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Sample records for high-field autosolitons formation

  1. Autosolitons in applied physics and traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, B.S.

    1996-06-01

    A review of investigations of autosolitons in nonlinear systems which are of interest for the applied physics and for the transportation research is presented. Autosolitons are solitary intrinsic states which can be formed in a broad class of physical, chemical, biological dissipative distributed media and in traffic flow. Properties of autosolitons which are general for physical systems and for traffic flow will be discussed. Based on results of recent investigations of traffic jams in traffic flow, a comparison of nonlinear characteristics of traffic jams and with nonlinear properties of autosolitons which can be formed in active systems with diffusion will be given. Forms, properties, processes of evolution of autosolitons in traffic flow, in semiconductors and in gas discharge plasma are considered. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Autosoliton in a fiber with distributed saturable amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, V. S.

    1996-12-01

    An autosoliton, which is an asymptotically stable solitary wave with all parameters fixed by the medium, is predicted in a fiber with distributed saturable amplifiers. The parameters of the autosoliton observed in numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with those predicted theoretically.

  3. Formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs from common envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Nordhaus, Jason; Wellons, Sarah; Spiegel, David S.; Metzger, Brian D.; Blackman, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of highly magnetized white dwarfs has remained a mystery since their initial discovery. Recent observations indicate that the formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs is intimately related to strong binary interactions during post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. If a low-mass companion, such as a planet, brown dwarf, or low-mass star, is engulfed by a post-main-sequence giant, gravitational torques in the envelope of the giant lead to a reduction of the companion’s orbit. Sufficiently low-mass companions in-spiral until they are shredded by the strong gravitational tides near the white dwarf core. Subsequent formation of a super-Eddington accretion disk from the disrupted companion inside a common envelope can dramatically amplify magnetic fields via a dynamo. Here, we show that these disk-generated fields are sufficiently strong to explain the observed range of magnetic field strengths for isolated, high-field magnetic white dwarfs. A higher-mass binary analogue may also contribute to the origin of magnetar fields. PMID:21300910

  4. Formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs from common envelopes.

    PubMed

    Nordhaus, Jason; Wellons, Sarah; Spiegel, David S; Metzger, Brian D; Blackman, Eric G

    2011-02-22

    The origin of highly magnetized white dwarfs has remained a mystery since their initial discovery. Recent observations indicate that the formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs is intimately related to strong binary interactions during post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. If a low-mass companion, such as a planet, brown dwarf, or low-mass star, is engulfed by a post-main-sequence giant, gravitational torques in the envelope of the giant lead to a reduction of the companion's orbit. Sufficiently low-mass companions in-spiral until they are shredded by the strong gravitational tides near the white dwarf core. Subsequent formation of a super-Eddington accretion disk from the disrupted companion inside a common envelope can dramatically amplify magnetic fields via a dynamo. Here, we show that these disk-generated fields are sufficiently strong to explain the observed range of magnetic field strengths for isolated, high-field magnetic white dwarfs. A higher-mass binary analogue may also contribute to the origin of magnetar fields. PMID:21300910

  5. Magnetization and diamagnetism of a longitudinal autosoliton in p-InSb in an external longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilov, I. K.; Stepurenko, A. A.; Gummetov, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    It has been experimentally shown that a longitudinal thermal-diffusion autosoliton, which is generated in a nonequilibrium electron-hole plasma in p-InSb, in an external longitudinal magnetic field acquires diamagnetic properties. The results of the calculation and numerical estimates of the diamagnetism have been presented.

  6. A new inclination shallowing correction of the Mauch Chunk Formation of Pennsylvania, based on high-field AIR results: Implications for the Carboniferous North American APW path and Pangea reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2010-10-01

    A new magnetic anisotropy study was performed on samples of the Lower Carboniferous Mauch Chunk Formation of Pennsylvania. These red beds had been sampled for an inclination shallowing study by Tan and Kodama (2002), however, application of a high-field anisotropy of isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR) technique specifically designed to measure the anisotropy of hematite provides considerably different results from those previously reported. The newly measured fabric has smaller anisotropy (~ 9-17% as opposed to ~ 25-40%) and shows a pronounced ENE-WSW magnetic lineation that is sub-parallel to the trend of the Appalachians and interpretable as a hematite intersection lineation that occurred during local NNW-directed shortening. The measured magnetic fabric yields a new inclination correction with a corrected paleopole that is in better agreement with recently corrected Carboniferous paleopoles than the previously corrected Mauch Chunk paleopole, defining a more consistent APW path. The corrected paleopoles allow calculation of new mean Early (~ 325 Ma) and Late (~ 312 Ma) Carboniferous inclination-corrected paleopoles for North America, which can be compared to coeval, but uncorrected, paleopoles from Gondwana. Results suggest a Pangea B assemblage unless inclination shallowing is considered for Gondwana. Estimating an inclination correction for Gondwana sedimentary rock-derived paleopoles permits a Pangea A-type assemblage at higher southern latitudes than previous reconstructions, which we term Pangea A3.

  7. A new inclination shallowing correction of the Mauch Chunk Formation of Pennsylvania, based on high field-AIR results: Implications for the Carboniferous North American APW path and Pangea reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, D.; Kodama, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    A new rock-magnetic study was performed on samples of the Lower Carboniferous Mauch Chunk Formation of Pennsylvania. These red beds had been sampled for an inclination shallowing study by Tan and Kodama (2002). High anisotropy values lead Kodama (2009) to suspect that the Formation had been affected by strain. However, more detailed rock-magnetic measurements also show that both magnetite and hematite contribute to the remanence, leading to the application of a high field anisotropy of isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR) technique specifically designed to isolate the anisotropy of the hematite, the characteristic remanence carrier. The newly measured fabric has a smaller anisotropy than Kodama (2009) observed (~9-17% as opposed to ~25-40%) and shows a pronounced ENE-WSW magnetic lineation that is sub-parallel to the trend of the Appalachians and interpretable as a hematite intersection lineation that occurred during local NNW-directed shortening. Results also yield a much different AIR/ anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) relationship than previously reported. We attribute the differences in the AIR/AMS relationship to varying concentrations of magnetite. Because the AIR/AMS relationship has been used to constrain the individual particle anisotropy we suggest this approach to determine grain anisotropy is invalid, at least until the AIR/AMS relationship for single domain hematite only is measured. The measured magnetic fabric yields a new inclination correction with a corrected paleopole that is in better agreement with recently corrected Carboniferous paleopoles than the previously corrected Mauch Chunk paleopole, defining a more consistent APW path. The corrected paleopoles allow calculation of new mean Early (~325 Ma) and Late (~312 Ma) Carboniferous inclination-corrected paleopoles for North America, which can be compared to coeval, but uncorrected, paleopoles from Gondwana. Results suggest a Pangea B assemblage unless Gondwanan sedimentary

  8. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  9. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  10. High field optical nonlinearities in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang

    Optical femtosecond self-channeling in gases, also called femtosecond filamentation, has become an important area of research in high field nonlinear optics. Filamentation occurs when laser light self-focuses in a gas owing to self-induced nonlinearity, and then defocuses in the plasma generated by the self-focused beam. The result of this process repeating itself multiple times is an extended region of plasma formation. Filamentation studies have been motivated by the extremely broad range of applications, especially in air, including pulse compression, supercontinuum generation, broadband high power terahertz pulse generation, discharge triggering and guiding, and remote sensing. Despite the worldwide work in filamentation, the fundamental gas nonlinearities governing self-focusing had never been directly measured in the range of laser intensity up to and including the ionization threshold. This dissertation presents the first such measurements. We absolutely measured the temporal refractive index change of O2, N2, Ar, H2, D2 and N2O caused by highfield ultrashort optical pulses with single-shot supercontinuum spectral interferometry, cleanly separating for the first time the instantaneous electronic and delayed rotational nonlinear response in diatomic gases. We conclusively showed that a recent claim by several European groups that the optical bound electron nonlinearity saturates and goes negative is not correct. Such a phenomenon would preclude the need for plasma to provide the defocusing contribution for filamentation. Our results show that the 'standard model of filamentation', where the defocusing is provided by plasma, is correct. Finally, we demonstrated that high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses filamenting in gases can generate long-lived gas density `holes' which persist on millisecond timescales, long after the plasma has recombined. Gas density decrements up to ~20% have been measured. The density hole refilling is dominated by thermal

  11. Space applications of superconductivity - High field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickett, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses developments in superconducting magnets and their applications in space technology. Superconducting magnets are characterized by high fields (to 15T and higher) and high current densities combined with low mass and small size. The superconducting materials and coil design are being improved and new high-strength composites are being used for magnet structural components. Such problems as maintaining low cooling temperatures (near 4 K) for long periods of time and degradation of existing high-field superconductors at low strain levels can be remedied by research and engineering. Some of the proposed space applications of superconducting magnets include: cosmic ray analysis with magnetic spectrometers, energy storage and conversion, energy generation by magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear fusion techniques, and propulsion. Several operational superconducting magnet systems are detailed.

  12. High-field dipoles for future accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wipf, S.L.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents the concept for building superconducting accelerator dipoles with record high fields. Economic considerations favor the highest possible current density in the windings. Further discussion indicates that there is an optimal range of pinning strength for a superconducting material and that it is not likely for multifilamentary conductors to ever equal the potential performance of tape conductors. A dipole design with a tape-wound, inner high-field winding is suggested. Methods are detailed to avoid degradation caused by flux jumps and to overcome problems with the dipole ends. Concerns for force support structure and field precision are also addressed. An R and D program leading to a prototype 11-T dipole is outlined. Past and future importance of superconductivity to high-energy physics is evident from a short historical survey. Successful dipoles in the 10- to 20-T range will allow interesting options for upgrading present largest accelerators.

  13. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Christian; Zheng, Yan; Easton, Daniel; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  14. Antenna development for high field plasma imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.

    2010-10-15

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are two microwave nonperturbing plasma visualization techniques that employ millimeter-wave imaging arrays with lens-coupled planar antennas, yielding time-resolved images of temperature (via ECEI) and electron density (via MIR) fluctuations within high temperature magnetic fusion plasmas. A series of new planar antennas have been developed that extend this technology to frequencies as high as 220 GHz for use on high field plasma devices with toroidal fields in excess of 3 T. Antenna designs are presented together with theoretical calculations, simulations, and experimental measurements.

  15. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-09-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs.

  16. Physical processes at high field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the radiation produced by the high field interaction with the rare gases have revealed the presence of both copious harmonic production and fluorescence. The highest harmonic observed was the seventeenth (14.6 rm) in Ne, the shortest wavelength ever produced by that means. Strong fluorescence was seen in Ar, Kr, and Xe with the shortest wavelengths observed being below 10 nm. Furthermore, radiation from inner-shell excited configurations in Xe, specifically the 4d/sup 9/5s5p ..-->.. 4d/sup 10/5s manifold at approx. 17.7 nm, was detected. The behaviors of the rare gases with respect to multiquantum ionization, harmonic production, and fluorescence were found to be correlated so that the materials fell into two groups, He and Ne in one and Ar, Kr, and Xe in the other. These experimental findings, in alliance with other studies on inner-shell decay processes, give evidence for a role of atomic correlations in a direct nonlinear process of inner-shell excitation. It is expected that an understanding of these high-field processes will enable the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 59 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. The Pioneer XI high field fluxgate magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. A.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    The high field fluxgate magnetometer experiment flown aboard the Pioneer XI spacecraft is described. This extremely simple instrument was used to extend the spacecraft's upper-limit measurement capability by approximately an order of magnitude (from 0.14 mT to 1.00 mT) with minimum power and volume requirements. This magnetometer was designed to complement the low-field measurements provided by a helium vector magnetometer and utilizes magnetic ring core sensors with biaxial orthogonal sense coils. The instrument is a single-range, triaxial-fluxgate magnetometer capable of measuring fields of up to 1 mT along each orthogonal axis, with a maximum resolution of 1 microT.

  18. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4/sup 0/K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs.

  19. Derivation of the high field semiconductor equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, P.S. ); Cox, R.W. ); Wagner, B.A. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-01-01

    Electron and hole densities evolve in x-z phase space according to Boltzmann equations. When the mean free path of the particles is short and electric force on the particles is weak, a well-known expansion can be used to solve the Boltzmann equation. This asymptotic solution shows that the spatial density of electrons and holes evolves according to diffusion-drift equations. As devices become smaller, electric fields become stronger, which renders the Basic Semiconductor Equations increasingly inaccurate. To remedy this problem, we use singular perturbation techniques to obtain a new asymptotic expansion for the Boltzmann equation. Like the Hilbert expansion, the new expansion requires the mean free path to be short compared to all macroscopic length scales. However, it does not require the electric forces to be weak. The new expansion shows that spatial densities obey diffusion-drift equations as before, but the diffusivity D and mobility {mu} turn out to be nonlinear functions of the electric field. In particular, our analysis determines the field-dependent mobilities {mu}(E) and diffusivities D(E) directly from the scattering operator. By carrying out this asymptotic expansion to higher order, we obtain the high frequency corrections to the drift velocity and diffusivity, and also the corrections due to gradients in the electric field. Remarkably, we find that Einsteins's relation is still satisfied, even with these corrections. The new diffusion-drift equations, together with Poissons' equation for the electric field, form the high-field semiconductor equations, which can be expected to be accurate regardless of the strength of the electric fields within the semiconductor. In addition, our analysis determines the entire momentum distribution of the particles, so we derive a very accurate first moment model for semi-conductors by substituting the asymptotically-correct distribution back into the Boltzmann equation and taking moments.

  20. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite experiments and

  1. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  2. HIGH FIELD Q-SLOPE AND THE BAKING EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2009-11-01

    The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing RF losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by a low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated at high temperature in the presence of a small partial pressure of nitrogen. Improvement of the cavity performances have been obtained, while surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  3. A High Field Magnet Design for A Future Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Millos, G.; McInturff, A.; Scanlan, R.

    1998-09-01

    US high energy physics community is exploring the possibilities of building a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) after the completion of LHC. This paper presents a high field magnet design option based on Nb{sub 3}Sn technology. A preliminary magnetic and mechanical design of a 14-16 T, 2-in-1 dipole based on the 'common coil design' approach is presented. The computer code ROXIE has been upgraded to perform the field quality optimization of magnets based on the racetrack coil geometry. A magnet R&D program to investigate the issues related to high field magnet designs is also outlined.

  4. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    New and highly sensitive method of detecting infrared irradiation makes possible solid state infrared detector which is more sensitive near room temperature than usual photoconductive low band gap semiconductor devices. Reconfiguration of high field domains in cadmium sulphide crystals provides basis for discovery.

  5. Survey of high field superconducting material for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Scahlan, R.; Greene, A.F.; Suenaga, M.

    1986-05-01

    The high field superconductors which could be used in accelerator dipole magnets are surveyed, ranking these candidates with respect to ease of fabrication and cost as well as superconducting properties. Emphasis is on Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi. 27 refs., 2 figs. (LEW)

  6. The Pioneer 11 high-field fluxgate magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1973-01-01

    The High Field Fluxgate Magnetometer Experiment flow aboard the Pioneer 11 spacecraft to investigate Jupiter's magnetic field is described. The instrument extends the spacecraft's upper limit measurement capability by more than an order of magnitude to 17.3 gauss with minimum power and volume requirements.

  7. Design Studies for an Ultra High Field K80 Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Jeff; Blosser, Henry

    1996-05-01

    We are investigating the use of a wide-bore, 8 T magnet as a component of an ultra high field cyclotron. Such a machine would use the highest magnetic field of any cyclotron, to date. The K80 `Eight Tesla Cyclotron' would have roughly the same magnetic rigidity (Bρ) as the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron in a package of only one fourth the radius, with a corresponding reduction in cost. This cyclotron could accelerate particles with a charge state Q/A = 1/4 to a final energy of between 5 and 6 MeV/nucleon, the energy range currently being used to study superdeformed, high angular momentum nuclei that result from glancing collisions. Studies thus far have stressed achieving sufficient vertical focusing (ν_z) despite the high magnetic field level. The high field also reduces the space available for central region structures, which complicates early-turn focusing, orbit centering and the design of the spiral inflector.

  8. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Gupta, R.; McInturff, A.; Millos, G.; Scanlan, R.

    1999-03-18

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a 'conductor-friendly' option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach.

  9. Metabolite quantification and high-field MRS in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haddadin, Ihab S.; McIntosh, Adeka; Meisamy, Sina; Corum, Curt; Styczynski Snyder, Angela L.; Powell, Nathaniel J.; Nelson, Michael T.; Yee, Douglas; Garwood, Michael; Bolan, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    In vivo 1H MRS is rapidly developing as a clinical tool for diagnosing and characterizing breast cancers. Many in vivo and in vitro experiments have demonstrated that alterations in concentrations of choline-containing metabolites are associated with malignant transformation. In recent years, considerable efforts have been made to evaluate the role of 1H MRS measurements of total choline-containing compounds in the management of patients with breast cancer. Current technological developments, including the use of high-field MR scanners and quantitative spectroscopic analysis methods, promise to increase the sensitivity and accuracy of breast MRS. This article reviews the literature describing in vivo MRS in breast cancer, with an emphasis on the development of high-field MR scanning and quantitative methods. Potential applications of these technologies for diagnosing suspicious lesions and monitoring response to chemotherapy are discussed. PMID:17957820

  10. Multi-shot PROPELLER for high-field preclinical MRI

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Prachi; Qi, Yi; Story, Jennifer; King, Kevin F.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2012-01-01

    With the development of numerous mouse models of cancer, there is a tremendous need for an appropriate imaging technique to study the disease evolution. High-field T2-weighted imaging using PROPELLER MRI meets this need. The 2-shot PROPELLER technique presented here, provides (a) high spatial resolution, (b) high contrast resolution, and (c) rapid and non-invasive imaging, which enables high-throughput, longitudinal studies in free-breathing mice. Unique data collection and reconstruction makes this method robust against motion artifacts. The 2-shot modification introduced here, retains more high-frequency information and provides higher SNR than conventional single-shot PROPELLER, making this sequence feasible at high-fields, where signal loss is rapid. Results are shown in a liver metastases model to demonstrate the utility of this technique in one of the more challenging regions of the mouse, which is the abdomen. PMID:20572138

  11. High field superconductor development and understanding project, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Larbalestier, David C.; Lee, Peter J.

    2009-07-15

    Over 25 years the Applied Superconductivity Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provided a vital technical resource to the High Energy Physics community covering development in superconducting strand for HEP accelerator magnet development. In particular the work of the group has been to develop the next generation of high field superconductors for high field application. Grad students Mike Naus, Chad Fischer, Arno Godeke and Matt Jewell improved our understanding of the microstructure and microchemistry of Nb3Sn and their impact on the physical and mechanical properties. The success of this work has led to the continued funding of this work at the ASC after it moved to the NHMFL and also to direct funding from BNL for some aspects of Nb3Sn cable evaluation.

  12. High-field magnetization of Dy2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetization of powdered samples of Dy2O3 has been measured at temperatures between 1.45 deg and 4.2 K, in applied magnetic fields ranging to 7 Teslas. A linear dependence of magnetization on applied field is observable in high field region, the slope of which is independent of temperature over the range investigated. The extrapolated saturation magnetic moment is 2.77 + or - 0.08 Bohr magnetons per ion.

  13. High-field magnetization of Dy2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetization of powdered samples of Dy2O3 has been measured at temperatures between 1.45 and 4.2 K, in applied magnetic fields ranging to 70 kilogauss. A linear dependence of magnetization on applied field is observable in the high-field region, the slope of which is independent of temperature over the range investigated. The extrapolated saturation magnetic moment is about 2.77 Bohr magnetons per ion.

  14. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  15. Design considerations for a large aperture high field superconducting dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Harfoush, F.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-03-01

    The final phase of the Fermilab upgrade proposal calls for a new ring of superconducting magnets to be placed in the existing Main Accelerator tunnel. The goal of this design study is to specify a high field dipole (HFD) that is capable of supporting fixed target operation (ramping, resonant extraction) at a field of 6.6T (1.5 Tev) and colliding beam physics at 8.0T (1.8 Tev). The magnetic field quality at high field is set by the large amplitude orbits associated with resonant extraction. The field quality must therefore be at least as good as the existing Tevatron magnets which fulfill these criteria. The high fields and large aperture of this magnet result in large forces on the coil and collar assemblies. Therefore, the cold mass design must be able to sustain these forces while providing sufficient cooling to the coils during 4.2 K fixed target operation, and a minimum heat load during 1.8 K collider operation. The design work is still in progress but a cosine-theta, cold-iron dipole with a 70mm inner diameter coil has been tentatively adopted. This report presents details on the conductor and cable parameters, coil cross-section, projected manufacturing tolerances, iron yoke design, and cold mass assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. High field magnetic resonance imaging of rodents in cardiovascular research.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Laetitia; Gerber, Bernhard L; Gallez, Bernard; Po, Chrystelle; Magat, Julie; Jean-Luc, Balligand; Feron, Olivier; Moniotte, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Transgenic and gene knockout rodent models are primordial to study pathophysiological processes in cardiovascular research. Over time, cardiac MRI has become a gold standard for in vivo evaluation of such models. Technical advances have led to the development of magnets with increasingly high field strength, allowing specific investigation of cardiac anatomy, global and regional function, viability, perfusion or vascular parameters. The aim of this report is to provide a review of the various sequences and techniques available to image mice on 7-11.7 T magnets and relevant to the clinical setting in humans. Specific technical aspects due to the rise of the magnetic field are also discussed. PMID:27287250

  17. High Field Magnet R&D in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, S.A.

    2003-10-01

    Accelerator magnet technology is currently dominated by the use of NbTi superconductor. New and more demanding applications for superconducting accelerator magnets require the use of alternative materials. Several programs in the US are taking advantage of recent improvements in Nb{sub 3}Sn to develop high field magnets for new applications. Highlights and challenges of the US R and D program are presented along with the status of conductor development. In addition, a new R and D focus, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program, will be discussed.

  18. Design and optimization of force-reduced high field magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembeczki, Szabolcs

    High field magnets have many important applications in different areas of research, in the power industry and also for military purposes. For example, high field magnets are particularly useful in: material sciences, high energy physics, plasma physics (as fusion magnets), high power applications (as energy storage devices), and space applications (in propulsion systems). One of the main issues with high-field magnets is the presence of very large electromagnetic stresses that must be counteracted and therefore require heavy support structures. In superconducting magnets, the problems caused by Lorentz forces are further complicated by the fact that superconductors for high field applications are pressure sensitive. The current carrying capacity is greatly reduced under stress and strain (especially in the case of Nb 3Sn and the new high temperature superconductors) so the reduction of the acting forces is of even greater importance. Different force-reduced magnet concepts have been studied in the past, both numerical and analytical methods have been used to solve this problem. The developed concepts are based on such complex winding geometries that the realization and manufacturing of such coils is extremely difficult and these concepts are mainly of theoretical interest. In the presented research, a novel concept for force-reduced magnets has been developed and analyzed which is easy to realize and therefore is of practical interest. The analysis has been performed with a new methodology, which does not require the time consuming finite element calculations. The developed computer models describe the 3-dimensional winding configuration by sets of filaments (filamentary approximation). This approach is much faster than finite element analysis and therefore allows rapid optimization of concepts. The method has been extensively tested on geometries of force-reduced solenoids where even analytical solutions exist. As a further cross check, the developed computer

  19. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  20. Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Scott Campbell Dr. Terry Holesinger Dr. Ybing Huang

    2012-06-30

    The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for {approx}18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb{sub 3}Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T{sub c} (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have

  1. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  2. High-field thermal transport properties of REBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonura, Marco; Senatore, Carmine

    2015-02-01

    The use of REBCO coated conductors (CCs) is envisaged for many applications, extending from power cables to high-field magnets. Whatever the case, thermal properties of REBCO tapes play a key role for the stability of superconducting devices. In this work, we present the first study on the longitudinal thermal conductivity (κ) of REBCO CCs in magnetic fields up to 19 T applied both parallel and perpendicularly to the thermal-current direction. Copper-stabilized tapes from six industrial manufacturers have been investigated. We show that zero-field κ of CCs can be calculated with an accuracy of +/- 15% from the residual resistivity ratio of the stabilizer and the Cu/non-Cu ratio. Measurements performed at high fields have allowed us to evaluate the consistency of the procedures generally used for estimating in-field κ in the framework of the Wiedemann-Franz law from an electrical characterization of the materials. In-field data are intended to provide primary ingredients for the thermal stability analysis of high-temperature superconductor-based magnets.

  3. Understanding and improving the Fermilab booster high field orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.; Ketcham, L.; Moore, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    This note is an account of the authors' effort in both understanding the Booster high field orbit and controlling it through displacements of the main combined function magnets. We were able to achieve the second goal with considerable accuracy while having limited success with the first, due to insufficient knowledge of the Booster dynamics. This work was initiated in Spring 1987 with the orbit control via magnet moves the chief purpose. A series of magnet moves in 1987 and 1988 resulting from this study testified to its reliability. The understanding of the Booster orbit in general remains an ongoing process in which we keep modifying our model with the hope of eventually having a quantitative grasp of the closed orbit and being able to manipulate it with more flexibility and accuracy. In this paper we give a brief description of the Booster environment in which the magnet moves are carried out, together with background information concerning the magnet moves. The method we use is discussed. The result of the moves is documented, and our effort to understand the Booster high field orbit is given a detailed account. 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. High-field electrical and thermal transport in suspended graphene.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Vincent E; Behnam, Ashkan; Conley, Hiram J; Bolotin, Kirill I; Pop, Eric

    2013-10-01

    We study the intrinsic transport properties of suspended graphene devices at high fields (≥1 V/μm) and high temperatures (≥1000 K). Across 15 samples, we find peak (average) saturation velocity of 3.6 × 10(7) cm/s (1.7 × 10(7) cm/s) and peak (average) thermal conductivity of 530 W m(-1) K(-1) (310 W m(-1) K(-1)) at 1000 K. The saturation velocity is 2-4 times and the thermal conductivity 10-17 times greater than in silicon at such elevated temperatures. However, the thermal conductivity shows a steeper decrease at high temperature than in graphite, consistent with stronger effects of second-order three-phonon scattering. Our analysis of sample-to-sample variation suggests the behavior of "cleaner" devices most closely approaches the intrinsic high-field properties of graphene. This study reveals key features of charge and heat flow in graphene up to device breakdown at ~2230 K in vacuum, highlighting remaining unknowns under extreme operating conditions. PMID:23387323

  5. High-Field Electrical and Thermal Transport in Suspended Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Vincent E.; Behnam, Ashkan; Conley, Hiram J.; Bolotin, Kirill I.; Pop, Eric

    2013-10-01

    We study the intrinsic transport properties of suspended graphene devices at high fields (>1 V/um) and high temperatures (>1000 K). Across 15 samples, we find peak (average) saturation velocity of 3.6x10^7 cm/s (1.7x10^7 cm/s), and peak (average) thermal conductivity of 530 W/m/K (310 W/m/K), at 1000 K. The saturation velocity is 2-4 times and the thermal conductivity 10-17 times greater than in silicon at such elevated temperatures. However, the thermal conductivity shows a steeper decrease at high temperature than in graphite, consistent with stronger effects of second-order three-phonon scattering. Our analysis of sample-to-sample variation suggests the behavior of "cleaner" devices most closely approaches the intrinsic high-field properties of graphene. This study reveals key features of charge and heat flow in graphene up to device breakdown at ~2230 K in vacuum, highlighting remaining unknowns under extreme operating conditions.

  6. High field breakdown characteristics of carbon nanotube thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Man Prakash; Behnam, Ashkan; Lian, Feifei; Estrada, David; Pop, Eric; Kumar, Satish

    2013-10-11

    The high field properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin film transistors (CN-TFTs) are important for their practical operation, and for understanding their reliability. Using a combination of experimental and computational techniques we show how the channel geometry (length L(C) and width W(C)) and network morphology (average CNT length L(t) and alignment angle distribution θ) affect heat dissipation and high field breakdown in such devices. The results suggest that when WC ≥ L(t), the breakdown voltage remains independent of W(C) but varies linearly with L(C). The breakdown power varies almost linearly with both W(C) and L(C) when WC > L(t). We also find that the breakdown power is more susceptible to the variability in the network morphology compared to the breakdown voltage. The analysis offers new insight into the tunable heat dissipation and thermal reliability of CN-TFTs, which can be significantly improved through optimization of the network morphology and device geometry. PMID:24029606

  7. Volcanic sanidinites: an example for the mobilization of high field strength elements (HFSE) in magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aßbichler, Donjá; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Müller, Dirk; Kunzmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In earth science the mobility of high field strength elements (HFSE) is generally discussed in context of hydrothermal processes. Recent investigations mainly address processes in (late) magmatic-, metamorphic- and submarine hydrothermal systems. They have all in common that H2O is main solvent. The transport of HFSE is suggested to be favored by volatiles, like boron, fluorine, phosphate and sulfate (Jiang et al., 2005). In this study processes in magmatic system are investigated. Sanidinites are rare rocks of igneous origin and are found as volcanic ejecta of explosive volcanoes. They consist mainly of sanidine and minerals of the sodalite group. The very porous fabric of these rocks is an indication of their aggregation from a gaseous magmatic phase. The large sanidine crystals (up to several centimeters) are mostly interlocking, creating large cavities between some crystals. In these pores Zr crystallizes as oxide (baddeleyite, ZrO2) or silicate (zircon, ZrSiO4). The euhedral shape of these minerals is a further indication of their formation out of the gas phase. Furthermore, bubbles in glass observed in some samples are evidence for gas-rich reaction conditions during the formation of the sanidinites. The formation of sanidinites is suggested to be an example for solvothermal processes in natural systems. Solvothermal processes imply the solvation, transport and recrystallization of elements in a gas phase. Results obtained from whole rock analysis from sanidinites from Laacher See (Germany) show a positive correlation between LOI, sulfate, Cl, and Na with the HFSE like Zr. Na-rich conditions seem to ameliorate the solvothermal transport of Zr. All these features point to the formation of sanidinites in the upper part of a magma chamber, where fluid consisting of SO3 and Cl compounds in addition to H2O, CO2 and HFSE (high field strength elements) like Zr accumulate.

  8. SKEW QUADRUPOLES IN RHIC DIPOLE MAGNETS AT HIGH FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; GUPTA, P.; THOMPSON, P.; WANDERER, P.

    1995-06-11

    In the RHIC arc dipoles, the center of the cold mass lies above the center of the cryostat. At the maximum design field, the magnetic flux lines leak through the yoke to the asymmetrically located cryostat, which provides an additional return path. This introduces a systematic top-bottom asymmetry leading to a skew quadrupole term at high fields. A similar asymmetry is also created by any difference in weights of the upper and the lower yoke halves. Data from measurements of several RHIC dipoles are presented to study this effect. In the current production series of the RDIC dipoles, an attempt is made to compensate the effect of the cryostat by an asymmetry in the iron yoke. Seven dipoles with this type of yoke have been cold tested, and show a reduced saturation in the skew quadrupole term, as expected.

  9. Skew quadrupole in RHIC dipole magnets at high fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.; Gupta, P.; Thompson, P.; Wanderer, P.

    1995-07-01

    In the RHIC arc dipoles, the center of the cold mass lies above the center of the cryostat. At the maximum design field, the magnetic flux lines leak through the yoke to the asymmetrically located cryostat, which provides an additional return path. This introduces a systematic top-bottom asymmetry leading to a skew quadrupole term at high fields. A similar asymmetry is also created by any difference in weights of the upper and the lower yoke halves. Data from measurements of several RHIC dipoles are presented to study this effect. In the current production series of the RHIC dipoles, an attempt is made to compensate the effect of the cryostat by an asymmetry in the iron yoke. Seven dipoles with this type of yoke have been cold tested, and show a reduced saturation in the skew quadrupole term, as expected.

  10. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  11. Sudden flux change studies in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, S.; Bordini, B.; Carcagno, R.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    As part of the High Field Magnet Program at Fermilab many magnets have been tested which utilize multi strand Rutherford type cable made of state-of-the art Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. During these magnet tests we observed sudden flux changes by monitoring coil voltages and the magnetic field close to the magnets. These flux changes might be linked to magnet instabilities. The voltage spike signals were correlated with quench antenna signals, a strong indication that these are magnet phenomena. With a new high resolution voltage spike detection system, we were able to observe the detailed structure of the spikes. Two fundamentally different signal shapes were distinguished, most likely generated by different mechanisms.

  12. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  13. REVIEW OF HIGH FIELD Q SLOPE, CAVITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2008-01-23

    One of the most interesting phenomenon occurring in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk niobium is represented by a sharp decrease of the quality factor above peak surface magnetic field of about 90 mT and is referred to as "high field Q-slope" or "Q-drop". This phenomenon was observed first in 1997 and since then some effort was devoted to the understanding of the causes behind it. Still, no clear physical interpretation of the Q-drop has emerged, despite several attempts. In this contribution, I will review the experimental results for various cavities measured in many laboratories and I will try to identify common features and differences related to the Q-drop.

  14. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ge

    2015-10-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST.

  15. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)-an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents-could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  16. High-field transport in two-dimensional graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tian; Konar, Aniruddha; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2011-09-01

    Transport of carriers in two-dimensional graphene at high electric fields is investigated by combining semianalytical and Monte Carlo methods. A semianalytical high-field transport model based on the high rate of optical phonon emission provides useful estimates of the saturation currents in graphene. For developing a more accurate picture, the nonequilibrium (hot) phonon effect and the role of electron-electron scattering were studied using Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the hot phonon effect plays a dominant role in current saturation, and electron-electron scattering strongly thermalizes the hot carrier population in graphene. We also find that electron-electron scattering removes negative differential resistance in graphene. Transient phenomenon such as velocity overshoot can be used to speed up graphene-based high-speed electronic devices by shrinking the channel length below 80 nm if electrostatic control can be exercised in the absence of a band gap.

  17. Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are {approx}15mV in magnitude and lasts for {approx}30 {micro}sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets at currents up to {approx}20KA will also be shown.

  18. Topical Developments in High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Matthew K.; Frantz, Derik K.; Walish, Joseph J.; Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    We report our recent efforts directed at improving high-field DNP experiments. We investigated a series of thiourea nitroxide radicals and the associated DNP enhancements ranging from ε = 25 to 82 that demonstrate the impact of molecular structure on performance. We directly polarized low-gamma nuclei including 13C, 2H, and 17O using trityl via the cross effect. We discuss a variety of sample preparation techniques for DNP with emphasis on the benefit of methods that do not use a glass-forming cryoprotecting matrix. Lastly, we describe a corrugated waveguide for use in a 700 MHz / 460 GHz DNP system that improves microwave delivery and increases enhancements up to 50%. PMID:25977588

  19. Study of HTS Insert Coils for High Field Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Vito; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Fermilab is currently working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these solenoids using Helium refrigeration. Several studies have been performed on insert coils made of BSCCO-2223 tapes and second generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors, which are tested at various temperatures and at external fields of up to 14 T. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of YBCO short samples are presented as a function of bending stress, magnetic field and field orientation with respect to the sample surface. An analytical fit of critical current data as a function of field and field orientation is also presented. Results from several single-layer and double-layer pancake coils are also discussed.

  20. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  1. Aluminum doping studies on high field ZnO varistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, K.M.; Doughty, D.H.

    1987-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of Al doping on the physical and electronic properties of high field ZnO varistors. For this study, varistors containing 98.94 m/o ZnO, 0.25 m/o CoO, 0.25 m/o MnO, 0.56 m/o Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 0 to 200 ppM Al were prepared from powders obtained from solution precipitation techniques. Because of the amphoteric nature of aluminum oxides, precise control of pH and metal concentrations was necessary to assure complete incorporation of dopants. We observed inhibition of grain growth during sintering of varistor pellets at aluminum concentrations of 50 ppM and above. The measured electrical properties show increased switching fields and increased nonlinearity coefficients for Al doping levels of 50 to 200 ppM.

  2. Improved capacitive stress transducers for high-field superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Christopher Pete; Holik, Eddie Frank, III; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.

    2012-06-01

    High-field (12-18 Tesla) superconducting magnets are required to enable an increase in the energy of future colliders. Such field strength requires the use of Nb3Sn superconductor, which has limited tolerance for compressive and shear strain. A strategy for stress management has been developed at Texas A&M University and is being implemented in TAMU3, a short-model 14 Tesla stress-managed Nb3Sn block dipole. The strategy includes the use of laminar capacitive stress transducers to monitor the stresses within the coil package. We have developed fabrication techniques and fixtures, which improve the reproducibility of the transducer response both at room temperature and during cryogenic operation. This is a report of the status of transducer development.

  3. Rapid brain MRI acquisition techniques at ultra-high fields.

    PubMed

    Setsompop, Kawin; Feinberg, David A; Polimeni, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-high-field MRI provides large increases in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as well as enhancement of several contrast mechanisms in both structural and functional imaging. Combined, these gains result in a substantial boost in contrast-to-noise ratio that can be exploited for higher-spatial-resolution imaging to extract finer-scale information about the brain. With increased spatial resolution, however, there is a concurrent increased image-encoding burden that can cause unacceptably long scan times for structural imaging and slow temporal sampling of the hemodynamic response in functional MRI - particularly when whole-brain imaging is desired. To address this issue, new directions of imaging technology development - such as the move from conventional 2D slice-by-slice imaging to more efficient simultaneous multislice (SMS) or multiband imaging (which can be viewed as "pseudo-3D" encoding) as well as full 3D imaging - have provided dramatic improvements in acquisition speed. Such imaging paradigms provide higher SNR efficiency as well as improved encoding efficiency. Moreover, SMS and 3D imaging can make better use of coil sensitivity information in multichannel receiver arrays used for parallel imaging acquisitions through controlled aliasing in multiple spatial directions. This has enabled unprecedented acceleration factors of an order of magnitude or higher in these imaging acquisition schemes, with low image artifact levels and high SNR. Here we review the latest developments of SMS and 3D imaging methods and related technologies at ultra-high field for rapid high-resolution functional and structural imaging of the brain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26835884

  4. The High Field Phase Diagram of (2) Perchlorate Tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKernan, Steffen Keleher

    1995-11-01

    We have established the magnetic phase diagram of (TMTSF)_2ClO_4 to fields of 30 tesla at temperatures above 0.5 K. The phase diagram is derived from a wealth of data amassed on six physical parameters, rho_ {xx}, rho_{yy }, rho_{zz} , rho_{xy}, S_{xx} (thermopower) and magnetization. The cascade of field induced spin density waves produced by fields along the crystalline c-axis and known to exist below 8 T, saturates to a maximum transition temperature of 5.5 K at approximately 15 T. This second order phase boundary persists at 5.5 K to 30 T. Wholly contained within this upper phase boundary, there is a newly discovered first order phase line which begins in an apparent critical point at 3.5 K and 22 T. This lower phase boundary continues at constant temperature to ~26 T, where it begins to decrease in temperature, falling below our measurement range at approximately 27 T. The previously reported high field reentrance to the normal state, is not found. (TMTSF)_2ClO_4 is formed by stacking the planar tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene (TMTSF) molecules along the crystalline a-axis. These stacks are separated along the c-axis by the perchlorate anions. At 24 K, the pyramidal anions order with wave vector (0, 1over 2, 0), thus distinguishing alternate chains and giving rise to two distinct Fermi surfaces. The high field spin density wave states are tentatively interpreted in terms of separate, weakly coupled transitions on these Fermi surfaces.

  5. New insights into rotating frame relaxation at high field.

    PubMed

    Spear, John T; Gore, John C

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of spin-lock relaxation rates in the rotating frame (R1ρ ) at high magnetic fields afford the ability to probe not only relatively slow molecular motions, but also other dynamic processes, such as chemical exchange and diffusion. In particular, measurements of the variation (or dispersion) of R1ρ with locking field allow the derivation of quantitative parameters that describe these processes. Measurements in deuterated solutions demonstrate the manner and degree to which exchange dominates relaxation at high fields (4.7 T, 7 T) in simple solutions, whereas temperature and pH are shown to be very influential factors affecting the rates of proton exchange. Simulations and experiments show that multiple exchanging pools of protons in realistic tissues can be assumed to behave independently of each other. R1ρ measurements can be combined to derive an exchange rate contrast (ERC) that produces images whose intensities emphasize protons with specific exchange rates rather than chemical shifts. In addition, water diffusion in the presence of intrinsic susceptibility gradients may produce significant effects on R1ρ dispersions at high fields. The exchange and diffusion effects act independently of each other, as confirmed by simulation and experimentally in studies of red blood cells at different levels of oxygenation. Collectively, R1ρ measurements provide an ability to quantify exchange processes, to provide images that depict protons with specific exchange rates and to describe the microstructure of tissues containing magnetic inhomogeneities. As such, they complement traditional T1 or T2 measurements and provide additional insights from measurements of R1ρ at a single locking field. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26866422

  6. Theory of high-field combined exciton-cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyubenko, Alexander

    2003-03-01

    Optical manifestations of many-body effects in low-dimensional electron and electron-hole (e-h) systems in magnetic fields have been the focus of many experimental and theoretical studies during the past decade. An interesting manifestation of many-body effects are shake-up processes (Finkelstein et al. 1996) in the photoluminescence of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG): After the recombination of the e-h pair, one electron is excited to one of the higher Landau levels. A closely related phenomenon, combined exciton-cyclotron resonance (ExCR), has also been identified in low-density 2DEG systems: Here, an incident photon creates an exciton and simultaneously excites one electron to higher Landau levels (Yakovlev et al. 1997). These phenomena and the relation between them remain only partially understood. In this work, I develop a theory of ExCR in a low-density strictly-2D electron gas in high magnetic fields. Electrons are assumed to be spin-polarized and occupy zero Landau level. In the low-density limit, ExCR can be considered to be a three-particle resonance involving a charged system of two electrons and one hole, 2e-h, in the final state. Importantly, there is a coupling of the center-of-mass and internal motions for charged e-h complexes in magnetic fields. In order to describe the high-field ExCR, I obtain the complete spectra of the 2e-h eigenstates in higher Landau levels with a consistent treatment of the Coulomb correlations. I derive exact ExCR selection rules that follow from the existing dynamical symmetries, magnetic translations and rotations about the magnetic field axis. This allows one to establish the characteristic features of the high-field ExCR; in particular, the double-peak structure of the transitions to the first electron Landau level is predicted. I also consider combined hole-ExCR in a low-density 2DEG, a resonance in which the hole is excited to higher hole Lnadau levels. It is shown that the high-field hole-ExCR has different

  7. Applications of high dielectric materials in high field magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Kristina Noel

    At high magnetic fields, radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of components all contribute to losses in conventional RF MRI coil designs. The hypothesis tested here is that these problems can be combated by the use of high permittivity ceramic materials at high fields. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in compact structures at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study NMR probes were constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) and 900 MHz (21.1 Tesla) using inductively fed CaTiO3 (relative permittivity of 156-166) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonators. The designs showed the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore, which accommodates the sample. The 600 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 microm3, have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures. The 900 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value of 940 and shows Q performance five times better than Alderman-Grant and loop-gap resonators of similar dimensions. High resolution images were acquired of an excised mouse spinal cord (25 microm 3) and an excised rat soleus muscle (20 microm3). The spatial distribution of electromagnetic fields within the human body can be tailored using external dielectric materials. Here, a new material is introduced with high dielectric constant and low background MRI signal. The material is based upon metal titanates, which can be made into geometrically formable suspensions in de-ionized water. The suspension's material properties are

  8. The design of a large aperture high field dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Harfoush, F.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-12-01

    The impetus for this design report originated in the Snowmass 88 meeting where the subject of higher energies within the constraints of the existing Tevatron tunnel enclosure was investigated. It was determined that beam transport to the fixed target experimental areas was possible up to an energy of {approximately}1.5 Tev. Collider operation was feasible at somewhat higher energies (1.8 Tev), primarily limited by the ability to design a single turn beam abort system within the constraints of the straight section length. A new accelerator in the existing tunnel would, of necessity, have a similar though not identical lattice and straight section layout to the present Tevatron. Thus when issues arose in the magnet design requiring input from the accelerator standpoint we have assumed a Tevatron like machine. The possibility of using these high field magnets as elements in the existing Tevatron to create new warm space,' for another Interaction Region for example, also emphasizes compatibility with the present machine. 16 refs., 62 figs., 23 tabs.

  9. Graded High Field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.

    2007-06-01

    Dipole magnets with fields beyond 16T will require superconducting coils that are at least 40 mm thick, an applied pres-stress around 150 MPa and a protection scheme for stored energy in the range of 1-2 MJ/m. The coil size will have a direct impact on the overall magnet cost and the stored energy will raise new questions on protection. To reduce coil size and minimize risk, the coil may have to be graded. Grading is achieved by splitting the coil into several layers with current densities that match the short sample field in each layer. Grading, especially at high fields, can be effective; however it will also significantly raise the stress. In this paper we report on the results of a study on the coil size and field relation to that of the stress and stored energy. We then extend the results to graded coils and attempt to address high stress issues and ways to reduce it.

  10. Towards Integrated Design and Modeling of High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.

    2006-06-01

    The next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets will most likely use a brittle conductor (such as Nb{sub 3}Sn), generate fields around 18 T, handle forces that are 3-4 times higher than in the present LHC dipoles, and store energy that starts to make accelerator magnets look like fusion magnets. To meet the challenge and reduce the complexity, magnet design will have to be more innovative and better integrated. The recent design of several high field superconducting magnets have now benefited from the integration between CAD (e.g. ProE), magnetic analysis tools (e.g. TOSCA) and structural analysis tools (e.g. ANSYS). Not only it is now possible to address complex issues such as stress in magnet ends, but the analysis can be better detailed an extended into new areas previously too difficult to address. Integrated thermal, electrical and structural analysis can be followed from assembly and cool-down through excitation and quench propagation. In this paper we report on the integrated design approach, discuss analysis results and point out areas of future interest.

  11. Low-frequency losses at high fields in multifilamentary superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, A.J.; Orlando, T.P.; Zieba, A.; Schwartz, B.B.; Foner, S.

    1984-12-01

    Low-frequency (approx.1 Hz) ac loss measurements were made at applied fields up to 20 T with field modulation amplitudes of up to 1 T. Results for the alternative in situ and powder metallurgy (P/M) processed Nb/sub 3/Sn and Nb--Al wires are presented for single-strand and multistrand geometries. Loss measurements for commercial continuous-fiber Nb/sub 3/Sn wires manufactured by Holec and Supercon also are presented and show that the effective fiber size determined by these ac-loss measurements corresponds to that measured optically. The effective fiber size for alternative processed wires was intermediate between the wire size and the fiber size, and the losses (and effective fiber size) were reduced by twisting. Multistrand geometries showed further reductions in losses. The smallest effective fiber size at high field was measured for P/M processed Nb--Al. The losses were fully hysteretic and the ac losses were used to determine the critical-current density at low fields where it was difficult to measure directly.

  12. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  13. 3D Hole Inspection Using Lens with High Field Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, Petr

    2015-02-01

    One of the actual 3D measurement problems is the optical inspection of various holes. In this respect, the task of plane image formation of holes as extended 3D objects using optical methods turns out to be of primary importance. We have developed specialized lenses that perform such transformations due to specially increased aberrations (field curvature, astigmatism) for the formation of extended objects plane images. The calculations of the lens parameters are presented. The detail analysis of the imaging properties was carried out. The presented hole inspection lens has been designed, constructed and used for inspection of the fuel assembly spacer grids.

  14. Diffuse Axonal Injury at Ultra-High Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Moenninghoff, Christoph; Kraff, Oliver; Maderwald, Stefan; Umutlu, Lale; Theysohn, Jens M.; Ringelstein, Adrian; Wrede, Karsten H.; Deuschl, Cornelius; Altmeppen, Jan; Ladd, Mark E.; Forsting, Michael; Quick, Harald H.; Schlamann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a specific type of traumatic brain injury caused by shearing forces leading to widespread tearing of axons and small vessels. Traumatic microbleeds (TMBs) are regarded as a radiological marker for DAI. This study aims to compare DAI-associated TMBs at 3 Tesla (T) and 7 T susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to evaluate possible diagnostic benefits of ultra-high field (UHF) MRI. Material and Methods 10 study participants (4 male, 6 female, age range 20-74 years) with known DAI were included. All MR exams were performed with a 3 T MR system (Magnetom Skyra) and a 7 T MR research system (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany) each in combination with a 32-channel-receive coil. The average time interval between trauma and imaging was 22 months. Location and count of TMBs were independently evaluated by two neuroradiologists on 3 T and 7 T SWI images with similar and additionally increased spatial resolution at 7 T. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Count and diameter of TMB were evaluated with Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results Susceptibility weighted imaging revealed a total of 485 TMBs (range 1-190, median 25) at 3 T, 584 TMBs (plus 20%, range 1-262, median 30.5) at 7 T with similar spatial resolution, and 684 TMBs (plus 41%, range 1-288, median 39.5) at 7 T with 10-times higher spatial resolution. Hemorrhagic DAI appeared significantly larger at 7 T compared to 3 T (p = 0.005). Inter- and intraobserver correlation regarding the counted TMB was high and almost equal 3 T and 7 T. Conclusion 7 T SWI improves the depiction of small hemorrhagic DAI compared to 3 T and may be supplementary to lower field strengths for diagnostic in inconclusive or medicolegal cases. PMID:25793614

  15. Anisotropic high field superconductinng behavior in MgB_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    I will discuss new effects resulting from the two-gap superconductivity in MgB_2, focusing on: 1. Current-induced interband breakdown and dynamic interband phase textures caused by nonequilibrium charge imbalance [1], 2. Anomalous enhancement of the upper critical field H_c2(T) by nonmagnetic impurities in dirty two-gap superconductors. A theory of H_c2 based on generalized two-gap Usadel equations, which include both intra and interband scattering channels and paramagnetic pairbreaking is presented. Solutions of these equations show that H_c2(T) can exhibit a strong upward curvature and an unusual temperature dependence of the anisotropy parameter H_c2^||/H_c2^⊥, which can both increase and decrease with T depending on the ratio of the intraband electron diffusivities D_π/D_σ [2]. The theory explains recent high-field transport experiments on resistive MgB2 films in which the upper critical field was increased by 3-10 times as compared to single crystals [3], H_c2 exceeding 50 Tesla for H||ab and 35T for H⊥ ab. The results suggest that nonmagnetic impurities due to selective atomic substitution on Mg and B sites can increase H_c2 of MgB2 to a much greater extend than in one-gap superconductors. [1]. A. Gurevich and V.M. Vinokur, PRL 90, 047004 (2003). [2]. A. Gurevich, PRB 67, 1845151 (2003) and unpublished. [3]. A. Gurevich et al. Supercond. Sci. Technol. (2003, to appear). *In collaboration with V.M. Vinokur, V. Braccini, S. Patnaik, X. Song, D.C. Larbalestier, C.B. Eom, X. Pan, X. Xi, V. Ferrando, C. Ferdighini, A. Siri, K.H. Kim and C. Mielke. Work supported by NSF Nanostructured Materials and Interfaces MRSEC at the University of Wisconsin.

  16. Ultra-high field magnets for whole-body MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Rory

    2016-09-01

    For whole-body MRI, an ultra-high field (UHF) magnet is currently defined as a system operating at 7 T or above. Over 70 UHF magnets have been built, all with the same technical approach originally developed by Magnex Scientific Ltd. The preferred coil configuration is a compensated solenoid. In this case, the majority of the field is generated by a simple long solenoid that stretches the entire length of the magnet. Additional coils are wound on a separate former outside the main windings with the purpose of balancing the homogeneity. Most of the magnets currently in operation are passively shielded systems where the magnet is surrounded by a steel box of 200–870 tonnes of carbon steel. More recently actively shielded magnets have been built for operation at 7 T; in this case the stray field is controlled by with reverse turns wound on a separate former outside the primary coils. Protection against quench damage is much more complex with an actively shielded magnet design due to the requirement to prevent the stray field from increasing during a quench. In the case of the 7 T 900 magnet this controlled by combining some of the screening coils into each section of the protection circuit. Correction of the field variations caused by manufacturing tolerances and environmental effects are made with a combination of superconducting shims and passive shims. Modern UHF magnets operate in zero boil-off mode with the use of cryocoolers with cooling capacity at 4.2 K. Although there are no cryogen costs associated with normal operation UHF magnets require a significant volume (10 000–20 000 l) of liquid helium for the cool-down. Liquid helium is expensive therefore new methods of cool-down using high-power cryocoolers are being implemented to reduce the requirement.

  17. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of the human temporal lobe☆

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Perez, Luis M.; King, Michael; Parekh, Mansi; Boutzoukas, Angelique; Carmona, Eduardo; Couret, Michelle; Klassen, Rosemary; Mareci, Thomas H.; Carney, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Emerging high-field diffusion weighted MR imaging protocols, along with tractography, can elucidate microstructural changes associated with brain disease at the sub-millimeter image resolution. Epilepsy and other neurological disorders are accompanied by structural changes in the hippocampal formation and associated regions; however, these changes can be subtle and on a much smaller scale than the spatial resolution commonly obtained by current clinical magnetic resonance (MR) protocols in vivo. Methods We explored the possibility of studying the organization of fresh tissue with a 17.6 Tesla magnet using diffusion MR imaging and tractography. The mesoscale organization of the temporal lobe was estimated using a fresh unfixed specimen obtained from a subject who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Following ex vivo imaging, the tissue was fixed, serial-sectioned, and stained for correlation with imaging. Findings We resolved tissue microstructural organizational features in the temporal lobe from diffusion MR imaging and tractography in fresh tissue. Conclusions Fresh ex vivo MR imaging, along with tractography, revealed complex intra-temporal structural variation corresponding to neuronal cell body layers, dendritic fields, and axonal projection systems evident histologically. This is the first study to describe in detail the human temporal lobe structural organization using high-field MR imaging and tractography. By preserving the 3-dimensional structures of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, specific changes in anatomy may inform us about the changes that occur in TLE in relation to the disease process and structural underpinnings in epilepsy-related memory dysfunction. PMID:26413472

  18. High-field electron transport in GaN under crossed electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochelap, V. A.; Korotyeyev, V. V.; Syngayivska, G. I.; Varani, L.

    2015-10-01

    High-field electron transport studied in crossed electric and magnetic fields in bulk GaN with doping of 1016 cm-3, compensation around 90% at the low lattice temperature (30 K). It was found the range of the magnetic and electric fields where the non-equilibrium electron distribution function has a complicated topological structure in the momentum space with a tendency to the formation of the inversion population. Field dependences of dissipative and Hall components of the drift velocity were calculated for the samples with short- and open- circuited Hall contacts in wide ranges of applied electric (0 — 20 kV/cm) and magnetic (1 — 10 T) fields. For former sample, field dependences of dissipative and Hall components of the drift velocity have a non-monotonic behavior. The dissipative component has the inflection point which corresponds to the maximum point of the Hall component. For latter sample, the drift velocity demonstrate a usual sub-linear growth without any critical points. We found that GaN samples with controlled resistance of the Hall circuit can be utilized as a electronic high-power switch.

  19. Intermediate length scale organisation in tin borophosphate glasses: new insights from high field correlation NMR.

    PubMed

    Tricot, G; Saitoh, A; Takebe, H

    2015-11-28

    The structure of tin borophosphate glasses, considered for the development of low temperature sealing glasses or anode materials for Li-batteries, has been analysed at the intermediate length scale by a combination of high field standard and advanced 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The nature and extent of B/P mixing were analysed using the (11)B((31)P) dipolar heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence NMR sequence and the data interpretation allowed (i) detecting the presence and analysing the nature of the B-O-P linkages, (ii) re-interpreting the 1D (31)P spectra and (iii) extracting the proportion of P connected to borate species. Interaction between the different borate species was analysed using the (11)B double quantum-simple quantum experiment to (i) investigate the presence and nature of the B-O-B linkage, (ii) assign the different borate species observed all along the composition line and (iii) monitor the borate network formation. In addition, (119)Sn static NMR was used to investigate the evolution of the chemical environment of the tin polyhedra. Altogether, the set of data allowed determining the structural units constituting the glass network and quantifying the extent of B/P mixing. The structural data were then used to explain the non-linear and unusual evolution of the glass transition temperature. PMID:26186677

  20. Electronic structure of the primary electron donor of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutants : high field EPR study.

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, N. S.; Poluektov, O. G.; Bylina, E. J.; Norris, J. R.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-09-01

    High-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HF EPR) has been employed to investigate the primary electron donor electronic structure of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutant reaction centers (RCs). In these mutants the amino acid substitution His(M200)Leu or His(L173)Leu eliminates a ligand to the primary electron donor, resulting in the loss of a magnesium in one of the constituent bacteriochlorophylls (BChl). Thus, the native BChl/BChl homodimer primary donor is converted into a BChl/bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) heterodimer. The heterodimer primary donor radical in chemically oxidized RCs exhibits a broadened EPR line indicating a highly asymmetric distribution of the unpaired electron over both dimer constituents. Observed triplet state EPR signals confirm localization of the excitation on the BChl half of the heterodimer primary donor. Theoretical simulation of the triplet EPR lineshapes clearly shows that, in the case of mutants, triplet states are formed by an intersystem crossing mechanism in contrast to the radical pair mechanism in wild type RCs. Photooxidation of the mutant RCs results in formation of a BPhe anion radical within the heterodimer pair. The accumulation of an intradimer BPhe anion is caused by the substantial loss of interaction between constituents of the heterodimer primary donor along with an increase in the reduction potential of the heterodimer primary donor D/D{sup +} couple. This allows oxidation of the cytochrome even at cryogenic temperatures and reduction of each constituent of the heterodimer primary donor individually. Despite a low yield of primary donor radicals, the enhancement of the semiquinone-iron pair EPR signals in these mutants indicates the presence of kinetically viable electron donors.

  1. Modeling the high-field section of a muon helical cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, M.J.; Lombardo, V.; Lopes, M.L.; Yu, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S.A.; Turenne, M.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design and parameters of a short model of a high-field helical solenoid for muon beam cooling. Structural materials choices, fabrication techniques and first test results are discussed.

  2. High Field Magnetization measurements of uranium dioxide single crystals (P08358- E003-PF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gofryk, K.; Harrison, N.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary high field magnetic measurements of UO2 are consistent with a complex nature of the magnetic ordering in this material, compatible with the previously proposed non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. Further extensive magnetic studies on well-oriented (<100 > and <111>) UO2 crystals are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states at high fields.

  3. Correlating Hemodynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging with high-field Intracranial Vessel Wall Imaging in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Weston; Donahue, Manus J.; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Rane, Swati; Strother, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) can be used to visualize vascular lesions noninvasively and holds potential for improving stroke-risk assessment in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We present the first multi-modal comparison of such high-field vessel wall imaging with more conventional (i) 3 Tesla hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging and (ii) digital subtraction angiography in a 69-year-old male with a left temporal ischemic infarct. PMID:25426229

  4. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of

  5. Understanding and improving the high field orbit in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.; Ketcham, L.; Moore, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    With the implementation of the BPM system in the Fermilab Booster, complete survey data of the main magnets have been employed to determine magnet moving schemes to correct the high field orbit at 8 GeV kinetic energy and to understand the global pattern of the high field orbit in both planes. Considerable success has been achieved in the former task. We also obtained reasonable understanding in the later effort, given the multitude of factors that have to be dealt with. In this paper an account is given of the survey record, the orbit correction exercise, and the effort to reconstruct the high field orbit based on the survey records. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Alpha channeling with high-field launch of lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-04

    Although lower hybrid waves are effective at driving currents in present-day tokamaks, they are expected to interact strongly with high-energy particles in extrapolating to reactors. In the presence of a radial alpha particle birth gradient, this interaction can take the form of wave amplification rather than damping. While it is known that this amplification more easily occurs when launching from the tokamak high-field side, the extent of this amplification has not been made quantitative. Here, by tracing rays launched from the high- field-side of a tokamak, the required radial gradients to achieve amplification are calculated for a temperature and density regime consistent with a hot-ion-mode fusion reactor. As a result, these simulations, while valid only in the linear regime of wave amplification, nonetheless illustrate the possibilities for wave amplification using high-field launch of the lower hybrid wave.

  7. Alpha channeling with high-field launch of lower hybrid waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-04

    Although lower hybrid waves are effective at driving currents in present-day tokamaks, they are expected to interact strongly with high-energy particles in extrapolating to reactors. In the presence of a radial alpha particle birth gradient, this interaction can take the form of wave amplification rather than damping. While it is known that this amplification more easily occurs when launching from the tokamak high-field side, the extent of this amplification has not been made quantitative. Here, by tracing rays launched from the high- field-side of a tokamak, the required radial gradients to achieve amplification are calculated for a temperature and densitymore » regime consistent with a hot-ion-mode fusion reactor. As a result, these simulations, while valid only in the linear regime of wave amplification, nonetheless illustrate the possibilities for wave amplification using high-field launch of the lower hybrid wave.« less

  8. Nb$_3$Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  9. Alpha channeling with high-field launch of lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-15

    Although lower hybrid waves are effective at driving currents in present-day tokamaks, they are expected to interact strongly with high-energy particles in extrapolating to reactors. In the presence of a radial alpha particle birth gradient, this interaction can take the form of wave amplification rather than damping. While it is known that this amplification more easily occurs when launching from the tokamak high-field side, the extent of this amplification has not been made quantitative. Here, by tracing rays launched from the high-field-side of a tokamak, the required radial gradients to achieve amplification are calculated for a temperature and density regime consistent with a hot-ion-mode fusion reactor. These simulations, while valid only in the linear regime of wave amplification, nonetheless illustrate the possibilities for wave amplification using high-field launch of the lower hybrid wave.

  10. The high-field state at the Dirac Point in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuan Ong, N.

    2009-03-01

    The discovery of the quantum Hall Effect in graphene has generated considerable interest in the state at the Dirac Point in a magnetic field H. In intense H, the 4-fold degeneracy of the n=0 Landau Level (LL) is lifted by the enhanced exchange energy. Among the broken symmetry states proposed are the quantum Hall ferromagnet, the quantum Hall insulator state, excitonic condensation, and charge-density-wave formation. A subset of these theories propose counter-propagating edge states that remain conducting in large H. We have performed measurements of the resistance Rxx and Hall resistance Rxy to fields of 33 T at temperatures T from 0.3 to 50 K in ˜6 graphene samples. We find that, as T decreases below 10 K, R0 (= Rxx at the Dirac Point) undergoes a steep increase with a divergence consistent with a field-driven transition to an insulating high-field state. The divergence in R0 fits well to the Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) form (b/√h-1) with h=H/Hc and b˜1.4. The critical field Hc is sample dependent (12 T to 33 T ), and correlates with the disorder as measured by the offset gate voltage V0 and the zero-H mobility. The divergence in R0 is strictly confined to the n=0 LL (bracketed by the sublevels ν= ±1). The peaks with n=±1 remain near the values h/e^2. Using an ultralow-power (3 fW), voltage-regulated technique, we show that the KT-fit to R0 is valid over 3 decades (40 kφ to 40 Mφ). The steepness of the R0 vs. T curves implies a bulk gap δ of magnitude 15-20 K that decreases when H falls below Hc. We compare our findings with the various proposed models. We will also report thermopower and Nernst measurements taken to fields of 14 T.[4pt] Refs. J. G. Checkelsky, L. Li and N. P. Ong, prl 100, 206801 (2008); ibid. cond-mat arXiv:0808.0906v1.

  11. High-field and thermal transport in 2D atomic layer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Andrey; Dorgan, Vincent E.; Behnam, Ashkan; English, Chris D.; Li, Zuanyi; Islam, Sharnali; Pop, Eric

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews our recent results of high-field electrical and thermal properties of atomically thin two-dimensional materials. We show how self-heating affects velocity saturation in suspended and supported graphene. We also demonstrate that multi-valley transport must be taken into account to describe high-field transport in MoS2. At the same time we characterized thermal properties of suspended and nanoscale graphene samples over a wide range of temperatures. We uncovered the effects of edge scattering and grain boundaries on thermal transport in graphene, and showed how the thermal conductivity varies between diffusive and ballistic heat flow limits.

  12. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  13. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  14. U.S. EPA High-Field NMR Facility with Remote Accessibility

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s High-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Research Facility housed in Athens, GA has two Varian 600 MHz NMR spectrometers used for conducting sophisticated experiments in environmental science. Off-site users can ship their samples and perform their NMR experiments remotely fr...

  15. 15 Years of R&D on High Field Accelerator Magnets at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-12-10

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  16. Low-field versus high-field MRI in diagnosing breast disorders.

    PubMed

    Pääkkö, Eija; Reinikainen, Heli; Lindholm, Eija-Leena; Rissanen, Tarja

    2005-07-01

    We evaluated the performance of low-field MRI in breast disorders by comparing it with high-field MRI and biopsy results. Twenty-eight consecutive patients who were able to undergo two magnetic resonance examinations on following days were examined by high-field and low-field MRI. After T1-weighted sagittal images had been obtained a dynamic 3D axial study was performed followed by the acquisition of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sagittal images. The images were analyzed separately by two radiologists paying attention to lesion morphology and enhancement kinetics. Six patients had problems in both breasts (34 breasts studied). The results were compared with biopsy results of 27 breasts. There were 16 malignant lesions, two fibroadenomas and nine other benign lesions. The inter-magnetic-resonance-scanner kappa value was 0.77 (substantial agreement), while the interobserver kappa value was 0.86 and 0.81 at low and high field, respectively (excellent agreement). The sensitivity was 100 and 100%, the specificity was 82 and 73% and the accuracy was 93 and 89% at low and high field, respectively. The mean lesion size was 2 cm and the smallest malignant lesion was 8 mm in diameter. Low-field MRI is a promising tool for breast imaging. Larger materials and smaller lesions are needed to evaluate its true sensitivity and specificity. PMID:15711841

  17. 15 Years of R&D on high field accelerator magnets at FNAL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  18. Eliminating a Major Cause of Wire Drawing Breakage in A-15 High-Field Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Austen, Alfred R.

    2003-05-20

    Eliminating a Major Cause of Wire Drawing Breakage in A-15 High-Field Superconductors Phase 1 Summary Purpose of the research: The Phase 1 goal was to make a significant improvement in the wire drawing technology used for difficult to draw superconductor precursor composites. Many ductile Nb-Al and Nb-Sn precursor wire composites have experienced the onset of wire drawing breakage at about 1.5 mm diameter. Phase 1 focused on evaluating the role that precision rigid guidance of the wire into the drawing die and the hydrostatic stress state at the die entrance played in preventing wire breakage. Research carried out: The research performed depended upon the construction of both a mechanical wire guide and a hydrostatic pressure stiffened wire guidance system. Innovare constructed the two wire guidance systems and tested them for their ability to reduce wire drawing breakage. One set of hardware provided rigid alignment of the wires to their wire drawing die axes within 0.35 degrees using ''hydrostatic pressure stiffening'' to enable the precision guidance strategy to be implemented for these highly flexible small diameter wires. This apparatus was compared to a guide arrangement that used short span mechanical guide alignment with a misalignment limit of about 0.75 degrees. Four A-15 composite wires with breakage histories were drawn to evaluate the use of these wire guiding systems to reduce and/or eliminate wire breakage. Research findings and results: In Phase 1, a breakthrough in wire drawing technology for A-15 superconductor composites was achieved by dramatically limiting or eliminating breakage in four different A-15 composite precursor wire designs during the drawing of these very desirable composites that previously could not be drawn to near final size. Research results showed that the proposed Phase 1 mechanical wire guides were sufficiently effective and successful in eliminating breakage when used along with other advanced wire drawing technology to

  19. Narrowband Emission in Compton/Thomson Sources Operating in the High-Field Regime

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Terzic, Balsa; Deitrick, Kirsten E.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kraff, Geoffrey A.

    2014-02-21

    We present a novel and quite general analysis of the interaction of a high-field chirped laser pulse and a relativistic electron, in which exquisite control of the spectral brilliance of the upshifted Thomson-scattered photon is shown to be possible. Normally, when Thomson scattering occurs at high field strengths, there is ponderomotive line broadening in the scattered radiation. This effect makes the bandwidth too large for some applications, and reduces the spectral brilliance. In this paper we show that such broadening can be corrected and eliminated by suitable frequency modulation of the incident laser pulse. Further, we suggest a practical realizationmore » of this compensation idea in terms of a chirped-beam driven FEL oscillator configuration, and show that significant compensation can occur, even with the imperfect matching to be expected in these conditions.« less

  20. High-field paramagnetic Meissner effect in melt-textured YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F. T.; Pureur, P.; Rodrigues, P.; Obradors, X.

    2004-08-01

    We present systematic field-cooled magnetization measurements in four directionally solidified samples of YBCO containing different amounts of Y211 precipitates. Fields up to 50 kOe were applied either parallel or perpendicular to the Cu-O 2 atomic planes. At high applied magnetic fields, the paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME) was observed in all of the studied samples, regardless of the field orientation with respect to the crystalline axes. This high-field PME shows some noticeable differences when compared to the most frequently investigated PME at low applied fields. Our results suggest that pinning by Y211 particles is important for explaining the high-field PME of melt-processed YBCO.

  1. Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: Sharing ultra-high-field MR images of the brain.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Christine Lucas; Schäfer, Andreas; Trampel, Robert; Villringer, Arno; Turner, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra high field opens the door to quantitative brain imaging at sub-millimeter isotropic resolutions. However, novel image processing tools to analyze these new rich datasets are lacking. In this article, we introduce the Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: a unique repository of high-resolution and quantitative images acquired at 7 T. The motivation for this project is to increase interest for high-resolution and quantitative imaging and stimulate the development of image processing tools developed specifically for high-field data. Our growing repository currently includes datasets from MP2RAGE and multi-echo FLASH sequences from 28 and 20 healthy subjects respectively. These datasets represent the current state-of-the-art in in-vivo relaxometry at 7 T, and are now fully available to the entire neuroimaging community. PMID:26318051

  2. High-field magnetization measurements on a ferromagnetic amorphous alloy from 295 to 5K

    SciTech Connect

    Szymczak, P. ); Graham, C.D. Jr. ); Gibbs, M.R.J. )

    1994-11-01

    Magnetization measurements on an amorphous ferromagnetic alloy Fe[sub 78](SiB)[sub 22] have been made over the temperature range from 5 to 295K and in fields to 5T, using a SQUID magnetometer and a superconducting magnet. As-received and field-annealed samples were measured. Having data over a range of temperatures allows the spin-wave contribution to the magnetization to be determined, and then subtracted. When the spin-wave contribution is removed, a substantial high-field susceptibility remains, which is independent of temperature. Attempts to fit the corrected curves to one of two theoretical equations were not conclusive, but the best fit seems to be to M = M[sub 0] + aH[sup [minus]0.5] + bH. The annealing treatment has no significant effect on the high-field magnetization.

  3. NMR spectroscopy of hyperpolarized ^129Xe at high fields: Maintaining spin polarization after optical pumping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Brian; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Lisitza, Natalia V.; Happer, William

    2003-05-01

    Spin-polarized ^129Xe has become an invaluable tool in nuclear magnetic resonance research, with applications ranging from medical imaging to high-resolution spectroscopy. High-field NMR studies using hyperpolarized xenon as a spectroscopic probe benefit from the high signal-to-noise ratios and large chemical shifts typical of optically-pumped noble gases. The experimental sensitivity is ultimately determined by the absolute polarization of the xenon in the sample, which can be substantially decreased during purification and transfer. NMR of xenon at high fields (9.4 Tesla) will be discussed, and potential mechanisms of spin relaxation during the distillation, storage(N. N. Kuzma, B. Patton, K. Raman, and W. Happer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88), 147602 (2002)., and delivery of hyperpolarized xenon will be analyzed.

  4. Narrow-band emission in Thomson sources operating in the high-field regime.

    PubMed

    Terzić, Balša; Deitrick, Kirsten; Hofler, Alicia S; Krafft, Geoffrey A

    2014-02-21

    We present a novel and quite general analysis of the interaction of a high-field chirped laser pulse and a relativistic electron, in which exquisite control of the spectral brilliance of the up-shifted Thomson-scattered photon is shown to be possible. Normally, when Thomson scattering occurs at high field strengths, there is ponderomotive line broadening in the scattered radiation. This effect makes the bandwidth too large for some applications and reduces the spectral brilliance. We show that such broadening can be corrected and eliminated by suitable frequency modulation of the incident laser pulse. Furthermore, we suggest a practical realization of this compensation idea in terms of a chirped-beam-driven free electron laser oscillator configuration and show that significant compensation can occur, even with the imperfect matching to be expected in these conditions. PMID:24579606

  5. Narrowband Emission in Compton/Thomson Sources Operating in the High-Field Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Terzic, Balsa; Deitrick, Kirsten E.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kraff, Geoffrey A.

    2014-02-21

    We present a novel and quite general analysis of the interaction of a high-field chirped laser pulse and a relativistic electron, in which exquisite control of the spectral brilliance of the upshifted Thomson-scattered photon is shown to be possible. Normally, when Thomson scattering occurs at high field strengths, there is ponderomotive line broadening in the scattered radiation. This effect makes the bandwidth too large for some applications, and reduces the spectral brilliance. In this paper we show that such broadening can be corrected and eliminated by suitable frequency modulation of the incident laser pulse. Further, we suggest a practical realization of this compensation idea in terms of a chirped-beam driven FEL oscillator configuration, and show that significant compensation can occur, even with the imperfect matching to be expected in these conditions.

  6. High field superconducting magnets (12 T and greater) for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Summers, L.T.; Kerns, J.A.

    1986-07-09

    The technology for producing high fields in large superconducting magnets has increased greatly in recent years, but must increase still more in the future. In this paper, we examine the present state of the art vis-a-vis the needs of a next-generation fusion machine and outline a program to provide for those needs. We also highlight recent developments that suggest the program goals are within reach.

  7. Perspectives for the high field approach in fusion research and advances within the Ignitor Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, B.; Airoldi, A.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; Belforte, G.; Boggio-Sella, E.; Cardinali, A.; Cenacchi, G.; Conti, F.; Costa, E.; D'Amico, A.; Detragiache, P.; De Tommasi, G.; DeVellis, A.; Faelli, G.; Ferraris, P.; Frattolillo, A.; Giammanco, F.; Grasso, G.; Lazzaretti, M.; Mantovani, S.; Merriman, L.; Migliori, S.; Napoli, R.; Perona, A.; Pierattini, S.; Pironti, A.; Ramogida, G.; Rubinacci, G.; Sassi, M.; Sestero, A.; Spillantini, S.; Tavani, M.; Tumino, A.; Villone, F.; Zucchi, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Ignitor Program maintains the objective of approaching D-T ignition conditions by incorporating systematical advances made with relevant high field magnet technology and with experiments on high density well confined plasmas in the present machine design. An additional objective is that of charting the development of the high field line of experiments that goes from the Alcator machine to the ignitor device. The rationale for this class of experiments, aimed at producing poloidal fields with the highest possible values (compatible with proven safety factors of known plasma instabilities) is given. On the basis of the favourable properties of high density plasmas produced systematically by this line of machines, the envisioned future for the line, based on novel high field superconducting magnets, includes the possibility of investigating more advanced fusion burn conditions than those of the D-T plasmas for which Ignitor is designed. Considering that a detailed machine design has been carried out (Coppi et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 104013), the advances made in different areas of the physics and technology that are relevant to the Ignitor project are reported. These are included within the following sections of the present paper: main components issues, assembly and welding procedures; robotics criteria; non-linear feedback control; simulations with three-dimensional structures and disruption studies; ICRH and dedicated diagnostics systems; anomalous transport processes including self-organization for fusion burning regimes and the zero-dimensional model; tridimensional structures of the thermonuclear instability and control provisions; superconducting components of the present machine; envisioned experiments with high field superconducting magnets.

  8. Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of the basal ganglia and related structures

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Birgit R.; Temel, Yasin; Roebroeck, Alard; Uludağ, Kâmil; Ivanov, Dimo; Kuijf, Mark L.; ter Haar Romenij, Bart M.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a treatment for Parkinson's disease and other related disorders, involving the surgical placement of electrodes in the deeply situated basal ganglia or thalamic structures. Good clinical outcome requires accurate targeting. However, due to limited visibility of the target structures on routine clinical MR images, direct targeting of structures can be challenging. Non-clinical MR scanners with ultra-high magnetic field (7T or higher) have the potential to improve the quality of these images. This technology report provides an overview of the current possibilities of visualizing deep brain stimulation targets and their related structures with the aid of ultra-high field MRI. Reviewed studies showed improved resolution, contrast- and signal-to-noise ratios at ultra-high field. Sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility such as T2* and susceptibility weighted imaging and their maps in general showed the best visualization of target structures, including a separation between the subthalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra, the lamina pallidi medialis and lamina pallidi incompleta within the globus pallidus and substructures of the thalamus, including the ventral intermediate nucleus (Vim). This shows that the visibility, identification, and even subdivision of the small deep brain stimulation targets benefit from increased field strength. Although ultra-high field MR imaging is associated with increased risk of geometrical distortions, it has been shown that these distortions can be avoided or corrected to the extent where the effects are limited. The availability of ultra-high field MR scanners for humans seems to provide opportunities for a more accurate targeting for deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease and related disorders. PMID:25414656

  9. Construction of block-coil high-field model dipoles for future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, Raymond; Elliott, Tim; Henchel, William; McInturff, Al; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdior

    2002-08-04

    A family of high-field dipoles is being developed at Texas A&M University, as part of the program to improve the cost-effectiveness of superconducting magnet technology for future hadron colliders. The TAMU technology employs stress management, flux-plate control of persistent-current multipoles, conductor optimization using mixed-strand cable, and metal-filled bladders to provide pre-load and surface compliance. Construction details and status of the latest model dipole will be presented.

  10. Measuring remanence anisotropy of hematite in red beds: anisotropy of high-field isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2009-09-01

    The potential of using high-field anisotropy of isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR) measurements for determining the origin of natural remanent magnetization in red beds and for identifying and correcting possible red-bed inclination shallowing was investigated for specimens of the Carboniferous Shepody Formation of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada. The technique makes it possible for a typical paleomagnetic laboratory to measure the remanence anisotropy of high-coercivity hematite. High-field (hf) AIR was used in conjunction with 100 mT alternating field (af) and 120°C thermal demagnetization to separate the contribution of hematite to the remanence anisotropy from that of magnetite/maghemite and goethite, respectively. A 5-T impulse DC magnetic field was used for the hf-AIR to reset the magnetic moment of high-coercivity hematite so that demagnetization between AIR orientations was not necessary. The ability of a 5-T field to reset the magnetization was tested by generating an isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curve for hematite by using impulse DC magnetic fields up to 5 T in one orientation and followed by applying a field in the opposite direction at each step. Each field application was treated by 120°C heating and 100 mT af demagnetization before measurement. At 5 T, the difference between the magnetizations applied in opposite directions disappeared indicating that no magnetic memory persisted at this field strength. We performed a validity and reproducibility test of our hf-AIR measurement technique by measuring three specimens multiple times along two orthogonal coordinate systems. The method yielded highly reproducible results and, on rotating the specimen's coordinates, the fabric rotated by 90° as expected, showing that it is not an artifact of the technique. We also measured hf-AIR on samples that had previously been chemically demagnetized in 3N HCl to remove the secondary, chemically grown pigmentary hematite. The hf

  11. Theory of intermediate- and high-field mobility in dilute nitride alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifikar, Masoud; O'Reilly, Eoin P.; Fahy, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    We have solved the steady-state Boltzmann transport equation in bulk GaAs1-xNx. Two different models of the conduction band structure have been studied to investigate the behavior of electrons with increasing electric field in these alloys: (1) carriers in parabolic Γ and L bands are scattered by resonant nitrogen substitutional defect states, polar optic and acoustic phonons, and intervalley optical phonons; (2) carriers, constrained in the lower band of the band-anticrossing (BAC) model, are scattered by phonons and by nitrogen states. We consider scattering both by isolated N atoms and also by a full distribution of N states. We find that it is necessary to include the full distribution of levels in order to account for the small low-field mobility and the absence of a negative differential velocity regime observed experimentally with increasing x. Model 2 breaks down at intermediate and high field, due to the unphysical constraint of limiting carriers to the lower BAC band. For model 1, carrier scattering into the L bands is reduced at intermediate electric fields but is comparable at high fields to that observed in GaAs, with the calculated high-field mobility and carrier distribution then also being comparable to GaAs. Overall the results account well for a wide range of experimental data.

  12. Stress management as an enabling technology for high-field superconducting dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie Frank, III

    This dissertation examines stress management and other construction techniques as means to meet future accelerator requirement demands by planning, fabricating, and analyzing a high-field, Nb3Sn dipole. In order to enable future fundamental research and discovery in high energy accelerator physics, bending magnets must access the highest fields possible. Stress management is a novel, propitious path to attain higher fields and preserve the maximum current capacity of advanced superconductors by managing the Lorentz stress so that strain induced current degradation is mitigated. Stress management is accomplished through several innovative design features. A block-coil geometry enables an Inconel pier and beam matrix to be incorporated in the windings for Lorentz Stress support and reduced AC loss. A laminar spring between windings and mica paper surrounding each winding inhibit any stress transferral through the support structure and has been simulated with ALGORRTM. Wood's metal filled, stainless steel bladders apply isostatic, surface-conforming preload to the pier and beam support structure. Sufficient preload along with mica paper sheer release reduces magnet training by inhibiting stick-slip motion. The effectiveness of stress management is tested with high-precision capacitive stress transducers and strain gauges. In addition to stress management, there are several technologies developed to assist in the successful construction of a high-field dipole. Quench protection has been designed and simulated along with full 3D magnetic simulation with OPERARTM. Rutherford cable was constructed, and cable thermal expansion data was analysed after heat treatment. Pre-impregnation analysis techniques were developed due to elemental tin leakage in varying quantities during heat treatment from each coil. Robust splicing techniques were developed with measured resistivites consistent with nO joints. Stress management has not been incorporated by any other high field dipole

  13. Inverse field-based approach for simultaneous B₁ mapping at high fields - a phantom based study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jin; Liu, Feng; Zuo, Zhentao; Xue, Rong; Li, Mingyan; Li, Yu; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-04-01

    Based on computational electromagnetics and multi-level optimization, an inverse approach of attaining accurate mapping of both transmit and receive sensitivity of radiofrequency coils is presented. This paper extends our previous study of inverse methods of receptivity mapping at low fields, to allow accurate mapping of RF magnetic fields (B(1)) for high-field applications. Accurate receive sensitivity mapping is essential to image domain parallel imaging methods, such as sensitivity encoding (SENSE), to reconstruct high quality images. Accurate transmit sensitivity mapping will facilitate RF-shimming and parallel transmission techniques that directly address the RF inhomogeneity issue, arguably the most challenging issue of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The inverse field-based approach proposed herein is based on computational electromagnetics and iterative optimization. It fits an experimental image to the numerically calculated signal intensity by iteratively optimizing the coil-subject geometry to better resemble the experiments. Accurate transmit and receive sensitivities are derived as intermediate results of the optimization process. The method is validated by imaging studies using homogeneous saline phantom at 7T. A simulation study at 300MHz demonstrates that the proposed method is able to obtain receptivity mapping with errors an order of magnitude less than that of the conventional method. The more accurate receptivity mapping and simultaneously obtained transmit sensitivity mapping could enable artefact-reduced and intensity-corrected image reconstructions. It is hoped that by providing an approach to the accurate mapping of both transmit and receive sensitivity, the proposed method will facilitate a range of applications in high-field MRI and parallel imaging. PMID:22391489

  14. Observation of Thermoelectric Currents in High-Field Superconductor-Ferromagnet Tunnel Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kolenda, S; Wolf, M J; Beckmann, D

    2016-03-01

    We report on the experimental observation of spin-dependent thermoelectric currents in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions in high magnetic fields. The thermoelectric signals are due to a spin-dependent lifting of the particle-hole symmetry, and are found to be in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient inferred from the data is about -100  μV/K, much larger than commonly found in metallic structures. Our results directly prove the coupling of spin and heat transport in high-field superconductors. PMID:26991193

  15. Observation of Thermoelectric Currents in High-Field Superconductor-Ferromagnet Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolenda, S.; Wolf, M. J.; Beckmann, D.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the experimental observation of spin-dependent thermoelectric currents in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions in high magnetic fields. The thermoelectric signals are due to a spin-dependent lifting of the particle-hole symmetry, and are found to be in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient inferred from the data is about -100 μ V /K , much larger than commonly found in metallic structures. Our results directly prove the coupling of spin and heat transport in high-field superconductors.

  16. Fabrication of spatial transient-density structures as high-field plasma photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, C.-H.; Huang, S.-Y.; Kuo, C.-C.; Lin, M.-W.; Wang, J.; Chen, S.-Y.; Lee, C.-H.; Lin, J.-Y.

    2005-07-15

    Fabrication of periodic transient-density structures in a gas jet with a boundary scale length approaching 10 {mu}m was demonstrated. This was achieved by passing an ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse through a patterned mask and imaging the mask onto the target plane. Gas/plasma density at the laser-irradiated regions drops as a result of hydrodynamic expansion following ionization and heating by the laser pulse. The fabrication of gas/plasma density structures with such a scheme is an essential step in the development of plasma photonic devices for applications in high-field physics.

  17. Utilization of a buffered dielectric to achieve high field-effect carrier mobility in graphene transistors.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Damon B; Chiu, Hsin-Ying; Lin, Yu-Ming; Jenkins, Keith A; Xia, Fengnian; Avouris, Phaedon

    2009-12-01

    We utilize an organic polymer buffer layer between graphene and conventional gate dielectrics in top-gated graphene transistors. Unlike other insulators, this dielectric stack does not significantly degrade carrier mobility, allowing for high field-effect mobilities to be retained in top-gate operation. This is demonstrated in both two-point and four-point analysis and in the high-frequency operation of a graphene transistor. Temperature dependence of the carrier mobility suggests that phonons are the dominant scatterers in these devices. PMID:19883119

  18. Cable testing for Fermilab's high field magnets using small racetrack coils

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bordini, B.; Bossert, R.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    As part of the High Field Magnet program at Fermilab simple magnets have been designed utilizing small racetrack coils based on a sound mechanical structure and bladder technique developed by LBNL. Two of these magnets have been built in order to test Nb{sub 3}Sn cables used in cos-theta dipole models. The powder-in-tube strand based cable exhibited excellent performance. It reached its critical current limit within 14 quenches. Modified jelly roll strand based cable performance was limited by magnetic instabilities at low fields as previously tested dipole models which used similar cable.

  19. Reduction of artifacts in T2-weighted PROPELLER in high-field preclinical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Prachi; Qi, Yi; King, Kevin F.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2010-01-01

    A simple technique is implemented for correction of artifacts arising from non-uniform T2-weighting of k-space data in FSE-based PROPELLER (Periodically Rotated Overlapping ParallEL Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction). An additional blade with no phase-encoding gradients is acquired to generate the scaling factor used for the correction. Results from simulations and phantom experiments, as well as in vivo experiments in free-breathing mice, demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method. This technique is developed specifically for high-field imaging applications where T2 decay is rapid. PMID:20928875

  20. Plasma engineering models of tandem mirror devices with high-field test-cell inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Campbell, R.B.

    1985-04-03

    Plasma physics and engineering models of tandem mirror devices operated with a high-field technology test-cell insert in the central cell, which have been incorporated recently in the TMRBAR tandem mirror reactor physics code, are described. The models include particle and energy balance in the test-cell region as well as the interactions between the test-cell particles and those flowing through the entire device. The code calculations yield consistent operating parameters for the test-cell, central cell, and end cell systems. A benchmark case for the MFTF-..cap alpha..+T configuration is presented which shows good agreement between the code results and previous calculations.

  1. Single-shot spatiotemporal measurements of high-field terahertz pulses

    SciTech Connect

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17

    The electric field profiles of broad-bandwidth coherent terahertz (THz) pulses, emitted by laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches, are studied. The near-single-cycle THz pulses are measured with two single-shot techniques in the temporal and spatial domains. Spectra of 0-6 THz and peak fields up to {approx_equal} 0.4 MV cm{sup -1} are observed. The measured field substructure demonstrates the manifestation of spatiotemporal coupling at focus, which affects the interpretation of THz radiation as a bunch diagnostic and in high-field pump-probe experiments.

  2. Ordering, nanostructure and high-field magnetization of quenched and annealed metastable ilmenite-hematite solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Karl; Thomas, Christopher I.; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Robinson, Peter; Mukai, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    The ilmenite-hematite solid solution series xFeTiO3-(1 - x)Fe2O3 can generate extremely unusual magnetic properties in natural rocks and has been investigated for more than fifty years. Both, ilmenite (FeTiO3) and hematite (Fe2O3) are antiferromagnetic, but intermediate compositions are either antiferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic, depending on their chemical order. Within a single sample, nano-scale variations in local composition x and ordering state Q depend on minute details of the cooling and annealing history, and have large effects on the magnetic properties, which include self-reversal of thermoremanent magnetization and large exchange bias. We present a systematic study of magnetic properties of samples in the composition range of 0.6 ˜ x ˜ 0.7 with differing nanostructure and consequently differing magnetic properties. Using high-field measurements up to 7 T, together with TEM images and theoretical models we classify nanostructure formation in terms of x, Q, and characteristic size d. These characteristics are then linked to the magnetic properties. The sample characterization relies on average mean-field models of Ms(T). To implement the varying Fe and Ti densities, and the distribution of Fe ions in the variably ordered solid solutions, the models either use statistical interactions between sites, whereby they effectively average over all possible configurations, or they describe specific random configurations. Statistical mean field models are successful in predicting the Curie temperatures TC and Ms(T) curves of the Ilmx solid solutions. The results depend on the interaction coefficients, which either had been determined by neutron diffraction measurements (Samuelson and Shirane, 1979), by Monte-Carlo model fits (Harrison, 2006), or by density-functional theoretic calculations (Nabi et al. 2010). Hysteresis branches have been measured for a wide variety of samples at different temperatures 40 K, 100 K and 300 K. None of them saturate at 7 T, the

  3. B0 mapping with multi-channel RF coils at high field.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Simon; Jovicich, Jorge

    2011-10-01

    Mapping the static magnetic field via the phase evolution over gradient echo scans acquired at two or more echo times is an established method. A number of possibilities exist, however, for combining phase data from multi-channel coils, denoising and thresholding field maps for high field applications. Three methods for combining phase images when no body/volume coil is available are tested: (i) Hermitian product, (ii) phase-matching over channels, and (iii) a new approach based on calculating separate field maps for each channel. The separate channel method is shown to yield field maps with higher signal-to-noise ratio than the Hermitian product and phase-matching methods and fewer unwrapping errors at low signal-to-noise ratio. Separate channel combination also allows unreliable voxels to be identified via the standard deviation over channels, which is found to be the most effective means of denoising field maps. Tests were performed using multichannel coils with between 8 and 32 channels at 3 T, 4 T, and 7 T. For application in the correction of distortions in echo-planar images, a formulation is proposed for reducing the local gradient of field maps to eliminate signal pile-up or swapping artifacts. Field maps calculated using these techniques, implemented in a freely available MATLAB toolbox, provide the basis for an effective correction for echo-planar imaging distortions at high fields. PMID:21608027

  4. The design and test of a new volume coil for high field imaging.

    PubMed

    Wen, H; Chesnick, A S; Balaban, R S

    1994-10-01

    A major problem in the development of high field (> 100 MHz) large volume (> 6000 cm3) MR coils is the interaction of the coil with the subject as well as the radiation loss to the environment. To reduce subject perturbation of the coil resonance modes, a volume coil that uses an array of freely rotating resonant elements radially mounted between two concentric cylinders was designed for operation at 170 MHz. Substantial electromagnetic energy is stored in the resonant elements outside the sample region without compromising the efficiency of the overall coil. This stored energy reduces the effect of the subject on the circuit and maintains a high Q, facilitating the tuning and matching of the coil. The unloaded Q of the coil is 680; when loaded with a head, it was 129. The ratio of 5.3 of the unloaded to loaded Q supports the notion that the efficiency of the coil was maintained in comparison with previous designs. The power requirement and signal-to-noise performance are significantly improved. The coil is tuned by a mechanism that imparts the same degree of rotation on all of the elements simultaneously, varying their degree of mutual coupling and preserving the overall coil symmetry. A thin radiofrequency shield is an integral part of the coil to reduce the radiation effect, which is a significant loss mechanism at high fields. MR images were collected at 4T using this coil design with high sensitivity and B1 homogeneity. PMID:7997115

  5. Quench problems of Nb3 Sn cosine theta high field dipole model magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Ryuji; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    We have developed and tested several cosine theta high field dipole model magnets for accelerator application, utilizing Nb{sub 3}Sn strands made by MJR method and PIT method. With Rutherford cables made with PIT strand we achieved 10.1 Tesla central field at 2.2 K operation, and 9.5 Tesla at 4.5 K operation. The magnet wound with the MJR cable prematurely quenched at 6.8 Tesla at 4.5 K due to cryo-instability. Typical quench behaviors of these magnets are described for both types of magnets, HFDA-04 of MJR and HFDA-05 of PIT. Their characteristics parameters are compared on d{sub eff}, RRR, thermal conductivity and others, together with other historical Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets. It is suggested a larger RRR value is essential for the stability of the epoxy impregnated high field magnets made with high current density strands. It is shown that a magnet with a larger RRR value has a longer MPZ value and more stable, due to its high thermal conductivity and low resistivity.

  6. Widespread inflammation in CLIPPERS syndrome indicated by autopsy and ultra-high-field 7T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Ruprecht, Klemens; Sinnecker, Tim; Kondziella, Daniel; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kerrn-Jespersen, Bjørg Morell; Lindelof, Mette; Lassmann, Hans; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Paul, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine if there is widespread inflammation in the brain of patients with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) syndrome by using histology and ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T. Methods: We performed a detailed neuropathologic examination in 4 cases, including 1 autopsy case, and studied 2 additional patients by MRI at 7.0T to examine (1) extension of inflammation to areas appearing normal on 3.0T MRI, (2) potential advantages of 7.0T MRI compared to 3.0T MRI in reflecting widespread inflammation, perivascular pathology, and axonal damage, and (3) the possibility of lymphoma. Results: In the autopsy case, perivascular inflammation dominated by CD4+ T cells was not only detected in the brainstem and cerebellum but also in brain areas with normal appearance on 3.0T MRI, including supratentorial regions and cranial nerve roots. There was no evidence of lymphoma in any of the 4 patients. The 7.0T MRI in clinical remission also revealed supratentorial lesions and perivascular pathology in vivo with contrast-enhancing lesions centered around a small venous vessel. Ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T disclosed prominent T1 hypointensities in the brainstem, which were not seen on 3.0T MRI. This corresponded to neuropathologic detection of axonal injury in the autopsy case. Conclusion: Our findings suggest more widespread perivascular inflammation and postinflammatory axonal injury in patients with CLIPPERS. PMID:27144217

  7. High-field NMR spectroscopy of the iron based superconductor LiFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehne, Hannes; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.; Hoch, M. J. R.; Yuan, S.; Grafe, H.-J.; Aswartham, S.; Wurmehl, S.; Buechner, B.

    2013-03-01

    The stoichiometric compound LiFeAs is unique among the iron based superconductors. It exhibits superconductivity below 18 K without the usually necessary introduction of chemical doping. From a number of macroscopic experiments, upper critical fields of 26 T or higher for a magnetic field orientation parallel to the FeAs planes were reported. But, until now, no local probe techniques were applied for the characterization of the microscopic electronic properties in this high-field parameter regime. On our poster, we present the results of recently performed high-field (up to 30 T) NMR experiments on three high quality LiFeAs single crystals, suggesting an upper critical field much lower than 26 T. We discuss the implications of the observed, field-induced suppression of the superconducting gap in this compound and its manifestation in the temperature dependent Knight shift, nuclear spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rates for fields and temperatures in the normal and superconducting state.

  8. High field and 2D-nmr studies with the aporphine alkaloid glaucine.

    PubMed

    Kerr, K M; Kook, A M; Davis, P J

    1986-01-01

    The aporphine alkaloid glaucine (1) was examined by comparison of the high field (600 MHz) 1H-nmr spectra of 1 vs. racemic 6a,7,7-trideutereoglaucine (4,5), by computer-simulated 1H-nmr spectra at 600 MHz, by using decoupled proton spectra, and two-dimensional COSY and HETCOR experiments with 1 at 500 and 360 MHz, respectively, and using high field (90 MHZ) 13C-nmr of S-(+)-glaucine (1). Emphasis was placed on the resolution of the chemical shifts and coupling constants for the H-4 alpha, H-4 beta, H-5 alpha, H-5 beta, H-6 alpha, H-7 alpha, and H-7 beta alicyclic protons of the molecule, which were previously unassigned. The complete assignment of the alicyclic protons of 1 by 1H-nmr was required for the structural elucidation of deuterated analogs of glaucine, which will be used in microbial transformation studies to determine the stereochemical course of aporphine dehydrogenation by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030). PMID:3783155

  9. Anesthesia during high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging experience with 80 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher; Wendel, Georg; Wienerl, Juergen; Ganslandt, Oliver; Jacobi, Klaus; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Schüttler, Juergen

    2003-07-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used for years to update neuronavigation and for intraoperative resection control. For this purpose, low-field (0.1-0.2 T) MR scanners have been installed in the operating room, which, in contrast to machines using higher magnetic field strength, allowed the use of standard anesthetic and surgical equipment. However, these low-field MR systems provided only minor image quality and a limited battery of MR sequences, excluding functional MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, or MR angiography and spectroscopy. Based on these advantages, a concept using high-field MRI (1.5 T) with intraoperative functional neuronavigational guidance has been developed that required adaptation of the anesthetic regimen to working in the close vicinity to the strong magnetic field. In this paper the authors present their experience with the first 80 consecutive patients who received anesthesia in a specially designed radio frequency-shielded operating room equipped with a high-field (1.5 T) MR scanner. We describe the MR-compatible anesthesia equipment used including ventilator, monitoring, and syringe pumps, which allow standard neuroanesthesia in this new and challenging environment. This equipment provides the use of total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil allowing rapid extubation and neurologic examination following surgery. In addition, extended intraoperative monitoring including EEG monitoring required for intracranial surgery is possible. Moreover, problems and dangers related to the effects of the strong magnetic field are discussed. PMID:12826974

  10. High field 207Pb spin-lattice relaxation in solid lead nitrate and lead molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Peter J.; Maher, Christopher A.; Vold, Robert L.; Hoatson, Gina L.

    2008-02-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation rates of lead have been measured at 17.6T (156.9MHz) as a function of temperature in polycrystalline lead nitrate and lead molybdate. Comparing the results with relaxation rates measured at lower fields, it is found that at high fields and low temperature, chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) makes small but observable contributions to lead relaxation in both materials. At 17.6T and 200K, CSA accounts for about 15% of the observed relaxation rate. Above 300K, the dominant relaxation mechanism even at 17.6T is an indirect Raman process involving modulation of the Pb207 spin-rotation tensor, as first proposed by Grutzner et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 7094 (2001)] and later treated theoretically in more detail by Vega et al. [Phys. Rev. B 74, 214420 (2006)]. The improved signal to noise ratio at high fields makes it possible to quantify relaxation time anisotropy by analyzing saturation-recovery functions for individual frequencies on the powder pattern line shape. No orientation dependence is found for the spin-lattice relaxation rate of either material. It is argued from examination of the appropriate theoretical expressions, derived here for the first time, that the lack of observable relaxation time anisotropy is probably a general feature of this indirect Raman mechanism.

  11. Initial experience of using high field strength intraoperative MRI for neurosurgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Raheja, Amol; Tandon, Vivek; Suri, Ashish; Sarat Chandra, P; Kale, Shashank S; Garg, Ajay; Pandey, Ravindra M; Kalaivani, Mani; Mahapatra, Ashok K; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2015-08-01

    We report our initial experience to optimize neurosurgical procedures using high field strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (IOMRI) in 300 consecutive patients as high field strength IOMRI rapidly becomes the standard of care for neurosurgical procedures. Three sequential groups (groups A, B, C; n=100 each) were compared with respect to time management, complications and technical difficulties to assess improvement in these parameters with experience. We observed a reduction in the number of technical difficulties (p<0.001), time to induction (p<0.001) and total anesthesia time (p=0.007) in sequential groups. IOMRI was performed for neuronavigation guidance (n=252) and intraoperative validation of extent of resection (EOR; n=67). Performing IOMRI increased the EOR over and beyond the primary surgical attempt in 20.5% (29/141) and 18% (11/61) of patients undergoing glioma and pituitary surgery, respectively. Overall, EOR improved in 59.7% of patients undergoing IOMRI (40/67). Intraoperative tractography and real time navigation using re-uploaded IOMRI images (accounting for brain shift) helps in intraoperative planning to reduce complications. IOMRI is an asset to neurosurgeons, helping to augment the EOR, especially in glioma and pituitary surgery, with no significant increase in morbidity to the patient. PMID:26077939

  12. ADX: a high field, high power density, Advanced Divertor test eXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; ADX Team

    2014-10-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment (ADX) - a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research program on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. This high field (6.5 tesla, 1.5 MA), high power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) facility would utilize Alcator magnet technology to test innovative divertor concepts for next-step DT fusion devices (FNSF, DEMO) at reactor-level boundary plasma pressures and parallel heat flux densities while producing high performance core plasma conditions. The experimental platform would also test advanced lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) actuators and wave physics at the plasma densities and magnetic field strengths of a DEMO, with the unique ability to deploy launcher structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-field side - a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and wave physics is most favorable for efficient current drive, heating and flow drive. This innovative experiment would perform plasma science and technology R&D necessary to inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of FNSF/DEMO - in a timely manner, on a cost-effective research platform. Supported by DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  13. The conceptual design of a robust, compact, modular tokamak reactor based on high-field superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, D. G.; Bonoli, P.; Barnard, H.; Haakonsen, C.; Hartwig, Z.; Kasten, C.; Palmer, T.; Sung, C.; Sutherland, D.; Bromberg, L.; Mangiarotti, F.; Goh, J.; Sorbom, B.; Sierchio, J.; Ball, J.; Greenwald, M.; Olynyk, G.; Minervini, J.

    2012-10-01

    Two of the greatest challenges to tokamak reactors are 1) large single-unit cost of each reactor's construction and 2) their susceptibility to disruptions from operation at or above operational limits. We present an attractive tokamak reactor design that substantially lessens these issues by exploiting recent advancements in superconductor (SC) tapes allowing peak field on SC coil > 20 Tesla. A R˜3.3 m, B˜9.2 T, ˜ 500 MW fusion power tokamak provides high fusion gain while avoiding all disruptive operating boundaries (no-wall beta, kink, and density limits). Robust steady-state core scenarios are obtained by exploiting the synergy of high field, compact size and ideal efficiency current drive using high-field side launch of Lower Hybrid waves. The design features a completely modular replacement of internal solid components enabled by the demountability of the coils/tapes and the use of an immersion liquid blanket. This modularity opens up the possibility of using the device as a nuclear component test facility.

  14. High field volume coil with unbalance current distribution for MRI applications of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrufo, O. R.; Hernández, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2010-12-01

    The development of transceiver volume coils for high field MRI is still a very dynamic field of investigation and development Temnikov has been recently proposed a new volume coil design, similar to the to the gradiometer coil. It is also claimed that it is possible to individually tune it with a single chip capacitor. This motivated the development of a coil prototype based on this idea for whole-body MRI of rodents at 7 Tesla. Electromagnetic simulations of the RF field generated by this coil design were previously performed to study its properties. Electromagnetic simulations were also conducted for a standard birdcage coil with similar dimensions for fare comparison. In all numerical simulations, an unbalanced currents distribution was assumed by applying half the current intensity to designated legs. This coil design operated in the transceiver mode and was linear-driven. The coil size was manufactured to accommodate small rodents. Numerical simulations showed a field uniformity improvement of our coil over the standard birdcage coil. A popular birdcage coil was also constructed to compare their performances. Phantom and rat images were acquired for both volume coils to prove the viability of this coil design for high field MRI applications and standard spin echo pulse sequences Thus, these preliminary results make this coil design a good candidate for MRI and MRS applications of high magnetic fields.

  15. Evaluation of the dielectric constant for RF shimming at high field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayatilake, Mohan; Storrs, Judd; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2010-10-01

    Optimal image quality for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at high fields requires a homogeneous RF (B1) field; however, the dielectric properties of the human brain result in B1 field inhomogeneities and signal loss at the periphery of the head. These result from constructive and destructive RF interactions of complex wave behaviour, which become worse with increasing magnetic field strength. Placement of a shim object with high-dielectric constant adjacent to the body has been proposed as a method for reducing B1 inhomogeneity by altering wave propagation within the volume of interest. Selecting the appropriate permittivity and quantity of material for the shim is essential. Whereas previous work has determined the dielectric properties of the shim empirically, this work introduces an improved theoretical framework for determining the requisite dielectric constant of the passive shim material directly by increasing the axial or minimizing the radial propagation constant.

  16. High field paramagnetic Meissner effect in Mo100-xRex alloy superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Shyam; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Roy, S. B.

    2015-07-01

    We have performed an experimental study on the temperature and field dependence of magnetization of a series of superconducting Mo100-xRex alloys. Our studies reveal the presence of high field paramagnetic effect (HFPME) in these low temperature superconductors. The results of our studies indicate that the HFPME in the Mo100-xRex alloys is related to the inhomogeneous distribution of strong and weak flux-line pinning centres, and the flux-compression resulting due to the same while cooling down the samples in the presence of high magnetic fields. The results are complemented by the studies on the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity and heat capacity of these alloys in different constant magnetic fields. We compare our findings with the studies reported in literature on both low TC and high TC superconductors.

  17. High field terahertz emission from relativistic laser-driven plasma wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2015-10-15

    We propose a method to generate high field terahertz (THz) radiation with peak strength of GV/cm level in the THz frequency gap range of 1–10 THz using a relativistic laser interaction with a gaseous plasma target. Due to the effect of local pump depletion, an initially Gaussian laser pulse undergoes leading edge erosion and eventually evolves to a state with leading edge being step function. Interacting with such a pulse, electrons gain transverse residual momentum and excite net transverse currents modulated by the relativistic plasma frequency. These currents give rise to the low frequency THz emission. We demonstrate this process with one and two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  18. A COMMON COIL DESIGN FOR HIGH FIELD 2 IN 1 ACCELERATOR MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.

    2002-05-12

    A common coil design concept for 2-in-1 superconducting accelerator magnets is presented. It practically eliminates the major problems in the ends of high field magnets built with either high temperature superconductors (HTS) or conventional superconductors. Racetrack coils, consisting of rectangular blocks built with either superconducting tapes or cables, are common to both apertures with each aperture containing one half of each coil. The ends are easy to wind with the conductors experiencing little strain. The overall magnet design, construction and tooling are also expected to be simpler than in the conventional cosine theta magnets. The concept is also suitable for superferric and combined function magnet designs. A modular design for an HTS based R&D magnet is also presented.

  19. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  20. An atomistic description of the high-field degradation of dielectric polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Bealing, Clive R.; Ramprasad, R.

    2013-11-07

    A microscopic mechanism governing the initiating step in the high-field aging of crystalline polyethylene is proposed, based on density functional calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is assumed that electrons, holes, and excitons are present in the system. While the additional individual electrons or holes are not expected to lead to significant degradation, the presence of triplet excitons are concluded to be rather damaging. The electron and hole states of the exciton localize on a distorted region of polyethylene, significantly weakening nearby C–H bonds and facilitating C–H bond scission. The barrier to cleavage of the weakened C–H bonds is estimated and is comparable to the thermal energy, suggesting that this mechanism may be responsible for the degradation of polyethylene when placed under electrical stress, e.g., in high-voltage cables.

  1. On the nature of high field charge transport in reinforced silicone dielectrics: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanhui; Schadler, Linda S.

    2016-08-01

    The high field charge injection and transport properties in reinforced silicone dielectrics were investigated by measuring the time-dependent space charge distribution and the current under dc conditions up to the breakdown field and were compared with the properties of other dielectric polymers. It is argued that the energy and spatial distribution of localized electronic states are crucial in determining these properties for polymer dielectrics. Tunneling to localized states likely dominates the charge injection process. A transient transport regime arises due to the relaxation of charge carriers into deep traps at the energy band tails and is successfully verified by a Monte Carlo simulation using the multiple-hopping model. The charge carrier mobility is found to be highly heterogeneous due to the non-uniform trapping. The slow moving electron packet exhibits a negative field dependent drift velocity possibly due to the spatial disorder of traps.

  2. Scaling of high-field transport and localized heating in graphene transistors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Myung-Ho; Islam, Sharnali; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric

    2011-10-25

    We use infrared thermal imaging and electrothermal simulations to find that localized Joule heating in graphene field-effect transistors on SiO(2) is primarily governed by device electrostatics. Hot spots become more localized (i.e., sharper) as the underlying oxide thickness is reduced, such that the average and peak device temperatures scale differently, with significant long-term reliability implications. The average temperature is proportional to oxide thickness, but the peak temperature is minimized at an oxide thickness of ∼90 nm due to competing electrostatic and thermal effects. We also find that careful comparison of high-field transport models with thermal imaging can be used to shed light on velocity saturation effects. The results shed light on optimizing heat dissipation and reliability of graphene devices and interconnects. PMID:21913673

  3. New high homogeneity 55T pulsed magnet for high field NMR.

    PubMed

    Orlova, A; Frings, P; Suleiman, M; Rikken, G L J A

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed magnets can produce magnetic fields largely exceeding those achieved with resistive or even hybrid magnets. This kind of magnet is indispensable in studies of field-induced phenomena which occur only in high magnetic field. A new high homogeneous pulsed magnet capable of producing field up to 55T and specially designed for NMR experiments was built and tested. Experimentally observed homogeneity of magnetic field in central part of the magnet is 10ppm over a sample volume of 2-3mm(3) at 12T and 30ppm at 47T, which are the best values ever reported for a pulsed magnet. Reasons which affect the field profile and reduce homogeneity at high field are discussed. PMID:27179456

  4. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Janna L.; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging. PMID:24559659

  5. Research activities on high-intensity laser and high field physics at APRI-GIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Tae Moon

    2015-05-01

    The performance of a 0.1-Hz-repetition-rate, 30-fs, 1.5-PW Ti:sapphire laser which is using for research on high field physics in APRI-GIST is presented. The charged particles (electrons and protons) are accelerated and an efficient x-ray generation is demonstrated using the PW laser. Protons are accelerated up to 80 MeV when an ultra-thin polymer target is irradiated by a circularly-polarized PW laser pulse. Electrons are accelerated to multi-GeV level with a help of injector and accelerator scheme. In the relativistic harmonic generation experiment, the harmonic order is dramatically extended, by optimizing the intensity of pre-pulse level, up to 164th that corresponds to 4.9 nm in wavelength and the experimental results can be explained by the oscillatory flying mirror model. The upgrade of the PW laser to the multi-PW level is under way.

  6. An atomistic description of the high-field degradation of dielectric polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bealing, Clive R.; Ramprasad, R.

    2013-11-01

    A microscopic mechanism governing the initiating step in the high-field aging of crystalline polyethylene is proposed, based on density functional calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is assumed that electrons, holes, and excitons are present in the system. While the additional individual electrons or holes are not expected to lead to significant degradation, the presence of triplet excitons are concluded to be rather damaging. The electron and hole states of the exciton localize on a distorted region of polyethylene, significantly weakening nearby C-H bonds and facilitating C-H bond scission. The barrier to cleavage of the weakened C-H bonds is estimated and is comparable to the thermal energy, suggesting that this mechanism may be responsible for the degradation of polyethylene when placed under electrical stress, e.g., in high-voltage cables.

  7. Enhanced high field terahertz emission from plasma wakefields via pulse sharpening by a foil shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi-Yu

    2016-06-01

    A dual-stage scheme is proposed to generate terahertz (THz) pulses with an extremely high field strength that is in the GV/cm regime from laser-driven plasma wakefields. A thin foil target is employed to act as an optical shutter to sharpen the laser pulse front based on the mechanism of relativistic transparency. The shaped laser pulse then interacts with gaseous density plasmas to generate THz pulses via excitation of net residual transverse currents. Compared to the case of without the foil shutter, THz field strength can be notably enhanced by one order of magnitude. The scheme is numerically demonstrated through one and two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  8. Light weight, high field, stable, superconducting magnets for advanced transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lubell, M.S.; Dresner, L.; Kenney, W.J.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Although the Guideway may be the most expensive component of a MAGLEV system, the importance of a suitable magnet system should not be underestimated. The reliability of operation of MAGLEV depends on the superconducting magnets performing to their specifications in a reliable manner (i.e., without training or quenching). Besides reliability the magnets should produce high field, be sufficiently stable to withstand reasonable perturbations, be light weight, be protected in the event of a quench, and be economical (although performance should outweigh cost). We propose to develop superconducting magnets that have these features. Our magnet designs are based on internally cooled, cable-in-conduit superconductor with Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC) as the structural reinforcement. Although the initial work is with metallic superconductors such as NbTi, the processes being developed will be applicable to the High Temperature Ceramic Superconductors when they become suitable for magnet applications.

  9. Process for the chemical preparation of high-field ZnO varistors

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, Robert A.; Dosch, Robert G.; Tuttle, Bruce A.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical preparation techniques involving co-precipitation of metals are used to provide micro-structural characteristics necessary in order to produce ZnO varistors and their precursors for high field applications. The varistors produced have homogeneous and/or uniform dopant distributions and a submicron average grain size with a narrow size distribution. Precursor powders are prepared via chemical precipitation techniques and varistors made by sintering uniaxially and/or isostatically pressed pellets. Using these methods, varistors were made which were suitable for high-power applications, having values of breakdown field, E.sub.B, in the 10-100 kV/cm range, .alpha.>30 and densities in the range of 65-99% of theoretical, depending on both composition and sintering temperature.

  10. A process for the chemical preparation of high-field ZnO varistors

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, R.A.; Dosch, R.G.; Tuttle, B.A.

    1986-02-19

    Chemical preparation techniques involving co-precipitation of metals are used to provide microstructural characteristics necessary in order to produce ZnO varistors and their precursors for high field applications. The varistors produced have homogeneous and/or uniform dopant distributions and a submicron average grain size with a narrow size distribution. Precursor powders are prepared via chemical precipitation techniques and varistors made by sintering uniaxially and/or isostatically pressed pellets. Using these methods, varistors were made which were suitable for high-power applications, having values of breakdown field, E/sub B/, in the 10 to 100 kV/cm range, ..cap alpha.. > 30 and densities in the range of 65 to 99% of theoretical, depending on both composition and sintering temperature.

  11. New high homogeneity 55 T pulsed magnet for high field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, A.; Frings, P.; Suleiman, M.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed magnets can produce magnetic fields largely exceeding those achieved with resistive or even hybrid magnets. This kind of magnet is indispensable in studies of field-induced phenomena which occur only in high magnetic field. A new high homogeneous pulsed magnet capable of producing field up to 55 T and specially designed for NMR experiments was built and tested. Experimentally observed homogeneity of magnetic field in central part of the magnet is 10 ppm over a sample volume of 2-3 mm3 at 12 T and 30 ppm at 47 T, which are the best values ever reported for a pulsed magnet. Reasons which affect the field profile and reduce homogeneity at high field are discussed.

  12. Development of superconducting magnet for high-field MR systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zanming; van Oort, Johannes M.; Zou, Mark X.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we describe the development of superconducting magnets for high-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) by various businesses and institutions in China. As the Chinese MR market rapidly expands, many foreign and domestic companies and research institutions are joining the race to meet the burgeoning demand by developing key MRI components for various magnetic field configurations. After providing a brief introduction to research on MRI superconducting magnets that dates back to the 1980s, the first large-bore 1.5 T superconducting magnet with 50-cm DSV for whole-body MRI - successfully developed and manufactured by AllTech Medical Systems in Chengdu, China-is presented and its specifications are described.

  13. Characterization of Plasma Discharges in a High-Field Magnetic Tandem Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1998-01-01

    High density magnetized plasma discharges in open-ended geometries, like Tandem Mirrors, have a variety of space applications. Chief among them is the production of variable Specific Impulse (I(sub sp)) and variable thrust in a magnetic nozzle. Our research group is pursuing the experimental characterization of such discharges in our high-field facility located at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL). These studies focus on identifying plasma stability criteria as functions of density, temperature and magnetic field strength. Plasma heating is accomplished by both Electron and Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ECR and ICR) at frequencies of 2-3 Ghz and 1-30 Mhz respectively, for both Hydrogen and Helium. Electron density and temperature has measured by movable Langmuir probes. Macroscopic plasma stability is being investigated in ongoing research.

  14. Local magnetometry at high fields and low temperatures using InAs Hall sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugel, E.; Shung, E.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Watkins, S. P.

    1997-10-01

    We characterize the temperature (0.3⩽T⩽300 K), magnetic field (0⩽H⩽80 kOe), and thickness (0.1, 0.5, and 2.5 μm) dependence of the Hall response of high purity InAs epilayers grown using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The high sensitivity, linearity, and temperature independence of the response make them attractive for local Hall probe magnetometry, and uniquely qualified for high field applications below liquid helium temperatures. As a stringent test of performance, we use a six element micron-sized array to monitor the internal field gradient during vortex avalanches at milliKelvin temperatures in a single crystal of YBa2Cu3O7-δ.

  15. A high-field (30 Tesla) pulsed magnet instrument for single-crystal scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Zahirul; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Narumi, Yasuo; Lang, Jonathan

    2010-03-01

    Pulsed magnets have emerged as a viable approach at synchrotron x-ray facilities for studying materials in high magnetic fields. We are developing a new high-field (30 Tesla) pulsed magnet system for single-crystal x-ray diffraction studies. It consists of a single 18mm-bore solenoid, designed and built at Tohoku University using high-tensile-strength and high conductivity CuAg wires. A dual-cryostat scheme has been developed at Advanced Photon Source in order to cool the coil using liquid nitrogen and the sample using a closed-cycle cryostat independently. Liquid nitrogen cooling allows repetition rate of a few minutes for peak fields near 30 Tesla. This scheme is unique in that it allows the applied magnetic field to be parallel to the scattering plane. Time-resolved scattering data are typically collected using a fast one-dimensional strip detector. Opportunities and challenges for experiments and instrumentation will be discussed.

  16. Image homogenization using pre-emphasis method for high field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Wang, Chunsheng; Yu, Baiying; Vigneron, Daniel; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) field (B1) inhomogeneity due to shortened wavelength at high field is a major cause of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nonuniformity in high dielectric biological samples (e.g., human body). In this work, we propose a method to improve the B1 and MRI homogeneity by using pre-emphasized non-uniform B1 distribution. The intrinsic B1 distribution that could be generated by a RF volume coil, specifically a microstrip transmission line (MTL) coil used in this work, was pre-emphasized in the sample’s periphery region of interest to compensate for the central brightness induced by high frequency interference effect due to shortened wave length. This pre-emphasized non-uniform B1 can be realized by varying the parameters of microstrip elements, such as the substrate thickness of MTL volume coil. Both numerical simulation and phantom MR imaging studies were carried out to investigate the feasibility and merit of the proposed method in achieving homogeneous MR images. The simulation results demonstrate that by using a pre-emphasized B1 distribution generated by the MTL volume coil, relatively uniform B1 distribution and homogeneous MR image (98% homogeneity) within the spherical phantom (15 cm diameter) were achieved with 4.5 mm thickness. The B1 and MRI intensity distributions of a 16-element MTL volume coil with fixed substrate thickness and five varied saline loads were modeled and experimentally tested. Similar results from both simulation and experiments were obtained, suggesting substantial improvements of B1 and MRI homogeneities within the phantom containing 125 mM saline. The overall results demonstrate an efficient B1 shimming approach for improving high field MRI. PMID:24040618

  17. INTERCOMPARISON OF PERFORMANCE OF RF COIL GEOMETRIES FOR HIGH FIELD MOUSE CARDIAC MRI

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Angeli, S.; Gkagkarellis, S.; Cofer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-turn spiral surface coils are constructed in flat and cylindrical arrangements and used for high field (7.1 T) mouse cardiac MRI. Their electrical and imaging performances, based on experimental measurements, simulations, and MRI experiments in free space, and under phantom, and animal loading conditions, are compared with a commercially available birdcage coil. Results show that the four-turn cylindrical spiral coil exhibits improved relative SNR (rSNR) performance to the flat coil counterpart, and compares fairly well with a commercially available birdcage coil. Phantom experiments indicate a 50% improvement in the SNR for penetration depths ≤ 6.1 mm from the coil surface compared to the birdcage coil, and an increased penetration depth at the half-maximum field response of 8 mm in the 4-spiral cylindrical coil case, in contrast to 2.9 mm in the flat 4-turn spiral case. Quantitative comparison of the performance of the two spiral coil geometries in anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal regions of the murine heart yield maximum mean percentage rSNR increases of the order of 27–167% in vivo post-mortem (cylindrical compared to flat coil). The commercially available birdcage outperforms the cylindrical spiral coil in rSNR by a factor of 3–5 times. The comprehensive approach and methodology adopted to accurately design, simulate, implement, and test radiofrequency coils of any geometry and type, under any loading conditions, can be generalized for any application of high field mouse cardiac MRI. PMID:23204945

  18. Magnetic properties of natural and synthetic olivines: high-field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferre, E. C.; Martin-Hernandez, F.

    2004-12-01

    Olivine [(Fex, Mg1-x)2 SiO4] is an orthosilicate solid solution between fayalite [Fe2 SiO4] and forsterite [Mg2 SiO4]. Olivine is a major constituent of the Earth mantle that is abundant in oceanic and continental peridotites and mantle xenoliths. The magnetic properties of olivines have been previously investigated using gem quality natural crystals known as peridots (Zabargad) or using laboratory grown synthetic crystals. Magnetic investigations are generally performed using low magnetic field or neutron diffraction techniques. Optical microscopy and TEM imagery reveal that most olivine crystals host iron oxides formed by exsolution during cooling. Theoretically, the magnetic susceptibility of olivine should decrease linearly from fayalite to fayalite as a function of the Fe content. The magnetic behavior should range from antiferromagnetic at high Fe content, paramagnetic at intermediate Fe contents and diamagnetic at very low Fe contents. New magnetic measurements, performed on various high field instruments (vibrating sample magnetometer, torque magnetometer, cantilever magnetometer), both on natural and synthetic samples, display ferromagnetic behavior, interpreted as due to the systematic presence of titanomagnetite inclusions in olivine crystals. These results emphasize the need to conduct measurements in high field in order to isolate the intrinsic paramagnetic properties of olivines. These measurements demonstrate the orthorhombic nature of the intrinsic paramagnetic properties, but also yield new data concerning the relationship between crystallographic axes, magnetic anisotropy and other physical anisotropies: [100] = K1, [010] = K2 and [001] = K3. Preliminary results also indicate substantial variations in degree of paramagnetic anisotropy (P) and paramagnetic shape factor (T). For Fo92, P = 1.359 and T = -0.845. These intrinsic paramagnetic properties are used to model the magnetic behavior of olivine across a range of temperatures relevant to

  19. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Truong, Milton L; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium 'hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of (1)H and (13)C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7T and 0.0475T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters. PMID:24239701

  20. Ultrawide band multifrequency high-field EMR technique: A methodology for increasing spectroscopic information.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A K; Pardi, L A; Krzystek, J; Sienkiewicz, A; Goy, P; Rohrer, M; Brunel, L C

    2000-02-01

    We report methodology that combines an ultrawide band multifrequency microwave system with technology of high magnetic fields for solving challenging problems in electron magnetic resonance (EMR) spectroscopy. This strategy has been made possible due to a novel EMR facility operating in an exceptionally wide range of microwave frequencies of 24 GHz to 3 THz, at magnetic fields up to 17 T, and in the temperature range of 1.6 to 330 K. The basic configuration of the multifrequency system works in a transmission mode and employs oversized cylindrical waveguides for routing the microwave power. A wide-band, low-noise, liquid helium cooled (4.2 K) InSb bolometer is used for signal detection. This approach results in an extremely wide-band performance, thus making it possible to employ a variety of solid-state millimeter and submillimeter microwave sources in combination with a far infrared laser microwave source for performing multifrequency EMR experiments. A complexity of resonant structures and related technical problems such as microphonics at high magnetic fields is virtually eliminated. The system is simple, yet sensitive, and has been revealed to be extremely advantageous while solving such problems as observation of AFMR transitions in spin-ordered systems, g-factor resolution enhancement in complex organic radicals, and resonance signal detection in EMR-silent spin systems having integer spin and large zero field splitting. A technical description of the multifrequency high-field EMR facility is presented and results of its performance tests are given. The potential utility of using the multifrequency high-field methodology in EMR studies is illustrated with selected examples of its recent applications. PMID:10648147

  1. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  2. Development and manufacture of a Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor for the high-field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.M.; Cornish, D.N.; Spencer, C.R.; Gregory, E.; Adam, E.

    1981-10-20

    The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) project has two primary goals. The first is to establish manufacturing capability for a Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor suitable for use in a mirror fusion coil. The second is to provide a test facility for evaluating other fusion conductor designs at high fields. This paper describes some of the problems encountered and the solutions devised in working toward the first goal. Construction of the test facility coils will be described in a subsequent paper.

  3. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI at ultra-high field: artifact prevention and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Jorge, João; Grouiller, Frédéric; Ipek, Özlem; Stoermer, Robert; Michel, Christoph M; Figueiredo, Patrícia; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Gruetter, Rolf

    2015-01-15

    The simultaneous recording of scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can provide unique insights into the dynamics of human brain function, and the increased functional sensitivity offered by ultra-high field fMRI opens exciting perspectives for the future of this multimodal approach. However, simultaneous recordings are susceptible to various types of artifacts, many of which scale with magnetic field strength and can seriously compromise both EEG and fMRI data quality in recordings above 3T. The aim of the present study was to implement and characterize an optimized setup for simultaneous EEG-fMRI in humans at 7 T. The effects of EEG cable length and geometry for signal transmission between the cap and amplifiers were assessed in a phantom model, with specific attention to noise contributions from the MR scanner coldheads. Cable shortening (down to 12 cm from cap to amplifiers) and bundling effectively reduced environment noise by up to 84% in average power and 91% in inter-channel power variability. Subject safety was assessed and confirmed via numerical simulations of RF power distribution and temperature measurements on a phantom model, building on the limited existing literature at ultra-high field. MRI data degradation effects due to the EEG system were characterized via B0 and B1(+) field mapping on a human volunteer, demonstrating important, although not prohibitive, B1 disruption effects. With the optimized setup, simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions were performed on 5 healthy volunteers undergoing two visual paradigms: an eyes-open/eyes-closed task, and a visual evoked potential (VEP) paradigm using reversing-checkerboard stimulation. EEG data exhibited clear occipital alpha modulation and average VEPs, respectively, with concomitant BOLD signal changes. On a single-trial level, alpha power variations could be observed with relative confidence on all trials; VEP detection was more limited, although

  4. Image-Guided Radio-Frequency Gain Calibration for High-Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Elodie; McGorty, KellyAnne; Wiggins, Graham C.; Axel, Leon; Kim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    High-field (≥ 3T) MRI provides a means to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, due to its higher tissue magnetization compared with 1.5T. However, both the static magnetic field (B0) and the transmit radio-frequency (RF) field (B1+) inhomogeneities are comparatively higher than those at 1.5T. These challenging factors at high-field strengths make it more difficult to accurately calibrate the transmit RF gain using standard RF calibration procedures. An image-based RF calibration procedure was therefore developed, in order to accurately calibrate the transmit RF gain within a specific region-of-interest (ROI). Using a single-shot ultra-fast gradient echo pulse sequence with centric k-space reordering, a series of “saturation-no-recovery” images was acquired by varying the flip angle of the preconditioning pulse. In the resulting images, the signal null occurs in regions where the flip angle of the preconditioning pulse is 90°. For a given ROI, the mean signal can be plotted as a function of the nominal flip angle, and the resulting curve can be used to quantitatively identify the signal null. This image-guided RF calibration procedure was evaluated through phantom and volunteer imaging experiments at 3T and 7T. The image-guided RF calibration results in vitro were consistent with standard B0 and B1+ maps. The standard automated RF calibration procedure produced approximately 20% and 15–30% relative error in the transmit RF gain in the left kidney at 3T and brain at 7T, respectively. For initial application, a T2 mapping pulse sequence was applied at 7T. The T2 measurements in the thalamus at 7T were 60.6 ms and 48.2 ms using the standard and image-guided RF calibration procedures, respectively. This rapid, image-guided RF calibration procedure can be used to optimally calibrate the flip angle for a given ROI and thus minimize measurement errors for quantitative MRI and MR spectroscopy. PMID:20014333

  5. Polarizing agents and mechanisms for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization of frozen dielectric solids.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan-Nian

    2011-09-01

    This article provides an overview of polarizing mechanisms involved in high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of frozen biological samples at temperatures maintained using liquid nitrogen, compatible with contemporary magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Typical DNP experiments require unpaired electrons that are usually exogenous in samples via paramagnetic doping with polarizing agents. Thus, the resulting nuclear polarization mechanism depends on the electron and nuclear spin interactions induced by the paramagnetic species. The Overhauser Effect (OE) DNP, which relies on time-dependent spin-spin interactions, is excluded from our discussion due the lack of conducting electrons in frozen aqueous solutions containing biological entities. DNP of particular interest to us relies primarily on time-independent, spin-spin interactions for significant electron-nucleus polarization transfer through mechanisms such as the Solid Effect (SE), the Cross Effect (CE) or Thermal Mixing (TM), involving one, two or multiple electron spins, respectively. Derived from monomeric radicals initially used in high-field DNP experiments, bi- or multiple-radical polarizing agents facilitate CE/TM to generate significant NMR signal enhancements in dielectric solids at low temperatures (<100 K). For example, large DNP enhancements (∼300 times at 5 T) from a biologically compatible biradical, 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL), have enabled high-resolution MAS NMR in sample systems existing in submicron domains or embedded in larger biomolecular complexes. The scope of this review is focused on recently developed DNP polarizing agents for high-field applications and leads up to future developments per the CE DNP mechanism. Because DNP experiments are feasible with a solid-state microwave source when performed at <20K, nuclear polarization using lower microwave power (<100 mW) is possible by forcing a high proportion of biradicals to

  6. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  7. Two high-field thermodynamically stable conductivity states in photoconductive CdS, one n-type and one p-type

    SciTech Connect

    Böer, Karl W.

    2015-08-28

    Photoconductive CdS is known to be n-type and develops high-field domains in the range of negative differential conductivities. These domains have been extensively discussed, and when remaining attached to the electrodes have been renamed Böer domains (a broader definition suggested earlier is misleading) [K. Thiessen, Phys. Status Solidi B 248, 2775 (2011)]. They are occurring at high applied voltage in a range at which the current becomes highly non-ohmic that is conventionally described as N-shaped when the conductance decreases with increasing bias or as S-shaped when the current starts to increase again. In this paper only such cases will be discussed in which the current stays below significant Joule heating (no current channel formation), and only for stationary electrode-attached high-field domains. These are the cathode-attached domains that are maintained by field-quenching and are thermodynamically stable. Their finding is summarized in the first segment of this paper. When the applied voltage is increased, an anode-attached hyper-high-field domain develops that is stabilized by a hole blocking anode and will be analyzed in more detail below. It will be shown that they are a thermodynamically stable p-type photoconductive state of CdS. These two new states can be used to determine the carrier densities and mobilities as function of the field and the effective work function in dependence of the spectral distribution of the optical excitation. In a thin slab adjacent to a blocking cathode, the quasi-Fermi levels are spread to a precise amount and are kept there in the entire high-field region. This opens the opportunity to analyze with small modulation of the excitation the trap transition coefficients near these quasi-Fermi levels separately, without broadening interference from other signals. This has already resulted in the discovery of an unusually sharp electron quenching level when the CdS was in a p-type state with an anode adjacent domain. It is

  8. Two high-field thermodynamically stable conductivity states in photoconductive CdS, one n-type and one p-type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böer, Karl W.

    2015-08-01

    Photoconductive CdS is known to be n-type and develops high-field domains in the range of negative differential conductivities. These domains have been extensively discussed, and when remaining attached to the electrodes have been renamed Böer domains (a broader definition suggested earlier is misleading) [K. Thiessen, Phys. Status Solidi B 248, 2775 (2011)]. They are occurring at high applied voltage in a range at which the current becomes highly non-ohmic that is conventionally described as N-shaped when the conductance decreases with increasing bias or as S-shaped when the current starts to increase again. In this paper only such cases will be discussed in which the current stays below significant Joule heating (no current channel formation), and only for stationary electrode-attached high-field domains. These are the cathode-attached domains that are maintained by field-quenching and are thermodynamically stable. Their finding is summarized in the first segment of this paper. When the applied voltage is increased, an anode-attached hyper-high-field domain develops that is stabilized by a hole blocking anode and will be analyzed in more detail below. It will be shown that they are a thermodynamically stable p-type photoconductive state of CdS. These two new states can be used to determine the carrier densities and mobilities as function of the field and the effective work function in dependence of the spectral distribution of the optical excitation. In a thin slab adjacent to a blocking cathode, the quasi-Fermi levels are spread to a precise amount and are kept there in the entire high-field region. This opens the opportunity to analyze with small modulation of the excitation the trap transition coefficients near these quasi-Fermi levels separately, without broadening interference from other signals. This has already resulted in the discovery of an unusually sharp electron quenching level when the CdS was in a p-type state with an anode adjacent domain. It is

  9. A method to localize RF B₁ field in high-field magnetic resonance imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J Thomas

    2012-12-01

    In high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, B₀ fields of 7 and 9.4 T, the RF field shows greater inhomogeneity compared to clinical MRI systems with B₀ fields of 1.5 and 3.0 T. In multichannel RF coils, the magnitude and phase of the input to each coil element can be controlled independently to reduce the nonuniformity of the RF field. The convex optimization technique has been used to obtain the optimum excitation parameters with iterative solutions for homogeneity in a selected region of interest. The pseudoinverse method has also been used to find a solution. The simulation results for 9.4- and 7-T MRI systems are discussed in detail for the head model. Variation of the simulation results in a 9.4-T system with the number of RF coil elements for different positions of the regions of interest in a spherical phantom are also discussed. Experimental results were obtained in a phantom in the 9.4-T system and are compared to the simulation results and the specific absorption rate has been evaluated. PMID:22929360

  10. High field strength following the Kauai R-N geomagnetic reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, H.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The paleomagnetism of superposed lava flows on Kauai, Hawaii shows that the ancient geomagnetic field was unusually strong following a reverse-to-normal polarity transition that occurred about 4 million years ago. Paleointensities were determined by a standard experimental procedure (Thelliers' method) that recreates the process of remanence acquisition in volcanic rocks. This experiment makes it possible to infer the strength of the geomagnetic field present with each lava flow formed, thus producing an accurate picture of the ancient field's behavior after the reversal. Samples from 10 volcanic units yielded virtual dipole moments (VDMs) ranging from 7.4 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] to 14.5 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] with an average of 11.1[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. This value is high in comparisons to the average VDM for the past 5 m.y., approximately 8.7[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. In contrast to the highly variable dipole moment observed following a 15 m.y. old reversal at Steen s Mountain, Oregon, the field following the Kauai transition was relatively steady. Surprisingly, the maximum dipole moments following the two reversals were nearly equal. This similarity hints that high field strength may be a systematic feature of the geodynamo immediately following a polarity reversal.

  11. Structural correlates of formal thought disorder in schizophrenia: An ultra-high field multivariate morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Palaniyappan, Lena; Mahmood, Jenaid; Balain, Vijender; Mougin, Olivier; Gowland, Penny A.; Liddle, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent formal thought disorder (FTD) is one of the most characteristic features of schizophrenia. Several neuroimaging studies report spatially distinct neuroanatomical changes in association with FTD. Given that most studies so far have employed a univariate localisation approach that obscures the study of covarying interregional relationships, the present study focussed on the multivariate systemic pattern of anatomical changes that contribute to FTD. Methods Speech samples from nineteen medicated clinically stable schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy controls were evaluated for subtle formal thought disorder. Ultra high-field (7 T) anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans were obtained from all subjects. Multivariate morphometric patterns were identified using an independent component approach (source based morphometry). Using multiple regression analysis, the morphometric patterns predicting positive and negative FTD scores were identified. Results Morphometric variations in grey matter predicted a substantial portion of inter-individual variance in negative but not positive FTD. A pattern of concomitant striato-insular/precuneus reduction along with frontocingular grey matter increase had a significant association with negative FTD. Conclusions These results suggest that concomitant increase and decrease in grey matter occur in association with persistent negative thought disorder in clinically stable individuals with schizophrenia. PMID:26232240

  12. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangxin; Xie, Huantong; Hou, Shulian; Chen, Wei; Yang, Xiuhong

    2016-01-01

    The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B 0) inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained. PMID:27034951

  13. High Field Magnetization Process of an S{=}1 One-Dimensional Antiferromagnet NENP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tsuneaki; Katori, Hiroko Aruga; Ajiro, Yoshitami

    1992-11-01

    High field magnetization measurements have been performed for NENP at low temperatures in steady fields up to 12 T and in pulsed fields up to 40 T. The magnetization for both directions parallel and perpendicular to the chain axis is extremely small in low fields and increases abruptly above the critical field Bc//{=}9.8± 0.2 T and Bc\\bot{=}13.1± 0.3 T. This result indicates that the ground state of NENP is nonmagnetic, that is, singlet and becomes magnetic above the critical field due to the crossover between the singlet and magnetic excited states, consistent with Haldane’s prediction. The magnetization data are analyzed on the basis of the Tsvelik theory. The two gaps and the single-ion anisotropy constant are estimated to be E1{=}14.2± 0.3 K, E2{=}26.8± 1.8 K and D≈7 K. Using the values of E1 and E2, the Haldane gap for D{=}0 is evaluated to be EG{=}(0.39± 0.2)|J|. This value is in good agreement with the estimation of the Haldane gap from the Monte Carlo simulation. The Tsvelik theory satisfactorily explains the field dependence of the magnetization for NENP.

  14. Paramagnetic Meissner effect at high fields in YCaBaCuO single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F. T.; Vieira, V. N.; Falck, A. L.; da Silva, D. L.; Pureur, P.; Schaf, J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on systematic magnetization experiments in an Y1-xCaxBa2Cu3O7-δ (x = 0.25 at%) single crystal. The magnetization experiments were made using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (SQUID). Magnetic moments were measured as functions of the temperature according to the zero-field cooling (ZFC), field-cooled cooling (FCC), and field-cooled warming (FCW) prescriptions. The time-dependence of the FC magnetization at fixed magnetic fields was studied. Magnetic fields up to 50 kOe were applied and a paramagnetic response related to the superconducting state was observed when strong enough fields were applied parallel to the c axis. The magnitude of the high field paramagnetic moment (HFPME) increases when the field is augmented. The effect shows strong and anomalous time dependence, such that the paramagnetic moment increases as a function of the time. An YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystal exhibiting the same effect was used for comparison. We discuss our results in terms of the flux compression scenario into the sample modulated by Ca concentration.

  15. Conceptual Design of a High Field Ultra-Compact Cyclotron for Nuclear Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, J.; Blosser, H.

    1997-05-01

    We have studied the feasibility of using of an existing wide-bore, 8 T magnet as a component of an ultra high field cyclotron. Such a machine would use the highest magnetic field of any cyclotron, to date. The K80 `Eight Tesla Cyclotron' would have roughly the same magnetic rigidity (Bρ) as the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron in a package of only one fourth the radius, with a corresponding reduction in cost. This cyclotron could accelerate particles with a charge state Q/A = 1/4 to a final energy of between 5 and 6 MeV/nucleon, the energy range currently being used to study superdeformed, high angular momentum nuclei that result from glancing collisions. We present models of the magnetic field, the central region electrodes and dees, and the extraction system. Studies have stressed achieving sufficient vertical focusing (ν_z) despite the high magnetic field level, and finding a central region geometry that fits comfortably in the limited space available while providing centering and early-turn focusing properties that are similar to those of less compact machines.

  16. Methane Storage in Nanoporous Media as Observed via High-Field NMR Relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, A.; Kausik, R.

    2015-08-01

    The storage properties of methane gas in Vycor porous glass (5.7 nm) are characterized in a wide pressure range from 0.7 to 89.7 MPa using nuclear magnetic resonance. We demonstrate the capability of high-field nuclear-magnetic-resonance relaxometry for the determination of the methane-gas storage capacity and the measurement of the hydrogen index, to a high degree of accuracy. This helps determine the excess gas in the pore space which can be identified to exhibit Langmuir properties in the low pressure regime of 0.7 to 39.6 MPa. The Langmuir model enables us to determine the equilibrium density of the monolayer of adsorbed gas to be 8.5% lower than that of liquid methane. We also identify the signatures of multilayer adsorption at the high pressure regime from 39.6 to 89.7 MPa and use the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller theory to determine the number of adsorbed layers of methane gas. We show how these measurements help us differentiate the gas stored in the Vycor pore space into free and adsorbed fractions for the entire pressure range paving way for similar applications such as studying natural-gas storage in gas shale rock or hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

  17. Low-Field and High-Field Characterization of THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Mossi, K.; Smith, R.; Bernd, J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    THUNDER (THin UNimorph DrivER) actuators are pre-stressed piezoelectric devices developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) that exhibit enhanced strain capabilities. As a result, they are of interest in a variety of aerospace applications. Characterization of their performance as a function of electric field, temperature and frequency is needed in order to optimize their operation. Towards that end, a number of THUNDER devices were obtained from FACE International Co. with a stainless steel substrate varying in thickness from 1 mil to 20 mils. The various devices were evaluated to determine low-field and high-field displacement its well as the polarization hysteresis loops. The thermal stability of these drivers was evaluated by two different methods. First, the samples were thermally cycled under electric field by systematically increasing the maximum temperature from 25 C to 200 C while the displacement was being measured. Second, the samples were isothermally aged at 0 C, 50 C, 100 C. and 150 C in air, and the isothermal decay of the displacement was measured at room temperature as a function of time.

  18. High-field functional magnetic resonance imaging of vocalization processing in marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Sadagopan, Srivatsun; Temiz-Karayol, Nesibe Z.; Voss, Henning U.

    2015-01-01

    Vocalizations are behaviorally critical sounds, and this behavioral importance is reflected in the ascending auditory system, where conspecific vocalizations are increasingly over-represented at higher processing stages. Recent evidence suggests that, in macaques, this increasing selectivity for vocalizations might culminate in a cortical region that is densely populated by vocalization-preferring neurons. Such a region might be a critical node in the representation of vocal communication sounds, underlying the recognition of vocalization type, caller and social context. These results raise the questions of whether cortical specializations for vocalization processing exist in other species, their cortical location, and their relationship to the auditory processing hierarchy. To explore cortical specializations for vocalizations in another species, we performed high-field fMRI of the auditory cortex of a vocal New World primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Using a sparse imaging paradigm, we discovered a caudal-rostral gradient for the processing of conspecific vocalizations in marmoset auditory cortex, with regions of the anterior temporal lobe close to the temporal pole exhibiting the highest preference for vocalizations. These results demonstrate similar cortical specializations for vocalization processing in macaques and marmosets, suggesting that cortical specializations for vocal processing might have evolved before the lineages of these species diverged. PMID:26091254

  19. Mass spectrometric characterization of a high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purves, Randy W.; Guevremont, Roger; Day, Stephen; Pipich, Charles W.; Matyjaszczyk, Matthew S.

    1998-12-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has become an important method for the detection of many compounds because of its high sensitivity and amenability to miniaturization for field-portable monitoring; applications include detection of narcotics, explosives, and chemical warfare agents. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) differs from IMS in that the electric fields are applied using a high-frequency periodic asymmetric waveform, rather than a dc voltage. Furthermore, in FAIMS the compounds are separated by the difference in the mobility of ions at high electric field relative to low field, rather than by compound to compound differences in mobility at low electric field (IMS). We report here the first cylindrical-geometry-FAIMS interface with mass spectrometry (FAIMS-MS) and the MS identification of the peaks observed in a FAIMS compensation voltage (CV) spectrum. Using both an electrometer-based-FAIMS (FAIMS-E) and FAIMS-MS, several variables that affect the sensitivity of ion detection were examined for two (polarity reversed) asymmetric waveforms (modes 1 and 2) each of which yields a unique spectrum. An increase in the dispersion voltage (DV) was found to improve the sensitivity and separation observed in the FAIMS CV spectrum. This increase in sensitivity and the unexpected dissimilarity in modes 1 and 2 suggest that atmospheric pressure ion focusing is occurring in the FAIMS analyzer. The sensitivity and peak locations in the CV spectra were affected by temperature, gas flow rates, operating pressure, and analyte concentration.

  20. Sintering behavior of doped ZnO powders for high field varistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirlanda, M.

    1990-08-01

    The sintering of ZnO varistor precursor powders, doped with Co, Mn and different concentrations of Bi and Al, is investigated and discussed in relation with sintering models. One purpose of the present study is to provide information valuable for the fabrication of high field varistors. As the fundamental parameter of these electronic components is the breakdown voltage per unit of thickness, which is determined by the number of grain boundaries per linear dimension, the grain size and the sintered density are crucial variables, and the sintering is a central step in the manufacturing of such varistors. Sintering experiments performed at constant heating rate in a loading dilatometer provide data on the densification and creep of the compacted powders. Another goal of the present study is to provide an experimental basis for the interpretation of the evolution of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate in terms of competition between densification and microstructure coarsening. This is accomplished by taking advantage of the variety of sintering behaviors that takes place in the system ZnO-Bi-Al: the comparison of these behaviors allows us to correlate the macroscopic sintering parameters to the evolution of the microstructure. It results that, while in non-doped powders densification and coarsening develop in a balanced way, resulting in the constancy of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate, the effect of the dopants on the sintering kinetics alters such a balance, leading this ratio to vary. 17 figs.

  1. High-field Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects at high pressure in oriented ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, Marius; Broto, Jean-Marc; Gonzalez, Jesus

    2008-10-01

    High-field Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects have been observed in single crystals of ruby submitted to hydrostatic pressure up to 10 GPa. A specific setup with a miniature diamond-anvil cell has been developed to combine high pressure and pulsed magnetic fields and to perform magnetophotoluminescence measurements. Careful analysis of low-temperature (4.2 and 77 K) photoluminescence spectra with a 56 T magnetic field applied along the c axis allows for the rectification of the assignment of observed emission lines to corresponding Zeeman-split levels. Besides, the intrinsic Zeeman-splitting factors of excited states reveal a linear pressure-induced increase. This enhancement is a signature of an increase in trigonal distortion induced by hydrostatic pressure. Moreover, spectra with magnetic field perpendicular to crystallographic c axis exhibit a Paschen-Back effect reflecting the progressive alignment of Cr3+ ions spin along the applied field. However, no pressure modification is observed in this compound, contrarily to the Heisenberg-to-Ising spin character pressure-induced transition observed in alexandrite.

  2. Progress in High-Field Optical Pumping of Alkali Metal Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Ishikawa, K.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2006-05-01

    We present preliminary results of an attempt to polarize alkali metal nuclei via optical pumping in a large (9.4-tesla) magnetic field. NMR measurements of ^87Rb and ^133Cs films in optical cells will be reported. Depopulation pumping of alkalis can easily produce electron polarizations of order unity, as measured during spin-exchange optical pumping of noble gases [1]. At low magnetic fields (< ˜1 kG), the strong hyperfine coupling between the alkali electron and nucleus allows angular momentum exchange from one to the other, resulting in nuclear polarization enhancement through optical pumping. In the high magnetic fields required for NMR, however, this interaction is largely decoupled and electron-nuclear spin exchange must rely upon the δA I .S interaction induced by buffer gas collisions (also called the ``Carver rate''). High-field optical pumping experiments may allow for a more precise measurement of this rate, as well as yielding insight into the transfer of angular momentum from the polarized alkali vapor to the bulk alkali metal on the cell walls. The technical challenges of high-resolution NMR of alkali metals at 9.4 tesla will be discussed. 1. E. Babcock, I. Nelson, S. Kadlecek, et al., Physical Review Letters 91, 123003 (2003).

  3. New High Field Superconducting Phase in CeCoIn5 Probed by Ultrasonic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Kasahara, Y.; Izawa, K.; Sakakibara, T.; van der Beek, C. J.; Shishido, H.; Settai, R.; Onuki, Y.; Matsuda, Y.

    2004-03-01

    Very recent reports of heat capacity measurements in field parallel to the ab--plane of the unconventional superconductor CeCoIn5 have raised great interest, because they pointed out the possibility of the Fulde-Ferrel-Larkin-Ovchinikov (FFLO) phase. We have measured ultrasound velocity of CeCoIn5 to clarify this novel superconducting phase. Sound velocities of the transverse mode with propagation kallel[100] ([010]) and polarization uallel[010] ([100]) were measured in the magnetic field Hallel[100]. The sound velocity is strongly enhanced when it tilts the flux line lattice (FLL) from the field direction (H ⊥ u), indicating the strong coupling between FLL and crystal lattice. Our experimental results reveal an unusual structural transformation of the FLL in the vicinity of the upper critical field. These results provide a strong evidence that the high field state is the textured order parameter state, i.e. the FFLO phase, in which the order parameter is spatially modulated and has planar nodes aligned perpendicular to the vortices.

  4. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; Rijk, G. de; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.; Hanzelka, P.

    2014-01-29

    In the framework of the R and D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m{sup 3} helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  5. High-field, high-current-density, stable superconducting magnets for fusion machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Designs for large fusion machines require high-performance superconducting magnets to reduce cost or increase machine performance. By employing force-flow cooling, cable-in-conduit conductor configuration, and NbTi superconductor, it is now possible to design superconducting magnets that operate a high fields (8-12 T) with high current densities (5-15 kA/cm/sup 2/ over the winding pack) in a stable manner. High current density leads to smaller, lighter, and thus less expensive coils. The force-flow cooling provides confined helium, full conductor insulation, and a rigid winding pack for better load distribution. The cable-in-conduit conductor configuration ensures a high stability margin for the magnet. The NbTi superconductor has reached a good engineering material standard. Its strain-insensitive critical parameters are particularly suitable for complex coil windings of a stellarator machine. The optimization procedure for such a conductor design, developed over the past decade, is summarized here. If desired a magnet built on the principles outlines in this paper can be extended to a field higher than the design value without degrading its stability by simply lowering the operating temperature below 4.2 K. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  6. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; de Rijk, G.; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Hanzelka, P.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the R&D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m3 helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  7. Use of Exotic Coordinate Systems in the Design of RF Resonators for High-Field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Edward

    2008-10-01

    High field human MRI (11.7 Tesla is FDC approved for human research) renders standard RF coil design inadequate because the resonant wavelength in human soft tissue (about 8 cm at 500 MHz) is significantly smaller than the physical size of the human body. I propose optimizing the design of such RF coils using coordinate systems appropriate to human body parts, as has been done with ellipticalootnotetextCrozier et al, Concepts Magn Reson 1997; 9:195-210. and Cassinian ovalootnotetextDe Zanche et al, Magn Reson Med 2005; 53:201-211. cross sections. I have computed analytically the magnetic fields produced by a device of toroidal cross section using a cascade of conformal transformations.ootnotetextButterworth & Gore, J Magn Reson 2005; 175:114-123. Building upon these efforts, I will use the eleven coordinate systems of Moon & Spencer,ootnotetextMoon & Spencer, Field Theory Handbook, Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1971. along with other possible coordinate systems and conformal transformations, to identify a small number of configurations that have the highest probability of being useful as RF coil designs for ultrahigh-field MRI.

  8. Project Overview of HTS Magnet for Ultra-high-field MRI System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosaka, Taizo; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Iwai, Sadanori; Otani, Yasumi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tasaki, Kenji; Nomura, Shunji; Kurusu, Tsutomu; Ueda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, So; Ishiyama, Atsushi; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    A project to develop an ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system based on HTS magnets using (RE)Ba2Cu3O7 (REBCO; RE=rear earth) coils is underway. The project is supported by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and aims to establish magnet technologies for a whole-body 9.4 T MRI system. REBCO wires have high critical current density in high magnetic fields and high strength against hoop stresses, and therefore, MRI magnets using REBCO coils are expected to have cryogenic systems that are smaller, lighter, and simpler than the conventional ones. A major problem in using REBCO coils for MRI magnets is the huge irregular magnetic field generated by the screening current in REBCO tapes. Thus, the main purpose of this project is to make the influence of this screening current predictable and controllable. Fundamental technologies, including treatment of the screening currents, were studied via experiments and numerical simulations using small coils. Two types of model magnets are planned to be manufactured, and the knowledge gained in the development of the model magnets will be reflected in the magnet design of a whole-body 9.4 T MRI system.

  9. Advances in High-Field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ningnannan; Song, Xiaowei; Bartha, Robert; Beyea, Steven; D’Arcy, Ryan; Zhang, Yunting; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) affects several important molecules in brain metabolism. The resulting neurochemical changes can be quantified non-invasively in localized brain regions using in vivo single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SV 1H MRS). Although the often heralded diagnostic potential of MRS in AD largely remains unfulfilled, more recent use of high magnetic fields has led to significantly improved signal-to-noise ratios and spectral resolutions, thereby allowing clinical applications with increased measurement reliability. The present article provides a comprehensive review of SV 1H MRS studies on AD at high magnetic fields (3.0 Tesla and above). This review suggests that patterned regional differences and longitudinal alterations in several neurometabolites are associated with clinically established AD. Changes in multiple metabolites are identifiable even at early stages of AD development. By combining information of neurochemicals in different brain regions revealing either pathological or compensatory changes, high field MRS can be evaluated in AD diagnosis and in the detection of treatment effects. To achieve this, standardization of data acquisition and analytical approaches is needed. PMID:24597505

  10. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; Wustmann, B.; Koesterke, I.; Schwarz, M.; Freitag, M.; Arnold, A.; Teichert, J.; Justus, M.; Seidel, W.; Ilgner, C.; Awari, N.; Nicoletti, D.; Kaiser, S.; Laplace, Y.; Rajasekaran, S.; Zhang, L.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.; Schay, G.; Lorincz, I.; Rauscher, A. A.; Radu, I.; Mährlein, S.; Kim, T. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kampfrath, T.; Wall, S.; Heberle, J.; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A.; Steiger, A.; Müller, A. S.; Helm, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T.; Michel, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Fisher, A. S.; Stojanovic, N.; Gensch, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution.

  11. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangxin; Xie, Huantong; Hou, Shulian; Chen, Wei; Yang, Xiuhong

    2016-01-01

    The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B0) inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained. PMID:27034951

  12. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    PubMed Central

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; Wustmann, B.; Koesterke, I.; Schwarz, M.; Freitag, M.; Arnold, A.; Teichert, J.; Justus, M.; Seidel, W.; Ilgner, C.; Awari, N.; Nicoletti, D.; Kaiser, S.; Laplace, Y.; Rajasekaran, S.; Zhang, L.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.; Schay, G.; Lorincz, I.; Rauscher, A. A.; Radu, I.; Mährlein, S.; Kim, T. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kampfrath, T.; Wall, S.; Heberle, J.; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A.; Steiger, A.; Müller, A. S.; Helm, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T.; Michel, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Fisher, A. S.; Stojanovic, N.; Gensch, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution. PMID:26924651

  13. Wall scanning probe for high-field side plasma measurements on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Smick, Noah; LaBombard, Brian

    2009-02-01

    A new, high-field side scanning probe has been added to Alcator C-Mod's complement of edge diagnostics. The wall scanning probe is designed to provide all the benefits of a linear plunge, multielectrode scanning probe while working from the confined space of the inner tokamak wall. The drive mechanism is an embedded coil which produces a torque with the ambient toroidal magnetic field when energized, thus allowing the probe to plunge to different preprogramed depths at different times during a plasma discharge. The probe tip is designed for easy replacement and is presently configured to operate as a modified, high heat-flux "Gundestrup-type" probe with four tungsten electrodes. The probe has demonstrated the ability to obtain cross-field profiles for electron temperature, density, floating potential, and plasma flow information (parallel and perpendicular to B) up to a depth of a few millimiters inside the last-closed flux surface in standard C-Mod discharges. The tungsten-tipped probe has proved very robust and shows little or no damage though it routinely handles surface heat fluxes on the order of 100 MW/m(2) at peak insertion. PMID:19256643

  14. Performance of the High Field Fusion Reactor (FIRE) and a Proposed Alternate Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritz, Arnold H.; Onjun, Thawatchai; Bateman, Glenn; Mazzucato, Ernesto

    2000-10-01

    Predictions of α-power production in FIRE and the Mazzucato proposed high-field tokamaks are examined using the Multi-Mode-95 (MMM95) and the Mixed-Bohm/gyro-Bohm (JETTO) transport models in the BALDUR transport code. Simulations of plasma evolution in the proposed tokamaks using the MMM95 model predict, after 16 seconds of 30 MW auxiliary heating, a fusion Q of 2.7 (for the FIRE design) and 8.2 (for the Mazzucato design) assuming an edge temperature of 2 keV. Our simulations show that significantly higher values Q result when the plasma current together with the magnetic field are increased, or when the plasma edge temperature is increased. The performance is moderately improved with density peaking; whereas, performance is degraded with increased Z_eff. The α-power production is found to depend on the rate at which the auxiliary heating power is turned off. The α-power remains higher when the auxiliary power is reduced gradually rather than abruptly. For plasmas with central ion temperatures greater than 10 keV, it is possible to turn off the auxiliary power with α-power remaining finite.

  15. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter.

    PubMed

    Green, B; Kovalev, S; Asgekar, V; Geloni, G; Lehnert, U; Golz, T; Kuntzsch, M; Bauer, C; Hauser, J; Voigtlaender, J; Wustmann, B; Koesterke, I; Schwarz, M; Freitag, M; Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Justus, M; Seidel, W; Ilgner, C; Awari, N; Nicoletti, D; Kaiser, S; Laplace, Y; Rajasekaran, S; Zhang, L; Winnerl, S; Schneider, H; Schay, G; Lorincz, I; Rauscher, A A; Radu, I; Mährlein, S; Kim, T H; Lee, J S; Kampfrath, T; Wall, S; Heberle, J; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A; Steiger, A; Müller, A S; Helm, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T; Michel, P; Cavalleri, A; Fisher, A S; Stojanovic, N; Gensch, M

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution. PMID:26924651

  16. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; et al

    2016-02-29

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields andmore » the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. In conclusion, we benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution.« less

  17. Demountable, High field High-Temperature Superconductor TF coils for flexible steady-state fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Phillip; Bromberg, Leslie; Vieira, Rui; Minervini, Joseph; Galea, Christopher; Hensley, Sarah; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The excellent properties of HTS materials (e.g., YBCO) at high fields and elevated temperatures (>20 K), offer operational advantages for fusion machines, but results in challenges. For fusion devices, the ability to disassemble the TF coil is very attractive as it provides direct access to maintain the vacuum vessel, first wall and other components in a timely manner. High current conductors, made from multiple thin tapes, are not available but are being developed. Quench protection is a serious issue with HTS magnets, and novel means are needed to detect normal zones and to quickly discharge the magnet. Potential cables designs, demountable magnets and solutions to quench and protection issues for an HTS TF magnet for the Vulcan device (long term PMI studies) will be described. We also describe means for making continuous, persistent loops with HTS tapes. These loops offer an alternative to expensive monoliths for field control for complex geometries, such as stellarator-like fields. Partially supported by US DOE DE-FC02-93ER54186.

  18. High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Solid and Solution Biological NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, A.B.; Paëpe, G. De; van der Wel, P.C.A.; Hu, K.-N.; Joo, C.-G.; Bajaj, V.S.; Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L.; Sirigiri, J.R.; Herzfeld, J.; Temkin, R.J.; Griffin, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) results in a substantial nuclear polarization enhancement through a transfer of the magnetization from electrons to nuclei. Recent years have seen considerable progress in the development of DNP experiments directed towards enhancing sensitivity in biological nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This review covers the applications, hardware, polarizing agents, and theoretical descriptions that were developed at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology for high-field DNP experiments. In frozen dielectrics, the enhanced nuclear polarization developed in the vicinity of the polarizing agent can be efficiently dispersed to the bulk of the sample via 1H spin diffusion. This strategy has been proven effective in polarizing biologically interesting systems, such as nanocrystalline peptides and membrane proteins, without leading to paramagnetic broadening of the NMR signals. Gyrotrons have been used as a source of high-power (5–10 W) microwaves up to 460 GHz as required for the DNP experiments. Other hardware has also been developed allowing in situ microwave irradiation integrated with cryogenic magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR. Advances in the quantum mechanical treatment are successful in describing the mechanism by which new biradical polarizing agents yield larger enhancements at higher magnetic fields. Finally, pulsed methods and solution experiments should play a prominent role in the future of DNP. PMID:19194532

  19. SAR simulations for high-field MRI: how much detail, effort, and accuracy is needed?

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Diehl, D; Gebhardt, M; Mallow, J; Speck, O

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of specific absorption rate (SAR) for high field MRI is necessary to best exploit its potential and guarantee safe operation. To reduce the effort (time, complexity) of SAR simulations while maintaining robust results, the minimum requirements for the creation (segmentation, labeling) of human models and methods to reduce the time for SAR calculations for 7 Tesla MR-imaging are evaluated. The geometric extent of the model required for realistic head-simulations and the number of tissue types sufficient to form a reliable but simplified model of the human body are studied. Two models (male and female) of the virtual family are analyzed. Additionally, their position within the head-coil is taken into account. Furthermore, the effects of retuning the coils to different load conditions and the influence of a large bore radiofrequency-shield have been examined. The calculation time for SAR simulations in the head can be reduced by 50% without significant error for smaller model extent and simplified tissue structure outside the coil. Likewise, the model generation can be accelerated by reducing the number of tissue types. Local SAR can vary up to 14% due to position alone. This must be considered and sets a limit for SAR prediction accuracy. All these results are comparable between the two body models tested. PMID:22611018

  20. Pioneering Structural Solutions for Compact High Field Experiments Developed for the Alcator and the Ignitor Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvetti, M.; Coppi, B.

    2015-11-01

    Recently there has been an increased awareness of the fact that the line of research based on compact high field machines is the most promising to approach ignition conditions in DT burning plasmas and has acquired new perspectives for its applications. Then the technological solutions that have made these machines possible have become subject to new attention and, in some cases, to rediscovery. The Alcator Program and, followed by Ignitor Program, has led to invent the coupled air-core former poloidal field system that has made compact machine possible and has been adopted on all advanced toroidal machines that came after Alcator. A recently rediscovered solution aimed at reducing the mechanical stresses in the inner legs of the toroidal magnet coils is the ``Upper and Lower Bracing Rings'' system that has had a key role in the design of the Ignitor machine and its evolution. Another solution to minimize the machine dimensions while maintaining high toroidal fields, in order to achieve high plasma current densities, is that of ``bucking and wedging'' of the toroidal magnet by coupling it mechanically to the central solenoid. Sponsored in part by the U.S. DoE.

  1. Early Knee Changes in Dancers Identified by Ultra High Field 7 Tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Gregory; Diamond, Matthew; Nevsky, Gregory; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Weiss, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to determine whether a unique, ultra high-field 7 Tesla (T) MRI scanner could detect occult cartilage and meniscal injuries in asymptomatic female dancers. Materials and Methods This study had institutional review board approval. We recruited eight pre-professional female dancers and nine non-athletic, female controls. We scanned the dominant knee on a 7T MRI scanner using a 3D-FLASH sequence and a proton density, fast spin-echo sequence to evaluate cartilage and menisci, respectively. Two radiologists scored cartilage (International Cartilage Repair Society classification) and meniscal (Stoller classification) lesions. We applied two-tailed z- and t-tests to determine statistical significance. Results There were no cartilage lesions in dancers or controls. For the medial meniscus, the dancers compared to controls demonstrated higher mean MRI score (2.38±0.61 vs. 1.0±0.97, p<0.0001) and higher frequency of mean grade 2 lesions (88% vs. 11%, p<0.01). For the lateral meniscus, there was no difference in score (0.5±0.81 vs. 0.5±0.78, p=0.78) in dancers compared to controls. Discussion Asymptomatic dancers demonstrate occult medial meniscal lesions. Because this has been described in early osteoarthritis, close surveillance of dancers’ knee symptoms and function with appropriate activity modification may help maintain their long-term knee health. PMID:23346987

  2. Peak deconvolution in high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) to characterize macromolecular conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Errol W.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2007-01-01

    Protonated poly(ethylene glycol), produced by electrospray ionization (ESI), with molecular weights ranging from 0.3 to 5 kDa and charge states from 1+ to 7+ were characterized using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). Results for all but some of the 3+ and 4+ charge states are consistent with a single gas-phase conformer or family of unresolved conformers for each of these charge states. The FAIMS compensation voltage scans resulted in peaks that could be accurately fit with a single Gaussian for each peak. The peak widths increase linearly with compensation voltage for maximum ion transmission but do not depend on m/z or molecular weight. Fitting parameters obtained from the poly(ethylene glycol) data were used to analyze conformations of oxidized and reduced lysozyme formed from different solutions. For oxidized lysozyme formed from a buffered aqueous solution, a single conformer (or group of unresolved conformers) was observed for the 7+ and 8+ charge states. Two conformers were observed for the 9+ and 10+ charge states formed from more denaturing solutions. Data for the fully reduced form indicate the existence of up to three different conformers for each charge state produced directly by ESI and a general progression from a more extended to a more folded structure with decreasing charge state. These results are consistent with those obtained previously by proton-transfer reactivity and drift tube ion mobility experiments, although more conformers were identified for the fully reduced form of lysozyme using FAIMS.

  3. Quantum oscillations of the critical current and high-field superconducting proximity in ballistic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Shalom, M.; Zhu, M. J.; Fal’Ko, V. I.; Mishchenko, A.; Kretinin, A. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Woods, C. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Geim, A. K.; Prance, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-based Josephson junctions provide a novel platform for studying the proximity effect due to graphene’s unique electronic spectrum and the possibility to tune junction properties by gate voltage. Here we describe graphene junctions with a mean free path of several micrometres, low contact resistance and large supercurrents. Such devices exhibit pronounced Fabry-Pérot oscillations not only in the normal-state resistance but also in the critical current. The proximity effect is mostly suppressed in magnetic fields below 10 mT, showing the conventional Fraunhofer pattern. Unexpectedly, some proximity survives even in fields higher than 1 T. Superconducting states randomly appear and disappear as a function of field and carrier concentration, and each of them exhibits a supercurrent carrying capacity close to the universal quantum limit. We attribute the high-field Josephson effect to mesoscopic Andreev states that persist near graphene edges. Our work reveals new proximity regimes that can be controlled by quantum confinement and cyclotron motion.

  4. A low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator.

    PubMed

    Secoli, Riccardo; Robinson, Matthew; Brugnoli, Michele; Rodriguez y Baena, Ferdinando

    2015-03-01

    To perform minimally invasive surgical interventions with the aid of robotic systems within a magnetic resonance imaging scanner offers significant advantages compared to conventional surgery. However, despite the numerous exciting potential applications of this technology, the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-compatible robotics has been hampered by safety, reliability and cost concerns: the robots should not be attracted by the strong magnetic field of the scanner and should operate reliably in the field without causing distortion to the scan data. Development of non-conventional sensors and/or actuators is thus required to meet these strict operational and safety requirements. These demands commonly result in expensive actuators, which mean that cost effectiveness remains a major challenge for such robotic systems. This work presents a low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator: a pneumatic stepper motor which is controllable in open loop or closed loop, along with a rotary encoder, both fully manufactured in plastic, which are shown to perform reliably via a set of in vitro trials while generating negligible artifacts when imaged within a standard clinical scanner. PMID:25833997

  5. SEMI-AUTOMATIC SEGMENTATION OF BRAIN SUBCORTICAL STRUCTURES FROM HIGH-FIELD MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinyoung; Lenglet, Christophe; Sapiro, Guillermo; Harel, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Volumetric segmentation of subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia and thalamus is necessary for non-invasive diagnosis and neurosurgery planning. This is a challenging problem due in part to limited boundary information between structures, similar intensity profiles across the different structures, and low contrast data. This paper presents a semi-automatic segmentation system exploiting the superior image quality of ultra-high field (7 Tesla) MRI. The proposed approach handles and exploits multiple structural MRI modalities. It uniquely combines T1-weighted (T1W), T2-weighted (T2W), diffusion, and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) MRI and introduces a dedicated new edge indicator function. In addition to this, we employ prior shape and configuration knowledge of the subcortical structures in order to guide the evolution of geometric active surfaces. Neighboring structures are segmented iteratively, constraining over-segmentation at their borders with a non-overlapping penalty. Extensive experiments with data acquired on a 7T MRI scanner demonstrate the feasibility and power of the approach for the segmentation of basal ganglia components critical for neurosurgery applications such as deep brain stimulation. PMID:25192576

  6. MR patterns of rotator cuff and labral lesions: comparison between low-field and high-field images.

    PubMed

    Shih, T T; Chen, W G; Su, C T; Huang, K M; Ericson, F; Chiu, L C

    1993-02-01

    Eighteen people (10 men, 8 women) were examined on a 0.3-T (low-field) imager with T1-weighted axial and coronal images and either axial or coronal T2-weighted images. Thirty-two people (22 men, 10 women) were examined on a 1.5-T (high-field) imager with axial T1-weighted images and coronal, sagittal dual-echo images. Rotator cuff lesions were diagnosed by the following findings: abnormal signal in the tendon, irregularity or discontinuity at the musculo-tendinous junction, or muscle abnormality. Glenoid labrum tears were considered if one or more of the following criteria were present: labral deformity of unusual size, focal defect, amputation or displacement with fluid, or capsular stripping. Comparison between the high-field and low-field MR images in the evaluation of rotator cuff lesions suggests that the high-field imager is better than the low-field imager in the differentiation of tendinitis from tears, in the confirmation of bursitis and in detection of subscapularis lesions. A higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), less time consumption, and more section planes (especially, sagittal sections) appear to be the main reasons for this. As far as labral lesions are concerned, the performances of the high-field imagers and low-field imagers were almost equal. The artifact of greater chemical shift with a high-field imager would more or less, we assume, degrade the better CNR achievable in the diagnosis of labral lesions. PMID:8101743

  7. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11

    the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

  8. Generation and evaluation of an ultra-high-field atlas with applications in DBS planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Brian T.; Poirier, Stefan; Guo, Ting; Parrent, Andrew G.; Peters, Terry M.; Khan, Ali R.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) and involves the use of brain atlases or intrinsic landmarks to estimate the location of target deep brain structures, such as the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi). However, these structures can be difficult to localize with conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus targeting can be prone to error. Ultra-high-field imaging at 7T has the ability to clearly resolve these structures and thus atlases built with these data have the potential to improve targeting accuracy. Methods T1 and T2-weighted images of 12 healthy control subjects were acquired using a 7T MR scanner. These images were then used with groupwise registration to generate an unbiased average template with T1w and T2w contrast. Deep brain structures were manually labelled in each subject by two raters and rater reliability was assessed. We compared the use of this unbiased atlas with two other methods of atlas-based segmentation (single-template and multi-template) for subthalamic nucleus (STN) segmentation on 7T MRI data. We also applied this atlas to clinical DBS data acquired at 1.5T to evaluate its efficacy for DBS target localization as compared to using a standard atlas. Results The unbiased templates provide superb detail of subcortical structures. Through one-way ANOVA tests, the unbiased template is significantly (p <0.05) more accurate than a single-template in atlas-based segmentation and DBS target localization tasks. Conclusion The generated unbiased averaged templates provide better visualization of deep brain nuclei and an increase in accuracy over single-template and lower field strength atlases.

  9. High-field localized 1H NMR spectroscopy in the anesthetized and in the awake monkey.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Juchem, Christoph; Merkle, Hellmut; Nauerth, Arno; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2004-12-01

    Localized cerebral in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy (MRS) was performed in the anesthetized as well as the awake monkey using a novel vertical 7 T/60 cm MR system. The increased sensitivity and spectral dispersion gained at high field enabled the quantification of up to 16 metabolites in 0.1- to 1-ml volumes. Quantification was accomplished by using simulations of 18 metabolite spectra and a macromolecule (MM) background spectrum consisting of 12 components. Major cerebral metabolites (concentrations >3 mM) such as glutamate (Glu), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr)/phosphocreatine (PCr) and myo-inositol (Ins) were identified with an error below 3%; most other metabolites were quantified with errors in the order of 10%. Metabolite ratios were 1.39:1 for total NAA, 1.38:1 for glutamate (Glu)/glutamine (Gln) and 0.09:1 for cholines (Cho) relative to total Cr. Taurine (Tau) was detectable at concentrations lower than 1 mM, while lactate (Lac) remained below the detection limit. The spectral dispersion was sufficient to separate metabolites of similar spectral patterns, such as Gln and Glu, N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) and NAA, and PCr-Cr. MRS in the awake monkey required the development and refinement of acquisition and correction strategies to minimize magnetic susceptibility artifacts induced by respiration and movement of the mouth or body. Periods with major motion artifacts were rejected, while a frequency/phase correction was performed on the remaining single spectra before averaging. In resting periods, both spectral amplitude and line width, that is, the voxel shim, were unaffected permitting reliable measurements. The corrected spectra obtained from the awake monkey afforded the reliable detection of 6-10 cerebral metabolites of 1-ml volumes. PMID:15707786

  10. CCD Washington photometry of three highly field star contaminated open clusters in the third Galactic quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Clariá, J. J.; Parisi, M. C.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    We present CCD photometry in the Washington system C and T1 passbands down to T1 ˜ 19.5 magnitudes in the fields of Czernik 26, Czernik 30, and Haffner 11, three poorly studied open clusters located in the third Galactic quadrant. We measured T1 magnitudes and C - T1 colors for a total of 6472 stars distributed throughout cluster areas of 13.6' × 13.6' each. Cluster radii were estimated from star counts in appropriate-sized boxes distributed throughout the entire observed fields. Based on the best fits of isochrones computed by the Padova group to the ( C - T1, T1) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), we derived color excesses, heliocentric distances and ages for the three clusters. These are characterized by a relatively small angular size and by a high field star contamination. We performed a firm analysis of the field star contamination of the CMDs and examined different relationships between the position in the Galaxy of known open clusters located within 1 kpc around the three studied ones, their age and their interstellar visual absorption. We confirm previous results in the sense that the closer the cluster birthplace to the Galactic plane, the higher the interstellar visual absorption. We also found that the space velocity dispersion perpendicular to the Galactic plane diminishes as the clusters are younger. The positions, interstellar visual absorptions, ages, and metallicities of the three studied clusters favor the hypothesis that they were not born in the recently discovered Canis major (CMa) dwarf galaxy before it was accreted by the Milky Way.

  11. High-field electrical transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaes, Matthias; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Salinga, Martin; Krebs, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Electrical transport in chalcogenide-based phase change materials is an active area of research owing to the prominent role played by these materials in the field of information technology. Here, we present transport measurements (IV curves) obtained on line-cells of as-deposited amorphous phase change materials (Ge2Sb2Te5, GeTe, Ag4In3Sb66Te27) over a wide voltage and temperature range (300 K to 160 K). The well defined geometry of our devices enables a description of the transport behavior in terms of conductivity vs. electric field. At higher temperatures (300 K ≥ T ≥ 220 K) and low to intermediate fields (F < 20 V/μm), the data can be described within the framework of a previously developed model, which is based on multiple trapping transport together with 3D Poole-Frenkel emission from a two-center Coulomb potential. Based on this model, we observe a temperature dependence of the inter-trap distance, which we can relate to a temperature dependence in the occupation of the defect creating the Coulomb potential governing Poole-Frenkel emission. At higher fields and lower temperatures, the dependency of the IV curve on the electric field can be described by ln(I/I0) = (F/Fc)2. By combining this contribution with that of the Poole-Frenkel emission, we can show that the slope at high fields, Fc, is independent of temperature. We argue that models based on direct tunneling or thermally assisted tunneling from a single defect into the valence band cannot explain the observed behavior quantitatively.

  12. Small grains: a key to high-field applications of granular Ba-122 superconductors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecher, J.; Baumgartner, T.; Weiss, J. D.; Tarantini, C.; Yamamoto, A.; Jiang, J.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Eisterer, M.

    2016-02-01

    The grain boundaries (GBs) of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) intrinsically limit the maximum achievable inter-grain current density ({J}{{c}}), when the misalignment between the crystallographic axes of adjacent grains exceeds a certain value. A prominent effect resulting from large-angle GBs is a hysteresis of {J}{{c}} between the increasing and decreasing field branches. Here, we investigate this feature for K- and Co-doped Ba-122 polycrystalline bulks with systematically varied grain size and find that the widely accepted explanation for this effect—the return field of the grains—fails. We use large-area scanning Hall-probe microscopy to distinguish {J}{{c}} from the intra-granular current density ({J}{{G}}) in order to clarify their interactions. Measurements on Ba-122 bulks reveal that a large {J}{{c}} results from a small {J}{{G}} as well as small grains. An extended version of the model proposed by Svistunov and D’yachenko is successfully applied to quantitatively evaluate this behavior. The excellent agreement between the model and experiments suggests that the GBs limit the macroscopic current in all of the samples and that the inter-grain coupling is governed by Josephson tunneling. The predictions of the model are promising in view of realizing high-field HTS magnets. Our main result is that the field dependence of the {J}{{c}} of an untextured wire can be significantly reduced by reducing the grain size, which results in much higher currents at high magnetic fields. This result is not limited to the investigated iron-based materials and is therefore of interest in the context of other HTS materials.

  13. High-Field Functional Imaging of Pitch Processing in Auditory Cortex of the Cat

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Blake E.; Hall, Amee J.; Lomber, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    The perception of pitch is a widely studied and hotly debated topic in human hearing. Many of these studies combine functional imaging techniques with stimuli designed to disambiguate the percept of pitch from frequency information present in the stimulus. While useful in identifying potential “pitch centres” in cortex, the existence of truly pitch-responsive neurons requires single neuron-level measures that can only be undertaken in animal models. While a number of animals have been shown to be sensitive to pitch, few studies have addressed the location of cortical generators of pitch percepts in non-human models. The current study uses high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the feline brain in an attempt to identify regions of cortex that show increased activity in response to pitch-evoking stimuli. Cats were presented with iterated rippled noise (IRN) stimuli, narrowband noise stimuli with the same spectral profile but no perceivable pitch, and a processed IRN stimulus in which phase components were randomized to preserve slowly changing modulations in the absence of pitch (IRNo). Pitch-related activity was not observed to occur in either primary auditory cortex (A1) or the anterior auditory field (AAF) which comprise the core auditory cortex in cats. Rather, cortical areas surrounding the posterior ectosylvian sulcus responded preferentially to the IRN stimulus when compared to narrowband noise, with group analyses revealing bilateral activity centred in the posterior auditory field (PAF). This study demonstrates that fMRI is useful for identifying pitch-related processing in cat cortex, and identifies cortical areas that warrant further investigation. Moreover, we have taken the first steps in identifying a useful animal model for the study of pitch perception. PMID:26225563

  14. High field magnetic resonance imaging-based gel dosimetry for small radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng

    Small megavoltage photon radiation fields (< 3cm diameter) are used in advanced radiation therapy techniques, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery, as well as for cellular and preclinical radiobiology studies (very small fields, <1 mm diameter). Radiation dose characteristics for these small fields are difficult to determine in multiple dimensions because of steep dose gradients (30--40% per mm) and conditions of electronic disequilibrium. Conventional radiation dosimetry techniques have limitations for small fields because detector size may be large compared to radiation field size and/or dose acquisition may be restricted to one or two dimensions. Polymer gel dosimetry, is a three-dimensional (3D) dosimeter based on radiation-induced polymerization of tissue equivalent gelatin. Polymer gel dosimeters can be read using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which detects changes in relaxivity due to gel polymerization. Spatial resolution for dose readout is limited to 0.25--0.5mm pixel size because of available the magnetic field strengths (1.5T and 3T) and the stability of polymer gelatin at room temperature. A reliable glucose-based MAGIC (methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatine initiated by copper) gel dosimeter was formulated and evaluated for small field 3D dosimetry using 3T and 7T high field MRI for dose readout. The melting point of the original recipe MAGIC gel was increased by 4°C by adding 10% glucose to improve gel stability. Excellent spatial resolution of 79um (1.5 hr scan) and 39um (12 hr scan) was achieved using 7T MRI, proving gel stability for long scan times and high resolution 3D dosimetry.

  15. High field properties of NbN conductors on practical substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kampwirth, R.T.; Capone, D.W. II; Gray, K.E.; Ho, H.; Chumbley, S.

    1987-01-01

    A new UHV, oil free, two gun magnetron sputtering system has been developed to allow continuous production of NbN conductors. A scaling rule relating film properties to preparation conditions was successfully used to predict the preparation conditions necessary to achieve the best NbN film properties in the two gun system. Comparison of high field J/sub c/ results between the new two gun system and a diffusion pumped one gun system show similar results for NbN on sapphire substrates, suggesting no effect from oil backstreaming. Short sections of double side coated Ti tapes 25 ..mu..m thick with approx. = ..mu..m of NbN have J/sub c/ = 1 x 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 18T with H/sub c2/(4.2K) of 22.5 to 23 T. Ta wires made under the same conditions with approx. =2.7 ..mu..m of NbN had J/sub c/(18T) a factor of two lower. An 11 turn coil with a 2.5 cm bending radius has been made by coating one side of a moving tape 1.3 m long with approx. =3..mu..m of NbN. The best section had a J/sub c/approx. = 1 x 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 18T and J/sub c/approx. =4 x 10/sup 3/ A/cm/sub 2/ at 20T.

  16. Feasibility study of Nb3Al Rutherford cable for high field accelerator magnet application

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Cooper, C.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Verweij, A.P.; Wake, M.; Willering, G; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Feasibility study of Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand and Rutherford cable for the application to high field accelerator magnets are being done at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. The Nb{sub 3}Al strand, which was developed and manufactured at NIMS in Japan, has a non-copper Jc of about 844 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2 K, a copper content of 50%, and filament size of about 50 microns. Rutherford cables with 27 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1.03 mm diameter were fabricated and tested. Quench tests on a short cable were done to study its stability with only its self field, utilizing a high current transformer. A pair of 2 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al cables was tested extensively at CERN at 4.3 and 1.9 K up to 11 Tesla including its self field with a high transport current of 20.2 kA. In the low field test we observed instability near splices and in the central region. This is related to the flux-jump like behavior, because of excessive amount of Nb in the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. There is possibility that the Nb in Nb{sub 3}Al can cause instability below 2 Tesla field regions. We need further investigation on this problem. Above 8 Tesla, we observed quenches near the critical surface at fast ramp rate from 1000 to 3000 A/sec, with quench velocity over 100 m/sec. A small racetrack magnet was made using a 14 m of Rutherford cable and successfully tested up to 21.8 kA, corresponding to 8.7 T.

  17. Early knee changes in dancers identified by ultra-high-field 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, G; Diamond, M; Nevsky, G; Regatte, R R; Weiss, D S

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to determine whether a unique, ultra-high-field 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner could detect occult cartilage and meniscal injuries in asymptomatic female dancers. This study had Institutional Review Board approval. We recruited eight pre-professional female dancers and nine non-athletic, female controls. We scanned the dominant knee on a 7 T MRI scanner using a three-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequence and a proton density, fast spin-echo sequence to evaluate cartilage and menisci, respectively. Two radiologists scored cartilage (International Cartilage Repair Society classification) and meniscal (Stoller classification) lesions. We applied two-tailed z- and t-tests to determine statistical significance. There were no cartilage lesions in dancers or controls. For the medial meniscus, the dancers demonstrated higher mean MRI score (2.38 ± 0.61 vs 1.0 ± 0.97, P < 0.0001) and higher frequency of mean grade 2 lesions (88% vs 11%, P < 0.01) compared with the controls. For the lateral meniscus, there was no difference in score (0.5 ± 0.81 vs 0.5 ± 0.78, P = 0.78) in dancers compared with the control groups. Asymptomatic dancers demonstrate occult medial meniscal lesions. Because this has been described in early osteoarthritis, close surveillance of dancers' knee symptoms and function with appropriate activity modification may help maintain their long-term knee health. PMID:23346987

  18. High field FT-ICR mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of snow board from Moscow regions.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Dmitry M; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Polyakova, Olga V; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-07-01

    High field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry analysis of eight snow samples from Moscow city allowed us to identify more than 2000 various elemental compositions corresponding to regional air pollutants. The hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the data showed good concordance of three main groups of samples with the main wind directions. The North-West group (A1) is represented by several homologous CHOS series of aliphatic organic aerosols. They may form as a result of enhanced photochemical reactions including oxidation of hydrocarbons with sulfonations due to higher amount of SO2 emissions in the atmosphere in this region. Group A2, corresponding to the South-East part of Moscow, contains large amount of oxidized hydrocarbons of different sources that may form during oxidation in atmosphere. These hydrocarbons appear correlated to emissions from traffic, neighboring oil refinery, and power plants. Another family of compounds specific for this region involves CHNO substances formed during oxidation processes including NOx and NO3 radical since emissions of NOx are higher in this part of the city. Group A3 is rich in CHO type of compounds with high H/C and low O/C ratios, which is characteristic of oxidized hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol. CHNO types of compounds in A3 group are probably nitro derivatives of condensed hydrocarbons such as PAH. This non-targeted profiling revealed site specific distribution of pollutants and gives a chance to develop new strategies in air quality control and further studies of Moscow environment. PMID:26994789

  19. Tunable High-Field Magnetization in Strongly Exchange-Coupled Freestanding Co/CoO Core/Shell Coaxial Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Alvarez, German; Geshev, Julian; Agramunt-Puig, Sebastià; Navau, Carles; Sanchez, Alvaro; Sort, Jordi; Nogués, Josep

    2016-08-31

    The exchange bias properties of Co/CoO coaxial core/shell nanowires were investigated with cooling and applied fields perpendicular to the wire axis. This configuration leads to unexpected exchange-bias effects. First, the magnetization value at high fields is found to depend on the field-cooling conditions. This effect arises from the competition between the magnetic anisotropy and the Zeeman energies for cooling fields perpendicular to the wire axis. This allows imprinting predefined magnetization states to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) shell, as corroborated by micromagnetic simulations. Second, the system exhibits a high-field magnetic irreversibility, leading to open hysteresis loops attributed to the AFM easy axis reorientation during the reversal (effect similar to athermal training). A distinct way to manipulate the high-field magnetization in exchange-biased systems, beyond the archetypical effects, was thus experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. PMID:27502034

  20. The effects of composition, temperature and sample size on the sintering of chem-prep high field varistors.

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, Terry J.

    2007-09-01

    The sintering behavior of Sandia chem-prep high field varistor materials was studied using techniques including in situ shrinkage measurements, optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. A thorough literature review of phase behavior, sintering and microstructure in Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO varistor systems is included. The effects of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content (from 0.25 to 0.56 mol%) and of sodium doping level (0 to 600 ppm) on the isothermal densification kinetics was determined between 650 and 825 C. At {ge} 750 C samples with {ge}0.41 mol% Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} have very similar densification kinetics, whereas samples with {le}0.33 mol% begin to densify only after a period of hours at low temperatures. The effect of the sodium content was greatest at {approx}700 C for standard 0.56 mol% Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and was greater in samples with 0.30 mol% Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} than for those with 0.56 mol%. Sintering experiments on samples of differing size and shape found that densification decreases and mass loss increases with increasing surface area to volume ratio. However, these two effects have different causes: the enhancement in densification as samples increase in size appears to be caused by a low oxygen internal atmosphere that develops whereas the mass loss is due to the evaporation of bismuth oxide. In situ XRD experiments showed that the bismuth is initially present as an oxycarbonate that transforms to metastable {beta}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} by 400 C. At {approx}650 C, coincident with the onset of densification, the cubic binary phase, Bi{sub 38}ZnO{sub 58} forms and remains stable to >800 C, indicating that a eutectic liquid does not form during normal varistor sintering ({approx}730 C). Finally, the formation and morphology of bismuth oxide phase regions that form on the varistors surfaces during slow cooling were studied.

  1. High strength kiloampere Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox cables for high-field magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tengming; Li, Pei; Jiang, Jianyi; Cooley, Lance; Tompkins, John; McRae, Dustin; Walsh, Robert

    2015-06-01

    INCONEL X750 for various high-field magnet applications.

  2. Ultra-high field NMR studies of antibody binding and site-specific phosphorylation of {alpha}-synuclein

    SciTech Connect

    Sasakawa, Hiroaki |; Sakata, Eri; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Masuda, Masami |; Mori, Tetsuya; Kurimoto, Eiji; Iguchi, Takeshi; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kato, Koichi |

    2007-11-23

    Although biological importance of intrinsically disordered proteins is becoming recognized, NMR analyses of this class of proteins remain as tasks with more challenge because of poor chemical shift dispersion. It is expected that ultra-high field NMR spectroscopy offers improved resolution to cope with this difficulty. Here, we report an ultra-high field NMR study of {alpha}-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein identified as the major component of the Lewy bodies. Based on NMR spectral data collected at a 920 MHz proton frequency, we performed epitope mapping of an anti-{alpha}-synuclein monoclonal antibody, and furthermore, characterized conformational effects of phosphorylation at Ser129 of {alpha}-synuclein.

  3. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  4. The high field strength element budget of atmospheric aerosols (puy de Dôme, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastelic, Ivan; Suchorski, Krzysztof; Sellegri, Karine; Colomb, Aurélie; Nauret, François; Bouvier, Laetitia; Piro, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    High field strength elements (HFSE), including Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta and Ti have low solubility in aqueous fluids and partition into dense and resistant minerals. HFSE proved useful in studying terrestrial weathering and sediment transport, but little is known about their behavior during atmospheric processes, which play an important role in global sedimentary cycles. The atmospheric budget of HFSE is evaluated from the sequential dissolution of aerosol samples collected between 2011 and 2014 at puy de Dôme (1465 m elevation, French Massif Central). Aerosols were sampled during nighttime, while the site is generally located above the planetary boundary layer. Systematic, partial recovery of HFSE during gentle dissolution of aerosols indicates that resistant minerals are ubiquitous in air samples. Total dissolution of aerosols in pressure vessels reveals that Zr and Hf occur on average in sub-crustal abundance, which is consistent with the sampling site being dominantly influenced by oceanic air masses depleted in zircons. Conversely, zircon excess occasionally occurs in continental air masses, in particular those originating from northern Africa. Overall, the Hf/Nd ratio, a proxy for zircon fractionation, varies from 0.26 to 3.94 times the Upper Continental Crust (UCC) value, encompassing the range of worldwide loess. This wide compositional range is consistent with (1) the occurrence of coarse zircons (10-30 μm) in dust source, with possible local enrichments relative to bulk UCC in residual wind-winnowed soils, and (2) gravitational settling of coarse zircons during long-distance (>ca. 1000 km) transport. Niobium and Ta are systematically more abundant (by a mean factor of ∼3) in puy de Dôme aerosols than expected from average crustal or soil concentrations. The volume-weighted average Nb/Ta ratio of 15.5 ± 2.6 (1σ) is also higher than in bulk UCC (11.4-13.3). The positive Nb-Ta anomaly of free troposphere aerosols unlikely reflects a net Nb-Ta enrichment but

  5. High-field transport studies of bulk gallium nitride and gallium nitride heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Joy Marie

    . In addition, results of ensemble Monte Carlo simulations are presented and the role of non-equilibrium phonons and high field inhomogeneities that may occur in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures are examined.

  6. Polarizing Agents and Mechanisms for High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of Frozen Dielectric Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of polarizing mechanisms involved in high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of frozen biological samples at temperatures maintained using liquid nitrogen, compatible with contemporary magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Typical DNP experiments require unpaired electrons that are usually exogenous in samples via paramagnetic doping with polarizing agents. Thus, the resulting nuclear polarization mechanism depends on the electron and nuclear spin interactions induced by the paramagnetic species. The Overhauser Effect (OE) DNP, which relies on time-dependent spin-spin interactions, is excluded from our discussion due the lack of conducting electrons in frozen aqueous solutions containing biological entities. DNP of particular interest to us relies primarily on time-independent, spin interactions for significant electron-nucleus polarization transfer through mechanisms such as the Solid Effect (SE), the Cross Effect (CE) or Thermal Mixing (TM), involving one, two or multiple electron spins, respectively. Derived from monomeric radicals initially used in DNP experiments, bi- or multiple-radical polarizing agents facilitate CE/TM to generate significant NMR signal enhancements in dielectric solids at low temperatures (< 100 K). For example, large DNP enhancements (~300 times at 5 T) from a biologically compatible biradical, 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL), have enabled high-resolution MAS NMR in sample systems existing in submicron domains or embedded in larger biomolecular complexes. The scope of this review is focused on recently developed DNP polarizing agents for high-field applications and leads up to future developments per the CE DNP mechanism. Because DNP experiments are feasible with a solid-state microwave source when performed at <20 K, nuclear polarization using lower microwave power (< 100 mW) is possible by forcing a high proportion of biradicals to fulfill the

  7. Electromagnetic modeling of REBCO high field coils by the H-formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jing; Bai, Hongyu; Lu, Jun; Gavrilin, Andrew V.; Zhou, Youhe; Weijers, Hubertus W.

    2015-12-01

    electromagnetic behavior and ac losses in REBCO high field coils. It also provides a basis to analyze the mechanical characteristics in the coils in the future.

  8. High field side launch of RF waves: A new approach to reactor actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lin, Y.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Vieira, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Launching radio frequency (RF) waves from the high field side (HFS) of a tokamak offers significant advantages over low field side (LFS) launch with respect to both wave physics and plasma material interactions (PMI). For lower hybrid (LH) waves, the higher magnetic field opens the window between wave accessibility (n∥≡c k∥/ω >√{1 -ωpi 2/ω2+ωpe 2/ωce 2 }+ωp e/|ωc e| ) and the condition for strong electron Landau damping (n∥˜√{30 /Te } with Te in keV), allowing LH waves from the HFS to penetrate into the core of a burning plasma, while waves launched from the LFS are restricted to the periphery of the plasma. The lower n∥ of waves absorbed at higher Te yields a higher current drive efficiency as well. In the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), HFS launch allows for direct access to the mode conversion layer where mode converted waves absorb strongly on thermal electrons and ions, thus avoiding the generation of energetic minority ion tails. The absence of turbulent heat and particle fluxes on the HFS, particularly in double null configuration, makes it the ideal location to minimize PMI damage to the antenna structure. The quiescent SOL also eliminates the need to couple LH waves across a long distance to the separatrix, as the antenna can be located close to plasma without risking damage to the structure. Improved impurity screening on the HFS will help eliminate the long-standing issues of high Z impurity accumulation with ICRF. Looking toward a fusion reactor, the HFS is the only possible location for a plasma-facing RF antenna that will survive long-term. By integrating the antenna into the blanket module it is possible to improve the tritium breeding ratio compared with an antenna occupying an equatorial port plug. Blanket modules will require remote handling of numerous cooling pipes and electrical connections, and the addition of transmission lines will not substantially increase the level of complexity. The obvious engineering

  9. High-field FT-ICR-MS and aromaticity equivalent approach for structural identification of water soluble organic compounds (WSOC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harir, Mourad; Yassine, Mahmoud M.; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) makes up a large and often dominant fraction, (20 to 90%) of the submicron atmospheric particulate mass, and its effects are becoming increasingly important in determining climatic and health effects of atmospheric aerosols. Despite the abundance of OA, our understanding of the sources, formation processes and atmospheric properties of OA is limited. Atmospheric OA has both primary (directly emitted) and secondary (formed in the atmosphere from precursor gases) sources, which can be natural (e.g. vegetation) and/or anthropogenic (e.g. fossil-based vehicle exhaust or biomass burning). A significant fraction of OA contains as much as 20-70% of water soluble organic compounds (WSOC). The WSOC fraction is a very complex mixture of low volatility, polyfunctional aliphatic and aromatic compounds containing carboxyl, alcohol, carbonyl, sulfo, nitro, and other functionalities. This high degree of chemical complexity of atmospheric organics has inspired a number of sophisticated approaches that are capable of identifying and detecting a variety of different analytes in OA. Accordingly, one of the most challenging areas of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) analysis is to comprehend the molecular complexity of the OA, especially WSOC fraction, a significant component of atmospheric fine PM (PM2.5). The sources of WSOC are not well understood, especially the relative contributions of primary vs. secondary organic aerosol. Therefore, the molecular characterization of WSOC is important because it allows gaining insight into aerosol sources and underlying mechanisms of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation and transformation. In this abstract, molecular characterization of WSOC was achieved using high-field mass spectrometry FT-ICR-MS and aromaticity equivalent approach. Aromaticity equivalent (Xc), defined recently as a new parameter calculated from the assigned molecular formulas (complementary to the aromaticity index [1]), is introduced to improve

  10. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, G. Myneni, F. Stevie, P. Maheshwari, D. Griffis

    2010-02-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low-temperature (100–140°C, 12–48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high-temperature heat treatments, while secondary ion mass spectroscopy surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  11. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    G. Ciovati; Myneni, G.; Stevie, F.; Maheshwari, P.; Griffis, D.

    2010-02-22

    Here, the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimedmore » at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q-slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high temperature heat-treatments, while SIMS surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.« less

  12. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati; Myneni, G.; Stevie, F.; Maheshwari, P.; Griffis, D.

    2010-02-22

    Here, the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q-slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high temperature heat-treatments, while SIMS surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  13. Anomalous thermal hysteresis in the high-field magnetic moments of magnetic nanoparticles embedded in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guo-Meng; Wang, Jun; Ren, Yang; Beeli, Pieder

    2012-02-01

    We report high-temperature (300-1120 K) magnetic properties of Fe and Fe3O4 nanoparticles embedded in multi-walled carbon nanotubes. We unambiguously show that the magnetic moments of Fe and Fe3O4 nanoparticles are seemingly enhanced by a factor of about 3 compared with what they would be expected to have for free (unembedded) magnetic nanoparticles. What is more intriguing is that the enhanced moments were completely lost when the sample was heated up to 1120 K and the lost moments at 1120 K were completely recovered through several thermal cycles below 1020 K. The anomalous thermal hysteresis of the high-field magnetic moments is unlikely to be explained by existing physical models except for the high-field paramagnetic Meissner effect due to the existence of ultrahigh temperature superconductivity in the multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  14. Summary of high field diffusion MRI and microscopy data demonstrate microstructural aberration in chronic mild stress rat brain.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Chuhutin, Andrey; Wiborg, Ove; Kroenke, Christopher D; Nyengaard, Jens R; Hansen, Brian; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-09-01

    This data article describes a large, high resolution diffusion MRI data set from fixed rat brain acquired at high field strength. The rat brain samples consist of 21 adult rat brain hemispheres from animals exposed to chronic mild stress (anhedonic and resilient) and controls. Histology from amygdala of the same brain hemispheres is also included with three different stains: DiI and Hoechst stained microscopic images (confocal microscopy) and ALDH1L1 antibody based immunohistochemistry. These stains may be used to evaluate neurite density (DiI), nuclear density (Hoechst) and astrocytic density (ALDH1L1). This combination of high field diffusion data and high resolution images from microscopy enables comparison of microstructural parameters derived from diffusion MRI to histological microstructure. The data provided here is used in the article (Jespersen, 2016) [1]. PMID:27508246

  15. High-field, hyperpolarized Xe-129 NMR: Preparation and transfer of pure spin-polarized xenon gas to the sample.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Sachs, D. B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Lisitza, N. V.; Happer, W.

    2003-03-01

    Hyperpolarized ^129Xe has already found extensive applications in magnetic resonance imaging(M. S. Albert et al., Nature 370, 199 (1994)) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy(J. P. Mugler, et al., Magn. Reson. Med. 37, 809 (1997)). Using hyperpolarized xenon in high-field NMR spectroscopy opens up new prospects for medical diagnostics of many pathologies and disorders(R. K. Mazitov, et al., Doklady Biophysics 364-366, 28-31 (1999)). Here we present a new set-up for production(N. N. Kuzma, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 147602 (2002)), delivery, and temporary storage of pure hyperpolarized xenon gas for high-field (9.4T) NMR spectroscopy, with an emphasis on in-situ monitoring of ^129Xe polarization along the gas flow path and using a 1.1 T permanent magnet for cryogenic separation of hyperpolarized xenon from the buffer gases.

  16. Spin-orbital nature of the high-field magnetic state in the Sr4Ru3O10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, Veronica; Capogna, Lucia; Forte, Filomena; Lepetit, Marie-Bernadette; Fittipaldi, Rosalba; Stunault, Anne; Cuoco, Mario; Vecchione, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    We perform a spin-polarized neutron-diffraction study to investigate the nature of the high-field magnetic state of the trilayered Sr4Ru3O10 . The analysis indicates that a high field applied within the a b plane leads to an unbalance of the spin and orbital moments with a spatial profile that is strongly tied to the layers where the electrons are located in the unit cell. We provide evidence of a layer dependent magnetic anisotropy with the inner layers having larger spin and orbital magnetic moments than the outer ones and show that such behavior is robust to temperature variation being persistent above the Curie temperature. By means of an effective model that includes the coupling between the spin-orbital degrees of freedom at inequivalent Ru sites we ascribe the origin of the layer anisotropy to the cooperative effects between octahedral distortions, spin orbit, and Coulomb interactions.

  17. Self-consistent description of the core and boundary plasma in the high-field ignition experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, R.; Zagórski, R.

    2000-03-01

    A model has been developed which is capable to describe in a self-consistent way plasma dynamics in the center and edge region of fusion reactor. The core plasma is treated in the frame of 1D radial transport model whereas a 1D analytical model along magnetic field lines for plasma and impurity transport outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) is applied. The model has been used to investigate operation regimes of the high-field IGNITOR experiment.

  18. High-field Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors prepared through a new route

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, K.; Natsuume, M.; Tomori, H.; Kuroda, Y.

    1997-06-01

    Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors have been prepared through Nb{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} compound powder synthesized by a melt diffusion process from Nb and Sn powders. The Nb{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} powder was mixed with Nb powder in a ball mill. The resulting mixed powder was encased in a Ta tube, and fabricated into a tape. The mechanical mixing of Nb{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} and Nb powder promotes the formation of A15 Nb{sub 3}Sn phase in the subsequent heat treatment, and improves superconducting performance. The Nb{sub 3}Sn tape shows an upper critical field B{sub c2} of nearly 25T at 4.2K after the reaction at 900{degrees}C. The B{sub c2} is still increased by Ti doping. A small amount of Cu addition decreases the optimum reaction temperature to 850{degrees}C. Present Nb{sub 3}Sn specimen exhibits considerably larger normal state resistivity than that of bronze-processed Nb{sub 3}Sn, which may be the origin of enhanced B{sub c2} in the present Nb{sub 3}Sn specimen.

  19. Phase 1 Final Technical Report - MgB2 Synthesis for High Field Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mohit Bhatia; Peter McIntyre

    2009-11-02

    boron results in the formation of parasitic phases such as MgB4, MgB7, etc. Such parasitic phases are a primary element of the connectivity problem, in which even though a sample powder may contain grains of high-quality MgB2, adjacent grains are surrounded by intergrowths of parasitic phases so that current trans-port is badly degraded. The best results to date have been obtained using boron powder produced long ago for a rocket propellant development project. The synthesis process was complex and is now largely lost, and the manufacturing equipment has long since been scrapped. The last batch of the powder has been used during recent years to support MgB2 R&D at several labs, but supplies are dwindling. ATC has identified a first application of its plasma torch to synthesize phase-pure amorphous boron flake using a rapid-quench splat technique. Inexpensive technical-grade boron would be purified of contaminants, then dispersed as an aerosol in inert gas and passed through the plasma torch to melt it into a spray. The spray would be splat-condensed on a rotating drum to form pure amorphous flake. The process would begin with technical-grade boron powder, having good stoichiometric purity, nanoscale particles, but significant contamination of MgO and crystalline boron. We used wet chemistry to remove B2O3 completely and reduced the MgO impurity, and analyzed the particle size distribution using a Coulter counter and the phase composition using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD). The next step will be to build an rf plasma torch with a recirculating single-component aerosol feed and the cooled splat drum and collector, and undertake process devel-opment for amorphous boron powder. This revised goal has two benefits. First, it is an easier technology than our ultimate goal of a multi-component laminar flow torch. We have been counseled by those experienced in plasma torch technology that our ultimate goal will require a torch that should be feasible but has never been attempted. It

  20. High-field domains in CdS adjacent to a junction of p-type solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böer, Karl W.

    2016-02-01

    A thin cover layer (150 Å preferred) of copper-doped CdS, when applied on top of any p-type solar cell, can connect this cell directly to an electron-blocking electrode without a pn-junction and increases the open circuit voltage close to its theoretical value; in the example of a CdS/CdTe cell, it increases Voc to its extrapolated value at T = 0 K of the band gap of 1.45 eV. This is caused by a high-field domain that is attached to the junction and limits the field to below tunneling to prevent junction leakage and connects to the CdS that has turned p-type. The large Debye length exceeding the thickness of the CdS forces a direct connection to the electron-blocking cathode with holes tunneling into the metal. The difference of junction-attached high-field domains to the electrode-attached domains, which were described earlier, are given and the consequences are delineated by increasing the conversion efficiency from 8% to 16% in CdTe, while also causing some series resistance limitation. The effect of the added CdS layer is discussed by drawing a to-scale model of the CdS/CdTe solar cell from all experimentally available data and the assumption of the continuity of the hole current. A small jump of the valence band downward is caused by interface recombination. The assistance of high-field domains in CdS is also exemplified by the results of an extremely simple production procedure of the CdS/Cu2S solar cells.

  1. DOE/University instrumentation program grant for funding of the high field, high mass, double focusing, high resolution mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This document discusses the research efforts accomplished using the double focusing, high field, high resolution mass spectrometer, Model JMS HX-100HF (JEOL). Installation of this instrument was accomplished during March of 1986 and operation of the instrument for purposes of application to biological and biochemical problems started during the month of April 1986. areas of research include post-translational modifications of rubisco, biosynthesis of abscisic acid, environmental control of plant development, plant cell wall protein, structural studies of thioltransferase and hexokinase and analogs of peptide harmones and neurotransmitters. 1 fig.

  2. Magnetic properties of superconducting GdBa2Cu3O(6 + delta) at low temperature and high field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Shapira, Y.; Hor, P. H.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetization of antiferromagnetic superconducting GdBa2Cu3O(6 + delta) has been measured for T in the range of 1.5 - 4.2 K for magnetic fields up to about 20 T. It is found that all Gd(3+) spins are nearly parallel at very high fields, and that this saturated spin subsystem coexists with superconductivity. Below the Neel temperature, 2.22 K, the transition from the 'canted' phase to the paramagnetic phase is observed by the application of a high magnetic field. The temperature dependence of this phase transition is also reported.

  3. Self-consistent description of the core and boundary plasma in the high-field ignition experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, R.; Zagórski, R.

    2001-03-01

    A model has been developed which is capable to describe in a self-consistent way plasma dynamics in the center and edge regions of fusion reactor. The core plasma is treated in the frame of 1-D radial transport model whereas a 1-D analytical model along magnetic field lines for plasma and impurity transport outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) is applied. The model is suitable to fast scans of the parameter space of the tokamak type reactor and has been used to investigate operation regimes of the high-field IGNITOR experiment.

  4. Studies of $${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; Lombardo, V.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  5. The reverse mode of the photo activated charge domain in high field biased semi-insulating GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Guanghui; Shi, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The nonlinear accumulation of the photogenerated electrons in high field biased SI-GaAs has been defined as photo activated charge domain (PACD). The transient transport dynamics of the PACD is investigated. The result shows that the PACD, working as a reverse gun dipole domain when biased electric field much higher than 4 kV/cm, and the reverse mode of the PACD could dominate the electric field shielding by its main electric field ultrafast and exponential rising against the bias field. Such mechanisms could play an important role in GaAs THz antenna, GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch, and the other ultrafast GaAs devices.

  6. Concept Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidya, Narendera

    This document, published in India by the Regional College of Education, deals with 13 subjects: the tough context (thinking), definitions of concept, functions of concept, the process of concept formation, discriminant learning, mediation process, second signalling system, factors affecting concept formation, studies in concept formation, the…

  7. Hole-exciton interaction induced high field decay of magneto-electroluminescence in Alq3-based organic light-emitting diodes at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingting; Holford, D. F.; Gu, Hang; Kreouzis, T.; Zhang, Sijie; Gillin, W. P.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic field effects on the electroluminescence of aluminium tris-(8-hydroxyqinoline) (Alq3) based organic light emitting diodes have been investigated by varying the electron/hole ratio in the emissive layer. Experimental results reveal that a negative high field effect in the magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) can be found in devices with very low triplet exciton concentration at room temperature. This suggests triplet-triplet annihilation cannot be used to explain the negative high field MEL in the Alq3 system. Our results suggest that hole-exciton interaction may be the origin of the negative high field MEL and also, in parallel with this interaction, there is also the more common positive high field process occurring which has been tentatively attributed to electron-exciton interactions. The competition between these different processes decides the final shape of the MEL at high fields.

  8. Limits of NbTi and Nb3Sn, and development of W& R Bi-2212 High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Daniel; Dietderich, Daniel; Ferrracin, Paolo; Prestemon, Soren; Sabbi, GianLuca; Scanlan, Ron; Godeke, A.

    2007-06-01

    NbTi accelerator dipoles are limited to magnetic fields (H) of about 10 T, due to an intrinsic upper critical field (H{sub c2}) limitation of 14 T. To surpass this restriction, prototype Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets are being developed which have reached 16 T. We show that Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole technology is practically limited to 17 to 18 T due to insufficient high field pinning, and intrinsically to 20 to 22 T due to H{sub c2} limitations. Therefore, to obtain magnetic fields approaching 20 T and higher, a material is required with a higher H{sub c2} and sufficient high field pinning capacity. A realistic candidate for this purpose is Bi-2212, which is available in round wires and sufficient lengths for the fabrication of coils based on Rutherford-type cables. We initiated a program to develop the required technology to construct accelerator magnets from 'wind-and-react' (W&R) Bi-2212 coils. We outline the complications that arise through the use of Bi-2212, describe the development paths to address these issues, and conclude with the design of W&R Bi-2212 sub-scale magnets.

  9. Toward increased concentration sensitivity for continuous wave EPR investigations of spin-labeled biological macromolecules at high fields.

    PubMed

    Song, Likai; Liu, Zhanglong; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Esquiaqui, Jackie M; Hunter, Robert I; Hill, Stephen; Smith, Graham M; Fanucci, Gail E

    2016-04-01

    High-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at W-(∼94GHz) and D-band (∼140GHz) is important for investigating the conformational dynamics of flexible biological macromolecules because this frequency range has increased spectral sensitivity to nitroxide motion over the 100ps to 2ns regime. However, low concentration sensitivity remains a roadblock for studying aqueous samples at high magnetic fields. Here, we examine the sensitivity of a non-resonant thin-layer cylindrical sample holder, coupled to a quasi-optical induction-mode W-band EPR spectrometer (HiPER), for continuous wave (CW) EPR analyses of: (i) the aqueous nitroxide standard, TEMPO; (ii) the unstructured to α-helical transition of a model IDP protein; and (iii) the base-stacking transition in a kink-turn motif of a large 232nt RNA. For sample volumes of ∼50μL, concentration sensitivities of 2-20μM were achieved, representing a ∼10-fold enhancement compared to a cylindrical TE011 resonator on a commercial Bruker W-band spectrometer. These results therefore highlight the sensitivity of the thin-layer sample holders employed in HiPER for spin-labeling studies of biological macromolecules at high fields, where applications can extend to other systems that are facilitated by the modest sample volumes and ease of sample loading and geometry. PMID:26923151

  10. Comprehensive untargeted lipidomic analysis using core-shell C30 particle column and high field orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivas, Mónica; Zhang, Qibin

    2016-04-01

    The goal of untargeted lipidomics is to have high throughput, yet comprehensive and unambiguous identification and quantification of lipids. Novel stationary phases in LC separation and new mass spectrometric instruments capable of high mass resolving power and faster scanning rate are essential to achieving this goal. In this work, 4 reversed phase LC columns coupled with a high field quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometer (Q Exactive HF) were thoroughly compared using complex lipid standard mixture and rat plasma and liver samples. A good separation of all lipids was achieved in 24min of gradient. The columns compared include C30 and C18 functionalization on either core-shell or totally porous silica particles, with size ranging from 1.7 to 2.6μm. Accucore C30 column showed the narrowest peaks and highest theoretical plate number, and excellent peak capacity and retention time reproducibility (<1% standard deviation). As a result, it resulted in 430 lipid species identified from rat plasma and rat liver samples with highest confidence. The high resolution offered by the up-front RPLC allowed discrimination of cis/trans isomeric lipid species, and the high field orbitrap mass spectrometer afforded the clear distinction of isobaric lipid species in full scan MS and the unambiguous assignment of sn-positional isomers for lysophospholipids in MS/MS. Taken together, the high efficiency LC separation and high mass resolving MS analysis are very promising tools for untargeted lipidomics analysis. PMID:26928874