Science.gov

Sample records for high-energy proton accelerator

  1. Laser-Produced and Accelerated High Energy Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Ultra-low emittance, multi-MeV proton beams have recently been produced by the interaction of high-intensity short-pulse lasers with thin metallic foils [1]. The acceleration process proceeds in two steps. First the laser ponderomotively accelerates huge, MA currents of ˜MeV electrons which propagate through the foil and form a dense relativistic electron sheath on the non-irradiated rear surface. This sheath produces an electrostatic field >10^12 V/m that ionizes the surface atoms almost instantaneously, forming a ˜1 nm thick ion layer which, together with the electron sheath, resembles a virtual cathode. The ions are accelerated initially normal to the foil surface, followed by a diverging plasma expansion phase driven by the electron plasma pressure. By structuring the rear surface of the foil, we have succeeded to produce modulations in the transverse phase space of the ions, which resemble fiducial ``beamlets'' within the envelope of the expanding plasma. This allows one to image the initial accelerating sheath, and map the plasma expansion of the beam envelope, to fully reconstruct the transverse phase space. We find that for protons of 10 MeV, the normalized transverse rms emittance is less than 0.004 π mm.mrad [1], i.e. 100-fold better than typical RF accelerators and at substantially higher ion currents exceeding 10 kA. Recent results will be reported on stripping the electrons while maintaining the low emittance from experiments at the LULI 100 TW laser, and theoretical estimates of the lowest emittance which can be expected based on ion heating mechanisms during the initial sheath formation and ion acceleration processes, will be presented. [1] T.E. Cowan, J. Fuchs, H. Ruhl et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004).

  2. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, Sayed H.; Cossairt, J.Donald; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  3. Hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration as a basis for producing high-energy proton bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Dover, N. P.; Najmudin, Z.

    2012-11-01

    The production of high-energy protons by the ‘hole-boring’ radiation pressure acceleration (HB-RPA) mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration is examined in the case where the plasma has a density less than a0nc in 2D. Previously this was examined in 1D (Robinson 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 056701) and was motivated by previous predictions of the non-linear criterion for an ultra-intense laser pulse to penetrate a dense plasma. By reducing the density well below a0nc the proton energies achieved increases considerably, thus leading to proton energies >100 MeV at laser intensities close to current capabilities. The results show that good quality proton beams with proton energies >100 MeV can be obtained via HB-RPA using targets with densities in the range 12-20nc and laser intensities in the range 5 × 1021-3 × 1022 W cm-2.

  4. Microstructured snow targets for high energy quasi-monoenergetic proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Baspaly, A.; Pomerantz, I.; Abricht, F.; Branzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Steinke, S.; Andreev, A.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Zigler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Compact size sources of high energy protons (50-200MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications 1-8. One promising approach is the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) scheme 9,10, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser 11. In general, laser intensity exceeding 1018 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Another approach is the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) scheme which is a more efficient acceleration scheme but requires an extremely clean pulse with contrast ratio of above 10-10. Increasing the energy of the accelerated protons using modest energy laser sources is a very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions 12,13 but no significant enhancement of the accelerated proton energy was measured. Here we report on the generation of up to 20MeV by a modest (5TW) laser system interacting with a microstructured snow target deposited on a Sapphire substrate. This scheme relax also the requirement of high contrast ratio between the pulse and the pre-pulse, where the latter produces the highly structured plasma essential for the interaction process. The plasma near the tip of the snow target is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and enhanced charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. PIC simulations of this targets reproduce the experimentally measured energy scaling and predict the generation of 150 MeV protons from laser power of 100TW laser system18.

  5. Shielding Benchmark Experiments Through Concrete and Iron with High-Energy Proton and Heavy Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Sasaki, M.; Nunomiya, T.; Nakao, N.; Kim, E.; Kurosawa, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Iwase, H.; Uwamino, Y.; Shibata, T.; Ito, S.; Fukumura, A.; Perry, D. R.; Wright, P.

    The deep penetration of neutrons through thick shield has become a very serious problem in the shielding design of high-energy, high-intensity accelerator facility. In the design calculation, the Monte Carlo transport calculation through thick shields has large statistical errors and the basic nuclear data and model used in the existing Monte Carlo codes are not well evaluated because of very few experimental data. It is therefore strongly needed to do the deep penetration experiment as shielding benchmark for investigating the calculation accuracy. Under this circumference, we performed the following two shielding experiments through concrete and iron, one with a 800 MeV proton accelerator of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), England and the other with a high energy heavy iron accelerator of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Here these two shielding benchmark experiments are outlined.

  6. Temporal relationship between high-energy proton acceleration and magnetic field changes during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Victoria; Yushkov, Boris

    Understanding of the association of the magnetic field evolution in the corona and the temporal evolution of electromagnetic emissions produced by the accelerated particles during a solar flare can provide information about the nature of the energy-release process and its location. Recent high-spatial-resolution observations in HXR, UV and radio emissions allow one to study in detail a structure of two-ribbon flare site. According to these observations, the flare process can be divided into two different intervals with different temporal evolution of morphological structure: loop contraction during impulsive phase and subsequent loop expansion. Оn the other hand, the appearance of high-energy protons (with energy >300 MeV - an energy threshold of the pion production) in the solar atmosphere can be revealed from an emerging pion-decay component of high-energy gamma-ray emission. The present work is based on comparison of measurements of high-energy gamma-rays performed with the SONG detector onboard the CORONAS-F mission and reported observations of magnetic field evolution, such as HXR foot points (FP) separation and flare shear temporal behavior, or motion of UV/radio loops. We reliably identified the pion-decay component of gamma-ray emission in the course of five events attended with suitable spatial observations, namely, 2001 August 25, 2002 August 24, 2003 October 28, 2003 October 29, and 2005 January 20, and determined its onset time. We found that in these events the pion-decay emission occurred when the distance between conjugated foot-points of flare loops ceased to decrease and began to increase, i.e. changed from shrinkage to expansion. This result leads to the conclusion that the most efficient proton acceleration up to >300 MeV coincided in time with the radical reconfiguration of the magnetic field in the flare site. Earlier we found that the pion-decay emission onset in the 2003 October 28 flare was close to the time of maximum change rate of the

  7. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from hemisphere-cone targets by high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Foord, M E; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; McLean, H; Patel, P K; Beg, F N

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration and focusing of high-energy proton beams from fast-ignition (FI) -related hemisphere-cone assembled targets have been numerically studied by hybrid particle-in-cell simulations and compared with those from planar-foil and open-hemisphere targets. The whole physical process including the laser-plasma interaction has been self-consistently modeled for 15 ps, at which time the protons reach asymptotic motion. It is found that the achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradients in the co-moving hot electrons, which induce a transverse defocusing electric field that bends proton trajectories near the axis. For the advanced hemisphere-cone target, the flow of hot electrons along the cone wall induces a local transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement in proton focusing; however, it leads to a significant loss of longitudinal sheath potential, reducing the total conversion efficiency from laser to protons. PMID:23410447

  8. Isochoric heating of matter by laser-accelerated high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Atzeni, S.; Benuzzi, A.; Brambrink, E.; Esposito, M.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Schreiber, J.; Schiavi, A.; Audebert, P.

    2006-06-01

    We describe an experiment on isochoric heating of matter by intense laser-accelerated protons. The experiment was performed using the LULI 100 TW facility with 15-20 J on target energy and > 1019 W.cm - 2 maximum focused intensity. Focusing the laser on a 10 micron thick Au foil, we accelerated forward a laminar proton beam with a maximum energy of 16 MeV. This proton beam irradiated and heated a secondary target positioned after a variable vacuum gap. The heating was diagnosed by 1D and 2D time-resolved measurements of the optical self-emission of the heated target rear-surface. Detailed results as a function of the Z and the thickness of the secondary target as well as analysis, including a full modelling of the target heating with a 2D hydro-code (DUED) coupled to a proton energy deposition code, were obtained. We have also studied the efficiency of heating as a function of the primary target topology, i.e. either flat, which results in a diverging proton beam, or curved, which has the ability of focusing partly the proton beam.

  9. Laser-Foil Acceleration of High-Energy Protons in Small-Scale Plasma Gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, J.; Audebert, P.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Grismayer, T.; Mora, P.; D'Humieres, E.; Sentoku, Y.; Antici, P.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.; Pipahl, A.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.

    2007-07-06

    Proton beams laser accelerated from thin foils are studied for various plasma gradients on the foil rear surface. The beam maximum energy and spectral slope reduce with the gradient scale length, in good agreement with numerical simulations. The results also show that the jxB mechanism determines the temperature of the electrons driving the ion expansion. Future ion-driven fast ignition of fusion targets will use multikilojoule petawatt laser pulses, the leading part of which will induce target preheat. Estimates based on the data show that this modifies by less than 10% the ion beam parameters.

  10. Laser-foil acceleration of high-energy protons in small-scale plasma gradients.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, J; Cecchetti, C A; Borghesi, M; Grismayer, T; d'Humières, E; Antici, P; Atzeni, S; Mora, P; Pipahl, A; Romagnani, L; Schiavi, A; Sentoku, Y; Toncian, T; Audebert, P; Willi, O

    2007-07-01

    Proton beams laser accelerated from thin foils are studied for various plasma gradients on the foil rear surface. The beam maximum energy and spectral slope reduce with the gradient scale length, in good agreement with numerical simulations. The results also show that the jxB mechanism determines the temperature of the electrons driving the ion expansion. Future ion-driven fast ignition of fusion targets will use multikilojoule petawatt laser pulses, the leading part of which will induce target preheat. Estimates based on the data show that this modifies by less than 10% the ion beam parameters. PMID:17678159

  11. Isochoric heating of matter by laser-accelerated high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julien; Mancic, Ana; Robiche, Jerome; Antici, Patrizio; Lancia, Livia; Audebert, Patrick; Combis, Patrick; Renaudin, Patrick; Kimura, Tomoaki; Kodama, Ryosuke; Nakatsutsumi, Motoaki

    2008-04-01

    Producing matter at a high temperature (1-25 eV) and solid density is of prime interest for fundamental plasma physics or ICF. The use of laser-based high energy proton beams to achieve such state of matter is interesting since they are short (< 1 ps) and they deposit their energy volumetrically; thus can heat, before they expand, much thicker samples than allowed using laser-heating. We performed, using two intense short pulses of the LULI 100 TW facility, experiments to characterize the achieved state of matter, coupled to a detailed hydro-modeling. A laser-generated proton beam irradiated and heated a secondary target positioned after a vacuum gap. Three diagnostics were used: (i) 1D time-resolved optical self-emission of the heated target rear-surface at two wavelengths, (ii) time-resolved interferometry of a chirped probe beam reflecting off the heated target rear-surface, (iii) x-ray absorption spectroscopy through the heated target using a laser-produced backlighter detecting its Kα-edge softening.

  12. High energy plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.

    1985-05-01

    Colinear intense laser beams ..omega../sub 0/, kappa/sub 0/ and ..omega../sub 1/, kappa/sub 1/ shone on a plasma with frequency separation equal to the electron plasma frequency ..omega../sub pe/ are capable of creating a coherent large longitudinal electric field E/sub L/ = mc ..omega../sub pe//e of the order of 1GeV/cm for a plasma density of 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ through the laser beat excitation of plasma oscillations. Accompanying favorable and deleterious physical effects using this process for a high energy beat-wave accelerator are discussed: the longitudinal dephasing, pump depletion, the transverse laser diffraction, plasma turbulence effects, self-steepening, self-focusing, etc. The basic equation, the driven nonlinear Schroedinger equation, is derived to describe this system. Advanced accelerator concepts to overcome some of these problems are proposed, including the plasma fiber accelerator of various variations. An advanced laser architecture suitable for the beat-wave accelerator is suggested. Accelerator physics issues such as the luminosity are discussed. Applications of the present process to the current drive in a plasma and to the excitation of collective oscillations within nuclei are also discussed.

  13. Characterization of warm dense matter produced by laser-accelerated high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Fuchs, J.; Mancic, A.; Robiche, J.; Renaudin, P.; Combis, P.; Dorchies, F.; Harmand, M.; Maynard, G.; Vassaux, J.; Mora, P.; Antici, P.; Fourmaux, S.; Audebert, P.

    2008-11-01

    Producing warm dense plasmas (WDM: solid density, few eV ˜ few 10s eV) is of interest for fundamental plasma physics or ICF. Laser-produced proton heating is of interest since they are short (<1ps) and deposit their energy volumetrically. Experiments were performed using the LULI 100 TW facility to create and characterize WDM. We used, (i) 2D time-resolved optical self-emission of the heated target, (ii) surface expansion velocity measurement through phase measurements of a reflecting probe beam, and (iii) x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We showed that we could produce quasi-uniform heating of solids, as suited for e.g. EoS measurements. Time-resolved solid-liquid-plasma transition has been measured, as well as energy-loss of MeV protons in warm dense plasmas.

  14. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, C. M.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Lancaster, K. L.; Musgrave, I. O.; Spindloe, C.; Winstone, T.; Wyatt, D.; Neely, D.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Deppert, O.; Batani, D.; Davies, J. R.; Hassan, S. M.; Tatarakis, M.; and others

    2014-02-24

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5–30 MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5 μm-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ∼1 ps.

  15. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  16. On the retention of high-energy protons and nuclei with charges Z or equal to 2 in large solar flares after the process of their acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volodichev, N. N.; Kuzhevsky, B. M.; Nechaev, O. Y.; Savenko, I. A.

    1985-01-01

    Data which suggest that the protons with energies of up to several GeV should be retained on the Sun after the process of their acceleration are presented. The protons are on the average retained for 15 min, irrespectively of the solar flare heliolatitude and of the accelerated particle energy ranging from 100 MeV to several GeV. It is suggested that the particles are retained in a magnetic trap formed in a solar active region. No Z or = 2 nuclei of solar origin during large solar flares. The absence of the 500 MeV/nucleon nuclei with Z or = 2 may be due to their retention in the magnetic trap which also retains the high-energy protons. During the trapping time the approx. 500 MeV/nucleon nuclei with Z or = 2 may escape due to nuclear interactions and ionization loss.

  17. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, E.

    2004-04-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather more broadly--at certain points--with the explicit ''struggle for the hearts and minds of

  18. High energy protons generation by two sequential laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin

    2015-04-15

    The sequential proton acceleration by two laser pulses of relativistic intensity is proposed to produce high energy protons. In the scheme, a relativistic super-Gaussian (SG) laser pulse followed by a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) pulse irradiates dense plasma attached by underdense plasma. A proton beam is produced from the target and accelerated in the radiation pressure regime by the short SG pulse and then trapped and re-accelerated in a special bubble driven by the LG pulse in the underdense plasma. The advantages of radiation pressure acceleration and LG transverse structure are combined to achieve the effective trapping and acceleration of protons. In a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, protons of 6.7 GeV are obtained from a 2 × 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} SG laser pulse and a LG pulse at a lower peak intensity.

  19. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  20. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  1. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1989-10-01

    In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community.

  2. Acceleration of polarized proton at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y Y

    1980-01-01

    The unexpected importance of high energy spin effects and the success of the ZGS in correcting many intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances led us to attempt to accelerate polarized protons in the AGS. A collaborative effort is underway by the groups in Argonne, Michigan, Rice, Yale and Brookhaven to improve and modify the AGS to accelerate polarized protons. With the appropriate funding the first polarized proton acceleration at the AGS should be possible by 1983.

  3. ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S

    2000-04-07

    The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.

  4. Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energies: Theory, phenomenology, and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tai Tsun.

    1990-01-01

    This is a brief review of the progress in the understanding, during the past twenty years, of hadronic elastic scattering near the forward direction at high energies. On the basis of quantum gauge field theories, the Pomeron is found to be a branch cut above 1. Using the physical picture that this result implies, phenomenology for proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is constructed. Two noteworthy features are that, at high energies, both the total cross section and the ratio of the integrated elastic cross section to the total cross section to the total cross section are increasing functions of the center-of-mass energy. Detailed predictions are given for the elastic differential cross sections, Coulomb interference and the ratios of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitudes. These predictions have been extensively and accurately confirmed by experiments, and have also been given both for future experiments on existing accelerators and for experiments on future accelerators. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energies: Theory, phenomenology, and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tai Tsun

    1990-12-31

    This is a brief review of the progress in the understanding, during the past twenty years, of hadronic elastic scattering near the forward direction at high energies. On the basis of quantum gauge field theories, the Pomeron is found to be a branch cut above 1. Using the physical picture that this result implies, phenomenology for proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is constructed. Two noteworthy features are that, at high energies, both the total cross section and the ratio of the integrated elastic cross section to the total cross section to the total cross section are increasing functions of the center-of-mass energy. Detailed predictions are given for the elastic differential cross sections, Coulomb interference and the ratios of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitudes. These predictions have been extensively and accurately confirmed by experiments, and have also been given both for future experiments on existing accelerators and for experiments on future accelerators. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Designing high energy accelerators under DOE's New Culture'' for environment and safety: An example, the Fermilab 150 GeV Main Injector proton synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, W.B.

    1991-05-01

    Fermilab has initiated a design for a new Main Injector (150 GeV proton synchrotron) to take the place of the current Main Ring accelerator. New Culture'' environmental and safety questions are having to be addressed. The paper will detail the necessary steps that have to be taken in order to obtain the permits which control the start of construction. Obviously these depend on site-specific circumstances, however some steps are universally applicable. In the example, floodplains and wetlands are affected and therefore the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance is a significant issue. The important feature is to reduce the relevant regulations to a concise set of easily understandable requirements. The effort required and the associated time line will be presented so that other new accelerator proposals can benefit from the experience gained from this example.

  7. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1994-08-01

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet.

  8. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  9. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  10. Process in high energy heavy ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinev, D.

    2009-03-01

    A review of processes that occur in high energy heavy ion acceleration by synchrotrons and colliders and that are essential for the accelerator performance is presented. Interactions of ions with the residual gas molecules/atoms and with stripping foils that deliberately intercept the ion trajectories are described in details. These interactions limit both the beam intensity and the beam quality. The processes of electron loss and capture lie at the root of heavy ion charge exchange injection. The review pays special attention to the ion induced vacuum pressure instability which is one of the main factors limiting the beam intensity. The intrabeam scattering phenomena which restricts the average luminosity of ion colliders is discussed. Some processes in nuclear interactions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions that could be dangerous for the performance of ion colliders are represented in the last chapter.

  11. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  12. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  13. PRaVDA: High Energy Physics towards proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T.

    2016-07-01

    Proton radiotherapy is an increasingly popular modality for treating cancers of the head and neck, and in paediatrics. To maximise the potential of proton radiotherapy it is essential to know the distribution, and more importantly the proton stopping powers, of the body tissues between the proton beam and the tumour. A stopping power map could be measured directly, and uncertainties in the treatment vastly reduce, if the patient was imaged with protons instead of conventional x-rays. Here we outline the application of technologies developed for High Energy Physics to provide clinical-quality proton Computed Tomography, in so reducing range uncertainties and enhancing the treatment of cancer.

  14. Proton acceleration in neutron star magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.; Katz, J. I.; Diamond, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    To explain the emission of TeV and PeV gamma rays from accreting X-ray binary sources, protons must be accelerated to several times the gamma-ray energy. It is shown here that at certain times, the plasma in the accretion column of the neutron star may form a deep enough pool that the top portion becomes unstable to convective motions in spite of the strong magnetic field. The resulting turbulence produces fluctuations in the strength of the magnetic field that travel up the accretion column, taking energy out to the region of the energetic protons. The protons resonantly absorb this energy and are accelerated to high energies. Including the synchrotron radiation losses of the protons, it is shown that they can be accelerated to energies that are high enough to explain the gamma-ray observations.

  15. "Espresso" Acceleration of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2015-10-01

    We propose that ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) above 1018 eV are produced in relativistic jets of powerful active galactic nuclei via an original mechanism, which we dub “espresso” acceleration: “seed” galactic CRs with energies ≲1017 eV that penetrate the jet sideways receive a “one-shot” boost of a factor of ∼Γ2 in energy, where Γ is the Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow. For typical jet parameters, a few percent of the CRs in the host galaxy can undergo this process, and powerful blazars with Γ ≳ 30 may accelerate UHECRs up to more than 1020 eV. The chemical composition of espresso-accelerated UHECRs is determined by that at the Galactic CR knee and is expected to be proton-dominated at 1018 eV and increasingly heavy at higher energies, in agreement with recent observations made at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  16. Relations Between Microwave Bursts and Near-Earth High-Energy Proton Enhancements and Their Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Kiselev, V. I.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Chertok, I. M.

    2015-10-01

    We further study the relations between parameters of bursts at 35 GHz recorded with the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters during 25 years and solar proton events (Grechnev et al. in Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 65, S4, 2013a). Here we address the relations between the microwave fluences at 35 GHz and near-Earth proton fluences above 100 MeV to find information on their sources and evaluate their diagnostic potential. The correlation between the microwave and proton fluences is pronouncedly higher than between their peak fluxes. This probably reflects a dependence of the total number of protons on the duration of the acceleration process. In events with strong flares, the correlation coefficients of high-energy proton fluences with microwave and soft X-ray fluences are higher than those with the speeds of coronal mass ejections. The results indicate a statistically larger contribution of flare processes to high-energy proton fluxes. Acceleration by shock waves seems to be less important at high energies in events associated with strong flares, although its contribution is probable and possibly prevails in weaker events. The probability of a detectable proton enhancement was found to directly depend on the peak flux, duration, and fluence of the 35 GHz burst, while the role of the Big Flare Syndrome might have been overestimated previously. Empirical diagnostic relations are proposed.

  17. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  18. Measurement of high energy resolution inelastic proton scattering at and close to zero degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, A.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Adachi, T.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Itahashi, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Popescu, L.; Rubio, B.; Saito, T.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Sasamoto, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Smit, F. D.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Zenhiro, J.

    2009-07-01

    Measurements of inelastic proton scattering with high energy resolution at forward scattering angles including 0∘ are described. High-resolution halo-free beams were accelerated by the cyclotron complex at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics. Instrumental background events were minimized using the high-quality beam. The remaining instrumental background events were eliminated by applying a background subtraction method. As a result, clean spectra were obtained even for a heavy target nucleus such as Pb208. A high energy resolution of 20 keV (FWHM) and a scattering angle resolution of ±0.6∘ were achieved at an incident proton energy of 295 MeV.

  19. Accelerated Hematopoietic Toxicity by High Energy 56Fe Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Trani, Daniela; Doiron, Kathryn; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Kolesnick, Richard; Cole, Michael F.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There is little information on the relative toxicity of highly charged (Z) high-energy (HZE) radiation in animal models compared to γ or x-rays, and the general assumption based on in vitro studies has been that acute toxicity is substantially greater. Methods C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon), and acute (within 30 d) toxicity compared to that of γ rays or protons (1 GeV). To assess relative hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity, the effects of 56Fe ions were compared to γ rays using complete blood count (CBC), bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (GM-CFU), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis in bone marrow, and intestinal crypt survival. Results Although onset was more rapid, 56Fe ions were only slightly more toxic than γ rays or protons with lethal dose (LD)50/30 (a radiation dose at which 50% lethality occurs at 30-day) values of 5.8, 7.25, and 6.8 Gy respectively with relative biologic effectiveness for 56Fe ions of 1.25 and 1.06 for protons. Conclusions 56Fe radiation caused accelerated and more severe hematopoietic toxicity. Early mortality correlated with more profound leukopenia and subsequent sepsis. Results indicate that there is selective enhanced toxicity to bone marrow progenitor cells, which are typically resistant to γ rays, and bone marrow stem cells, because intestinal crypt cells did not show increased HZE toxicity. PMID:22077279

  20. ACCELERATING HIGH-ENERGY PULSAR RADIATION CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Venter, C.; De Jager, O. C.

    2010-12-20

    Curvature radiation (CR) is believed to be a dominant mechanism for creating gamma-ray emission from pulsars and is emitted by relativistic particles that are constrained to move along curved magnetic field lines. Additionally, synchrotron radiation (SR) is expected to be radiated by both relativistic primaries (involving cyclotron resonant absorption of radio photons and re-emission of SR photons), or secondary electron-positron pairs (created by magnetic or photon-photon pair production processes involving CR gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere). When calculating these high-energy spectra, especially in the context of pulsar population studies where several millions of CR and SR spectra have to be generated, it is profitable to consider approximations that would save computational time without sacrificing too much accuracy. This paper focuses on one such approximation technique, and we show that one may gain significantly in computational speed while preserving the accuracy of the spectral results.

  1. Present and future high-energy accelerators for neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    There is an active neutrino program making use of the high-energy (larger than 50 GeV) accelerators both in USA at Fermilab with NuMI and at CERN in Europe with CNGS. In this paper we will review the prospects for high intensity high energy beams in those two locations during the next decade.

  2. Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Protons: The First 10 Minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Chee K.; Reames, Donald V.

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration at a parallel coronal shock is modeled with self-consistent Alfven wave excitation and shock transmission. 18 - 50 keV seed protons at 0.1% of plasma proton density are accelerated in 10 minutes to a power-law intensity spectrum rolling over at 300 MeV by a 2500km s-1 shock traveling outward from 3.5 solar radius, for typical coronal conditions and low ambient wave intensities. Interaction of high-energy protons of large pitch-angles with Alfven waves amplified by low-energy protons of small pitch angles is key to rapid acceleration. Shock acceleration is not significantly retarded by sunward streaming protons interacting with downstream waves. There is no significant second-order Fermi acceleration.

  3. High-energy protons from submicron-sized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Govras, E. A.; Brantov, A. V.; Popov, K. I.

    2012-07-11

    Improving of intensity contrast ratio of intense short laser pulses is making it possible to use submicron-sized targets, both spherical and plane, in the interest of proton acceleration for different applications. The way of improving of the ion beam quality is utilization of targets with two ion species - heavy ions (majority) and light ions, e.g. protons, (minority). Two different approaches, analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations (PIC) are presented for studying the characteristics of laser-triggered ions due to the Coulomb-like mechanism of particle acceleration from submicron-sized targets. The comparative analysis of explosions of heterogeneous (layered) and homogeneously mixed targets for production of best quality ion bunches has been performed. We also found the regime of anisotropic proton acceleration from spherical targets with light and heavy ions relevant to the experiments with submicron-diameter droplets from water spray target irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser pulse.

  4. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton-proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  5. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    collider and neutrino factory - summary of working group 2 / J. Galambos, R. Garoby and S. Geer -- Prospects for a very high power CW SRF linac / R. A. Rimmer -- Indian accelerator program for ADS applications / V. C. Sahni and P. Singh -- Ion accelerator activities at VECC (particularly, operating at low temperature) / R. K. Bhandari -- Chinese efforts in high intensity proton accelerators / S. Fu, J. Wang and S. Fang -- ADSR activity in the UK / R. J. Barlow -- ADS development in Japan / K. Kikuchi -- Project-X, SRF, and very large power stations / C. M. Ankenbrandt, R. P. Johnson and M. Popovic -- Power production and ADS / R. Raja -- Experimental neutron source facility based on accelerator driven system / Y. Gohar -- Transmutation mission / W. S. Yang -- Safety performance and issues / J. E. Cahalan -- Spallation target design for accelerator-driven systems / Y. Gohar -- Design considerations for accelerator transmutation of waste system / W. S. Yang -- Japan ADS program / T. Sasa -- Overview of members states' and IAEA activities in the field of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) / A. Stanculescu -- Linac for ADS applications - accelerator technologies / R. W. Garnett and R. L. Sheffield -- SRF linacs and accelerator driven sub-critical systems - summary working groups 3 & 4 / J. Delayen -- Production of Actinium-225 via high energy proton induced spallation of Thorium-232 / J. Harvey ... [et al.] -- Search for the electric dipole moment of Radium-225 / R. J. Holt, Z.-T. Lu and R. Mueller -- SRF linac and material science and medicine - summary of working group 5 / J. Nolen, E. Pitcher and H. Kirk.

  6. Measurements of the proton-air cross section with high energy cosmic ray experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Rasha

    2016-07-01

    Detecting Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) enables us to measure the proton-air inelastic cross section σinel p-air at energies that we are unable to access with particle accelerators. The proton-proton cross section σp-p is subsequently inferred from the proton-air cross section at these energies. UHECR experiments have been reportingon the proton-air inelastic cross section starting with the Fly's Eye in 1984 at √s =30 TeV and ending with the most recent result of the Telescope Array experiment at √s = 95 TeV in 2015. In this proceeding, I will summarize the most recent experimental results on the σinel p-air measurements from the UHECR experiments.

  7. Investigation of high-energy-proton effects in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Todosow, M.

    1997-12-01

    Specimens of 1100 aluminum were exposed to several fluences of 23.5-GeV protons at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Although this energy is above those currently being proposed for spallation-neutron applications, the results can be viewed as indicative of trends and other microstructural evolution with fluence that take place with high-energy proton exposures such as those associated with an increasing ratio of gas generation to dpa. TEM investigation showed significantly larger bubble size and lower density of bubbles compared with lower-energy proton results. Additional testing showed that the tensile strength increased with fluence as expected, but the microhardness decreased, a result for which an intepretation is still under investigation.

  8. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  9. About multiple scattering of high energy protons in crystal deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taratin, A. M.; Scandale, W.

    2015-07-01

    The process of multiple scattering of high energy protons in a silicon crystal at its amorphous orientation was studied by simulation of proton trajectories in the model of binary collisions and by a straight simulation of the sequences of proton collisions with atoms when their impact parameters are randomly and uniformly distributed on the symmetry cell for a given crystallography direction. The value of the RMS deflection of multiple scattering obtained by the simulation is in a good agreement with the experiment and more than 15% larger than it follows from the Moliere theory. The obtained RMS deflection used in the Gaussian approach of multiple scattering well describes dechanneling of protons in the frame of the planar potential model. Different number of proton collisions with atoms occurs along the same crystal length for different crystal orientations. However, the change of the collision number is compensated by the corresponding change of the mean square deflection in a single collision. Therefore, multiple scattering is the same for different crystal orientations. The generator of multiple scattering for amorphous crystal orientations was proposed.

  10. Interaction of High-Energy Proton Beam with a Thin Target and Multiplicities of Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Demirkol, I.; Tatar, M.; Safak, M. S.; Arasoglu, A.; Tel, E.

    2007-04-23

    An important ingredient in the performance of accelerator driven systems for energy production, waste transmutation and other applications are the number of spallation neutrons produced per incident proton. The neutron multiplicities, angular and energy distributions are usually calculated using simulation codes. We have presented multiplicities of the neutrons emitted in the interaction of a high-energy proton (1500 MeV) with a thin target Pb, Bi. In this study we have used the code ISABEL to calculate multiplicities of the neutron emitted. The results obtained have been compared with the available data.

  11. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  12. Si film separation obtained by high energy proton implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Braley, C.; Mazen, F.; Papon, A.-M.; Rieutord, F.; Charvet, A.-M.; Ntsoenzok, E.

    2012-11-06

    High energy protons implantation in the 1-1.5 MeV range can be used to detach free-standing thin silicon films with thickness between 15 and 30 {mu}m. Recently, we showed that Si orientation has a strong effect on the layer separation threshold fluence and efficiency. While complete delamination of (111)Si films is achieved, (100)Si films separation is more challenging due to blistering phenomena or partial separation of the implanted layer. In this work, we study the fracture mechanism in (100) and (111)Si after high energy implantation in order to understand the origin of such a behavior. We notably point out that fracture precursor defects, i.e. the platelets, preferentially form on (111) planes, as a consequence of the low strain level in the damaged region in our implantation conditions. Fracture therefore propagates easily in (111)Si, while it requires higher fluence to overcome unfavorable precursors orientation and propagate in (100)Si.

  13. Reinventing the Accelerator for the High Energy Frontier

    ScienceCinema

    Rosenzweig, James [UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States

    2009-09-01

    The history of discovery in high-energy physics has been intimately connected with progress in methods of accelerating particles for the past 75 years. This remains true today, as the post-LHC era in particle physics will require significant innovation and investment in a superconducting linear collider. The choice of the linear collider as the next-generation discovery machine, and the selection of superconducting technology has rather suddenly thrown promising competing techniques -- such as very large hadron colliders, muon colliders, and high-field, high frequency linear colliders -- into the background. We discuss the state of such conventional options, and the likelihood of their eventual success. We then follow with a much longer view: a survey of a new, burgeoning frontier in high energy accelerators, where intense lasers, charged particle beams, and plasmas are all combined in a cross-disciplinary effort to reinvent the accelerator from its fundamental principles on up.

  14. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  15. PROTON ACCELERATION AT OBLIQUE SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-20

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  16. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-20

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton–proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This article briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  17. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The High Energy Density and Exotic Acceleration working group took as our goal to reach beyond the community of plasma accelerator research with its applications to high energy physics, to promote exchange with other disciplines which are challenged by related and demanding beam physics issues. The scope of the group was to cover particle acceleration and beam transport that, unlike other groups at AAC, are not mediated by plasmas or by electromagnetic structures. At this Workshop, we saw an impressive advancement from years past in the area of Vacuum Acceleration, for example with the LEAP experiment at Stanford. And we saw an influx of exciting new beam physics topics involving particle propagation inside of solid-density plasmas or at extremely high charge density, particularly in the areas of laser acceleration of ions, and extreme beams for fusion energy research, including Heavy-ion Inertial Fusion beam physics. One example of the importance and extreme nature of beam physics in HED research is the requirement in the Fast Ignitor scheme of inertial fusion to heat a compressed DT fusion pellet to keV temperatures by injection of laser-driven electron or ion beams of giga-Amp current. Even in modest experiments presently being performed on the laser-acceleration of ions from solids, mega-amp currents of MeV electrons must be transported through solid foils, requiring almost complete return current neutralization, and giving rise to a wide variety of beam-plasma instabilities. As keynote talks our group promoted Ion Acceleration (plenary talk by A. MacKinnon), which historically has grown out of inertial fusion research, and HIF Accelerator Research (invited talk by A. Friedman), which will require impressive advancements in space-charge-limited ion beam physics and in understanding the generation and transport of neutralized ion beams. A unifying aspect of High Energy Density applications was the physics of particle beams inside of solids, which is proving to

  18. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO 250 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as the first high energy polarized proton collider was designed t o provide polarized proton collisions a t a maximum beam energy of 250 GeV. I t has been providing collisions a t a beam energy of 100 Gel' since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during the acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with careful control of the betatron tunes and the vertical orbit distortions. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV? making it important t o examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were accelerated t o the record energy of 250 GeV in RHIC with a polarization of 46% measured a t top energy in 2006. The polarization measurement as a function of beam energy also shows some polarization loss around 136 GeV, the first strong intrinsic resonance above 100 GeV. This paper presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival t o orbit distortions.

  19. Yang-Mills theories at high energy accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterman, George

    2016-03-01

    I will begin with a brief review of the triumph of Yang-Mills theory at particle accelerators, a development that began some years after their historic paper. This story reached a culmination, or at least local extremum, with the discovery at the Large Hadron Collider of a Higgs-like scalar boson in 2012. The talk then proceeds to a slightly more technical level, discussing how we derive predictions from the gauge field theories of the Standard Model and its extensions for use at high energy accelerators.

  20. Yang-Mills Theories at High Energy Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterman, George

    I will begin with a brief review of the triumph of Yang-Mills theory at particle accelerators, a development that began some years after their historic paper. This story reached a culmination, or at least local extremum, with the discovery at the Large Hadron Collider of a Higgs-like scalar boson in 2012. The talk then proceeds to a slightly more technical level, discussing how we derive predictions from the gauge field theories of the Standard Model and its extensions for use at high energy accelerators.

  1. Photonic Band Gap resonators for high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, S.; Smith, D.R.; Kroll, N. |

    1993-12-31

    We have proposed that a new type of microwave resonator, based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures, may be particularly useful for high energy accelerators. We provide an explanation of the PBG concept and present data which illustrate some of the special properties associated with such structures. Further evaluation of the utility of PBG resonators requires laboratory testing of model structures at cryogenic temperatures, and at high fields. We provide a brief discussion of our test program, which is currently in progress.

  2. Future Accelerator Challenges in Support of High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, M.S.

    2008-05-03

    Historically, progress in high-energy physics has largely been determined by development of more capable particle accelerators. This trend continues today with the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the worldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider. Looking ahead, there are two scientific areas ripe for further exploration--the energy frontier and the precision frontier. To explore the energy frontier, two approaches toward multi-TeV beams are being studied, an electron-positron linear collider based on a novel two-beam powering system (CLIC), and a Muon Collider. Work on the precision frontier involves accelerators with very high intensity, including a Super-BFactory and a muon-based Neutrino Factory. Without question, one of the most promising approaches is the development of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very high scientific potential, and would substantially advance the state-of-the-art in accelerator design. The challenges of the new generation of accelerators, and how these can be accommodated in the accelerator design, are described. To reap their scientific benefits, all of these frontier accelerators will require sophisticated instrumentation to characterize the beam and control it with unprecedented precision.

  3. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Reed, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; et al

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data frommore » 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.« less

  4. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Reed, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; LaBel, K. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Swanson, Scot E.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Van Deusen, Stuart B.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Gordon, M. S.

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data from 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.

  5. An introduction to the physics of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.A.; Syphers, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    This book is an outgrowth of a course given by the authors at various universities and particle accelerator schools. It starts from the basic physics principles governing particle motion inside an accelerator, and leads to a full description of the complicated phenomena and analytical tools encountered in the design and operation of a working accelerator. The book covers acceleration and longitudinal beam dynamics, transverse motion and nonlinear perturbations, intensity dependent effects, emittance preservation methods and synchrotron radiation. These subjects encompass the core concerns of a high energy synchrotron. The authors apparently do not assume the reader has much previous knowledge about accelerator physics. Hence, they take great care to introduce the physical phenomena encountered and the concepts used to describe them. The mathematical formulae and derivations are deliberately kept at a level suitable for beginners. After mastering this course, any interested reader will not find it difficult to follow subjects of more current interests. Useful homework problems are provided at the end of each chapter. Many of the problems are based on actual activities associated with the design and operation of existing accelerators.

  6. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  7. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  8. Proton-Proton On Shell Optical Potential at High Energies and the Hollowness Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriola, Enrique Ruiz; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the usefulness of the optical potential as suggested by the double spectral Mandelstam representation at very high energies, such as in the proton-proton scattering at ISR and the LHC. Its particular meaning regarding the interpretation of the scattering data up to the maximum available measured energies is discussed. Our analysis reconstructs 3D dynamics from the effective transverse 2D impact parameter representation and suggests that besides the onset of gray nucleons at the LHC there appears an inelasticity depletion (hollowness) which precludes convolution models at the attometer scale.

  9. Proton-Proton On Shell Optical Potential at High Energies and the Hollowness Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriola, Enrique Ruiz; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the usefulness of the optical potential as suggested by the double spectral Mandelstam representation at very high energies, such as in the proton-proton scattering at ISR and the LHC. Its particular meaning regarding the interpretation of the scattering data up to the maximum available measured energies is discussed. Our analysis reconstructs 3D dynamics from the effective transverse 2D impact parameter representation and suggests that besides the onset of gray nucleons at the LHC there appears an inelasticity depletion (hollowness) which precludes convolution models at the attometer scale.

  10. CGC/saturation approach for high energy soft interactions: v2 in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsman, E.; Levin, E.; Maor, U.; Tapia, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we continue our program to construct a model for high energy soft interactions, based on the CGC/saturation approach. We demonstrate that in our model, which describes diffractive physics as well as multiparticle production at high energy, the density variation mechanism leads to the value of v2 , which is about 60%-70% of the measured v2 . Bearing in mind that in the CGC/saturation approach there are two other mechanisms present, Bose enhancement in the wave function and local anisotropy, we believe that the azimuthal long range rapidity correlations in proton-proton collisions stem from the CGC/saturation physics, and not from quark-gluon plasma production.

  11. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing experimental efforts to detect cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos are guided by the expectation that astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray protons would also generate neutrinos through interactions with ambient matter and/or photons. However, there will be a reduction in the predicted neutrino flux if cosmic ray sources accelerate not only protons but also significant numbers of heavier nuclei, as is indicated by recent air shower data. We consider plausible extragalactic sources such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and starburst galaxies and demand consistency with the observed cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum at Earth after allowing for propagation through intergalactic radiation fields. This allows us to calculate the expected neutrino fluxes from the sources, normalized to the observed cosmic ray spectrum. We find that the likely signals are still within reach of next generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.PACS95.85.Ry98.70.Rz98.54.Cm98.54.EpReferencesFor a review, see:F.HalzenD.HooperRep. Prog. Phys.6520021025A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.972006221101A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationAstropart. Phys.262006282arXiv:astro-ph/0611063arXiv:astro-ph/0702265V.NiessANTARES CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8672006217I.KravchenkoPhys. Rev. D732006082002S.W.BarwickANITA CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.962006171101V.Van ElewyckPierre Auger CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8092006187For a survey of possible sources and event rates in km3 detectors see e.g.,W.BednarekG.F.BurgioT.MontaruliNew Astron. Rev.4920051M.D.KistlerJ.F.BeacomPhys. Rev. D742006063007A. Kappes, J. Hinton, C. Stegmann, F.A. Aharonian, arXiv:astro-ph/0607286.A.LevinsonE.WaxmanPhys. Rev. Lett.872001171101C.DistefanoD.GuettaE.WaxmanA.LevinsonAstrophys. J.5752002378F.A.AharonianL.A.AnchordoquiD.KhangulyanT.MontaruliJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.392006408J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenAstrophys. J.5762002L33F.VissaniAstropart. Phys.262006310F.W

  12. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We

  13. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  14. String black holes as particle accelerators to arbitrarily high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2014-07-01

    We show that an extremal Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole may act as a particle accelerator with arbitrarily high energy when two uncharged particles falling freely from rest to infinity on the near horizon. We show that the center of mass energy of collision is independent of the extreme fine tuning of the angular momentum of the colliding particles. We further show that the center of mass energy of collisions of particles at the ISCO ( r ISCO ) or at the photon orbit ( r ph ) or at the marginally bound circular orbit ( r mb ) i.e. at r≡ r ISCO = r ph = r mb =2 M could be arbitrarily large for the aforementioned space-time, which is quite different from the Schwarzschild and the Reissner-Nordstrøm space-time. For non-extremal GMGHS space-time the CM energy is finite and depends upon the asymptotic value of the dilation field ( ϕ 0).

  15. Laser acceleration of low emittance, high energy ions and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julien; Audebert, Patrick; Borghesi, Marco; Pépin, Henri; Willi, Oswald

    2009-03-01

    Laser-accelerated ion sources have exceptional properties, i.e. high brightness and high spectral cut-off (56 MeV at present), high directionality and laminarity (at least 100-fold better than conventional accelerators beams), short burst duration (ps). Thanks to these properties, these sources open new opportunities for applications. Among these, we have already explored their use for proton radiography of fields in plasmas and for warm dense matter generation. These sources could also stimulate development of compact ion accelerators or be used for medical applications. To extend the range of applications, ion energy and conversion efficiency must however be increased. Two strategies for doing so using present-day lasers have been successfully explored in LULI experiments. In view of applications, it is also essential to control (i.e. collimate and energy select) these beams. For this purpose, we have developed an ultra-fast laser-triggered micro-lens providing tuneable control of the beam divergence as well as energy selection. To cite this article: J. Fuchs et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  16. Laboratory laser acceleration and high energy astrophysics: {gamma}-ray bursts and cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.

    1998-08-20

    Recent experimental progress in laser acceleration of charged particles (electrons) and its associated processes has shown that intense electromagnetic pulses can promptly accelerate charged particles to high energies and that their energy spectrum is quite hard. On the other hand some of the high energy astrophysical phenomena such as extremely high energy cosmic rays and energetic components of {gamma}-ray bursts cry for new physical mechanisms for promptly accelerating particles to high energies. The authors suggest that the basic physics involved in laser acceleration experiments sheds light on some of the underlying mechanisms and their energy spectral characteristics of the promptly accelerated particles in these high energy astrophysical phenomena.

  17. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prall, Matthias; Durante, Marco; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, Phillipp M.; LaTessa, Ciara; Shestov, Less; Simoniello, P.; Danly, Christopher R.; et al

    2016-06-10

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allowsmore » imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. As a result, tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.« less

  18. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; Latessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-06-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.

  19. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; LaTessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-01-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics. PMID:27282667

  20. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Prall, M; Durante, M; Berger, T; Przybyla, B; Graeff, C; Lang, P M; LaTessa, C; Shestov, L; Simoniello, P; Danly, C; Mariam, F; Merrill, F; Nedrow, P; Wilde, C; Varentsov, D

    2016-01-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics. PMID:27282667

  1. On ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration at the termination shock of young pulsar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Kotera, Kumiko; Pétri, Jérôme

    2015-07-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are outstanding accelerators in Nature, in the sense that they accelerate electrons up to the radiation reaction limit. Motivated by this observation, this paper examines the possibility that young pulsar wind nebulae can accelerate ions to ultra-high energies at the termination shock of the pulsar wind. We consider here powerful PWNe, fed by pulsars born with ~ millisecond periods. Assuming that such pulsars exist, at least during a few years after the birth of the neutron star, and that they inject ions into the wind, we find that protons could be accelerated up to energies of the order of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off, for a fiducial rotation period P ~ 1 msec and a pulsar magnetic field Bstar ~ 1013 G, implying a fiducial wind luminosity Lp ~ 1045 erg/s and a spin-down time tsd ~ 3× 107 s. The main limiting factor is set by synchrotron losses in the nebula and by the size of the termination shock; ions with Z>= 1 may therefore be accelerated to even higher energies. We derive an associated neutrino flux produced by interactions in the source region. For a proton-dominated composition, our maximum flux lies slightly below the 5-year sensitivity of IceCube-86 and above the 3-year sensitivity of the projected Askaryan Radio Array. It might thus become detectable in the next decade, depending on the exact level of contribution of these millisecond pulsar wind nebulae to the ultra-high energy cosmic ray flux.

  2. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  3. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  4. Resource Letter AFHEP-1: Accelerators for the Future of High-Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William A.

    2012-02-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to literature concerning the development of accelerators for the future of high-energy physics. Research articles, books, and Internet resources are cited for the following topics: motivation for future accelerators, present accelerators for high-energy physics, possible future machine, and laboratory and collaboration websites.

  5. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  6. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  7. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  8. Internal spin structure of the proton from high energy polarized e-p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, V.W.; Baum, G.; Bergstroem, M.R.

    1981-02-01

    A review is given of experimental knowledge of the spin dependent structure functions of the proton, which is based on inclusive high energy scattering of longitudinal polarized electrons by longitudinally polarized protons in both the deep inelastic and resonance regions, and includes preliminary results from our most recent SLAC experiment. Implications for scaling, sum rules, models of proton structure, and the hyperfine structure interval in hydrogen are given. Possible future directions of research are indicated.

  9. A New High-Current Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; DeSanto, L.; Jongen, Y.

    2009-03-10

    A high-current (>20 mA) dc proton accelerator is being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the detection of explosive materials by nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma radiation. The high-voltage dc accelerator (adjustable between 1.4 and 2.8 MeV) will be a single-ended industrial Dynamitron registered system equipped with a compact high-current, microwave-driven proton source. A magnetic mass analyzer inserted between the ion source and the acceleration tube will select the protons and reject heavier ions. A sorption pump near the ion source will minimize the flow of neutral hydrogen gas into the acceleration tube. For BNCT, a lithium target for generating epithermal neutrons is being developed that will be capable of dissipating the high power (>40 kW) of the proton beam. For NRA, special targets will be used to generate gamma rays with suitable energies for exciting nuclides typically present in explosive materials. Proton accelerators with such high-current and high-power capabilities in this energy range have not been developed previously.

  10. A New High-Current Proton Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; DeSanto, L.; Jongen, Y.

    2009-03-01

    A high-current (>20 mA) dc proton accelerator is being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the detection of explosive materials by nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma radiation. The high-voltage dc accelerator (adjustable between 1.4 and 2.8 MeV) will be a single-ended industrial Dynamitron® system equipped with a compact high-current, microwave-driven proton source. A magnetic mass analyzer inserted between the ion source and the acceleration tube will select the protons and reject heavier ions. A sorption pump near the ion source will minimize the flow of neutral hydrogen gas into the acceleration tube. For BNCT, a lithium target for generating epithermal neutrons is being developed that will be capable of dissipating the high power (>40 kW) of the proton beam. For NRA, special targets will be used to generate gamma rays with suitable energies for exciting nuclides typically present in explosive materials. Proton accelerators with such high-current and high-power capabilities in this energy range have not been developed previously.

  11. Proton Structure in High-Energy High-Multiplicity p-p Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głazek, Stanisław D.; Kubiczek, Patryk

    2016-06-01

    A few-body proton image, expected to be derivable from QCD in the renormalization group procedure for effective particles, is used within the Monte Carlo Glauber model to calculate the anisotropy coefficients in the initial collision-state of matter in high-energy high-multiplicity proton-proton interaction events. We estimate the ridge-like correlations in the final hadronic state by assuming their proportionality to the initial collision-state anisotropy. In our estimates, some distinct few-body proton structures appear capable of accounting for the magnitude of p-p ridge effect, with potentially discernible differences in dependence on multiplicity.

  12. POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN AGS AND RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    2007-09-10

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species including polarized proton beams. The acceleration of polarized beams in both the injector and the collider rings is complicated by numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Partial and full Siberian snakes have made it possible to overcome the depolarization and beam polarizations of up to 65% have been reached at 100 GeV in RHIC.

  13. Status of BINP proton tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdakov, A.; Davydenko, V.; Dolgushin, V.; Dranichnikov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Farrell, J. P.; Khilchenko, A.; Kobets, V.; Konstantinov, S.; Krivenko, A.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Tiunov, M.; Savkin, V.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.

    2007-08-01

    The status of a unique 2.0 MeV, 10 mA proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation is presented. The accelerator is intended to be used in facilities generating resonant gamma rays for explosives detection and epithermal neutrons for boron neutron-capture therapy of brain tumors. A magnetically coupled DC voltage multiplier derived from an industrial ELV-type electron accelerator is used as a high voltage source for the accelerator. A dc high current negative ion source has been developed for injection into the tandem. In the tandem accelerator there is set of nested potential electrodes with openings which form a channel for accelerating the negative hydrogen ion beam and subsequently accelerating the proton beam after stripping in the gas target. The electrodes are connected to a high voltage feedthrough insulator to which required potentials are applied from the high voltage power supply by means of a resistor voltage divider. In the paper the first experimental results obtained with the vacuum insulated tandem accelerator are also given.

  14. CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

  15. Rf cavity primer for cyclic proton accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, J. E.

    1988-04-01

    The electrical and mechanical properities of particle accelerator rf cavities are described in a manner which will be useful to physics and engineering graduates entering the accelerator field. The discussion is limited to proton (or antiproton) synchrotron accelerators or storage rings operating roughly in the range of 20 to 200 MHz. The very high gradient, fixed frequency UHF or microwave devices appropriate for electron machines and the somewhat lower frequency and broader bandwidth devices required for heavy ion accelerators are discussed extensively in other papers in this series. While it is common practice to employ field calculation programs such as SUPERFISH, URMEL, or MAFIA as design aids in the development of rf cavities, we attempt here to elucidate various of the design parameters commonly dealt with in proton machines through the use of simple standing wave coaxial resonator expressions. In so doing, we treat only standing wave structures. Although low-impedance, moderately broad pass-band travelling wave accelerating systems are used in the CERN SPS, such systems are more commonly found in linacs, and they have not been used widely in large cyclic accelerators. Two appendices providing useful supporting material regarding relativistic particle dynamics and synchrotron motion in cyclic accelerators are added to supplement the text.

  16. Designing of electrode for high energy charged particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Basanta Kumar; Shyam, A.

    2010-02-01

    Vacuum insulation plays an important role in charged particle acceleration. We are making one compact size neutron generator in our lab. For this purpose the deuterium ions are formed in a penning ion source and extracted along the axis of the electrode arrangement. For neutron generation from D-T reaction, the deuterium ions are to be accelerated up to ~ 100KeV to the tritium target. After extraction of the ions from the ion source, the ions pass through the acceleration electrode. For high acceleration voltage, selecting the shape of the electrode is important. The plane geometry leads to high electric field at the edge whereas a curved geometry reduces this effect. The study of the physical processes at the electrode surface due to ion interaction is crucial. In this presentation, we will present the designing of the electrode for our purpose and discuss the issues related to the physical process at the surface of the electrode

  17. APPARATUS FOR CONTROL OF HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS

    DOEpatents

    Heard, H.G.

    1961-10-24

    A particle beam positioning control for a synchrotron or the like is described. The control includes means for selectively impressing a sinusoidal perturbation upon the rising voltage utilized to sweep the frequency of the f-m oscillator which is conventionally coupled to the accelerating electrode of a synchrotron. The perturbation produces a variation in the normal rate of change of frequency of the accelerating voltage applied to the accelerating electrode, resulting in an expansion or contraction of the particle beam orbit diameter during the perturbation. The beam may thus be controlled such that a portion strikes a target positioned close to the expanded or contracted orbit diameter and returns to the original orbit for further acceleration to the final energy. (AEC)

  18. Electron injector for compact staged high energy accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, T. L.; Desforges, F. G.; Maitrallain, A.; Dufrénoy, S. Dobosz; Bougeard, M.; Maynard, G.; Lee, P.; Hansson, M.; Aurand, B.; Persson, A.; González, I. Gallardo; Monot, P.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.; Cros, B.

    2016-09-01

    An electron injector for multi-stage laser wakefield experiments is presented. It consists of a variable length gas cell of small longitudinal dimension (⩽ 10 mm). The gas filling process in this cell was characterized both experimentally and with fluid simulation. Electron acceleration experiments were performed at two different laser facilities. Results show low divergence and low pointing fluctuation electron bunches suitable for transport to a second stage, and a peaked energy distribution suitable for injection into the second stage wakefield accelerator.

  19. Ion Desorption Stability in Superconducting High Energy Physics Proton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.

    1995-05-29

    In this paper we extend our previous analysis of cold beam tube vacuum in a superconducting proton collider to include ion desorption in addition to thermal desorption and synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption. The new ion desorption terms introduce the possibility of vacuum instability. This is similar to the classical room temperature case but now modified by the inclusion of ion desorption coefficients for cryosorbed (physisorbed) molecules which can greatly exceed the coefficients for tightly bound molecules. The sojourn time concept for physisorbed H{sub 2} is generalized to include photodesorption and ion desorption as well as the usually considered thermal desorption. The ion desorption rate is density dependent and divergent so at the onset of instability the sojourn time goes to zero. Experimental data are used to evaluate the H{sub 2} sojourn time for the conditions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the situation is found to be stable. The sojourn time is dominated by photodesorption for surface density s(H{sub 2}) less than a monolayer and by thermal deposition for s(H{sub 2}) greater than a monolayer. For a few percent of a monolayer, characteristic of a beam screen, the photodesorption rate exceeds ion desorption rate by more than two orders of magnitude. The photodesorption rate corresponds to a sojourn time of approximately 100 sec. The paper next turns to the evaluation of stability margins and inclusion of gases heavier than H{sub 2} (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), where ion desorption introduces coupling between molecular species. Stability conditions are worked out for a simple cold beam tube, a cold beam tube pumped from the ends and a cold beam tube with a co-axial perforated beam screen. In each case a simple inequality for stability of a single component is replaced by a determinant that must be greater than zero for a gas mixture. The connection with the general theory of feedback stability is made and it is shown that the gains

  20. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  1. Laser-plasma accelerators-based high energy radiation femtochemistry and spatio-temporal radiation biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauduel, Y. A.; Lundh, O.; Martin, M. T.; Malka, V.

    2012-06-01

    The innovating advent of powerful TW laser sources (~1019 W cm-z) and laser-plasma interactions providing ultra-short relativistic particle beams (electron, proton) in the MeV domain open exciting opportunities for the simultaneous development of high energy radiation femtochemistry (HERF) and ultrafast radiation biomedicine. Femtolysis experiments (Femtosecond radiolysis) of aqueous targets performed with relativistic electron bunches of 2.5-15 MeV give new insights on transient physicochemical events that take place in the prethermal regime of confined ionization tracks. Femtolysis studies emphasize the pre-eminence of ultra-fast quantum effects in the temporal range 10-14 - 10-11 s. The most promising advances of HERF concern the quantification of ultrafast sub-nanometric biomolecular damages (bond weakening and bond breaking) in the radial direction of a relativistic particle beam. Combining ultra-short relativistic particle beams and near-infrared spectroscopic configurations, laser-plasma accelerators based high energy radiation femtochemistry foreshadows the development of real-time radiation chemistry in the prethermal regime of nascent ionisation clusters. These physico-chemical advances would be very useful for future developments in biochemically relevant environments (DNA, proteins) and in more complex biological systems such as living cells. The first investigation of single and multiple irradiation shots performed at high energy level (90 MeV) and very high dose rate, typically 1013 Gy s-1, demonstrates that measurable assessments of immediate and reversible DNA damage can be explored at single cell level. Ultrafast in vivo irradiations would permit the development of bio-nanodosimetry on the time scale of molecular motions, i.e. angstrom or sub-angstrom displacements and open new perspectives in the emerging domain of ultrafast radiation biomedicine such as pulsed radiotherapy.

  2. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, James T.; Nolen, Jerry; Vandergrift, George; Gomes, Itacil; Kroc, Tom; Horwitz, Phil; McAlister, Dan; Bowers, Del; Sullivan, Vivian; Greene, John

    2011-12-30

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces {approx}100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 Ge

  3. Single event upset and charge collection measurements using high energy protons and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.; Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Ness, J.D.; Majewski, P.P. ); Wender, S.; Gavron, A. )

    1994-12-01

    RAMs, microcontrollers and surface barrier detectors were exposed to beams of high energy protons and neutrons to measure the induced number of upsets as well as energy deposition. The WNR facility at Los Alamos provided a neutron spectrum similar to that of the atmospheric neutrons. Its effect on devices was compared to that of protons with energies of 200, 400, 500, and 800 MeV. Measurements indicate that SEU cross sections for 400 MeV protons are similar to those induced by the atmospheric neutron spectrum.

  4. Response of a tungsten powder target to an incident high energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Rivkin, L.

    2014-10-01

    The experiment described in this paper is the first study of the response of a static tungsten powder sample to an impinging high energy proton beam pulse. The experiment was carried out at the HiRadMat facility at CERN. Observations include high speed videos of a proton beam induced perturbation of the powder sample as well as data from a laser Doppler vibrometer measuring the oscillations of the powder container. A comparison with a previous analogous experiment which studied a proton beam interaction with mercury is made.

  5. On the possibility for precision measurements of differential cross sections for elastic proton-proton scattering at the Protvino accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S. P.; Kozelov, A. V.; Petrov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    Elastic-scattering data were analyzed, and it was concluded on the basis of this analysis that precisionmeasurements of differential cross sections for elastic proton-proton scattering at the accelerator of the Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP, Protvino, Russia) over a broad momentum-transfer range are of importance and topical interest. The layout of the respective experimental facility detecting the scattered particle and recoil proton and possessing a high momentum-transfer resolution was examined along with the equipment constituting this facility. The facility in question is able to record up to a billion events of elastic proton-proton scattering per IHEP accelerator run (20 days). Other lines of physics research with this facility are briefly discussed.

  6. Proton shock acceleration using a high contrast high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; Kim, Jongjin; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art; Kerr, Shaun; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Ruby, John; William, Jackson; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration is a field of intense research due to the interesting characteristics of this novel particle source including high brightness, high maximum energy, high laminarity, and short duration. Although the ion beam characteristics are promising for many future applications, such as in the medical field or hybrid accelerators, the ion beam generated using TNSA, the acceleration mechanism commonly achieved, still need to be significantly improved. Several new alternative mechanisms have been proposed such as collisionless shock acceleration (CSA) in order to produce a mono-energetic ion beam favorable for those applications. We report the first results of an experiment performed with the TITAN laser system (JLF, LLNL) dedicated to the study of CSA using a high intensity (5x1019W/cm2) high contrast ps laser pulse focused on 55 μm thick CH and CD targets. We show that the proton spectrum generated during the interaction exhibits high-energy mono-energetic features along the laser axis, characteristic of a shock mechanism.

  7. Summary Report of Working Group 3: High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Gennady; Schoessow, Paul

    2006-11-27

    This report summarizes presented results and discussions in the Working Group 3 at the Twelfth Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop in 2006. Presentations on varied topics, such as laser proton acceleration, novel radiation sources, active medium accelerators, and many others, are reviewed, and the status and future directions of research in these areas are summarized.

  8. DESIGN CRITERIA OF A PROTON FFAG ACCELERATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO, A.G.

    2004-10-13

    There are two major issues that are to be confronted in the design of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerator, namely: (1) the stability of motion over the large momentum range needed for the beam acceleration, and (2) the compactness of the trajectories over the same momentum range to limit the dimensions of the magnets. There are a numbers of rules that need to be followed to resolve these issues. In particular, the magnet arrangement in the accelerator lattice and the distribution of the bending and focusing fields are to be set properly in accordance with these rules. In this report they describe four of these rules that ought to be applied for the optimum design of a FFAG accelerator, especially in the case of proton beams.

  9. Kerr black holes as particle accelerators to arbitrarily high energy.

    PubMed

    Bañados, Máximo; Silk, Joseph; West, Stephen M

    2009-09-11

    We show that intermediate mass black holes conjectured to be the early precursors of supermassive black holes and surrounded by relic cold dark matter density spikes can act as particle accelerators with collisions, in principle, at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies in the case of Kerr black holes. While the ejecta from such interactions will be highly redshifted, we may anticipate the possibility of a unique probe of Planck-scale physics. PMID:19792361

  10. Biological Effects of Particles with Very High Energy Deposition on Mammalian Cells Utilizing the Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Janapriya; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wang, Minli

    2013-01-01

    High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and secondary protons and neutrons, and secondaries from protons in SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk to astronauts due to induction of DNA damage and oxidative stress. Experiments with high energy particles mimicking the space environment for estimation of radiation risk are being performed at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL. Experiments with low energy particles comparing to high energy particles of similar LET are of interest for investigation of the role of track structure on biological effects. For this purpose, we report results utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at BNL. The primary objective of our studies is to elucidate the influence of high vs low energy deposition on track structure, delta ray contribution and resulting biological responses. These low energy ions are of special relevance as these energies may occur following absorption through the spacecraft and shielding materials in human tissues and nuclear fragments produced in tissues by high energy protons and neutrons. This study will help to verify the efficiency of these low energy particles and better understand how various cell types respond to them.

  11. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  12. Compact accelerator concept for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporaso, G. J.; Sampayan, S.; Chen, Y.-J.; Harris, J.; Hawkins, S.; Holmes, C.; Krogh, M.; Nelson, S.; Nunnally, W.; Paul, A.; Poole, B.; Rhodes, M.; Sanders, D.; Selenes, K.; Sullivan, J.; Wang, L.; Watson, J.

    2007-08-01

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash X-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  13. Stochastic acceleration of solar flare protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The acceleration of solar flare protons is considered by cyclotron damping of intense Alfven wave turbulence in a magnetic trap. The energy diffusion coefficient is computed for a near-isotropic distribution of super-Alfvenic protons and a steady-state solution for the particle spectrum is found for both transit-time and diffusive losses out of the ends of the trap. The acceleration time to a characteristic energy approximately 20 Mev/nucl can be as short as 10 sec. On the basis of phenomenological arguments an omega/2 frequency dependence for the Alfven wave spectrum is inferred. The correlation time of the turbulence lies in the range .0005 less than tau/corr less than .05s.

  14. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf; Büscher, Markus; Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  15. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of >100 MeV Protons in Large Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, Edward W.

    2016-05-01

    Recently several studies have presented correlative evidence for a significant-to-dominant role for a flare-resident process in the acceleration of high-energy protons in large solar particle events. In one of these investigations, a high correlation between >100 MeV proton fluence and 35 GHz radio fluence is obtained by omitting large proton events associated with relatively weak flares; these outlying events are attributed to proton acceleration by shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We argue that the strong CMEs and associated shocks observed for proton events on the main sequence of the scatter plot are equally likely to accelerate high-energy protons. In addition, we examine ratios of 0.5 MeV electron to >100 MeV proton intensities in large SEP events, associated with both well-connected and poorly-connected solar eruptions, to show that scaled-up versions of the small flares associated with classical impulsive SEP events are not significant accelerators of >100 MeV protons.

  16. Results on damage induced by high-energy protons in LYSO calorimeter crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissertori, G.; Luckey, D.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pauss, F.; Quittnat, M.; Wallny, R.; Glaser, M.

    2014-05-01

    Lutetium-Yttrium Orthosilicate doped with Cerium (LYSO), as a bright scintillating crystal, is a candidate for calorimetry applications in strong ionising-radiation fields and large high-energy hadron fluences are expected at the CERN Large Hadron Collider after the planned High-Luminosity upgrade. There, proton-proton collisions will produce fast hadron fluences up to ~ 5 ×1014cm-2 in the large-rapidity regions of the calorimeters. The performance of LYSO has been investigated, after exposure to different fluences of 24 GeV c-1 protons. Measured changes in optical transmission as a function of proton fluence are presented, and the evolution over time due to spontaneous recovery at room temperature is studied. The activation of materials will also be an issue in the described environment. Studies of the ambient dose induced by LYSO and its evolution with time, in comparison with other scintillating crystals, have also been performed through measurements and FLUKA simulations.

  17. A Nuclear Interaction Model for Understanding Results of Single Event Testing with High Energy Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culpepper, William X.; ONeill, Pat; Nicholson, Leonard L.

    2000-01-01

    An internuclear cascade and evaporation model has been adapted to estimate the LET spectrum generated during testing with 200 MeV protons. The model-generated heavy ion LET spectrum is compared to the heavy ion LET spectrum seen on orbit. This comparison is the basis for predicting single event failure rates from heavy ions using results from a single proton test. Of equal importance, this spectra comparison also establishes an estimate of the risk of encountering a failure mode on orbit that was not detected during proton testing. Verification of the general results of the model is presented based on experiments, individual part test results, and flight data. Acceptance of this model and its estimate of remaining risk opens the hardware verification philosophy to the consideration of radiation testing with high energy protons at the board and box level instead of the more standard method of individual part testing with low energy heavy ions.

  18. Centrality-dependent forward J/ψ production in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducloué, B.; Lappi, T.; Mäntysaari, H.

    2016-03-01

    Forward J/ψ production and suppression in high energy proton-nucleus collisions can be an important probe of gluon saturation. In an earlier work we studied this process in the Color Glass Condensate framework and showed that using the Glauber approach to extrapolate the dipole cross section of a proton to a nucleus leads to results closer to experimental data than previous calculations in this framework. Here we investigate the centrality dependence of the nuclear suppression in this model and show a comparison of our results with recent LHC data.

  19. Possibilities of polarized protons in Sp anti p S and other high energy hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements for collisions with polarized protons in hadron colliders above 200 GeV are listed and briefly discussed. Particular attention is given to the use of the ''Siberan snake'' to eliminate depolarizing resonances, which occur when the spin precession frequency equals a frequency contained in the spectrum of the field seen by the beam. The Siberian snake is a device which makes the spin precession frequency essentially constant by using spin rotators, which precess the spin by 180/sup 0/ about either the longitudinal or transverse horizontal axis. It is concluded that operation with polarized protons should be possible at all the high energy hadron colliders. (LEW)

  20. High energy proton irradiation induced pinning centers in Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, J.O.; Safar, H.; Cho, J.H.

    1995-12-01

    Bi-2212 single crystals and Bi-2223/Ag-sheathed tapes were irradiated with high energy protons. TEM images reveal the production of randomly oriented (splayed) columnar defects with an amorphous core of {approximately}10 nm diameter caused by the fissioning of Bi nuclei. The critical current density J{sub c} and irreversibility line both substantially increased with the proton dose for both crystals and tapes, especially for the magnetic field parallel to the c axis. An irradiated tape had a J{sub c} value {approximately}100 times greater than that of an unirradiated one at 1 T and 75 K.

  1. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: High-energy electron accelerators for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimov, Rustam A.

    2000-02-01

    The principle of operation and the design of main parts of high-energy industrial electron accelerators are described. Accelerators based on high-voltage dc rectifiers are very efficient, compact and characterized by a high degree of unification of their main units. In total, more than 70 accelerators have been manufactured at the G I Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, with over 20 of them for export.

  2. High-energy proton radiation damage of high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.; Varnell, L. S.; Metzger, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative studies of radiation damage in high-purity germanium gamma-ray detectors due to high-energy charged particles have been carried out; two 1.0 cm thick planar detectors were irradiated by 6 GeV/c protons. Under proton bombardment, degradation in the energy resolution was found to begin below 7 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm and increased proportionately in both detectors until the experiment was terminated at a total flux of 5.7 x 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm, equivalent to about a six year exposure to cosmic-ray protons in space. At the end of the irradiation, the FWHM resolution measured at 1332 keV stood at 8.5 and 13.6 keV, with both detectors of only marginal utility as a spectrometer due to the severe tailing caused by charge trapping. Annealing these detectors after proton damage was found to be much easier than after neutron damage.

  3. Laser-driven high-energy proton beam with homogeneous spatial profile from a nanosphere target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Kim, I. J.; Psikal, J.; Kaufman, J.; Mocek, T.; Choi, I. W.; Stolcova, L.; Proska, J.; Choukourov, A.; Melnichuk, I.; Klimo, O.; Limpouch, J.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Korn, G.; Jeong, T. M.

    2015-07-01

    A high-energy, high-yield proton beam with a good homogeneous profile has been generated from a nanosphere target irradiated by a short (30-fs), intense (7 ×1020 W /cm2 ) laser pulse. A maximum proton energy of 30 MeV has been observed with a high proton number of 7 ×1010 in the energy range 5-30 MeV. A homogeneous spatial profile with a uniformity (standard deviation from an average value within 85% beam area) of 15% is observed with the nanosphere dielectric target. Particle-in-cell simulations show the enhancement of proton cutoff energy and proton number with the nanosphere target and reveal that the homogeneous beam profile is related with a broadened angular distribution of hot electrons, which is initiated by the nanosphere structure. The homogeneous spatial properties obtained with the nanosphere target will be advantageous in developing laser-driven proton sources for practical applications in which high-quality beams are required.

  4. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE POLARIZATION OF HIGH ENERGY PROTON BEAMS AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; BRAVAR, A. BUNCE, G. GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires knowledge of the beam polarization to better than 5%. Such a goal is made the more difficult by the lack of knowledge of the analyzing power of high energy nuclear physics processes. To overcome this, a polarized hydrogen jet target was constructed and installed at one intersection region in RHIC where it intersects both beams and utilizes the precise knowledge of the jet atomic hydrogen beam polarization to measure the analyzing power in proton-proton elastic scattering in the Nuclear Coulomb Interference (CNI) region at the prescribed RHIC proton beam energy. The reverse reaction is used to assess the absolute beam polarization. Simultaneous measurements taken with fast high statistics polarimeters that measure the p-Carbon elastic scattering process also in the CNI region use the jet results to calibrate the latter.

  5. Production of high energy and low flux protons using 2D(3He,p)4He for space detector calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Tesmer, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    In this report, we want to demonstrate that besides the conventional use for elemental analysis and depth profiling by ion beam analysis (IBA), particles generated through ion-solid interactions in IBA may find other novel and important applications. Specifically, we use Rutherford backscattered and nuclear reaction produced high energy proton particles to calibrate an energetic particle subsystem (called ZEP) of the Space and Atmospheric Burst Reporting System (SABRS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). To simulate low radiation flux in the space, we have devised an experiment that uses an ultrathin (∼51.8 nm) self-support gold foil to scatter a proton beam from a 3 MV Tandem accelerator into the ZEP subsystem. Direct backscattering from the thin gold foil produces proton particles with tunable energies of 0.2-6.0 MeV and desired counting rates of <10 kHz. To extend the proton particle energy beyond the Tandem's limit of 6 MeV, a high Q-value nuclear reaction, 2D + 3He → p + 4He + 18.352 MeV, was used. This reaction allows us to obtain as high as 25.6 MeV proton particles on our 3 MV tandem accelerator, more than 4 times as high as the accelerator's maximum proton beam energy, and has greatly extended our proton energy range for this calibration activity. Preliminary ZEP subsystem calibration results are presented.

  6. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  7. The Quest for Spinning Glue in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Surrow, Bernd

    2007-10-26

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at {radical}(s) = 200-500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A{sub LL}, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV.

  8. Report of the Subpanel on Accelerator Research and Development of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Accelerator R and D in the US High Energy Physics (HEP) program is reviewed. As a result of this study, some shift in priority, particularly as regards long-range accelerator R and D, is suggested to best serve the future needs of the US HEP program. Some specific new directions for the US R and D effort are set forth. 18 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

  9. Controlled transport and focusing of laser-accelerated protons with miniature magnetic devices.

    PubMed

    Schollmeier, M; Becker, S; Geissel, M; Flippo, K A; Blazević, A; Gaillard, S A; Gautier, D C; Grüner, F; Harres, K; Kimmel, M; Nürnberg, F; Rambo, P; Schramm, U; Schreiber, J; Schütrumpf, J; Schwarz, J; Tahir, N A; Atherton, B; Habs, D; Hegelich, B M; Roth, M

    2008-08-01

    This Letter demonstrates the transporting and focusing of laser-accelerated 14 MeV protons by permanent magnet miniature quadrupole lenses providing field gradients of up to 500 T/m. The approach is highly reproducible and predictable, leading to a focal spot of (286 x 173) microm full width at half maximum 50 cm behind the source. It decouples the relativistic laser-proton acceleration from the beam transport, paving the way to optimize both separately. The collimation and the subsequent energy selection obtained are perfectly applicable for upcoming high-energy, high-repetition rate laser systems. PMID:18764401

  10. Regolith Biological Shield for a Lunar Outpost from High Energy Solar Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tai T.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2008-01-01

    Beyond Earth atmosphere, natural space radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Protons (SEPs) represents a significant hazard to both manned and robotic missions. For lunar settlements, protecting astronauts from SEPs is a key safety issue that needs to be addressed by identifying appropriate shielding materials. This paper investigates the interaction of SEPs with the lunar regolith, and quantifies the effectiveness of the regolith as a biological shield for a human habitat, compared to aluminum, presently the standard shielding material. Also calculated is the shielding thickness to reduce the dose in the habitat to those recommended by International Radiation Protection Committee and by NASA for operation on the international space station. The present calculations are for the most energetic solar event of February 1956, which included high energy protons up to 1000 MeV. Results show that the lunar regolith is as effective as aluminum for shielding lunar outposts. A large thickness of the regolith (~30 g/cm2) would be needed to reduce the dose in the habitat from high energy protons below the 30 days flight crew limit of 25 Rem (or 250 mSv) and significantly more shielding would be needed (~150 g/cm2) to reduce the dose down to the limit for radiation workers of 5 Rem (or 50 mSv).

  11. Regolith Biological Shield for a Lunar Outpost from High Energy Solar Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Tai T.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2008-01-21

    Beyond Earth atmosphere, natural space radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Protons (SEPs) represents a significant hazard to both manned and robotic missions. For lunar settlements, protecting astronauts from SEPs is a key safety issue that needs to be addressed by identifying appropriate shielding materials. This paper investigates the interaction of SEPs with the lunar regolith, and quantifies the effectiveness of the regolith as a biological shield for a human habitat, compared to aluminum, presently the standard shielding material. Also calculated is the shielding thickness to reduce the dose in the habitat to those recommended by International Radiation Protection Committee and by NASA for operation on the international space station. The present calculations are for the most energetic solar event of February 1956, which included high energy protons up to 1000 MeV. Results show that the lunar regolith is as effective as aluminum for shielding lunar outposts. A large thickness of the regolith ({approx}30 g/cm{sup 2}) would be needed to reduce the dose in the habitat from high energy protons below the 30 days flight crew limit of 25 Rem (or 250 mSv) and significantly more shielding would be needed ({approx}150 g/cm{sup 2}) to reduce the dose down to the limit for radiation workers of 5 Rem (or 50 mSv)

  12. Spin-spin correlations in proton-proton collisions at high energy and threshold enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, G.F.

    1988-05-01

    The striking effects in the spin structure observed in elastic proton collisions and the Nuclear Transparency phenomenon recently discovered at BNL are described in terms of heavy quark threshold enhancements. The deviations from scaling laws and the broadening of the angular distributions at resonance are also consistent with the introduction of new degrees of freedom in the pp system. This implies new s-channel physics. Predictions are given for the spin effects in pp collisions near 18.5 GeV/c at large p/sub T//sup 2/ where new measurements are planned. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Shielding for High-Energy Electron Accelerator Installations. National Bureau of Standards Handbook 97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    Recommendations for radiation shielding, protection, and measurement are presented. This handbook is an extension of previous recommendations for protection against radiation from--(1) high energy and power electron accelerators, (2) food processing equipment, and (3) general sterilization equipment. The new recommendations are concerned with…

  14. Production and supply of radioisotopes with high-energy particle accelerators current status and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.

    1994-03-01

    Although the production of radioisotopes in reactors or in low to medium energy cyclotrons appears to be relatively well established, especially for those isotopes that are routinely used and have a commercial market, certain isotopes can either be made only in high-energy particle accelerators or their production is more cost effective when made this way. These facilities are extremely expensive to build and operate, and isotope production is, in general, either not cost-effective or is in conflict with their primary mandate or missions which involve physics research. Isotope production using high-energy accelerators in the US, therefore, has been only an intermittent and parasitic activity. However, since a number of isotopes produced at higher energies are emerging as being potentially useful for medical and other applications, there is a renewed concern about their availability in a continuous and reliable fashion. In the US, in particular, the various aspects of the prediction and availability of radioisotopes from high-energy accelerators are presently undergoing a detailed scrutiny and review by various scientific and professional organizations as well as the Government. A number of new factors has complicated the supply/demand equation. These include considerations of cost versus needs, reliability factors, mission orientation, research and educational components, and commercial viability. This paper will focus on the present status and projected needs of radioisotope production with high-energy accelerators in the US, and will compare and examine the existing infrastructure in other countries for this purpose.

  15. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle. (LSP)

  16. Measurements of high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, W. Vargas, M.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nees, J.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Sarri, G.; Dromey, B.; Zepf, M.

    2014-05-15

    Using high-energy (∼0.5 GeV) electron beams generated by laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), bremsstrahlung radiation was created by interacting these beams with various solid targets. Secondary processes generate high-energy electrons, positrons, and neutrons, which can be measured shot-to-shot using magnetic spectrometers, short half-life activation, and Compton scattering. Presented here are proof-of-principle results from a high-resolution, high-energy gamma-ray spectrometer capable of single-shot operation, and high repetition rate activation diagnostics. We describe the techniques used in these measurements and their potential applications in diagnosing LWFA electron beams and measuring high-energy radiation from laser-plasma interactions.

  17. High energy proton-proton elastic scattering at the Large Hadron Collider and nucleon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luddy, Richard Joseph

    To gain insight into the structure of the nucleon, we pursue the development of the phenomenological model of Islam et al. (IIFS model) for high energy elastic pp and p¯p scattering. We determine the energy dependence of the parameters of the IIFS model using the available elastic differential cross section data from SPS Collider and Tevatron and the known asymptotic behavior of sigmatot (s) and rho(s) from dispersion relation calculations and more recent analyses of Cudell et al. (COMPETE Collaboration). Next, we incorporate a high energy elastic valence quark-quark scattering amplitude into the model based on BFKL pomeron to describe small impact parameter (large | t|) pp collisions. Finally, we predict the pp elastic differential cross section at the unprecedented c.m. energy of s = 14.0 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This prediction assumes crucial significance---because of an approved experiment at LHC: TOTal and Elastic Measurement (TOTEM). The TOTEM group plans to measure pp elastic dsigma/dt at 14.0 TeV all the way from momentum transfer |t| = 0 to |t| ≃ 10 GeV 2. Their measurement will stringently test not only the diffraction and o-exchange descriptions of the original IIFS model, but also the additional valence quark-quark scattering contribution that we find to be dominant for large |t|. Successful quantitative verification of the predicted dsigma/dt will mean that our picture of the nucleon with an outer cloud of qq¯ condensed ground state, an inner core of topological baryonic charge, and a still smaller core of massless valence quarks provides a realistic description of nucleon structure.

  18. Optimum angle-cut of collimator for dense objects in high-energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-Bo, Xu; Na, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The use of minus identity lenses with an angle-cut collimator can achieve high contrast images in high-energy proton radiography. This article presents the principles of choosing the angle-cut aperture of the collimator for different energies and objects. Numerical simulation using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 has been implemented to investigate the entire radiography for the French test object. The optimum angle-cut apertures of the collimators are also obtained for different energies. Supported by NSAF (11176001) and Science and Technology Developing Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012A0202006)

  19. Development of an abort gap monitor for high-energy proton rings

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, Jean-Francois; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Denes, Peter; Placidi, Massimo; Turner, William; Zolotorev, Max

    2004-05-03

    The fill pattern in proton synchrotrons usually features an empty gap, longer than the abort kicker raise time, for machine protection. This gap is referred to as the ''abort gap'' and any particles, which may accumulate in it due to injection errors and diffusion between RF buckets, would be lost inside the ring, rather than in the beam dump, during the kicker firing. In large proton rings, due to the high energies involved, it is vital to monitor the build up of charges in the abort gap with a high sensitivity. We present a study of an abort gap monitor based on a photomultiplier with a gated microchannel plate, which would allow for detecting low charge densities by monitoring the synchrotron radiation emitted. We show results of beam test experiments at the Advanced Light Source using a Hamamatsu 5916U MCP-PMT and compare them to the specifications for the Large Hadron Collider

  20. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  1. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-15

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  2. Study of the effects of high-energy proton beams on escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection is one of the most serious risks to public health care today. However, discouragingly, the development of new antibiotics has progressed little over the last decade. There is an urgent need for alternative approaches to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Novel methods, which include photothermal therapy based on gold nano-materials and ionizing radiation such as X-rays and gamma rays, have been reported. Studies of the effects of high-energy proton radiation on bacteria have mainly focused on Bacillus species and its spores. The effect of proton beams on Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been limitedly reported. Escherichia coli is an important biological tool to obtain metabolic and genetic information and is a common model microorganism for studying toxicity and antimicrobial activity. In addition, E. coli is a common bacterium in the intestinal tract of mammals. In this research, the morphological and the physiological changes of E. coli after proton irradiation were investigated. Diluted solutions of cells were used for proton beam radiation. LB agar plates were used to count the number of colonies formed. The growth profile of the cells was monitored by using the optical density at 600 nm. The morphology of the irradiated cells was observed with an optical microscope. A microarray analysis was performed to examine the gene expression changes between irradiated samples and control samples without irradiation. E coli cells have observed to be elongated after proton irradiation with doses ranging from 13 to 93 Gy. Twenty-two were up-regulated more than twofold in proton-irradiated samples (93 Gy) compared with unexposed one.

  3. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, R Glynn; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 muC will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 muC by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 mus after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 muC and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber ( approximately 300 mus), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles. PMID:20370004

  4. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  5. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10−11 achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W∕cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions∕light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 μm (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150–500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100–220 MeV energies. PMID:18561651

  6. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-05-15

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10{sup -11} achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions/light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 {mu}m (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150-500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100-220 MeV energies.

  7. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  8. Requirements of a proton beam accelerator for an accelerator-driven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Zhao, Y.; Tsoupas, N.; An, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    1997-12-31

    When the authors first proposed an accelerator-driven reactor, the concept was opposed by physicists who had earlier used the accelerator for their physics experiments. This opposition arose because they had nuisance experiences in that the accelerator was not reliable, and very often disrupted their work as the accelerator shut down due to electric tripping. This paper discusses the requirements for the proton beam accelerator. It addresses how to solve the tripping problem and how to shape the proton beam.

  9. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  10. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  11. Disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars as high-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of an accretion disk with the magnetic field of a neutron star produces large electromotive forces, which drive large conduction currents in the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit. Here we argue that such large conduction currents will cause microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere. If the minimum plasma density in the magnetosphere is relatively low is less than or aproximately 10(exp 9)/cu cm, current-driven micro-instabilities may cause relativistic double layers to form, producing voltage differences in excess of 10(exp 12) V and accelerating charged particles to very high energies. If instead the plasma density is higher (is greater than or approximately = 10(exp 9)/cu cm, twisting of the stellar magnetic field is likely to cause magnetic field reconnection. This reconnection will be relativistic, accelerating plasma in the magnetosphere to relativistic speeds and a small fraction of particles to very high energies. Interaction of these high-energy particles with X-rays, gamma-rays, and accreting plasma may produce detectable high-energy radiation.

  12. High-Energy Ions from Near-Critical Density Plasmas via Magnetic Vortex Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki

    2010-09-24

    Ultraintense laser pulses propagating in near-critical density plasmas generate magnetic dipole vortex structures. In the region of decreasing plasma density, the vortex expands both in forward and lateral directions. The magnetic field pressure pushes electrons and ions to form a density jump along the vortex axis and induces a longitudinal electric field. This structure moves together with the expanding dipole vortex. The background ions located ahead of the electric field are accelerated to high energies. The energy scaling of ions generated by this magnetic vortex acceleration mechanism is derived and corroborated using particle-in-cell simulations.

  13. Rare isotope accelerator project in Korea and its application to high energy density sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, M.; Chung, Y. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, B. J.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    As a national science project, the Korean government has recently established the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) with the goal of conducting world-class research in basic sciences. One of the core facilities for the IBS will be the rare isotope accelerator which can produce high-intensity rare isotope beams to investigate the fundamental properties of nature, and also to support a broad research program in material sciences, medical and biosciences, and future nuclear energy technologies. The construction of the accelerator is scheduled to be completed by approximately 2017. The design of the accelerator complex is optimized to deliver high average beam current on targets, and to maximize the production of rare isotope beams through the simultaneous use of Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) and In-Flight Fragmentation (IFF) methods. The proposed accelerator is, however, not optimal for high energy density science, which usually requires very high peak currents on the target. In this study, we present possible beam-plasma experiments that can be done within the scope of the current accelerator design, and we also investigate possible future extension paths that may enable high energy density science with intense pulsed heavy ion beams.

  14. Laser-induced generation of ultraintense proton beams for high energy-density science

    SciTech Connect

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.; Parys, P.; Rosinski, M.; Suchanska, R.; Wolowski, J.; Antici, P.; Fuchs, J.; Mancic, A.; Szydlowski, A.

    2008-06-24

    Basic properties of high-current high-intensity ion beam generation using laser-induced skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (SLPA) are discussed. The results of a recent experiment, in which 0.35-ps laser pulse of intensity up to 2x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} irradiated a thin (1-3 {mu}m) PS (plastic) or Au/PS target (PS covered by 0.1-0.2 {mu}m Au front layer), are presented. It is shown that multi-MA proton beams of current densities >1 TA/cm{sup 2} and intensities > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} at the source can be produced when the laser-target interaction conditions approach the SLPA requirements. The proton beam parameters as well as the laser-protons energy conversion efficiency substantially depend on the target structure and can be significantly increased with the use of a double-layer Au/PS target. A prospect for the application of SLPA-driven proton beams in ICF fast ignition research is outlined.

  15. Three-hadron angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions from perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alejandro; Ortiz, Antonio; Paic, Guy; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Magnin, J.; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-08-15

    We study three-hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider at midrapidity. We use the leading-order parton matrix elements for 2{yields}3 processes and include the effect of parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma using the modified fragmentation function approach. For the case when the produced hadrons have either the same or not too different momenta, we observe two away-side peaks at 2{pi}/3 and 4{pi}/3. We consider the dependence of the angular correlations on energy loss parameters that have been used in studies of single inclusive hadron production at RHIC. Our results on the angular dependence of the cross section agree well with preliminary data by the PHENIX Collaboration. We comment on the possible contribution of 2{yields}3 processes to dihadron angular correlations and how a comparison of the two processes may help characterize the plasma further.

  16. Production of qq pairs in proton-nucleus collisions at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Tuchin, Kirill

    2006-09-01

    We calculate production of quark-antiquark pairs in high energy proton-nucleus collisions both in the quasiclassical approximation of McLerran-Venugopalan model and including quantum small-x evolution. The resulting production cross section is explicitly expressed in terms of Glauber-Mueller multiple rescatterings in the classical case and in terms of dipole-nucleus scattering amplitude in the quantum evolution case. We generalize the result of [K. Tuchin, Phys. Lett. B 593, 66 (2004).] beyond the aligned jet configurations. We expand on the earlier results of Blaizot, Gelis and Venugopalan [J. P. Blaizot, F. Gelis, and R. Venugopalan, Nucl. Phys. A743, 57 (2004).] by deriving quark production cross section including quantum evolution corrections in rapidity intervals both between the quarks and the target and between the quarks and the projectile.

  17. Production of qq¯ pairs in proton-nucleus collisions at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Tuchin, Kirill

    2006-09-01

    We calculate production of quark-antiquark pairs in high energy proton-nucleus collisions both in the quasiclassical approximation of McLerran-Venugopalan model and including quantum small-x evolution. The resulting production cross section is explicitly expressed in terms of Glauber-Mueller multiple rescatterings in the classical case and in terms of dipole-nucleus scattering amplitude in the quantum evolution case. We generalize the result of [K. Tuchin, Phys. Lett. B 593, 66 (2004).PYLBAJ0370-269310.1016/j.physletb.2004.04.057] beyond the aligned jet configurations. We expand on the earlier results of Blaizot, Gelis and Venugopalan [J. P. Blaizot, F. Gelis, and R. Venugopalan, Nucl. Phys. A743, 57 (2004).] by deriving quark production cross section including quantum evolution corrections in rapidity intervals both between the quarks and the target and between the quarks and the projectile.

  18. A prediction model for bipolar RAMs in a high energy ion/proton environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, D. K.; Price, W. E.; Nichols, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    A model has been developed which predicts the relative susceptibility of bipolar RAMs to heavy ion and proton upset. During the course of evaluating this model, physical and electrical variations were also evaluated indicating that the minimum internal signal level is the primary upset susceptibility indicator. Unfortunately, all of the physical and electrical variations expected during a normal product development cycle are in direct opposition to improved high-energy particle upset tolerance. Hence, a trade-off between highly susceptible, low power (medium speed) devices must be made against the less susceptible, higher power (high speed) equivalent device, taking into account the systems trade-off with respect to system power, software, error correction procedures and/or circuit redundancy.

  19. Intestinal microbiota reduces genotoxic endpoints induced by high-energy protons.

    PubMed

    Maier, Irene; Berry, David M; Schiestl, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing space radiation causes oxidative DNA damage and triggers oxidative stress responses, and compromised DNA repair mechanisms can lead to increased risk of carcinogenesis. Young adult mice with developed innate and adaptive immune systems that harbored either a conventional intestinal microbiota (CM) or an intestinal microbiota with a restricted microbial composition (RM) were irradiated with a total dose of 1 Gy delivered by high-energy protons (2.5 GeV/n, LET = 0.2-2 keV/μm) or silicon or iron ions (850 MeV/n, LET ≈ 50 keV/μm and 1 GeV/n, LET = 150 keV/μm, respectively). Six hours after whole-body irradiation, acute chromosomal DNA lesions were observed for RM mice but not CM mice. High-throughput rRNA gene sequencing of intestinal mucosal bacteria showed that Barnesiella intestinihominis and unclassified Bacterodiales were significantly more abundant in male RM mice than CM mice, and phylotype densities changed in irradiated mice. In addition, Helicobacter hepaticus and Bacteroides stercoris were higher in CM than RM mice. Elevated levels of persistently phosphorylated γ-H2AX were observed in RM mice exposed to high-energy protons compared to nonirradiated RM mice, and they also were associated with a decrease of the antioxidant glutathione in peripheral blood measured at four weeks after irradiation. After radiation exposure, CM mice showed lower levels of γ-H2AX phosphorylation than RM mice and an increase in specific RM-associated phylotypes, indicating a down-regulating force on DNA repair by differentially abundant phylotypes in RM versus a radiation-sensitive complex CM. PMID:24397477

  20. Investigation of efficient shock acceleration of ions using high energy lasers in low density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antici, P.; Gauthier, M.; D'Humieres, E.; Albertazzi, B.; Beaucourt, C.; Böker, J.; Chen, S.; Dervieux, V.; Feugeas, J. L.; Glesser, M.; Levy, A.; Nicolai, P.; Romagnani, L.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Pepin, H.; Fuchs, J.

    2012-10-01

    Intense research is being conducted on sources of laser-accelerated ions and their applications that have the potential of becoming novel particle sources. In most experiments, a high intensity and short laser pulse interacts with a solid density target. It was recently shown that a promising way to accelerate ions to higher energies and in a collimated beam is to use under-dense or near-critical density targets instead of solid ones. In these conditions, simulations have revealed that protons are predicted to be accelerated by a collisionless shock mechanism that significantly increases their energy. We present recent experiments performed on the 100 TW LULI laser (France) and the TITAN facility at LLNL, USA. The near critical density plasma was prepared by exploding thin solid foils by a long laser pulse. The plasma density profile was controlled by varying the target thickness and the delay between the long and the short laser pulse. When exploding the target, we obtained proton energies that are comparable if not higher than what was obtained under similar laser conditions, but with solid targets which make them a promising candidate for an efficient proton source.

  1. Laser Acceleration of Monoenergetic Protons Trapped in Moving Double Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Shao, X.

    2008-10-15

    We present analytic theory of monoenergetic protons acceleration by short pulse laser irradiation on a thin foil with specific thickness suggested by Yan et al. in simulations. The laser ponderomotive force pushes the electrons forward, leaving ions behind until the space charge field balances the ponderomotive force at distance {delta}. For the optimal target thickness D = {delta}>c/{omega}{sub p}, the electron sheath piled up at the rear surface of width skin depth moves into vacuum, carrying with it the protons contained in the sheath. These protons are trapped by the self field of the electron sheath and are collectively accelerated as a double layer by the laser ponderomotive force. We present here the analytic expression for the energy of the accelerated protons as a function of time, laser intensity, wavelength, and plasma density. For example, proton energy can reach {approx_equal}200 MeV at a = 5, and pulse length 90 fs.

  2. The Rhodotron, a new high-energy, high-power, CW electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Y.; Abs, M.; Capdevila, J. M.; Defrise, D.; Genin, F.; NGuyen, A.

    1994-05-01

    Over the last years, a new kind of industrial electron accelerator has been conjointly developed by the French Atomic Energy Agency (CEA) and IBA (Ion Beam Applications) in Belgium. This accelerator, called the Rhodotron, is a recirculating accelerator, operated in CW. It uses low frequencies (metric waves), that make possible the generation of continuous high-energy high-power beams. The construction of the first industrial model of the Rhodotron began in January 1992. It is a 10 MeV, 100 kW beam power unit, with an additional beam exit at 5 MeV. A target is also being developed in order to allow an efficient conversion of the electrons into X-rays. The different subsystems of this machine are now being assembled and tested. The first beam tests are scheduled for the autumn of 1993. A complete report presenting the state of development of this prototype is included in this paper.

  3. Workshop on acceleration of polarized protons: summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Terwilliger, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    The workshop sessions concentrated on polarized protons in circular accelerators and storage rings. Topics such as polarized electrons were discussed only when the subject was relevant to proton phenomena. Of major interest was the possible applicability of the new idea of spin matching for crossing depolarizing resonances. On the experimental side, some remarkable new data were presented by the SATURNE II Group. They have successfully crossed both intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances by the spin flip method with minimal depolarization-the first group to do so. They also obtained some results which apparently cannot be explained with our present understanding of spin phenomena. The workshop concluded that more experimental measurements are needed to understand the physics and that such studies would be very important for the future acceleration of polarized protons at KEK and the AGS. The workshop included status reports from the four laboratories which have programs of polarized particle acceleration--or approved projects to accelerate polarized protons.

  4. Monte Carlo approach for hadron azimuthal correlations in high energy proton and nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Dominguez, Isabel; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Magnin, J.; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2012-09-01

    We use a Monte Carlo approach to study hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies at midrapidity. We build a hadron event generator that incorporates the production of 2→2 and 2→3 parton processes and their evolution into hadron states. For nucleus-nucleus collisions we include the effect of parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma using a modified fragmentation function approach. In the presence of the medium, for the case when three partons are produced in the hard scattering, we analyze the Monte Carlo sample in parton and hadron momentum bins to reconstruct the angular correlations. We characterize this sample by the number of partons that are able to hadronize by fragmentation within the selected bins. In the nuclear environment the model allows hadronization by fragmentation only for partons with momentum above a threshold pTthresh=2.4 GeV. We argue that one should treat properly the effect of those partons with momentum below the threshold, because their interaction with the medium may lead to showers of low-momentum hadrons along the direction of motion of the original partons as the medium becomes diluted.

  5. Resistivity changes in superconducting-cavity-grade Nb following high-energy proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Hanson, A.; Greene, G.A.

    1997-12-01

    Niobium superconducting rf cavities are proposed for use in the proton LINAC accelerators for spallation-neutron applications. Because of accidental beam loss and continual halo losses along the accelerator path, concern for the degradation of the superconducting properties of the cavities with accumulating damage arises. Residual-resistivity-ratio (RRR) specimens of Nb, with a range of initial RRR`s were irradiated at room temperature with protons at energies from 200 to 2000 MeV. Four-probe resistance measurements were made at room temperature and at 4.2 K both prior to and after irradiation. Nonlinear increases in resistivity simulate expected behavior in cavity material after extended irradiation, followed by periodic anneals to room temperature: For RRR = 316 material, irradiations to (2 - 3) x 10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2} produce degradations up to the 10% level, a change that is deemed operationally acceptable. Without. periodic warming to room temperature, the accumulated damage energy would be up to a factor of ten greater, resulting in unacceptable degradations. Likewise, should higher-RRR material be used, for the same damage energy imparted, relatively larger percentage changes in the RRR will result.

  6. Intergalactic Magnetic Field and Arrival Direction of Ultra-High-Energy Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Das, Santabrata; Kang, Hyesung

    2010-02-01

    We studied how the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) affects the propagation of super-Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) protons that originate from extragalactic sources within the local GZK sphere. To this end, we set up hypothetical sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), virtual observers, and the magnetized cosmic web in a model universe constructed from cosmological structure formation simulations. We then arranged a set of reference objects mimicking active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the local universe, with which correlations of simulated UHECR events are analyzed. With our model IGMF, the deflection angle between the arrival direction of super-GZK protons and the sky position of their actual sources is quite large with a mean value of langθrang ~ 15° and a median value of \\tilde{θ}˜ 7°-10°. On the other hand, the separation angle between the arrival direction and the sky position of nearest reference objects is substantially smaller with langSrang ~ 3fdg5-4°, which is similar to the mean angular distance in the sky to nearest neighbors among the reference objects. This is a direct consequence of our model that the sources, observers, reference objects, and the IGMF all trace the matter distribution of the universe. The result implies that extragalactic objects lying closest to the arrival direction of UHECRs are not necessarily their actual sources. With our model for the distribution of reference objects, the fraction of super-GZK proton events, whose closest AGNs are true sources, is less than 1/3. We discussed implications of our findings for correlation studies of real UHECR events.

  7. Status Of The Dielectric Wall Accelerator For Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen Yujiuan; Watson, James A.; Blackfield, Don T.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.; Stanley, Joel R.; Sullivan, James S.

    2011-06-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA) offers the potential to produce a high gradient linear accelerator for proton therapy and other applications. The current status of the DWA for proton therapy will be reviewed. Recent progress in SiC photoconductive switch development will be presented. There are serious beam transport challenges in the DWA arising from short pulse excitation of the wall. Solutions to these transport difficulties will be discussed.

  8. Experimental stand for studying the impact of laser-accelerated protons on biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdonov, K. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Ignatova, N. I.; Osmanov, R. R.; Sladkov, A. D.; Soloviev, A. A.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Ginzburg, V. N.; Kuz'min, A. A.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Revet, G.; Sergeev, A. M.; Fuchs, J.; Khazanov, E. A.; Chen, S.; Shaykin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    An original experimental stand is presented, aimed at studying the impact of high-energy protons, produced by the laser-plasma interaction at a petawatt power level, on biological objects. In the course of pilot experiments with the energy of laser-accelerated protons up to 25 MeV, the possibility is demonstrated of transferring doses up to 10 Gy to the object of study in a single shot with the magnetic separation of protons from parasitic X-ray radiation and fast electrons. The technique of irradiating the cell culture HeLa Kyoto and measuring the fraction of survived cells is developed. The ways of optimising the parameters of proton beams and the suitable methods of their separation with respect to energy and transporting to the studied living objects are discussed. The construction of the stand is intended for the improvement of laser technologies for hadron therapy of malignant neoplasms.

  9. On the threshold of proton acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the reconnection theory of a flare and on recent observational and statistical findings, the problem of the initial acceleration of solar cosmic rays (SCR) is discussed. Simple estimates of the electric fields required to start the electron acceleration are obtained and the problem of proton ionization losses for overcoming the Coulomb barrier is considered. We take into account also the possible differences between proton and electron spectra from the very beginning of the acceleration process. Special attention is paid to the distribution functions of solar flare events in various parameters (peak fluxes and/or energy fluences in X-ray and radio wave bursts, in proton and electron emissions, etc.). It is shown that the distribution functions allow the interpretation of some scale and time flare parameters in terms of expected threshold effects. However, these functions are still insuffienet to evaluate the relative share of different emissions in the global energy budget of a flare. In this context, a more promising approach is to derive the direct ratio between the number of accelerated protons, Np, and total flare energy, Wf, within the frame of a certain acceleration model. It is argued that an absolute threshold for proton production (in Hudson's formulation) does not exist. Meanwhile, the flux and threshold energy of accelerated protons overcoming the Coulomb loss maximum, in fact, may depend heavily on the global output of flare energy.

  10. Transmission calculation by empirical numerical model and Monte Carlo simulation in high energy proton radiography of thick objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Na; Xu, Hai-Bo

    2015-10-01

    An empirical numerical model that includes nuclear absorption, multiple Coulomb scattering and energy loss is presented for the calculation of transmission through thick objects in high energy proton radiography. In this numerical model the angular distributions are treated as Gaussians in the laboratory frame. A Monte Carlo program based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed and used for high energy proton radiography experiment simulations and verification of the empirical numerical model. The two models are used to calculate the transmission fraction of carbon and lead step-wedges in proton radiography at 24 GeV/c, and to calculate radial transmission of the French Test Object in proton radiography at 24 GeV/c with different angular cuts. It is shown that the results of the two models agree with each other, and an analysis of the slight differences is given. Supported by NSAF (11176001) and Science and Technology Developing Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012A0202006)

  11. Laser Radiation Pressure Accelerator for Quasi-Monoenergetic Proton Generation and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. S.; Shao, X.; Liu, T. C.; Su, J. J.; He, M. Q.; Eliasson, B.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dudnikova, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Wilks, S.; Chen, C. D.; Sheng, Z. M.

    Laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of ultrathin foils of subwavelength thickness provides an efficient means of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation. With an optimal foil thickness, the ponderomotive force of the intense short-pulse laser beam pushes the electrons to the edge of the foil, while balancing the electric field due to charge separation. The electron and proton layers form a self-organized plasma double layer and are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser, the so-called light sail. However, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can limit the acceleration and broaden the energy of the proton beam. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the formation of finger-like structures due to the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability limits the acceleration and leads to a leakage of radiation through the target by self-induced transparency. We here review the physics of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation by RPA and recent advances in the studies of energy scaling of RPA, and discuss the RPA of multi-ion and gas targets. The scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic protons with RPA has the potential of leading to table-top accelerators as sources for producing monoenergetic 50-250 MeV protons. We also discuss potential medical implications, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment, using quasi-monoenergetic proton beams generated from RPA. Compact monoenergetic ion sources also have applications in many other areas such as high-energy particle physics, space electronics radiation testing, and fast ignition in laser fusion.

  12. Dosimetric characteristics of four PTW microDiamond detectors in high-energy proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsolat, F.; De Marzi, L.; Patriarca, A.; Nauraye, C.; Moignier, C.; Pomorski, M.; Moignau, F.; Heinrich, S.; Tromson, D.; Mazal, A.

    2016-09-01

    Small diamond detectors are useful for the dosimetry of high-energy proton beams. However, linear energy transfer (LET) dependence has been observed in the literature with such solid state detectors. A novel synthetic diamond detector has recently become commercially available from the manufacturer PTW-Freiburg (PTW microDiamond type 60019). This study was designed to thoroughly characterize four microDiamond detectors in clinical proton beams, in order to investigate their response and their reproducibility in high LET regions. Very good dosimetric characteristics were observed for two of them, with good stability of their response (deviation less than 0.4% after a pre-irradiation dose of approximately 12 Gy), good repeatability (coefficient of variation of 0.06%) and a sensitivity of approximately 0.85 nC Gy‑1. A negligible dose rate dependence was also observed for these two microDiamonds with a deviation of the sensitivity less than 0.7% with respect to the one measured at the reference dose rate of 2.17 Gy min‑1, in the investigated dose rate range from 1.01 Gy min‑1 to 5.52 Gy min‑1. Lateral dose profile measurements showed the high spatial resolution of the microDiamond oriented with its stem perpendicular to the beam axis and with its small sensitive thickness of about 1 μm in the scanning profile direction. Finally, no significant LET dependence was found with these two diamond dosimeters in comparison to a reference ionization chamber (model IBA PPC05). These good results were in accordance to the literature. However, this study showed also a non reproducibility between the devices in terms of stability, sensitivity and LET dependence, since the two other microDiamonds characterized in this work showed different dosimetric characteristics making them not suitable for proton beam dosimetry with a maximum difference of the peak-to-plateau ratio of 6.7% relative to the reference ionization chamber in a clinical 138 MeV proton beam.

  13. Dosimetric characteristics of four PTW microDiamond detectors in high-energy proton beams.

    PubMed

    Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Patriarca, A; Nauraye, C; Moignier, C; Pomorski, M; Moignau, F; Heinrich, S; Tromson, D; Mazal, A

    2016-09-01

    Small diamond detectors are useful for the dosimetry of high-energy proton beams. However, linear energy transfer (LET) dependence has been observed in the literature with such solid state detectors. A novel synthetic diamond detector has recently become commercially available from the manufacturer PTW-Freiburg (PTW microDiamond type 60019). This study was designed to thoroughly characterize four microDiamond detectors in clinical proton beams, in order to investigate their response and their reproducibility in high LET regions. Very good dosimetric characteristics were observed for two of them, with good stability of their response (deviation less than 0.4% after a pre-irradiation dose of approximately 12 Gy), good repeatability (coefficient of variation of 0.06%) and a sensitivity of approximately 0.85 nC Gy(-1). A negligible dose rate dependence was also observed for these two microDiamonds with a deviation of the sensitivity less than 0.7% with respect to the one measured at the reference dose rate of 2.17 Gy min(-1), in the investigated dose rate range from 1.01 Gy min(-1) to 5.52 Gy min(-1). Lateral dose profile measurements showed the high spatial resolution of the microDiamond oriented with its stem perpendicular to the beam axis and with its small sensitive thickness of about 1 μm in the scanning profile direction. Finally, no significant LET dependence was found with these two diamond dosimeters in comparison to a reference ionization chamber (model IBA PPC05). These good results were in accordance to the literature. However, this study showed also a non reproducibility between the devices in terms of stability, sensitivity and LET dependence, since the two other microDiamonds characterized in this work showed different dosimetric characteristics making them not suitable for proton beam dosimetry with a maximum difference of the peak-to-plateau ratio of 6.7% relative to the reference ionization chamber in a clinical 138 MeV proton beam. PMID:27499356

  14. Polarized proton acceleration at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    At the conclusion of polarized proton commissioning in February 1986, protons with an average polarization of 45%, momentum of 21.7 GeV/c, and intensity of 2 x 10/sup 10/ protons per pulse, were extracted to an external polarimeter at the Brookhaven AGS. In order to maintain this polarization, five intrinsic and nearly forty imperfection depolarizing resonances had to be corrected. An apparent interaction between imperfection and intrinsic resonances occurring at very nearly the same energy was observed and the correction of imperfection resonances using ''beat'' magnetic harmonics discovered in the previous AGS commissioning run was further confirmed.

  15. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Dérouillat, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. In this paper, we compare the results given by different codes and point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. These limitations are illustrated in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy particle acceleration.

  16. High-energy Laser-accelerated Electron Beams for Long-range Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Banerjee, Sudeep; Ramanathan, Vidya; Powers, Nathan; Chandler-Smith, Nate; Umstadter, Donald; Vane, Randy; Schultz, David; Beene, James; Pozzi, Sara; Clarke, Shaun

    2009-03-10

    We are studying the use of 0.1-1.0 GeV laser-accelerated electron beams as active interrogation probes for long-standoff radiography or nuclear activation of concealed special nuclear material. Use of beams in this energy range is largely unexplored, but such beams could provide notable advantages over lower-energy beams and x-rays. High-energy laser-accelerated electrons exhibit large penetration range through air and solids, and low beam divergence for both direct beams and secondary Bremsstrahlung x-rays. We present laboratory measurements of radiography and activation, using the high-power Diodes laser system at the University of Nebraska, as well as MCNP and GEANT Monte Carlo simulation results used to aid experiment design and interpretation.

  17. High-Energy Laser-Accelerated Electron Beams for Long-Range Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Cummingham, N. J.; Banerjee, Sudeep; Ramanathan, Vidya; Powell, Nathan; Chandler-Smith, Nate; Vane, C Randy; Schultz, David Robert; Pozzi, Sara; Clarke, Shaun; Beene, James R; Umstadter, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We are studying the use of 0.1 1.0 GeV laser-accelerated electron beams as active interrogation probes for long-standoff radiography or nuclear activation of concealed special nuclear material. Use of beams in this energy range is largely unexplored, but such beams could provide notable advantages over lower-energy beams and x-rays. High-energy laser-accelerated electrons exhibit large penetration range through air and solids, and low beam divergence for both direct beams and secondary Bremsstrahlung x-rays. We present laboratory measurements of radiography and activation, using the high-power Diodes laser system at the University of Nebraska, as well as MCNP and GEANT Monte Carlo simulation results used to aid experiment design and interpretation.

  18. Proton shock acceleration in laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, M.; Davies, J.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Fahlen, J.; Ren, C.; Tsung, F.; Mori, W. B.

    2003-10-01

    The formation of strong, high Mach number (2--3), electrostatic shocks by laser pulses incident on overdense plasma slabs is observed in 1 and 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, for a wide range of intensities, pulse durations, target thicknesses and densities. The shocks propagate undisturbed across the plasma, accelerating the ions (protons). For dimensionless field strength parameter a_0=16 (Iλ^2 ≈ 3 × 10^20 W cm-2 μm^2, where I is intensity and λ wavelength) the highest energy protons are accelerated by the shock. A plateau in the ion spectrum provides a direct signature for shock acceleration.

  19. Present Status of the TAC Proton Accelerator Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Akkus, B.; Bilgin, P. S.; Caliskan, A.; Yilmaz, M.; Sultansoy, S.

    2007-04-23

    Recently, conceptual design of the Turkic Accelerator Center (TAC) proposal was completed. The main goal of this proposal is a charm factory that consist of a linac-ring type electron-positron collider. In addition, synchrotron radiation from the positron ring, free electron laser from the electron linac and a GeV energy proton accelerator are proposed. The Project related with this proposal has been accepted by the Turkish State Planning Committee. It is planned that the Tecnical Design Repotr of the TAC will have been written in the next three years. In this study we consider main parameters of the TAC proton accelerator, secondary beams and their applications.

  20. Extended Acceleration in Slot Gaps and Pulsar High-Energy Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2003-01-01

    We revise the physics of primary electron acceleration in the "slot gap" (SG) above the pulsar polar caps (PCs), a regime originally proposed by Arons and Scharlemann (1979) in their electrodynamic model of pulsar PCs. We employ the standard definition of the SG as a pair-free space between the last open field lines and the boundary of the pair plasma column which is expected to develop above the bulk of the PC. The rationale for our revision is that the proper treatment of primary acceleration within the pulsar SGs should take into account the effect of the narrow geometry of the gap on the electrodynamics within the gap and also to include the effect of inertial frame dragging on the particle acceleration. We show that the accelerating electric field within the gap, being significantly boosted by the effect of frame dragging, becomes reduced because of the gap geometry by a factor proportional to the square of the SG width. The combination of the effects of frame dragging and geometrical screening in the gap region naturally gives rise to a regime of extended acceleration, that is not limited to favorably curved field lines as in earlier models, and the possibility of multiple-pair production by curvature photons at very high altitudes, up to several stellar radii. We present our estimates of the characteristic SG thickness across the PC, energetics of primaries accelerated within the gap, high-energy bolometric luminosities emitted from the high altitudes in the gaps, and maximum heating luminosities produced by positrons returning from the elevated pair fronts. The estimated theoretical high-energy luminosities are in good agreement with the corresponding empirical relationships for gamma-ray pulsars. We illustrate the results of our modeling of the pair cascades and gamma-ray emission from the high altitudes in the SG for the Crab pulsar. The combination of the frame-dragging field and high-altitude SG emission enables both acceleration at the smaller

  1. Production of ACTINIUM-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of THORIUM-232

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, James; Nolen, Jerry A.; Kroc, Thomas; Gomes, Itacil; Horwitz, E. Philip.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2010-06-01

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). The object of this effort is to refine the simulations for producing actinium-225 at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 GeV protons available at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Targets will be processed at Argonne National Laboratory to separate and purify the actinium-225 that will subsequently be transferred to NorthStar laboratory facilities for product quality testing and comparison to the product quality of ORNL produced actinium-225, which is currently the industry standard. The test irradiations at FNAL will produce 1-20 mCi per day which is more than sufficient for quantitative evaluation of the proposed production process.

  2. Effects of high energy protons on the E771 silicon microstrip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Antoniazzi, L.; Arenton, M.; Ballagh, C.; Bingham, H.; Blankman, A.; Block, M.; Boden, A.; Borodin, S.; Budagov, J.; Cao, Z. L.; Cataldi, G.; Chen, T. Y.; Clark, K.; Cline, D.; Conetti, S.; Cooper, M.; Corti, G.; Cox, B.; Creti, P.; Dukes, E.; Durandet, C.; Elia, V.; Erwin, A.; Fortney, L.; Golovatyuk, S.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Haire, M.; Hanlet, P.; He, M.; Introzzi, G.; Jenkins, M.; Jennings, J.; Judd, D.; Kaeding, T.; Kononenko, W.; Kowald, W.; lanza, A.; Lau, K.; Liguori, G.; Lys, J.; Mazur, P.; McManus, A.; Misawa, S.; Mo, G.; Murphy, T.; Nelson, K.; Newcomer, M.; Panareo, M.; Ramachandran, S.; Recagni, M.; Rhoades, J.; Segal, J.; Selove, W.; Smith, R.; Spiegel, L.; Sun, J.; Tokar, S.; Torre, P.; Trischuk, J.; Trojak, T.; Tsyganov, E.; Turnbull, L.; VanBerg, R.; Wagoner, D.; Wang, C.; Wang, H. C.; Wei, C.; Yang, W.; Yao, N.; Zhang, N.; Zhang, S. N.; Zou, B.

    1993-01-01

    A silicon strip detector (SSD) system for use in very high rate experiments has been operated in Experiment E771 (Cox, 1989) at the Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The detector electronics were designed (Swoboda, 1990; Bowden, 1990; Zimmerman, 1989; Christian, 1991) to meet the specific needs of Fermilab experiment E771 using ASIC chip sets where commercial circuits were not suitable. The electronics for the SSD were designed to operate at rates up to 60 Mhz and were operated at interaction rates up to 10 7 interaction/sec (beam rates of 2 × 10 8 proton/sec). In addition to being very fast, the detector for the 1991 run was very compact with 10000 channels of active detector in a volume fo 5cm × 5cm × 10cm. An expansion of the system to 16000 channels is planned for the next Fermilab fixed target run. The strip pitch ranged from 25 μ m in the center of the detector near the target to 100 μ m pitch at the most downstream, outer edges of the detector. The readout is a latch design with pipelined readout and appears to have single strip efficiencies of ≈ 75% even in the presence of a high radiation dose (∽ 10 14 protons/cm 2) and high leakage currents(≈ 1 nA/strip). The detector and associated amplifier electronics has presently been operated at 17° C and is designed to operate as low as 8° C.

  3. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-nucleus collisions: CGC meets NRQCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Ma, Yan-Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-01-01

    We study the production of heavy quarkonium states in high energy proton-nucleus collisions. Following earlier work of Blaizot, Fujii, Gelis, and Venugopalan, we systematically include both small x evolution and multiple scattering effects on heavy quark pair production within the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) framework. We obtain for the first time expressions in the Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formalism for heavy quarkonium differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity. We observe that the production of color singlet heavy quark pairs is sensitive to both "quadrupole" and "dipole" Wilson line correlators, whose energy evolution is described by the Balitsky-JIMWLK equations. In contrast, the color octet channel is sensitive to dipole correlators alone. In a quasi-classical approximation, our results for the color singlet channel reduce to those of Dominguez et al. [1]. We compare our results to those obtained combining the CGC with the color evaporation model and point to qualitative differences in the two approaches.

  4. Ratio of aerosol and gases of radioactive chlorine and particle size distribution of aerosol formed by high-energy proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S; Sato, K; Manabe, K; Noguchi, H; Kaneko, H; Oki, Y; Iida, T; Tanaka, Su

    2007-01-01

    To estimate internal doses due to the inhalation of radionuclides produced by the nuclear spallation of the air nuclei in high-energy proton accelerator facilities, the physicochemical properties of radionuclides are very important. Thus, the ratio of aerosol and gases of 38Cl and 39Cl formed by irradiating argon gas-added air with a 48 MeV proton beam has been measured. Radionuclides of 38Cl and 39Cl exist as aerosol, acid gas and non-acid gas. The percentages of activity of 38Cl and 39Cl aerosols are about 80%. The number size distributions of non-radioactive aerosol were characterised by two peaks with diameters of 10-20 nm and larger than 20 nm. As a result predicted by a simple surface model, it was found that the activity size distribution of 38Cl aerosols can be regarded as that having a single peak at 120 nm. PMID:18033760

  5. Numerical studies of electron acceleration behind self-modulating proton beam in plasma with a density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, A.; Lotov, K.; Sosedkin, A.

    2016-09-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1015cm-3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project-the proof-of-principle experiment on proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CERN.

  6. Hybrid proton acceleration scheme using relativistic intense laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.; Platonov, K. Yu.; Schnuerer, M.; Prasad, R.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-03-15

    Ion acceleration phenomena at relativistic intense laser interaction with thin foil targets are studied to find an efficient laser-target interaction concept at the conditions, where neither the ponderomotive pressure of the laser light nor the hot electron pressure is negligible. Particle in cell simulations and the analytical model are allowing to predict optimum laser-target parameters and suggesting a significant increase of proton energy if a hybrid proton acceleration scheme is used. In the proposed scenario, the laser polarisation is changed during the acceleration process: First with circularly polarised laser light the target is accelerated as a whole by the ponderamotive pressure, and then with linearly polarised laser light the electrons are heated which additionally increases the accelerating field. The calculations are in good agreement with experimental findings.

  7. Detailed parametrization of neutrino and gamma-ray energy spectra from high energy proton-proton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supanitsky, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma rays and neutrinos are produced as a result of proton-proton interactions that occur in different astrophysical contexts. The detection of these two types of messengers is of great importance for the study of different physical phenomena, related to nonthermal processes, taking place in different astrophysical scenarios. Therefore, the knowledge of the energy spectrum of these two types of particles, as a function of the incident proton energy, is essential for the interpretation of the observational data. In this paper, parametrizations of the energy spectra of gamma rays and neutrinos, originated in proton-proton collisions, are presented. The energy range of the incident protons considered extends from 102 to 108 GeV . The parametrizations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of proton-proton interactions performed with the hadronic interaction models QGSJET-II-04 and EPOS-LHC, which have recently been updated with the data taken by the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Proton linear accelerators: A theoretical and historical introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lapostolle, P.M.

    1989-07-01

    From the beginning, the development of linear accelerators has followed a number of different directions. This report surveys the basic ideas and general principles of such machines, pointing out the problems that have led to the various improvements, with the hope that it may also aid further progress. After a brief historical survey, the principal aspects of accelerator theory are covered in some detail: phase stability, focusing, radio-frequency accelerating structures, the detailed calculation of particle dynamics, and space-charge effects at high intensities. These developments apply essentially to proton and ion accelerators, and only the last chapter deals with a few aspects relative to electrons. 134 refs.

  9. Proton Injector for CW-Mode Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Joseph D.; Swenson, Donald; Guy, Frank; Love, Cody; Starling, Joel; Willis, Carl

    2009-03-01

    Numerous applications exist for CW linear accelerators with final energies in the 0.5 to 4.0 MeV proton energy range. Typical proton current at the linac output energy is 20 mA. An important subsystem for the accelerator facility is a reliable dc mode proton injector. We present here design and laboratory results for a dc, 25-keV, 30-mA proton injector. The proton source is a 2.45-GHz microwave hydrogen ion source which operates with an 875-G axial magnetic field. Low emittance, high proton fraction (>85%), beams have been demonstrated from this source. The injector uses a novel dual-solenoid magnet for matching the injector beam into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. Recently, a dc ion-source development program has given up to 30 mA beam current. The dual solenoid is a compact and simple design utilizing tape-wound, edge-cooled coils. The low-energy beam transport design as well as 25-keV beam matching calculations to an RFQ will also be presented.

  10. Plasma wakefield acceleration with a modulated proton bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, A.; Lotov, K. V.

    2011-10-15

    The plasma wakefield amplitudes which could be achieved via the modulation of a long proton bunch are investigated. We find that in the limit of long bunches compared to the plasma wavelength, the strength of the accelerating fields is directly proportional to the number of particles in the drive bunch and inversely proportional to the square of the transverse bunch size. The scaling laws were tested and verified in detailed simulations using parameters of existing proton accelerators, and large electric fields were achieved, reaching 1 GV/m for LHC bunches. Energy gains for test electrons beyond 6 TeV were found in this case.

  11. TAC Proton Accelerator Facility: The Status and Road Map

    SciTech Connect

    Algin, E.; Akkus, B.; Caliskan, A.; Yilmaz, M.; Sahin, L.

    2011-06-28

    Proton Accelerator (PA) Project is at a stage of development, working towards a Technical Design Report under the roof of a larger-scale Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project. The project is supported by the Turkish State Planning Organization. The PA facility will be constructed in a series of stages including a 3 MeV test stand, a 55 MeV linac which can be extended to 100+ MeV, and then a full 1-3 GeV proton synchrotron or superconducting linac. In this article, science applications, overview, and current status of the PA Project will be given.

  12. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  13. A brief history of high power RF proton linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The first mention of linear acceleration was in a paper by G. Ising in 1924 in which he postulated the acceleration of positive ions induced by spark discharges which produced electric fields in gaps between a series of {open_quotes}drift tubes{close_quotes}. Ising apparently was not able to demonstrate his concept, most likely due to the limited state of electronic devices. Ising`s work was followed by a seminal paper by R. Wideroe in 1928 in which he demonstrated the first linear accelerator. Wideroe was able to accelerate sodium or potassium ions to 50 keV of energy using drift tubes connected alternately to high frequency waves and to ground. Nuclear physics during this period was interested in accelerating protons, deuterons, electrons and alpha particles and not heavy ions like sodium or potassium. To accelerate the light ions required much higher frequencies than available at that time. So linear accelerators were not pursued heavily at that time. Research continued during the 1930s but the development of high frequency RF tubes for radar applications in World War 2 opened the potential for RF linear accelerators after the war. The Berkeley laboratory of E. 0. Lawrence under the leadership of Luis Alvarez developed a new linear proton accelerator concept that utilized drift tubes that required a full RF period to pass through as compared to the earlier concepts. This development resulted in the historic Berkeley 32 MeV proton linear accelerator which incorporated the {open_quotes}Alvarez drift tube{close_quotes} as the basic acceleration scheme using surplus 200 MHz radar components.

  14. The slingshot effect: A possible new laser-driven high energy acceleration mechanism for electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato; Angelis, Umberto de

    2014-11-15

    We show that under appropriate conditions the impact of a very short and intense laser pulse onto a plasma causes the expulsion of surface electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to the one of the propagations of the pulse. This is due to the combined effects of the ponderomotive force and the huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation (“slingshot effect”). The effect should also be present with other states of matter, provided the pulse is sufficiently intense to locally cause complete ionization. An experimental test seems to be feasible and, if confirmed, would provide a new extraction and acceleration mechanism for electrons, alternative to traditional radio-frequency-based or laser-wake-field ones.

  15. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  16. Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Protons for Chromosome Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    George, Kerry A.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated chromosome exchanges induced in human cells by seven different energies of protons (5–2500 MeV) with LET values ranging from 0.2 to 8 keV/μm. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro and chromosome damage was assessed using three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization chromosome painting in chemically condensed chromosomes collected during the first cell division post irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was calculated from the initial slope of the dose–response curve for chromosome exchanges with respect to low dose and low dose-rate γ-rays (denoted as RBEmax), and relative to acute doses of γ-rays (denoted as RBEγAcute). The linear dose–response term was similar for all energies of protons, suggesting that the decrease in LET with increasing proton energy was balanced by the increase in dose from the production of nuclear secondaries. Secondary particles increase slowly above energies of a few hundred megaelectronvolts. Additional studies of 50 g/cm2 aluminum shielded high-energy proton beams showed minor differences compared to the unshielded protons and lower RBE values found for shielded in comparison to unshielded beams of 2 or 2.5 GeV. All energies of protons produced a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges when compared to acute doses of γ-rays. The implications of these results for space radiation protection and proton therapy are discussed. PMID:26539409

  17. Enhancing proton acceleration by using composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-07-10

    Efficient laser ion acceleration requires high laser intensities, which can only be obtained by tightly focusing laser radiation. In the radiation pressure acceleration regime, where the tightly focused laser driver leads to the appearance of the fundamental limit for the maximum attainable ion energy, this limit corresponds to the laser pulse group velocity as well as to another limit connected with the transverse expansion of the accelerated foil and consequent onset of the foil transparency. These limits can be relaxed by using composite targets, consisting of a thin foil followed by a near critical density slab. Such targets provide guiding of a laser pulse inside a self-generated channel and background electrons, being snowplowed by the pulse, compensate for the transverse expansion. The use of composite targets results in a significant increase in maximum ion energy, compared to a single foil target case.

  18. Mount Aragats as a stable electron accelerator for atmospheric high-energy physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Mnatsakanyan, Eduard

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the numerous thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs), i.e., enhanced fluxes of electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons detected by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface and related to the strong thunderstorms above it, helped to establish a new scientific topic—high-energy physics in the atmosphere. Relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) are believed to be a central engine initiating high-energy processes in thunderstorm atmospheres. RREAs observed on Mount Aragats in Armenia during the strongest thunderstorms and simultaneous measurements of TGE electron and gamma-ray energy spectra proved that RREAs are a robust and realistic mechanism for electron acceleration. TGE research facilitates investigations of the long-standing lightning initiation problem. For the last 5 years we were experimenting with the "beams" of "electron accelerators" operating in the thunderclouds above the Aragats research station. Thunderstorms are very frequent above Aragats, peaking in May-June, and almost all of them are accompanied with enhanced particle fluxes. The station is located on a plateau at an altitude 3200 asl near a large lake. Numerous particle detectors and field meters are located in three experimental halls as well as outdoors; the facilities are operated all year round. All relevant information is being gathered, including data on particle fluxes, fields, lightning occurrences, and meteorological conditions. By the example of the huge thunderstorm that took place at Mount Aragats on August 28, 2015, we show that simultaneous detection of all the relevant data allowed us to reveal the temporal pattern of the storm development and to investigate the atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes.

  19. Coronal shock acceleration and heliospheric transport of solar energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, Kamen Asenov

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) in the Sun's atmosphere produce highly energetic charged particles during violent bursts of activity. Protons, the most numerous and important species of these solar energetic particles (SEP), accelerate and propagate throughout the heliosphere, probing the interplanetary transport conditions. They also present a significant radiation hazard to space operations. Nevertheless, SEP acceleration in the low corona is currently not well constrained and poorly understood. In this dissertation, I examine off-limb extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave dynamics between 1.3 and 2.0 solar radii in the corona, and I show that the EUV signatures are consistent with CME-driven shocks. Therefore, such shocks may form very low in the corona. I also develop a data-driven model for estimating the maximum energy to which protons may be accelerated in coronal shocks. I apply it to an observed shock and show that it may accelerate protons up to tens of MeV during its fast coronal passage, consistent with in-situ observations. To explore further coronal SEP acceleration by CME-driven shocks, I modify a global, 3D numerical model for interplanetary SEP transport for the coronal conditions, and adapt it to incorporate results from a realistic magnetohydrodynamic coronal and CME model. Furthermore, I apply a diffusive shock acceleration model, which explicitly treats proton energization at traveling shocks, to an MHD simulation of a real CME event. I find that the source population becomes strongly accelerated. In addition, I simulate the proton transport between the Sun and Earth, and find that the modeled fluxes are consistent with particle observations near Earth. Results suggest that CME-driven shocks in the corona may be the primary source of SEPs in solar storms. In addition, conditions along coronal shock fronts vary greatly, influencing the amount of acceleration. Finally, I model the global proton transport between Earth and 5 AU during a

  20. Radiation protection challenges in the management of radioactive waste from high-energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Ulrici, Luisa; Algoet, Yvon; Bruno, Luca; Magistris, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) has operated high-energy accelerators for fundamental physics research for nearly 60 y. The side-product of this activity is the radioactive waste, which is mainly generated as a result of preventive and corrective maintenance, upgrading activities and the dismantling of experiments or accelerator facilities. Prior to treatment and disposal, it is common practice to temporarily store radioactive waste on CERN's premises and it is a legal requirement that these storage facilities are safe and secure. Waste treatment typically includes sorting, segregation, volume and size reduction and packaging, which will depend on the type of component, its chemical composition, residual activity and possible surface contamination. At CERN, these activities are performed in a dedicated waste treatment centre under the supervision of the Radiation Protection Group. This paper gives an overview of the radiation protection challenges in the conception of a temporary storage and treatment centre for radioactive waste in an accelerator facility, based on the experience gained at CERN. The CERN approach consists of the classification of waste items into 'families' with similar radiological and physical-chemical properties. This classification allows the use of specific, family-dependent techniques for radiological characterisation and treatment, which are simultaneously efficient and compliant with best practices in radiation protection. The storage was planned on the basis of radiological and other possible hazards such as toxicity, pollution and fire load. Examples are given of technical choices for the treatment and radiological characterisation of selected waste families, which could be of interest to other accelerator facilities. PMID:25377753

  1. Simulation on buildup of electron cloud in a proton circular accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai-Wei; Liu, Yu-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beams are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerators. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detailed processes of the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by electron clouds. The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an intense proton accelerator facility now being built, whose accelerator complex includes two main parts: an H-linac and a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The RCS accumulates the 80 MeV proton beam and accelerates it to 1.6 GeV with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. During beam injection with lower energy, the emerging electron cloud may cause serious instability and beam loss on the vacuum pipe. A simulation code has been developed to simulate the build-up, distribution and density of electron cloud in CSNS/RCS. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275221, 11175193)

  2. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  3. Accelerating slow excited state proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J; Concepcion, Javier J; Brennaman, M Kyle; Binstead, Robert A; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-01-15

    Visible light excitation of the ligand-bridged assembly [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(II)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)] (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; L is the bridging ligand, 4-phen-tpy) results in emission from the lowest energy, bridge-based metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state (L(-•))Ru(b)(III)-OH(2) with an excited-state lifetime of 13 ± 1 ns. Near-diffusion-controlled quenching of the emission occurs with added HPO(4)(2-) and partial quenching by added acetate anion (OAc(-)) in buffered solutions with pH control. A Stern-Volmer analysis of quenching by OAc(-) gave a quenching rate constant of k(q) = 4.1 × 10(8) M(-1) • s(-1) and an estimated pK(a)* value of ~5 ± 1 for the [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L(•-))Ru(b)(III)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)]* excited state. Following proton loss and rapid excited-state decay to give [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(II)(bpy)(OH)(3+)] in a H(2)PO(4)(-)/HPO(4)(2-) buffer, back proton transfer occurs from H(2)PO(4)(-) to give [(bpy)(2)Ru(a)(II)(L)Ru(b)(bpy)(OH(2))(4+)] with k(PT,2) = 4.4 × 10(8) M(-1) • s(-1). From the intercept of a plot of k(obs) vs. [H(2)PO(4)(-)], k = 2.1 × 10(6) s(-1) for reprotonation by water providing a dramatic illustration of kinetically limiting, slow proton transfer for acids and bases with pK(a) values intermediate between pK(a)(H(3)O(+)) = -1.74 and pK(a)(H(2)O) = 15.7. PMID:23277551

  4. Canted-Cosine-Theta Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for High Energy Physics and Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Lucas Nathan

    Advances in superconducting magnet technology have historically enabled the construction of new, higher energy hadron colliders. Looking forward to the needs of a potential future collider, a significant increase in magnet field and performance is required. Such a task requires an open mind to the investigation of new design concepts for high field magnets. Part I of this thesis will present an investigation of the Canted-Cosine-Theta (CCT) design for high field Nb3Sn magnets. New analytic and finite element methods for analysis of CCT magnets will be given, along with a discussion on optimization of the design for high field. The design, fabrication, and successful test of the 2.5 T NbTi dipole CCT1 will be presented as a proof-of-principle step towards a high field Nb3Sn magnet. Finally, the design and initial steps in the fabrication of the 16 T Nb3Sn dipole CCT2 will be described. Part II of this thesis will investigate the CCT concept extended to a curved magnet for use in an ion beam therapy gantry. The introduction of superconducting technology in this field shows promise to reduce the weight and cost of gantries, as well as open the door to new beam optics solutions with high energy acceptance. An analytic approach developed for modeling curved CCT magnets will be presented, followed by a design study of a superconducting magnet for a proton therapy gantry. Finally, a new magnet concept called the "Alternating Gradient CCT" (AG-CCT) will be introduced. This concept will be shown to be a practical magnet solution for achieving the alternating quadrupole fields desired for an achromatic gantry, allowing for the consideration of treatment with minimal field changes in the superconducting magnets. The primary motivation of this thesis is to share new developments for Canted-Cosine-Theta superconducting magnets, with the hope this design will improve technology for high energy physics and ion beam cancer therapy.

  5. High-efficiency deflection of high energy protons due to channeling along the <110> axis of a bent silicon crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, W.; Arduini, G.; Butcher, M.; Cerutti, F.; Garattini, M.; Gilardoni, S.; Lechner, A.; Masi, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Montesano, S.; Redaelli, S.; Rossi, R.; Smirnov, G.; Breton, D.; Burmistrov, L.; Chaumat, V.; Dubos, S.; Maalmi, J.; Puill, V.; Stocchi, A.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Dabagov, S.; Murtas, F.; Addesa, F.; Cavoto, G.; Iacoangeli, F.; Galluccio, F.; Afonin, A. G.; Chesnokov, Yu. A.; Durum, A. A.; Maisheev, V. A.; Sandomirskiy, Yu. E.; Yanovich, A. A.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Taratin, A. M.; Denisov, A. S.; Gavrikov, Yu. A.; Ivanov, Yu. M.; Lapina, L. P.; Malyarenko, L. G.; Skorobogatov, V. V.; James, T.; Hall, G.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, M.

    2016-09-01

    A deflection efficiency of about 61% was observed for 400 GeV/c protons due to channeling, most strongly along the <110> axis of a bent silicon crystal. It is comparable with the deflection efficiency in planar channeling and considerably larger than in the case of the <111> axis. The measured probability of inelastic nuclear interactions of protons in channeling along the <110> axis is only about 10% of its amorphous level whereas in channeling along the (110) planes it is about 25%. High efficiency deflection and small beam losses make this axial orientation of a silicon crystal a useful tool for the beam steering of high energy charged particles.

  6. Comparative Studies of Hard X-Ray Spectral Evolution in Solar Flares with High-Energy Proton Events Observed at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1995-11-01

    correctly predicted associations of 22 out of 23 SESC events, for a 96% success rate, while 700 out of 708 flares were projected to be correct rejections with no associated proton events. The data suggest that progressive hardening is a diagnostic of high-energy particle acceleration of electrons and of protons and that it is not a manifestation of the "big flare syndrome" which asserts that the largest flares are associated with many or most known phenomena. There also appears to be an approximate relationship between the timescales (FWHM) of progressively hardening X-ray peaks and the cube of the interplanetary peak proton fluxes. The strong associations of particular hard X-ray characteristics and interplanetary proton events are of interest both on physical grounds and because the techniques employed can be directly adapted into a practical means of predicting which events are most likely to be associated with large interplanetary proton events that pose threats to humans in space and to spacecraft.

  7. Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, AY; Sitnov, MI; Merkin, VG; Artemyev, AV

    2013-01-01

    [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processes operate in a realistic magnetotail geometry. For this purpose we construct an analytical model of the front which is superimposed onto the ambient field of the magnetotail. According to our numerical simulations, both trapping and quasi-trapping can produce rapid acceleration of protons by more than an order of magnitude. In the case of trapping, the acceleration levels depend on the amount of time particles stay in phase with the front which is controlled by the magnetic field curvature ahead of the front and the front width. Quasi-trapping does not cause particle scattering out of the equatorial plane. Energization levels in this case are limited by the number of encounters particles have with the front before they get magnetized behind it. PMID:26167430

  8. Proton acceleration from short pulse lasers interacting with ultrathin foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, George; McGuffey, Christopher; Thomas, Alec; Krushelnick, Karl; Beg, Farhat

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using 50 nm Si3N4 and DLC foils are compared to published experimental data of proton acceleration from ultra-thin foils (<1 μm) irradiated by short pulse lasers (30-50 fs), and some underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration have been addressed. 2D particle-in-cell simulations show that the maximum proton energy scales as I2/3, stronger than Target Normal Sheath Acceleration for thick foils (>1 μm), which is typically between I1/3 and I1/2. Published experimental data were found to depend primarily on the laser energy and scale as E2/3. The different scaling laws for thick (>1 μm) and ultra-thin (<1 μm) foils are explained qualitatively as transitioning from Target Normal Sheath Acceleration to more advanced acceleration schemes such as Radiation-Induced Transparency and Radiation Pressure Acceleration regimes. This work was performed with the support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant FA9550-14-1-0282.

  9. Lattice design and beam dynamics studies of the high energy beam transport line in the RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2015-12-01

    In RAON heavy ion accelerator, beams generated by superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR-IS) or Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) system are accelerated by lower energy superconducting linac and high energy superconducting linac. The accelerated beams are used in the high energy experimental hall which includes bio-medical and muon-SR facilities, after passing through the high energy beam transport lines. At the targets of those two facilities, the stable and small beams meeting the requirements rigorously are required in the transverse plane. Therefore the beams must be safely sent to the targets and simultaneously satisfy the two requirements, the achromatic condition and the mid-plane symmetric condition, of the targets. For this reason, the lattice design of the high energy beam transport lines in which the long deflecting sections are included is considered as a significant issue in the RAON accelerator. In this paper, we will describe the calculated beam optics satisfying the conditions and present the result of particle tracking simulations with the designed lattice of the high energy beam transport lines in the RAON accelerator. Also, the orbit distortion caused by the machine imperfections and the orbit correction with correctors will be discussed.

  10. Luminescent tracks of high-energy photoemitted electrons accelerated by plasmonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vece, Marcel; Giannakoudakis, Giorgos; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Tang, Wingjohn

    2015-12-01

    The emission of an electron from a metal nanostructure under illumination and its subsequent acceleration in a plasmonic field forms a platform to extend these phenomena to deposited nanoparticles, which can be studied by state-of-the-art confocal microscopy combined with femtosecond optical excitation. The emitted and accelerated electrons leave defect tracks in the immersion oil, which can be revealed by thermoluminescence. These photographic tracks are read out with the confocal microscope and have a maximum length of about 80 μm, which corresponds to a kinetic energy of about 100 keV. This energy is consistent with the energy provided by the intense laser pulse combined with plasmonic local field enhancement. The results are discussed within the context of the rescattering model by which electrons acquire more energy. The visualization of electron tracks originating from plasmonic field enhancement around a gold nanoparticle opens a new way to study with confocal microscopy both the plasmonic properties of metal nano objects as well as high energy electron interaction with matter.

  11. Accelerating piston action and plasma heating in high-energy density laser plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. C.; Wilks, S. C.; Baring, M. G.

    2013-03-01

    In the field of high-energy density physics (HEDP), lasers in both the nanosecond and picosecond regimes can drive conditions in the laboratory relevant to a broad range of astrophysical phenomena, including gamma-ray burst afterglows and supernova remnants. In the short-pulse regime, the strong light pressure (>Gbar) associated ultraintense lasers of intensity I > 1018 W/cm2 plays a central role in many HEDP applications. Yet, the behavior of this nonlinear pressure mechanism is not well-understood at late time in the laser-plasma interaction. In this paper, a more realistic treatment of the laser pressure 'hole boring' process is developed through analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. A simple Liouville code capturing the phase space evolution of ponderomotively-driven ions is employed to distill effects related to plasma heating and ion bulk acceleration. Taking into account these effects, our results show that the evolution of the laser-target system encompasses ponderomotive expansion, equipartition, and quasi-isothermal expansion epochs. These results have implications for light piston-driven ion acceleration scenarios, and astrophysical applications where the efficiencies of converting incident Poynting flux into bulk plasma flow and plasma heat are key unknown parameters.

  12. Acceleration of High Energy Cosmic Rays in the Nonlinear Shock Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzhinsky, F.; Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    2006-10-01

    The problem of understanding acceleration of very energetic cosmic rays to energies above the 'knee' in the spectrum at 10^15-10^16eV remains one of the great challenges in modern physics. Recently, we have proposed a new approach to understanding high energy acceleration, based on exploiting scattering of cosmic rays by inhomogenities in the compressive nonlinear shock precursor, rather than by scattering across the main shock, as is conventionally assumed. We extend that theory by proposing a mechanism for the generation of mesoscale magnetic fields (krg<1, where rg is the cosmic ray gyroradius). The mechanism is the decay or modulational instability of resonantly generated Alfven waves scattering off ambient density perturbations in the precursors. Such perturbations can be produced by Drury instability. This mechanism leads to the generation of longer wavelength Alfven waves, thus enabling the confinement of higher energy particles. A simplified version of the theory, cast in the form of a Fokker-Planck equation for the Alfven population, will also be presented. This process also limits field generation on rg scales.

  13. Niobium cavity development for the high-energy linac of the rare isotope accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    D. Barni; C. Pagani; P. Pierini; C. Compton; T. Grimm; W. Hartung; H. Podlech; R. York; G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel

    2001-08-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is being designed to supply an intense beam of exotic isotopes for nuclear physics research [1]. Superconducting cavities are to be used to accelerate the CW beam of heavy ions to 400 MeV per nucleon, with a beam power of up to 400 kW. Because of the varying velocity of the ion beam along the linac, a number of different types of superconducting structures are needed. The RIA linac will accelerate heavy ions over the same velocity range as the proton linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). It was decided to use the 6-cell axisymmetric 805 MHz cavities and cryostats of SNS for the downstream portion of the RIA linac, thereby saving the non-recurring development and engineering costs. For additional cost saving, it was decided to extend the SNS multi-cell axisymmetric cavity design to lower velocity, {beta} = v/c = 0.4, using the same cryostats and RF systems. Axisymmetric cavities will thus constitute about three-quarters of RIA's total accelerating voltage, and most of that voltage will be provided by cavities already developed for SNS. The axisymmetric cavities will accelerate the RIA beam from {beta} = 0.4 to {beta} = 0.72. This velocity range can be efficiently covered with two different types of 6-cell cavities, one with a geometric {beta}, {beta}{sub g}, of 0.47, and the other with a {beta}{sub g} of 0.61. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 cavity will be of the existing SNS design; some {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 SNS cavities may also be desired at the end of the RIA linac for acceleration of light ions above 400 MeV per nucleon. Prototypes for both {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 and {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 have been fabricated and tested [2]. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.47 cavity is the focus of the present work. The reduction in {beta}{sub g} to 0.47 results in less favourable electromagnetic and mechanical properties, and opens up the possibility of multipacting, but several groups have already designed and prototyped cavities in this range. These

  14. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  15. Acceleration of electrons by the wake field of proton bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel idea to accelerate low-intensity bunches of electrons (or positrons) by the wake field of intense proton bunches travelling along the axis of a cylindrical rf structure. Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/m and large ''transformer ratios'', which allow for acceleration of electrons to energies in the TeV range, are calculated. A possible application of the method is an electron-positron linear collider with luminosity of 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/. The relatively low cost and power consumption of the method is emphasized.

  16. Effective generation of the spread-out-Bragg peak from the laser accelerated proton beams using a carbon-proton mixed target.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung Hoon; Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Song, Yongkeun; Jung, Won-Gyun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Pae, Ki-Hong; Park, Sung Yong

    2014-12-01

    Conventional laser accelerated proton beam has broad energy spectra. It is not suitable for clinical use directly, so it is necessary for employing energy selection system. However, in the conventional laser accelerated proton system, the intensity of the proton beams in the low energy regime is higher than that in the high energy regime. Thus, to generate spread-out-Bragg peak (SOBP), stronger weighting value to the higher energy proton beams is needed and weaker weighting value to the lower energy proton beams is needed, which results in the wide range of weighting values. The purpose of this research is to investigate a method for efficient generating of the SOBP with varying magnetic field in the energy selection system using a carbon-proton mixture target. Energy spectrum of the laser accelerated proton beams was acquired using Particle-In-Cell simulations. The Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was implemented for energy selection, particle transportation, and dosimetric property measurement. The energy selection collimator hole size of the energy selection system was changed from 1 to 5 mm in order to investigate the effect of hole size on the dosimetric properties for Bragg peak and SOBP. To generate SOBP, magnetic field in the energy selection system was changed during beam irradiation with each beam weighting factor. In this study, our results suggest that carbon-proton mixture target based laser accelerated proton beams can generate quasi-monoenergetic energy distribution and result in the efficient generation of SOBP. A further research is needed to optimize SOBP according to each range and modulated width using an optimized weighting algorithm. PMID:25154880

  17. Using high-energy proton fluence to improve risk prediction for consequences of solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-12-01

    The potential for exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is a major concern during interplanetary transfer and extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. Previously, we have used data from the last 5 solar cycles to estimate percentiles of dose to a typical blood-forming organ (BFO) for a hypothetical astronaut in a nominally shielded spacecraft during a 120-d lunar mission. As part of this process, we made use of complete energy spectra for 34 large historical SPEs to calculate what the BFO mGy-Eq dose would have been in the above lunar scenario for each SPE. From these calculated doses, we then developed a prediction model for BFO dose based solely on an assumed value of integrated fluence above 30 MeV ( Φ30) for an otherwise unspecified future SPE. In this study, we reasoned that since BFO dose is determined more by protons with higher energies than by those with lower energies, more accurate BFO dose prediction models could be developed using integrated fluence above 60 ( Φ60) and above 100 MeV ( Φ100) as predictors instead of Φ30. However to calculate the unconditional probability of a BFO dose exceeding a pre-specified limit ("BFO dose risk"), one must also take into account the distribution of the predictor ( Φ30,Φ60, or Φ100), as estimated from historical SPEs. But Φ60 and Φ100 have more variability, and less available historical information on which to estimate their distributions over many SPE occurrences, than does Φ30. Therefore, when estimating BFO dose risk there is a tradeoff between increased BFO dose prediction at a given energy threshold and decreased accuracy of models for describing the distribution of that threshold over future SPEs as the threshold increases. Even when taking the second of these two factors into account, we still arrived at the conclusion that overall prediction improves as the energy level threshold increases from 30 to 60 to 100 MeV. These results can be applied

  18. A high brightness proton injector for the Tandetron accelerator at Jožef Stefan Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, Primož; Podaru, Nicolae C.; Vavpetič, Primož; Jeromel, Luka; Ogrinc Potocnik, Nina; Ondračka, Simon; Gottdang, Andreas; Mous, Dirk J. M.

    2014-08-01

    Jožef Stefan Institute recently commissioned a high brightness H- ion beam injection system for its existing tandem accelerator facility. Custom developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa, the multicusp ion source has been tuned to deliver at the entrance of the Tandetron™ accelerator H- ion beams with a measured brightness of 17.1 A m-2 rad-2 eV-1 at 170 μA, equivalent to an energy normalized beam emittance of 0.767 π mm mrad MeV1/2. Upgrading the accelerator facility with the new injection system provides two main advantages. First, the high brightness of the new ion source enables the reduction of object slit aperture and the reduction of acceptance angle at the nuclear microprobe, resulting in a reduced beam size at selected beam intensity, which significantly improves the probe resolution for micro-PIXE applications. Secondly, the upgrade strongly enhances the accelerator up-time since H and He beams are produced by independent ion sources, introducing a constant availability of 3He beam for fusion-related research with NRA. The ion beam particle losses and ion beam emittance growth imply that the aforementioned beam brightness is reduced by transport through the ion optical system. To obtain quantitative information on the available brightness at the high-energy side of the accelerator, the proton beam brightness is determined in the nuclear microprobe beamline. Based on the experience obtained during the first months of operation for micro-PIXE applications, further necessary steps are indicated to obtain optimal coupling of the new ion source with the accelerator to increase the normalized high-energy proton beam brightness at the JSI microprobe, currently at 14 A m-2 rad-2 eV-1, with the output current at 18% of its available maximum.

  19. Contributions from Ultraviolet Spectroscopy to the Prediction of High-energy Proton Hazards from CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Raymond, J. C.; Cranmer, S. R.; Kohl, J. L.

    2004-05-01

    A significant potential hazard to astronauts and their equipment in interplanetary space is the relativistic proton flux produced by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares. The longest-duration phase of solar energetic particle (SEP) activity is believed to come from the CME shock as it propagates through the extended corona and heliosphere. Ultraviolet spectroscopy by SOHO has revealed a means for: (1) detecting and characterizing CME shocks in the corona, and (2) determining the plasma conditions in the pre-CME corona which are needed to understand the formation and evolution of shocks. Such remote sensing - combined with models of SEP acceleration and transport - can be used to predict the strength, duration, and production sites of the radiation. This poster describes the specific means by which ultraviolet spectroscopy and other remote-sensing data can be used to determine the inputs and boundary conditions for individual events (such as the October-November 2003 storms) in existing SEP model codes. We also discuss an additional potential source of SEP radiation associated with electric fields in the current sheets that form in flare regions in the wake of CME. Both observations and model calculations show that the reconnection-induced electric field can reach a maximum strength of a few V/cm within tens of minutes after the onset of the eruption, then decreases gradually over several hours. SEPs produced in these regions may account for X-rays and γ -rays observed prior to the formation of CME shocks. Ultraviolet spectroscopy has been shown to provide constraints on the plasma properties in all of the above CME features. This work is supported by NASA under grant NAG5-12865 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, and by the Swiss contribution to ESA's PRODEX program.

  20. First measurements of laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz Dufrenoy, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Gremillet, L.

    2012-09-15

    We present our first results about laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence in solids. In the first part, we describe the optimization of the proton source as a function of the target thickness as well as the laser pulse duration and energy. Due to the ultra high contrast ratio of our laser beam, we succeeded in using targets ranging from the micron scale down to nanometers thickness. The two optimal thicknesses we put in evidence are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Laser pulse duration shows a small influence on proton maximum energy, whereas the latter turns out to vary almost linearly as a function of laser energy. Thanks to this optimisation work, we have been able to acquire images of the proton energy deposition in a solid scintillator.

  1. Application of ILC superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Aseev, V.N.; Gonin, I.V.; Rusnak, B.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2007-10-01

    Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC) will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC) cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on {pi}-mode to provide maximum accelerating gradient. Significant R&D effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its RF system which resulted excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above {approx}1.2 GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC) cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for {beta}{sub G} = 0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H{sup -} from {approx}420 MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new {beta}{sub G} = 0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9{pi}-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  2. Emittance measurements from the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Gillespie, G. H.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    A new method of calculating beam emittances at the extraction point of a particle accelerator is presented. The technique uses the optimization programs NPSOL and MINOS developed at Stanford University in order to determine the initial values of beam size, divergence and correlation parameters (i.e. beam sigma matrix, σij) that best fit measured beam parameters. These σij elements are then used to compute the Twiss parameters α, β, and the phase space area, ε, of the beam at the extraction point. Beam size measurements in X and Y throughout the transport line were input to the optimizer along with the magnetic elements of bends, quads, and drifts. The σij parameters were optimized at the accelerator's extraction point by finding the best agreement between these measured beam sizes and those predicted by TRANSPORT. This expands upon a previous study in which a "trial and error" technique was used instead of the optimizer software, and which yielded similar results. The Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab™) program used for this paper integrates particle beam optics and other codes into a single intuitive graphically-based computing environment. This new software provides a seamless interface between the NPSOL and MINOS optimizer and TRANSPORT calculations. The results of these emittance searches are presented here for the eight clinical energies between 70 and 250 MeV currently being used at LLUMC.

  3. Acceleration of Ultra-Low Emittance Proton and Ion Beams with High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Thomas E.

    2002-11-01

    Intense beams of several MeV protons and ions, generated by the interaction of high-intensity short pulse lasers with thin foils, have been observed by many researchers in recent years.(S.P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000); T.E. Cowan et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. A 455, 130 (2000); R.A. Snavely et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2945 (2000); S.C. Wilks et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 532 (2000); E. Clark et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 670 (2000).) In experiments performed at the 100 TW LULI laser, we have succeeded to control the ion acceleration process to produce ultra high quality proton beams, whose transverse emittance is <0.006 π mm-mrad (rms-normalized), a factor of 100 lower than is typical of conventional RF linear accelerators. Within the envelope of the entire beam, we could focus individual proton beamlets to 100 nm spatial scales. This required control of the laser-plasma interaction, of the transport of MA currents of relativistic electrons through the target substrate, and of the surface topology and source material layering on the target foil rear-surface.(M. Roth et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 061002 (2002).) By varying the source material, we also accelerated light ion beams, such as He-like fluorine, to over 5 MeV/nucleon.(M. Hegelich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 085002 (2002).) From PIC simulations we understand the highest-energy and lowest-divergence proton acceleration as a transient laser-driven virtual cathode effect occurring at the target rear-surface. We have also confirmed the acceleration of ions from the front surface (A. Maksimchuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4108 (2000).), which we find exhibits an intense low-energy component, but only a tenuous high-energy component, in agreement with PIC simulations. This work was performed with corporate support of General Atomics.

  4. Monoenergetic proton backlighter for measuring E and B fields and for radiographing implosions and high-energy density plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Rygg, J. R.; Petrasso, R. D.; Town, R. P. J.; Amendt, P. A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Landen, O. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-10-15

    A novel monoenergetic proton backlighter source and matched imaging detector have been utilized on the OMEGA laser system to study electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields generated by laser-plasma interactions and will be utilized in the future to radiograph implosions and high-energy density (HED) plasmas. The backlighter consists of an imploding glass microballoon with D {sup 3}He fuel, producing 14.7 MeV D {sup 3}He protons and 3 MeV DD protons that are then passed through a mesh that divides the protons into beamlets. For quantitative study of E+B field structure, monoenergetic protons have several unique advantages compared to the broad energy spectrum used in previous experiments. Recent experiments have been performed with a single laser beam (intensity of {approx}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) interacting with a CH foil, and B fields of {approx}0.5 MG and E fields of {approx}1.5x10{sup 8} V/m have been measured using proton deflectometry. LASNEX simulations are being used to interpret these experiments. Additional information will also be presented on the application of this technique to measuring E and B fields associated with Hohlraums and directly driven implosions, to radiographically mapping the areal density ({rho}R) distribution in imploded capsules, and to radiographing HED plasmas.

  5. The non-orthogonal fixed beam arrangement for the second proton therapy facility at the National Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreuder, A. N.; Jones, D. T. L.; Conradie, J. L.; Fourie, D. T.; Botha, A. H.; Müller, A.; Smit, H. A.; O'Ryan, A.; Vernimmen, F. J. A.; Wilson, J.; Stannard, C. E.

    1999-06-01

    The medical user group at the National Accelerator Center (NAC) is currently unable to treat all eligible patients with high energy protons. Developing a second proton treatment room is desirable since the 200 MeV proton beam from the NAC separated sector cyclotron is currently under-utilized during proton therapy sessions. During the patient positioning phase in one treatment room, the beam could be used for therapy in a second room. The second proton therapy treatment room at the NAC will be equipped with two non-orthogonal beam lines, one horizontal and one at 30 degrees to the vertical. The two beams will have a common isocentre. This beam arrangement together with a versatile patient positioning system (commercial robot arm) will provide the radiation oncologist with a diversity of possible beam arrangements and offers a reasonable cost-effective alternative to an isocentric gantry.

  6. The non-orthogonal fixed beam arrangement for the second proton therapy facility at the National Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schreuder, A. N.; Jones, D. T. L.; Conradie, J. L.; Fourie, D. T.; Botha, A. H.; Mueller, A.; Smit, H. A.; O'Ryan, A.; Vernimmen, F. J. A.; Wilson, J.; Stannard, C. E.

    1999-06-10

    The medical user group at the National Accelerator Center (NAC) is currently unable to treat all eligible patients with high energy protons. Developing a second proton treatment room is desirable since the 200 MeV proton beam from the NAC separated sector cyclotron is currently under-utilized during proton therapy sessions. During the patient positioning phase in one treatment room, the beam could be used for therapy in a second room. The second proton therapy treatment room at the NAC will be equipped with two non-orthogonal beam lines, one horizontal and one at 30 degrees to the vertical. The two beams will have a common isocentre. This beam arrangement together with a versatile patient positioning system (commercial robot arm) will provide the radiation oncologist with a diversity of possible beam arrangements and offers a reasonable cost-effective alternative to an isocentric gantry.

  7. Laser Proton acceleration from mass limited silicon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, K.; Kraft, S.; Richter, T.; Metzkes, J.; Bussmann, M.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Fuchs, J.; Buffechoux, S.

    2009-11-01

    We present recent studies on laser proton acceleration experiments using mass limited silicon targets. Small micro machined silicon foils with 2 μm thickness and 20x20 μm2 to 100x100μm2 size mounted on very tiny stalks were shot with the 100 TW LULI Laser (long pulse 150 fs) and with the new 150 TW DRACO Laser facility (short pulse 30 fs) of the Research Centre Dresden-Rossendorf. The experiments were carried out using high contrast levels. Proton spectra have been measured with magnetic spectrometers and radio chromic film stacks.

  8. Remarkable new results for high-energy protons and electrons in the inner Van Allen belt regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-04-01

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep 'slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location.. Recent Van Allen Probes observations have revealed an unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than several megaelectronvolts). The data show an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons right at L=2.8. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport is likely due to scattering by powerful human electromagnetic transmitter (VLF) wave fields. We show that weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere due to manmade signals can act to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate. Inside of this distance, the Van Allen Probes data show that high energy (20 -100 MeV) protons have a double belt structure with a stable peak of flux at L~1.5 and a much more variable belt peaking at L~2.3.

  9. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    PubMed Central

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  10. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets.

    PubMed

    Stockem Novo, A; Kaluza, M C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  11. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  12. A STUDY OF POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN J-PARC.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO, A.U.; BAI, M.; ROSER, T.

    2006-10-02

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductive partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  13. A Study of Polarized Proton Acceleration in J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A. U.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.; Molodojentsev, A.; Ohmori, C.; Sato, H.; Hatanaka, K.

    2007-06-13

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductve partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  14. Proton Shock Acceleration in Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Luís O.; Marti, Michael; Davies, Jonathan R.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Ren, Chuang; Tsung, Frank S.; Mori, Warren B.

    2004-01-01

    The formation of strong, high Mach number (2 3), electrostatic shocks by laser pulses incident on overdense plasma slabs is observed in one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, for a wide range of intensities, pulse durations, target thicknesses, and densities. The shocks propagate undisturbed across the plasma, accelerating the ions (protons). For a dimensionless field strength parameter a0=16 (Iλ2≈3×1020 W cm-2 μm2, where I is the intensity and λ the wavelength), and target thicknesses of a few microns, the shock is responsible for the highest energy protons. A plateau in the ion spectrum provides a direct signature for shock acceleration.

  15. A longitudinal bunch rotation and acceleration scheme for a short bunch and high energy spread muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivens, R.

    2000-08-01

    A neutrino factory for νμ would require a high-power proton beam bombarding a target to produce pions that decay to muons which can be accelerated. Such a proton driver could be realized with a high-power linac, which could produce short bunches in the interaction point. If the bunch structure could be maintained to the input of a linear accelerator, the re-bunching of muons would be avoided. A preliminary design of the longitidinal beam dynamics for the acceleration of short muon bunches with a large-energy spread will be presented. Muons bunches are assumed at the linac input to consist of a phase space occupying a region from 200-400 MeV with a bunch length of 24 ps. They are captured and accelerated to 1 GeV with a resulting bunch length of 100 ps. Seventy five percent of the muons are transported within these limits.

  16. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  17. Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; White, R. Allen; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Gillin, Michael T.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. Methods: We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. Results: We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. Conclusions: As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

  18. Rainbow effect in channeling of high energy protons through single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Borka, D.; Nešković, N.

    2005-05-01

    We studied theoretically the angular distributions and the rainbows in the case of 1 GeV protons channeled in the ropes of (10, 10) single-wall carbon nanotubes. It was assumed that the transverse cross section of a rope could be described via a (two-dimensional) hexagonal superlattice with one nanotube per lattice point. The rope length was varied between 2.4 and 7.2 μm, corresponding to the reduced rope lengths associated with the transverse proton motion close to the centers of the regions in between three neighboring nanotubes, Λb, between 0.17 and 0.50, respectively. The angular distributions of channeled protons were generated by the computer simulation method using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane. We used the Molière's expression for the interaction potential of the proton and a carbon atom. The rainbow lines were determined numerically too. We showed that they ensured the full explanation of the angular distributions. The effect of zero-degree focusing of channeled ions for the reduced rope length Λb = 0.50 was also observed, indicating the existence of the rainbow cycles in the evolution of the angular distribution. We noted a strong influence of the rainbow effect on the effect of zero-degree focusing.

  19. Baseline measures for net-proton distributions in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netrakanti, P. K.; Luo, X. F.; Mishra, D. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mohanty, A.; Xu, N.

    2016-03-01

    We report a systematic comparison of the recently measured cumulants of the net-proton distributions for 0-5% central Au + Au collisions in the first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES) Program at the Relativistic Heavy Collider facility to various kinds of possible baseline measures. These baseline measures correspond to an assumption that the proton and anti-proton distributions follow Poisson statistics, Binomial statistics, obtained from a transport model calculation and from a hadron resonance gas model. The higher order cumulant net-proton data for the center of mass energies (√{sNN}) of 19.6 and 27 GeV are observed to deviate from most of the baseline measures studied. The deviations are predominantly due to the difference in shape of the proton distributions between data and those obtained in the baseline measures. We also present a detailed study on the relevance of the independent production approach as a baseline for comparison with the measurements at various beam energies. Our studies point to the need of either more detailed baseline models for the experimental measurements or a description via QCD calculations in order to extract the exact physics process that leads to deviation of the data from the baselines presented.

  20. The effect of stochastic re-acceleration on the energy spectrum of shock-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Vainio, Rami; Kocharov, Leon

    2014-07-20

    The energy spectra of particles in gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events do not always have a power-law form attributed to the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In particular, the observed spectra in major SEP events can take the form of a broken (double) power law. In this paper, we study the effect of a process that can modify the power-law spectral form produced by the diffusive shock acceleration: the stochastic re-acceleration of energetic protons by enhanced Alfvénic turbulence in the downstream region of a shock wave. There are arguments suggesting that this process can be important when the shock propagates in the corona. We consider a coronal magnetic loop traversed by a shock and perform Monte Carlo simulations of interactions of shock-accelerated protons with Alfvén waves in the loop. The wave-particle interactions are treated self-consistently, so the finiteness of the available turbulent energy is taken into account. The initial energy spectrum of particles is taken to be a power law. The simulations reveal that the stochastic re-acceleration leads either to the formation of a spectrum that is described in a wide energy range by a power law (although the resulting power-law index is different from the initial one) or to a broken power-law spectrum. The resulting spectral form is determined by the ratio of the energy density of shock-accelerated protons to the wave energy density in the shock's downstream region.

  1. LiF TLD-100 as a Dosimeter in High Energy Proton Beam Therapy-Can It Yield Accurate Results?

    SciTech Connect

    Zullo, John R. Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael T.

    2010-04-01

    In the region of high-dose gradients at the end of the proton range, the stopping power ratio of the protons undergoes significant changes, allowing for a broad spectrum of proton energies to be deposited within a relatively small volume. Because of the potential linear energy transfer dependence of LiF TLD-100 (thermolumescent dosimeter), dose measurements made in the distal fall-off region of a proton beam may be less accurate than those made in regions of low-dose gradients. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy and precision of dose measured using TLD-100 for a pristine Bragg peak, particularly in the distal fall-off region. All measurements were made along the central axis of an unmodulated 200-MeV proton beam from a Probeat passive beam-scattering proton accelerator (Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) at varying depths along the Bragg peak. Measurements were made using TLD-100 powder flat packs, placed in a virtual water slab phantom. The measurements were repeated using a parallel plate ionization chamber. The dose measurements using TLD-100 in a proton beam were accurate to within {+-}5.0% of the expected dose, previously seen in our past photon and electron measurements. The ionization chamber and the TLD relative dose measurements agreed well with each other. Absolute dose measurements using TLD agreed with ionization chamber measurements to within {+-} 3.0 cGy, for an exposure of 100 cGy. In our study, the differences in the dose measured by the ionization chamber and those measured by TLD-100 were minimal, indicating that the accuracy and precision of measurements made in the distal fall-off region of a pristine Bragg peak is within the expected range. Thus, the rapid change in stopping power ratios at the end of the range should not affect such measurements, and TLD-100 may be used with confidence as an in vivo dosimeter for proton beam therapy.

  2. J/ψ production and suppression in high-energy proton-nucleus collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju; Zhang, Hong -Fei

    2015-10-02

    In this study, we apply a color glass condensate+nonrelativistic QCD (CGC+NRQCD) framework to compute J/ψ production in deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC. Our results match smoothly at high p⊥ to a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD+NRQCD computation. Excellent agreement is obtained for p⊥ spectra at the RHIC and LHC for central and forward rapidities, as well as for the normalized ratio RpA of these results to spectra in proton-proton collisions. In particular, we observe that the RpA data are strongly bounded by our computations of the same for each of the individual NRQCD channels; this resultmore » provides strong evidence that our description is robust against uncertainties in initial conditions and hadronization mechanisms.« less

  3. J/ψ production and suppression in high-energy proton-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju; Zhang, Hong -Fei

    2015-10-02

    In this study, we apply a color glass condensate+nonrelativistic QCD (CGC+NRQCD) framework to compute J/ψ production in deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC. Our results match smoothly at high p⊥ to a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD+NRQCD computation. Excellent agreement is obtained for p⊥ spectra at the RHIC and LHC for central and forward rapidities, as well as for the normalized ratio RpA of these results to spectra in proton-proton collisions. In particular, we observe that the RpA data are strongly bounded by our computations of the same for each of the individual NRQCD channels; this result provides strong evidence that our description is robust against uncertainties in initial conditions and hadronization mechanisms.

  4. Water corrosion measurements on tungsten irradiated with high energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Scott Lillard, R.; Sommer, Walter F.; Butt, Darryl P.; Gac, Frank D.; Willcutt, Gordon J.; Louthan, McIntyre R.

    2012-12-01

    A detailed analysis was performed on the degradation of a tungsten target under water cooling while being exposed to a 761 MeV proton beam at an average current of 0.867 mA to a maximum fluence of 1.3 × 1021 protons/cm2. The target consisted of 3 mm diameter tungsten rods arranged in bundles and cooled with deionized water flowing over their length. Degradation of the tungsten was measured through analyzing water resistivity, tungsten concentration in water samples that were taken during irradiation and through dimensional measurements on the rods after irradiation. Chemical analysis of irradiated water samples showed W concentrations up to 35 μg/ml. Gamma analysis showed increases in concentrations of many isotopes including W-178, Lu-171, Tm-167, Tm-166, Yb-169 and Hf-175. Dimensional measurements performed after irradiation on the W rods revealed a decrease in diameter as a function of position that followed closely the Gaussian proton beam profile along the rod length and indicated a definite beam-effect. A general decrease in diameter, especially on the coolant-water entrance point where turbulent flow was likely, also suggests a chemically and mechanically-driven corrosion effect. A method to estimate the apparent corrosion rate based on proton fluence is presented and application of this method estimates the material loss rate at about 1.9 W atoms/incident proton. From this result, the corrosion rate of tungsten in a 761 MeV, 0.867 mA proton beam was calculated to be 0.073 cm/full power year. of irradiation.

  5. High-energy proton irradiation of C57Bl6 mice under hindlimb unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonca, Marc; Todd, Paul; Orschell, Christie; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Farr, Jonathan; Klein, Susan; Sokol, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) pose substantial risk for crewmembers on deep space missions. It has been shown that low gravity and ionizing radiation both produce transient anemia and immunodeficiencies. We utilized the C57Bl/6 based hindlimb suspension model to investigate the consequences of hindlimb-unloading induced immune suppression on the sensitivity to whole body irradiation with modulated 208 MeV protons. Eight-week old C57Bl/6 female mice were conditioned by hindlimb-unloading. Serial CBC and hematocrit assays by HEMAVET were accumulated for the hindlimb-unloaded mice and parallel control animals subjected to identical conditions without unloading. One week of hindlimb-unloading resulted in a persistent, statistically significant 10% reduction in RBC count and a persistent, statistically significant 35% drop in lymphocyte count. This inhibition is consistent with published observations of low Earth orbit flown mice and with crewmember blood analyses. In our experiments the cell count suppression was sustained for the entire six-week period of observation and persisted for at least 7 days beyond the period of active hindlimb-unloading. C57Bl/6 mice were also irradiated with 208 MeV Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) protons at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. We found that at 8.5 Gy hindlimb-unloaded mice were significantly more radiation sensitive with 35 lethalities out of 51 mice versus 15 out of 45 control (non-suspended) mice within 30 days of receiving 8.5 Gy of SOBP protons (p =0.001). Both control and hindlimb-unloaded stocktickerCBC analyses of 8.5 Gy proton irradiated and control mice by HEMAVET demonstrated severe reductions in WBC counts (Lymphocytes and PMNs) by day 2 post-irradiation, followed a week to ten days later by reductions in platelets, and then reductions in RBCs about 2 weeks post-irradiation. Recovery of all blood components commenced by three weeks post-irradiation. CBC analyses of 8

  6. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  7. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons.

  8. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  9. Development and creation of conditions for the radiation of biological objects with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, V. P.; Portman, A. I.; Sychkov, M. A.; Kolodkin, A. V.; Nikl, I.

    1974-01-01

    Depth distribution of an absorbed proton radiation dose was studied by both calculation and experimental methods on a cylindrical, homogeneous plexiglass phantom that represented the geometric form of a dog. The basis of the heterogeneous phantom was the natural skeleton of a dog, muscle tissue was simulated by a mixture of paraffin and silica filler, and lung tissue by gelatine capsules.

  10. Beam optics of the 2 MeV proton injection line at the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    Simulations of the beam optics of the LLUMC proton accelerator injection line have been modeled using the computer codes Parmila [Los Alamos Nat'l Lab, Internal Report LA-UR-98-4478, Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group, Los Alamos, NM] and Trace 3D [Distributed by AccelSoft Inc, P.O. Box 2813. Del Mar, CA 92014, United States]. These simulations give reasonable agreement with the known accelerator dispersion, beam energy spread and optimal debuncher setting. The purpose of this paper is to understand the beam losses and show where improvements can be made, if required, in the future. It has previously been found [G. Coutrakon et al., J. Med. Phys. 20 (11) (1994) 1691] that most intensity losses in the synchrotron can be ascribed to the narrow energy acceptance of the synchrotron. While the present intensity of the accelerator is quite adequate for patient treatments, future plans to treat larger fields will make higher intensity more desirable. A simulation has been performed which adds a second debuncher, or energy compactor, which shows a reduction in energy spread by a factor of two yielding a factor of two increase in the available intensity. The present intensity of 2.5 × 1010 protons per pulse with 34% of the injected intensity captured in the ring can possibly be improved to 5 × 1010 protons per pulse by capturing 68% of the injected beam intensity. These results are discussed in this paper.

  11. Evaluation of the dosimetric properties of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector in high energy clinical proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mandapaka, A. K.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Patyal, B.; Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric properties of a synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky diode for accurate relative dose measurements in large and small field high-energy clinical proton beams.Methods: The dosimetric properties of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector were assessed by comparison with a reference Markus parallel plate ionization chamber, an Exradin A16 microionization chamber, and Exradin T1a ion chamber. The diamond detector was operated at zero bias voltage at all times. Comparative dose distribution measurements were performed by means of Fractional depth dose curves and lateral beam profiles in clinical proton beams of energies 155 and 250 MeV for a 14 cm square cerrobend aperture and 126 MeV for 3, 2, and 1 cm diameter circular brass collimators. ICRU Report No. 78 recommended beam parameters were used to compare fractional depth dose curves and beam profiles obtained using the diamond detector and the reference ionization chamber. Warm-up/stability of the detector response and linearity with dose were evaluated in a 250 MeV proton beam and dose rate dependence was evaluated in a 126 MeV proton beam. Stem effect and the azimuthal angle dependence of the diode response were also evaluated.Results: A maximum deviation in diamond detector signal from the average reading of less than 0.5% was found during the warm-up irradiation procedure. The detector response showed a good linear behavior as a function of dose with observed deviations below 0.5% over a dose range from 50 to 500 cGy. The detector response was dose rate independent, with deviations below 0.5% in the investigated dose rates ranging from 85 to 300 cGy/min. Stem effect and azimuthal angle dependence of the diode signal were within 0.5%. Fractional depth dose curves and lateral beam profiles obtained with the diamond detector were in good agreement with those measured using reference dosimeters.Conclusions: The observed dosimetric properties of the synthetic single

  12. ELECTRON AND PROTON ACCELERATION DURING THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Sun, L. P.; Firoz, Kazi A.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    2013-06-10

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 {+-} 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 {+-} 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released {approx}10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of {approx}1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to {approx}3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  13. Electron and Proton Acceleration during the First Ground Level Enhancement Event of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Firoz, Kazi A.; Sun, L. P.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    2013-06-01

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 ± 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 ± 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released ~10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of ~1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to ~3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  14. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  15. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  16. Dose equivalent near the bone-soft tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons.

    PubMed

    Shavers, M R; Poston, J W; Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W

    1996-04-01

    During manned space missions, high-energy nucleons of cosmic and solar origin collide with atomic nuclei of the human body and produce a broad linear energy transfer spectrum of secondary particles, called target fragments. These nuclear fragments are often more biologically harmful than the direct ionization of the incident nucleon. That these secondary particles increase tissue absorbed dose in regions adjacent to the bone-soft tissue interface was demonstrated in a previous publication. To assess radiological risks to tissue near the bone-soft tissue interface, a computer transport model for nuclear fragments produced by high energy nucleons was used in this study to calculate integral linear energy transfer spectra and dose equivalents resulting from nuclear collisions of 1-GeV protons transversing bone and red bone marrow. In terms of dose equivalent averaged over trabecular bone marrow, target fragments emitted from interactions in both tissues are predicted to be at least as important as the direct ionization of the primary protons-twice as important, if recently recommended radiation weighting factors and "worst-case" geometry are used. The use of conventional dosimetry (absorbed dose weighted by aa linear energy transfer-dependent quality factor) as an appropriate framework for predicting risk from low fluences of high-linear energy transfer target fragments is discussed. PMID:8617586

  17. Dose equivalent near the bone-soft tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Poston, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    During manned space missions, high-energy nucleons of cosmic and solar origin collide with atomic nuclei of the human body and produce a broad linear energy transfer spectrum of secondary particles, called target fragments. These nuclear fragments are often more biologically harmful than the direct ionization of the incident nucleon. That these secondary particles increase tissue absorbed dose in regions adjacent to the bone-soft tissue interface was demonstrated in a previous publication. To assess radiological risks to tissue near the bone-soft tissue interface, a computer transport model for nuclear fragments produced by high energy nucleons was used in this study to calculate integral linear energy transfer spectra and dose equivalents resulting from nuclear collisions of 1-GeV protons transversing bone and red bone marrow. In terms of dose equivalent averaged over trabecular bone marrow, target fragments emitted from interactions in both tissues are predicted to be at least as important as the direct ionization of the primary protons-twice as important, if recently recommended radiation weighting factors and "worst-case" geometry are used. The use of conventional dosimetry (absorbed dose weighted by aa linear energy transfer-dependent quality factor) as an appropriate framework for predicting risk from low fluences of high-linear energy transfer target fragments is discussed.

  18. Tungsten fragmentation in nuclear reactions induced by high-energy cosmic-ray protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechenin, N. G.; Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten fragmentation arising in nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray protons in space-vehicle electronics is considered. In modern technologies of integrated circuits featuring a three-dimensional layered architecture, tungsten is frequently used as a material for interlayer conducting connections. Within the preequilibrium model, tungsten-fragmentation features, including the cross sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of protons of energy between 30 and 240 MeV; the yields of isotopes and isobars; their energy, charge, and mass distributions; and recoil energy spectra, are calculated on the basis of the TALYS and EMPIRE-II-19 codes. It is shown that tungsten fragmentation affects substantially forecasts of failures of space-vehicle electronics.

  19. Tungsten fragmentation in nuclear reactions induced by high-energy cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chechenin, N. G. Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.

    2015-01-15

    Tungsten fragmentation arising in nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray protons in space-vehicle electronics is considered. In modern technologies of integrated circuits featuring a three-dimensional layered architecture, tungsten is frequently used as a material for interlayer conducting connections. Within the preequilibrium model, tungsten-fragmentation features, including the cross sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of protons of energy between 30 and 240 MeV; the yields of isotopes and isobars; their energy, charge, and mass distributions; and recoil energy spectra, are calculated on the basis of the TALYS and EMPIRE-II-19 codes. It is shown that tungsten fragmentation affects substantially forecasts of failures of space-vehicle electronics.

  20. Recent Results on High-Energy Spin Phenomena of Gluons and Sea-Quarks in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at Rhic at Bnl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrow, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is carrying out a spin physics program in high-energy polarized proton collisions at √ {s} = 200 GeV and √ {s} = 500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. One of the main objectives of the spin physics program at RHIC is the precise determination of the polarized gluon distribution function. The STAR detector is well suited for the reconstruction of various final states involving jets, π0, π±, e± and γ, which allows to measure several different processes. Recent results suggest a gluon spin contribution to the proton spin at the same level as the quark spin contribution itself. The production of W bosons in polarized p+p collisions at √ {s} = 500 GeV opens a new era in the study of the spin-flavor structure of the proton. W-(+) bosons are produced in \\bar {u} + d (\\bar {d} + u) collisions and can be detected through their leptonic decays, e- + \\bar {ν }e (e++ν e), where only the respective charged lepton is measured. Results of W-(+) production suggest a large asymmetry between the polarization of anti-u and anti-d quarks.

  1. Hadron Production in the Restricted Rapidity Intervals in Proton-Nucleus Interactions at High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Madan M.

    Data on 200 and 400 GeV proton interactions with nuclear emulsion have been analyzed. It is found that the multiplicity distributions of the shower particles in the restricted rapidity intervals are well described by the negative binomial distribution (NBD). The dependences of the NBD parameters on rapidity interval, energy and target size have been studied. The results have also been discussed in terms of Giovannini and Van Hove’s clan model of multiparticle production.

  2. Recoil-proton polarization in high-energy deuteron photodisintegration with circularly plarized photons.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Arrington, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Qattan, I. A.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Physics; Rutgers Univ.; Univ. Blaise Pascal; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  3. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Benmokhtar, F.; Glashauser, C.; McCormick, K.; Ransome, R. D.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Camsonne, A.

    2007-05-04

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  4. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J. P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. J. Holt; C. W. de Jager; M. K. Jones; L. J. Kaufman; E. R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K. D. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I. A. Qattan; R. D. Ransome; P. E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E. C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G. M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; and L. Zhu

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  5. Angular dependence of recoil proton polarization in high-energy \\gamma d \\to p n

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J.P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D.W. Higinbotham; R.J. Holt; C.W. de Jager; M.K. Jones; L.J. Kaufman; E.R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K.D. Paschke; C.F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I.A. Qattan; R.D. Ransome; P.E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E.C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G.M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Zhu

    2007-02-26

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily.. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  6. The effect of irradiation with high-energy protons on 4H-SiC detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kazukauskas, V. Jasiulionis, R.; Kalendra, V.; Vaitkus, J.-V.

    2007-03-15

    The effect of irradiation of 4H-SiC ionizing-radiation detectors with various doses (as high as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}) of 24-GeV protons is studied. Isotopes of B, Be, Li, He, and H were produced in the nuclear spallation reactions of protons with carbon. Isotopes of Al, Mg, Na, Ne, F, O, and N were produced in the reactions of protons with silicon. The total amount of the produced stable isotopes varied in proportion with the radiation dose from 1.2 x 10{sup 11} to 5.9 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. It is shown that, at high radiation doses, the contact characteristics of the detectors change appreciably. The potential-barrier height increased from the initial value of 0.7-0.75 eV to 0.85 eV; the rectifying characteristics of the Schottky contacts deteriorated appreciably. These effects are attributed to the formation of a disordered structure of the material as a result of irradiation.

  7. First acceleration of a proton beam in a side coupled drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsivalle, C.; Picardi, L.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Marracino, F.; Nenzi, P.; Snels, C.; Surrenti, V.; Vadrucci, M.; Ambrosini, F.

    2015-07-01

    We report the first experiment aimed at the demonstration of low-energy protons acceleration by a high-efficiency S-band RF linear accelerator. The proton beam has been accelerated from 7 to 11.6 MeV by a 1 meter long SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac) module powered with 1.3 MW. The experiment has been done in the framework of the Italian TOP-IMPLART (Oncological Therapy with Protons-Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Linear Accelerator for Radio-Therapy) project devoted to the realization of a proton therapy centre based on a proton linear accelerator for intensity modulated cancer treatments to be installed at IRE-IFO, the largest oncological hospital in Rome. It is the first proton therapy facility employing a full linear accelerator scheme based on high-frequency technology.

  8. Evaluation of ‘OpenCL for FPGA’ for Data Acquisition and Acceleration in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Srikanth

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the data acquisition and processing needs of High Energy Physics experiments has made it more essential to use FPGAs to meet those needs. However harnessing the capabilities of the FPGAs has been hard for anyone but expert FPGA developers. The arrival of OpenCL with the two major FPGA vendors supporting it, offers an easy software-based approach to taking advantage of FPGAs in applications such as High Energy Physics. OpenCL is a language for using heterogeneous architectures in order to accelerate applications. However, FPGAs are capable of far more than acceleration, hence it is interesting to explore if OpenCL can be used to take advantage of FPGAs for more generic applications. To answer these questions, especially in the context of High Energy Physics, two applications, a DAQ module and an acceleration workload, were tested for implementation with OpenCL on FPGAs2. The challenges on using OpenCL for a DAQ application and their solutions, together with the performance of the OpenCL based acceleration are discussed. Many of the design elements needed to realize a DAQ system in OpenCL already exists, mostly as FPGA vendor extensions, but a small number of elements were found to be missing. For acceleration of OpenCL applications, using FPGAs has become as easy as using GPUs. OpenCL has the potential for a massive gain in productivity and ease of use enabling non FPGA experts to design, debug and maintain the code. Also, FPGA power consumption is much lower than other implementations. This paper describes one of the first attempts to explore the use of OpenCL for applications outside the acceleration workloads.

  9. Stochastic acceleration of solar protons in the transrelativistic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, J.; Schlickeiser, R.

    1989-10-01

    A model for the stochastic proton acceleration in solar flares with solutions valid for all energies is presented. A comparison with measured proton spectra supplies excellent agreement for shock dominated events and deviations in the nonrelativistic range for spectra of curved shape in contradiction to the conclusions of McGuire and v. Rosenvinge 1984, who used exclusively the non- and ultrarelativistic approximation. The deviations are discussed in detail with regard to a more accurate consideration of the spatial conditions. In the case of a constant escape time we obtain a theoretical spectrum that can be used for calculating the gamma ray radiation with energies greater than 10 MeV, reproducing the data in the transrelativistic region, where the relevant cross sections of the radiation producing processes are maximal.

  10. CLUST - EVAP Monte Carlo Simulation Applications for Determining Effective Energy Deposition in Silicon by High Energy Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, Pat M.

    2000-01-01

    The CLUST-EVAP is a Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of high energy (25 - 400 MeV) protons with silicon nuclei. The initial nuclear cascade stage is modeled using the CLUST model developed by Indiana University over 30 years ago. The second stage, in which the excited nucleus evaporates particles in random directions, is modeled according to the evaporation algorithm provided by H. H. K. Tang of IBM. Using the CLUST-EVAP code to model fragment produ6tion and the Vavilov-Landau theory to model fluctuations in direct ionization in thin silicon layers, we have predicted energy deposition in silicon components for various geometrical configurations. We have compared actual measurements with model predictions for geometry's such as single, thin silicon particle detectors, telescopic particle detectors flown in space to measure the environment, and thin sensitive volumes of modern micro-electronic components. We have recently compared the model predictions with actual measurements made by the DOSTEL spectrometer flown in the Shuttle payload bay on STS-84. The model faithfully reproduces the features and aids in interpretation of flight results of this instrument. We have also applied the CLUST-EVAP model to determine energy deposition in the thin sensitive volumes of modern micro-electronic components. We have accessed the ability of high energy (200 MeV) protons to induce latch-up in certain devices that are known to latch up in heavy ion environments. However, some devices are not nearly as susceptible to proton induced latch-up as expected according to their measured heavy ion latch-up cross sections. The discrepancy is believed to be caused by the limited range of the proton-silicon interaction fragments. The CLUST-EV AP model was used to determine a distribution of these fragments and their range and this is compared to knowledge of the ranges required based on the known device structure. This information is especially useful in accessing the risk to on

  11. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group. Progress report, March 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered in this research summary include: status of the OPAL collaboration at LEP, CERN; two-photon physics at PLUTO; search for new particles at JADE; neutrinoless double beta decay at DESY; Fermilab jet experiment; neutrino deuterium experiment in the 15 foot bubble chamber at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon experiment at Fermilab; new experiments at the proton-antiproton collider; neutrino-electron scattering at Los Alamos; parity violation in proton-proton scattering; an upgrade of laboratory and computer facilities; and a study of bismuth germanate as a durable scintillation crystal. (GHT)

  12. Absolute calibration of photostimulable image plate detectors used as (0.5-20 MeV) high-energy proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Mancić, A; Fuchs, J; Antici, P; Gaillard, S A; Audebert, P

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the absolute calibration of photostimulable image plates (IPs) used as proton detectors is presented. The calibration is performed in a wide range of proton energies (0.5-20 MeV) by exposing simultaneously the IP and calibrated detectors (radiochromic films and solid state detector CR39) to a source of broadband laser-accelerated protons, which are spectrally resolved. The final result is a calibration curve that enables retrieving the proton number from the IP signal. PMID:18681694

  13. High energy proton radiation damage to (AlGa)As-G aAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R.; Goldhammer, L.; Kamath, S.; Knechtli, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Twelve 2 + 2 sq cm (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells were fabricated and were subjected to 15.4 and 40 MeV of proton irradiation. The results showed that the GaAs cells degrade considerably less than do conventional and developmental K7 silicon cells. The detailed characteristics of the GaAs and silicon cells, both before and after irradiation, are described. Further optimization of the GaAs cells seems feasible, and areas for future work are suggested.

  14. High power solid state rf amplifier for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2008-01-15

    A 1.5 kW solid state rf amplifier at 352 MHz has been developed and tested at RRCAT. This rf source for cw operation will be used as a part of rf system of 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. A rf power of 1.5 kW has been achieved by combining output power from eight 220 W rf amplifier modules. Amplifier modules, eight-way power combiner and divider, and directional coupler were designed indigenously for this development. High efficiency, ease of fabrication, and low cost are the main features of this design.

  15. First observations of power MOSFET burnout with high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Normand, E.; Majewski, P.P.; Wender, S.A.

    1996-12-01

    Single event burnout was seen in power MOSFETs exposed to high energy neutrons. Devices with rated voltage {ge}400 volts exhibited burnout at substantially less than the rated voltage. Tests with high energy protons gave similar results. Burnout was also seen in limited tests with lower energy protons and neutrons. Correlations with heavy-ion data are discussed. Accelerator proton data gave favorable comparisons with burnout rates measured on the APEX spacecraft. Implications for burnout at lower altitudes are also discussed.

  16. Comparative study by IBIC of Si and SiC diodes irradiated with high energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Lopez, J.; Jimenez-Ramos, M. C.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Ceballos, J.; Linez, F.; Raisanen, J.

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties of a series of Si and SiC diodes have been studied using the Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) technique. Structural defects were induced into the samples during the irradiation with 17 MeV protons. The experimental values of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) vs bias voltages have been analyzed using a modified drift-diffusion model, which takes into account the recombination of carriers in the neutral and depletion regions. From these simulations, we have obtained the values of the carrier's lifetime for pristine and irradiated diodes, which are found to degrade faster in the case of the SiC samples. However, the decrease of the CCE at high bias voltages is more important for the Si detectors, indicative of the lower radiation hardness of this material compared to SiC. The nature of the proton-induced defects on Si wafers has been studied by Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) and Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS). The results suggest that the main defect detected by the positrons in p-type samples is the divacancy while for n-type at least a fraction of the positron annihilate in another defect. The concentration of defects is much lower than the number of vacancies predicted by SRIM.

  17. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  18. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  19. Technical assessment of the Loma Linda University proton therapy accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    In April 1986, officials of Loma Linda University requested that Fermilab design and construct a 250 MeV proton synchrotron for radiotherapy, to be located at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. In June 1986 the project, having received all necessary approvals, commenced. In order to meet a desirable schedule providing for operation in early 1990, it was decided to erect such parts of the accelerator as were complete at Fermilab and conduct a precommissioning activity prior to the completion of the building at Loma Linda which will house the final radiotherapy facility. It was hoped that approximately one year would be saved by the precommissioning, and that important information would be obtained about the system so that improvements could be made during installation at Loma Linda. This report contains an analysis by Fermilab staff members of the information gained in the precommissioning activity and makes recommendations about steps to be taken to enhance the performance of the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda. In the design of the accelerator, effort was made to employ commercially available components, or to industrialize the products developed so that later versions of the accelerator could be produced industrially. The magnets could only be fabricated at Fermilab if the schedule was to be met, but efforts were made to transfer that technology to industry. Originally, it was planned to use a 1.7 MeV RFQ fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as injector, but LBL would have found it difficult to meet the project schedule. After consideration of other options, for example a 3.4 MeV tandem accelerator, a supplier (AccSys Inc.) qualified itself to provide a 2 MeV RFQ on a schedule well matched to the project schedule. This choice was made, but a separate supplier was selected to develop and provide the 425 MHz power amplifier for the RFQ.

  20. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  1. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) Instrument on Board the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Spacecraft: Characterization of Earth's Radiation Belt High-Energy Particle Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Batiste, S.; Bolton, M.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Monk, S.; Reukauf, R.; Steg, S.; Westfall, J.; Belting, C.; Bolton, B.; Braun, D.; Cervelli, B.; Hubbell, K.; Kien, M.; Knappmiller, S.; Wade, S.; Lamprecht, B.; Stevens, K.; Wallace, J.; Yehle, A.; Spence, H. E.; Friedel, R.

    2013-11-01

    Particle acceleration and loss in the million electron Volt (MeV) energy range (and above) is the least understood aspect of radiation belt science. In order to measure cleanly and separately both the energetic electron and energetic proton components, there is a need for a carefully designed detector system. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) on board the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) pair of spacecraft consists of a stack of high-performance silicon solid-state detectors in a telescope configuration, a collimation aperture, and a thick case surrounding the detector stack to shield the sensors from penetrating radiation and bremsstrahlung. The instrument points perpendicular to the spin axis of the spacecraft and measures high-energy electrons (up to ˜20 MeV) with excellent sensitivity and also measures magnetospheric and solar protons to energies well above E=100 MeV. The instrument has a large geometric factor ( g=0.2 cm2 sr) to get reasonable count rates (above background) at the higher energies and yet will not saturate at the lower energy ranges. There must be fast enough electronics to avert undue dead-time limitations and chance coincidence effects. The key goal for the REPT design is to measure the directional electron intensities (in the range 10-2-106 particles/cm2 s sr MeV) and energy spectra (Δ E/ E˜25 %) throughout the slot and outer radiation belt region. Present simulations and detailed laboratory calibrations show that an excellent design has been attained for the RBSP needs. We describe the engineering design, operational approaches, science objectives, and planned data products for REPT.

  2. Requirements for the Loma Linda proton therapy accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, George; Ghebremedhin, Abiel

    1999-06-10

    More than eight years have passed since Loma Linda University Medical Center treated its first cancer patient with the world's first hospital based proton therapy accelerator. Using a synchrotron with extracted energies in the range of 70 to 250 MeV, nearly one hundred patients per day have been treated at the facility. Over the past five years, more than 97% of the patients received treatments on the day they were scheduled for irradiation. The activity schedules of accelerator maintenance and operations to maintain this patient load and accelerator reliability are presented in this paper. A typical 24-hour schedule of daily beam activities is presented. The specifications of what was needed in 1990 and what is needed now will also be discussed, as will an accelerator control system upgrade for achieving better intensity and energy control for more advanced dose localization. These new requirements include rapid energy and intensity changes within a patient treatment, fast beam abort systems, uniform beam spill, and energy control to better than 0.1%.

  3. Requirements for the Loma Linda proton therapy accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, George; Ghebremedhin, Abiel

    1999-06-01

    More than eight years have passed since Loma Linda University Medical Center treated its first cancer patient with the world's first hospital based proton therapy accelerator. Using a synchrotron with extracted energies in the range of 70 to 250 MeV, nearly one hundred patients per day have been treated at the facility. Over the past five years, more than 97% of the patients received treatments on the day they were scheduled for irradiation. The activity schedules of accelerator maintenance and operations to maintain this patient load and accelerator reliability are presented in this paper. A typical 24-hour schedule of daily beam activities is presented. The specifications of what was needed in 1990 and what is needed now will also be discussed, as will an accelerator control system upgrade for achieving better intensity and energy control for more advanced dose localization. These new requirements include rapid energy and intensity changes within a patient treatment, fast beam abort systems, uniform beam spill, and energy control to better than 0.1%.

  4. Proton laser accelerator by means of the inverse free electron laser mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Zakowicz, W.

    1984-07-01

    The inverse free electron laser accelerator is considered to be a potential high gradient electron accelerator. In this accelerator electrons oscillating in the magnetic field of a wiggler can gain energy from a strong laser beam propagating collinearly. The same mechanism of acceleration can work for protons and all other heavier particles. One can expect that the proton acceleration will be less effective, as it is more difficult to wiggle a heavier particle. It is indeed so, but this less efficient coupling of the proton and laser beam is partly compensated by the negligible radiative losses. These losses impose restrictions on the electron acceleration above 100 Gev. 6 references, 2 figures.

  5. Studies and calculations of transverse emittance growth in high-energy proton storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.R.; Jackson, G.

    1989-03-01

    In the operation of proton-antiproton colliders, an important goal is to maximize the integrated luminosity. During such operations in the Fermilab Tevatron, the transverse beam emittances were observed to grow unexpectedly quickly, thus causing a serious reduction of the luminosity. We have studied this phenomenon experimentally and theoretically. A formula for the emittance growth rate, due to random dipole kicks, is derived. In the experiment, RF phase noise of known amplitude was deliberately injected into the Tevatron to kick the beam randomly, via dispersion at the RF cavities. Theory and experiment are found to agree reasonably well. We also briefly discuss the problem of quadrupole kicks. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. The influence of the Earth's magnetosphere on the high-energy solar protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Makhmutov, V. S.; Charakhchyan, T. N.

    1985-01-01

    In the Earth's polar regions the intensity of the solar protons with the energy above the critical energy of geomagnetic cutoff is the same as in the interplanetary space. The penumbra in the polar regions is small and the East-West effect is also small. However the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity R sub c in polar regions is difficult to calculate because it is not sufficient to include only the internal sources of the geomagnetic field. During the magneto-quiescent periods the real value of R sub c can be less by 0.1 GV than the calculated value because of the external sources. During the geomagnetic storms the real value of R sub c is still lower.

  7. Pyrolysis of complex organics following high-energy proton irradiation of a simple inorganic gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Marumo, Katsumi; Yabashi, Suguru; Kaneko, Takeo; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2004-08-01

    Complex organics formed by 3MeV proton irradiation of a simple inorganic gas mixture with a composition representative of the primitive earth atmosphere (carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and water) were characterized by application of Curie-point pyrolysis. Pyrolysis products consisted of a wide variety of organic compounds including amide compounds, heterocyclic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present data showed that primary and primitive organic matter serving as "precursors" to fundamental building blocks associated with life might have been formed in a gaseous mixture of a similar composition to that of the primitive earth atmosphere. Large numbers of endogenous organic compounds and protocatalysis components produced by cosmic rays may have contributed significantly to the early stages of chemical evolution on the primitive earth.

  8. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    2016-03-24

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 10(15) electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators ('PeVatrons'), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 10(13) electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators--not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays--has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 10(6)-10(7) years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays. PMID:26982725

  9. High energy physics advisory panel`s composite subpanel for the assessment of the status of accelerator physics and technology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    In November 1994, Dr. Martha Krebs, Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (OER), initiated a broad assessment of the current status and promise of the field of accelerator physics and technology with respect to five OER programs -- High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy, and Health and Environmental Research. Dr. Krebs asked the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to establish a composite subpanel with representation from the five OER advisory committees and with a balance of membership drawn broadly from both the accelerator community and from those scientific disciplines associated with the OER programs. The Subpanel was also charged to provide recommendations and guidance on appropriate future research and development needs, management issues, and funding requirements. The Subpanel finds that accelerator science and technology is a vital and intellectually exciting field. It has provided essential capabilities for the DOE/OER research programs with an enormous impact on the nation`s scientific research, and it has significantly enhanced the nation`s biomedical and industrial capabilities. Further progress in this field promises to open new possibilities for the scientific goals of the OER programs and to further benefit the nation. Sustained support of forefront accelerator research and development by the DOE`s OER programs and the DOE`s predecessor agencies has been responsible for much of this impact on research. This report documents these contributions to the DOE energy research mission and to the nation.

  10. Hole-boring radiation pressure proton acceleration at high intensity in near-critical density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinqing; Dover, N. P.; Jin, Xiaolin; Li, Bin; Dangor, A. E.; Najmudin, Z.

    2014-10-01

    We will present high quality proton beams accelerated from hole-boring radiation pressure proton acceleration (HB-RPA) using three-dimension Particle-in-Cell simulation results. Scaling works on proton cut off energy with laser parameters such as laser intensity and laser pulse duration have been studied in detail by two-dimension Particle-in-Cell simulations. Optimal conditions for generating proton beam of narrow energy spread will be discussed.

  11. Equation Of State Measurements of Warm Dense Copper Heated By Laser Accelerated Proton Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gilliss; Feldman, Samuel; Kuk, Donghoon; Wagner, Craig; Gaul, Erhard; Donovan, Michael; Martinez, Mikael; Borger, Teddy; Spinks, Michael; Jiang, Sheng; Aymond, Franki; Akli, Kramer; Ditmire, Todd

    2014-10-01

    We report equation of state (EOS) measurements of solid density transition metals heated to temperatures of 1 to 50 eV by laser accelerated pulsed proton beams. Matter at these densities and temperatures, referred to as warm dense matter (WDM), will exhibit long-range coupling, partial ionization and thermal energies comparable to the Fermi energy, making theoretical predictions of state properties very challenging. Mbar pressures likewise make such states difficult to study in the lab. In this work we use a terawatt or petawatt laser to accelerate MeV protons from a source foil, which then heat an adjacent sample foil. We probe the sample foil on a picosecond timescale using streaked optical pyrometery, time resolved interferometry, and XUV imaging. Previously we and various other groups have applied these techniques to the study of aluminum, one of the best-understood metals from the standpoint of high energy density equations of state. Here we present measurements of Cu, Cr, and Ag. Transition metals such as these are of particular interest because of modeling challenges posed by a partially filled d - orbital.

  12. A performance study of the Loma Linda proton medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J.; Johanning, J.; Maudsley, G.; Slaton, T.; Morton, P. )

    1994-11-01

    More than three years have passed since Loma Linda treated the first cancer patient with the world's first proton accelerator dedicated to radiation therapy. Since that time, over 1000 patients have completed treatments and the facility currently treats more than 45 patients per day. With a typical intensity of 3[times]10[sup 10] protons per pulse and 27 pulses per minute, dose rates of 90--100 cGy/min are easily achieved on a 20-cm diameter field. In most cases, patient treatment times are 2 min, much less than the patient alignment time required before each treatment. Nevertheless, there is considerable medical interest in increasing field sizes up to 40-cm diameter while keeping dose rates high and treatment times low. In this article, beam measurements relevant to intensity studies are presented and possible accelerator modifications for upgrades are proposed. It is shown that nearly all intensity losses can be ascribed to the large momentum spread of the injected beam and occur at or near the injection energy of 2 MeV. The agreement between calculations and measurements appears quite good. In addition, optimum beam characteristics for a new injector are discussed based upon the momentum acceptance and space charge limits of the Loma Linda synchrotron.

  13. A performance study of the Loma Linda proton medical accelerator.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Hubbard, J; Johanning, J; Maudsley, G; Slaton, T; Morton, P

    1994-11-01

    More than three years have passed since Loma Linda treated the first cancer patient with the world's first proton accelerator dedicated to radiation therapy. Since that time, over 1000 patients have completed treatments and the facility currently treats more than 45 patients per day. With a typical intensity of 3 x 10(10) protons per pulse and 27 pulses per minute, dose rates of 90-100 cGy/min are easily achieved on a 20-cm diameter field. In most cases, patient treatment times are 2 min, much less than the patient alignment time required before each treatment. Nevertheless, there is considerable medical interest in increasing field sizes up to 40-cm diameter while keeping dose rates high and treatment times low. In this article, beam measurements relevant to intensity studies are presented and possible accelerator modifications for upgrades are proposed. It is shown that nearly all intensity losses can be ascribed to the large momentum spread of the injected beam and occur at or near the injection energy of 2 MeV. The agreement between calculations and measurements appears quite good. In addition, optimum beam characteristics for a new injector are discussed based upon the momentum acceptance and space charge limits of the Loma Linda synchrotron. PMID:7891629

  14. Laser-accelerated proton conversion efficiency thickness scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, D. S.; Foord, M. E.; Key, M. H.; LePape, S. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Fedosejevs, R.; Friesen, H.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y. Y.

    2009-12-15

    The conversion efficiency from laser energy into proton kinetic energy is measured with the 0.6 ps, 9x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility as a function of target thickness in Au foils. For targets thicker than 20 {mu}m, the conversion efficiency scales approximately as 1/L, where L is the target thickness. This is explained by the domination of hot electron collisional losses over adiabatic cooling. In thinner targets, the two effects become comparable, causing the conversion efficiency to scale weaker than 1/L; the measured conversion efficiency is constant within the scatter in the data for targets between 5 and 15 {mu}m, with a peak conversion efficiency of 4% into protons with energy greater than 3 MeV. Depletion of the hydrocarbon contaminant layer is eliminated as an explanation for this plateau by using targets coated with 200 nm of ErH{sub 3} on the rear surface. The proton acceleration is modeled with the hybrid-particle in cell code LSP, which reproduced the conversion efficiency scaling observed in the data.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation and parameterized treatment on the effect of nuclear elastic scattering in high-energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hai-Bo; Zheng, Na

    2015-07-01

    A version of Geant4 has been developed to treat high-energy proton radiography. This article presents the results of calculations simulating the effects of nuclear elastic scattering for various test step wedges. Comparisons with experimental data are also presented. The traditional expressions of the transmission should be correct if the angle distribution of the scattering is Gaussian multiple Coulomb scattering. The mean free path (which depends on the collimator angle) and the radiation length are treated as empirical parameters, according to transmission as a function of thickness obtained by simulations. The results can be used in density reconstruction, which depends on the transmission expressions. Supported by NSAF (11176001) and Science and Technology Developing Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012A0202006)

  16. Assessing Antibody Microarray for Space Missions: Effect of Long-term Storage, Gamma radiation and High Energy proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diego-Castilla, G.; Parro, V.

    2012-09-01

    Fluorescent antibody microarray has been proposed for Molecular biomarker detector in planetary exploration [1]. A number of different environmental stresses may affect the antibody performance, such as temperatures variations, highly penetrating radiation and high energy particles. Here we have tested the effect of gamma radiation, proton radiation and longterm storage on the microarray immunoassay and fluorocromes. Although different antibodies might have different susceptibilities we conclude that there was not significant reduction in the functionality of antibodies printed on the microarray and the fluorescent tracers antibodies, even in a extreme case of receiving a radiation dose 3000-fold than a biochip would receive in a trip mission to Mars. In summary, antibodies are suitable for use in planetary exploration purposes.

  17. Compression and acceleration of high-energy electron beam by intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Shigeo; Miyazaki, Shuji; Kikuchi, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    A generation of a high-density electron bunch is investigated. In order to compress a pre-accelerated electron bunch, we employ a laser of a TEM10 mode + TEM01 mode. This laser has a circle-shaped intensity distribution in transverse, and the pre-accelerated electrons are confined by the transverse ponderomotive force in transverse. A laser longitudinal electric field accelerates the pre-accelerated electrons further in longitudinal^[1]. At the parameter values of a0=10, λ=0.8 μm, w0=20λ, Lz=10λ, and γi=7, the maximum electron energy is about 400 MeV. Here a0 is the dimensionless value of the laser amplitude, λ is the laser wavelength, w0 is the laser spot size, Lz is the pulse length and γi is the relativistic factor of the pre-accelerated electrons. The electrons accelerated are compressed into a length of about 10λ from the original size of 150λ. Our analytical study also shows that if the laser intensity and pre-accelerated electrons are in relativistic, the electron energy is proportional to a0. This scaling law agrees well with the simulation results. [1] S. Miyazaki, S. Kawata, Q. Kong, et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38, pp. 1665-1673 (2005).

  18. On the nucleon effective mass role to the high energy proton spallation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, B. M.; Pinheiro, A. R. C.; Gonçalves, M.; Duarte, S. B.; Cabral, R. G.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the effect of the nucleon effective mass to the dynamic evolution of the rapid phase of proton-nucleus spallation reactions. The analysis of the relaxation time for the non-equilibrium phase is studied by variations in the effective mass parameter. We determine the final excitation energy of the hot residual nucleus at the end of cascade phase and the de-excitation of the nuclear system is carried out considering the competition of particle evaporation and fission processes. It was shown that the excitation energy depends of the hot compound residual nucleus at the end of the rapid phase on the changing effective mass. The multiplicity of particles was also analyzed in cascade and evaporation phase of the reaction. The use of nucleon effective mass during cascade phase can be considered as an effect of the many-body nuclear interactions not included explicitly in a treatment to the nucleon-nucleon interaction inside the nucleus. This procedure represents a more realistic scenario to obtain the neutron multiplicity generated in this reaction, which is a benchmark for the calculation of the neutronic in the ADS reactors.

  19. [Indralin--a novel effective radioprotector during irradiation by high-energy protons].

    PubMed

    Shashkov, V S; Efimov, V I; Vasin, M V; Antipov, V V; Iliukhin, A V; Vlasov, P A; Karsanova, S K; Grigor'ev, Iu G; Ushakov, I B

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with 120 mongrel dogs were aimed at the assessment of radio protective strength of indralin and local shielding of the pelvic marrow from 2.5 Gy, and also their concurrent use for the dogs irradiated by protons (240 MeV) at absolutely lethal and over-lethal 4 Gy and 5 Gy. Clinical observations, hematological investigations and ECG analysis of survived animals were conducted 4.5 years post the irradiation. Dogs that remained healthy following 3.5 to 4.5 years since the irradiation were sacrificed for pathomorphological investigations. The radioprotective effect of local shielding against 4 Gy was weak while this effect of intramuscular indralin (10, 20, 40 mg/kg of body) was significant reaching 50 to 67.7%. The concurrent use of two methods had, apparently, potentiated the 100% radioprotection of the animals irradiated by overlethal 5 Gy. Blood investigations of the survived dogs every 2-4 months evidenced that complete recovery of the total leukocyte count had taken 9 to 13 months. Also, dogs' pregnancy in 9-10 months since the beginning of irradiation pointed to maintenance of fertility and the ability to parturiate 2 or 3 times yielding 5-6 live cubs. Necropsy of the dogs did not reveal gross macroscopic structural changes of visceral organs or tissues. Seven out of 27 sacrificed dogs had benign tumors infrequent in intact dogs at this age. PMID:20803992

  20. High energy density proton exchange membrane fuel cell with dry reactant gases

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, S.; Gamburzev, S.; Velev, O.A.

    1996-12-31

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) require careful control of humidity levels in the cell stack to achieve a high and stable level of performance. External humidification of the reactant gases, as in the state-of-the-art PEMFCs, increases the complexity, the weight, and the volume of the fuel cell power plant. A method for the operation of PEMFCs without external humidification (i.e., self-humidified PEMFCs) was first developed and tested by Dhar at BCS Technology. A project is underway in our Center to develop a PEMFC cell stack, which can work without external humidification and attain a performance level of a current density of 0.7 A/cm{sup 2} at a cell potential of 0.7 V, with hydrogen/air as reactants at 1 atm pressure. In this paper, the results of our efforts to design and develop a PEMFC stack requiring no external humidification will be presented. This paper focuses on determining the effects of type of electrodes, the methods of their preparation, as well as that of the membrane and electrode assembly (MEA), platinum loading and types of electrocatalyst on the performance of the PEMFC will be illustrated.

  1. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HESS Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dewilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemiére, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Lui, R.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seyffert, A. S.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Valerius, K.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Żywucka, N.

    2016-03-01

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 1015 electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators (‘PeVatrons’), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 1013 electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators—not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays—has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 106-107 years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  2. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  3. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group: Progress report, March 1, 1987-February 29, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Progress is reported on the OPAL experiment at LEP, including construction and assembly of the hadron calorimeter and development of OPAL software. Progress on the JADE experiment, which examines e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at PETRA, and of the PLUTO collaboration are also discussed. Experiments at Fermilab are reported, including deep inelastic muon scattering at TeV II, the D0 experiment at TeV I, and hadron jet physics. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering and a search for point-sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are reported. Other activities discussed include polarization in electron storage rings, participation in studies for the SSC and LEP 200, neutron-antineutron oscillations, and the work of the electronics support group. High energy physics computer experience is also discussed. 158 refs. (LEW)

  4. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  5. High-brightness, high-energy radiation generation from non-linear Thomson scattering of laser wakefield accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, W.; Zhao, Z.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Sarri, G.; Corvan, D.; Zepf, M.; Cole, J.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2014-10-01

    To date, all-optical sources of high-energy (>MeV) photons have only been reported in the linear (a0 < 1) regime of Thomson scattering using laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). We present novel results of high-brightness, high-energy photons generated via non-linear Thomson scattering using the two-beam Astra-Gemini laser facility. With one 300 TW beam, electrons were first accelerated to 500 MeV energies inside gas cells through the process of LWFA. A second 300 TW laser pulse focused to a0 = 2 was subsequently scattered off these electrons, resulting in a highly directional, small source size, and short pulse beam of photons with >10 MeV energies. The photon beam was propagated through a low- Z converter and produced Compton-scattered electrons that were spectrally measured by magnetic deflection and correlated with the incident photons. The measured photon yield at 15 MeV was 2 ×106 photons/MeV and, when coupled with the small source size, divergence, and pulse duration, results in a record peak brightness of 2 ×1019 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%bandwidth at 15 MeV photon energy. Current Affiliation: Stanford University/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  6. Design and test of superconducting RF cavity prototypes for high intensity proton accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junquera, T.; Biarrotte, J. L.; Saugnac, H.; Gassot, H.; Lesrel, J.; Olry, G.; Bousson, S.; Safa, H.; Charrier, J. P.; Devanz, G.

    2002-05-01

    High intensity proton beams, in the multi-MW range (typically 1 GeV and a few mA) are considered today for different applications: neutron sources, nuclear waste transmutation, radioactive ion beams and neutrino factories. All the foreseen projects are based on superconducting RF cavities for the high energy part of the linac accelerator between 100 MeV and 1 GeV. In this paper we present conceptual and experimental work made by the French group in the R&D preliminary phase. The aim of this study was to design an optimized cavity prototype integrating the more recent progress on RF superconductivity in terms of fabrication and preparation techniques. To reach high accelerating gradients while keeping safety margins and good reliability imposes careful cavity geometry optimization and detailed study of some important technological issues. The most relevant results obtained with several cavity prototypes (accelerating gradient, multipactor,…) are presented. Some other important components of the cavity (helium tank and cold tuner) are also discussed.

  7. High-energy particle acceleration by explosive electromagnetic interaction in an accretion disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haswell, C. A.; Tajima, T.; Sakai, J.-I.

    1992-01-01

    By examining electromagnetic field evolution occurring in an accretion disk around a compact object, we arrive at an explosive mechanism of particle acceleration. Flux-freezing in the differentially rotating disk causes the seed and/or generated magnetic field to wrap up tightly, becoming highly sheared and locally predominantly azimuthal in orientation. We show how asymptotically nonlinear solutions for the electromagnetic fields may arise in isolated plasma blobs as a result of the driving of the fluid equations by the accretion flow. These fields are capable of rapidly accelerating charged particles from the disk. Acceleration through the present mechanism from AGN can give rise to energies beyond 10 exp 20 eV. Such a mechanism may present an explanation for the extragalactic origin of the most energetic observed cosmic rays.

  8. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  9. Electron acceleration to high energies at quasi-parallel shock waves in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves are generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections. They manifest themselves in solar type 2 radio bursts appearing as emission stripes with a slow drift from high to low frequencies in dynamic radio spectra. Their nonthermal radio emission indicates that electrons are accelerated to suprathermal and/or relativistic velocities at these shocks. As well known by extraterrestrial in-situ measurements supercritical, quasi-parallel, collisionless shocks are accompanied by so-called SLAMS (short large amplitude magnetic field structures). These SLAMS can act as strong magnetic mirrors, at which charged particles can be reflected and accelerated. Thus, thermal electrons gain energy due to multiple reflections between two SLAMS and reach suprathermal and relativistic velocities. This mechanism of accelerating electrons is discussed for circumstances in the solar corona and may be responsible for the so-called 'herringbones' observed in solar type 2 radio bursts.

  10. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  11. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group. Progress report, May 1, 1980--March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.A.

    1980-12-01

    The major activities of the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Maryland during the current contract period have been: analysis of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} events from the PLUTO detector at PETRA, design and construction of modifications to PLUTO for 2{gamma} physics, analyses of {nu}{sub {mu}}D{sub 2} bubble chamber pictures from Fermilab, completion of the {nu}{sub {mu}}e elastic scattering experiment at Fermilab, development and demonstration of an ultra cold neutron source produced by Doppler shifting, testing of equipment for the hadron jet experiment at Fermilab that is about to begin, and planning for large projects in the future.

  12. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  13. Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; Qiao, B.; McGuffey, C.; He, X. T.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of intense laser pulses is investigated. Different from previously studied RPA of protons or light ions, the dynamic ionization of high-Z atoms can stabilize the heavy ion acceleration. A self-organized, stable RPA scheme specifically for heavy ion beams is proposed, where the laser peak intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization state passes the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state ( Z - 2 ) + to ( Z - 1 ) + ]. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a mono-energetic Al13+ beam with peak energy 1.0 GeV and energy spread of only 5% can be obtained at intensity of 7 × 10 20 W / cm 2 through the proposed scheme. A heavier, mono-energetic, ion beam (Fe26+) can attain a peak energy of 17 GeV by increasing the intensity to 10 22 W / cm 2 .

  14. Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Qiao, B.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; He, X. T.

    2014-12-15

    Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of intense laser pulses is investigated. Different from previously studied RPA of protons or light ions, the dynamic ionization of high-Z atoms can stabilize the heavy ion acceleration. A self-organized, stable RPA scheme specifically for heavy ion beams is proposed, where the laser peak intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization state passes the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state (Z−2){sup +} to (Z−1){sup +}]. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a mono-energetic Al{sup 13+} beam with peak energy 1.0 GeV and energy spread of only 5% can be obtained at intensity of 7×10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} through the proposed scheme. A heavier, mono-energetic, ion beam (Fe{sup 26+}) can attain a peak energy of 17 GeV by increasing the intensity to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Neutron yield and induced radioactivity: a study of 235-MeV proton and 3-GeV electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Cheng; Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude of potential neutron yield and induced radioactivity of two new accelerators in Taiwan: a 235-MeV proton cyclotron for radiation therapy and a 3-GeV electron synchrotron serving as the injector for the Taiwan Photon Source. From a nuclear interaction point of view, neutron production from targets bombarded with high-energy particles is intrinsically related to the resulting target activation. Two multi-particle interaction and transport codes, FLUKA and MCNPX, were used in this study. To ensure prediction quality, much effort was devoted to the associated benchmark calculations. Comparisons of the accelerators' results for three target materials (copper, stainless steel and tissue) are presented. Although the proton-induced neutron yields were higher than those induced by electrons, the maximal neutron production rates of both accelerators were comparable according to their respective beam outputs during typical operation. Activation products in the targets of the two accelerators were unexpectedly similar because the primary reaction channels for proton- and electron-induced activation are (p,pn) and (γ,n), respectively. The resulting residual activities and remnant dose rates as a function of time were examined and discussed. PMID:25628454

  16. Latest Diagnostic Electronics Development for the PROSCAN Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Duperrex, P.A.; Frei, U.; Gamma, G.; Mueller, U.; Rezzonico, L.

    2004-11-10

    New VME-based diagnostic electronics are being developed for PROSCAN, a proton accelerator for medical application presently under construction at PSI. One new development is a VME-based multi-channel logarithmic amplifier for converting current to voltage (LogIV). The LogIV boards are used for measuring current from the multiple wire (harp) profile monitors. The LogIV calibration method, current dependant bandwidth and temperature stability are presented. Another development is a BPM front end, based on the newest digital receiver techniques. Features of this new system are the remote control of the preamplifier stage and the continuous monitoring of each individual signal overall gain. Characteristics of the developed prototype are given.

  17. Study of crosslinking onset and hydrogen annealing of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene irradiated with high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John Ford

    1997-09-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) is used extensively in hip and knee endoprostheses. Radiation damage from the sterilization of these endoprostheses prior to surgical insertion results in polymer crosslinking and decreased oxidative stability. The motivation for this study was to determine if UHMW-PE could be crosslinked by low dose proton irradiation with minimal radiation damage and its subsequent deleterious effects. I found that low dose proton irradiation and post irradiation hydrogen annealing did crosslink UHMW-PE and limit post irradiation oxidation. Crosslinking onset was investigated for UHMW-PE irradiated with 2.6 and 30 MeV H+ ions at low doses from 5.7 × 1011-2.3 × 1014 ions/cm2. Crosslinking was determined from gel permeation chromatography (GPC) of 1,2,4 trichlorobenzene sol fractions and increased with dose. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed irradiation resulted in increased free radicals confirmed from increased carbonyl groups. Radiation damage, especially at the highest doses observed, also showed up in carbon double bonds and increased methyl end groups. Hydrogen annealing after ion irradiation resulted in 40- 50% decrease in FTIR absorption associated with carbonyl. The hydrogen annealing prevented further oxidation after aging for 1024 hours at 80oC. Hydrogen annealing was successful in healing radiation damage through reacting with the free radicals generated during proton irradiation. Polyethylenes, polyesters, and polyamides are used in diverse applications by the medical profession in the treatment of orthopedic impairments and cardiovascular disease and for neural implants. These artificial implants are sterilized with gamma irradiation prior to surgery and the resulting radiation damage can lead to accelerated deterioration of the implant properties. The findings in this study will greatly impact the continued use of these materials through the elimination of many problems associated with radiation

  18. High-energy electron acceleration in the gas-puff Z-pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takasugi, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Takanori; Nishio, Mineyuki

    2014-12-15

    The characteristics of hard x-ray generation were examined in the gas-puff z-pinch experiment. The experiment on reversing the voltage was conducted. In both of the positive and negative discharges, the x-ray was generated only from the anode surface, so it was considered that the electrons were accelerated by the induced electromagnetic force at the pinch time.

  19. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  20. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties and microstructural development of Alloy 718 irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Garner, F. A.; Hamilton, M. L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a γ '(Ni 3(Al,Ti))-γ″(Ni 3Nb) hardenable superalloy with attractive strength, and corrosion resistance. This alloy is a candidate material for use in accelerator production of tritium (APT) target and blanket applications, where it would have to withstand low-temperature irradiation by high-energy protons and spallation neutrons. The existing data base, relevant to such irradiation conditions, is very limited. Alloy 718 has therefore been exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), closely matching those expected in the APT target and blanket applications. The yield stress of Alloy 718 increases with increasing dose up to ˜0.5 dpa, and then decreases with further increase in dose. The uniform elongation, however, drastically decreases with increasing dose at very low doses (<0.5 dpa), and does not recover when the alloy later softens somewhat. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of Alloy 718 shows that superlattice spots corresponding to the age-hardening precipitate phases γ ' and γ″ are lost from the diffraction patterns for Alloy 718 by only 0.6 dpa, the lowest proton-induced dose level achieved in this experiment. Examination of samples that were neutron irradiated to doses of only ˜0.1 dpa showed that precipitates are faintly visible in diffraction patterns but are rapidly becoming invisible. It is proposed that the γ ' and γ″ first become disordered (by <0.6 dpa), but remain as solute-rich aggregates that still contribute to the hardness at relatively low dpa levels, and then are gradually dispersed at higher doses.

  1. Mixing, staging, and phasing for a proton-driven wake field accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Simpson, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper expands on a few important details of the Wakeatron concept. This is a device where electrons can be accelerated by the wake field of short intense proton bunches travelling along the axis of an rf structure. Specifically, we have examined the consequences of the longitudinal dynamics of both the electron and the proton bunches. Included were ''mixing'' in the proton bunches (crucial to the overall concept) and phase shifts (electron bunches relative to proton bunches) in the acceleration process. Because of the deterioration of the proton bunches, due to the ''mixing'' process, it is required that the Wakeatron is indeed staged in a number of consecutive sections.

  2. Theory of elementary particles and accelerator theory: Task C: Experimental high energy physics. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    The experimental high energy physics group at the University of Oregon broadened its effort during the past year. The SLD effort extends from maintaining and operating the SLD luminosity monitor which was built at Oregon, to significant responsibility in physics analysis, such as event selection and background analysis for the left-right asymmetry measurement. The OPAL work focussed on the luminosity monitor upgrade to a silicon-tungsten calorimeter. Building on the work done at Oregon for SLD, the tungsten for this upgrade was machined by the Oregon shops and shipped to CERN for assembly. The Oregon GEM effort now concentrates on tracking, specifically silicon tracking. Oregon also has developed a silicon strip preradiator prototype, and tested it in a Brookhaven beam.

  3. Theory of elementary particles and accelerator theory: Task C: Experimental high energy physics. [Univ. of Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental high energy physics group at the University of Oregon broadened its effort during the past year. The SLD effort extends from maintaining and operating the SLD luminosity monitor which was built at Oregon, to significant responsibility in physics analysis, such as event selection and background analysis for the left-right asymmetry measurement. The OPAL work focussed on the luminosity monitor upgrade to a silicon-tungsten calorimeter. Building on the work done at Oregon for SLD, the tungsten for this upgrade was machined by the Oregon shops and shipped to CERN for assembly. The Oregon GEM effort now concentrates on tracking, specifically silicon tracking. Oregon also has developed a silicon strip preradiator prototype, and tested it in a Brookhaven beam.

  4. Can Low-Energy Electrons Affect High-Energy Physics Accelerators?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimino, R.; Collins, I. R.; Furman, M. A.; Pivi, M.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Zimmermann, F.

    2004-06-01

    Present and future accelerators' performances may be limited by the electron cloud (EC) effect. The EC formation and evolution are determined by the wall-surface properties of the accelerator vacuum chamber. We present measurements of the total secondary electron yield (SEY) and the related energy distribution curves of the secondary electrons as a function of incident-electron energy. Particular attention has been paid to the emission process due to very low-energy primary electrons (<20 eV). It is shown that the SEY approaches unity and the reflected electron component is predominant in the limit of zero primary incident electron energy. Motivated by these measurements, we have used state-of-the-art EC simulation codes to predict how these results may impact the production of the electron cloud in the Large Hadron Collider, under construction at CERN, and the related surface heat load.

  5. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy. PMID:12512712

  6. Preplasma effects on the generation of high-energy protons in ultraintense laser interaction with foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, F. L.; Huang, T. W.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhang, H.; He, X. T.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 ; Yu, M. Y.; Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum ; Zhou, C. T.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088; Science College, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073

    2013-12-15

    It is shown that the intense quasistatic electric and magnetic fields self-generated near the axis of the laser-driven channel in an appropriately profiled preplasma during ultraintense laser interaction with a thin target can create dense relativistic electron bunches. The latter easily penetrate through the target and can greatly enhance the sheath field at the rear, resulting in significant increase in the laser-to-ion energy conversion efficiency and the maximum energy of the target normal sheath accelerated ions. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a hydrogen targets a proton beam of peak energy ∼38 MeV and energy conversion efficiency ≥6.5% can be produced by a linearly polarized 5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} laser. An analytical model is also proposed and its results agree well with those of the simulations.

  7. Preplasma effects on the generation of high-energy protons in ultraintense laser interaction with foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, F. L.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhang, H.; Huang, T. W.; Yu, M. Y.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that the intense quasistatic electric and magnetic fields self-generated near the axis of the laser-driven channel in an appropriately profiled preplasma during ultraintense laser interaction with a thin target can create dense relativistic electron bunches. The latter easily penetrate through the target and can greatly enhance the sheath field at the rear, resulting in significant increase in the laser-to-ion energy conversion efficiency and the maximum energy of the target normal sheath accelerated ions. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a hydrogen targets a proton beam of peak energy ˜38 MeV and energy conversion efficiency ≥6.5% can be produced by a linearly polarized 5 × 1019 W/cm2 laser. An analytical model is also proposed and its results agree well with those of the simulations.

  8. Proton Acceleration to Therapeutic Energies with Ultra-Intense Ultra-Clean and Ultra-Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S. A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalinchenko, G.; Matsuoka, T.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2006-11-27

    The acceleration of protons to therapeutic energies of over 200 MeV by short-pulse, high-intensity lasers requires very high temporal intensity contrast. We describe improvements to the contrast ratio of the laser pulse produced by a multi-terawatt chirped pulsed amplification (CPA) Ti:sapphire laser for the application of proton acceleration. The modified cross-polarized wave generation (XPW) technique has been implemented on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan to reject the low-intensity amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) preceding the main laser pulse. We demonstrate that by using two BaF2 crystals, the XPW technique yields a 10-11 contrast ratio between the main peak and the ASE for a 50 TW laser system which can be maintained up to 500 TW. Such contrast may be sufficient for a preplasma-free interaction of 225 TW laser pulses with sub-micron thick foils at an intensity of {approx}10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations were conducted under the anticipated experimental conditions: 6.75 J, 30 fs laser pulse without a prepulse, focused to a spot size of 1.2 microns (FWHM) on thin foils of varying thickness. The performed PIC simulations show that for a 0.2 {mu}m thick hydrogen foil protons with energy up to 200 MeV can be produced. In the case of the two-layer aluminum-hydrogen foil, the maximum energy of accelerated protons is about 150 MeV, but the flux-energy spectrum of the accelerated protons has a narrow peak at high energies, which may be more advantageous for medical applications.

  9. Modeling particle acceleration and transport during high-energy solar gamma-ray events: Results from the HESPERIA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Vainio, Rami; Rouillard, Alexis; Aran, Angels; Sipola, Robert; Pomoell, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The EU/H2020 project "High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis" (HESPERIA) has an objective to gain improved understanding of solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration, release and transport related to long-duration gamma-ray emissions recently observed by Fermi/LAT. We have performed simulation studies for particle acceleration and transport for the 17 May 2012 event, which is also a Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) of solar cosmic rays. The particle event is modeled assuming that it is accelerated by the shock wave driven by the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME). We first analyze the 3-dimensional propagation of the shock through the corona using imaging observations from SDO, SOHO and STEREO spacecraft. The derived kinematics of the shock is combined with magnetohydrodynamic and potential field modeling of the ambient corona to derive the evolution of the shock parameters on a large set of field lines. We then employ the self-consistent Coronal Shock Acceleration (CSA) simulation model of the University of Turku to study the acceleration process on selected field lines and combine it with a new model of downstream particle transport to assess the energy spectrum and time profile of accelerated particles precipitating in the dense surface regions below the corona. We also employ the Shock and Particle (SaP) simulation model of the University of Barcelona to analyze the interplanetary counterpart of the Fermi event. In this paper, we will present the observations of the event, our approach to the modeling and the first results of the analysis. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA).

  10. High energy gain in three-dimensional simulations of light sail acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sgattoni, A.; Sinigardi, S.; Macchi, A.

    2014-08-25

    The dynamics of radiation pressure acceleration in the relativistic light sail regime are analysed by means of large scale, three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. Differently to other mechanisms, the 3D dynamics leads to faster and higher energy gain than in 1D or 2D geometry. This effect is caused by the local decrease of the target density due to transverse expansion leading to a “lighter sail.” However, the rarefaction of the target leads to an earlier transition to transparency limiting the energy gain. A transverse instability leads to a structured and inhomogeneous ion distribution.

  11. Multi-processor developments in the United States for future high energy physics experiments and accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, I.

    1988-03-01

    The use of multi-processors for analysis and high-level triggering in High Energy Physics experiments, pioneered by the early emulator systems, has reached maturity, in particular with the multiple microprocessor systems in use at Fermilab. It is widely acknowledged that such systems will fulfill the major portion of the computing needs of future large experiments. Recent developments at Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program will make such systems even more powerful, cost-effective, and easier to use than they are at present. The next generation of microprocessors, already available, will provide CPU power of about one VAX 780 equivalent/$300, while supporting most VMS FORTRAN extensions and large (>8MB) amounts of memory. Low cost high density mass storage devices (based on video tape cartridge technology) will allow parallel I/O to remove potential I/O bottlenecks in systems of over 1000 VAX equipment processors. New interconnection schemes and system software will allow more flexible topologies and extremely high data bandwidth, especially for on-line systems. This talk will summarize the work at the Advanced Computer Program and the rest of the US in this field. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantha, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Satyamurthy, P.

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth{eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  13. Attenuation of ambient dose equivalent from neutrons by thick concrete, cast iron and composite shields for high energy proton, 3He, 48Ca and 238U ions on Cu targets for shielding design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Ronningen, R. M.

    2011-02-01

    Data on neutron dose attenuation by thick concrete, cast iron, and cast iron plus concrete composite shields for heavy ions and protons having high energies (200-1000 MeV/u) are necessary for shielding designs of high-powered heavy ion accelerator facilities. Neutron production source terms, shield material attenuation lengths, and neutron dose rate reduction effectiveness of the bulk shielding in the angular range from 0° to 125° were determined by the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code (PHITS) for beams of 300 and 550 MeV/u 48Ca ions, 200 and 400 MeV/u 238U ions, 800 MeV/u 3He and 1 GeV protons. Calculated results of interaction lengths of concrete and cast iron were also compared with similar work performed by Agosteo et al., and to experimental and other calculated data on interaction lengths. The agreement can be regarded as acceptable.

  14. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

    2011-06-30

    It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

  15. QUASI-OPTICAL 3-dB HYBRID FOR FUTURE HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-15

    Phase-controlled wave combiners-commutators and isolators for protecting rf sources against reflection from the accelerating structure can be built using a 3-dB hybrid built around a metallic grating used in a ''magic-Y'' configuration. Models of the magic-Y were designed and tested, both at 34.272 GHz using the Omega-P Ka-band magnicon, and at 11.424 GHz using the Omega-P/NRL X-band magnicon. All elements of the magic-Y were optimized analytically and numerically. A non-vacuum 34 GHz model of the magic Y was built and tested experimentally at a low power. An engineering design for the high power (vacuum) compressor was configured. Similar steps were taken for the 11-GHz version.

  16. An accelerator scenario for a hard X-ray free electron laser combined with high energy electron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Li, Yiding; Yang, Guojun; Pang, Jian; Li, Yuhui; Li, Peng; Pflueger, Joachim; He, Xiaozhong; Lu, Yaxin; Wang, Ke; Long, Jidong; Zhang, Linwen; Wu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    In order to study the dynamic response of the material and the physical mechanism of fluid dynamics, an accelerator scenario which can be applied to both hard X-ray free electron laser and high energy electron radiography is proposed. This accelerator is mainly composed of a 12 GeV linac, an undulator branch and an eRad beamline. In order to characterize a sample’s dynamic behavior in situ and real-time with XFEL and eRad simultaneously, the linac should be capable of accelerating the two kinds of beam within the same operation mode. Combining in-vacuum and tapering techniques, the undulator branch can produce more than 1011 photons per pulse in 0.1% bandwidth at 42 keV. Finally, an eRad amplifying beamline with 1:10 ratio is proposed as an important complementary tool for the wider view field and density identification ability. Supported by China Academy of Engineering Physics (2014A0402016) and Institute of Fluid Physics (SFZ20140201)

  17. Focusing of short-pulse high-intensity laser-accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartal, Teresa; Foord, Mark E.; Bellei, Claudio; Key, Michael H.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Patel, Pravesh K.; Jarrott, Leonard C.; Higginson, Drew P.; Roth, Markus; Otten, Anke; Kraus, Dominik; Stephens, Richard B.; McLean, Harry S.; Giraldez, Emilio M.; Wei, Mingsheng S.; Gautier, Donald C.; Beg, Farhat N.

    2012-02-01

    Recent progress in generating high-energy (>50MeV) protons from intense laser-matter interactions (1018-1021Wcm-2 refs , , , , , , ) has opened up new areas of research, with applications in radiography, oncology, astrophysics, medical imaging, high-energy-density physics, and ion-proton beam fast ignition. With the discovery of proton focusing with curved surfaces, rapid advances in these areas will be driven by improved focusing technologies. Here we report on the first investigation of the generation and focusing of a proton beam using a cone-shaped target. We clearly show that the focusing is strongly affected by the electric fields in the beam in both open and enclosed (cone) geometries, bending the trajectories near the axis. Also in the cone geometry, a sheath electric field effectively `channels' the proton beam through the cone tip, substantially improving the beam focusing properties. These results agree well with particle simulations and provide the physics basis for many future applications.

  18. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  19. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES AT FAST INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS: A PARAMETER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Giacalone, Joe

    2015-01-20

    We present results from numerical simulations of the acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) associated with strong, fast, and radially propagating interplanetary shocks. We focus on the phase of the SEP event at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU, which is when the peak intensity at energies below a few MeV is the highest. The shocks in our study start between 2 and 10 solar radii and propagate beyond 1 AU. We study the effect of various shock and particle input parameters, such as the spatial diffusion coefficient, shock speed, solar wind speed, initial location of the shock, and shock deceleration rate, on the total integrated differential intensity, I, of SEPs with kinetic energies > 10 MeV. I is the integral over energy of the differential intensity spectrum at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU. We find that relatively small changes in the parameters can lead to significant event-to-event changes in I. For example, a factor of 2 increase in the diffusion coefficient at a given energy and spatial location, can lead to a decrease in I by as much as a factor of 50. This may help explain why there are fewer large SEP events seen during the current solar maximum compared to previous maxima. It is known that the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field is noticeably weaker this solar cycle than it was in the previous cycle and this will naturally lead to a somewhat larger diffusion coefficient of SEPs.

  20. Electron beam effective source surface distances for a high energy linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S C; Johnson, M W

    1991-06-01

    The design of the Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator electron applicator system does not allow clearance for all head and neck patients to be treated at the standard calibration distance of 100 cm. Discrepancies have been found between dose calculations using the inverse square law for extended distances and their measured data. A 4 X 4 cm2 applicator at an energy of 9 MeV, for example, had dose differences of 13 and 23% at distances of 105 and 110 cm SSD. Because of these discrepancies, effective source surface distances (SSDeff) were determined for all the standard electron energies and applicators of a Clinac 1800. These effective source surface distances ranged from 41.6 cm to 92.6 cm for the 4 X 4 cm2 cone/6 MeV electron beam through the 25 X 25 cm2 cone/20 MeV electron beam. A summary of these distances and an analysis of the clinical use of both a best fit SSDeff and a common SSDeff for patient dosimetry calculations is presented. PMID:1907830

  1. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental results using shock-wave acceleration (SWA) driven by a CO2 laser in a H2 gas-jet plasma have shown the possibility of producing proton beams with energy spreads <10% and with energies of up to 20 MeV using a modest peak laser power of 4 TW. Here we propose the investigation of the scaling of the SWA mechanism to higher laser powers using the 1- μm OMEGA EP Laser System at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The required tailored plasma profile is created by expanding a CH target using the thermal x-ray emission from a UV ablated material. The desired characteristics optimal for SWA are met: (a) peak plasma density is overcritical for the 1- μm main pulse and (b) the plasma profile exponentially decays over a long scale length on the rear side. Results will be shown using a 4 ω probe to experimentally characterize the plasma density profile. Scaling from simulations of the SWA mechanism shows that ion energies in the range of 100 MeV/amu are achievable with a focused a0 of 5 from the OMEGA EP Laser System. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Spectral Features in Laser Driven Proton Acceleration from Cylindrical Solid-density Hydrogen Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Chandra; Gauthier, Maxence; Mishra, Rohini; Kim, Jongjin; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Williams, Jackson; Ruby, John; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art E.; Kerr, Shaun; Tsui, Ying Y.; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Aurand, Bastian; Willi, Oswald; Roedel, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The generation of monoenergetic proton beams by ultrashort high-intensity laser-plasma interactions is of great interest for applications such as stopping power measurements, fast ignition laser confinement fusion, and ion beam therapy. In general, the commonly used mechanism of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) does not provide the required energy spread or maximum proton energy. Here we study alternative acceleration mechanisms, which have been identified in particle in cell (PIC) simulations, to overcome the limitations of TNSA. Using the Titan laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we investigate proton acceleration from wire targets and a cryogenic solid-density hydrogen jet. Due to the cylindrical geometry, TNSA is suppressed allowing other accelerations mechanisms to become observable. Quasi-monoenergetic features in laser-forward direction are observed in the proton spectrum indicating radiation-pressure-driven acceleration mechanisms. Our experimental results are accompanied by supporting PIC simulations.

  3. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W. P.; Li, B. W.; Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Yan, X. Q.; Qiao, B.

    2016-01-01

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 1022 W cm-2, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density.

  4. Mass entrainment and turbulence-driven acceleration of ultra-high energy cosmic rays in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wykes, Sarka; Croston, Judith H.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Eilek, Jean A.; Biermann, Peter L.; Achterberg, Abraham; Bray, Justin D.; Lazarian, Alex; Haverkorn, Marijke; Protheroe, Ray J.; Bromberg, Omer

    2013-10-01

    Observations of the FR I radio galaxy Centaurus A in radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands provide evidence for lepton acceleration up to several TeV and clues about hadron acceleration to tens of EeV. Synthesising the available observational constraints on the physical conditions and particle content in the jets, inner lobes and giant lobes of Centaurus A, we aim to evaluate its feasibility as an ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray source. We apply several methods of determining jet power and affirm the consistency of various power estimates of ~1 × 1043 erg s-1. Employing scaling relations based on previous results for 3C 31, we estimate particle number densities in the jets, encompassing available radio through X-ray observations. Our model is compatible with the jets ingesting ~3 × 1021 g s-1 of matter via external entrainment from hot gas and ~7 × 1022 g s-1 via internal entrainment from jet-contained stars. This leads to an imbalance between the internal lobe pressure available from radiating particles and magnetic field, and our derived external pressure. Based on knowledge of the external environments of other FR I sources, we estimate the thermal pressure in the giant lobes as 1.5 × 10-12 dyn cm-2, from which we deduce a lower limit to the temperature of ~1.6 × 108 K. Using dynamical and buoyancy arguments, we infer ~440-645 Myr and ~560 Myr as the sound-crossing and buoyancy ages of the giant lobes respectively, inconsistent with their spectral ages. We re-investigate the feasibility of particle acceleration via stochastic processes in the lobes, placing new constraints on the energetics and on turbulent input to the lobes. The same "very hot" temperatures that allow self-consistency between the entrainment calculations and the missing pressure also allow stochastic UHECR acceleration models to work.

  5. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a = 30 over 108 protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least107 protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  6. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-21

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a= 30 over 10{sup 8} protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least10{sup 7} protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  7. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Arun

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  8. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  9. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bailey, J. E.; Bennett, N. L.; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Rovang, D. C.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator's capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.

  10. Role of target material in proton acceleration from thin foils irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Ramakrishna, B.; Mandal, T.; Upadhyay, A.; Ramis, R.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2014-08-01

    We report on the proton acceleration studies from thin metallic foils of varying atomic number (Z) and thicknesses, investigated using a 45 fs, 10 TW Ti:sapphire laser system. An optimum foil thickness was observed for efficient proton acceleration for our laser conditions, dictated by the laser ASE prepulse and hot electron propagation behavior inside the material. The hydrodynamic simulations for ASE prepulse support the experimental observation. The observed maximum proton energy at different thicknesses for a given element is in good agreement with the reported scaling laws. The results with foils of different atomic number Z suggest that a judicious choice of the foil material can enhance the proton acceleration efficiency, resulting into higher proton energy.

  11. Scaling Laws for Proton Acceleration from the Rear Surface of Laser-Irradiated Thin Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; D'Humieres, E.; Lefebvre, E.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Brambrink, E.; Audebert, P.; Kaluza, M.; Schreiber, J.; Malka, V.; Manclossi, M.; Meyroneinc, S.; Mora, P.; Toncian, T.; Pepin, H.

    2006-04-07

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on the topic of laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications. Ultra-bright beams of multi-MeV protons are produced by irradiating thin metallic foils with ultra-intense short laser pulses. These sources open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control, and could stimulate development of compact ion accelerators for many applications, in particular proton therapy of deep-seated tumours. Here we show that scaling laws deduced from fluid models reproduce well the acceleration of proton beams for a large range of laser and target parameters. These scaling laws show that, in our regime, there is an optimum in the laser pulse duration of {approx}200 fs-1 ps, with a needed laser energy level of 30 to 100 J, in order to achieve e.g. 200 MeV energy protons necessary for proton therapy.

  12. Radiation pressure acceleration of protons to 93 MeV with circularly polarized petawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Hyung Taek; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    The radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of charged particles has been a challenging task in laser-driven proton/ion acceleration due to its stringent requirements in laser and target conditions. The realization of radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration requires irradiating ultrathin targets with an ultrahigh contrast and ultraintense laser pulses. We report the generation of 93-MeV proton beams achieved by applying 800-nm 30-fs circularly polarized laser pulses with an intensity of 6.1 × 10 20 W / cm 2 to 15-nm-thick polymer targets. The radiation pressure acceleration was confirmed from the obtained optimal target thickness, quadratic energy scaling, polarization dependence, and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We expect this clear demonstration of RPA to facilitate the realization of laser-driven proton/ion sources delivering energetic and short-pulse particle beams for novel applications.

  13. Laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Austin Yi, S.; Shvets, Gennady; Pukhov, Alexander

    2013-10-15

    A new method for initiating the modulation instability (MI) of a proton beam in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator using a short laser pulse preceding the beam is presented. A diffracting laser pulse is used to produce a plasma wave that provides a seeding modulation of the proton bunch with the period equal to that of the plasma wave. Using the envelope description of the proton beam, this method of seeding the MI is analytically compared with the earlier suggested seeding technique that involves an abrupt truncation of the proton bunch. The full kinetic simulation of a realistic proton bunch is used to validate the analytic results. It is further used to demonstrate that a plasma density ramp placed in the early stages of the laser-seeded MI leads to its stabilization, resulting in sustained accelerating electric fields (of order several hundred MV/m) over long propagation distances (∼100–1000 m)

  14. Near monochromatic 20 Me V proton acceleration using fs laser irradiating Au foils in target normal sheath acceleration regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ceccio, G.; Cannavò, A.; Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Jakubowska, K.; Ducret, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    A 200 mJ laser pulse energy, 39 fs-pulse duration, 10 μm focal spot, p-polarized radiation has been employed to irradiate thin Au foils to produce proton acceleration in the forward direction. Gold foils were employed to produce high density relativistic electrons emission in the forward direction to generate a high electric field driving the ion acceleration. Measurements were performed by changing the focal position in respect of the target surface. Proton acceleration was monitored using fast SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. A high proton energy, up to about 20 Me V, with a narrow energy distribution, was obtained in particular conditions depending on the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions, and a target optimization.

  15. Capture and Transport of Laser Accelerated Protons by Pulsed Magnetic Fields: Advancements Toward Laser-Based Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, Trevor J.

    The interaction of intense laser light (I > 10 18 W/cm2) with a thin target foil leads to the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism (TNSA). TNSA is responsible for the generation of high current, ultra-low emittance proton beams, which may allow for the development of a compact and cost effective proton therapy system for the treatment of cancer. Before this application can be realized, control is needed over the large divergence and the 100% kinetic energy spread that are characteristic of TNSA proton beams. The work presented here demonstrates control over the divergence and energy spread using strong magnetic fields generated by a pulse power solenoid. The solenoidal field results in a parallel proton beam with a kinetic energy spread DeltaE/E = 10%. Assuming that next generation lasers will be able to operate at 10 Hz, the 10% spread in the kinetic energy along with the 23% capture efficiency of the solenoid yield enough protons per laser pulse to, for the first time, consider applications in Radiation Oncology. Current lasers can generate proton beams with kinetic energies up to 67.5 MeV, but for therapy applications, the proton kinetic energy must reach 250 MeV. Since the maximum kinetic energy Emax of the proton scales with laser light intensity as Emax ∝ I0.5, next generation lasers may very well accelerate 250 MeV protons. As the kinetic energy of the protons is increased, the magnetic field strength of the solenoid will need to increase. The scaling of the magnetic field B with the kinetic energy of the protons follows B ∝ E1/2. Therefor, the field strength of the solenoid presented in this work will need to be increased by a factor of 2.4 in order to accommodate 250 MeV protons. This scaling factor seems reasonable, even with present technology. This work not only demonstrates control over beam divergence and energy spread, it also allows for us to now perform feasibility studies to further research what a laser-based proton therapy system

  16. Spot size dependence of laser accelerated protons in thin multi-ion foils

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung-Chang Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2014-06-15

    We present a numerical study of the effect of the laser spot size of a circularly polarized laser beam on the energy of quasi-monoenergetic protons in laser proton acceleration using a thin carbon-hydrogen foil. The used proton acceleration scheme is a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion due to the carbon ions. We observe that the spot size plays a crucial role in determining the net charge of the electron-shielded carbon ion foil and consequently the efficiency of proton acceleration. Using a laser pulse with fixed input energy and pulse length impinging on a carbon-hydrogen foil, a laser beam with smaller spot sizes can generate higher energy but fewer quasi-monoenergetic protons. We studied the scaling of the proton energy with respect to the laser spot size and obtained an optimal spot size for maximum proton energy flux. Using the optimal spot size, we can generate an 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam containing more than 10{sup 8} protons using a laser beam with power 250 TW and energy 10 J and a target of thickness 0.15 wavelength and 49 critical density made of 90% carbon and 10% hydrogen.

  17. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-01

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67 GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  18. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-15

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67 GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  19. Simultaneous observation of angularly separated laser-driven proton beams accelerated via two different mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; Bedacht, S.; Bagnoud, V.; Deppert, O.; Geschwind, S.; Jaeger, R.; Ortner, A.; Tebartz, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Roth, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present experimental data showing an angular separation of laser accelerated proton beams. Using flat plastic targets with thicknesses ranging from 200 nm to 1200 nm, a laser intensity of 6 ×1020 W cm-2 incident with an angle of 10°, we observe accelerated protons in target normal direction with cutoff energies around 30 MeV independent from the target thickness. For the best match of laser and target conditions, an additional proton signature is detected along the laser axis with a maximum energy of 65 MeV. These different beams can be attributed to two acceleration mechanisms acting simultaneously, i.e., target normal sheath acceleration and acceleration based on relativistic transparency, e.g., laser breakout afterburner, respectively.

  20. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.; Bailey, J. E.; Rovang, D. C.

    2015-11-30

    ) simulations suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator’s capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.

  1. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; et al

    2015-11-30

    ) simulations suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator’s capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.« less

  2. High-energy in-beam neutron measurements of metal-based shielding for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Björgvinsdóttir, H.; Kokai, Z.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-based shielding plays an important role in the attenuation of harmful and unwanted radiation at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. At the European Spallation Source, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, metal-based materials are planned to be used extensively as neutron guide substrates in addition to other shielding structures around neutron guides. The usage of metal-based materials in the vicinity of neutron guides however requires careful consideration in order to minimize potential background effects in a neutron instrument at the facility. Therefore, we have carried out a combined study involving high-energy neutron measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of metal-based shielding, both to validate the simulation methodology and also to investigate the benefits and drawbacks of different metal-based solutions. The measurements were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, using a 174.1 MeV neutron beam and various thicknesses of aluminum-, iron-, and copper-based shielding blocks. The results were compared to geant4 simulations and revealed excellent agreement. Our combined study highlights the particular situations where one type of metal-based solution may be preferred over another.

  3. Plasma Density Tapering for Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons and Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, A.; Gordon, D.; Kaganovich, D.; Sprangle, P.; Helle, M.; Hafizi, B.

    2010-11-04

    Extended acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator can be achieved by tailoring the phase velocity of the accelerating plasma wave, either through profiling of the density of the plasma or direct manipulation of the phase velocity. Laser wakefield acceleration has also reached a maturity that proton acceleration by wakefield could be entertained provided we begin with protons that are substantially relativistic, {approx}1 GeV. Several plasma density tapering schemes are discussed. The first scheme is called ''bucket jumping'' where the plasma density is abruptly returned to the original density after a conventional tapering to move the accelerating particles to a neighboring wakefield period (bucket). The second scheme is designed to specifically accelerate low energy protons by generating a nonlinear wakefield in a plasma region with close to critical density. The third scheme creates a periodic variation in the phase velocity by beating two intense laser beams with laser frequency difference equal to the plasma frequency. Discussions and case examples with simulations are presented where substantial acceleration of electrons or protons could be obtained.

  4. Simultaneous acceleration of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic quasiparallel collisionless shocks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Caprioli, Damiano; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-02-27

    We study diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic, high Mach number, quasiparallel, collisionless shocks by means of self-consistent 1D particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, both species are found to develop power-law distributions with the universal spectral index -4 in momentum space, in agreement with the prediction of DSA. We find that scattering of both protons and electrons is mediated by right-handed circularly polarized waves excited by the current of energetic protons via nonresonant hybrid (Bell) instability. Protons are injected into DSA after a few gyrocycles of shock drift acceleration (SDA), while electrons are first preheated via SDA, then energized via a hybrid acceleration process that involves both SDA and Fermi-like acceleration mediated by Bell waves, before eventual injection into DSA. Using the simulations we can measure the electron-proton ratio in accelerated particles, which is of paramount importance for explaining the cosmic ray fluxes measured on Earth and the multiwavelength emission of astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants, radio supernovae, and galaxy clusters. We find the normalization of the electron power law is ≲10^{-2} of the protons for strong nonrelativistic shocks. PMID:25768768

  5. Simultaneous Acceleration of Protons and Electrons at Nonrelativistic Quasiparallel Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Caprioli, Damiano; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-02-01

    We study diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic, high Mach number, quasiparallel, collisionless shocks by means of self-consistent 1D particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, both species are found to develop power-law distributions with the universal spectral index -4 in momentum space, in agreement with the prediction of DSA. We find that scattering of both protons and electrons is mediated by right-handed circularly polarized waves excited by the current of energetic protons via nonresonant hybrid (Bell) instability. Protons are injected into DSA after a few gyrocycles of shock drift acceleration (SDA), while electrons are first preheated via SDA, then energized via a hybrid acceleration process that involves both SDA and Fermi-like acceleration mediated by Bell waves, before eventual injection into DSA. Using the simulations we can measure the electron-proton ratio in accelerated particles, which is of paramount importance for explaining the cosmic ray fluxes measured on Earth and the multiwavelength emission of astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants, radio supernovae, and galaxy clusters. We find the normalization of the electron power law is ≲1 0-2 of the protons for strong nonrelativistic shocks.

  6. Formation of amino acids and nucleic acid constituents from simulated primitive planetary atmospheres by irradiation with high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Yamanashi, H.; Ohashi, A.; Kaneko, T.; Miyakawa, S.; Saito, T.

    It is suggested that primitive Earth atmosphere was only slightly reduced, which w as composed of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and water. It has been shown that bioorganic compounds can be hardly formed by energies as UV light, heat and spark discharges. We therefore examined possible formation pat hways of bioorganic compounds in the primitive E arth. A mixt ure of carbon monoxide, nitrogen and water was irradiated with high-energy prot ons generated by a van de Graaff accelerator, whi c h simulated an action of cosm ic rays. Aqueous solution of the product was hydr olyzed, and then analyzed by chromatography and mass spectrometry. A wide variety of amino acids and uracil, one of the nucle ic acid bases, wer e identified. Ribose, the RNA sugar, has not been identified, but formation of reducing polyols was suggested. A mino acids and uracil were also formed from a mixture of carbo n dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and water, and their yields correlated to the ratio of carbon monoxide and nitrogen in the mixture. Since a certain percentage of carbon monoxide could be expected to be in it [1], cosmic radiation can be regarded as an effective energ so urce for prebiotic formation of life's building blocks in they primitive Earth [2]. In the conventional scenario of chemical evolution, amino acids were formed in t he primitive ocean from such intermediates as HCN an d HCHO formed in t he atmosphere. T his scenario seem s not to be possible due to the following reasons: (1) The irradiation products were quit e complex organic com pound s whose molecular weights were ca. 1000, and they gave amino acids after hydrolysis. (2) Energy yields of amino ac ids in the hydrolysates were comparable to those of HCN and HCHO in the irradiation pro duct s. (3) Irradiation products from a mixture of carbon monoxide and nitrogen without water als o gave amino acids aft er hydrolysis. T hes e observations strongly sugge s t e d that complex precursors of bioor ganic com

  7. Control of target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons from a guiding cone

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Shao, F. Q.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations that target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons can be well controlled by using a guiding cone. Compared to a conventional planar target, both the collimation and number density of proton beams are substantially improved, giving a high-quality proton beam which maintained for a longer distance without degradation. The effect is attributed to the radial electric field resulting from the charge due to the hot target electrons propagating along the cone surface. This electric field can effectively suppress the spatial spread of the protons after the expansion of the hot electrons.

  8. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  9. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  10. Pulsars as cosmic ray particle accelerators: Proton orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielheim, K. O.

    1985-01-01

    Proton orbits are calculated in the electromagnetic vacuum field of a magnetic point dipole rotating with its angular velocity omega perpendicular to its dipole moment mu by numerical integration of the Lorentz-Dirac equation. Trajectories are shown and discussed for various initial conditions. A critical surface is shown separating initial positions of protons which finally hit the pulsar in the polar region from those which finally recede to infinity.

  11. Combined proton acceleration from foil targets by ultraintense short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuan; Yu, Tongpu; Ge, Xulei; Yang, Su; Wei, Wenqing; Yuan, Tao; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Liu, Jingquan; Li, Yutong; Yuan, Xiaohui; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Proton emission from solid foil targets irradiated by relativistically intense femtosecond laser pulses is studied experimentally. Broad plateaus in energy spectra are measured from micron-thick targets when the incident laser pulses have relatively low intensity contrasts. It is proposed that such proton spectra can be attributed to the combined processes of laser-driven collisionless shock acceleration and target normal sheath acceleration. Simple analytic estimation and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed, which support our interpretation. The obtained plateau-shape spectrum may also serve as an effective tool to diagnose the plasma state and verify the ion acceleration mechanisms in laser-solid interactions.

  12. Instrumentation for diagnostics and control of laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P R; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C; Carroll, D C; De Martinis, C; Fiorini, Francesca; Flacco, A; Floquet, V; Fuchs, J; Gallegos, P; Giove, D; Green, J S; Green, S; Jones, B; Kirby, D; McKenna, P; Neely, D; Nuesslin, F; Prasad, R; Reinhardt, S; Roth, M; Schramm, U; Scott, G G; Ter-Avetisyan, S; Tolley, M; Turchetti, G; Wilkens, J J

    2014-05-01

    Suitable instrumentation for laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams is critical for development of integrated, laser-driven ion accelerator systems. Instrumentation aimed at beam diagnostics and control must be applied to the driving laser pulse, the laser-plasma that forms at the target and the emergent proton (ion) bunch in a correlated way to develop these novel accelerators. This report is a brief overview of established diagnostic techniques and new developments based on material presented at the first workshop on 'Instrumentation for Diagnostics and Control of Laser-accelerated Proton (Ion) Beams' in Abingdon, UK. It includes radiochromic film (RCF), image plates (IP), micro-channel plates (MCP), Thomson spectrometers, prompt inline scintillators, time and space-resolved interferometry (TASRI) and nuclear activation schemes. Repetition-rated instrumentation requirements for target metrology are also addressed. PMID:24100298

  13. Post-acceleration of laser driven protons with a compact high field linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Turchetti, Giorgio; Bolton, Paul R.

    2013-05-01

    We present a start-to-end 3D numerical simulation of a hybrid scheme for the acceleration of protons. The scheme is based on a first stage laser acceleration, followed by a transport line with a solenoid or a multiplet of quadrupoles, and then a post-acceleration section in a compact linac. Our simulations show that from a laser accelerated proton bunch with energy selection at ~ 30MeV, it is possible to obtain a high quality monochromatic beam of 60MeV with intensity at the threshold of interest for medical use. In the present day experiments using solid targets, the TNSA mechanism describes accelerated bunches with an exponential energy spectrum up to a cut-off value typically below ~ 60MeV and wide angular distribution. At the cut-off energy, the number of protons to be collimated and post-accelerated in a hybrid scheme are still too low. We investigate laser-plasma acceleration to improve the quality and number of the injected protons at ~ 30MeV in order to assure efficient post-acceleration in the hybrid scheme. The results are obtained with 3D PIC simulations using a code where optical acceleration with over-dense targets, transport and post-acceleration in a linac can all be investigated in an integrated framework. The high intensity experiments at Nara are taken as a reference benchmarks for our virtual laboratory. If experimentally confirmed, a hybrid scheme could be the core of a medium sized infrastructure for medical research, capable of producing protons for therapy and x-rays for diagnosis, which complements the development of all optical systems.

  14. Induction of Cell Death through Alteration of Oxidants and Antioxidants in Epithelial Cells Exposed to High Energy Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    Radiation affects several cellular and molecular processes including double strand breakage, modifications of sugar moieties and bases. In outer space, protons are the primary radiation source which poses a range of potential health risks to astronauts. On the other hand, the use of proton radiation for tumor radiation therapy is increasing as it largely spares healthy tissues while killing tumor tissues. Although radiation related research has been conducted extensively, the molecular toxicology and cellular mechanisms affected by proton radiation remain poorly understood. Therefore, in the present study, we irradiated rat epithelial cells (LE) with different doses of protons and investigated their effects on cell proliferation and cell death. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in proton irradiated cells with a significant dose dependent activation and repression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, glutathione and superoxide dismutase respectively as compared to control cells. In addition, apoptotic related genes such as caspase-3 and -8 activities were induced in a dose dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in proton irradiated cells than control cells. Together, our results show that proton radiation alters oxidant and antioxidant levels in the cells to activate apoptotic pathway for cell death.

  15. Induction of Cell Death Through Alteration of Oxidants and Antioxidants in Epithelial Cells Exposed to High Energy Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    2012-07-01

    Radiation affects several cellular and molecular processes including double strand breakage, modifications of sugar moieties and bases. In outer space, protons are the primary radiation source which poses a range of potential health risks to astronauts. On the other hand, the use of proton radiation for tumor radiation therapy is increasing as it largely spares healthy tissues while killing tumor tissues. Although radiation related research has been conducted extensively, the molecular toxicology and cellular mechanisms affected by proton radiation remain poorly understood. Therefore, in the present study, we irradiated rat epithelial cells (LE) with different doses of protons and investigated their effects on cell proliferation and cell death. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in proton irradiated cells with a significant dose dependent activation and repression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, glutathione and superoxide dismutase respectively as compared to control cells. In addition, apoptotic related genes such as caspase-3 and -8 activities were induced in a dose dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in proton irradiated cells than control cells. Together, our results show that proton radiation alters oxidant and antioxidant levels in the cells to activate apoptotic pathway for cell death.

  16. High-energy Coulomb breakup of proton-dripline nuclei as a tool to study radiative-capture reactions of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sümmerer, K.

    2007-11-01

    High-energy Coulomb dissociation (CD) can be used to investigate the time-reversed process, radiative capture, for unstable nuclei where the direct capture reaction is difficult or impossible to perform. At GSI, we have run a series of CD measurements involving the proton-halo nucleus 8B which plays a major role in solar-neutrino physics. We could show that for this case CD and direct proton capture yield the same result. Theoretical guidance is necessary, however, to make sure that contributions of different electro-magnetic multipolarities and nuclear dissociation processes are well under control. Recently, we have complemented the LAND/ALADIN experimental apparatus at GSI with new Si microstrip detectors and proton-drift-chambers to continue similar studies with radioactive beams from the fragment separator FRS at GSI. The first case of astrophysical interest to be studied will be the CD of 27P. Another case will be the 2-proton breakup of 17Ne to investigate radiative two-proton capture on 15O, a process which could modify the reaction flow of the rp-process.

  17. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.; Blazevic, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.

    2008-05-15

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50 {mu}m Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10 {mu}m) show large source sizes of over 100 {mu}m diameter for 5 MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  18. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Blažević, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernández, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geißel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.; Roth, M.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50μm Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10μm) show large source sizes of over 100μm diameter for 5MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  19. Laser Acceleration of Protons Using Multi-Ion Plasma Gaseous Targets and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xi; Liu, Tung-Chang; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Hill, Wendell; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2014-10-01

    We present an acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO2 laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 μm, the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the foil compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with peak power 70 TW and pulse duration of 150 wave periods. We compared the effects of modifying the thickness and density of the gaseous targets and showed that the compression of the gaseous target affects significantly in the quasi-monoenergetic property of the proton beams. To assess the feasibility of laser-proton cancer therapy with such a proton accelerator, simulations are carried out to model the interaction of protons with water and determine the depth and lateral dose distribution for particle beams produced from PIC simulation. Comparison between the dosage maps of the proton beams produced with different foil densities and thicknesses is also presented. This work was supported by US DoE Grant DE-SC0008391.

  20. Feasibility of producing a short, high energy s-band linear accelerator using a klystron power source

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, Devin; Aubin, J. St.; Fallone, B. G.; Steciw, S.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To use a finite-element method (FEM) model to study the feasibility of producing a short s-band (2.9985 GHz) waveguide capable of producing x-rays energies up to 10 MV, for applications in a linac-MR, as well as conventional radiotherapy. Methods: An existing waveguide FEM model developed by the authors' group is used to simulate replacing the magnetron power source with a klystron. Peak fields within the waveguide are compared with a published experimental threshold for electric breakdown. The RF fields in the first accelerating cavity are scaled, approximating the effect of modifications to the first coupling cavity. Electron trajectories are calculated within the RF fields, and the energy spectrum, beam current, and focal spot of the electron beam are analyzed. One electron spectrum is selected for Monte Carlo simulations and the resulting PDD compared to measurement. Results: When the first cavity fields are scaled by a factor of 0.475, the peak magnitude of the electric fields within the waveguide are calculated to be 223.1 MV/m, 29% lower than the published threshold for breakdown at this operating frequency. Maximum electron energy increased from 6.2 to 10.4 MeV, and beam current increased from 134 to 170 mA. The focal spot FWHM is decreased slightly from 0.07 to 0.05 mm, and the width of the energy spectrum increased slightly from 0.44 to 0.70 MeV. Monte Carlo results show d{sub max} is at 2.15 cm for a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} field, compared with 2.3 cm for a Varian 10 MV linac, while the penumbral widths are 4.8 and 5.6 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The authors' simulation results show that a short, high-energy, s-band accelerator is feasible and electric breakdown is not expected to interfere with operation at these field strengths. With minor modifications to the first coupling cavity, all electron beam parameters are improved.

  1. Proton acceleration in the interaction of high power laser and cryogenic hydrogen targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    High intensity laser driven ion acceleration has attracted great interest due to many prospective applications ranging from inertial confinement fusion, cancer therapy, particle accelerators. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed to model and design experiments at MEC for high power laser interaction with cryogenic hydrogen targets of tunable density and thickness. Preliminary 1D and 2D simulations, using fully relativistic particle-in-cell code PICLS, show a unique regime of proton acceleration, e.g. ~ 300 MeV peak energy protons are observed in the 1D run for interaction of ~1020 W/cm2, 110 fs intense laser with 6nc dense (nc = 1021 cm-3) and 2 micron thin target. The target is relativistically under-dense for the laser and we observe that a strong (multi-terawatt) shock electric field is produced and protons are reflected to high velocities by this field. Further, the shock field and the laser field keep propagating through the hydrogen target and meets up with target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) electric field produced at the target rear edge and vacuum interface and this superposition amplifies the TNSA fields resulting in higher proton energy. In addition, the electrons present at the rear edge of the target continue to gain energy via strong interaction with laser that crosses the target and these accelerated electrons maintains higher electric sheath fields which further provides acceleration to protons. We will also present detailed investigation with 2D PICLS simulations to gain a better insight of such physical processes to characterize multidimensional effects and establish analytical scaling between laser and target conditions for the optimization of proton acceleration.

  2. Scaling of cross sections for K-electron capture by high-energy protons and alpha-particles from the multielectron atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1976-01-01

    Electron capture by protons from H, He, and the K-shell of Ar, and alpha particles from He are considered. It is shown that when a certain function of the experimental cross sections is plotted versus the inverse of the collision energy, at high energies the function falls on a straight line. At lower energies the function concaves up or down, depending on the charge of the projectile, the effective charge and the ionization potential of the electron that is being captured. The plot can be used to predict cross sections where experimental data are not available, and as a guide in future experiments. High energy scaling formulas for K-electron capture by low-charge projectiles are given.

  3. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  4. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jack

    2003-06-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space. PMID:12959128

  5. High-Energy-Resolution Inelastic Electron and Proton Scattering and the Multiphonon Nature of Mixed-Symmetry 2{sup +} States in {sup 94}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Burda, O.; Kuhar, M.; Lenhardt, A.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Botha, N.; Fearick, R. W.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fransen, C.; Fujita, H.; Holt, J. D.; Pietralla, N.; Scholten, O.

    2007-08-31

    High-energy-resolution inelastic electron scattering (at the S-DALINAC) and proton scattering (at iThemba LABS) experiments permit a thorough test of the nature of proposed one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} states of the nucleus {sup 94}Mo. The combined analysis reveals the one-phonon content of the mixed-symmetry state and its isovector character suggested by microscopic nuclear model calculations. The purity of two-phonon 2{sup +} states is extracted.

  6. Particle selection and beam collimation system for laser-accelerated proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Fourkal, Eugene; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2005-03-01

    In a laser-accelerated proton therapy system, the initial protons have broad energy and angular distributions, which are not suitable for direct therapeutic applications. A compact particle selection and collimation device is needed to deliver small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra. In this work, we characterize a superconducting magnet system that produces a desired magnetic field configuration to spread the protons with different energies and emitting angles for particle selection. Four magnets are set side by side along the beam axis; each is made of NbTi wires which carry a current density of approximately 10(5) A/cm2 at 4.2 K, and produces a magnetic field of approximately 4.4 T in the corresponding region. Collimation is applied to both the entrance and the exit of the particle selection system to generate a desired proton pencil beam. In the middle of the magnet system, where the magnetic field is close to zero, a particle selection collimator allows only the protons with desired energies to pass through for therapy. Simulations of proton transport in the presence of the magnetic field show that the selected protons have successfully refocused on the beam axis after passing through the magnetic field with the optimal magnet system. The energy spread for any given characteristic proton energy has been obtained. It is shown that the energy spread is a function of the magnetic field strength and collimator size and reaches the full width at half maximum of 25 MeV for 230 MeV protons. Dose distributions have also been calculated with the GEANT3 Monte Carlo code to study the dosimetric properties of the laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy applications. PMID:15839352

  7. The quantification of wound healing as a method to assess late radiation damage in primate skin exposed to high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    In an experiment examining the effects of space radiations on primates, different groups of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were exposed to single whole-body doses of 32- or 55-MeV protons. Survivors of those exposures, together with age-matched controls, have been monitored continuously since 1964 and 1965. Late effects of nominal proton doses ranging from 2-6 Gray have been measured in vitro using skin fibroblasts from the animals. A logical extension of that study is reported here, and it involves observations of wound healing after 3-mm diameter dermal punches were removed from the ears (pinnae) of control and irradiated monkeys. Tendencies in the reduction of competence to repair cutaneous wound have been revealed by the initial examinations of animals that received doses greater than 2 Gy more than 2 decades earlier. These trends indicate that this method of assessing radiation damage to skin exposed to high-energy radiations warrants further study.

  8. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  9. Nonlinear laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Yi, S. Austin; Pukhov, Alexander; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-10-01

    A new method for seeding the modulation instability (MI) in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator (PDPWA) using a CO2 laser pulse is presented. The proton beam's envelope equation is used to analytically compare the laser seed with previously suggested seeding methods. Simulations demonstrate that a laser pulse placed ahead of a proton beam with a realistic longitudinal density profile leads to peak accelerating gradients that are comparable to those produced by other seeding methods. The nonlinear BNS damping of the MI is analytically shown to lead to instability saturation. The envelope equation is Fourier expanded into a set of coupled, nonlinear equations that describe the evolution of the beam's Fourier components. Peak beam density and peak accelerating gradient during the beam's evolution are estimated.

  10. Proton acceleration with high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2006-10-01

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications [1,2]. Proton beams accelerated from solid planar targets have exceptional properties that open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control. Experiments conducted at LANL and LULI have shown that high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets can produce proton beams more collimated and more energetic than with planar targets. These micro-cone targets are composed of a curved cone attached to a micro-table. 2D PIC simulations were performed to understand the experiments and separate the effect of the cone from the effect of the micro-table. These new targets could help increase the laser-accelerated protons maximum energy to the 100 MeV range. [1] J. Fuchs et al., Nature Physics 2, 48 (2006). [2] T.Toncian et al., Science Vol. 312, 21 April 2006, p.410-413.

  11. INJECTOR PARTICLE SIMULATION AND BEAM TRANSPORT IN A COMPACT LINEAR PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D T; Chen, Y J; Harris, J; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B

    2007-06-18

    A compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), with field gradient up to 100 MW/m is being developed to accelerate proton bunches for use in cancer therapy treatment. The injector must create a proton pulse up to several hundred picoseconds, which is then shaped and accelerated with energies up to 250 MeV. The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code LSP is used to model several aspects of this design. First, we use LSP to obtain the voltage waveform in the A-K gap that will produce a proton bunch with the requisite charge. We then model pulse compression and shaping in the section between the A-K gap and the DWA. We finally use LSP to model the beam transport through the DWA.

  12. A crystal routine for collimation studies in circular proton accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirarchi, D.; Hall, G.; Redaelli, S.; Scandale, W.

    2015-07-01

    A routine has been developed to simulate interactions of protons with bent crystals in a version of SixTrack for collimation studies. This routine is optimized to produce high-statistics tracking simulations for a highly efficient collimation system, like the one of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The routine has recently been reviewed and improved through a comparison with experimental data, benchmarked against other codes and updated by adding better models of low-probability interactions. In this paper, data taken with 400 GeV/c proton beams at the CERN-SPS North Area are used to verify the prediction of the routine, including the results of a more recent analysis.

  13. Interesting experimental results in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex H- ion-source development (invited).

    PubMed

    Ueno, A; Oguri, H; Ikegami, K; Namekawa, Y; Ohkoshi, K

    2010-02-01

    The following interesting experimental results observed in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) H(-) ion-source developments are reviewed. It was proven that almost all of H(-) ions were produced with surface reactions in cesium (Cs)-free J-PARC H(-) ion-sources. The world's most intense class H(-) ion current of 38 mA in Cs-free ion sources for a high-energy linac was attained by an optimal shape and high temperature of the plasma electrode (PE), usage of a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB(6)) filament, and a newly devised high-power constant-current pulsed-arc power supply indispensable for it. It was also proven that the H(-) ion current could be increased to more than 40 mA by optimizing LaB(6)-filament shape. The surface elemental analysis of the PE after operation with a LaB(6)-filament showed that it was coated by boron (B) 95.5%, lanthanum (La) 2.5%, and oxygen (O) 1.9%. The H(-) ion current decreased by about 20% when a tungsten (W) filament was used instead of a LaB(6)-filament. The H(-) ion current could not be increased by seeding cesium (Cs) if the LaB(6)-filament was used. On the other hand, it was increased to more than 70 mA with much lower arc current of 150 A if Cs was seeded when a W-filament was used. PMID:20192389

  14. Enhancement of proton energy by polarization switch in laser acceleration of multi-ion foils

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2013-10-15

    We present a scheme to significantly increase the energy of quasi-monoenergetic protons accelerated by a laser beam without increasing the input power. This improvement is accomplished by first irradiating the foil several wave periods with circular polarization and then switching the laser to linear polarization. The polarization switch increases the electron temperature and thereby moves more electrons ahead of the proton layer, resulting in a space charge electric field pushing the protons forwards. The scaling of the proton energy evolution with respect to the switching time is studied, and an optimal switching time is obtained. The proton energy for the case with optimal switching time can reach about 80 MeV with an input laser power of 70 TW, an improvement of more than 30% compared to the case without polarization switch.

  15. Laser accelerated protons captured and transported by a pulse power solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, T.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Busold, S.; Bussmann, M.; Deppert, O.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joost, M.; Sobiella, M.; Tauschwitz, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Using a pulse power solenoid, we demonstrate efficient capture of laser accelerated proton beams and the ability to control their large divergence angles and broad energy range. Simulations using measured data for the input parameters give inference into the phase-space and transport efficiencies of the captured proton beams. We conclude with results from a feasibility study of a pulse power compact achromatic gantry concept. Using a scaled target normal sheath acceleration spectrum, we present simulation results of the available spectrum after transport through the gantry.

  16. Resistively enhanced proton acceleration via high-intensity laser interactions with cold foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The acceleration of MeV protons by high-intensity laser interaction with foil targets is studied using a recently developed plasma simulation technique. Based on a hierarchical N-body tree algorithm, this method provides a natural means of treating three-dimensional, collisional transport effects hitherto neglected in conventional explicit particle-in-cell simulations. For targets with finite resistivity, hot electron transport is strongly inhibited, even at temperatures in the MeV range. This leads to suppression of ion acceleration from the rear of the target and an enhancement in energies and numbers of protons originating from the front.

  17. Dynamics of Electric Fields Driving the Laser Acceleration of Multi-MeV Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Romagnani, L.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; Audebert, P.; Ceccherini, F.; Macchi, A.; Cowan, T.; Grismayer, T.; Mora, P.; Pretzler, G.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.; Schiavi, A.

    2005-11-04

    The acceleration of multi-MeV protons from the rear surface of thin solid foils irradiated by an intense ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) and short ({approx}1.5 ps) laser pulse has been investigated using transverse proton probing. The structure of the electric field driving the expansion of the proton beam has been resolved with high spatial and temporal resolution. The main features of the experimental observations, namely, an initial intense sheath field and a late time field peaking at the beam front, are consistent with the results from particle-in-cell and fluid simulations of thin plasma expansion into a vacuum.

  18. Solar Interacting Protons Versus Interplanetary Protons in the Core Plus Halo Model of Diffusive Shock Acceleration and Stochastic Re-acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharov, L.; Laitinen, T.; Vainio, R.; Afanasiev, A.; Mursula, K.; Ryan, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    With the first observations of solar γ-rays from the decay of pions, the relationship of protons producing ground level enhancements (GLEs) on the Earth to those of similar energies producing the γ-rays on the Sun has been debated. These two populations may be either independent and simply coincident in large flares, or they may be, in fact, the same population stemming from a single accelerating agent and jointly distributed at the Sun and also in space. Assuming the latter, we model a scenario in which particles are accelerated near the Sun in a shock wave with a fraction transported back to the solar surface to radiate, while the remainder is detected at Earth in the form of a GLE. Interplanetary ions versus ions interacting at the Sun are studied for a spherical shock wave propagating in a radial magnetic field through a highly turbulent radial ray (the acceleration core) and surrounding weakly turbulent sector in which the accelerated particles can propagate toward or away from the Sun. The model presented here accounts for both the first-order Fermi acceleration at the shock front and the second-order, stochastic re-acceleration by the turbulence enhanced behind the shock. We find that the re-acceleration is important in generating the γ-radiation and we also find that up to 10% of the particle population can find its way to the Sun as compared to particles escaping to the interplanetary space.

  19. High intensity proton acceleration at the Brookhaven AGS -- An update

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    1997-07-01

    The AGS accelerator complex is into its third year of 60+ {times} 10{sup 12} (teraproton = Tp) per cycle operation. The hardware making up the complex as configured in 1997 is briefly mentioned. The present level of accelerator performance is discussed. This includes beam transfer efficiencies at each step in the acceleration process, i.e. losses; which are a serious issue at this intensity level. Progress made in understanding beam behavior at the Linac-to-Booster (LtB) injection, at the Booster-to-AGS (BtA) transfer as well as across the 450 ms AGS accumulation porch is presented. The state of transition crossing, with the gamma-tr jump is described. Coherent effects including those driven by space charge are important at all of these steps.

  20. A beam intensity monitor for the Loma Linda cancer therapy proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Miller, D. ); Kross, B.J.; Anderson, D.F. ); DeLuca, P. Jr.; Siebers, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A beam intensity monitor was tested in a 230-MeV proton beam at the Loma Linda Proton Therapy Accelerator during its commissioning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The intensity monitor was designed to regulate the beam intensity extracted from the proton synchrotron. The proton beam is tunable between 70 and 250 MeV with an adjustable intensity between 10{sup 10} and 10{sup 11} protons per spill. A beam spill is typically 1 s long with a 2-s repetition period. The intensity monitor must be radiation hard, expose minimum mass to the beam, and measure intensity to 1% in 1-ms time intervals. To this end, a 5-cm-thick xenon gas scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) was tested to measure its response to the proton beam. The gas cell was operated at 1.2 atm of pressure and has 12.7-{mu}m-thick titanium entrance and exit foils. The total mass exposed to the beam is 0.14 g/cm{sup 2} and is dominated by the titanium windows. This mass corresponds to a range attenuation equal to 1.4 mm of water. The energy lost to the xenon gas is about 70 keV per proton. Each passing proton will produce approximately 2000 photons. With a detection efficiency on the order of 0.05% for this UV light, one would anticipate over 10{sup 10} photoelectrons per second. In a 1-ms time bin there will be approximately 10{sup 7} photoelectrons. This yields a resolution limited by systematics. For unregulated 0.4-s proton spills, we observe a response bandwidth in excess of 10{sup 4} Hz. While signal-to-noise and linearity were not easily measured, we estimate as few as 10{sup 3} protons can be observed suggesting a dynamic range in excess of 10{sup 5} is available.

  1. A beam intensity monitor for the Loma Linda cancer therapy proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Miller, D; Kross, B J; Anderson, D F; DeLuca, P; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A beam intensity monitor was tested in a 230-MeV proton beam at the Loma Linda Proton Therapy Accelerator during its commissioning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The intensity monitor was designed to regulate the beam intensity extracted from the proton synchrotron. The proton beam is tunable between 70 and 250 MeV with an adjustable intensity between 10(10) and 10(11) protons per spill. A beam spill is typically 1 s long with a 2-s repetition period. The intensity monitor must be radiation hard, expose minimum mass to the beam, and measure intensity to 1% in 1-ms time intervals. To this end, a 5-cm-thick xenon gas scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) was tested to measure its response to the proton beam. The gas cell was operated at 1.2 atm of pressure and has 12.7-microns-thick titanium entrance and exit foils. The total mass exposed to the beam is 0.14 g/cm2 and is dominated by the titanium windows. This mass corresponds to a range attenuation equal to 1.4 mm of water. The energy lost to the xenon gas is about 70 keV per proton. Each passing proton will produce approximately 2000 photons. With a detection efficiency on the order of 0.05% for this UV light, one would anticipate over 10(10) photoelectrons per second. In a 1-ms time bin there will be approximately 10(7) photoelectrons. This yields a resolution limited by systematics. For unregulated 0.4-s proton spills, we observe a response bandwidth in excess of 10(4) Hz. While signal-to-noise and linearity were not easily measured, we estimate as few as 10(3) protons can be observed suggesting a dynamic range in excess of 10(5) is available. PMID:1656180

  2. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route: An example of technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience in this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A major issue is the transfer of this technology to the commercial sector to provide hospitals with simple, reliable, and relatively inexpensive accelerators for this application. The author has chosen the SBIR route to accomplish this goal. ACCTEK Associates have received grants from the National Cancer Institute for development of the medical accelerator and beam delivery systems. Considerable encouragement and help has been received from Argonne National Laboratory and the Department of Energy. The experiences to date and the pros and cons on this approach to commercializing medical accelerators are described. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  3. RF properties of 1050 MHz, β = 0.49 Elliptical cavity for High Current Proton Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Amitava; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K. C.

    2008-04-01

    BARC is developing technology for the accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS) that will be mainly utilized for the transmutation of nuclear waste and enrichment of U233. Design and development of superconducting medium velocity cavity has been taken up as a part of the accelerator driven subcritical system project. We have studied RF properties of 1050 MHz, β = 0.49 single cell Elliptical cavity for possible use in High Current Proton Accelerator. Cavity shape optimization studies have been done by means of 2D cavity tuning code SUPERFISH and 3D High Frequency Simulation code CST Microwave Studio. The cavity peak electric and magnetic fields, power dissipation Pc, quality factor Q and effective shunt impedante ZT2 were calculated for various cavity dimensions using these codes. Based on these analyses a list of design parameter for the inner cell of the cavity has been suggested for possible use in high current proton accelerator.

  4. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams.

    PubMed

    Raschke, S; Spickermann, S; Toncian, T; Swantusch, M; Boeker, J; Giesen, U; Iliakis, G; Willi, O; Boege, F

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 10(7)-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  5. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  6. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  7. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda (US)

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Bauman, M.; Lesyna, D.; Miller, D.; Nusbaum, J.; Slater, J.; Johanning, J.; Miranda, J. ); DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Siebers, J. ); Ludewigt, B. )

    1991-11-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented (R. R. Wilson, Radiology {bold 47}, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. {bold 9}, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. {bold 10}, 831 (1983)). One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less then {plus minus}5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7{times}10{sup 9} protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5{times}10{sup 10} protons/spills for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation. The distal edge of the spread out Bragg peak was observed at 27.5-cm depth with an incident proton energy of 235 MeV. The dose at the distal edge falls from 90% to 10% of peak value in 7 mm.

  8. Research methods for parameters of accelerated low-energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Dudkin, G. N.; Kyznetsov, S. I.; Nechaev, B. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Philippov, A. V.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Varlachev, V. A.; Zvaygintsev, O. A.

    2015-07-01

    To study the pd-reaction cross-section it is necessary to know the main parameters of the accelerated hydrogen ion beam with a high accuracy. These parameters include: the energy ion dispersion; the content of neutrals; the ratio of atomic and molecular ions of hydrogen in the flux of accelerated particles. This work is aimed at development of techniques and the measurement of the above mentioned parameters of the low-energy proton beam.

  9. First experimental results from 2MeV proton tandem accelerator for neutron productiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A.; Belchenko, Yu.; Burdakov, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Krivenko, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Mekler, K.; Sanin, A.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.; Sulyaev, Yu.; Tiunov, M.

    2008-02-01

    A 2MeV proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation was developed and first experiments are carried out in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). The accelerator is designed for neutron production via reaction Li7(p,n)Be7 for the boron neutron-capture therapy of the brain tumors, and for explosive detection based on 9.1724MeV resonance gamma, which are produced via reaction C13(p,γ)N14, absorption in nitrogen.

  10. Effects of high energy x ray and proton irradiation on lead zirconate titanate thin films' dielectric and piezoelectric response

    SciTech Connect

    Bastani, Y.; Cortes-Pena, A. Y.; Wilson, A. D.; Gerardin, S.; Bagatin, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Bassiri-Gharb, N.

    2013-05-13

    The effects of irradiation by X rays and protons on the dielectric and piezoelectric response of highly (100)-textured polycrystalline Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x})O{sub 3} (PZT) thin films have been studied. Low-field dielectric permittivity, remanent polarization, and piezoelectric d{sub 33,f} response all degraded with exposure to radiation, for doses higher than 300 krad. At first approximation, the degradation increased at higher radiation doses, and was stronger in samples exposed to X rays, compared to the proton-irradiated ones. Nonlinear and high-field dielectric characterization suggest a radiation-induced reduction of the extrinsic contributions to the response, attributed to increased pinning of the domain walls by the radiation-induced point defects.

  11. Response of Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) to High Energy Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Coupland, Daniel David Schechtman; Stonehill, Laura Catherine; Goett, John Jerome III

    2015-11-23

    Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) is a promising new inorganic scintillator for gamma and neutron detection. As a gamma-ray detector, it exhibits bright light output and better resolution and proportionality of response than traditional gamma-ray scintillators such as NaI. It is also highly sensitive to thermal neutrons through capture on 6Li, and recent experiments have demonstrated sensitivity to fast neutrons through interactions with 35Cl. The response of CLYC to other forms of radiation has not been reported. We have performed the first measurements of the response of CLYC to several-hundred MeV protons. We have collected digitized waveforms from proton events, and compare to those produced by gammas and thermal neutrons. Finally, we discuss the potential for pulse shape discrimination between them.

  12. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  13. Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration with funnel-shaped-hole target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Da Peng; Li, Yu Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration using a funnel-shaped-hole target is demonstrated through particle simulations. When an intense short pulse laser illuminates a thin foil target with a hole at the rear surface, the proton beam divergence is suppressed compared with that obtained in a traditional flat target. In this paper, a funnel-shaped-hole target is proposed to improve the proton beam quality. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, three different shapes of target (funnel-shaped-hole target, cylinder-shaped-hole target and flat target) are simulated and compared. The funnel-shaped hole in the rear surface of the target helps to focus the electron cloud significantly and improve the maximum proton energy and suppress the proton beam divergence. Different thicknesses of the new target are also simulated, and the effects of thickness on the divergence angle and proton spectra are investigated. The optimal size of the new target is obtained and the quality of the proton beam is improved significantly. The funnel-shaped-hole target serves as a new method to improve the proton beam quality in laser-plasma interactions.

  14. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-03-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  15. Proton acceleration from microdroplet spray by weakly relativistic femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Xiaoyu; Li Yingjun; Li Hanming; Zhang Jie; Zheng Jun; Sheng Zhengming; Xu Miaohua; Zheng Zhiyuan; Liang Tianjiao; Li Yutong; Dong Quanli; Yuan Xiaohui

    2006-09-15

    Angular distribution of protons is measured from ethanol droplet spray irradiated by linearly polarized 150 fs laser pulses at an intensity of 1.1x10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. Fast protons (with energies >16 keV) with an anisotropic distribution can be observed only in or near the polarization plane of the laser fields, while the slow protons (with energies IE16 keV) emit with nearly an isotropic distribution. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations suggest that three groups of protons originate from different acceleration regimes in the laser-droplet interaction. The first group with the highest energies is accelerated backwards by the anisotropic charge-separation field near the front surface (laser-droplet interaction side) due to the resonance absorption; the second group (forward emission) is generated by the target-normal sheath acceleration mechanism; and the third group, with the lowest energies, is accelerated by the hydrodynamic expansion of the droplet plasmas.

  16. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, C. Kester, O.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.

    2014-02-15

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 10{sup 10} cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 10{sup 16} protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms)

  17. Electron and proton acceleration efficiency by merger shocks in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.; Eckert, D.; Brüggen, M.; Huber, B.

    2015-08-01

    Radio relics in galaxy clusters are associated with powerful shocks that (re)accelerate relativistic electrons. It is widely believed that the acceleration proceeds via diffusive shock acceleration. In the framework of thermal leakage, the ratio of the energy in relativistic electrons to the energy in relativistic protons should be smaller than Ke/p ˜ 10-2. The relativistic protons interact with the thermal gas to produce γ-rays in hadronic interactions. Combining observations of radio relics with upper limits from γ-ray observatories can constrain the ratio Ke/p. In this work, we selected 10 galaxy clusters that contain double radio relics, and derive new upper limits from the stacking of γ-ray observations by Fermi. We modelled the propagation of shocks using a semi-analytical model, where we assumed a simple geometry for shocks and that cosmic ray protons are trapped in the intracluster medium. Our analysis shows that diffusive shock acceleration has difficulties in matching simultaneously the observed radio emission and the constraints imposed by Fermi, unless the magnetic field in relics is unrealistically large ( ≫ 10 μG). In all investigated cases (also including realistic variations of our basic model and the effect of re-acceleration), the mean emission of the sample is of the order of the stacking limit by Fermi, or larger. These findings put tension on the commonly adopted model for the powering of radio relics, and imply that the relative acceleration efficiency of electrons and protons is at odds with predictions of diffusive shock acceleration, requiring Ke/p ≥ 10 - 10-2.

  18. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS IN THE AGS WITH TWO HELICAL PARTIAL SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, H.; AHRENS, L.A.; BAI, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BROWN, K.; COURANT, E.D.; GARDNER, C.; GLENN, J.W.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MACKAY, W.W.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TSOUPAS, N.; WOOD, J.; YIP, K.; ZELENSKI, A.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-26

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult: the depolarizing resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions and are not feasible in the AGS since straight sections are too short. Recently, two helical partial snakes with double pitch design have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate the intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the accelerator setup and preliminary results.

  19. Neutron-proton-converter acceleration mechanism at subphotospheres of relativistic outflows.

    PubMed

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2013-09-27

    We study a type of particle acceleration that operates via neutron-proton conversion in inelastic nuclear collisions. This mechanism can be expected for relativistic shocks at subphotospheres if relativistic outflows contain neutrons. Using a test-particle approximation, we numerically calculate the energy spectrum and the efficiency of accelerated particles, and show that a good energy fraction of the nucleons can be accelerated. This mechanism may be especially relevant if the shock is radiation mediated, and it would enhance the detectability of GeV-TeV neutrinos. PMID:24116765

  20. Polarized Proton Acceleration in the AGS with Two Helical Partial Snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Bravar, A.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Wood, J.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Lin, F.; Okamura, M.

    2007-06-13

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult: the depolarizing resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions and are not feasible in the AGS since straight sections are too short. Recently, two helical partial snakes have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate the intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the accelerator setup and preliminary results.

  1. Beam Transport in a Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Caporaso, G; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2011-03-16

    To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator, the DWA will be operated in the 'virtual' traveling mode with potentially non-uniform and time-dependent axial accelerating field profiles, especially near the DWA entrance and exit, which makes beam transport challenging. We have established a baseline transport case without using any external lenses. Results of simulations using the 3-D, EM PIC code, LSP indicate that the DWA transport performance meets the medical specifications for proton treatment. Sensitivity of the transport performance to Blumlein block failure will be presented.

  2. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Bauman, M; Lesyna, D; Miller, D; Nusbaum, J; Slater, J; Johanning, J; Miranda, J; DeLuca, P M; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented [R. R. Wilson, Radiology 47, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. 9, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. 10, 831 (1983)]. One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less than +/- 5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7 x 10(9) protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5 x 10(10) protons/spill for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1661367

  3. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Zepf, M.; Yan, X. Q.

    2014-06-15

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  4. Micro-sphere layered targets efficiency in laser driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Limpouch, J.; Proska, J.; Novotny, F.; Stolcova, L.; Velyhan, A.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Vassura, L.; Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2013-08-28

    Proton acceleration from the interaction of high contrast, 25 fs laser pulses at >10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intensity with plastic foils covered with a single layer of regularly packed micro-spheres has been investigated experimentally. The proton cut-off energy has been measured as a function of the micro-sphere size and laser incidence angle for different substrate thickness, and for both P and S polarization. The presence of micro-spheres with a size comparable to the laser wavelength allows to increase the proton cut-off energy for both polarizations at small angles of incidence (10∘). For large angles of incidence, however, proton energy enhancement with respect to flat targets is absent. Analysis of electron trajectories in particle-in-cell simulations highlights the role of the surface geometry in the heating of electrons.

  5. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2013-09-30

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup −15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1μm) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  6. External-Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Multiple Proton Beam Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Amos, Richard A.; Zhang Xiaodong; Taddei, Phillip J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Yu, Tse Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia; Perkins, George H.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Zhang, Sean X.; Sun, Tzou Liang; Gillin, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty was evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.

  7. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  8. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  9. Proton radiography of dynamic electric and magnetic fields in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Manuel, M.; Casey, D.; Sinenian, N.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Delettrez, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-05-15

    Time-gated, monoenergetic-proton radiography provides unique measurements of the electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields produced in laser-foil interactions and during the implosion of inertial-confinement-fusion capsules. These experiments resulted in the first observations of several new and important features: (1) observations of the generation, decay dynamics, and instabilities of megagauss B fields in laser-driven planar plastic foils, (2) the observation of radial E fields inside an imploding capsule, which are initially directed inward, reverse direction during deceleration, and are likely related to the evolution of the electron pressure gradient, and (3) the observation of many radial filaments with complex electromagnetic field striations in the expanding coronal plasmas surrounding the capsule. The physics behind and implications of such observed fields are discussed.

  10. Proton radiography of dynamic electric and magnetic fields in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Manuel, M.; Casey, D.; Sinenian, N.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Delettrez, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvarts, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Back, C. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2009-01-01

    Time-gated, monoenergetic-proton radiography provides unique measurements of the electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields produced in laser-foil interactions and during the implosion of inertial-confinement-fusion capsules. These experiments resulted in the first observations of several new and important features: (1) observations of the generation, decay dynamics, and instabilities of megagauss B fields in laser-driven planar plastic foils, (2) the observation of radial E fields inside an imploding capsule, which are initially directed inward, reverse direction during deceleration, and are likely related to the evolution of the electron pressure gradient, and (3) the observation of many radial filaments with complex electromagnetic field striations in the expanding coronal plasmas surrounding the capsule. The physics behind and implications of such observed fields are discussed.

  11. Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Farzana, E.; Sun, W. Y.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; McSkimming, B.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.

    2015-10-21

    The impact of annealing of proton irradiation-induced defects in n-type GaN devices has been systematically investigated using deep level transient and optical spectroscopies. Moderate temperature annealing (>200–250 °C) causes significant reduction in the concentration of nearly all irradiation-induced traps. While the decreased concentration of previously identified N and Ga vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.13 eV, 0.16 eV, and 2.50 eV generally followed a first-order reaction model with activation energies matching theoretical values for N{sub I} and V{sub Ga} diffusion, irradiation-induced traps at E{sub C} − 0.72 eV, 1.25 eV, and 3.28 eV all decrease in concentration in a gradual manner, suggesting a more complex reduction mechanism. Slight increases in concentration are observed for the N-vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.20 eV and 0.25 eV, which may be due to the reconfiguration of other N-vacancy related defects. Finally, the observed reduction in concentrations of the states at E{sub C} − 1.25 and E{sub C} − 3.28 eV as a function of annealing temperature closely tracks the detailed recovery behavior of the background carrier concentration as a function of annealing temperature. As a result, it is suggested that these two levels are likely to be responsible for the underlying carrier compensation effect that causes the observation of carrier removal in proton-irradiated n-GaN.

  12. Obtaining a proton beam with 5-mA current in a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Kasatov, D. A.; Koshkarev, A. M.; Makarov, A. N.; Ostreinov, Yu. M.; Sorokin, I. N.; Taskaev, S. Yu.; Shchudlo, I. M.

    2016-06-01

    Suppression of parasitic electron flows and positive ions formed in the beam tract of a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation allowed a more than threefold increase (from 1.6 to 5 mA) in the current of accelerated 2-MeV protons. Details of the modification are described. Results of experimental investigation of the suppression of secondary charged particles and data on the characteristics of accelerated proton beam with increased current are presented.

  13. Proton acceleration from high-contrast short pulse lasers interacting with sub-micron thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study complemented with published experimental data of proton acceleration from sub-micron (thickness < 1 μm) foils irradiated by ultra-high contrast ( >1010 ) short pulse lasers is presented. The underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration are addressed using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For laser energy ɛ≤4 J (intensity I ≤5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), simulation predictions agree with experimental data, both exhibiting scaling superior to Target Normal Sheath Acceleration's model. Anomalous behavior was observed for ɛ>4 J ( I >5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), for which the measured maximum proton energies were much lower than predicted by scaling and these simulations. This unexpected behavior could not be explained within the frame of the model, and we conjecture that pre-pulses preceding the main pulse by picoseconds may be responsible. If technological issues can be resolved, energetic proton beams could be generated for a wide range of applications such as nuclear physics, radiography, and medical science.

  14. Development of methods for calculating basic features of the nuclear contribution to single event upsets under the effect of protons of moderately high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chechenin, N. G. Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.

    2015-10-15

    As a continuation and a development of previous studies of our group that were devoted to the investigation of nuclear reactions induced by protons of moderately high energy (between 10 and 400 MeV) in silicon, aluminum, and tungsten atoms, the results obtained by exploring nuclear reactions on atoms of copper, which is among the most important components in materials for contact pads and pathways in modern and future ultralarge-scale integration circuits, especially in three-dimensional topology, are reported in the present article. The nuclear reactions in question lead to the formation of the mass and charge spectra of recoil nuclei ranging fromheavy target nuclei down to helium and hydrogen. The kineticenergy spectra of reaction products are calculated. The results of the calculations based on the procedure developed by our group are compared with the results of calculations and experiments performed by other authors.

  15. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio; Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo; Bolton, Paul R.

    2014-03-01

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15 M €. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments.

  16. Proton acceleration by single-cycle laser pulses offers a novel monoenergetic and stable operating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. L.; Yan, X. Q.; Mourou, G.; Wheeler, J. A.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.

    2016-04-01

    Prompted by the possibility to produce high energy, single-cycle laser pulses with tens of Petawatt (PW) power, we have investigated laser-matter interactions in the few optical cycle and ultra relativistic intensity regimes. A particularly interesting instability-free regime for ion production was revealed leading to the efficient coherent generation of short (femtosecond; 10 - 15 s ) monoenergetic ion bunches with a peak energy greater than GeV. Of paramount importance, the interaction is absent of the Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities and hole boring that plague techniques such as target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration.

  17. Nonlinear surface plasma wave induced target normal sheath acceleration of protons

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K. Shao, Xi; Liu, T. C.

    2015-02-15

    The mode structure of a large amplitude surface plasma wave (SPW) over a vacuum–plasma interface, including relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities, is deduced. It is shown that the SPW excited by a p-polarized laser on a rippled thin foil target can have larger amplitude than the transmitted laser amplitude and cause stronger target normal sheath acceleration of protons as reported in a recent experiment. Substantial enhancement in proton number also occurs due to the larger surface area covered by the SPW.

  18. Laser acceleration of protons using multi-ion plasma gaseous targets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung -Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan -Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; W. T. Hill, III; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih -Hung

    2015-02-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of a novel acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO₂ laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 μm—much greater than that of a Ti: Sapphire laser—the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the target compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. By impinging such a laser beam on a carbon–hydrogen target, the gaseous target is first compressed and accelerated by radiation pressure until the electron layer disrupts, after which the protons are further accelerated by the electron-shielded carbon ion layer. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with a peak power of 70 TW and a pulse duration of 150 wave periods.

  19. Laser acceleration of protons using multi-ion plasma gaseous targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Tung -Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan -Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; W. T. Hill, III; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih -Hung

    2015-02-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of a novel acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO₂ laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 μm—much greater than that of a Ti: Sapphire laser—the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the target compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. By impinging such amore » laser beam on a carbon–hydrogen target, the gaseous target is first compressed and accelerated by radiation pressure until the electron layer disrupts, after which the protons are further accelerated by the electron-shielded carbon ion layer. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with a peak power of 70 TW and a pulse duration of 150 wave periods.« less

  20. An MCNP-based model for the evaluation of the photoneutron dose in high energy medical electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Carinou, Eleutheria; Stamatelatos, Ion Evangelos; Kamenopoulou, Vassiliki; Georgolopoulou, Paraskevi; Sandilos, Panayotis

    The development of a computational model for the treatment head of a medical electron accelerator (Elekta/Philips SL-18) by the Monte Carlo code mcnp-4C2 is discussed. The model includes the major components of the accelerator head and a pmma phantom representing the patient body. Calculations were performed for a 14 MeV electron beam impinging on the accelerator target and a 10 cmx10 cm beam area at the isocentre. The model was used in order to predict the neutron ambient dose equivalent at the isocentre level and moreover the neutron absorbed dose distribution within the phantom. Calculations were validated against experimental measurements performed by gold foil activation detectors. The results of this study indicated that the equivalent dose at tissues or organs adjacent to the treatment field due to photoneutrons could be up to 10% of the total peripheral dose, for the specific accelerator characteristics examined. Therefore, photoneutrons should be taken into account when accurate dose calculations are required to sensitive tissues that are adjacent to the therapeutic X-ray beam. The method described can be extended to other accelerators and collimation configurations as well, upon specification of treatment head component dimensions, composition and nominal accelerating potential. PMID:18348851

  1. The relation between the fundamental scale controlling high-energy interactions of quarks and the proton mass

    SciTech Connect

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2015-04-06

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) provides a fundamental description of the physics binding quarks into protons, neutrons, and other hadrons. QCD is well understood at short distances where perturbative calculations are feasible. Establishing an explicit relation between this regime and the large-distance physics of quark confinement has been a long-sought goal. A major challenge is to relate the parameter Λs, which controls the predictions of perturbative QCD (pQCD) at short distances, to the masses of hadrons. Here we show how new theoretical insights into QCD's behavior at large and small distances lead to an analytical relation between hadronic masses and Λs. The resulting prediction, Λs = 0.341 ± 0.024 GeV agrees well with the experimental value 0.339 ± 0.016 GeV. Conversely, the experimental value of Λs can be used to predict the masses of hadrons, a task which had so far only been accomplished through intensive numerical lattice calculations, requiring several phenomenological input parameters.

  2. What is learned from high energy bursts and flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneid, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) with its large Nal Total Absorption Shower Counter (TASC) has the scientific capability of performing spectroscopy of high energy cosmic gamma ray bursts and solar flares. EGRET, with a spectroscopy energy range from 0.6 to 140 MeV, provides an opportunity to increase the understanding of the high energy mechanisms of gamma ray bursts and solar flares. A likely interpretation of gamma ray burst sources is that they are rotating, magnetized neutron stars. High magnetic fields can influence the emission of high energy gamma rays, so observational spectroscopic data at high energies can provide information on the upper limits of the magnetic fields in the GRB regions of magnetized neutron stars. Likewise, spectroscopy of high energy gamma rays can provide information useful for deriving the flare proton spectrum which in turn can lead to an understanding of high energy solar flare particle acceleration mechanisms.

  3. Dosimetric advantages of IMPT over IMRT for laser-accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Li, J.; Fourkal, E.; Fan, J.; Xu, X.; Chen, Z.; Jin, L.; Price, R.; Ma, C.-M.

    2008-12-01

    As a clinical application of an exciting scientific breakthrough, a compact and cost-efficient proton therapy unit using high-power laser acceleration is being developed at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The significance of this application depends on whether or not it can yield dosimetric superiority over intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The goal of this study is to show how laser-accelerated proton beams with broad energy spreads can be optimally used for proton therapy including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and achieve dosimetric superiority over IMRT for prostate cancer. Desired energies and spreads with a varying δE/E were selected with the particle selection device and used to generate spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). Proton plans were generated on an in-house Monte Carlo-based inverse-planning system. Fifteen prostate IMRT plans previously used for patient treatment have been included for comparison. Identical dose prescriptions, beam arrangement and consistent dose constrains were used for IMRT and IMPT plans to show the dosimetric differences that were caused only by the different physical characteristics of proton and photon beams. Different optimization constrains and beam arrangements were also used to find optimal IMPT. The results show that conventional proton therapy (CPT) plans without intensity modulation were not superior to IMRT, but IMPT can generate better proton plans if appropriate beam setup and optimization are used. Compared to IMRT, IMPT can reduce the target dose heterogeneity ((D5-D95)/D95) by up to 56%. The volume receiving 65 Gy and higher (V65) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 45% and 88%, respectively, while the volume receiving 40 Gy and higher (V40) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 49% and 68%, respectively. IMPT can also reduce the whole body non-target tissue dose by up to 61% or a factor 2.5. This study has shown that the laser accelerator under development has a

  4. Observations of high-energy jets in the corona above the quiet sun, the heating of the corona, and the acceleration of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.

    1983-01-01

    High spatial resolution observations of the ultraviolet solar spectrum which reveal high-energy events in the quiet sun are presented. The tandem Wadsworth spectrograph used to make the observations is described along with the observing techniques, and a brief description of the characteristics of high-resolution transition zone spectra is given. The sizes, velocities, line profiles, time behavior, temperature range, differential emission measures, densities, masses, energies, and birthrates of turbulent events and jets in the quiet sun are derived from the observations and discussed. Possible accelerating mechanisms for these events are discussed, and the consequences of these events for the heating of the solar corona are discussed. A cloud model of the solar wind is proposed and possible correlations between the high-energy events and other solar fine-structure features are discussed.

  5. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared to Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.

  6. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomore » Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.« less

  7. Lower hybrid turbulence at cometary bow wave and acceleration of cometary protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, V. D.; Shevchenko, V. I.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Lebedev, V. B.

    1993-01-01

    The wave measurements at the spacecraft encounters with Comet Halley have shown intense wave activity at the lower hybrid frequency. The excitation of the lower hybrid instability by the pickup cometary ions (protons and water group) in the bow wave region and the quasi-linear diffusion of the ions in these fluctuations are discussed. The quasi-linear diffusion of the pickup protons takes place over a scale length shorter than that of the heavier water group ions. This enhances damping of the waves by protons, and when the pickup proton density is large enough, it can result in the saturation of the instability as this damping balances the heavy ion driven growth. The observed electric field amplitude and the scale length of proton relaxation are in agreement with the theory. For small pickup proton density the instability can saturate due to the wave energy cascade arising from the modulation instability of the large-amplitude lower hybrid waves. This saturation mechanism leads to electron acceleration and suprathermal tail formation.

  8. High Power Proton Accelerator Development at KAERI and its Vacuum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Ho; Park, Mi Young; Kim, Kui Young; Kim, Kye Ryung; Kim, Jun Yeon; Cho, Yong-Sub

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP), approved and launched by the Korean government in July 2002, includes a 100 MeV proton linear accelerator (linac) development and programs for its utilization and application. The main goals in the first phase of the project, spanning from 2002 to 2005, were the design of a 100 MeV proton linac and the development of a 20 MeV linac consisting of a 50 keV proton injector, a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and a 20 MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The 50 keV injector and 3 MeV RFQ have been installed and tested, and the 20 MeV DTL is being assembled, tuned and under a beam test. At the same time, the utilization programs using the proton beam have been planned, and some are now under way. The vacuum system of the 20 MeV proton linac and its related issues, especially in operation with a high duty, are discussed in detail.

  9. Advanced low-beta cavity development for proton and ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Z. A.; Kelly, M. P.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in designing and processing low-beta superconducting cavities at Argonne National Laboratory are very encouraging for future applications requiring compact proton and ion accelerators. One of the major benefits of these accelerating structures is achieving real-estate accelerating gradients greater than 3 MV/m very efficiently either continuously or for long-duty cycle operation (>1%). The technology has been implemented in low-beta accelerator cryomodules for the Argonne ATLAS heavy-ion linac where the cryomodules are required to have real-estate gradients of more than 3 MV/m. In offline testing low-beta cavities with even higher gradients have already been achieved. This paper will review this work where we have achieved surface fields greater than 166 mT magnetic and 117 MV/m electric in a 72 MHz quarter-wave resonator optimized for β = 0.077 ions.

  10. On the feasibility of increasing the energy of laser-accelerated protons by using low-density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    Optimal regimes of proton acceleration in the interaction of short high-power laser pulses with thin foils and low-density targets are determined by means of 3D numerical simulation. It is demonstrated that the maximum proton energy can be increased by using low-density targets in which ions from the front surface of the target are accelerated most efficiently. It is shown using a particular example that, for the same laser pulse, the energy of protons accelerated from a low-density target can be increased by one-third as compared to a solid-state target.

  11. On the feasibility of increasing the energy of laser-accelerated protons by using low-density targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brantov, A. V. Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-06-15

    Optimal regimes of proton acceleration in the interaction of short high-power laser pulses with thin foils and low-density targets are determined by means of 3D numerical simulation. It is demonstrated that the maximum proton energy can be increased by using low-density targets in which ions from the front surface of the target are accelerated most efficiently. It is shown using a particular example that, for the same laser pulse, the energy of protons accelerated from a low-density target can be increased by one-third as compared to a solid-state target.

  12. Accelerating monoenergetic protons from ultrathin foils by flat-top laser pulses in the directed-Coulomb-explosion regime

    PubMed Central

    Bulanov, S. S.; Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Chvykov, V.; Kalinchenko, G.; Matsuoka, T.; Rousseau, P.; Reed, S.; Yanovsky, V.; Litzenberg, D. W.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the effect of laser beam shaping on proton acceleration in the interaction of a tightly focused pulse with ultrathin double-layer solid targets in the regime of directed Coulomb explosion. In this regime, the heavy ions of the front layer are forced by the laser to expand predominantly in the direction of the pulse propagation, forming a moving longitudinal charge separation electric field, thus increasing the effectiveness of acceleration of second-layer protons. The utilization of beam shaping, namely, the use of flat-top beams, leads to more efficient proton acceleration due to the increase of the longitudinal field. PMID:18850951

  13. Definition and Application of Proton Source Efficiency in Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seltborg, Per; Wallenius, Jan; Tucek, Kamil; Gudowski, Waclaw

    2003-11-15

    In order to study the beam power amplification of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), a new parameter, the proton source efficiency {psi}* is introduced. {psi}* represents the average importance of the external proton source, relative to the average importance of the eigenmode production, and is closely related to the neutron source efficiency [varphi]*, which is frequently used in the ADS field. [varphi]* is commonly used in the physics of subcritical systems driven by any external source (spallation source, (d,d), (d,t), {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fissions, etc.). On the contrary, {psi}* has been defined in this paper exclusively for ADS studies where the system is driven by a spallation source. The main advantage with using {psi}* instead of [varphi]* for ADS is that the way of defining the external source is unique and that it is proportional to the core power divided by the proton beam power, independent of the neutron source distribution.Numerical simulations have been performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX in order to study {psi}* as a function of different design parameters. It was found that, in order to maximize {psi}* and therefore minimize the proton current needs, a target radius as small as possible should be chosen. For target radii smaller than {approx}30 cm, lead-bismuth is a better choice of coolant material than sodium, regarding the proton source efficiency, while for larger target radii the two materials are equally good. The optimal axial proton beam impact was found to be located {approx}20 cm above the core center. Varying the proton energy, {psi}*/E{sub p} was found to have a maximum for proton energies between 1200 and 1400 MeV. Increasing the americium content in the fuel decreases {psi}* considerably, in particular when the target radius is large.

  14. Electron versus proton accelerator driven sub-critical system performance using TRIGA reactors at power

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Burgio, N.; D'Angelo, A.; Santagata, A.; Petrovich, C.; Schikorr, M.; Beller, D.; Felice, L. S.; Imel, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison of the performance of an electron accelerator-driven experiment, under discussion within the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project, being conducted within the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and of the proton-driven experiment TRADE (TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment) originally planned at ENEA-Casaccia in Italy. Both experiments foresee the coupling to sub-critical TRIGA core configurations, and are aimed to investigate the relevant kinetic and dynamic accelerator-driven systems (ADS) core behavior characteristics in the presence of thermal reactivity feedback effects. TRADE was based on the coupling of an upgraded proton cyclotron, producing neutrons via spallation reactions on a tantalum (Ta) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 200 kW. RACE is based on the coupling of an Electron Linac accelerator, producing neutrons via photoneutron reactions on a tungsten-copper (W-Cu) or uranium (U) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 50 kW. The paper is focused on analysis of expected dynamic power response of the RACE core following reactivity and/or source transients. TRADE and RACE target-core power coupling coefficients are compared and discussed. (authors)

  15. First experimental results from 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator for neutron production.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, A; Belchenko, Yu; Burdakov, A; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Khilchenko, A; Konstantinov, S; Krivenko, A; Kuznetsov, A; Mekler, K; Sanin, A; Shirokov, V; Sorokin, I; Sulyaev, Yu; Tiunov, M

    2008-02-01

    A 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation was developed and first experiments are carried out in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). The accelerator is designed for neutron production via reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be for the boron neutron-capture therapy of the brain tumors, and for explosive detection based on 9.1724 MeV resonance gamma, which are produced via reaction (13)C(p,gamma)(14)N, absorption in nitrogen. PMID:18315262

  16. Construction of low current 30 keV proton accelerator for detection efficiency studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Bacci, Americo; Baessler, Stefan; Ross, Aaron; Roane, Nicholas; Whitaker, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    We have constructed a small ion source and proton accelerator at UVA. This accelerator is needed for the characterization of the detection efficiency of a large area, thick, 127-hexagonal segmented Silicon detector for the neutron beta decay ``Nab'' experiment that will be carried out at SNS, Oak Ridge National Laboratory in search of physics beyond the standard model. We will present the design, simulations, operation, and detection of 30 keV H+ and H2+, as well as our efforts to stabilize and correlate both ion currents.

  17. First experimental results from 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, A.; Belchenko, Yu.; Burdakov, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Krivenko, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Mekler, K.; Sanin, A.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.; Sulyaev, Yu.; Tiunov, M.

    2008-02-15

    A 2 MeV proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation was developed and first experiments are carried out in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). The accelerator is designed for neutron production via reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be for the boron neutron-capture therapy of the brain tumors, and for explosive detection based on 9.1724 MeV resonance gamma, which are produced via reaction {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N, absorption in nitrogen.

  18. Protons acceleration in thin CH foils by ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, I. N.

    2015-03-15

    Interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with the intensities 10{sup 21}, 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} with CH plastic foils is studied in the framework of kinetic theory of laser plasma based on the construction of propagators (in classical limit) for electron and ion distribution functions in plasmas. The calculations have been performed for real densities and charges of plasma ions. Protons are accelerated both in the direction of laser pulse (up to 1 GeV) and in the opposite direction (more than 5 GeV). The mechanisms of forward acceleration are different for various intensities.

  19. Shock wave acceleration of protons in inhomogeneous plasma interacting with ultrashort intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lecz, Zs.; Andreev, A.

    2015-04-15

    The acceleration of protons, triggered by solitary waves in expanded solid targets is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The near-critical density plasma is irradiated by ultrashort high power laser pulses, which generate the solitary wave. The transformation of this soliton into a shock wave during propagation in plasma with exponentially decreasing density profile is described analytically, which allows to obtain a scaling law for the proton energy. The high quality proton bunch with small energy spread is produced by reflection from the shock-front. According to the 2D simulations, the mechanism is stable only if the laser pulse duration is shorter than the characteristic development time of the parasitic Weibel instability.

  20. Proton acceleration with high-intensity ultrahigh-contrast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Ceccotti, T; Lévy, A; Popescu, H; Réau, F; D'Oliveira, P; Monot, P; Geindre, J P; Lefebvre, E; Martin, Ph

    2007-11-01

    We report on simultaneous measurements of backward- and forward-accelerated protons spectra when an ultrahigh intensity (approximately 5 x 10(18) W/cm(20), ultrahigh contrast (>10(10)) laser pulse interacts with foils of thickness ranging from 0.08 to 105 microm. Under such conditions, free of preplasma originating from ionization of the laser-irradiated surface, we show that the maximum proton energies are proportional to the p component of the laser electric field only and not to the ponderomotive force and that the characteristics of the proton beams originating from both target sides are almost identical. All these points have been corroborated by extensive 1D and 2D particle-in-cell simulations showing a very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:17995415

  1. Proton Acceleration with High-Intensity Ultrahigh-Contrast Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccotti, T.; Levy, A.; Popescu, H.; Reau, F.; D'Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Lefebvre, E.

    2007-11-02

    We report on simultaneous measurements of backward- and forward-accelerated protons spectra when an ultrahigh intensity ({approx}5x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}), ultrahigh contrast (>10{sup 10}) laser pulse interacts with foils of thickness ranging from 0.08 to 105 {mu}m. Under such conditions, free of preplasma originating from ionization of the laser-irradiated surface, we show that the maximum proton energies are proportional to the p component of the laser electric field only and not to the ponderomotive force and that the characteristics of the proton beams originating from both target sides are almost identical. All these points have been corroborated by extensive 1D and 2D particle-in-cell simulations showing a very good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Calculations of neutron shielding data for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Sheu, R J; Jian, S H

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of neutron sources and their attenuation in concrete were investigated in detail for protons with energies ranging from 10 to 100 MeV striking on target materials of C, N, Al, Fe, Cu and W. A two-step approach was adopted: thick-target double-differential neutron yields were first calculated from the (p, xn) cross sections recommended in the ICRU Report 63; further, transport simulations of those neutrons in concrete were performed by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The purpose of this study is to provide reasonably accurate parameters for shielding design for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators. Source terms and the corresponding attenuation lengths in concrete for several target materials are given as a function of proton energies and neutron emission angles. PMID:16604637

  3. Numerical study of a linear accelerator using laser-generated proton beams as a source

    SciTech Connect

    Antici, P.; Fazi, M.; Migliorati, M.; Palumbo, L.; Lombardi, A.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-12-15

    The injection of laser-generated protons through conventional drift tube linear accelerators (linacs) has been studied numerically. For this, we used the parameters of the proton source produced by ultraintense lasers, i.e., with an intrinsic high beam quality. The numerical particle tracing code PARMELA[L. M. Young and J. H. Billen, LANL Report No. LA-UR-96-1835, 2004] is then used to inject experimentally measured laser-generated protons with energies of 7{+-}0.1 MeV and rms un-normalized emittance of 0.180 mm mrad into one drift tube linac tank that accelerated them to more than 14 MeV. The simulations exhibit un-normalized emittance growths of 8 in x direction and 22.6 in y direction, with final emittances lower than those produced using conventional sources, allowing a potential luminosity gain for the final beam. However, the simulations also exhibit a limitation in the allowed injected proton charge as, over 0.112 mA, space charge effect worsens significantly the beam emittance.

  4. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  5. The short-lived (<2 minutes) acceleration of protons to >13 GeV in association with solar flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Ken; Shea, Margaret Ann; Smart, Don

    2016-04-01

    release) mechanism must then decrease greatly in efficiency abruptly ~3 minutes after it started. We note that this is not a unique example; the >10GeV particle pulse in the GLE of 20 January 2005 persisted for only 3 minutes; and a >4.5 GeV pulse at the commencement of the GLE of 7 December, 1982, only lasted one minute. We conclude with a comparison between these observations and the predictions of several proposed acceleration models. We conclude that these short-lived bursts of highly relativistic cosmic rays have been accelerated in the reconnection regions associated with large solar flares. In the greater majority of cases, the short-lived, high energy cosmic ray pulse at the commencement of a GLE is followed by a slowly rising component accelerated in the CME generated shock.

  6. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M H; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S; Murphy, Chris D; Stockhausen, Luca C; Carroll, David C; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  7. Multifactorial Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spores to High-Energy Proton Radiation: Role of Spore Structural Components and the Homologous Recombination and Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Günther; Li, Zuofeng; Klein, Stuart; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The space environment contains high-energy charged particles (e.g., protons, neutrons, electrons, α-particles, heavy ions) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources or trapped in the radiation belts. Protons constitute the majority (87%) of high-energy charged particles. Spores of Bacillus species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. In this study, spores of different Bacillus subtilis strains were used to study the effects of high energetic proton irradiation on spore survival. Spores of the wild-type B. subtilis strain [mutants deficient in the homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathways and mutants deficient in various spore structural components such as dipicolinic acid (DPA), α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) formation, spore coats, pigmentation, or spore core water content] were irradiated as air-dried multilayers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons with 218 MeV protons [with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 0.4 keV/μm] to various final doses up to 2500 Gy. Spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to proton radiation than wild-type spores, indicating that both HR and NHEJ DNA repair pathways are needed for spore survival. Spores lacking DPA, α/β-type SASP, or with increased core water content were also significantly more sensitive to proton radiation, whereas the resistance of spores lacking pigmentation or spore coats was essentially identical to that of the wild-type spores. Our results indicate that α/β-type SASP, core water content, and DPA play an important role in spore resistance to high-energy proton irradiation, suggesting their essential function as radioprotectants of the spore interior. Key Words: Bacillus—Spores—DNA repair—Protection—High-energy proton radiation. Astrobiology 12, 1069–1077. PMID:23088412

  8. How to Produce a Reactor Neutron Spectrum Using a Proton Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K.; Wootan, D.; Gates, R.; Schmitt, B.; Asner, D. M.

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  9. How to produce a reactor neutron spectrum using a proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Wootan, David W.; Gates, Robert O.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Asner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  10. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanzo, J.; Fallavier, M.; Alphonse, G.; Bernard, C.; Battiston-Montagne, P.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Dauvergne, D.; Beuve, M.

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  11. Acceleration of electrons to high energies in a standing wave generated by counterpropagating intense laser pulses with tilted amplitude fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Galkin, A. L.; Korobkin, V. V.; Romanovskiy, M. Yu.; Trofimov, V. A.; Shiryaev, O. B.

    2012-07-15

    The dynamics of an electron in a standing wave generated by two relativistically intense linearly polarized laser pulses with tilted amplitude fronts is studied. The analysis is based on solving numerically the relativistic Newton's equation with the corresponding Lorentz force. A new scheme of laser acceleration of electrons by the direct action of the standing wave is proposed. It is shown that short bunches of electrons with energies reaching several GeV can be created for relativistic laser intensities.

  12. Study of proton acceleration at the target front surface in laser-solid interactions by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Proton acceleration inside solid LiF and CH-LiF targets irradiated by a 450-fs, 20-J, 1053-nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} has been studied via neutron spectroscopy. Neutron spectra produced through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction that occurs between accelerated protons, at the front surface, and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. From measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, total number, and slope temperature of the accelerated protons are investigated. The study indicates that protons originate at the front surface and are accelerated to a maximum energy that is reasonably consistent with the calculated one due to the ponderomotive force.

  13. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-15

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  14. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-01

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  15. Accelerating into the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Cherry

    2009-05-01

    Accelerator science has traditionally been associated with high-energy physics and nuclear physics. But the use of accelerators in other areas of science, as well as in medicine and industry, is steadily growing. Accelerators are now, for example, used to treat cancer using proton therapy, which can deposit radiation onto a tumour while causing much less damage to surrounding healthy tissue than with other treatment techniques.

  16. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilan, N.; Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  17. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices.

    PubMed

    Pilan, N; Antoni, V; De Lorenzi, A; Chitarin, G; Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming. PMID:26932053

  18. Microstructural origins of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of 316 L and 304 L austenitic stainless steels irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Hamilton, M. L.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    A number of candidate alloys were exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) that closely match the mixed high-energy proton/neutron spectra expected in accelerator production of tritium (APT) window and blanket applications. Austenitic stainless steels 316 L and 304 L are two of these candidate alloys possessing attractive strength and corrosion resistance for APT applications. This paper describes the dose dependence of the irradiation-induced microstructural evolution of SS 316 L and 304 L in the temperature range 30-60°C and consequent changes in mechanical properties. It was observed that the microstructural evolution during irradiation was essentially identical in the two alloys, a behavior mirrored in their changes in mechanical properties. With one expection, it was possible to correlate all changes in mechanical properties with visible microstructural features. A late-term second abrupt decrease in uniform elongation was not associated with visible microstructure, but is postulated to be a consequence of large levels of retained hydrogen measured in the specimens. In spite of large amounts of both helium and hydrogen retained, approaching 1 at.% at the highest exposures, no visible cavities were formed, indicating that the gas atoms were either in solution or in subresolvable clusters.

  19. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  20. Irradiation damage from low-dose high-energy protons on mechanical properties and positron annihilation lifetimes of Fe-9Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Fukumoto, K.; Ishi, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Uesugi, T.; Sato, K.; Mori, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in accelerator-driven systems (ADS) result in the generation of helium within the ADS materials. The amount of helium produced in this way is approximately one order of magnitude higher than that generated by nuclear fusion. As helium is well-known to induce degradation in the mechanical properties of metals, its effect on ADS materials is an important factor to assess. The results obtained in this study show that low-dose proton irradiation (11 MeV at 573 K to 9.0 × 10-4 dpa and 150 MeV at room temperature to 2.6 × 10-6 dpa) leads to a decrease in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength in a Fe-9Cr alloy. Moreover, interstitial helium and hydrogen atoms, as well as the annihilation of dislocation jogs, were identified as key factors that determine the observed softening of the alloy.

  1. Research program for the 660 MeV proton accelerator driven MOX-plutonium subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Buttseva, G. L.; Dudarev, S. Ju.; Polanski, A.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the research program of the Experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (25% PuO2+75% UO2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff=0.945, energetic gain G=30, and accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW.

  2. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND THERMAL SIMULATIONS FOR THE SWITCH REGION OF A COMPACT PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Caporaso, G J; Sullivan, J S

    2007-06-15

    A compact proton accelerator for medical applications is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The accelerator architecture is based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) concept. One critical area to consider is the switch region. Electric field simulations and thermal calculations of the switch area were performed to help determine the operating limits of rmed SiC switches. Different geometries were considered for the field simulation including the shape of the thin Indium solder meniscus between the electrodes and SiC. Electric field simulations were also utilized to demonstrate how the field stress could be reduced. Both transient and steady steady-state thermal simulations were analyzed to find the average power capability of the switches.

  3. Trapping of high-energy electrons into regime of surfatron acceleration by electromagnetic waves in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Erokhin, A. N.; Erokhin, N. S.; Milant'ev, V. P.

    2012-05-15

    The phenomenon of trapping of weakly relativistic charged particles (with kinetic energies on the order of mc{sup 2}) into a regime of surfatron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave that propagates in plasma across a weak external magnetic field has been studied using nonlinear numerical calculations based on a solution of the relativistic equations of motion. Analysis showed that, for the wave amplitude above a certain threshold value and the initial wave phase outside the interval favorable for the surfing regime, the trajectory of a charged particle initially corresponds to its cyclotron rotation in the external magnetic field. For the initial particle energies studied, the period of this rotation is relatively short. After a certain number (from several dozen to several thousand and above) of periods of rotation, the wave phase takes a value that is favorable for trapping of the charged particle on its trajectory by the electromagnetic wave, provided the Cherenkov resonance conditions are satisfied. As a result, the wave traps the charged particle and imparts it an ultrarelativistic acceleration. In momentum space, the region of trapping into the regime of surfing on an electromagnetic wave turns out to be rather large.

  4. CORONAS-F observation of HXR and gamma-ray emissions from the solar flare X10 on 29 October 2003 as a probe of accelerated proton spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, V. G.; Yushkov, B. Yu.; Kudela, K.; Galkin, V. I.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2015-04-01

    HXR and gamma-ray emissions in the 0.04—150 MeV energy range associated with the solar flare on 29 October 2003 (X10/3B) were observed at 20:38—20:58 UT by the SONG instrument aboard the CORONAS-F mission. We restored consecutive flare gamma-emission spectra from SONG and RHESSI data and found a good agreement of these spectra in the 0.1—10 MeV energy range. Two phases were identified which showed major changes in the spectral shape of flare emission: 20:38:00-20:44:20 UT and 20:44:20-20:58:00 UT. During the second phase an efficiency of proton acceleration increased considerably relatively to the efficiency of acceleration of high energy electrons. The pion-decay component of the flare gamma-emission was elicited statistically significant only during the second phase since 20:47:40 UT. A power law spectrum index of accelerated protons was estimated from the ratio between intensities of the pion-decay and gamma-line components. The hardest spectrum (power law index S=3.7) was at 20:48—20:51 UT when the intensity of the pion-decay emission was maximal. Our subdivision of the flare into two phases is consistent with sharp changes in the structure of the flare found by Ji et al. (2008) and Liu et al. (2009). This flare was accompanied by GLE 66. The time profile of the pion-decay gamma-emission was compared with the GLE onset time. It was shown that both protons interacting at the Sun and the particles responsible for the GLE onset could belong to the same population of accelerated particles.

  5. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Slow extraction of protons beams from circular accelerators is currently widely used for a variety of beam-based experiments. The method has some deficiencies including limited efficiency of extraction, radiation induced due to scattering on the electrostatic septa and limited beam pipe aperture, beam dynamics effects of space charge forces and magnet power supplies ripple. Here we present a novel slow extraction scheme employing a number of non-standard accelerator elements, such as Silicone crystal strips and pulsed stripline dipole correctors, and illustrate practicality of these examples at the 8 GeV proton Recycler Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in simulations. We propose to initiate an R&D program in the Fermilab 8 GeV Recycler to address the key issues of the method: (a) feasibility of very short crystals - from few mm down to 0.2 mm; (b) their efficiency in the channelling and volume reflection regimes; (c) practical aspects of the fast deflectors.

  6. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  7. Simulation of EAS properties on the basis of high energy interaction model deduced from the accelerator data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubiak, G.; Szabelski, J.; Wdeyozyk, J.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Calculations of extensive air showers in atmosphere were performed using formulae describing p-p and p-air nucleus interactions. The formulae fitted to the accelerator data were extrapolated taking the same trend up to 10 to the 16 eV. Above that energy it was assumed that the degree of scaling violating/alpha-parameter/ is saturating or even decreasing. The latter assumption follows from earlier work where it was found that without this restriction shower maxima at the highest energies are located too high in the atmosphere. Results of calculations have been compared with experimental data. The comparison was made separately for the curves obtained from the so called equal intensity cuts and for the Cerenkov data.

  8. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Sefkow, A. B.; Flippo, K. A.

    2014-04-15

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  9. Search by mariner 10 for electrons and protons accelerated in association with venus.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J A; Eraker, J H; Lamport, J E; Walpole, P H

    1974-03-29

    The University of Chicago instrumnents on board the Mariner 10 spacecraft bound for Mercury have measured energy spectra and fluxes of electrons from 0.18 to 30 million electron volts and protons from 0.5 to 68 million electron volts along the plasma wake and in the bow shock regions associated with Venus. Unusually quiet solar conditions and improved instrumentation made it possible to search for much lower fluxes of protons and electrons in similar energy regions as compared to earlier Mariner missions to Venus-that is, lower by a factor of 10(2) for protons and 10(3) for electrons. We found no evidence for electrons or protons either in the form of increases of intensity or energy spectral changes in the vicinity of the planet, nor any evidence of bursts of radiation in or near the observed bow shock where bursts of electrons might have been expected in analogy with the bow shock at the earth. The importance of these null results for determining the necessary and sufficient conditions for particle acceleration is discussed with respect to magnetometer evidence that Venus does not have a magnetosphere. PMID:17791375

  10. Comparative Study of Radiation Dosage Distribution and Medical Implication of Quasi-monoenergetic Proton Generated from Laser Acceleration of Ultra-thin Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batpurev, Temuge; Cao, Jennifer; Xie, Wang; Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Recently the search for mono-energetic protons has gained great interest, particularly in applications such as proton therapy for cancer treatment. The advantage of proton therapy is that unlike photon radiation, proton beams deposit most of the energy at the tumor, sparing surrounding tissue and vital organs. A compact laser-driven proton accelerator is attractive for proton cancer therapy since the electric fields for particle acceleration can reach the order of tens of GV per cm which allows large reduction of the system size. Recent work by Liu et al. [2012] shows that laser acceleration of an ultra-thin multi-ion foil can generate high quality quasi-monoenergetic proton beams. The proton acceleration is due to the combination of radiation pressure and heavy-ion Coulomb repulsion. To assess the feasibility of laser-proton cancer therapy with such a proton accelerator, we simulated the interaction of protons with water and determine the radiation dosage deposition for particle beams produced from the PIC simulation of laser acceleration of multi-ion targets. We used the SRIM code to calculate the depth and lateral dose distribution of protons. We also compared the dosage map produced from protons generated from laser acceleration of single ion and multi-ion targets.

  11. Acceleration of interstellar pickup protons at the heliospheric termination shock: Voyager 1/2 energetic proton fluxes in the inner heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalov, S. V.; Malama, Y. G.; Alexashov, D. B.; Izmodenov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Fluxes of energetic protons in the range from 30 keV up to several MeV measured at the Voyager 1/2 spacecraft downstream of the heliospheric termination shock can be explained by shock-drift acceleration theory, which includes variations of the magnetic field direction in a vicinity of the shock. The variations can be connected with the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field near the solar equatorial plane. Theoretical fluxes of accelerated protons are calculated numerically in the framework of a 3D kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic model of the interaction of the solar wind and local interstellar medium.

  12. Electron trapping and acceleration by the plasma wakefield of a self-modulating proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Petrenko, A. V.; Amorim, L. D.; Vieira, J.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Muggli, P.

    2014-12-15

    It is shown that co-linear injection of electrons or positrons into the wakefield of the self-modulating particle beam is possible and ensures high energy gain. The witness beam must co-propagate with the tail part of the driver, since the plasma wave phase velocity there can exceed the light velocity, which is necessary for efficient acceleration. If the witness beam is many wakefield periods long, then the trapped charge is limited by beam loading effects. The initial trapping is better for positrons, but at the acceleration stage a considerable fraction of positrons is lost from the wave. For efficient trapping of electrons, the plasma boundary must be sharp, with the density transition region shorter than several centimeters. Positrons are not susceptible to the initial plasma density gradient.

  13. Focal spot effects on the generation of proton beams during target normal sheath acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, H.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Yu, L. H.; Chu, Y. X.; Li, Y. Y.; Xu, T. J.; Zhang, H.; Zhai, S. H.; Leng, Y. X.; Liang, X. Y.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Focal spot effects on the generation of proton beams are investigated by a high-intensity high-contrast laser irradiating on solid foil in target normal sheath acceleration experiments. Different spot size, transverse shape, and intensity of the laser are obtained by appropriately using deformable mirrors and parabolic mirrors. Experiments show that the maximum proton energy is mainly determined by the laser intensity if the focal spot size is not seriously changed. Compared with the previous experimental results, the optimum foil thickness d o is scaled by the laser intensity I as d o ~ I 0.33. The corresponding theoretical estimation is carried out as d o ~ I 0.25 for ultra-high intensity laser systems with similar contrast. MULTI and particle-in-cell simulations are used to interpret the experimental results.

  14. Laser acceleration of monoenergetic protons with a near-critical, optically-shaped gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Helle, Michael; Ting, Antonio; Gordon, Daniel; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration is studied using the intense terawatt CO2 laser pulse with a near-critical hydrogen gas target. The gas density profile is tailored by a hydrodynamic shock, which is launched by ablation of solid with a moderate-energy, nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulse in the vicinity of the gas jet. A sharp density gradient is thus created near the edge of the gas column, resulting to ~ 6X local density enhancement up to several times of critical density within 100 micrometers before CO2 laser pulse arrives. With such density profile, we have observed quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with energies >1 MeV and good shot-to-shot reproducibility. In contrast, no protons were observed when the hydrodynamic shock is absent. Results from experiments and simulations will be presented. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Reduction of proton acceleration in high-intensity laser interaction with solid two-layer targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, M. S.; Davies, J. R.; Clark, E. L.; Beg, F. N.; Gopal, A.; Tatarakis, M.; Willingale, L.; Nilson, P.; Dangor, A. E.; Norreys, P. A.; Zepf, M.; Krushelnick, K.

    2006-12-15

    Reduction of proton acceleration in the interaction of a high-intensity, picosecond laser with a 50-{mu}m aluminum target was observed when 0.1-6 {mu}m of plastic was deposited on the back surface (opposite side of the laser). The maximum energy and number of energetic protons observed at the back of the target were greatly reduced in comparison to pure aluminum and plastic targets of the same thickness. This is attributed to the effect of the interface between the layers. Modeling of the electron propagation in the targets using a hybrid code showed strong magnetic-field generation at the interface and rapid surface heating of the aluminum layer, which may account for the results.

  16. Guiding and collimation of laser-accelerated proton beams using thin foils followed with a hollow plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; He, X. T.

    2015-09-01

    It is proposed that guided and collimated proton acceleration by intense lasers can be achieved using an advanced target—a thin foil followed by a hollow plasma channel. For the advanced target, the laser-accelerated hot electrons can be confined in the hollow channel at the foil rear side, which leads to the formation of transversely localized, Gaussian-distributed sheath electric field and resultantly guiding of proton acceleration. Further, due to the hot electron flow along the channel wall, a strong focusing transverse electric field is induced, taking the place of the original defocusing one driven by hot electron pressure in the case of a purely thin foil target, which results in collimation of proton beams. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that collimated proton beams with energy about 20 MeV and nearly half-reduced divergence of 26° are produced at laser intensities 1020 W/cm2 by using the advanced target.

  17. Proton Acceleration beyond 100 EeV by an Oblique Shock Wave in the Jet of 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Yasuko S.; Honda, Mitsuru

    2004-09-01

    We estimate the highest energy of a proton diffusively accelerated by a shock in knot A1 of the jet in luminous nearby quasar 3C 273. Referring to the recent polarization measurements using very long baseline interferometry, we consider the shock propagation across magnetic field lines, namely, configuration of the oblique shock. For larger inclination of the field lines, the effects of particle reflection at the shock front are more pronounced, to significantly increase acceleration efficiency. The quasiperpendicular shock turns out to be needed for safely achieving the proton acceleration to the energy above 100 EeV (1020 eV) in a parameter domain reflecting conceivable energy restrictions.

  18. The problems associated with the monitoring of complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities.

    PubMed

    Bilski, P; Blomgren, J; d'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2007-01-01

    The European Commission is funding within its Sixth Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organisational framework for this project is provided by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. One task within the CONRAD project, Work Package 6 (WP6), was to provide a report outlining research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterisation of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators, but also at the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities. The paper provides an overview of the report, which will be available as CERN Yellow Report. PMID:17496292

  19. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS IN THE AGS WITH TWO HELICAL PARTIAL SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H.; AHRENS,L.; BAI,M.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The RHIC spin program requires 2 x 10{sup 11} proton/bunch with 70% polarization. As the injector to RHIC, AGS is the bottleneck for preserving polarization: there is no space for a full snake to overcome numerous depolarizing resonances. An ac dipole and a partial snake have been used to preserve beam polarization in the past few years. Two helical snakes have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate all depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the setup and preliminary results.

  20. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark