between the shapes of beam-target DD and DT neutron spectra, due to differences in the reaction cross-sections, are illustrated.

  20. Determination of proton and neutron spectra in the LANSCE spallation irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Fowler, M.M.; Dry, D.; Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.; Corzine, R.K.

    1999-06-01

    Materials samples were recently irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical and physical properties of materials. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including, high-energy protons, mixed protons and high-energy neutrons, and low-energy neutrons. The samples were irradiated for approximately six months during a ten month period using an 800 MeV proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.0 cm. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils were also extracted that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples. These were used to quantify the fluences in various locations.

  1. Measurement of cumulative-neutron and cumulative-proton spectra in 1-GeV proton-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Baturin, V.N.; Vikhrov, V.V.; Makarov, M.M.; Nelyubin, V.V.; Naberezhnov, A.A.; Sulimov, V.V.; Uvarov, L.N.

    1982-11-20

    A comparative study has been made of the spectra of cumulative neutrons and protons produced at an angle of 114/sup 0/ in collisions of 1-GeV protons with /sup 9/Be and /sup 12/C nuclei. The slope parameters of the inclusive neutron spectra are similar to those of the proton spectra.

  2. Introducing Nuclear Data Evaluations of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Neudecker, Denise

    2015-06-17

    Nuclear data evaluations provide recommended data sets for nuclear data applications such as reactor physics, stockpile stewardship or nuclear medicine. The evaluated data are often based on information from multiple experimental data sets and nuclear theory using statistical methods. Therefore, they are collaborative efforts of evaluators, theoreticians, experimentalists, benchmark experts, statisticians and application area scientists. In this talk, an introductions is given to the field of nuclear data evaluation at the specific example of a recent evaluation of the outgoing neutron energy spectrum emitted promptly after fission from 239Pu and induced by neutrons from thermal to 30 MeV.

  3. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature. PMID:26057186

  4. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  5. Ground-based observations of thunderstorm-correlated fluxes of high-energy electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chilingarian, A.; Daryan, A.; Arakelyan, K.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Mailyan, B.; Melkumyan, L.; Hovsepyan, G.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.; Vanyan, L.

    2010-08-15

    The Aragats Space Environmental Center facilities continuously measure fluxes of neutral and charged secondary cosmic ray incidents on the Earth's surface. Since 2003 in the 1-minute time series we have detected more than 100 enhancements in the electron, gamma ray, and neutron fluxes correlated with thunderstorm activities. During the periods of the count rate enhancements, lasting tens of minutes, millions of additional particles were detected. Based on the largest particle event of September 19, 2009, we show that our measurements support the existence of long-lasting particle multiplication and acceleration mechanisms in the thunderstorm atmosphere. For the first time we present the energy spectra of electrons and gamma rays from the particle avalanches produced in the thunderstorm atmosphere, reaching the Earth's surface.

  6. Comparison of graphite, aluminum, and TransHab shielding material characteristics in a high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.; Thibeault, Sheila

    2002-01-01

    Space radiation transport models clearly show that low atomic weight materials provide a better shielding protection for interplanetary human missions than high atomic weight materials. These model studies have concentrated on shielding properties against charged particles. A light-weight, inflatable habitat module called TransHab was built and shown to provide adequate protection against micrometeoroid impacts and good shielding properties against charged particle radiation in the International Space Station orbits. An experiment using a tissue equivalent proportional counter, to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra with graphite, aluminum, and a TransHab build-up as shielding, was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. It is a continuation of a previous study using regolith and doped polyethylene materials. This paper describes the results and their comparison with the previous study. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. Comparison of graphite, aluminum, and TransHab shielding material characteristics in a high-energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Huff, H; Wilkins, R; Thibeault, Sheila

    2002-12-01

    Space radiation transport models clearly show that low atomic weight materials provide a better shielding protection for interplanetary human missions than high atomic weight materials. These model studies have concentrated on shielding properties against charged particles. A light-weight, inflatable habitat module called TransHab was built and shown to provide adequate protection against micrometeoroid impacts and good shielding properties against charged particle radiation in the International Space Station orbits. An experiment using a tissue equivalent proportional counter, to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra with graphite, aluminum, and a TransHab build-up as shielding, was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. It is a continuation of a previous study using regolith and doped polyethylene materials. This paper describes the results and their comparison with the previous study. PMID:12455499

  8. Broad-range neutron spectra identification in ultraintense laser interactions with carbon-deuterated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Habara, H.; Tanaka, K.A.; Sentoku, Y.; Tampo, M.; Toyama, Y.

    2005-11-15

    Detailed neutron energy spectra produced from a CD2 target irradiated by a 450 fs, 20 J, 1053 nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been studied. Wide-ranging neutron spectra were observed from two different observation angles 20 deg. and 70 deg. relative to the rear-side target normal. The experiment and numerically calculated spectra, by a three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, indicate that the range of the measured spectra is larger than that produced by the D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction. An interpretation for the measured spectra is introduced by considering the {sup 12}C(d,n){sup 13}N and D({sup 12}c,n){sup 13}N reactions. In addition, the study revealed that the neutron spectra produced by the D-C and C-D reactions can overlap that produced by the D-D reaction, and due to their high cross sections, comparing to the D-D reaction, both of them effectively participate in the neutron yield.

  9. Neutron spectra measurement and comparison of the HFR and THOR BNCT beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-07-01

    This paper aims to measure the spectra of HB11 (high flux reactor, HFR) and the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) beams by multiple activation foils. The self-shielding corrections were made with the aid of MCNP calculations. The initial spectra were adjusted by a sophisticated process named coarse-scaling adjustment using SAND-EX, which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with excellent continuity. The epithermal neutron flux of the THOR beam is about three times of HB11. The thermal neutron flux, boron and gold reaction rates along the central axis of a PMMA phantom are calculated for both adjusted spectra for comparison. PMID:19409798

  10. 239Pu Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra Impact on a Set of Criticality and Experimental Reactor Benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peneliau, Y.; Litaize, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.

    2014-04-01

    A large set of nuclear data are investigated to improve the calculation predictions of the new neutron transport simulation codes. With the next generation of nuclear power plants (GEN IV projects), one expects to reduce the calculated uncertainties which are mainly coming from nuclear data and are still very important, before taking into account integral information in the adjustment process. In France, future nuclear power plant concepts will probably use MOX fuel, either in Sodium Fast Reactors or in Gas Cooled Fast Reactors. Consequently, the knowledge of 239Pu cross sections and other nuclear data is crucial issue in order to reduce these sources of uncertainty. The Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra (PFNS) for 239Pu are part of these relevant data (an IAEA working group is even dedicated to PFNS) and the work presented here deals with this particular topic. The main international data files (i.e. JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0, BRC-2009) have been considered and compared with two different spectra, coming from the works of Maslov and Kornilov respectively. The spectra are first compared by calculating their mathematical moments in order to characterize them. Then, a reference calculation using the whole JEFF-3.1.1 evaluation file is performed and compared with another calculation performed with a new evaluation file, in which the data block containing the fission spectra (MF=5, MT=18) is replaced by the investigated spectra (one for each evaluation). A set of benchmarks is used to analyze the effects of PFNS, covering criticality cases and mock-up cases in various neutron flux spectra (thermal, intermediate, and fast flux spectra). Data coming from many ICSBEP experiments are used (PU-SOL-THERM, PU-MET-FAST, PU-MET-INTER and PU-MET-MIXED) and French mock-up experiments are also investigated (EOLE for thermal neutron flux spectrum and MASURCA for fast neutron flux spectrum). This study shows that many experiments and neutron parameters are very sensitive to

  11. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  12. Study of degraded neutron spectra through metal matrix composites using CR-39 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalani, Deepak; Kumar, S.; Ramaseshu, P.; Sundaram, V. K.; Mehta, S. K.

    1998-06-01

    Considerable interest has grown in the last decade in the use of CR-39 films in routine neutron monitoring and dosimetry. In addition, work in neutron spectrometry has been undertaken by various workers ( Decossas et al., 1984; Faermann et al., 1983; Fews et al., 1984; Turner et al., 1984). In the present study metal matrix composites (MMC) samples of Pb-Li, Pb-Cd, Al-Li and Al-B 4C were prepared by using powder metallurgy and alloying elements techniques. The density was obtained for these MMC samples in the range of 80-90% of the metal density. Degraded neutron spectra were obtained by exposing these samples to a 252Cf source housed in a camera and the detector used was CR-39 films covered with a 1 mm PE radiator. These spectra have also been validated through Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code (1983).

  13. Accurate simulations of TEPC neutron spectra using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. C.; Hawkes, N. P.; Shippen, A.

    2015-11-01

    A Geant4 model of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) has been developed in which the calculated output spectrum exhibits unparalleled agreement with experiment for monoenergetic neutron fields at several energies below 20 MeV. The model uses the standard release of the Geant4 9.6 p2 code, but with a non-standard neutron cross section file as provided by Mendoza et al., and with the environment variable options recommended by the same authors. This configuration was found to produce significant improvements in the alpha-dominated region of the calculated response. In this paper, these improvements are presented, and the post-processing required to convert deposited energy into the number of ion pairs (which is the quantity actually measured experimentally) is discussed.

  14. Measurements of the Martian Gamma/Neutron Spectra with MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Ehresmann, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Reitz, G.; Brinza, D.; Weigle, E.; Boettcher, S.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Boehm, E.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S. C.; Kortmann, O.

    2013-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory's rover curiosity measures the energetic charged and neutral particle spectra and the radiation dose rate on the Martian surface. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, which possess a high biological effectiveness. In contrast to charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays are generally only measured indirectly. Their measurement is the result of a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the measurement process. We apply an inversion method to calculate the gamma/neutron spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show first measurements of the Martian gamma/neutron spectra and compare them to theoretical predictions. We find that the shape of the gamma spectrum is very similar to the predicted one, but with a ~50% higher intensity. The measured neutron spectrum agrees well with prediction up to ~100 MeV, but shows a considerably increased intensity for higher energies. The measured neutron spectrum translates into a radiation dose rate of 25 μGy/day and a dose equivalent rate of 106 μSv/day. This corresponds to 10% of the total surface dose rate, and 15% of the biological relevant surface dose equivalent rate on Mars. Measuring the Martian neutron spectra is an essential step for determining the mutagenic influences to past or present life at or beneath the Martian surface as well as the radiation hazard for future human exploration, including the shielding design of a potential habitat. The contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent increases considerably with shielding thickness, so our measurements provide an important figure to mitigate cancer risk.

  15. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  16. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH ENERGY COMPONENT OF THE X-RAY SPECTRA INTHE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Benitez, Janilee Y.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd,Damon S.; Ropponen,Tommi; Ropponen,Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Gammino, Santo

    2007-11-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for Nuclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental set-up to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental set-up for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the correction for detector efficiency, the shielding of the detector and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power and heating frequency.

  17. Optimization of Beam-Shaping Assemblies for BNCS Using the High-Energy Neutron Sources D-D and D-T

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, Jerome M.; Chen, Allen S.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2001-06-15

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy is a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in articulating joints. The treatment of knee joints is the focus of this work. A method was developed, as discussed previously, to predict the dose distribution in a knee joint from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method is validated and used to design moderators for the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron sources. Treatment times >2 h were obtained with the D-D reaction. They could potentially be reduced if the {sup 10}B concentration in the synovium was increased. For D-T neutrons, high therapeutic ratios and treatment times <5 min were obtained for neutron yields of 10{sup 14} s{sup -1}. This treatment time makes the D-T reaction attractive for boron neutron capture synovectomy.

  18. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recktenwald, Geoff; Deinert, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks.

  19. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-01-01

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energymore » $pp$ and $$p\\bar p $$ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $$p \\bar p$$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions.« less

  20. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy pp and pp¯ collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-06-22

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energymore » $pp$ and $$p\\bar p $$ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $$p \\bar p$$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Lastly, because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions.« less

  1. Comparison of neutron spectra measured with three sizes of organic liquid scintillators using differentiation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Pierce, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    Proton recoil distributions were obtained by using organic liquid scintillators of different size. The measured distributions are converted to neutron spectra by differentiation analysis for comparison to the unfolded spectra of the largest scintillator. The approximations involved in the differentiation analysis are indicated to have small effects on the precision of neutron spectra measured with the smaller scintillators but introduce significant error for the largest scintillator. In the case of the smallest cylindrical scintillator, nominally 1.2 by 1.3 cm, the efficiency is shown to be insensitive to multiple scattering and to the angular distribution to the incident flux. These characteristics of the smaller scintillator make possible its use to measure scalar flux spectra within media high efficiency is not required.

  2. Effects of Rapid Spin on the Spectra and Pulse Profiles of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Baubock, Michi; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Morsink, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    A large number of sources that are prime targets for determining neutron star masses and radii spin at 300-700 Hz. At these high spin frequencies, neutron stars become oblate and their spacetime acquires a significant quadrupole moment. In this talk, I will present the rotational broadening and distortion of thermal and line spectra due to these effects. I will also discuss the asymmetry and the energy dependence introduced by the stellar spin to X-ray pulse profiles. I will conclude by describing ways to mitigate and/or exploit these rapid spin effects when measuring neutron star radii.

  3. Analysis of inelastic neutron scattering spectra from a time-of-flight spectrometer with filter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Vorderwisch, P.; Mezei, F.; Eckert, J.; Goldstone, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra obtained from time-of-flight spectrometers with filter detector suffer in energy resolution from a long time-of-flight tail in the filter response function. A mathematical method is described which removes this tail in measured spectra. The energy resolution can thereby be adapted for each part of the spectrum. Applications of the method to data taken at the LANSCE pulsed spallation source are presented.

  4. Measurement of cold neutron spectra using a model cryogenic moderator of the IBR-2M reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, S. A.; Kalinin, I. V.; Morozov, V. M.; Novikov, A. G.; Puchkov, A. V.; Chernikov, A. N.; Shabalin, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    The method and results of an experiment to determine the cold neutron spectrum from solid mesitylene at moderator temperatures of 10-50 K are presented. This study was performed at the DIN-2PI spectrometer of the IBR-2 reactor. The objective of the study was to verify the system of constants used in the Monte Carlo simulation of cryogenic neutron moderators of the IBR-2M reactor and to obtain the cold neutron yield as a function of the moderator temperature. Satisfactory agreement between the experimental and calculated neutron spectra at a mesitylene temperature of 20 K has been obtained; the ratio of cold neutron intensities at 10 and 50 K is ˜1.8.

  5. Measurement of the Surface and Underground Neutron Spectra with the UMD/NIST Fast Neutron Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, Thomas J.

    The typical fast neutron detector falls into one of two categories, Bonner sphere spectrometers and liquid scintillator proton recoil detectors. These two detector types have traditionally been used to measure fast neutrons at the surface and in low background environments. The cosmogenic neutron spectrum and flux is an important parameter for a number of experimental efforts, including procurement of low background materials and the prediction of electronic device faults. Fast neutrons can also cause problems for underground low-background experiments, through material activation or signals that mimic rare events. Current detector technology is not sufficient to properly characterize these backgrounds. To this end, the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology designed, developed, and deployed two Fast Neutron Spectrometers (FaNS) comprised of plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. The detectors are based upon capture-gated spectroscopy, a technique that demands a delayed coincidence between a neutron scatter and the resulting neutron capture after thermalization. This technique provides both particle identification and knowledge that the detected neutron fully thermalized. This improves background rejection capabilities and energy resolution. Presented are the design, development, and deployment of FaNS-1 and FaNS-2. Both detectors were characterized using standard fields at NIST, including calibrated 252Cf neutron sources and two monoenergetic neutron generators. Measurements of the surface fast neutron spectrum and flux have been made with both detectors, which are compared with previous measurements by traditional detectors. Additionally, FaNS-1 was deployed at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Ripplemead, VA. A measurement of the fast neutron spectrum and flux at KURF is presented as well. FaNS-2 is currently installed in a shallow underground laboratory where it is measuring the muon

  6. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    PubMed

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of

  7. Study of TFTR D-T neutron spectra using natural diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, A.L.; Krasilnikov, A.V., Gorelenkov, N.N.

    1996-12-31

    Three Natural Diamond Detector (NDD) based spectrometers have been used for neutron spectra measurement during Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) experiments using high power Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) and Ton Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in 1996. A 2-3 % energy resolution coupled with the high radiation resistance of NDDs (5 x 10{sup 14}n/cm{sup 2}) makes them ideal for measuring the D-T neutron spectra in the high radiation environment of TFTR tritium experiments. The compact size of the NDD made it possible to insert one of the detectors into one of the center channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator to provide a vertical view perpendicular to the vessel midplane, Two other detectors were placed inside shields in TFTR test cell and provide measurements of the neutrons having angles of emission of 110- 180{degrees} and 60-12-{degrees} with respect to the direction of the plasma current. By using a 0.25 {mu}s shaping time of the Ortec 673 spectroscopy amplifier we were able to accumulate useful spectrometry data at count rates up to 1.5 x 10{sup 3} counts/sec. To model the D- T neutron spectra measured by each of three NDD`s the Neutron Source post TRANSP (NST) code and semi-analytical model were developed. A set of D-T and D-D plasmas is analyzed for the dynamics of D-T neutron spectral broadening for each of three NDD cones of view. The application of three NDD based D-T neutron -spectrometer array demonstrated the anisotropy of the ion distribution function. and provided a mature of the dynamics of the effective ion temperatures for each detector view, and determined the tangential velocity of resonant tritons during ICRH.

  8. Analysis of neutron noise spectra using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, K. ); Uhrig, R.E. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1991-01-01

    Neural network architectures based on the back-propagation paradigm have been developed to recognize the features, and detect resonance shifts in, power spectral density (PSD) data. Our goal is to advance the state of the art in the application of noise analysis techniques to monitor nuclear reactor internals. The initial objectives have been to use PSD data, acquired over a period of about 2 years by PSDREC (power spectral density recognition system), to develop neural networks that are able to differentiate between normal neutron power spectral density data and anomalous spectral data, and detect significant shifts in the positions of spectral resonances while reducing the effect of small shifts. Neural network systems referred to in this paper as spectral feature detectors (SFDs) and integral network filters have been developed to meet these objectives. The performance of the SFDs is the subject of this paper. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Detailed parametrization of neutrino and gamma-ray energy spectra from high energy proton-proton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supanitsky, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma rays and neutrinos are produced as a result of proton-proton interactions that occur in different astrophysical contexts. The detection of these two types of messengers is of great importance for the study of different physical phenomena, related to nonthermal processes, taking place in different astrophysical scenarios. Therefore, the knowledge of the energy spectrum of these two types of particles, as a function of the incident proton energy, is essential for the interpretation of the observational data. In this paper, parametrizations of the energy spectra of gamma rays and neutrinos, originated in proton-proton collisions, are presented. The energy range of the incident protons considered extends from 102 to 108 GeV . The parametrizations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of proton-proton interactions performed with the hadronic interaction models QGSJET-II-04 and EPOS-LHC, which have recently been updated with the data taken by the Large Hadron Collider.

  10. Measurement of the charged particle spectra from neutron irradiated tissue-equivalent plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Earls, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    The charged particle spectra from the 49 MeV deuteron on beryllium neutron beam onto Shonka A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic has been measured as a function of off-axis angle from 10/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/. Particle detection was accomplished by silicon detectors in a detector telescope array. A ..delta..E-E algorithm was used to identify particles. Average particle energies for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles have been calculated and compared with calculations made by Wells. Certain discrepancies between Wells' slowing down spectra and the detected charged particle spectra have been observed.

  11. Energy spectra of the pneumatically positioned neutron sources at LLNL's Hazards control standards and calibration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1987-06-15

    The Hazards Control Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains a Standards and Calibration Laboratory that includes three neutron sources (two /sup 252/Cf and one /sup 238/PuBe that can be positioned pneumatically for irradiations. Ten moderators exist to modify the neutron energy spectra produced by these sources. The thicknesses and materials of these moderators are: 25-cm water; 5-, 10-, 15-, and 25-cm heavy water; 20-cm aluminum; and 2-, 5-, 10-, and 15-cm polyethylene. We used a multisphere spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at 2 m from both the PuBe source and the smaller Cf source, with the sources bare, and in all of the moderators. These data were reduced in 25 energy groups ranging from 0.25 eV to 16 MeV. Except for the 15-m polyethylene moderator, we also made measurements using a liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer. These data were reduced in 0.1-MeV increments from 0.5 to 12.5 MeV. Spectra from the measurements and from independent calculations are presented in tabular and graphic form. Dosimetric values, calculated from both the measured and calculated spectra, are also presented.

  12. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Senhou, N

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses. PMID:22257567

  13. Neutron fluences and energy spectra in the Cosmos-2044 biosatellite orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    Joint Soviet-American measurements of the neutron component of space radiation (SR) were carried out during the flight of the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos-2044. Neutron flux densities and differential energy spectra were measured inside and on the external surface of the spacecraft. Three energy intervals were employed: thermal (En < or = 0.2 eV), resonance (0.2 eV < En < 1.0 MeV) and fast (En > or = 1.0 MeV) neutrons. The first two groups were measured with U.S. 6LiF detectors, while fast neutrons were recorded both by U.S. fission foils and Soviet nuclear emulsions. Estimations were made of the contributions to absorbed and equivalent doses from each neutron energy interval and a correlation was presented between fast neutron fluxes, measured outside the satellite, and the phase of solar activity (SA). Average dose equivalent rates of 0.018 and 0.14 mrem d-1 were measured for thermal and resonance neutrons, respectively, outside the spacecraft. The corresponding values for fast neutrons were 3.3 (U.S.) and 1.8 (U.S.S.R.) mrem d-1. Inside the spacecraft, a value of 3.5 mrem d-1 was found.

  14. Neutron influences and energy spectra in the Cosmos-2044 biosatellite orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.; Rshtuni, Sh. B.; Benton, E, V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Joint Soviet-American measurements of the neutron component of space radiation (SR) were carried out during the flight of the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos-2044. Neutron flux densities and differential energy spectra were measured inside and on the external surface of the spacecraft. Three energy intervals were employed: thermal (E(sub n) less than or equal to 0.2 eV), resonance (0.2 eV less than E(sub n) less than 1.0 MeV) and fast (E(sub n) greater than or equal to 1.0 MeV) neutrons. The first two groups were measured with U.S. (6)LiF detectors, while fast neutrons were recorded both by U.S. fission foils and Soviet nuclear emulsions. Estimations were made of the contributions to absorbed and equivalent doses from each neutron energy interval and a correlation was presented between fast neutron fluxes, measured outside the satellite, and the phase of solar activity (SA). Average dose equivalent rates of 0.018 and 0.14 mrem d(exp -1) were measured for thermal and resonance neutrons, respectively, outside the spacecraft. The corresponding values for fast neutrons were 3.3 (U.S.) and 1.8 (U.S.S.R.) mrem d(exp -1). Inside the spacecraft, a value of 3.5 mrem d(exp -1) was found.

  15. Unfolding neutron spectra obtained from BS-TLD system using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Santos, J A L; Silva, E R; Ferreira, T A E; Vilela, E C

    2012-12-01

    Due to the variability of neutron spectrum within the same environment, it is essential that the spectral distribution as a function of energy should be characterized. The precise information allows radiological quantities establishment related to that spectrum, but it is necessary that a spectrometric system covers a large interval of energy and an unfolding process is appropriate. This paper proposes use of a technique of Artificial Intelligence (AI) called genetic algorithm (GA), which uses bio-inspired mathematical models with the implementation of a specific matrix to unfolding data obtained from a combination of TLDs embedded in a BS system to characterize the neutron spectrum as a function of energy. The results obtained with this method were in accordance with reference spectra, thus enabling this technique to unfold neutron spectra with the BS-TLD system. PMID:22963980

  16. The effects of boron on the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of alanine irradiated with thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesielski, B.; Wielopolski, L.

    1995-10-01

    The effects of boric acid admixture on the intensity and line structure of EPR spectra of free radicals produced in alanine by thermal neutrons are presented. The EPR signal enhancement, up to a factor of 40 depending on the boron concentration, is related to additional energy deposition in alanine crystals by the disintegration products resulting from the capture of a thermal neutron by boron, {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li. The changes in the shape of the EPR spectra observed by changing the microwave power are due to the differences in the microwave power saturation of the free radicals produced by a low-LET radiation and those produced by the high-LET components of the radiation after the neutron capture reaction. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Rotational Corrections to Neutron-star Radius Measurements from Thermal Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauböck, Michi; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the rotational broadening in the observed thermal spectra of neutron stars spinning at moderate rates in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. These calculations accurately account for the effects of the second-order Doppler boosts as well as for the oblate shapes and the quadrupole moments of the neutron stars. We find that fitting the spectra and inferring the bolometric fluxes under the assumption that a star is not rotating causes an underestimate of the inferred fluxes and, thus, radii. The correction depends on the stellar spin, mass, radius, and the observer's inclination. For a 10 km, 1.4 M ⊙ neutron star spinning at 600 Hz, the rotational correction to the flux is ~1%-4%, while for a 15 km neutron star with the same spin period, the correction ranges from 2% for pole-on sources to 12% for edge-on sources. We calculate the inclination-averaged corrections to inferred radii as a function of the neutron-star radius and mass and provide an empirical formula for the corrections. For realistic neutron-star parameters (1.4 M ⊙, 12 km, 600 Hz), the stellar radius is on the order of 4% larger than the radius inferred under the assumption that the star is not spinning.

  18. ROTATIONAL CORRECTIONS TO NEUTRON-STAR RADIUS MEASUREMENTS FROM THERMAL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bauböck, Michi; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2015-01-20

    We calculate the rotational broadening in the observed thermal spectra of neutron stars spinning at moderate rates in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. These calculations accurately account for the effects of the second-order Doppler boosts as well as for the oblate shapes and the quadrupole moments of the neutron stars. We find that fitting the spectra and inferring the bolometric fluxes under the assumption that a star is not rotating causes an underestimate of the inferred fluxes and, thus, radii. The correction depends on the stellar spin, mass, radius, and the observer's inclination. For a 10 km, 1.4 M {sub ☉} neutron star spinning at 600 Hz, the rotational correction to the flux is ∼1%-4%, while for a 15 km neutron star with the same spin period, the correction ranges from 2% for pole-on sources to 12% for edge-on sources. We calculate the inclination-averaged corrections to inferred radii as a function of the neutron-star radius and mass and provide an empirical formula for the corrections. For realistic neutron-star parameters (1.4 M {sub ☉}, 12 km, 600 Hz), the stellar radius is on the order of 4% larger than the radius inferred under the assumption that the star is not spinning.

  19. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a quasiparticle random-phase approximation-Hauser-Feshbach model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Moeller, P.; Wilson, W. B.

    2008-11-15

    Theoretical {beta}-delayed-neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after {beta} decay to the granddaughter residual are more accurately calculated than in previous evaluations, including all the microscopic nuclear structure information, such as a Gamow-Teller strength distribution and discrete states in the granddaughter. The calculated delayed-neutron spectra agree reasonably well with those evaluations in the ENDF decay library, which are based on experimental data. The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors.

  20. Current Issues in Nuclear Data Evaluation Methodology: {sup 235}U Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra and Multiplicity for Thermal Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Trkov, A.; Capote, R.; Pronyaev, V.G.

    2015-01-15

    Issues in evaluation methodology of the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) and neutron multiplicity for the thermal-neutron-induced fission of the {sup 235}U are discussed. The inconsistency between the experimental differential and integral data is addressed. By using differential data as ”shape data” good consistency was achieved between available sets of differential data. Integral dosimetry data have been used to define the PFNS slope at high outgoing neutron energies, where the quality of the differential data is poor. The inclusion into the fit of measured integral (spectrum-averaged) cross sections had a very small impact in the region where differential PFNS data are abundant and accurate, but removed the discrepancy with integral data at higher neutron emission energies. All experimental data are consistently fitted giving a PFNS average energy of 2.008 MeV. The impact on criticality prediction of the newly evaluated PFNS was tested. The highly enriched {sup 235}U solution assemblies with high leakage HEU-SOL-THERM-001 and HEU-SOL-THERM-009 benchmarks are the most sensitive to the PFNS. Criticality calculations for those solutions show a significant increase in reactivity if the average neutron energy of the fission neutrons is reduced from the ENDF/B-VI.5 value of 2.03 MeV. The proposed reduction of the PFNS average energy by 1.1% can be compensated by reducing the average number of neutrons per fission ν{sup ¯} at the thermal energy to the Gwin et al. measured value. The simple least-squares PFNS fit was confirmed by a more sophisticated combined fit of differential PFNS data for {sup 233,235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 252}Cf nuclides with the generalised least-squares method using the GMA and GANDR codes.

  1. Current Issues in Nuclear Data Evaluation Methodology: 235U Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra and Multiplicity for Thermal Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trkov, A.; Capote, R.; Pronyaev, V. G.

    2015-01-01

    Issues in evaluation methodology of the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) and neutron multiplicity for the thermal-neutron-induced fission of the 235U are discussed. The inconsistency between the experimental differential and integral data is addressed. By using differential data as "shape data" good consistency was achieved between available sets of differential data. Integral dosimetry data have been used to define the PFNS slope at high outgoing neutron energies, where the quality of the differential data is poor. The inclusion into the fit of measured integral (spectrum-averaged) cross sections had a very small impact in the region where differential PFNS data are abundant and accurate, but removed the discrepancy with integral data at higher neutron emission energies. All experimental data are consistently fitted giving a PFNS average energy of 2.008 MeV. The impact on criticality prediction of the newly evaluated PFNS was tested. The highly enriched 235U solution assemblies with high leakage HEU-SOL-THERM-001 and HEU-SOL-THERM-009 benchmarks are the most sensitive to the PFNS. Criticality calculations for those solutions show a significant increase in reactivity if the average neutron energy of the fission neutrons is reduced from the ENDF/B-VI.5 value of 2.03 MeV. The proposed reduction of the PFNS average energy by 1.1% can be compensated by reducing the average number of neutrons per fission νbar at the thermal energy to the Gwin et al. measured value. The simple least-squares PFNS fit was confirmed by a more sophisticated combined fit of differential PFNS data for 233,235U, 239Pu and 252Cf nuclides with the generalised least-squares method using the GMA and GANDR codes.

  2. Transport analysis of measured neutron energy spectra in a graphite stack with a collimated deuterium-tritium neutron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tsechanski, A.; Ofek, R.; Goldfeld, A.; Shani, G.

    1989-02-01

    The Ben-Gurion University measurements of neutron energy spectra in a graphite stack, resulting from the scattering of 14.7-MeV neutrons streaming through a 6-cm-diam collimator in a 121-cm-thick paraffin wall, have been used as a benchmark for the compatability and accuracy of discrete ordinates, P/sub n/, and transport calculations and as a tool for fusion reactor neutronics. The transport analysis has been carried out with the DOT 4.2 discrete ordinates code and with cross sections processed with the NJOY code. Most of the parameters affecting the accuracy of the flux and L system scattering cross sections in the P/sub n/ approximation, the quadrature set employed, and the energy multigroup structure. First, a spectrum calculated with DOT 4.2, with a detector located on the axis of the system, was compared with a spectrum calculated with the MCNP Monte Carlo code, which was a preliminary verification of the DOT 4.2 results. Both calculated spectra were in good agreement. Next, the DOT 4.2 calculations were compared with the measured spectra. The comparison showed that the discrepancies between the measurements and the calculations increase as the distance between the detector and the system axis increases. This trend indicates that when the flux is determined mainly by multiple scatterings, a more divided multigroup structure should be employed.

  3. Neutron spectrum measurements using proton recoil proportional counters: results of measurements of leakage spectra for the Little Boy assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of degraded fission-neutron spectra using recoil proportional counters are done routinely for studies involving fast reactor mockups. The same techniques are applicable to measurements of neutron spectra required for personnel dosimetry in fast neutron environments. A brief discussion of current applications of these methods together with the results of a measurement made on the LITTLE BOY assembly at Los Alamos are here described.

  4. Vibrational spectra of light and heavy water with application to neutron cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, J. I. Marquez; Granada, J. R.; Malaspina, D. C.

    2013-07-14

    The design of nuclear reactors and neutron moderators require a good representation of the interaction of low energy (E < 1 eV) neutrons with hydrogen and deuterium containing materials. These models are based on the dynamics of the material, represented by its vibrational spectrum. In this paper, we show calculations of the frequency spectrum for light and heavy water at room temperature using two flexible point charge potentials: SPC-MPG and TIP4P/2005f. The results are compared with experimental measurements, with emphasis on inelastic neutron scattering data. Finally, the resulting spectra are applied to calculation of neutron scattering cross sections for these materials, which were found to be a significant improvement over library data.

  5. Neutron irradiation of superconductors and damage energy scaling of different neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, P. A.; Weber, H. W.; Guinan, M. W.; Birtcher, R. C.; Brown, B. S.; Greenwood, L. R.

    1985-08-01

    Three different neutron sources were used to irradiate identical sets of NbTi superconductors up to about half the lifetime dose of a superconducting magnet in a fusion reactor. Based on a careful source characterization of the TRIGA Mark-II reactor in Vienna, the spallation neutron source IPNS at Argonne and the 14 MeV neutron source RTNS-II at Livermore, the damage energy cross sections were calculated for four different types of NbTi alloys (42, 46.5, 49 and 54 wt % Ti). The experimental results on the variations of critical current densities j sub c with neutron dose are found to scale within the experimental uncertainties with the appropriate damage energy cross sections. This first explicit proof of damage energy scaling for j sub c-variations in superconductors is considered to be most valuable for the evaluation of radiation damage in superconductors under fusion reactor conditions.

  6. The LANL/LLNL Program to Measure Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, Robert; Wu, Ching Yen; Lee, Hye Young; Taddeucci, Terry; Mosby, Shea; O'Donnell, John; Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Mattew; Ullmann, John; Nelson, Ronald; Wender, Stephen; White, Morgan; Solomon, Clell; Neudecker, Denise; Talou, Patrick; Rising, Michael; Bucher, Brian; Buckner, Matthew; Henderson, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Accurate data on the spectrum of neutrons emitted in neutron-induced fission are needed for applications and for a better understanding of the fission process. At LANSCE we have made important progress in understanding systematic uncertainties and in obtaining data for 235U on the low-energy part of the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS), a particularly difficult region because down-scattered neutrons go in this direction. We use a double time-of-flight technique to determine energies of incoming and outgoing neutrons. With data acquisition via waveform digitizers, accidental coincidences between fission chamber and neutron detector are measured to high statistical accuracy and then subtracted from measured events. Monte Carlo simulations with high performance computers have proven to be essential in the design to minimize neutron scattering and in calculating detector response. Results from one of three approaches to analyzing the data will be presented. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration and Office of Nuclear Physics.

  7. An integral test of the inelastic cross sections of Pb and Mo using measured neutron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.; Ford, C. H.; Wrights, G. N.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of measurements and calculations of fast neutron spectra from a radioactive neutron source inside spheres of Mo or Pb and from a cylindrical reactor containing a thick Pb or Mo reflector are used as a test of ENDF cross sections. The sphere leakage spectra were measured at a sphere-to-spectrometer distance of 2 meters using a 54 Ci spherical Am-Be neutron source. Reactor leakage spectrum measurements were made at the surface of the ZP-1 reactor when bare, with a Pb radial reflector 21 cm thick, and with a metallic Mo radial reflector 10 cm thick. In the case of the thin Mo sphere there is agreement between the calculation and measurement. The Pb calculation is much lower than the measurement except at the highest neutron energy. Two-dimensional calculations of reactor spectra result indicate that the reactor source is reasonably well known. Significant differences in leakage spectrum shape for both Mo and Pb reflectors suggest that there are large uncertainties in the inelastic cross sections for Pb and some for Mo.

  8. Out-of-field neutron and leakage photon exposures and the associated risk of second cancers in high-energy photon radiotherapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Takam, R; Bezak, E; Marcu, L G; Yeoh, E

    2011-10-01

    Determination and understanding of out-of-field neutron and photon doses in accelerator-based radiotherapy is an important issue since linear accelerators operating at high energies (>10 MV) produce secondary radiations that irradiate parts of the patient's anatomy distal to the target region, potentially resulting in detrimental health effects. This paper provides a compilation of data (technical and clinical) reported in the literature on the measurement and Monte Carlo simulations of peripheral neutron and photon doses produced from high-energy medical linear accelerators and the reported risk and/or incidence of second primary cancer of tissues distal to the target volume. Information in the tables facilitates easier identification of (1) the various methods and measurement techniques used to determine the out-of-field neutron and photon radiations, (2) reported linac-dependent out-of-field doses, and (3) the risk/incidence of second cancers after radiotherapy due to classic and modern treatment methods. Regardless of the measurement technique and type of accelerator, the neutron dose equivalent per unit photon dose ranges from as low as 0.1 mSv/Gy to as high as 20.4 mSv/Gy. This radiation dose potentially contributes to the induction of second primary cancer in normal tissues outside the treated area. PMID:21756083

  9. Effects of Magnetic Field Topology on Secondary Neutron Spectra in MagLIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in Magneto-Inertial Fusion schemes requires both inertial and magnetic confinement of the fuel and charged fusion products. Recent theoretical and experimental work has demonstrated the confinement of charged fusion products by magnetic fields in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments. This confinement can be inferred from the ratio of secondary to primary neutron yields and the shape of secondary neutron spectra. In this work we investigate the effects of magnetic field topology on the shape of secondary neutron spectra. The MagLIF design has a cylindrical geometry and includes both axial and azimuthal magnetic fields. The azimuthal field is initially in the liner surrounding the fuel but instability growth may cause it to penetrate into the fuel. Charged fusion products (such as tritons or alpha particles) that are isotropically emitted and then confined by an axial field will flow parallel and anti-parallel to the field with equal intensities. In the case of tritons, this motion results in a secondary neutron spectrum emitted in the axial direction that is symmetric. However, in an azimuthal field such particles exhibit singular orbits and there is a net ion drift along the axis. This ion drift can cause the secondary neutron spectrum to be asymmetric. We examine the effects on the spectrum shape of confinement by a combination of axial and azimuthal fields.

  10. Thermal-neutron-capture prompt-gamma emission spectra of representative coals. [1. 5 to 11 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C L; Olson, I K

    1981-12-01

    Prompt gamma ray emission spectra have been calculated from 1.5 to 11 MeV for a wide range of coal compositions exposed to a thermal neutron flux. These include contributions to the spectra from all of the major and minor elements present in the coals. Characteristics of the spectra are discussed and correlated with the coal compositions.