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Sample records for high-frequency gmi effect

  1. High Frequency Amplitude Detector for GMI Magnetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Asfour, Aktham; Zidi, Manel; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    A new concept of a high-frequency amplitude detector and demodulator for Giant-Magneto-Impedance (GMI) sensors is presented. This concept combines a half wave rectifier, with outstanding capabilities and high speed, and a feedback approach that ensures the amplitude detection with easily adjustable gain. The developed detector is capable of measuring high-frequency and very low amplitude signals without the use of diode-based active rectifiers or analog multipliers. The performances of this detector are addressed throughout the paper. The full circuitry of the design is given, together with a comprehensive theoretical study of the concept and experimental validation. The detector has been used for the amplitude measurement of both single frequency and pulsed signals and for the demodulation of amplitude-modulated signals. It has also been successfully integrated in a GMI sensor prototype. Magnetic field and electrical current measurements in open- and closed-loop of this sensor have also been conducted. PMID:25536003

  2. GMI High Frequency Antenna Pattern Correction Update Based on GPM Inertial Hold and Comparison with ATMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, David W.

    2015-01-01

    In an inertial hold, the spacecraft does not attempt to maintain geodetic pointing, but rather maintains the same inertial position throughout the orbit. The result is that the spacecraft appears to pitch from 0 to 360 degrees around the orbit. Two inertial holds were performed with the GPM spacecraft: 1) May 20, 2014 16:48:31 UTC-18:21:04 UTC, spacecraft flying forward +X (0yaw), pitch from 55 degrees (FCS) to 415 degrees (FCS) over the orbit2) Dec 9, 2014 01:30:00 UTC-03:02:32 UTC, spacecraft flying backward X (180yaw), pitch from 0 degrees (FCS) to 360 degrees (FCS) over the orbitThe inertial hold affords a view of the earth through the antenna backlobe. The antenna spillover correction may be evaluated based on the inertial hold data.The current antenna pattern correction does not correct for spillover in the 166 and 183 GHz channels. The two inertial holds both demonstrate that there is significant spillover from the 166 and 183 GHz channels. By not correcting the spillover, the 166 and 183 GHz channels are biased low by about 1.8 to 3K. We propose to update the GMI calibration algorithm with the spill-over correction presented in this document for 166 GHz and 183 GHz.

  3. Enhanced GMI effect in NiZn-ferrite-modified Fe-based amorphous ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojun; Du, Jinlu; Zhu, Zengtai; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2015-06-01

    A thin NiZn-ferrite layer was fabricated on the free surface of a Fe-based amorphous ribbon by radio frequency magnetron sputtering, and the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect was measured at different magnetic fields and frequencies. An enhanced GMI effect has been observed in the NiZn-ferrite-modified ribbon at all measured frequencies. The largest GMI ratio up to 80 % is about 2.6 times as large as that of the ribbon without any coating. This enhanced GMI effect is mainly explained in terms of induced stress, the transformation of the domain structure and the magnetic flux path in the modified ribbon. The results obtained are of significant importance in developing strong-signal magnetic sensors.

  4. GMI Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strode, Sarah; Rodriguez, Jose; Steenrod, Steve; Liu, Junhua; Strahan, Susan; Nielsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe the capabilities of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model (CTM) with a special focus on capabilities related to the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom). Several science results based on GMI hindcast simulations and preliminary results from the ATom simulations are highlighted. We also discuss the relationship between GMI and GEOS-5.

  5. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  6. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  7. GMI Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimchansky, Sergey; Newell, David

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is concerned with the status of the Global Precipitation Measurement-Microwave Imager (GMI). Included in the presentation is an overview that shows a diagram of the craft, the improvements over other precipitation measurement satellites, and information about the calibration approach.

  8. Osteogenic Effect of High-frequency Acceleration on Alveolar Bone

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani, M.; Khoo, E.; Alyami, B.; Raptis, M.; Salgueiro, J.M.; Oliveira, S.M.; Boskey, A.; Teixeira, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation contributes to the health of alveolar bone, but no therapy using the osteogenic effects of these stimuli to increase alveolar bone formation has been developed. We propose that the application of high-frequency acceleration to teeth in the absence of significant loading is osteogenic. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided among control, sham, and experimental groups. The experimental group underwent localized accelerations at different frequencies for 5 min/day on the occlusal surface of the maxillary right first molar at a very low magnitude of loading (4 µε). Sham rats received a similar load in the absence of acceleration or frequency. The alveolar bone of the maxilla was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (µCT), histology, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR imaging), and RT-PCR for osteogenic genes. Results demonstrate that application of high-frequency acceleration significantly increased alveolar bone formation. These effects were not restricted to the area of application, and loading could be replaced by frequency and acceleration. These studies propose a simple mechanical therapy that may play a significant role in alveolar bone formation and maintenance. PMID:22337699

  9. Effects of high frequency current in welding aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Uncontrolled high frequency current causes cracking in the heat-affected zone of aluminum alloy 6061 weldments during tungsten inert gas ac welding. Cracking developed when an improperly adjusted superimposed high frequency current was agitating the semimolten metal in the areas of grain boundary.

  10. Inaudible high-frequency sounds affect brain activity: hypersonic effect.

    PubMed

    Oohashi, T; Nishina, E; Honda, M; Yonekura, Y; Fuwamoto, Y; Kawai, N; Maekawa, T; Nakamura, S; Fukuyama, H; Shibasaki, H

    2000-06-01

    pleasant than the same sound lacking an HFC. These results suggest the existence of a previously unrecognized response to complex sound containing particular types of high frequencies above the audible range. We term this phenomenon the "hypersonic effect." PMID:10848570

  11. Prediction of high frequency gust response with airfoil thickness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysak, Peter D.; Capone, Dean E.; Jonson, Michael L.

    2013-05-01

    The unsteady lift forces that act on an airfoil in turbulent flow are an undesirable source of vibration and noise in many industrial applications. Methods to predict these forces have traditionally treated the airfoil as a flat plate. At higher frequencies, where the relevant turbulent length scales are comparable to the airfoil thickness, the flat plate approximation becomes invalid and results in overprediction of the unsteady force spectrum. This work provides an improved methodology for the prediction of the unsteady lift forces that accounts for the thickness of the airfoil. An analytical model was developed to calculate the response of the airfoil to high frequency gusts. The approach is based on a time-domain calculation with a sharp-edged gust and accounts for the distortion of the gust by the mean flow around the airfoil leading edge. The unsteady lift is calculated from a weighted integration of the gust vorticity, which makes the model relatively straightforward to implement and verify. For routine design calculations of turbulence-induced forces, a closed-form gust response thickness correction factor was developed for NACA 65 series airfoils.

  12. Impact-GMI Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-03-22

    IMPACT-GMI is an atmospheric chemical transport model designed to run on massively parallel computers. It is designed to model trace pollutants in the atmosphere. It includes models for emission, chemistry and deposition of pollutants. It can be used to assess air quality and its impact on future climate change.

  13. High-frequency acousto-optic effects in Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Farmer, D J; Akimov, A V; Gippius, N A; Bailey, J; Sharp, J S; Kent, A J

    2014-06-16

    Picosecond acoustic interferometry was used to study the acousto-optic properties of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) manufactured from two immiscible polymers (cellulose acetate and polyvinylcarbyzole). Picosecond strain pulses were injected into the structure and changes in its reflectance were monitored as a function of time. The reflectance exhibited single-frequency harmonic oscillations as the strain pulse traversed the DBR. A transfer matrix method was used to model the reflectance of the DBR in response to interface modulation and photo-elastic effects. This work shows that photo-elastic effects can account for the acousto-optic response of DBRs with acoustically matched layers. PMID:24977613

  14. Influence of Fe doping and FeNi-layer thickness on the magnetic properties and GMI effect of electrodeposited Ni100-xFex/Cu (x = 0 95) wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Tung, Mai; Van Dung, Nguyen; Hoang Nghi, Nguyen; Phan, Manh-Huong; Peng, Hua-Xin

    2008-05-01

    A systematic study has been performed by the influence of Fe doping and FeNi-layer thickness on the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect of electrodeposited Ni100-xFex/Cu (x = 0-95) composite wires. Results obtained show that there is a correlation between the structure, soft magnetic properties and the GMI effect. Among the compositions investigated, the largest MI ratio is achieved for Ni44Fe56/Cu as a result of it having the softest magnetic property (i.e. the lowest coercivity), which arises from the smallest nanograin size. As the NiFe-layer thickness (t) increases from 1 to 27.4 µm, the GMI ratio initially increases, reaches a maximum of 110% at t = 27.4 µm and then decreases for t > 27.4 µm. Interestingly, GMI curves show a single-peak feature for wires with t < 20 µm, but a double-peak one for wires with t >= 20 µm. This indicates that there is a formation of a circular domain structure with a well-defined circumferential anisotropy in the NiFe magnetic layer of the wires with t >= 20 µm. This in turn results in a great improvement in the GMI effect of these wires.

  15. Observations of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies: Finite dust temperature effects and wave interference

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward Jr.; Fisher, Ross; Merlino, Robert L.

    2007-12-15

    An experiment has been performed to study the behavior of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies (f>100 Hz), extending the range of previous work. In this study, two previously unreported phenomena are observed--interference effects between naturally excited dust acoustic waves and driven dust acoustic waves, and the observation of finite dust temperature effects on the dispersion relation.

  16. High frequency electromagnetic resistive instability in a Hall thruster under the effect of ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sukhmander; Malik, Hitendra K.; Nishida, Yasushi

    2013-10-01

    Two types of high frequency electromagnetic resistive instabilities are found to occur in a Hall thruster plasma in the presence of collisions and ionization, out of which one of lower growth rate (called lower magnitude high frequency instability (LMHFI)) is sensitive to the axial component of the wave vector. The effects of ionization, collisions, and electron drift velocity on the growth rates of these instabilities are studied in greater details. The LMHFI grows faster in the presence of ionization but shows weaker dependence on the electrons' E→×B→ drift, contrary to the case of other instability (called higher magnitude high frequency instability) which is sensitive to the azimuthal wave number and collisions.

  17. High frequency electromagnetic resistive instability in a Hall thruster under the effect of ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sukhmander; Malik, Hitendra K.; Nishida, Yasushi

    2013-10-15

    Two types of high frequency electromagnetic resistive instabilities are found to occur in a Hall thruster plasma in the presence of collisions and ionization, out of which one of lower growth rate (called lower magnitude high frequency instability (LMHFI)) is sensitive to the axial component of the wave vector. The effects of ionization, collisions, and electron drift velocity on the growth rates of these instabilities are studied in greater details. The LMHFI grows faster in the presence of ionization but shows weaker dependence on the electrons' E(vector sign)×B(vector sign) drift, contrary to the case of other instability (called higher magnitude high frequency instability) which is sensitive to the azimuthal wave number and collisions.

  18. High frequency ultrasound penetration through concentric tubes: illustrating cooling effects and cavitation intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Masoud; Abolhasani, Mahdieh; Azimi, Neda

    2015-04-01

    Effective cooling of water by using high frequency ultrasound waves in two concentric straight tubes was investigated. The outer tube was equipped with eight 1.7 MHz ultrasound transducers. The cavitation intensity in both tubes was examined by employing the Weissler reaction. The experimental results showed that employing the 1.7 MHz ultrasound waves caused high temperature drop in the internal tube while no significant thermal effects occurred in the outer tube.

  19. High frequency ultrasound penetration through concentric tubes: illustrating cooling effects and cavitation intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Masoud; Abolhasani, Mahdieh; Azimi, Neda

    2014-10-01

    Effective cooling of water by using high frequency ultrasound waves in two concentric straight tubes was investigated. The outer tube was equipped with eight 1.7 MHz ultrasound transducers. The cavitation intensity in both tubes was examined by employing the Weissler reaction. The experimental results showed that employing the 1.7 MHz ultrasound waves caused high temperature drop in the internal tube while no significant thermal effects occurred in the outer tube.

  20. Effects of High-frequency Wind Sampling on Simulated Mixed Layer Depth and Upper Ocean Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Liu, W. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing the model with a 12 hourly averaged wind product and its 24 hourly subsamples in separate experiments. The differences in mixed layer depth and sea surface temperature resulting from these experiments are examined, and the underlying physical processes are investigated. The 24 hourly subsampling not only reduces the high-frequency variability of the wind but also affects the annual mean wind because of aliasing. While the former effect largely impacts mid- to high-latitude oceans, the latter primarily affects tropical and coastal oceans. At mid- to high-latitude regions the subsampled wind results in a shallower mixed layer and higher sea surface temperature because of reduced vertical mixing associated with weaker high-frequency wind. In tropical and coastal regions, however, the change in upper ocean structure due to the wind subsampling is primarily caused by the difference in advection resulting from aliased annual mean wind, which varies with the subsampling time. The results of the study indicate a need for more frequent sampling of satellite wind measurement and have implications for data assimilation in terms of identifying the nature of model errors.

  1. Little effect of natural noise on high-frequency hearing in frogs, Odorrana tormota.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yang, Han; Hu, Guang-Lei; Li, Shan; Xu, Zhi-Min; Qi, Zhi; Shen, Jun-Xian

    2015-10-01

    Ambient noise influences acoustic communication in animals. The concave-eared frogs (Odorrana tormota) produce high-frequency sound signals to avoid potential masking from noise. However, whether environmental noise has effect on the high-frequency hearing of frogs is largely unclear. By measuring the auditory evoked near-field potentials (AENFPs) from the torus semicircularis of the midbrain at frequencies 1-23 kHz in the presence of three noise levels, we found no significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitude, threshold and latency of AENFP between low-level (35 dB SPL) background noise and mid-level (65 dB SPL) broadcast natural noise. For a natural noise level of 85 dB SPL, AENFP amplitude decreased and threshold and latency increased at frequencies 3-13 kHz. Spike counts evoked by stimuli at the best excitatory frequency under 85 dB SPL natural noise exposure were lower in 7-kHz CF neurons than in exposures to 35 and 65 dB SPL noise. However spike counts were similar for 14- and 20-kHz CF neurons at the three exposure levels. These findings indicate that environmental noise does not mask the responses of high-frequency tuned auditory neurons, and suggest that the acoustic communication system of O. tormota is efficiently adapted to noisy habitats. PMID:26260392

  2. Enhanced GMI effect in Fe 73.5-xMn xSi 13.5B 9Nb 3Cu I (x=1,3,5) nanocomposites due to Mn substitution for Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Peng, Hua-Xin; Yu, Seong-Cho; Tho, Nguyen D.; Chau, Nguyen

    2006-03-01

    Influence of Mn partial substitution for Fe on the magnetic and magnetoimpedance properties of Fe 73.5-xMn xSi 13.5B 9Nb 3Cu I (x = 1, 3, and 5) nanocomposite ribbons were investigated. The results indicated that the Mn addition led to an improved exchange coupling between grains and hence in the magnetic softness. Consequently, the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect was significantly enhanced in these nanocomposites. In the frequency range of 0.1-10 Mhz, the GMI ratio reached the highest values of 83%, 94%, and 130% at the frequency of 2 MHz for x = 1, 3, and 5 compositions, respectively. The corresponding field sensitivity of GMI reached the highest values of 6, 7, and 16 %/Oe, respectively. These indicate that Fe 73.5-xMn xSi 13.5B 9Nb 3Cu I (x = 1, 3, and 5) nanocomposites are potential candidate materials for making GMI sensors.

  3. The effects of pulsed, high frequency radio waves on rat liver (ultrastructural and biomedical observations)

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, L.; Muresan, M.; Comorosan, S.; Paslaru, L. )

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a high frequency electromagnetic field, generated by a Diapulse instrument (Diapulse Corporation of America) on rat liver has been investigated. Ultrastructural aspects are described and quantitative determinations of mitochondrial enzymes MAO, CyT-Ox, MDH, SDH and ATP-ase recorded. The standard therapeutic parameters generally used with the Diapulse instrument in medicine were found to induce a stimulation effect at the investigated level, without apparent degenerative modifications. A concordance between the qualitative ultrastructural data and quantitative subcellular enzymic determinations has been observed.

  4. Some General Effects of Strong High-Frequency Excitation: Stiffening, Biasing and Smoothening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    THOMSEN, J. J.

    2002-06-01

    Mechanical high-frequency (HF) excitation provides a working principle behind many industrial and natural applications and phenomena. This paper concerns three particular effects of HF excitation, that may change the apparent characteristics of mechanical systems: (1) stiffening, by which the apparent linear stiffness associated with an equilibrium is changed, along with derived quantities such as stability and natural frequencies; (2) biasing by which the system is biased towards a particular state, static or dynamic, which does not exist or is unstable in the absence of the HF excitation; and (3) smoothening, referring to a tendency for discontinuities to be effectively “smeared out” by HF excitation. Illustrating first these effects for a few specific systems, analytical results are provided that quantify them for a quite general class of mechanical systems. This class covers systems that can be modelled by a finite number of second order ordinary differential equations, generally non-linear, with periodically oscillating excitation terms of high frequency and small amplitude. The results should be useful for understanding the effects in question in a broader perspective than is possible with specific systems, for calculating effects for specific systems using well-defined formulas, and for possibly designing systems that display prescribed characteristics in the presence of HF excitation.

  5. Effect of Interfacial characteristics of metal clad polymeric substrates on electrical high frequency interconnection performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Ponchak, G. E.; Liu, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    Etched metallic conductor lines on metal clad polymeric substrates are used for electronic component interconnections. Significant signal losses are observed for microstrip conductor lines used for interconnecting high frequency devices. At these frequencies, the electronic signal travels closer to the metal-polymer interface due to the skin effect. Copper-teflon interfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to determine the interfacial properties. Data relating roughness of the copper film to signal losses was compared to theory. Films used to enhance adhesion are found, to contribute to these losses.

  6. High-frequency ultrasound treatment of sludge: combined effect of surfactants removal and floc disintegration.

    PubMed

    Gallipoli, A; Braguglia, C M

    2012-07-01

    Ultrasounds represent an effective technology in many research fields. In sewage sludge treatment, low-frequency ultrasound, particularly at 20 kHz, are widely used for sludge disintegration before the anaerobic digestion, while in the last years novel application of high-frequency ultrasound regards the decontamination of water and wastewater through sonochemical reactions. The innovative approach presented in this paper is the treatment of sewage sludge with ultrasound at 200 kHz for obtaining efficient sludge disintegration and the removal of the linear alkylbenzenesulphonates (LAS) at the same time. Results of the sonolysis experiments showed that native LAS degradation up to 40% can be achieved with low power input in less than 1h. The degradation pattern was different for each LAS homologue (from C10 to C13), because of their physical-chemical properties, in particular as regards the alkyl chain length. This high-frequency ultrasound irradiation resulted effective also in terms of floc disintegration and soluble organic matter release, in particular for energy inputs higher than 30,000 kJ/kg TS. The disrupting effect of the 200 kHz treatment was also evaluated by microscope analyses and determination of the extracellular polymeric substances release in the liquid phase. PMID:22245371

  7. The effect of sampling rate and anti-aliasing filters on high-frequency response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Goulet, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used intensity measure in ground-motion prediction equations is the pseudo-absolute response spectral acceleration (PSA), for response periods from 0.01 to 10 s (or frequencies from 0.1 to 100 Hz). PSAs are often derived from recorded ground motions, and these motions are usually filtered to remove high and low frequencies before the PSAs are computed. In this article we are only concerned with the removal of high frequencies. In modern digital recordings, this filtering corresponds at least to an anti-aliasing filter applied before conversion to digital values. Additional high-cut filtering is sometimes applied both to digital and to analog records to reduce high-frequency noise. Potential errors on the short-period (high-frequency) response spectral values are expected if the true ground motion has significant energy at frequencies above that of the anti-aliasing filter. This is especially important for areas where the instrumental sample rate and the associated anti-aliasing filter corner frequency (above which significant energy in the time series is removed) are low relative to the frequencies contained in the true ground motions. A ground-motion simulation study was conducted to investigate these effects and to develop guidance for defining the usable bandwidth for high-frequency PSA. The primary conclusion is that if the ratio of the maximum Fourier acceleration spectrum (FAS) to the FAS at a frequency fsaa corresponding to the start of the anti-aliasing filter is more than about 10, then PSA for frequencies above fsaa should be little affected by the recording process, because the ground-motion frequencies that control the response spectra will be less than fsaa . A second topic of this article concerns the resampling of the digital acceleration time series to a higher sample rate often used in the computation of short-period PSA. We confirm previous findings that sinc-function interpolation is preferred to the standard practice of using

  8. Centrifugal compressor modifications and their effect on high-frequency pipe wall vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Motriuk, R.W.; Harvey, D.P.

    1998-08-01

    High-frequency pulsation generated by centrifugal compressors, with pressure wave-lengths much smaller than the attached pipe diameter, can cause fatigue failures of the compressor internals, impair compressor performance, and damage the attached compressor piping. There are numerous sources producing pulsation in centrifugal compressors. Some of them are discussed in literature at large (Japikse, 1995; Niese, 1976). NGTL has experienced extreme high-frequency discharge pulsation and pipe wall vibration on many of its radial inlet high-flow centrifugal gas compressor facilities. These pulsations led to several piping attachment failures and compressor internal component failures while the compressor operated within the design envelope. This paper considers several pulsation conditions at an NGTL compression facility which resulted in unacceptable piping vibration. Significant vibration attenuation was achieved by modifying the compressor (pulsation source) through removal of the diffuser vanes and partial removal of the inlet guide vanes (IGV). Direct comparison of the changes in vibration, pulsation, and performance are made for each of the modifications. The vibration problem, probable causes, options available to address the problem, and the results of implementation are reviewed. The effects of diffuser vane removal on discharge pipe wall vibration as well as changes in compressor performance are described.

  9. Optimization of the Electromagnetic (EM) Perturbative Effects Produced by High-Frequency Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Zhang, Lu; Wen, Hao

    2016-03-01

    For the relic gravitational waves in high frequency band, we survey the electromagnetic resonance effect generated from the high frequency gravitational waves, which can be described in the transverse perturbative photon fluxes. Under the fixed tensor-scalar ratio r = 0.2, spectral index n t = 0 and running index α t = 0.01, we discuss several properties and quantity changes of the transverse perturbative photon fluxes, which can be improved significantly through setting the longitudinal magnetic component of background EM field in the standard gaussian form, and wave impedance analysis on the transverse direction. Through the theoretical calculation, the transverse perturbative photon fluxes can reach up to 103 s -1 with some optimal parameters such as waist of EM field W 0 = 0.05m, initial stochastic phase of gravitational waves δ = (0.21 + n) π( n = 0,1,2...). Furthermore the interference of the background transverse photon fluxes can be removed completely through establishing a suitable wave impedance function.

  10. High frequency current sensors using the Faraday effect in optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cernosek, R.W.

    1994-09-01

    This study investigates the high frequency response of Faraday effect optical fiber current sensors that are bandwidth-limited by the transit time of the light in the fiber. Mathematical models were developed for several configurations of planar (collocated turns) and travelling wave (helical turns) singlemode fiber sensor coils, and experimental measurements verified the model predictions. High frequency operation above 500 MHz, with good sensitivity, was demonstrated for several current sensors; this frequency region was not previously considered accessible by fiber devices. Planar fiber coils in three configurations were investigated: circular cross section with the conductor centered coaxially; circular cross section with the conductor noncentered; and noncircular cross section with arbitrary location of the conductor. The helical travelling wave fiber coils were immersed in the dielectric of a coaxial transmission line to improve velocity phase matching between the field and light. Three liquids (propanol, methanol, and water) and air were used as transmission line dielectric. Complete models, which must account for liquid dispersion and waveguide dispersion from the multilayer dielectric in the transmission line, were developed to describe the Faraday response of the travelling wave sensors. Other travelling wave current sensors with potentially greater Faraday sensitivity, wider bandwidth and smaller size are investigated using the theoretical models developed for the singlemode fibers coils.

  11. Experimental observation of standing wave effect in low-pressure very-high-frequency capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Jia; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-07-28

    Radial uniformity measurements of plasma density were carried out by using a floating double probe in a cylindrical (21 cm in electrode diameter) capacitive discharge reactor driven over a wide range of frequencies (27–220 MHz). At low rf power, a multiple-node structure of standing wave effect was observed at 130 MHz. The secondary density peak caused by the standing wave effect became pronounced and shifts toward the axis as the driving frequency further to increase, indicative of a much more shortened standing-wave wavelength. With increasing rf power, the secondary density peak shift toward the radial edge, namely, the standing-wave wavelength was increased, in good qualitative agreement with the previous theory and simulation results. At higher pressures and high frequencies, the rf power was primarily deposited at the periphery of the electrode, due to the fact that the waves were strongly damped as they propagated from the discharge edge into the center.

  12. [Effectiveness of high frequency jet ventilation introduced immediately after cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Morishita, A; Hoshino, K; Katahira, S; Tomioka, H

    2008-11-01

    It is important to establish the lung protective strategy strictly for serious respiratory failure after cardiac surgery, because the hemodynamic state is unstable. High frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) was introduced in 5 patients with respiratory failure after cardiac surgery. Two had been diagnosed with acute aortic dissection and 3 with angina pectorlis. Off pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed in 2 patients. Hemodynamic variables during HFJV were stable, and the duration of HFJV was 9 to 45 hours. Oxygenations improved immediately by the introduction of HFJV in all patients, and no adverse effect was recognized. Therefore, use of HFJV immediately after cardiac surgery might be an effective respiratory therapy of choice for patients with acute lung injury. PMID:19048904

  13. The effect of metal-contacts on carbon nanotube for high frequency interconnects and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chimowa, George; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2014-08-15

    High frequency characterisation of platinum and tungsten contacts on individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) is performed from 10 MHz to 50 GHz. By measuring the scattering parameters of aligned individual MWNTs, we show that metal contacts enhance an inductive response due to the improved MWNT-electrode coupling reducing the capacitive effect. This behaviour is pronounced in the frequency below 10 GHz and strong for tungsten contacts. We explain the inductive response as a result of the interaction of stimulus current with the localized (or defects) states present at the contact region resulting in the current lagging behind the voltage. The results are further supported by direct current measurements that show tungsten to significantly increase carbon nanotube-electrode coupling. The immediate consequence is the reduction of the contact resistance, implying a reduction of electron tunnelling barrier from the electrode to the carbon nanotube.

  14. High-frequency electron-gas secondary neutral mass spectrometry: evaluation of transient effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimke, Ralf; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Wucher, Andreas

    1997-06-01

    In electron-gas secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), a low-pressure plasma serves both as an ion source for sputter depth profiling the target and for post-ionizing the sputtered neutrals. In its high-frequency mode, a rectangular RF bias is applied to the target. We investigate by PIC/MC kinetic simulation the processes occurring in the vicinity of the substrate as a consequence of the voltage jumps: sheath expansion and contraction, as well as flux and energy of the ions impinging onto the substrate. In particular, we determine the enhancement of the ion current shortly after negatively charging the substrate; this enhancement is due to the acceleration of the large ion population in the expanding sheath. Our results indicate that already at a switch frequency of only 1 MHz the surface treatment by rectangularly shaped RF potentials is dominated by transient effects.

  15. Experimental investigation of the effects of high-frequency electroactive morphing on the shear-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Johannes; Rizzo, Karl-Joseph; Jodin, Gurvan; Duhayon, Eric; Rouchon, Jean-François; Hunt, Julian; Braza, Marianna

    2015-11-01

    Time-resolved PIV measurements are conducted at a Reynolds number of 270 . 000 downstream of the trailing edge of a NACA4412 airfoil equipped with trailing-edge piezoelectric tab actuators to investigate the high-frequency low-amplitude actuation's effect on the shear-layer. A comparison of the time-averaged Reynolds stress tensor components at different actuation frequency reveals a significant impact of the actuation on the shear-layer dynamics. A proper orthogonal decomposition analysis is conducted in order to investigate the actuation's impact on the vortex breakdown. It will be shown that a specific low-amplitude actuation frequency enables a reduction of the predominant shear-layer frequencies.

  16. High-frequency vibration effect on the stability of a horizontal layer of ternary fluid.

    PubMed

    Lyubimova, Tatyana

    2015-05-01

    The effect of small-amplitude high-frequency longitudinal vibrations on the stability of a horizontal layer of ternary fluid is studied in the framework of average approach. Long-wave instability is studied analytically and instability to the perturbations with finite wave numbers is studied numerically. It is found that, similar to the case when vibrations are absent, for ternary fluids there exist monotonic and oscillatory long-wave instability modes. The calculations show that the vibrations lead to destabilization in the case of heating from below and to stabilization in the case of heating from above. Additionally, vibrations influence on the parameter range where long-wave instability is most dangerous. New, vibrational, instability modes are found which leads to the existence of convection in zero-gravity conditions. PMID:25998169

  17. Neuro-genetic system for optimization of GMI samples sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pitta Botelho, A C O; Vellasco, M M B R; Hall Barbosa, C R; Costa Silva, E

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic sensors are largely used in several engineering areas. Among them, magnetic sensors based on the Giant Magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect are a new family of magnetic sensing devices that have a huge potential for applications involving measurements of ultra-weak magnetic fields. The sensitivity of magnetometers is directly associated with the sensitivity of their sensing elements. The GMI effect is characterized by a large variation of the impedance (magnitude and phase) of a ferromagnetic sample, when subjected to a magnetic field. Recent studies have shown that phase-based GMI magnetometers have the potential to increase the sensitivity by about 100 times. The sensitivity of GMI samples depends on several parameters, such as sample length, external magnetic field, DC level and frequency of the excitation current. However, this dependency is yet to be sufficiently well-modeled in quantitative terms. So, the search for the set of parameters that optimizes the samples sensitivity is usually empirical and very time consuming. This paper deals with this problem by proposing a new neuro-genetic system aimed at maximizing the impedance phase sensitivity of GMI samples. A Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) Neural Network is used to model the impedance phase and a Genetic Algorithm uses the information provided by the neural network to determine which set of parameters maximizes the impedance phase sensitivity. The results obtained with a data set composed of four different GMI sample lengths demonstrate that the neuro-genetic system is able to correctly and automatically determine the set of conditioning parameters responsible for maximizing their phase sensitivities. PMID:26775132

  18. Frequencies of Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Differentially Affect Brain Activity: Positive and Negative Hypersonic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10–13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  19. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  20. Effects of high-frequency alternating current on axonal conduction through the vagus nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waataja, Jonathan J.; Tweden, Katherine S.; Honda, Christopher N.

    2011-10-01

    High-frequency alternating current (HFAC) is known to disrupt axonal conduction in peripheral nerves, and HFAC has much potential as a therapeutic approach for a number of pathological conditions. Many previous studies have utilized motor output as a bioassay of effects of HFAC on conduction through medium- to large-diameter motor axons. However, little is known about the effectiveness of HFAC on smaller, more slowly conducting nerve fibres. The present study tested whether HFAC influences axonal conduction through sub-diaphragmatic levels of the rat vagus nerve, which consists almost entirely of small calibre axons. Using an isolated nerve preparation, we tested the effects of HFAC on electrically evoked compound action potentials (CAPs). We found that delivery of charge-balanced HFAC at 5000 Hz for 1 min was effective in producing reversible blockade of axonal conduction. Both Aδ and C components of the vagus CAP were attenuated, and the degree of blockade as well as time to recovery was proportional to the amount of HFAC current delivered. The Aδ waves were more sensitive than C waves to HFAC blockade, but they required more time to recover.

  1. Effects of high-frequency alternating current on axonal conduction through the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Waataja, Jonathan J; Tweden, Katherine S; Honda, Christopher N

    2011-10-01

    High-frequency alternating current (HFAC) is known to disrupt axonal conduction in peripheral nerves, and HFAC has much potential as a therapeutic approach for a number of pathological conditions. Many previous studies have utilized motor output as a bioassay of effects of HFAC on conduction through medium- to large-diameter motor axons. However, little is known about the effectiveness of HFAC on smaller, more slowly conducting nerve fibres. The present study tested whether HFAC influences axonal conduction through sub-diaphragmatic levels of the rat vagus nerve, which consists almost entirely of small calibre axons. Using an isolated nerve preparation, we tested the effects of HFAC on electrically evoked compound action potentials (CAPs). We found that delivery of charge-balanced HFAC at 5000 Hz for 1 min was effective in producing reversible blockade of axonal conduction. Both Aδ and C components of the vagus CAP were attenuated, and the degree of blockade as well as time to recovery was proportional to the amount of HFAC current delivered. The Aδ waves were more sensitive than C waves to HFAC blockade, but they required more time to recover. PMID:21918293

  2. GMI, an Immunomodulatory Protein from Ganoderma microsporum, Potentiates Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Autophagy in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hsin, I-Lun; Ou, Chu-Chyn; Wu, Ming-Fang; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Hsiao, Yi-Min; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Ko, Jiunn-Liang

    2015-05-01

    Cisplatin-based therapy is common in the treatment of several types of cancers, including lung cancers. In our previous study, GMI, an immunomodulatory protein cloned from Ganoderma microsporum, induced a cytotoxic effect in lung cancer cells via autophagy. The aim of this study is to examine the role of GMI in enhancing cisplatin-mediated cell death. On the basis of MTT assay and Combination Index, GMI and cisplatin cotreatment induced a synergistic cytotoxic effect. GMI and cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined by sub-G1, nuclear condensation, and annexin-V/propidium iodide analyses. On Western blot, expressions of γH2AX and cleaved forms of PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-7 were induced by combined treatment. Akt/mTOR pathway activity, LC3-II expression, and acidic vesicular organelle development demonstrated that cisplatin does not abolish GMI-mediated autophagy. Cyto-ID Green/hoechst 33342 double staining and time-dependent experiment indicated that GMI and cisplatin-treated A549 cells simultaneously express autophagosomes and apoptotic nuclei. To elucidate the role of autophagy in inducing apoptosis by GMI and cisplatin, chemical inhibitors and LC3 shRNA were used to inhibit autophagy. The results showed that 3-methyladenine decreases, while chloroquine increases GMI and cisplatin cotreatment-induced cleavage of caspase-7 and PARP. LC3 silencing abolished activation of apoptosis in A549 cells. Caspase inhibitors and caspase-7 silencing mitigated GMI and cisplatin-elicited cell viability inhibition and apoptosis. This is the first study to reveal the novel function of GMI in potentiating cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. GMI and cisplatin induce apoptosis via autophagy/caspase-7-dependent and survivin- and ERCC1-independent pathway. GMI may be a potential cisplatin adjuvant against lung cancer. PMID:25811903

  3. The thermal effects on high-frequency vibration of beams using energy flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Chen, Hualing; Zhu, Danhui; Kong, Xiangjie

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the energy flow analysis (EFA) method is developed to predict the high-frequency response of beams in a thermal environment, which is a topic of concern in aerospace and automotive industries. The temperature load applied on the structures can generate thermal stresses and change material properties. The wavenumber and group velocity associated with the in-plane axial force arising from thermal stresses are included in the derivation of the governing energy equation, and the input power is obtained from the derived effective bending stiffness. In addition, effect of temperature-dependent material properties is considered in the EFA model. To verify the proposed formulation, numerical simulations are performed for a pinned-pinned beam in a uniform thermal environment. The EFA results are compared with the modal solutions for various frequencies and damping loss factors, and good correlations are observed. The results show that the spatial distributions and levels of energy density can be affected by the thermal effects, and the vibration response of beams increases with temperature.

  4. High-frequency electromagnetic radiation injury to the upper extremity: local and systemic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ciano, M.; Burlin, J.R.; Pardoe, R.; Mills, R.L.; Hentz, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    Industrial use of radiofrequency and microwave energy sources (nonionizing, high-frequency electromagnetic radiation) is a growing and widespread phenomenon, with projected risks of exposure to more than 20 million workers in the United States. A description of the nature of this form of electromagnetic energy is given, with emphasis on the variability of energy absorption by humans. The current state of biological research is reviewed, and a summary of the known effects of radiofrequency and microwave radiation exposure on animals and humans provided. These known effects appear to be principally thermal, similar to conventional electrical burn injuries, but with some unique systemic expression. Derangements of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine, hematological, ophthalmological, and behavioral functions are well described in animal experimentation. Two patients are presented--one a young woman exposed to a high-density radiofrequency field in an industrial setting, leading to necrosis of the entire hand and wrist as well as to a constellation of systemic effects, and one an older woman exposed to excessive microwave radiation from a malfunctioning microwave oven, leading to chronic hand pain and paresthesias resembling median nerve entrapment at the carpus. The prevalence of potential exposure in certain industries is noted and recommendations for follow-up care of workers exposed to this form of trauma are delineated.

  5. Effect of the heme oxygenase inducer hemin on blood haemostasis measured by high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Rochefort, Gaël Y; Libgot, Rachel; Desbuards, Nicolas; Schlecht, Deborah; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Ossant, Frederic; Eder, Veronique; Antier, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    1. Heme compounds, like hemin, a heme oxygenase-1 inducer, are used in the treatment of acute porphyria treatment. The side-effects of hemin on haemostasis have been reported. To address those effects, in the present study we used a sensitive, high-frequency ultrasound technique to record acoustic velocity and to investigate whole blood clotting in Wistar rats treated chronically with hemin (50 mg/kg per day). 2. The hemin-induced disturbances in haemostasis measured were comparable to the heparin reference treatment, with a significant decrease in clotting velocity in both groups compared with controls (e.g. the time to clot was 40 +/- 5, 53 +/- 13 and 10 +/- 2 min, respectively; P < 0.05). Precautions must be taken when using high doses of hemin or in the treatment of bleeding diseases. 3. Further investigations are required to explore the effects of hemin in thrombosis models, because it could be a promising 'old drug' for the treatment of venous thrombosis in patients. PMID:17973866

  6. High frequency effects of modifications to Morison`s equation on the response of a TLP

    SciTech Connect

    Mekha, B.B.; Johnson, C.P.; Roesset, J.M

    1995-12-31

    The work described in this paper is part of a research project conducted at the University of Texas at Austin in conjunction with the Offshore Technology Research Center. The research studies the contribution of different nonlinearities to the global response of tension leg platforms. A rigid body model with three degrees of freedom is selected to represent a TLP hull which consists of four columns and four pontoons. The tendons are modelled as elastic springs allowing for the variation of the axial forces and the effect of setdown. The forces are computed using Morison`s equation with and without the nonlinear modifications formulated by Rainey. Forces on the bottom of a truncated cylinder are employed to account for the diffraction and radiation effects. The effects of these modifications on the high frequency response and on the tendon forces are discussed for different aspects ratios of column diameter to wavelength. Among other conclusions, the tendons forces are dominated by the heave response at the wave frequencies and by the pitch response at the pitch natural frequency.

  7. Effect of high-frequency driving current on magnetization reversal in Co-rich amorphous microwires

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhik, A.; Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Blanco, J.M.

    2004-09-20

    Influence of high frequency electric current on the magnetization reversal in Co-rich glass covered amorphous microwires has been studied. The strong correlation between the coercivity and the circular magnetization in the outer shell of the wire has been found. The change of the mechanism of magnetization reversal in the presence of high-frequency circular magnetic field, which is related with the impedance properties, is presented.

  8. The effect of high voltage, high frequency pulsed electric field on slain ovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Asgarifar, Hajarossadat; Oloyede, Adekunle; Zare, Firuz

    2014-04-01

    High power, high frequency pulsed electric fields known as pulsed power (PP) has been applied recently in biology and medicine. However, little attention has been paid to investigate the application of pulse power in musculoskeletal system and its possible effect on functional behavior and biomechanical properties of bone tissue. This paper presents the first research investigating whether or not PP can be applied safely on bone tissue as a stimuli and what will be the possible effect of these signals on the characteristics of cortical bone by comparing the mechanical properties of this type of bone pre and post expose to PP and in comparison with the control samples. A positive buck-boost converter was applied to generate adjustable high voltage, high frequency pulses (up to 500 V and 10 kHz). The functional behavior of bone in response to pulse power excitation was elucidated by applying compressive loading until failure. The stiffness, failure stress (strength) and the total fracture energy (bone toughness) were determined as a measure of the main bone characteristics. Furthermore, an ultrasonic technique was applied to determine and comprise bone elasticity before and after pulse power stimulation. The elastic property of cortical bone samples appeared to remain unchanged following exposure to pulse power excitation for all three orthogonal directions obtained from ultrasonic technique and similarly from the compression test. Nevertheless, the compressive strength and toughness of bone samples were increased when they were exposed to 66 h of high power pulsed electromagnetic field compared to the control samples. As the toughness and the strength of the cortical bone tissue are directly associated with the quality and integrity of the collagen matrix whereas its stiffness is primarily related to bone mineral content these overall results may address that although, the pulse power stimulation can influence the arrangement or the quality of the collagen network

  9. The Effect of High Voltage, High Frequency Pulsed Electric Field on Slain Ovine Cortical Bone

    PubMed Central

    Asgarifar, Hajarossadat; Oloyede, Adekunle; Zare, Firuz

    2014-01-01

    High power, high frequency pulsed electric fields known as pulsed power (PP) has been applied recently in biology and medicine. However, little attention has been paid to investigate the application of pulse power in musculoskeletal system and its possible effect on functional behavior and biomechanical properties of bone tissue. This paper presents the first research investigating whether or not PP can be applied safely on bone tissue as a stimuli and what will be the possible effect of these signals on the characteristics of cortical bone by comparing the mechanical properties of this type of bone pre and post expose to PP and in comparison with the control samples. A positive buck-boost converter was applied to generate adjustable high voltage, high frequency pulses (up to 500 V and 10 kHz). The functional behavior of bone in response to pulse power excitation was elucidated by applying compressive loading until failure. The stiffness, failure stress (strength) and the total fracture energy (bone toughness) were determined as a measure of the main bone characteristics. Furthermore, an ultrasonic technique was applied to determine and comprise bone elasticity before and after pulse power stimulation. The elastic property of cortical bone samples appeared to remain unchanged following exposure to pulse power excitation for all three orthogonal directions obtained from ultrasonic technique and similarly from the compression test. Nevertheless, the compressive strength and toughness of bone samples were increased when they were exposed to 66 h of high power pulsed electromagnetic field compared to the control samples. As the toughness and the strength of the cortical bone tissue are directly associated with the quality and integrity of the collagen matrix whereas its stiffness is primarily related to bone mineral content these overall results may address that although, the pulse power stimulation can influence the arrangement or the quality of the collagen network

  10. Maximization of the effective impulse delivered by a high-frequency/low-frequency planetary drill tool.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Patrick; Lucas, Margaret; Cardoni, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Ultrasonic tools are used for a variety of cutting applications in surgery and the food industry, but when they are applied to harder materials, such as rock, their cutting performance declines because of the low effective impulse delivered by each vibration cycle. To overcome this problem, a technique known as high-frequency/low-frequency (or alternatively, ultrasonic/sonic) drilling is employed. In this approach, an ultrasonic step-horn is used to deliver an impulse to a free mass which subsequently moves toward a drilling bit, delivering the impulse on contact. The free mass then rebounds to complete the cycle. The horn has time between impacts to build significant vibration amplitude and thus delivers a much larger impulse to the free mass than could be delivered if it were applied directly to the target. To maximize the impulse delivered to the target by the cutting bit, both the momentum transfer from the ultrasonic horn to the free mass and the dynamics of the horn/free mass/cutting bit stack must be optimized. This paper uses finite element techniques to optimize the ultrasonic horns and numerical propagation of the stack dynamics to maximize the delivered effective impulse, validated in both cases by extensive experimental analysis. PMID:22083772

  11. Effects of Position and Operator on High-frequency Ultrasound Scan Quality

    PubMed Central

    Burk, Ruth S.; Parker, Angela; Sievers, Lisa; Rooney, Melissa B.; Pepperl, Anathea; Schubert, Christine M.; Grap, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives High-frequency ultrasound may evaluate those at risk for pressure ulcers. Images may be obtained by clinicians with limited training. The prone position is recommended for obtaining sacral scans but may not be feasible in the critically ill. This study investigated image quality using multiple operators and a variety of patient positions. Research Methodology Sacral scans were performed in three randomized positions in 50 volunteers by three different investigators using a 20 MHz ultrasound system. General linear models and ANOVA random effects models were used to examine the effects of operator and position on image quality rating, and measures of dermal thickness, and dermal density. Results The best scan for each position and operator was used for analysis (N=447 images). Image rating varied by operator (p=0.0004), although mean ratings were 3.5 or above for all operators. Dermal thickness was less for the prone position than in 90° or 60° side-lying positions (p=0.0137, p=0.0003). Dermal density was lower for the prone position than for the 90° or 60° positions (p<0.0001 for both). Conclusions These data show that overall scan quality was acceptable in all positions with all operators. However, differences were found between side-lying positions and the prone for dermal thickness and dermal density measures. PMID:25636253

  12. Method for manufacturing compound semiconductor field-effect transistors with improved DC and high frequency performance

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Sherwin, Marc E.; Baca, Albert G.

    2000-01-01

    A method for making compound semiconductor devices including the use of a p-type dopant is disclosed wherein the dopant is co-implanted with an n-type donor species at the time the n-channel is formed and a single anneal at moderate temperature is then performed. Also disclosed are devices manufactured using the method. In the preferred embodiment n-MESFETs and other similar field effect transistor devices are manufactured using C ions co-implanted with Si atoms in GaAs to form an n-channel. C exhibits a unique characteristic in the context of the invention in that it exhibits a low activation efficiency (typically, 50% or less) as a p-type dopant, and consequently, it acts to sharpen the Si n-channel by compensating Si donors in the region of the Si-channel tail, but does not contribute substantially to the acceptor concentration in the buried p region. As a result, the invention provides for improved field effect semiconductor and related devices with enhancement of both DC and high-frequency performance.

  13. Compound semiconductor field-effect transistors with improved dc and high frequency performance

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Sherwin, M.E.; Baca, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    A method for making compound semiconductor devices including the use of a p-type dopant is disclosed wherein the dopant is co-implanted with an n-type donor species at the time the n-channel is deposited. Also disclosed are devices manufactured using the method. In the preferred embodiment n-MESFETs and other similar field effect transistor devices are manufactured using C ions implanted with Si atoms in GaAs to form an n-channel. C exhibits a unique characteristic in the context of the invention in that it exhibits a low activation efficiency (typically, 50% or less) as a p-type dopant, and consequently, it acts to sharpen the Si n-channel by compensating Si donors in the region the Si-channel tail, but does not contribute substantially to the acceptor concentration in the region of the buried p-implant. As a result, the invention provides for improved field effect transistor devices with enhancement of both DC and high-frequency performance.

  14. A high-frequency study of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect morphology in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, D. A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Akahori, T.; Million, E. T.; Nagataki, S.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2011-09-01

    High-frequency, high-resolution imaging of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect is an important technique to study the complex structures of the atmospheres of merging galaxy clusters. Such observations are sensitive to the details of the electron spectrum. We show that the morphology of the SZ intensity maps in simulated galaxy clusters observed at 345, 600 and 857 GHz are significantly different because of SZ relativistic corrections. These differences can be revealed by high-resolution imaging instruments. We calculate relativistically corrected SZ intensity maps of a simulated, massive, merging galaxy cluster and of the massive, merging clusters 1E0657-558 (the Bullet cluster) and Abell 2219. The morphologies of the SZ intensity maps are remarkably different between 345 and 857 GHz for each merging cluster. We show that high-resolution imaging observations of the SZ intensity maps at these frequencies, obtainable with the LABOCA and HERSCHEL-SPIRE instruments, allow to fully exploit the astrophysical relevance of the predicted SZ morphological effect.

  15. Extended High Frequency Thresholds in College Students: Effects of Recreational Noise

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Spankovich, C.; Lobarinas, E.; Griffiths, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human hearing is sensitive to sounds from as low as 20 Hz to as high as 20,000 Hz in normal ears. However, clinical tests of human hearing rarely include extended high frequency (EHF) threshold assessments, at frequencies extending beyond 8,000 Hz. EHF thresholds have been suggested for use monitoring the earliest effects of noise on the inner ear, although the clinical utility of EHF threshold testing is not well established for this purpose. Purpose The primary objective of this study was to determine if EHF thresholds in healthy, young adult college students vary as a function of recreational noise exposure. Research Design A retrospective analysis of a laboratory database was conducted; all participants with both EHF threshold testing and noise history data were included. The potential for “pre-clinical” EHF deficits was assessed based on the measured thresholds, with the noise surveys used to estimate recreational noise exposure. Study Sample EHF thresholds measured during participation in other ongoing studies were available from 87 subjects (34 male and 53 female); all participants had hearing within normal clinical limits (≤25 HL) at conventional frequencies (0.25 to 8 kHz). Results EHF thresholds closely matched standard reference thresholds [ANSI S3.6 (1996) Annex C]. There were statistically reliable threshold differences in subjects that used music players, with 3–6 dB worse thresholds at the highest test frequencies (10–16 kHz) in participants that reported long-term music player device use (longer than 5 years), or higher listening levels during music player use. Conclusions It should be possible to detect small changes in high frequency hearing for patients/participants that undergo repeat testing at periodic intervals. However, the increased population-level variability in thresholds at the highest frequencies will make it difficult to identify the presence of small but potentially important deficits in otherwise normal hearing

  16. Atmospheric and Fog Effects on Ultra-Wide Band Radar Operating at Extremely High Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Balal, Nezah; Pinhasi, Gad A; Pinhasi, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    The wide band at extremely high frequencies (EHF) above 30 GHz is applicable for high resolution directive radars, resolving the lack of free frequency bands within the lower part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Utilization of ultra-wideband signals in this EHF band is of interest, since it covers a relatively large spectrum, which is free of users, resulting in better resolution in both the longitudinal and transverse dimensions. Noting that frequencies in the millimeter band are subjected to high atmospheric attenuation and dispersion effects, a study of the degradation in the accuracy and resolution is presented. The fact that solid-state millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation sources are producing low power, the method of continuous-wave wideband frequency modulation becomes the natural technique for remote sensing and detection. Millimeter wave radars are used as complementary sensors for the detection of small radar cross-section objects under bad weather conditions, when small objects cannot be seen by optical cameras and infrared detectors. Theoretical analysis for the propagation of a wide "chirped" Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave (FMCW) radar signal in a dielectric medium is presented. It is shown that the frequency-dependent (complex) refractivity of the atmospheric medium causes distortions in the phase of the reflected signal, introducing noticeable errors in the longitudinal distance estimations, and at some frequencies may also degrade the resolution. PMID:27223286

  17. Atmospheric and Fog Effects on Ultra-Wide Band Radar Operating at Extremely High Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Balal, Nezah; Pinhasi, Gad A.; Pinhasi, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    The wide band at extremely high frequencies (EHF) above 30 GHz is applicable for high resolution directive radars, resolving the lack of free frequency bands within the lower part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Utilization of ultra-wideband signals in this EHF band is of interest, since it covers a relatively large spectrum, which is free of users, resulting in better resolution in both the longitudinal and transverse dimensions. Noting that frequencies in the millimeter band are subjected to high atmospheric attenuation and dispersion effects, a study of the degradation in the accuracy and resolution is presented. The fact that solid-state millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation sources are producing low power, the method of continuous-wave wideband frequency modulation becomes the natural technique for remote sensing and detection. Millimeter wave radars are used as complementary sensors for the detection of small radar cross-section objects under bad weather conditions, when small objects cannot be seen by optical cameras and infrared detectors. Theoretical analysis for the propagation of a wide “chirped” Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave (FMCW) radar signal in a dielectric medium is presented. It is shown that the frequency-dependent (complex) refractivity of the atmospheric medium causes distortions in the phase of the reflected signal, introducing noticeable errors in the longitudinal distance estimations, and at some frequencies may also degrade the resolution. PMID:27223286

  18. Effect of near-surface topography on high-frequency Rayleigh-wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Limin; Xu, Yixian; Xia, Jianghai; Luo, Yinhe

    2015-05-01

    Rayleigh waves, which are formed due to interference of P- and Sv-waves near the free surface, propagate along the free surface and vanish exponentially in the vertical direction. Their propagation is strongly influenced by surface topography. Due to the high resolution and precision requirements of near-surface investigations, the high-frequency Rayleigh waves are usually used for near-surface structural detecting. Although there are some numerical studies on high-frequency Rayleigh-wave propagation on topographic free surface, detailed analysis of characters of high-frequency Rayleigh-wave propagation on topographic free surface remains untouched. Hence, research of propagation of Rayleigh waves on complex topographic surface becomes critical for Rayleigh-wave methods in near-surface applications. To study the propagation of high-frequency Rayleigh waves on topographic free surface, two main topographic models are designed in this study. One of the models contains a depressed topographic surface, and another contains an uplifted topographic surface. We numerically simulate the propagation of high-frequency Rayleigh waves on these two topographic surfaces by finite-difference method. Soon afterwards, we analyze the propagation character of high-frequency Rayleigh waves on such topographic models, and compare the variations on its energy and frequency before and after passing the topographic region. At last, we discuss the relationship between the variations and topographical steepness of each model. Our numerical results indicate that influence of depressed topography for high-frequency Rayleigh waves is more distinct than influence of uplifted topography. Rayleigh waves produce new scattering body waves during passing the depressed topography with reduction of amplitude and loss of high-frequency components. Moreover, the steeper the depressed topography is, the more energy of Rayleigh waves is lost. The uplifted topography with gentle slope produces similar

  19. High-resolution music with inaudible high-frequency components produces a lagged effect on human electroencephalographic activities.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Ryuma; Yamamoto, Ryuta; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2014-06-18

    High-quality digital sound sources with inaudible high-frequency components (above 20 kHz) have become available because of recent advances in information technology. Listening to such sounds has been shown to increase the α-band power of an electroencephalogram (EEG). The present study scrutinized the time course of this effect by recording EEG along with autonomic measures (skin conductance level and heart rate) and facial electromyograms (corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major). Twenty university students (19-24 years old) listened to two types of a 200-s musical excerpt (J. S. Bach's French Suite No. 5) with or without inaudible high-frequency components using a double-blind method. They were asked to rate the sound quality and to judge which excerpt contained high-frequency components. High-α EEG power (10.5-13 Hz) was larger for the excerpt with high-frequency components than for the excerpt without them. This effect was statistically significant only in the last quarter of the period (150-200 s). Participants were not able to distinguish between the excerpts, which did not produce any discernible differences in subjective, autonomic, and facial muscle measures. This study shows that inaudible high-frequency components have an impact on human brain activity without conscious awareness. Unlike a standard test for sound quality, at least 150 s of exposure is required to examine this effect in future research. PMID:24722228

  20. Effects of high-frequency understorey fires on woody plant regeneration in southeastern Amazonian forests

    PubMed Central

    Balch, Jennifer K.; Massad, Tara J.; Brando, Paulo M.; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Curran, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic understorey fires affect large areas of tropical forest, yet their effects on woody plant regeneration post-fire remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of repeated experimental fires on woody stem (less than 1 cm at base) mortality, recruitment, species diversity, community similarity and regeneration mode (seed versus sprout) in Mato Grosso, Brazil. From 2004 to 2010, forest plots (50 ha) were burned twice (B2) or five times (B5), and compared with an unburned control (B0). Stem density recovered within a year after the first burn (initial density: 12.4–13.2 stems m−2), but after 6 years, increased mortality and decreased regeneration—primarily of seedlings—led to a 63 per cent and 85 per cent reduction in stem density in B2 and B5, respectively. Seedlings and sprouts across plots in 2010 displayed remarkable community similarity owing to shared abundant species. Although the dominant surviving species were similar across plots, a major increase in sprouting occurred—almost three- and fourfold greater in B2 and B5 than in B0. In B5, 29 species disappeared and were replaced by 11 new species often present along fragmented forest edges. By 2010, the annual burn regime created substantial divergence between the seedling community and the initial adult tree community (greater than or equal to 20 cm dbh). Increased droughts and continued anthropogenic ignitions associated with frontier land uses may promote high-frequency fire regimes that may substantially alter regeneration and therefore successional processes. PMID:23610167

  1. Effects of high-frequency understorey fires on woody plant regeneration in southeastern Amazonian forests.

    PubMed

    Balch, Jennifer K; Massad, Tara J; Brando, Paulo M; Nepstad, Daniel C; Curran, Lisa M

    2013-06-01

    Anthropogenic understorey fires affect large areas of tropical forest, yet their effects on woody plant regeneration post-fire remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of repeated experimental fires on woody stem (less than 1 cm at base) mortality, recruitment, species diversity, community similarity and regeneration mode (seed versus sprout) in Mato Grosso, Brazil. From 2004 to 2010, forest plots (50 ha) were burned twice (B2) or five times (B5), and compared with an unburned control (B0). Stem density recovered within a year after the first burn (initial density: 12.4-13.2 stems m(-2)), but after 6 years, increased mortality and decreased regeneration--primarily of seedlings--led to a 63 per cent and 85 per cent reduction in stem density in B2 and B5, respectively. Seedlings and sprouts across plots in 2010 displayed remarkable community similarity owing to shared abundant species. Although the dominant surviving species were similar across plots, a major increase in sprouting occurred--almost three- and fourfold greater in B2 and B5 than in B0. In B5, 29 species disappeared and were replaced by 11 new species often present along fragmented forest edges. By 2010, the annual burn regime created substantial divergence between the seedling community and the initial adult tree community (greater than or equal to 20 cm dbh). Increased droughts and continued anthropogenic ignitions associated with frontier land uses may promote high-frequency fire regimes that may substantially alter regeneration and therefore successional processes. PMID:23610167

  2. The Advanced Composition Course at GMI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Marvin H.

    The General Motors Institute (GMI), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Motors Corporation, was created to provide leaders for its parent organization. GMI is a fully accredited undergraduate college that offers degrees in industrial, electrical, and mechanical engineering and in industrial administration. Since people in business and…

  3. Effects of Bandwidth, Compression Speed, and Gain at High Frequencies on Preferences for Amplified Music

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews a series of studies on the factors influencing sound quality preferences, mostly for jazz and classical music stimuli. The data were obtained using ratings of individual stimuli or using the method of paired comparisons. For normal-hearing participants, the highest ratings of sound quality were obtained when the reproduction bandwidth was wide (55 to 16000 Hz) and ripples in the frequency response were small (less than ± 5 dB). For hearing-impaired participants listening via a simulated five-channel compression hearing aid with gains set using the CAM2 fitting method, preferences for upper cutoff frequency varied across participants: Some preferred a 7.5- or 10-kHz upper cutoff frequency over a 5-kHz cutoff frequency, and some showed the opposite preference. Preferences for a higher upper cutoff frequency were associated with a shallow high-frequency slope of the audiogram. A subsequent study comparing the CAM2 and NAL-NL2 fitting methods, with gains slightly reduced for participants who were not experienced hearing aid users, showed a consistent preference for CAM2. Since the two methods differ mainly in the gain applied for frequencies above 4 kHz (CAM2 recommending higher gain than NAL-NL2), these results suggest that extending the upper cutoff frequency is beneficial. A system for reducing “overshoot” effects produced by compression gave small but significant benefits for sound quality of a percussion instrument (xylophone). For a high-input level (80 dB SPL), slow compression was preferred over fast compression. PMID:23172008

  4. Effects of bandwidth, compression speed, and gain at high frequencies on preferences for amplified music.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2012-09-01

    This article reviews a series of studies on the factors influencing sound quality preferences, mostly for jazz and classical music stimuli. The data were obtained using ratings of individual stimuli or using the method of paired comparisons. For normal-hearing participants, the highest ratings of sound quality were obtained when the reproduction bandwidth was wide (55 to 16000 Hz) and ripples in the frequency response were small (less than ± 5 dB). For hearing-impaired participants listening via a simulated five-channel compression hearing aid with gains set using the CAM2 fitting method, preferences for upper cutoff frequency varied across participants: Some preferred a 7.5- or 10-kHz upper cutoff frequency over a 5-kHz cutoff frequency, and some showed the opposite preference. Preferences for a higher upper cutoff frequency were associated with a shallow high-frequency slope of the audiogram. A subsequent study comparing the CAM2 and NAL-NL2 fitting methods, with gains slightly reduced for participants who were not experienced hearing aid users, showed a consistent preference for CAM2. Since the two methods differ mainly in the gain applied for frequencies above 4 kHz (CAM2 recommending higher gain than NAL-NL2), these results suggest that extending the upper cutoff frequency is beneficial. A system for reducing "overshoot" effects produced by compression gave small but significant benefits for sound quality of a percussion instrument (xylophone). For a high-input level (80 dB SPL), slow compression was preferred over fast compression. PMID:23172008

  5. Effect of High Frequency, Low Magnitude Vibration on Bone and Muscle in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Wren, Tishya A. L.; Lee, David C.; Hara, Reiko; Rethlefsen, Susan A.; Kay, Robert M.; Dorey, Frederick J.; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have decreased strength, low bone mass, and an increased propensity to fracture. High frequency, low magnitude vibration might provide a non-invasive, non-pharmacological, home-based treatment for these musculoskeletal deficits. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of this intervention on bone and muscle in children with CP. METHODS Thirty-one children with CP ages 6-12 years (mean 9.4, SD 1.4) stood on a vibrating platform (30 Hz, 0.3 g peak acceleration) at home for 10 min/day for 6 months and on the floor without the platform for another 6 months. The order of vibration and standing was randomized, and outcomes were measured at 0, 6, and 12 months. The outcome measures included computed tomography measurements of vertebral cancellous bone density (CBD) and cross-sectional area, CBD of the proximal tibia, geometric properties of the tibial diaphysis, and dynamometer measurements of plantarflexor strength. Outcomes were assessed using mixed model linear regression and Pearson's correlation. RESULTS The main difference between vibration and standing was greater increases in the cortical bone properties (cortical bone area and moments of inertia) during the vibration period (all p's ≤ 0.03). There was no difference in cancellous bone or muscle between vibration and standing (all p's > 0.10) and no correlation between compliance and outcome (all r's < 0.27; all p's > 0.15). The results did not depend on the order of treatment (p > 0.43) and was similar for children in GMFCS 1-2 and GMFCS 3-4. CONCLUSIONS The primary benefit of the vibration intervention in children with CP was to cortical bone in the appendicular skeleton. Increased cortical bone area and structural (strength) properties could translate into a decreased risk of long bone fractures for some patients. More research is needed to corroborate these findings, to elucidate the mechanisms of the intervention, and to determine the most effective

  6. Fundamental Study on the Effect of High Frequency Vibration on Ride Comfort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Chizuru; Shimamune, Ryohei; Watanabe, Ken; Suzuki, Erimitsu

    To develop a more suitable method of evaluating ride comfort of high speed trains, a fundamental study was conducted on sensitivity of passengers to various frequencies of vibration with respect to ride comfort. Experiments were performed on 55 subjects using an electrodynamic vibration system that can generate vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 80 Hz in the vertical direction. Results of experiments indicated that the subjects tend to experience greater discomfort when exposed to high frequency vibrations than that presumed by the conventional Japanese ride comfort assessment method, the "Ride Comfort Level."

  7. Effects of fast-acting high-frequency compression on the intelligibility of speech in steady and fluctuating background sounds.

    PubMed

    Stone, M A; Moore, B C; Wojtczak, M; Gudgin, E

    1997-08-01

    This study examines whether speech intelligibility in background sounds can be improved for persons with loudness recruitment by the use of fast-acting compression applied at high frequencies, when the overall level of the sounds is held constant by means of a slow-acting automatic gain control (AGC) system and when appropriate frequency-response shaping is applied. Two types of fast-acting compression were used in the high-frequency channel of a two-channel system: a compression limiter with a 10:1 compression ratio and with a compression threshold about 9 dB below the peak level of the signal in the high-frequency channel; and a wide dynamic range compressor with a 2:1 compression ratio and with the compression threshold about 24 dB below the peak level of the signal in the high-frequency channel. A condition with linear processing in the high-frequency channel was also used. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured for two background sounds: a steady speech-shaped noise and a single male talker. All subjects had moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Three different types of speech material were used: the adaptive sentence lists (ASL), the Bamford-Kowal-Bench (BKB) sentence lists and the Boothroyd word lists. For the steady background noise, the compression generally led to poorer performance than for the linear condition, although the deleterious effect was only significant for the 10:1 compression ratio. For the background of a single talker, the compression had no significant effect except for the ASL sentences, where the 10:1 compression gave significantly better performance than the linear condition. Overall, the results did not show any clear benefits of the fast-acting compression, possibly because the slow-acting AGC allowed the use of gains in the linear condition that were markedly higher than would normally be used with linear hearing aids. PMID:9307821

  8. Optimization of the high frequency magneto-impedance effect in Co-based amorphous ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, V.; Eggers, T.; Phan, M. H.

    The magnetic field dependence of the impedance, known as magneto-impedance (MI), was measured as a function of excitation frequency in Co-based amorphous ribbons. An optimization of the MI profile on the high frequency regime (100 MHz - 1000 MHz) was attempted through annealing techniques. Current annealing was performed with different annealing amplitudes ranging from 200 mA up to 1 A. Field annealing was also performed by raising the temperature of the sample through Joule heating and applying an external magnetic field of 55 Oe transversal to the ribbon. It was found that annealing at low current improved the MI response at lower frequencies, between 100 MHz and 300 MHz. On the other hand annealing at higher amplitude, past the Curie temperature (Tc) favored higher frequencies. These findings provide good guidance toward the optimization of the MI response of Co-based amorphous ribbons for high-frequency sensor applications. This project is supported by the NSF REU Grant # DMR - 1263066: REU Site in Applied Physics at USF.

  9. GMI Rainfall Data on Tropical Storm Adjali

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows GMI rainfall data on Tropical Storm Adjali on Nov. 19, 2014 combined with cloud data from the METEOSAT-7 satellite. Rainfall was found to be falling at a rate of over 69 mm/hr ...

  10. High-Frequency Audibility: The Effects of Audiometric Configuration, Stimulus Type, and Device

    PubMed Central

    Kimlinger, Chelsea; McCreery, Ryan; Lewis, Dawna

    2015-01-01

    Background For the last decade, the importance of providing amplification up to 9–10 kHz has been supported by multiple studies involving children and adults. The extent to which a listener with hearing loss can benefit from bandwidth expansion is dependent on the audibility of high-frequency cues. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) devised a standard method for measuring and reporting hearing aid bandwidth for quality-control purposes. However, ANSI bandwidth measurements were never intended to reflect the true frequency range that is audible for a speech stimulus for a person with hearing loss. Purpose The purpose of this study was to (1) determine the maximum audible frequency of conventional hearing aids using a speech signal as the input through the hearing aid microphone for different degrees of hearing loss, (2) examine how the maximum audible frequency changes when the input stimulus is presented through hearing assistance technology (HAT) systems with cross-coupling of manufacturers' transmitters and receivers, and (3) evaluate how the maximum audible frequency compares with the upper limit of the ANSI bandwidth measure. Research Design Eight behind-the-ear hearing aids from five hearing aid manufacturers were selected based on a range of ANSI bandwidth upper frequency limits. Three audiometric configurations with varied degrees of high-frequency hearing loss were programmed into each hearing aid. Hearing aid responses were measured with the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), broadband noise, and a short speech token (/asa/) as stimuli presented through a loudspeaker. HAT devices from three manufacturers were used to create five HAT scenarios. These instruments were coupled to the hearing aid programmed for the audiogram that provided the highest maximum audible frequency in the hearing aid analysis. The response from each HAT scenario was obtained using the same three stimuli as during the hearing aid analysis. Study Sample All

  11. Effects of the Effect of Ultra High Frequency Mobile Phone Radiation on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mosa; Naghdi, Nasrollah; Hemmati, Hamidreza; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Bahmani, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Public and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields due to the growing trend of electronic devices may cause adverse effects on human health. This paper describes the risk of mutation and sexual trauma and infertility in masculine sexual cell by mobile phone radiations. Methods In this study, we measured the emitted dose from a radiofrequency device, such as switching high voltage at different frequencies using a scintillation detector. The switching high voltage power supply (HVPS) was built for the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system. For radiation dosimetry, we used an ALNOR scintillator that can measure gamma radiation. The simulation was performed by MATLAB software, and data from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) were used to verify the simulation. Results We investigated the risks that result from the waves, according to a report by International Commission on Non Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), to every organ of the body is defined by the beam and electromagnetic radiation from this electronic device on people. The results showed that the maximum personal dose over a 15-min period working at the mentioned HVPS did not exceed 0.31 μSV/h (with an aluminum shield). So, according to other sources of radiation, continuous working time of the system should not be more than 10 hours. Finally, a characteristic curve for secure working with modules at different frequencies was reported. The RF input signal to the body for maximum penetration depth (δ) and electromagnetic energy absorption rate (SAR) of biological tissue were obtained for each tissue. Conclusion The results of this study and International Commission of Non Ionization Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) reports showed the people who spend more than 50 minutes a day using a cell phone could have early dementia or other thermal damage due to the burning of glucose in the brain. PMID:27382458

  12. [INVESTIGATION OF THE COMBINED DISINFECTANT EFFECT OF ULTRA-HIGH FREQUENCY ENERGY AND SILVER ON WATER IN FLOW].

    PubMed

    Klimarev, S I; Siniak, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the results of investigating the combined effect of ultra-high frequency (UHF) energy and silver on contaminated water. Silver was used both in the ion form at the minimal concentration of 0.01-0.02 mg/l and solid state, i.e. a silver wire spiral. The purpose was to determine UHF-regimes of the flowing water disinfection process in the presence of silver. PMID:26554133

  13. Quantifying the Effects of Radiation on Tumour Vasculature with High-Frequency Three-Dimensional Power Doppler Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupple, Clinton

    Recent evidence suggests that radiation may have a significant effect on tumour vasculature in addition to damaging tumour cell DNA. It is well established that endothelial cells are among the first cells to respond after administration of ionizing radiation in both normal and tumour tissues. It has also been suggested that microvascular dysfunction may regulate tumour response to radiotherapy at high doses. However, due to limitations in imaging the microcirculation this response is not well characterized. Advances in high-frequency ultrasound and computation methods now make it possible to acquire and analyze 3-D ultrasound data of tumour blood flow in tumour microcirculation. This thesis outlines the work done to test the hypothesis that single dose 8 Gy radiotherapy produces changes in tumour blood vessels which can be quantified using high-frequency power Doppler ultrasound. In addition, the issue of reproducibility of power Doppler measurements and the relationship between histopathology and power Doppler measurements have been examined.

  14. Scaling effects of relaxor-PbTiO3 crystals and composites for high frequency ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    The dielectric and piezoelectric properties of Pb(Mg1∕3Nb2∕3)O3–PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) and Pb(In1∕2Nb1∕2)O3–Pb(Mg1∕3Nb2∕3)O3–PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) ferroelectric single crystals were investigated as a function of thickness∕scale in monolithic and piezoelectric∕polymer 1–3 composites. For the case of PMN-PT single crystals, the dielectric (ε33T∕ε0) and electromechanical properties (k33) were found to significantly decrease with decreasing thickness (500–40 μm), while minimal thickness dependency was observed for PIN-PMN-PT single crystals. Temperature dependent dielectric behavior of the crystals suggested that the observed thickness dependence in PMN-PT was strongly related to their relatively large domain size (>10–20 μm). As anticipated, 1–3 composite comprised of PIN-PMN-PT crystals exhibited superior properties to that of PMN-PT composite at high frequencies (>20 MHz). However, the observed couplings, being on the order of 80%, were disappointedly low when compared to their monolithic counterparts, the result of surface damage introduced during the dicing process, as evidenced by the broadened [002] peaks in the x-ray diffraction pattern. PMID:20644658

  15. Finite beta effects on low- and high-frequency magnetosonic waves in a two-ion-species plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Toida, Mieko; Aota, Yukio

    2013-08-15

    A magnetosonic wave propagating perpendicular to a magnetic field in a two-ion-species plasma has two branches, high-frequency and low-frequency modes. The finite beta effects on these modes are analyzed theoretically on the basis of the three-fluid model with finite ion and electron pressures. First, it is shown that the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the low-frequency mode is valid for amplitudes ε<ε{sub max}, where the upper limit of the amplitude ε{sub max} is given as a function of β (β is the ratio of the kinetic and magnetic energy densities), the density ratio, and the cyclotron frequency ratio of two ion species. Next, the linear dispersion relation and KdV equation for the high-frequency mode are derived, including β as a factor. In addition, the theory for heavy ion acceleration by the high-frequency mode pulse and the pulse damping due to this energy transfer in a finite beta plasma are presented.

  16. Phase-shift effect in capacitively coupled plasmas with two radio frequency or very high frequency sources

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiang; Zhao Shuxia; Zhang Yuru; Wang Younian

    2010-08-15

    A two-dimensional fluid model was built to study the argon discharge in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor and the full set of Maxwell equations is included in the model to understand the electromagnetic effect in the capacitive discharge. Two electrical sources are applied to the top and bottom electrodes in our simulations and the phase-shift effect is focused on. We distinguish the difference of the phase-shift effect on the plasma uniformity in the traditional radio frequency discharge and in the very high frequency discharge where the standing wave effect dominates. It is found that in the discharges with frequency 13.56 MHz, the control of phase difference can less the influence of the electrostatic edge effect, and it gets the best radial uniformity of plasma density at the phase difference {pi}. But in the very high frequency discharges, the standing wave effect plays an important role. The standing wave effect can be counteracted at the phase difference 0, and be enhanced at the phase difference {pi}. The standing wave effect and the edge effect are balanced at some phase-shift value between 0 and {pi}, which is determined by discharge parameters.

  17. Millimeter waves or extremely high frequency electromagnetic fields in the environment: what are their effects on bacteria?

    PubMed

    Soghomonyan, Diana; Trchounian, Karen; Trchounian, Armen

    2016-06-01

    Millimeter waves (MMW) or electromagnetic fields of extremely high frequencies at low intensity is a new environmental factor, the level of which is increased as technology advance. It is of interest that bacteria and other cells might communicate with each other by electromagnetic field of sub-extremely high frequency range. These MMW affected Escherichia coli and many other bacteria, mainly depressing their growth and changing properties and activity. These effects were non-thermal and depended on different factors. The significant cellular targets for MMW effects could be water, cell plasma membrane, and genome. The model for the MMW interaction with bacteria is suggested; a role of the membrane-associated proton FOF1-ATPase, key enzyme of bioenergetic relevance, is proposed. The consequences of MMW interaction with bacteria are the changes in their sensitivity to different biologically active chemicals, including antibiotics. Novel data on MMW effects on bacteria and their sensitivity to different antibiotics are presented and discussed; the combined action of MMW and antibiotics resulted with more strong effects. These effects are of significance for understanding changed metabolic pathways and distinguish role of bacteria in environment; they might be leading to antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The effects might have applications in the development of technique, therapeutic practices, and food protection technology. PMID:27087527

  18. Modelling switching-time effects in high-frequency power conditioning networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. A.; Sloane, T. H.; Rimer, B. H.; Wilson, T. G.

    1979-01-01

    Power transistor networks which switch large currents in highly inductive environments are beginning to find application in the hundred kilohertz switching frequency range. Recent developments in the fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors in the power device category have enhanced the movement toward higher switching frequencies. Models for switching devices and of the circuits in which they are imbedded are required to properly characterize the mechanisms responsible for turning on and turning off effects. Easily interpreted results in the form of oscilloscope-like plots assist in understanding the effects of parametric studies using topology oriented computer-aided analysis methods.

  19. Electromagnetic effects in high-frequency large-area capacitive discharges: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-03-15

    In traditional capacitively coupled plasmas, the discharge can be described by an electrostatic model, in which the Poisson equation is employed to determine the electrostatic electric field. However, current plasma reactors are much larger and driven at a much higher frequency. If the excitation wavelength λ in the plasma becomes comparable to the electrode radius, and the plasma skin depth δ becomes comparable to the electrode spacing, the electromagnetic (EM) effects will become significant and compromise the plasma uniformity. In this regime, capacitive discharges have to be described by an EM model, i.e., the full set of Maxwell's equations should be solved to address the EM effects. This paper gives an overview of the theory, simulation and experiments that have recently been carried out to understand these effects, which cause major uniformity problems in plasma processing for microelectronics and flat panel display industries. Furthermore, some methods for improving the plasma uniformity are also described and compared.

  20. The effect of frequency-dependent electron swarm parameters on fluid modeling of high-frequency CCP discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Rochan; Mahadevan, Shankar; Sawada, Ikuo; Vukovic, Mirko; Ventzek, Peter; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2012-10-01

    Fluid models are computationally the most feasible approach for the multidimensional simulation of reactive CCPs. Fluid models require the specification of species reaction-rate and transport coefficients. For electrons, these closure terms are dependent on the assumed/computed EEDF that depend on the excitation frequency. However the excitation frequency dependence of these electron properties for fluid models are rarely discussed. Here we explore the significance of frequency-dependent electron transport and reaction rate coefficients for high-frequency CCP discharges. We use pre-computed electron properties from a zero-dimensional electron Boltzmann solver which are used in the simulation of an argon CCP at 60MHz and pressures of 15 mTorr and 100 mTorr. A high-resolution computational mesh is developed and used to overcome any uncertainty associated with numerical discretization. We report significant differences in the pre-computed electron reaction-rate and transport coefficients for a 60 MHz EEDF compared to direct-current EEDF or assumed Maxwellian EEDF. The effects of these differences on the discharge structure are found to be significant; clearly emphasizing the importance of using frequency-dependent electron properties in high-frequency CCP models.

  1. Influence of 2D electrostatic effects on the high-frequency noise behavior of sub-100-nm scaled MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raul; Pardo, Daniel; Martin, Maria J.

    2004-05-01

    In this work, we have performed an investigation of the consequences of dowscaling the bulk MOSFET beyond the 100 nm range by means of a particle-based Monte Carlo simulator. Taking a 250 nm gate-length ideal structure as the starting point, the constant field scaling rules (also known as "classical" scaling) are considered and the high-frequency dynamic and noise performance of transistors with 130 nm, 90 nm and 60 nm gate-lengths are studied in depth. The analysis of internal quantities such as electric fields, velocity and energy of carriers or conduction band profiles shows the increasing importance of electrostatic two-dimensional effects due to the proximity of source and drain regions even when the most ideal bias conditions are imposed. As a consequence, a loss of the transistor action for the smallest MOSFET and the degradation of the most important high-frequency figures of merit is observed. Whereas the comparative values of intrinsic noise sources (SID, SIG) are improved when reducing the dimensions and the bias voltages, the poor dynamic performance yields an overall worse noise behaviour than expected (especially for Rn and Gass), limiting at the same time the useful bias ranges and conditions for a proper low-noise configuration.

  2. The effect of ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification on the high-frequency fretting wear behavior of AISI304 steel.

    PubMed

    Cho, In-Shik; Lee, Chang-Soon; Amanov, Auezhan; Pyoun, Young-Shik; Park, In-Gyu

    2011-01-01

    The fact that one of fundamental characteristics of fretting is the very small sliding amplitude dictates the unique feature of wear mechanism. Ultrasonic Nanocrystalline Surface Modification (UNSM) technology was applied in order to investigate its effect on the high-frequency fretting wear behavior of AISI304 steel. Its influence on the fretting wear is also reported in this paper with these treated and untreated samples. UNSM delivers force onto the workpiece surface 20,000 times per second with 1,000 to 4,000 contact counts per square millimeter. UNSM creates homogenous nanocrystalline structures as well on the surface. UNSM process is expected to eliminate or significantly retard the formation of fretting wear. Nanocrystalline structure generation after UNSM has been reported to produce its unique structure and to offer a variety of beneficial properties compared to conventionally treated materials. A deformed layer of 220 microm exhibits high dislocation density, where top layer transformed to a nanostructure of the grain size in 23 nm and mechanical twins were observed. Deformation-induced martensite was observed to form at the intersections of mechanical twins, whose volume fraction has increased up to 38.4% and wear loss rate at 800,000 cycles has decreased by 40%. In this paper, experimental results are discussed to elucidate potential mechanism of high-frequency fretting wear. PMID:21446536

  3. Diminishing high-frequency directivity due to a source effect: Empirical evidence from small earthquakes in the Abruzzo region, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacor, F.; Gallovič, F.; Puglia, R.; Luzi, L.; D'Amico, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the directivity effects of ~250 aftershocks (magnitudes 3-5.5) of the Mw 6.1 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy). To this end, we estimate the apparent source spectra at each station removing path and site effects inferred by standard Generalized Inversion Technique. Then, we evaluate the residuals between the apparent source spectra and the event mean source spectrum at selected frequencies. We investigate azimuthal and frequency dependence of the residuals for 40 events with the best station coverage. For most of events with the strongest directivity effect (Mw 3.4-4.0), we observe a remarkable decrease of the directivity amplification at high frequencies, which has not yet been documented for such relatively small-magnitude events. Since there is negligible distance dependence, we ascribe this observation to a source phenomenon such as significant small-scale rupture propagation complexity.

  4. The microwave effects on the properties of alumina at high frequencies of microwave sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudiana, I. Nyoman; Mitsudo, Seitaro; Sako, Katsuhide; Inagaki, Shunsuke; Ngkoimani, La Ode; Usman, Ida; Aripin, H.

    2016-03-01

    Microwave sintering of materials has attracted much research interest because of its significant advantages (e.g. reduced sintering temperatures and soaking times) over the conventional heating. Most researchers compared processes that occurred during the microwave and conventional heating at the same temperature and time. The enhancements found in the former method are indicated as a `non-thermal effect` which is usually used for explaining the phenomena in microwave processing. Numerous recent studies have been focused on the effect to elucidate the microwave interaction mechanism with materials. Moreover, recent progress on microwave sources such as gyrotrons has opened the possibility for processing materials by using a higher microwave frequency. Therefore, the technology is expected to exhibit a stronger non-thermal effect. This paper presents results from a series of experiments to study the non-thermal effect on microwave sintered alumina. Sintering by using a wide rage of microwave frequencies up to 300 GHz as well as a conventional furnace was carried out. The linear shrinkages of samples for each sintering method were measured. Pores and grains taken from scanning electron microstructure (SEM) images of cut surfaces were also examined. The results of a comparative study of the shrinkages and microstructure evolutions of the sintered samples under annealing in microwave heating systems and in an electric furnace were analyzed. A notably different behavior of the shrinkages and microstructures of alumina after being annealed was found. The results suggested that microwave radiations provided an additional force for mass transports. The results also indicated that the sintering process depended on microwave frequencies.

  5. High frequency capacitively coupled RF plasma discharge effects on the order/disorder structure of PAN-based carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Ümmugül E.; Bilikmen, Sinan; Akbar, Demiral

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution confocal Raman microscopy was used to investigate the effects of nitrogen plasma on unsized high strength (HS) PAN-based carbon fiber surfaces. The fibers were treated by a high frequency (40.68 MHz) capacitively coupled single RF-PECVD reactor under different processing conditions (exposure times, RF powers and gas pressures). It was found that the order/disorder structure of the treated carbon fiber changed with different processing conditions. At low pressures, the degree of disordered structure increased with HF-RF power and process time. However, at high pressures, high-order structure () was observed and almost no observable structural effects appeared at long treatment time. Also, the first-order Raman-band peaks (D and G) of the treated carbon fibers shifted. And, FWHM (), intensity () and D-band relative integrated intensity () ratios increased with ordering whereas they decreased with disordering.

  6. Multiquasiparticle configuration effects deduced from the very high frequency discrete lines spectroscopy of /sup 165/Yb

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, C.; Bendjallah, N.; Diamond, R.M.; Ellis-Akovali, Y.; Lindenberg, K.H.; Newton, J.O.; Shih, S.; Stephens, F.S.; Garret, J.D.; Herskind, B.

    1982-01-01

    New experimental data are presented for /sup 165/Yb in which three already known rotational bands are extended up to very high angular frequencies. We do not observe, below h-bar omega/sub c/ approx. 0.45 MeV in any of these three bands the second discontinuity occuring for h-bar omega/sub c/ approx. 0.42 MeV in N = 90 nuclei. Furthermore, we observe in these three sequences a dealignment of high enough amplitude that it cannot be explained in terms of a single quasi-neutron configuration, and must then be due to a collective effect. A gradual decrease of the neutron pairing with increasing angular frequencies is suggested.

  7. High-frequency, 'quantum' and electromechanical effects in quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovskii, Vadim Ya; Zybtsev, Sergey G.; Nikitin, Maksim V.; Gorlova, Irina G.; Nasretdinova, Venera F.; Zaitsev-Zotov, Sergei V.

    2013-01-01

    Recent results (some previously unpublished) on the physics of charge density waves (CDWs) are reviewed. The synthesis conditions and unique properties of the quasi-one-dimensional compound {NbS_3}, with highly coherent room temperature CDWs, are described. A peculiar type of 'quantization' is discussed, which is observed in micro- and nanosamples of {K_{0.3}MoO_3} and {NbSe_3} due to the discrete nature of CDW wave vector values. The electric-field-induced torsional strain (TS) in quasi-one-dimensional conductors is considered. Research results on the TS of a noise character induced by sliding CDWs are presented, along with those on the inverse effect, the modulation of the voltage induced by externally driven TS. Results on the nonlinear conduction of {TiS_3}, a quasi-one-dimensional compound not belonging to the family of classical Peierls conductors, are also described.

  8. Effects of Isotropic and Anisotropic Structure in the Lowermost Mantle on High-Frequency Body Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, L.; Ferreira, A. M. G.; Ritsema, J.

    2015-12-01

    It has been observed that vertically (SV) and horizontally (SH) polarised S waves crossing the lowermost mantle sometimes are split by a few seconds The splitting of such waves is often interpreted in terms of seismic anisotropy in the D" region. Here we investigate systematically the effects of elastic, anelastic, isotropic and anisotropic structure on shear-wave splitting, including 3-D variations in some of these physical properties. Taking advantage of accurate waveform modeling techniques such as Gemini and the Spectral Element Method we generate three-component theoretical waveforms in a wide set of 1-D and 3-D, isotropic and radially anisotropic earth models, accurate down to a wave period of T~5.6s. Our numerical simulations in isotropic earth models show that the contamination of S waves by other phases can generate an apparent splitting between SH and SV waves. In particular, in the case of very shallow sources, the sS phase can interfere with the direct S phase, resulting in split SH and SV pulses when the SH and SV (or sSH and sSV) waves have different polarity or a substantial amplitude difference. In the case of deep earthquake sources, a positive shear velocity jump at the top of the D" can cause the triplication of S waves and the ScSH and ScSV phases can have different polarity. Thus, when the triplicated S wave is combined with the ScS phase, the resulting SH-ScSH and SV-ScSV phases may seem split. On the other hand, in the absence of a sharp vertical variation in the shear wave velocity, the difference in polarity between ScSH and ScSV can make the SH pulse larger than SV and thus also lead to apparent splitting between these phases. This effect depends on the thickness of the D" and the Vs gradient within it. S waveforms simulated in radially anisotropic models reveal that a radial anisotropy of ξ=1.07 in the D" seems to be necessary to explain the 2-3s of splitting observed in waveforms recorded in Tanzania from an event in the Banda Sea

  9. An effective way to increase the high-frequency permeability of Fe3O4 nanorods.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao; Yang, Haitao; Tang, Jin; Li, Zi-An; Su, Yi Kun; Geng, Sai; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Xiangqun; Cheng, Zhaohua

    2016-07-14

    Uniform Fe3O4 magnetic nanorods (NRs) were successfully synthesized and oriented in epoxy resin under a rotating magnetic field. Magnetic induction fields within and around a single Fe3O4 nanorod in the remanence state were obtained by off-axis electron holography. The induction fields indicated a single domain state of the highly anisotropic Fe3O4 nanorod due to its strong magnetic shape anisotropy. Quantitative magnetic moment analysis of the obtained phase image yielded an average magnetization of 0.53 T of a single Fe3O4 nanorod. Moreover, the real part of the permeability (μ') of magnetic-oriented Fe3O4 NRs is obviously higher than that of random Fe3O4 NRs in the GHz range. The oriented Fe3O4 NRs exhibit a higher resonance peak at 4.75 GHz compared to the bulk counterpart (1.2 GHz) in the frequency dependence of μ in the range of 1-10 GHz. Moreover, the calculated μ value of the oriented Fe3O4 NRs could be improved to 4.22 with the increased dipolar interaction strength using the OOMMF software. These results could play a guiding significance in the development of an effective method to improve the permeability of magnetic nanomaterials at GHz working frequency. PMID:27305587

  10. An effective way to increase the high-frequency permeability of Fe3O4 nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiao; Yang, Haitao; Tang, Jin; Li, Zi-An; Su, Yi Kun; Geng, Sai; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Xiangqun; Cheng, Zhaohua

    2016-06-01

    Uniform Fe3O4 magnetic nanorods (NRs) were successfully synthesized and oriented in epoxy resin under a rotating magnetic field. Magnetic induction fields within and around a single Fe3O4 nanorod in the remanence state were obtained by off-axis electron holography. The induction fields indicated a single domain state of the highly anisotropic Fe3O4 nanorod due to its strong magnetic shape anisotropy. Quantitative magnetic moment analysis of the obtained phase image yielded an average magnetization of 0.53 T of a single Fe3O4 nanorod. Moreover, the real part of the permeability (μ') of magnetic-oriented Fe3O4 NRs is obviously higher than that of random Fe3O4 NRs in the GHz range. The oriented Fe3O4 NRs exhibit a higher resonance peak at 4.75 GHz compared to the bulk counterpart (1.2 GHz) in the frequency dependence of μ in the range of 1-10 GHz. Moreover, the calculated μ value of the oriented Fe3O4 NRs could be improved to 4.22 with the increased dipolar interaction strength using the OOMMF software. These results could play a guiding significance in the development of an effective method to improve the permeability of magnetic nanomaterials at GHz working frequency.Uniform Fe3O4 magnetic nanorods (NRs) were successfully synthesized and oriented in epoxy resin under a rotating magnetic field. Magnetic induction fields within and around a single Fe3O4 nanorod in the remanence state were obtained by off-axis electron holography. The induction fields indicated a single domain state of the highly anisotropic Fe3O4 nanorod due to its strong magnetic shape anisotropy. Quantitative magnetic moment analysis of the obtained phase image yielded an average magnetization of 0.53 T of a single Fe3O4 nanorod. Moreover, the real part of the permeability (μ') of magnetic-oriented Fe3O4 NRs is obviously higher than that of random Fe3O4 NRs in the GHz range. The oriented Fe3O4 NRs exhibit a higher resonance peak at 4.75 GHz compared to the bulk counterpart (1.2 GHz) in the

  11. High frequency jet ventilation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Effect of cerebral blood flow in patients after open heart surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Pittet, J.F.; Forster, A.; Suter, P.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Attenuation of ventilator-synchronous pressure fluctuations of intracranial pressure has been demonstrated during high frequency ventilation in animal and human studies, but the consequences of this effect on cerebral blood flow have not been investigated in man. We compared the effects of high frequency jet ventilation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation on CBF in 24 patients investigated three hours after completion of open-heart surgery. The patients were investigated during three consecutive periods with standard sedation (morphine, pancuronium): a. IPPV; b. HFJV; c. IPPV. Partial pressure of arterial CO{sub 2} (PaCO{sub 2}: 4.5-5.5 kPa) and rectal temperature (35.5 to 37.5{degree}C) were maintained constant during the study. The CBF was measured by intravenous {sup 133}Xe washout technique. The following variables were derived from the cerebral clearance of {sup 133}Xe: the rapid compartment flow, the initial slope index, ie, a combination of the rapid and the slow compartment flows, and the ratio of fast compartment flow over total CBF (FF). Compared to IPPV, HFJV applied to result in the same mean airway pressure did not produce any change in pulmonary gas exchange, mean systemic arterial pressure, and cardiac index. Similarly, CBF was not significantly altered by HFJV. However, important variations of CBF values were observed in three patients, although the classic main determinants of CBF (PaCO{sub 2}, cerebral perfusion pressure, Paw, temperature) remained unchanged. Our results suggest that in patients with normal systemic hemodynamics, the effects of HFJV and IPPV on CBF are comparable at identical levels of mean airway pressure.

  12. High frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with diphenidol administration results in an additive antiallodynic effect in rats following chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Teng; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2015-03-01

    The impact of coadministration of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and diphenidol is not well established. Here we estimated the effects of diphenidol in combination with TENS on mechanical allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression. Using an animal chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, the rat was estimated for evidence of mechanical sensitivity via von Frey hair stimulation and TNF-α expression in the sciatic nerve using the ELISA assay. High frequency (100Hz) TENS or intraperitoneal injection of diphenidol (2.0μmol/kg) was applied daily, starting on postoperative day 1 (POD1) and lasting for the next 13 days. We demonstrated that both high frequency TENS and diphenidol groups had an increase in mechanical withdrawal thresholds of 60%. Coadministration of high frequency TENS and diphenidol gives better results of paw withdrawal thresholds in comparison with high frequency TENS alone or diphenidol alone. Both diphenidol and coadministration of high frequency TENS with diphenidol groups showed a significant reduction of the TNF-α level compared with the CCI or HFS group (P<0.05) in the sciatic nerve on POD7, whereas the CCI or high frequency TENS group exhibited a higher TNF-α level than the sham group (P<0.05). Our resulting data revealed that diphenidol alone, high frequency TENS alone, and the combination produced a reduction of neuropathic allodynia. Both diphenidol and the combination of diphenidol with high frequency TENS inhibited TNF-α expression. A moderately effective dose of diphenidol appeared to have an additive effect with high frequency TENS. Therefore, multidisciplinary treatments could be considered for this kind of mechanical allodynia. PMID:25596445

  13. On-chip integration of high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and Hall-effect magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Quddusi, H M; Ramsey, C M; Gonzalez-Pons, J C; Henderson, J J; del Barco, E; de Loubens, G; Kent, A D

    2008-07-01

    A sensor that integrates high-sensitivity micro-Hall effect magnetometry and high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy capabilities on a single semiconductor chip is presented. The Hall-effect magnetometer (HEM) was fabricated from a two-dimensional electron gas GaAsAlGaAs heterostructure in the form of a cross, with a 50 x 50 microm2 sensing area. A high-frequency microstrip resonator is coupled with two small gaps to a transmission line with a 50 Omega impedance. Different resonator lengths are used to obtain quasi-TEM fundamental resonant modes in the frequency range 10-30 GHz. The resonator is positioned on top of the active area of the HEM, where the magnetic field of the fundamental mode is largest, thus optimizing the conversion of microwave power into magnetic field at the sample position. The two gaps coupling the resonator and transmission lines are engineered differently--the gap to the microwave source is designed to optimize the loaded quality factor of the resonator (Q

  14. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hae-Won; Youn, Young C; Chung, Sun J; Sohn, Young H

    2016-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) occurs in a small proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and reduces their quality of life. We performed a randomized sham-controlled study to evaluate the effect of high-frequency (HF) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on MDD in patients with PD. Ten patients participated to a real-rTMS group and eight patients to a sham-rTMS group. Evaluations were performed at baseline, 2 and 6 weeks after rTMS treatment. All participants underwent examinations of depression rating scales, including the Hamilton Rating Scale, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the motor part of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III). The real-rTMS group had improved scores on HRS and the MADRS after 10 sessions, and these beneficial effects persisted for 6 weeks after the initial session. The BDI score did not change immediately after the sessions. The sham-rTMS group had no significant changes in any of the depression rating scales. The UPDRS-III did not change in either group. HF-rTMS of the left DLPFC is an effective treatment for MDD in patients with PD. PMID:27178002

  15. Administration duration influences the effects of low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration on ovariectomized rat bone.

    PubMed

    Qing, Fangzhu; Xie, Pengfei; Liem, Yacincha Selushia; Chen, Ying; Chen, Xuening; Zhu, Xiangdong; Fan, Yujiang; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-07-01

    Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) has been proposed as a non-drug anti-osteoporosis treatment. However, the influence of administration duration on its effect is seldom investigated. In this study, the effect of 16-week LMHFV (0.3 g, 30 Hz, 20 min/day) on the bone mineral densities (BMDs), bone mechanical properties, and cellular responses of osteoporotic and healthy rats was examined by in vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), fracture tests, cell assays, and mRNA quantification. Forty-eight adult rats were equally assigned to sham surgery (SHM), sham surgery with LMHFV (SHM+V), ovariectomy (OVX), and ovariectomy with LMHFV (OVX+V) groups. At week 8, LMHFV ameliorated ovariectomy-induced deterioration of trabecular bone, with a significantly higher tibia trabecular BMD (+11.2%) being noted in OVX+V rats (vs. OVX). However, this positive effect was not observed at later time points. Furthermore, 16 weeks of LMHFV caused significant reductions in the vertebral mean BMD (-13.0%), trabecular BMD (-15.7%), and maximum load (-21.5%) in OVX+V rats (vs. OVX). Osteoblasts derived from osteoporotic rat bone explants showed elevated BSP and OSX mRNA expression induced by LMHFV on day 1. However, no further positive effect on osteoblastic mRNA expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, or calcium deposition was observed with prolonged culture time. A higher ratio of RANKL/OPG induced by LMHFV suggests that osteoclastogenesis may be activated. Together, these results demonstrate that administration duration played an important role in the effect of LMHFV. Early exposure to LMHFV can positively modulate osteoporotic bone and osteoblasts; however, the beneficial effect seems not to persist over time. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1147-1157, 2016. PMID:26662723

  16. The differential effect of low- versus high-frequency random noise stimulation in the treatment of tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Joos, Kathleen; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-05-01

    Tinnitus is the sensation of a ringing, buzzing, roaring or hissing sound in the absence of an external sound. As tinnitus has been related to hyperactivity and synaptic plasticity changes in the central auditory system, invasive and noninvasive neuromodulation methods have been used to interfere with this underlying mechanism to reduce tinnitus loudness and distress. Recently, transcranial random noise stimulation applied over the auditory cortex induced a more pronounced effect on tinnitus loudness than transcranial direct current and alternating current stimulation. We performed tRNS over the temporoparietal cortex in 154 patients with non-pulsatile tinnitus. A total of 119 patients received low-frequency tRNS (lf-tRNS), 19 high-frequency tRNS (hf-tRNS) and 16 whole frequency spectrum tRNS (wf-tRNS). The effect was evaluated by using the numeric rating scale loudness and distress pre- and post-stimulation. This study revealed a significant reduction in tinnitus loudness when lf-tRNS and hf-tRNS were applied as well as a reduction in tinnitus-related distress with lf-tRNS. Moreover, we observed a significantly more pronounced reduction in loudness and distress in pure tone (PT) tinnitus compared to narrow band noise (NBN) tinnitus when hf-tRNS was applied, a difference that could not be obtained with lf-tRNS. Based on these results, tRNS might be a promising treatment option for non-pulsatile tinnitus; however, we cannot yet provide a clear mechanistic explanation for the different results obtained with different types of stimulation, i.e., lf-tRNS, hf-tRNS and wf-tRNS, or with different types of tinnitus, i.e., PT and NBN tinnitus. PMID:25694243

  17. Effect of low and high frequency thalamic stimulation on sleep in patients with Parkinson's disease and essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Arnulf, I; Bejjani, B P; Garma, L; Bonnet, A M; Damier, P; Pidoux, B; Dormont, D; Cornu, P; Derenne, J P; Agid, Y

    2000-03-01

    Continuous high frequency stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (Vim), delivered through surgically implanted quadripolar electrodes, alleviates tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET). The Vim is adjacent to the thalamic reticular nuclei, where sleep spindles originate according to animal models. In order to determine whether Vim stimulation affects sleep spindles, six patients (4 PD, 2 ET), aged 60-69 years, were recorded on a control night and a stimulation night (130 Hz, 2-3 V; right stimulation in five patients and bilateral stimulation in one patient). Stimulation did not modify sleep quality or architecture. Sleep spindles were present and symmetrical in five out of six patients under stimulation. However, in one patient with a sustained 'thalamotomy-like effect' that abolished tremor, spindles were asymmetrical even without stimulation. In each patient, spindle density was similar on both nights (mean+/- SEM: 2.25+/-0. 61 spindles per min of stage 2 sleep vs. 1.84+/-0.31). In an attempt to promote sleep two different patterns of stimulation were applied in the region of ventrooralis posterior and reticularis nuclei in five patients in the awake state. Continuous low frequency stimulation (5 Hz, 0.1 V), and repeated trains of 15 Hz for 1 s every 15 s mimicking the pattern of physiological spindles, each failed to induce sleep or cortical synchronization. We conclude that Vim stimulation, unlike thalamotomy, selectively reduces tremor without altering sleep or sleep spindles. Our results also suggest that low frequency stimulation applied in the region of the reticular nuclei does not induce sleep. PMID:10733690

  18. Electrical high frequency stimulation in the dorsal striatum: Effects on response learning and on GABA levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Anett; de Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira; Lecourtier, Lucas; Moser, Andreas; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2011-09-23

    Electrical high frequency stimulation (HFS) has been used to treat various neurological and psychiatric diseases. The striatal area contributes to response learning and procedural memory. Therefore, we investigated the effect of striatal HFS application on procedural/declarative-like memory in rats. All rats were trained in a flooded Double-H maze for three days (4 trials/day) to swim to an escape platform hidden at a constant location. The starting place was the same for all trials. After each training session, HFS of the left dorsal striatum was performed over 4h in alternating 20 min periods (during rest time, 10a.m. to 3p.m.). Nineteen hours after the last HFS and right after a probe trial assessing the rats' strategy (procedural vs. declarative-like memory-based choice), animals were sacrificed and the dorsal striatum was quickly removed. Neurotransmitter levels were measured by HPLC. Stimulated rats did not differ from sham-operated and control rats in acquisition performance, but exhibited altered behavior during the probe trial (procedural memory responses being less frequent than in controls). In stimulated rats, GABA levels were significantly increased in the dorsal striatum on both sides. We suggest that HFS of the dorsal striatum does not alter learning behavior in rats but influences the strategy by which the rats solve the task. Given that the HFS-induced increase of GABA levels was found 19 h after stimulation, it can be assumed that HFS has consequences lasting for several hours and which are functionally significant at a behavioral level, at least under our stimulation (frequency, timing, location, side and strength of stimulation) and testing conditions. PMID:21501632

  19. The effective Q values inferred from the high-frequency decay parameter for the sediments in Taipei basin, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Wey; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Chang, Chi-Ling; Liu, Sheu-Yien

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the high-frequency decay parameter κ, proposed by Anderson and Hough (1984), are measured from the seismograms recorded by stations, which installed in the Taipei basin. The spectral amplitudes decay exponentially with frequency, f, which can be formulated as A(f)=A_0e‑πκf, for f > fe, where A(f) is the spectral amplitude, and A0 depends on the earthquake source and epicenter distance, and the value of κ is independent of frequency, unit in second. The time windows applied to seismograms are suggested to be shear waves that are transformed to spectra by the technique of Fourier transform. The seismograms from the downhole array in Taipei Basin by Academia Sinica since 1992, provide a good opportunity to estimate the attenuation factor of the sedimentary strata over the Tertiary base rock beneath the Taipei basin (Wang et al., 2004). The seismograms of 23 earthquakes with magnitude ranges of 5.1-7.1 over the period of 2003-2010 at 9 downhole array stations are taken into calculation of the κ values for the shear waves. The results show that the κ values vary with depth and are in the range of 0.009-0.095 sec. The averaged Δκ values from observations range +/- 0.02 seconds respective to Δκ values at surface of each of station. The effective Q values for the sedimentary layers are inferred from the varied Δκ at each downhole stations following the evaluation method of 1-D analytical transfer function (Safak, 1995).

  20. Preliminary Evidence of the Effects of High-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Swallowing Functions in Post-Stroke Individuals with Chronic Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ivy K. Y.; Chan, Karen M. K.; Wong, C. S.; Cheung, Raymond T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of potential benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the rehabilitation of dysphagia. However, the site and frequency of stimulation for optimal effects are not clear. Aims: The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the short-term effects of high-frequency 5 Hz rTMS applied to…

  1. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  2. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  3. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  4. The effects of high frequency subthalamic stimulation on balance performance and fear of falling in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Maria H; Fransson, Per-Anders; Jarnlo, Gun-Britt; Magnusson, Måns; Rehncrona, Stig

    2009-01-01

    Background Balance impairment is one of the most distressing symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) even with pharmacological treatment (levodopa). A complementary treatment is high frequency stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Whether STN stimulation improves postural control is under debate. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of STN stimulation alone on balance performance as assessed with clinical performance tests, subjective ratings of fear of falling and posturography. Methods Ten patients (median age 66, range 59–69 years) with bilateral STN stimulation for a minimum of one year, had their anti-PD medications withdrawn overnight. Assessments were done both with the STN stimulation turned OFF and ON (start randomized). In both test conditions, the following were assessed: motor symptoms (descriptive purposes), clinical performance tests, fear of falling ratings, and posturography with and without vibratory proprioceptive disturbance. Results STN stimulation alone significantly (p = 0.002) increased the scores of the Berg balance scale, and the median increase was 6 points. The results of all timed performance tests, except for sharpened Romberg, were significantly (p ≤ 0.016) improved. The patients rated their fear of falling as less severe, and the total score of the Falls-Efficacy Scale(S) increased (p = 0.002) in median with 54 points. All patients completed posturography when the STN stimulation was turned ON, but three patients were unable to do so when it was turned OFF. The seven patients with complete data showed no statistical significant difference (p values ≥ 0.109) in torque variance values when comparing the two test situations. This applied both during quiet stance and during the periods with vibratory stimulation, and it was irrespective of visual input and sway direction. Conclusion In this sample, STN stimulation alone significantly improved the results of the clinical performance tests that mimic activities in

  5. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  6. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  7. Effect of high-frequency in-plane substrate vibration on a three-phase contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manor, Ofer; Pismen, Len M.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate analytically the contribution of high-frequency horizontal (in-plane) vibration of a solid substrate to the apparent contact angle of a liquid meniscus in the framework of the lubrication approximation. We show that oscillatory excitation invokes a drift of liquid within the meniscus resulting from nonlinear contributions from both the motion of the solid surface and acoustically induced capillary waves at the free surface of the liquid. Our analysis reveals that under this type of excitation, the relative increase of the steady apparent contact angle is proportional to the product of the capillary and Reynolds numbers.

  8. Effects on Lung Function of Small-Volume Conventional Ventilation and High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in a Model of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikusiakova, L Tomcikova; Pistekova, H; Kosutova, P; Mikolka, P; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2015-01-01

    For treatment of severe neonatal meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), lung-protective mechanical ventilation is essential. This study compared short-term effects of small-volume conventional mechanical ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation on lung function in experimentally-induced MAS. In conventionally-ventilated rabbits, MAS was induced by intratracheal instillation of meconium suspension (4 ml/kg, 25 mg/ml). Then, animals were ventilated conventionally with small-volume (f-50/min; VT-6 ml/kg) or with high frequency ventilation (f-10/s) for 4 h, with the evaluation of blood gases, ventilatory pressures, and pulmonary shunts. After sacrifice, left lung was saline-lavaged and cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined. Right lung was used for the estimation of lung edema formation (wet/dry weight ratio). Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), oxidative damage markers, were detected in lung tissue and plasma. Meconium instillation worsened gas exchange, and induced inflammation and lung edema. Within 4 h of ventilation, high frequency ventilation improved arterial pH and CO2 elimination compared with conventional ventilation. However, no other significant differences in oxygenation, ventilatory pressures, shunts, BALF cell counts, TBARS concentrations, or edema formation were observed between the two kinds of ventilation. We conclude that high frequency ventilation has only a slight advantage over small-volume conventional ventilation in the model of meconium aspiration syndrome in that it improves CO2 elimination. PMID:26017729

  9. Effect of Bipolar Cuff Electrode Design on Block Thresholds in High-Frequency Electrical Neural Conduction Block

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, D. Michael; Foldes, Emily L.; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.

    2012-01-01

    Many medical conditions are characterized by undesired or pathological peripheral neurological activity. The local delivery of high-frequency alternating currents (HFAC) has been shown to be a fast acting and quickly reversible method of blocking neural conduction and may provide a treatment alternative for eliminating pathological neural activity in these conditions. This work represents the first formal study of electrode design for high-frequency nerve block, and demonstrates that the interpolar separation distance for a bipolar electrode influences the current amplitudes required to achieve conduction block in both computer simulations and mammalian whole nerve experiments. The minimal current required to achieve block is also dependent on the diameter of the fibers being blocked and the electrode–fiber distance. Single fiber simulations suggest that minimizing the block threshold can be achieved by maximizing both the bipolar activating function (by adjusting the bipolar electrode contact separation distance) and a synergistic addition of membrane sodium currents generated by each of the two bipolar electrode contacts. For a rat sciatic nerve, 1.0–2.0 mm represented the optimal interpolar distance for minimizing current delivery. PMID:19840914

  10. Acute effects of high-frequency microfocal vibratory stimulation on the H reflex of the soleus muscle. A double-blind study in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsi, Enrico; Paone, Paolo; Tassorelli, Cristina; De Icco, Roberto; Moglia, Arrigo; Alvisi, Elena; Marchetta, Lucky; Fresia, Mauro; Montini, Alessandra; Calabrese, Marzia; Versiglia, Vittorio; Sandrini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study in healthy subjects examined the effects of a system delivering focal microvibrations at high frequency (Equistasi®) on tonic vibration stimulus (TVS)-induced inhibition of the soleus muscle H reflex. High-frequency microvibrations significantly increased the inhibitory effect of TVS on the H reflex for up to three minutes. Moreover, Equistasi® also significantly reduced alpha-motoneuron excitability, as indicated by the changes in the ratio between the maximum-amplitude H reflex (Hmax reflex) and the maximum-amplitude muscle response (Mmax response); this effect was due to reduction of the amplitude of the H reflex because the amplitude of muscle response remained unchanged. The present findings indicate that Equistasi® has a modulatory effect on proprioceptive reflex circuits. Therefore, Equistasi® might interfere with some mechanisms involved in both physiological and pathophysiological control of movement and of posture. PMID:26727706

  11. Impedance model of lithium ion polymer battery considering temperature effects based on electrochemical principle: Part I for high frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng; Choe, Song-Yul

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of impedance is one of well-known methods to experimentally characterize electrochemical properties of Li-ion batteries. The measured impedance responses are generally fitted to an equivalent circuit model that is composed of linear and nonlinear electric components that mimic behaviors of different layers of a battery. However, the parameters do not provide quantitative statements on charge dynamics considering material properties. Therefore, electrochemical models are widely employed to study the charge dynamics, but have not included high frequency responses predominantly determined by double layers. Thus, we have developed models for the double layer and bulk that are integrated into the electrochemical model for a pouch type Li-ion battery. The integrated model is validated against the frequency response obtained from EIS equipment at different temperatures as well as the time response. The results show that the proposed model is capable of representing the responses at charging and discharging in time and frequency domain.

  12. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  13. Effect of asymmetrical double-pockets and gate-drain underlap on Schottky barrier tunneling FET: Ambipolar conduction vs. high frequency performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ahmed; Ossaimee, Mahmoud; Zekry, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a proposed structure based on asymmetrical double pockets SB-TFET with gate-drain underlap is presented. 2D extensive modeling and simulation, using Silvaco TCAD, were carried out to study the effect of both underlap length and pockets' doping on the transistor performance. It was found that the underlap from the drain side suppresses the ambipolar conduction and doesn't enhance the high-frequency characteristics. The enhancement of the high-frequency characteristics could be realized by increasing the doping of the drain pocket over the doping of the source pocket. An optimum choice was found which gives the conditions of minimum ambipolar conduction, maximum ON current and maximum cut-off frequency. These enhancements render the device more competitive as a nanometer transistor.

  14. Randomized phase 2 study of GMI-1070 in SCD: reduction in time to resolution of vaso-occlusive events and decreased opioid use

    PubMed Central

    Wun, Ted; McCavit, Timothy L.; De Castro, Laura M.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Lanzkron, Sophie; Hsu, Lewis L.; Smith, Wally R.; Rhee, Seungshin; Magnani, John L.; Thackray, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of vaso-occlusive crises (VOC) or events in sickle cell disease (SCD) remains limited to symptom relief with opioids. Animal models support the effectiveness of the pan-selectin inhibitor GMI-1070 in reducing selectin-mediated cell adhesion and abrogating VOC. We studied GMI-1070 in a prospective multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase 2 study of 76 SCD patients with VOC. Study drug (GMI-1070 or placebo) was given every 12 hours for up to 15 doses. Other treatment was per institutional standard of care. All subjects reached the composite primary end point of resolution of VOC. Although time to reach the composite primary end point was not statistically different between the groups, clinically meaningful reductions in mean and median times to VOC resolution of 41 and 63 hours (28% and 48%, P = .19 for both) were observed in the active treatment group vs the placebo group. As a secondary end point, GMI-1070 appeared safe in acute vaso-occlusion, and adverse events were not different in the two arms. Also in secondary analyses, mean cumulative IV opioid analgesic use was reduced by 83% with GMI-1070 vs placebo (P = .010). These results support a phase 3 study of GMI-1070 (now rivipansel) for SCD VOC. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01119833. PMID:25733584

  15. GMI Instrument Spin Balance Method, Optimization, Calibration and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayari, Laoucet; Kubitschek, Michael; Ashton, Gunnar; Johnston, Steve; Debevec, Dave; Newell, David; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The Global Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument must spin at a constant rate of 32 rpm continuously for the 3-year mission life. Therefore, GMI must be very precisely balanced about the spin axis and center of gravity (CG) to maintain stable scan pointing and to minimize disturbances imparted to the spacecraft and attitude control on-orbit. The GMI instrument is part of the core Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft and is used to make calibrated radiometric measurements at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. The GPM mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological predictions through more accurate and frequent precipitation measurements. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) was selected by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to design, build, and test the GMI instrument. The GMI design has to meet a challenging set of spin balance requirements and had to be brought into simultaneous static and dynamic spin balance after the entire instrument was already assembled and before environmental tests began. The focus of this contribution is on the analytical and test activities undertaken to meet the challenging spin balance requirements of the GMI instrument. The novel process of measuring the residual static and dynamic imbalances with a very high level of accuracy and precision is presented together with the prediction of the optimal balance masses and their locations.

  16. GMI Instrument Spin Balance Method, Optimization, Calibration, and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayari, Laoucet; Kubitschek, Michael; Ashton, Gunnar; Johnston, Steve; Debevec, Dave; Newell, David; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The Global Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument must spin at a constant rate of 32 rpm continuously for the 3 year mission life. Therefore, GMI must be very precisely balanced about the spin axis and CG to maintain stable scan pointing and to minimize disturbances imparted to the spacecraft and attitude control on-orbit. The GMI instrument is part of the core Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft and is used to make calibrated radiometric measurements at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. The GPM mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological predictions through more accurate and frequent precipitation measurements. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) was selected by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to design, build, and test the GMI instrument. The GMI design has to meet a challenging set of spin balance requirements and had to be brought into simultaneous static and dynamic spin balance after the entire instrument was already assembled and before environmental tests began. The focus of this contribution is on the analytical and test activities undertaken to meet the challenging spin balance requirements of the GMI instrument. The novel process of measuring the residual static and dynamic imbalances with a very high level of accuracy and precision is presented together with the prediction of the optimal balance masses and their locations.

  17. The Effects of High-Frequency Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Dental Professionals with Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Single-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders (WMSDs) have a significant issue for dental professionals. This study investigated the effects of high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on work-related pain, fatigue, and the active range of motion in dental professionals. Among recruited 47 dental professionals with WMSDs, 24 subjects received high-frequency TENS (the TENS group), while 23 subjects received placebo stimulation (the placebo group). TENS was applied to the muscle trigger points of the levator scapulae and upper trapezius, while placebo-TENS was administered without electrical stimulation during 60 min. Pain and fatigue at rest and during movement were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain pressure threshold (PPT), and active range of motion (AROM) of horizontal head rotation at six time points: prelabor, postlabor, post-TENS, and at 1 h, 3 h, and 1 day after TENS application. Both groups showed significantly increased pain and fatigue and decreased PPT and AROM after completing a work task. The TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in VAS score, fatigue, PPT, and AROM at post-TENS and at 1 h and 3 h after application (all P < 0.05) as compared to the placebo group. A single session high-frequency TENS may immediately reduce symptoms related to WMSDs in dental professionals. PMID:26664451

  18. A 1DVAR retrieval applied to GMI: Algorithm description, validation, and sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, David I.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    2016-06-01

    A fully physical, 1-D variational inversion algorithm (1DVAR) has been developed to simultaneously retrieve total precipitable water (TPW), 10 m wind speed, and cloud liquid water path (CLWP) over ocean. Results presented are for the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI), but the algorithm is adaptable to any microwave imager. The Colorado State University 1DVAR is novel in that the observation error covariances are not assumed to be zero and empirical orthogonal functions are utilized to retrieve the structure of the water vapor profile, aided by GMI's high-frequency channels. Validation against radiosonde and ocean buoy observations demonstrates a near zero bias for wind speed and a small positive bias for water vapor, respectively, with RMS errors that rival those of benchmark products. RMS errors against validation are 2.6 mm and 1.2 m/s for TPW and wind speed. No calibration adjustments were made to achieve these results, and no "truth" data were used to train the algorithm. The advantages of this fully physical inversion are its adaptability, transparency, and full description of retrieval errors. Sensitivities of the algorithm are explored in detail.

  19. Positional stability and radial dynamics of sonoluminescent bubbles under bi-harmonic driving: Effect of the high-frequency component and its relative phase.

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2016-07-01

    The use of bi-frequency driving in sonoluminescence has proved to be an effective way to avoid the spatial instability (pseudo-orbits) developed by bubbles in systems with high viscous liquids like sulfuric or phosphoric acids. In this work, we present extensive experimental and numerical evidence in order to assess the effect of the high frequency component (PAc(HF)) of a bi-harmonic acoustic pressure field on the dynamic of sonoluminescent bubbles in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid. The present study is mainly focused on the role of the harmonic frequency (Nf0) and the relative phase between the two frequency components (φb) of the acoustic field on the spatial, positional and diffusive stability of the bubbles. The results presented in this work were analyzed by means of three different approaches. First, we discussed some qualitative considerations about the changes observed in the radial dynamics, and the stability of similar bubbles under distinct bi-harmonic drivings. Later, we have investigated, through a series of numerical simulations, how the use of high frequency harmonic components of different order N, affects the positional stability of the SL bubbles. Furthermore, the influence of φb in their radius temporal evolution is systematically explored for harmonics ranging from the second to the fifteenth harmonic (N=2-15). Finally, a multivariate analysis based on the covariance method is performed to study the dependences among the parameters characterizing the SL bubble. Both experimental and numerical results indicate that the impact of PAc(HF) on the positional instability and the radial dynamics turns to be progressively negligible as the order of the high frequency harmonic component grows (i.e. N ≫ 1), however its effectiveness on the reduction of the spatial instability remains unaltered or even improved. PMID:26964988

  20. Design, Development and Testing of the GMI Reflector Deployment Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, Larry; Foster, Mike; McEachen, Mike; Pellicciotti, Joseph; Kubitschek, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The GMI Reflector Deployment Assembly (RDA) is an articulating structure that accurately positions and supports the main reflector of the Global Microwave Imager (GMI) throughout the 3 year mission life. The GMI instrument will fly on the core Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft and will be used to make calibrated radiometric measurements at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. The GPM mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydrometeorological predictions through more accurate and frequent precipitation measurements1. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) was selected by NASA Goddard to design, build, and test the GMI instrument. The RDA was designed and manufactured by ATK Aerospace Systems Group to meet a number of challenging packaging and performance requirements. ATK developed a flight-like engineering development unit (EDU) and two flight mechanisms that have been delivered to BATC. This paper will focus on driving GMI instrument system requirements, the RDA design, development, and test activities performed to demonstrate that requirements have been met.

  1. High-frequency non-linear motions induced by non-tidal ocean loading and their effect on estimating the geocenter motion from a geodetic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memin, A.; Watson, C. S.; Tregoning, P.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the influence of high-frequency non-tidal ocean loading on the displacement induced at a global set of geodetic stations and on estimating the geocenter motion from a geodetic network. Ground displacements of each geodetic site induced by atmospheric and ocean loading are computed by convolving surface mass or pressure variations with Green functions for the vertical and horizontal displacement. The displacements resulting from atmospheric loading are computed using the surface pressure variations provided by the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts model (1.5° space and 3h time sampling). The ocean response is taken into account assuming an inverted barometer and a non-inverted barometer response of the ocean to changes in the atmosphere. The first one is derived from the atmospheric model. The latter is computed using the sea height variations from the global barotropic ocean model named Toulouse Unstructured Grid Ocean model (0.25° grid and 3h time sampling). To examine the spatial and temporal effects of the high-frequency non-tidal atmospheric and ocean deformations spanning the network, made of 157 stations, from 2002 to 2011, we remove a seasonal component from the loading and geodetic time series. We find that high-frequency non-tidal ocean loading induces a larger long term variability (mean increase of 25% and up to 80%) in the vertical displacement than the non-tidal atmospheric loading at 131 stations. A similar conclusion holds for the induced sub-daily scatter at 127 stations (mean increase of 37% and up to 90%). Using the dynamic ocean's response, when correcting the geodetic time series for non-tidal ocean loading, reduces the weighted variance of the geodetic time series at 118 sites, the largest reductions (> 11%) are obtained along the Baltic sea. We compute the deformation in a center of mass and center of figure reference frame and estimate the time series of the translation of the geocenter. Comparing the

  2. [Pulse-modulated Electromagnetic Radiation of Extremely High Frequencies Protects Cellular DNA against Damaging Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, A B; Lukyanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    Using a comet assay technique, we investigated protective effects of. extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in combination with the damaging effect of X-ray irradiation, the effect of damaging agents hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate on DNA in mouse whole blood leukocytes. It was shown that the preliminary exposure of the cells to low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20-min exposure, modulation frequencies of 1 and 16 Hz) caused protective effects decreasing the DNA damage by 20-45%. The efficacy of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation depended on the type of genotoxic agent and increased in a row methyl methanesulfonate--X-rays--hydrogen peroxide. Continuous electromagnetic radiation was ineffective. The mechanisms of protective effects may be connected with an induction of the adaptive response by nanomolar concentrations of reactive oxygen species formed by pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation. PMID:26591599

  3. Quantitative methods for stochastic high frequency spatio-temporal and non-linear analysis: Assessing health effects of exposure to extreme ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Alexander

    Extreme weather events, such as heat waves and cold spells, cause substantial excess mortality and morbidity in the vulnerable elderly population, and cost billions of dollars. The accurate and reliable assessment of adverse effects of extreme weather events on human health is crucial for environmental scientists, economists, and public health officials to ensure proper protection of vulnerable populations and efficient allocation of scarce resources. However, the methodology for the analysis of large national databases is yet to be developed. The overarching objective of this dissertation is to examine the effect of extreme weather on the elderly population of the Conterminous US (ConUS) with respect to seasonality in temperature in different climatic regions by utilizing heterogeneous high frequency and spatio-temporal resolution data. To achieve these goals the author: 1) incorporated dissimilar stochastic high frequency big data streams and distinct data types into the integrated data base for use in analytical and decision support frameworks; 2) created an automated climate regionalization system based on remote sensing and machine learning to define climate regions for the Conterminous US; 3) systematically surveyed the current state of the art and identified existing gaps in the scientific knowledge; 4) assessed the dose-response relationship of exposure to temperature extremes on human health in relatively homogeneous climate regions using different statistical models, such as parametric and non-parametric, contemporaneous and asynchronous, applied to the same data; 5) assessed seasonal peak timing and synchronization delay of the exposure and the disease within the framework of contemporaneous high frequency harmonic time series analysis and modification of the effect by the regional climate; 6) modeled using hyperbolic functional form non-linear properties of the effect of exposure to extreme temperature on human health. The proposed climate

  4. Effect of non-symmetric waveform on conduction block induced by high-frequency (kHz) biphasic stimulation in unmyelinated axon.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shouguo; Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-10-01

    The effect of a non-symmetric waveform on nerve conduction block induced by high-frequency biphasic stimulation is investigated using a lumped circuit model of the unmyelinated axon based on Hodgkin-Huxley equations. The simulation results reveal that the block threshold monotonically increases with the stimulation frequency for the symmetric stimulation waveform. However, a non-monotonic relationship between block threshold and stimulation frequency is observed when the stimulation waveform is non-symmetric. Constant activation of potassium channels by the high-frequency stimulation results in the increase of block threshold with increasing frequency. The non-symmetric waveform with a positive pulse 0.4-0.8 μs longer than the negative pulse blocks axonal conduction by hyperpolarizing the membrane and causes a decrease in block threshold as the frequency increases above 12-16 kHz. On the other hand, the non-symmetric waveform with a negative pulse 0.4-0.8 μs longer than the positive pulse blocks axonal conduction by depolarizing the membrane and causes a decrease in block threshold as the frequency increases above 40-53 kHz. This simulation study is important for understanding the potential mechanisms underlying the nerve block observed in animal studies, and may also help to design new animal experiments to further improve the nerve block method for clinical applications. PMID:24928360

  5. Effect of bending stresses on the high-frequency magnetic properties and their time stability in a cobalt-based amorphous alloy with an extremely low magnetostriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil'nikov, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    An unusual effect of the stresses of bending (toroidal sample diameter D) on the hysteretic magnetic properties ( H c , μ5) of an amorphous Co69Fe3.7Cr3.8Si12B11 alloy with an extremely low magnetostriction (|λ s | ≤ 10-7) is revealed. These properties are measured in a dynamic regime at a magnetic-field frequency f = 0.1-20 kHz. The coercive force of the alloy H c weakly depends on D at low frequencies ( f < 1 kHz), and permeability μ5 ( H = 5 mOe), in contrast, is independent of D at high frequencies and is dependent on D at low frequencies. The samples subjected to high-temperature (390°C) annealing followed by water quenching exhibit "anomalous" dependences: permeability μ5 increases with decreasing toroidal sample radius, i.e., with increasing bending stresses. The detected dependences are related to the fact that magnetization reversal via the displacement of rigid domain walls is predominant at low frequencies and during static measurements and magnetization reversal via the displacement of flexible domain walls is predominant at high frequencies.

  6. New Performance Indicators of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors for High-Frequency Power-Conscious Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Kosuke; Fujishima, Minoru

    2012-02-01

    With the progress of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process technology, it is possible to apply CMOS devices to millimeter-wave amplifier design. However, the power consumption of the system becomes higher in proportion to its target frequency. Moreover, CMOS devices are biased at a point where the device achieves the highest gain and consumes much power. In order to reduce the power consumption without any compromise, we introduce two types of indicator. One works towards achieving the highest gain with the lowest power consumption. The other works towards achieving the highest linearity with consideration of the power consumption. In this work, we have shown the effectiveness of those indicators by applying measured data of the fabricated metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) to cascade common-source amplifiers.

  7. High-frequency normal-mode statistics in shallow water: the combined effect of random surface and internal waves.

    PubMed

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Colosi, John A

    2015-05-01

    In an earlier article, the statistical properties of mode propagation were studied at a frequency of 1 kHz in a shallow water environment with random sound-speed perturbations from linear internal waves, using a hybrid transport theory and Monte Carlo numerical simulations. Here, the analysis is extended to include the effects of random linear surface waves, in isolation and in combination with internal waves. Mode coupling rates for both surface and internal waves are found to be significant, but strongly dependent on mode number. Mode phase randomization by surface waves is found to be dominated by coupling effects, and therefore a full transport theory treatment of the range evolution of the cross mode coherence matrix is needed. The second-moment of mode amplitudes is calculated using transport theory, thereby providing the mean intensity while the fourth-moment is calculated using Monte Carlo simulations, which provides the scintillation index. The transport theory results for second-moment statistics are shown to closely reproduce Monte Carlo simulations. Both surface waves and internal waves strongly influence the acoustic field fluctuations. PMID:25994721

  8. The Effect of Inhomogeneities on High-Frequency, Low-1 p-Modes: DIFOS Experiment on CORONAS-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    The investigation of the effects of inhomogeneities of the acoustic modes of the global solar oscillation spectrum has two parts, the first dealing with the prediction of wave fluxes in magnetic flux tubes due to the excitation of longitudinal (i.e. pressure) modes, and the second part, concerning the effects of radiation damping on the p-modes themselves. Part 1 of this work, in collaboration with S.S. Hasan (Indian Institute of Astro- physics, Bangalore), is complete and has resulted in a publication titled Excitation of Longitudinal Modes in Solar Magnetic Flux Tubes, By S.S. Hasan & WK. It is in press in the ASP conference series, containing the proceedings of the Cool Stars conference of 1997, R.A. Donahue and J.A. Bookbinder, editors; publication is expected in 1998. Part 2, in collaboration with Y. Zhugzhda (Izmiran, Moscow) and J. Staude (Sonnenobservatorium Einsteinturm, Potsdam) is in progress and is expected to result in a paper in the forthcoming Boston conference on Helio- and Asteroseismology in June, 1998. A fuller accounting of the work done under the grant will be given when the work started with funding from the grant is complete.

  9. High frequency directivity effect for a Mw 4.1 earthquake (Barcelonnette event, 2012), widely felt by the population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courboulex, Francoise; Dujardin, Alain; Vallée, Martin; Delouis, Bertrand; Deschamps, Anne; Sira, Christophe; Maron, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    Can the directivity effect of a rupture process be detected by the population 100 km away for a moderate size Mw 4.1 earthquake? The February 26th 2012, earthquake that occurred in the French Alps proved that it can ! During the night of February 26, 2012, the inhabitants and winter holidaymakers of the Vallée de l'Ubaye in the French Alps were woken by a brutal vibration due to an earthquake. This event that occurred at 8km depth was widely felt in the epicentral area and caused some light damage to houses (25 chimneys were broken, and a great deal of non-structural damage was detected). This event occurred in a mountainous area populated only by villages or small cities, the two largest cities (Grenoble and Nice) being both situated about 100 km from the epicenter. A rapid inspection of the macroseismic intensity values (collected by the BCSF) estimated in both cities immediately proved the fact that this event was much more felt in Nice and its surroundings than in Grenoble. This discrepancy is very well correlated with Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) values measured on the 16 accelerograms of the RAP network (Réseau Accélérométrique Permanent Français) in the two cities, the values measured in Grenoble being in average 8 times smaller than the one measured in Nice (smaller PGA value in Nice/ smaller PGA value in Grenoble, on good rock sites). A factor 10 was also observed inside both cities due to site effects, which results in a variability that reaches a factor 60 between the smallest and the largest PGA values recorded at 100km. In order to explain these observations, we selected French and Italian broad band stations in different azimuths and deconvolved the mainshock velocity recordings by the one of an aftershock (Mw 2.3) taken as empirical Green's function. The apparent source time functions obtained clearly show that the Barcelonnette event had a strong directivity effect of its rupture process. We found, using a simple linear source model

  10. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  11. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    PubMed

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  12. High frequency normal mode statistics in a shallow water waveguide: the effect of random linear internal waves.

    PubMed

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Colosi, John A

    2014-07-01

    Using transport theory and Monte Carlo numerical simulation, the statistical properties of mode propagation at a frequency of 1 kHz are studied in a shallow water environment with random sound-speed perturbations from linear internal waves. The environment is typical of summer conditions in the mid-Atlantic bight during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment. Observables of interest include the second and fourth moments of the mode amplitudes, which are relevant to full-field mean intensity and scintillation index. It is found that mode phase randomization has a strong adiabatic component while at the same time mode coupling rates are significant. As a consequence, a computationally efficient transport theory is presented, which models cross-mode correlation adiabatically, but accounts for mode coupling using the mode energy equations of Creamer [(1996). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 2825-2838]. The theory also has closed-form expressions for the internal wave scattering matrix and a correction for an edge effect. The hybrid transport theory is shown to accurately reproduce many statistical quantities from the Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:24993196

  13. Effects of eddy current and dispersion of magnetic anisotropy on the high-frequency permeability of Fe-based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Rozanov, K. N.; Zezyulina, P. A.; Wu, Yan-Hui

    2015-06-01

    Fe-Cu-Nb-Si-B microflakes have been prepared by ball milling. The structural, magnetostatic and microwave permeability of the flakes and flake-filled composites have been studied. Two ferromagnetic phases, nanograins and amorphous matrix, are found in the flakes. The Mössbauer study shows that the nanograins are α-Fe3(Si) with D03 superlattice structure. High resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that the nanograins are well dispersed in the matrix. The microwave permeability of composites containing the flakes has been measured. The comparison of the intrinsic permeability of the flakes obtained from the permeability measurements and from the anisotropy field distribution reveals a disagreement in the magnetic loss peak location. It is concluded that the low-frequency loss in the composites is not due to the effect of eddy currents. The low-frequency loss may be attributed to other sources, such as domain wall motion or peculiarities of the magnetic structure of the flakes in the composite.

  14. Chinchilla middle-ear admittance and sound power: High-frequency estimates and effects of inner-ear modifications

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2012-01-01

    The middle-ear input admittance relates sound power into the middle ear (ME) and sound pressure at the tympanic membrane (TM). ME input admittance was measured in the chinchilla ear canal as part of a larger study of sound power transmission through the ME into the inner ear. The middle ear was open, and the inner ear was intact or modified with small sensors inserted into the vestibule near the cochlear base. A simple model of the chinchilla ear canal, based on ear canal sound pressure measurements at two points along the canal and an assumption of plane-wave propagation, enables reliable estimates of YTM, the ME input admittance at the TM, from the admittance measured relatively far from the TM. YTM appears valid at frequencies as high as 17 kHz, a much higher frequency than previously reported. The real part of YTM decreases with frequency above 2 kHz. Effects of the inner-ear sensors (necessary for inner ear power computation) were small and generally limited to frequencies below 3 kHz. Computed power reflectance was ∼0.1 below 3.5 kHz, lower than with an intact ME below 2.5 kHz, and nearly 1 above 16 kHz. PMID:23039439

  15. Effect of Mg2+ and Ti4+ dopants on the structural, magnetic and high-frequency ferromagnetic properties of barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Mohammad H.; Rozatian, Amir S. H.; Yousefi, Mohammad H.; Valíček, Jan; Šepelák, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The doped barium hexaferrite, BaFe12-x(Mg0.5Ti0.5)xO19 with 1≤x≤5, is synthesized by a solid state ceramic method. Its crystalline structure, morphology, as well as static and dynamic magnetic properties are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), vibrating sample magnetometry, and vector network analysis, respectively. The cation distribution of Mg2+ and Ti4+ in the hexagonal structure of BaFe12-x(Mg0.5Ti0.5)xO19 is investigated by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The effect of Mg2+ and Ti4+ dopants on static and high-frequency magnetic properties of the ferrite is studied.

  16. High-Frequency Inductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Finemet-type nanocrystalline alloy represents an advanced soft-magnetic metal-metal-type nanocomposite with an eddy-current-determined high- frequency limit. A survey of different heat treatments under tensile stress is presented to tailor the hysteresis loop by induced transversal anisotropy. The flattened loop having reduced effective permeability enhances the eddy- current limit in the MHz region; For example, continuous stress annealing in a tubular furnace of 1 m length at 650°C, pulling the ribbon with a velocity of 4 m/min under a tensile stress of 200 MPa, results in a wound core having a permeability of 120 and a frequency limit of 10 MHz. Careful annealing preserves the static coercivity below 10 A/m. The power loss at 0.1 T and 100 kHz is only 82 mW/cm3, which is an order of magnitude lower then the values obtained for Sendust™ cores in similar conditions.

  17. Improved Tropospheric Ozone Residual and Comparisons to the GMI Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Joiner, J.; Ziemke, G.; Duncan, B.; Stahan, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Our tropospheric ozone residual (TOR) is produced by subtracting the stratospheric ozone column measured by MLS and the tropospheric ozone column measured by OMI. In our approach we use backward and forward trajectories from four days of MLS V2.2 measurements to boost the horizontal resolution of the stratospheric ozone field. The MLS stratospheric column is then subtracted from the OMI Col. 3 total ozone column. High reflectivity scenes (clouds) are no longer discarded - the OMI cloud pressure and radiative cloud fraction is used to adjust the surface pressure to the cloud centroid pressure. The subsequent TOR fields are validated by comparing them to ozonesondes. Our TOR fields show a 0.8 correlation to sonde columns; a clear improvement over earlier calculations. OMI-MLS TOR from 2005 and 2006 are compared with the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) derived tropospheric column. The results show that the OMI-MLS TOR underestimates the tropospheric column. GMI tropospheric column and OMI-MLS TOR compare better if the lowest 1.5 km of the GMI column is excluded. This is consistent with a global -7 DU low offset from the sonde columns that is probably due to lack of OMI boundary layer ozone sensitivity. The GMI model zonal distribution also shows relatively higher tropospheric columns at mid latitudes and lower column amounts at high latitudes compared to the OMI-MLS TOR.

  18. Report on GMI Special Study #15: Radio Frequency Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This report contains the results of GMI special study #15. An analysis is conducted to identify sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) to the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI). The RFI impacts the 10 GHz and 18 GHz channels at both polarities. The sources of RFI are identified for the following conditions: over the water (including major inland water bodies) in the earth view, and over land in the earth view, and in the cold sky view. A best effort is made to identify RFI sources in coastal regions, with noted degradation of flagging performance due to the highly variable earth scene over coastal regions. A database is developed of such sources, including latitude, longitude, country and city of earth emitters, and position in geosynchronous orbit for space emitters. A description of the recommended approach for identifying the sources and locations of RFI in the GMI channels is given in this paper. An algorithm to flag RFI contaminated pixels which can be incorporated into the GMI Level 1Base/1B algorithms is defined, which includes Matlab code to perform the necessary flagging of RFI. A Matlab version of the code is delivered with this distribution.

  19. What's Good for GMI is Good for GM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastor, Susan M.

    1980-01-01

    The General Motors Institute (GMI), a fully accredited college of engineering and management that is a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Motors Corporation, is considered the West Point of the auto industry. Its five-year cooperative program of work and study is described. (MLW)

  20. GMI Spin Mechanism Assembly Design, Development, and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolaway, Scott; Kubitschek, Michael; Berdanier, Barry; Newell, David; Dayton, Chris; Pellicciotti, Joseph W.

    2012-01-01

    The GMI Spin Mechanism Assembly (SMA) is a precision bearing and power transfer drive assembly mechanism that supports and spins the Global Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument at a constant rate of 32 rpm continuously for the 3 year plus mission life. The GMI instrument will fly on the core Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft and will be used to make calibrated radiometric measurements at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. The GPM mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological predictions through more accurate and frequent precipitation measurements [1]. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) was selected by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to design, build, and test the GMI instrument. The SMA design has to meet a challenging set of requirements and is based on BATC space mechanisms heritage and lessons learned design changes made to the WindSat BAPTA mechanism that is currently operating on orbit and has recently surpassed 8 years of Flight operation.

  1. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  2. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  3. Effect of Pressure Controlled Waveforms on Flow Transport and Gas mixing in a Patient Specific Lung Model during Invasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam

    2012-11-01

    A computational fluid dynamic study is carried out to investigate gas transport in patient specific human lung models (based on CT scans) during high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Different pressure-controlled waveforms and various ventilator frequencies are studied to understand the effect of flow transport and gas mixing during these processes. Three different pressure waveforms are created by solving the equation of motion subjected to constant lung wall compliance and flow resistance. Sinusoidal, exponential and constant waveforms shapes are considered with three different frequencies 6, 10 and 15 Hz and constant tidal volume 50 ml. The velocities are calculated from the obtained flow rate and imposed as inlet flow conditions to represent the mechanical ventilation waveforms. An endotracheal tube ETT is joined to the model to account for the effect of the invasive management device with the peak Reynolds number (Re) for all the cases ranging from 6960 to 24694. All simulations are performed using high order LES turbulent model. The gas transport near the flow reversal will be discussed at different cycle phases for all the cases and a comparison of the secondary flow structures between different cases will be presented.

  4. Effects of frequency, tidal volume, and lung volume on CO2 elimination in dogs by high frequency (2-30 Hz), low tidal volume ventilation.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, A S; Kamm, R D; Rossing, T H; Loring, S H; Lehr, J; Shapiro, A H; Ingram, R H; Drazen, J M

    1981-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that effective pulmonary ventilation is possible with tidal volumes (VT) less than the anatomic dead-space if the oscillatory frequency (f) is sufficiently large. We systematically studied the effect on pulmonary CO2 elimination (VCO2) of varying f (2-30 Hz) and VT (1-7 ml/kg) as well as lung volume (VL) in 13 anesthetized, paralyzed dogs in order to examine the contribution of those variables that are thought to be important in determining gas exchange by high frequency ventilation. All experiments were performed when the alveolar PCO2 was 40 +/- 1.5 mm Hg. In all studies, VCO2 increased monotonically with f at constant VT. We quantitated the effects of f and VT on VCO2 by using the dimensionless equation VCO2/VOSC = a(VT/VTo)b(f/fo)c where: VOSC = f X VT, VTo = mean VT, fo = mean f and a, b, c, are constants obtained by multiple regression. The mean values of a, b, and c for all dogs were 2.12 X 10(-3), 0.49, and 0.08, respectively. The most important variable in determining VCO2 was VOSC; however, there was considerable variability among dogs in the independent effect of VT and f on VCO2, with a doubling of VT at a constant VOSC causing changes in VCO2 ranging from -13 to +110% (mean = +35%). Increasing VL from functional residual capacity (FRC) to the lung volume at an airway opening minus body surface pressure of 25 cm H2O had no significant effect on VCO2. PMID:6798071

  5. Effect of Time-dependent Pressure Boundary Condition on Flow Transport in a Patient Specific Lung Model during Invasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam

    2013-11-01

    Large eddy simulation was used to investigate gas transport in a human lung (image-based) model during high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). A time-dependent pressure boundary condition as a function of the flow rate and coupled resistance-compliance was imposed at the outlets. The study was conducted for three different HFOV frequencies of 6, 10 and 15 Hz; a constant tidal volume of 50 ml and various compliance ratios (1, 4 and 10). The results are compared to computations that use traditional boundary conditions (such as pre-specified flow and constant pressure), experimental and gamma scintgraphy results. While traditional pre-specified mass fraction boundary condition failed to capture the Pendelluft flow at regional lung units that are observed in experiments, our modified resistance-compliance based pressure boundary condition was successful in predicting this feature. The impact of compliance ratio and frequency on phase-delay at different lung sections and its effect on secondary flow and turbulence will also be presented.

  6. Effect of dopants on the soft magnetic properties and high frequency characteristics of FeCoBM (M = Ti, Nb, Hf, and Ta) thin films.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C C; Lin, T H; Chang, H W; Chang, C W; Chang, W C; Yang, C C

    2011-03-01

    Effect of dopants on the soft magnetic properties and high frequency characteristics of FeCoBM thin films (M = Ti, Nb, Hf, and Ta) have been studied. For (Fe0.55Co0.45)(100-x)B(x) (x = 5-15) thin films, with the increase of B content, the resistivity was increased because B could decrease the crystallinity of the films. The (Fe0.55Co0.45)90B10 thin film showed the optimum properties, where 4piM(s) = 16.1 kG, H(ce) = 64.2 Oe, H(ch) = 13.5 Oe, H(k) = 310 Oe and p = 338 microomega-cm. To reduce the coercivity of the film, the elements M, including Ti, Nb, Hf, and Ta, were selected to substitute for B in the FeCoB films. It was found that (Fe0.55Co0.45)90B6Ti2Nb2 thin film after annealing at a temperature of 200 degrees C for 30 min showed the optimal properties, where 4piM(s) = 15.8 kG, H(ce) = 4.8 Oe, H(ch) = 3.6 Oe, H(k) = 224 Oe and p = 290 microomega-cm. The theoretically calculated ferromagnetic resonance frequency of the developed films can be higher than 5 GHz. PMID:21449469

  7. Investigation of the Hall Effect in Rectangular Quantum Wells with a Perpendicular Magnetic Field in the Presence of a High-Frequency Electromagnetic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Nguyen Quang; Hoi, Bui Dinh

    2014-11-01

    The Hall effect is theoretically studied in a rectangular quantum well (RQW) with infinite barriers subjected to a crossed dc electric field and magnetic field (the magnetic field is oriented perpendicularly to the barriers) in the presence of a high-frequency electromagnetic wave (EMW). By using the quantum kinetic equation for electrons interacting with acoustic phonons at low temperatures, we obtain analytical expressions for the conductivity tensor as well as the Hall coefficient (HC). Numerical results for the AlGaN/GaN RQW show the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations in the magnetoresistance (MR) whose period does not depend on the temperature and amplitude decreases with increasing temperature. In the presence of the EMW, the MR shows maxima at Ω/ωc = 1, 2, 3, … and minima at Ω/ωc = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, … (Ω and ωc are the EMW and the cyclotron frequencies, respectively), and with increasing of the EMW amplitude the MR approaches zero. Obtained results are in accordance with recent experimental data and in good agreement with other theories in two-dimensional (2D) electron systems. The results for the HC show a saturation of the HC as the magnetic field or the EMW frequency increases. Furthermore, in the region of large magnetic field the HC depends weakly on the well-width.

  8. The tumor protection effect of high-frequency administration of whole tumor cell vaccine and enhanced efficacy by the protein component from Agrocybe aegerita

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yi; Sun, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Whole tumor cell vaccines have been widely studied and elicits limited immune responses because of the poor immunogenicity. In the present study, we discovered that high-frequency administration of irradiated whole tumor cell vaccine triggered rejection of tumor cells (90% or 100% of the mice that were vaccinated with irradiated H22 cells or S180 respectively were protected), and provided cross-protection and long-term anti-tumor immunity in BALB/c mouse models. The antitumor activity required CD4+, CD8+ T cells and macrophage that was proved in the nude mice and cell depletion mouse models. The adoptive transfer experiment suggested that repeated whole tumor cell vaccination successfully stimulated the anti-tumor response by activation of the immune cells. A high immunization frequency within a short period of time and the presence of glycosylated molecules and nucleic acids on the surface of intact tumor cells were crucial for the successful prevention of tumor growth by whole tumor cell vaccines. Moreover, Yt, the protein component from fungus Agrocybe aegerita, increased whole tumor cell vaccine-mediated tumor rejection and cross-protection effect. These data indicated that the frequency of administration of whole tumor cell vaccines was of critical importance for the efficacy, which needed to be integrated into vaccine strategies for producing potential vaccines. PMID:26221228

  9. Pressurized high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas D.

    Acoustic heat engines show much promise for converting waste heat to electricity. Since most applications require high power levels, high frequency thermoacoustic engines can reach such performance by operating with a pressurized working gas. Results on a 3 kHz prime mover, consisting of a quarter-wave resonator and a random stack material between two heat exchangers, show that the acoustic power from such a device is raised substantially as the working gas is pressurized. At pressures up to approximately 10 bar, the increase in acoustic power is approximately linear to the increase in pressure, and thus is an effective way to increase the power output of thermoacoustic engines. Since the heat input was not changed during the experiments, the increases in acoustic power translate directly to increases in engine efficiency which is calculated as the output acoustic power divided by the input heat power. In most experiments run in this study, the engine efficiency increased by a factor of at least 4 as the pressure was increased from 2 bar up to about 10 bar. Further increases in pressure lead to acoustic power saturation and eventual attenuation. This is most likely due to a combination of several factors including the shrinking thermal penetration depth, and the fact that the losses increase faster with pressure in a random stack material than in traditional parallel plates. Pressurization also leads to a lower DeltaT for onset of oscillations in the range of 10 bar of mean pressure, potentially opening up even more heat sources that can power a thermoacoustic engine. Results from another 3 kHz engine, one that was pressurized itself as opposed to being placed in a pressurized chamber, are also presented. The configuration of this engine solves the problem of how to simultaneously pressurize the engine and inject heat into the hot heat exchanger. It was also noted that the geometry of the resonator cavity in the quarter wavelength pressurized engine plays an

  10. Effect of Low-Magnitude, High-Frequency Vibration Treatment on Retardation of Sarcopenia: Senescence-Accelerated Mouse-P8 Model.

    PubMed

    Guo, An-Yun; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Qin, Jiang-Hui; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Cheung, Wing-Hoi

    2016-08-01

    Sarcopenia-related falls and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling elderly people garnered more and more interest in recent years. Low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) was proven beneficial to musculoskeletal system and recommended for sarcopenia treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of LMHFV on the sarcopenic animals and explore the mechanism of the stimulatory effects. Senescence-accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8) mice at month 6 were randomized into control (Ctrl) and vibration (Vib) groups and the mice in the Vib group were given LMHFV (0.3 g, 20 min/day, 5 days/week) treatment. At months 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 post-treatment, muscle mass, structure, and function were assessed. The potential proliferation capacity of the muscle was also evaluated by investigating satellite cells (SCs) pool and serum myostatin expression. At late stage, the mice in the Vib group showed higher muscle strength (month 4, p = 0.028). Generally, contractibility was significantly improved by LMHFV (contraction time [CT], p = 0.000; half-relaxation time [RT50], p = 0.000). Enlarged cross-sectional area of fiber type IIA was observed in the Vib group when compared with Ctrl group (p = 0.000). No significant difference of muscle mass was observed. The promotive effect of LMHFV on myoregeneration was reflected by suppressed SC pool reduction (month 3, p = 0.000; month 4, p = 0.000) and low myostatin expression (p = 0.052). LMHFV significantly improved the structural and functional outcomes of the skeletal muscle, hence retarding the progress of sarcopenia in SAMP8. It would be a good recommendation for prevention of the diseases related to skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:26608404

  11. Effect of middle-ear pathology on high-frequency ear-canal reflectance measurements in the frequency and time domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Gabrielle R.; Siegel, Jonathan H.; Neely, Stephen T.; Rosowski, John J.; Nakajima, Hideko H.

    2015-12-01

    Wideband immittance and reflectance have not been well described at frequencies above 6-8 kHz, and past analyses of these measurements have focused on the responses to stimulus frequencies below 3-4 kHz, while ignoring high-frequency or time-domain information. This work uses a novel approach to measure reflectance that utilizes high-frequency signals and analyzes reflectance in both the frequency and the time domains. Experiments were performed with fresh normal human temporal bones before and after simulating various middle-ear pathologies. In addition to experimental data, novel model analyses were used to obtain fitted parameter values of middle-ear elements that vary systematically due to simulations and thus may have diagnostic implications. Our results show that high-frequency measurements improve temporal resolution of reflectance measurements, and this data combined with novel modeling techniques provides separation of three major conductive pathologies.

  12. Effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on spontaneously hypertensive rats, an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungyun; Park, Heamen; Yu, Seong-Lan; Jee, Sungju; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Song, Dong Ho; Kim, Seung Jun; Im, Woo-Young; Kang, Jaeku

    2016-10-01

    The current treatment of choice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is pharmacotherapy. A search for new treatment options is underway, however, as the wide application of drugs to the general population of patients with ADHD is limited by side effects and the variance of pharmacokinetic effects of the drugs in each patient. In the present study, we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a non-invasive treatment used in a number of other psychiatric disorders, to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), an animal model of ADHD, in order to assess the efficacy of the treatment in modifying behavioural symptoms as well as levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A total of fifteen sessions of high-frequency rTMS treatment were administered. Behavioural symptoms were observed using open field, Y-maze, and elevated plus-maze tests. Upon completion of the experiments, rats were sacrificed, and the neurochemical changes in brain tissue were analysed using high performance liquid chromatography and Western blotting. The SHRs treated with rTMS tended to exhibit less locomotor activity in the open field test over the course of treatment, but there was no improvement in inattention as measured by the Y-maze test. Furthermore, BDNF concentration increased and noradrenaline concentration decreased in the prefrontal cortex of SHRs treated with rTMS. The results of the present preclinical study indicate that rTMS may constitute a new modality of treatment for patients with ADHD, through further evaluation of specific treatment parameters as well as safety and efficacy in humans are required. PMID:27469434

  13. Mobile high frequency vibrator system

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, D.W.; Buller, P.L.

    1985-01-08

    A carrier mounted seismic vibrator system that is primarily adapted for generation of high force, high frequency seismic energy into an earth medium. The apparatus includes first and second vibrators as supported by first and second lift systems disposed in tandem juxtaposition generally centrally in said vehicle, and the lift systems are designed to maintain equal hold-down force on the vibrator coupling baseplates without exceeding the weight of the carrier vehicle. The juxtaposed vibrators are then energized in synchronized relationship to propagate increased amounts of higher frequency seismic energy into an earth medium.

  14. Hepatic effects of lung-protective pressure-controlled ventilation and a combination of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and extracorporeal lung assist in experimental lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kredel, Markus; Muellenbach, Ralf M.; Johannes, Amélie; Brederlau, Joerg; Roewer, Norbert; Wunder, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can lead to hepatic dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatic effects of strategies using high airway pressures either in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) or in high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) combined with an arteriovenous extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA). Material/Methods Pietrain pigs underwent induction of lung injury by saline lavage. Ventilation was continued for 24 hours either as PCV with tidal volumes of 6 ml/kg and PEEP 3 cmH2O above the lower inflection point of the pressure-volume curve or as HFOV (≥12 Hz) with a mean tracheal airway pressure 3 cmH2O above the lower inflection point combined with arteriovenous ECLA (HFOV+ECLA). Fluids and norepinephrine stabilized the circulation. The indocyanine green plasma disappearance rate, serum bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, γ-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, glutamate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase were determined repeatedly. Finally, liver neutrophils were counted and liver cell apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results Aspartate aminotransferase increased in the PCV group about three-fold and in the HFOV+ECLA group five-fold (p<0.001). Correspondingly, creatine kinase increased about two-fold and four-fold, respectively (p<0.001). Lactate dehydrogenase was increased in the HFOV+ECLA group (p<0.028). The number of neutrophils infiltrating the liver tissue and the apoptotic index were low. Conclusions High airway pressure PCV and HFOV with ECLA in the treatment of lavage-induced lung injury in pigs did not cause liver dysfunction or damage. The detected elevation of enzymes might be of extrahepatic origin. PMID:21959601

  15. Effect of imprecise lag time and high-frequency attenuation on surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes determined with the relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, A.; Trebs, I.; Foken, T.

    2013-09-01

    eddy accumulation (REA) systems that employ one single long inlet tube are prone to measurement uncertainties caused by (a) an imprecisely determined lag time between the change of sign in the vertical wind velocity and the switching of the splitter valves and (b) attenuation of high-frequency concentration fluctuations in the tube flow. However, there is currently no commonly applied procedure to address these uncertainties. In this study, we first evaluated the lag time error of the volume flow, mass flow, and cross-correlation method (online and offline) and experimentally determined the magnitude of high-frequency attenuation for a 21.5 m long inlet tube of an operating REA system. In a second step, we simulated the impact for different artificial lag time errors and low-pass filter strengths on the REA concentration differences and, thus, on the REA flux, using high-frequency time series of temperature, O3, CO2, and H2O. The reduction of scalar fluxes was mainly correlated with increasing switching frequencies and ranged for typical lag time errors of the investigated REA system between <5% and 50%, whereas the flux loss due to high-frequency attenuation was between <5% and 30%. The results were very similar for all scalar quantities. Based on our results, we derived empirical correction functions for both imprecise lag times and high-frequency attenuation, discuss their potential application to correct fluxes measured with other REA systems, and give a general procedure to address the uncertainties in future REA setups.

  16. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  17. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  18. Source parameters and effects of bandwidth and local geology on high- frequency ground motions observed for aftershocks of the northeastern Ohio earthquake of 31 January 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glassmoyer, G.; Borcherdt, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    A 10-station array (GEOS) yielded recordings of exceptional bandwidth (400 sps) and resolution (up to 96 dB) for the aftershocks of the moderate (mb???4.9) earthquake that occurred on 31 January 1986 near Painesville, Ohio. Nine aftershocks were recorded with seismic moments ranging between 9 ?? 1016 and 3 ?? 1019 dyne-cm (MW: 0.6 to 2.3). The aftershock recordings at a site underlain by ???8m of lakeshore sediments show significant levels of high-frequency soil amplification of vertical motion at frequencies near 8, 20 and 70 Hz. Viscoelastic models for P and SV waves incident at the base of the sediments yield estimates of vertical P-wave response consistent with the observed high-frequency site resonances, but suggest additional detailed shear-wave logs are needed to account for observed S-wave response. -from Authors

  19. Effects of high-frequency stimulation and doublets on dynamic contractions in rat soleus muscle exposed to normal and high extracellular [K+

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Katja K; Nielsen, Ole B; Overgaard, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The development of maximal velocity and power in muscle depends on the ability to transmit action potentials (AP) at very high frequencies up to about 400 Hz. However, for every AP there is a small loss of K+ to the interstitium, which during intense exercise, may build up to a point where excitability is reduced, thus limiting the intensity of further exercise. It is still unknown how the muscle responds to high-frequency stimulation when exposed to high [K+]. Contractile parameters of the muscles (force [F], velocity [V], power [P], rate of force development [RFD], and work) were examined during dynamic contractions, performed in vitro using rat soleus muscles incubated in buffers containing 4 or 8 mmol/L K+ and stimulated with constant trains of tetanic or supratetanic frequency or with trains initiated by a high-frequency doublet, followed by tetanic or subtetanic trains. At 4 mmol/L K+, an increase in frequency increased Pmax when using constant train stimulation. When stimulating with trains containing high-frequency doublets an increase in 120-msec work was seen, however, no increase in Pmax was observed. At 8 mmol/L K+, no differences were seen for either Pmax or 120-msec work when increasing frequency or introducing doublets. In all experiments where the frequency was increased or doublets applied, an increase in RFD was seen in both normal and high [K+]. The results indicate that stimulation with supratetanic frequencies can improve dynamic muscle contractility, but improvements are attenuated when muscles are exposed to high extracellular [K+]. PMID:24303113

  20. A robust and flexible Geospatial Modeling Interface (GMI) for environmental model deployment and evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper provides an overview of the GMI (Geospatial Modeling Interface) simulation framework for environmental model deployment and assessment. GMI currently provides access to multiple environmental models including AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W), Nitrate Leaching and Economic Analysis 2 (NLEA...

  1. Intercalibration of High Frequency Channels on GPM Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, H.; Datta, S.; Jones, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission is an international effort to measure precipitation worldwide every three hours. The research objective is to reduce errors in global rainfall estimates associated with temporal/spatial sampling by using a constellation of satellites. Inter-calibration of microwave radiometer channels using the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) is a challenging task. In GPM constellation we have a combination of cross track and conical scanner sensors, the goal is to make a consistent measurement between all the sensors in this constellation. GMI is a conical scanner and is going to be a reference for the calibration of all the other sensors in the constellation., almost all the sensors with channels lower than 89 GHz are conical scanners, the inter-calibration between conical scanners have been done successfully over years, But for frequencies equal and higher than 89GHz, there is SSMIS on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) which is a conical scanner, other sensors such as ATMS on AMSU, MHS on NOAA 18, NOAA 19, METOP A and METOP B and SAPHIR on Megha -Tropique , are cross track sensors. For these sensors each Instantaneous Field of View (IFOV) has different Earth incidence angles (EIA) and different slant paths through the atmosphere while conical scanner has constant earth incidence angle for all IFOVs. Here the double difference (DD) technique, which has been successfully applied for imager channel calibration before, has been applied to sounder channels, also the effect of using different surface emissivity models such as Elsasser's and RSS model and atmosphere models such as Rosenkranz and MonoRTM models, in these frequencies has been investigated.

  2. High frequency dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K; Swager, Timothy M; Temkin, Richard J; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-09-17

    During the three decades 1980-2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical, and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = 1/2 species (13)C or (15)N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, such as (17)O or (27)Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime, roughly 150-660 GHz, and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades, scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  3. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 1980–2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = ½ species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime — roughly 150–660 GHz — and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  4. Special Aspects in Designing High - Frequency Betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, A. A.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to designing the high - frequency betatron. In high - frequency betatron most important problem is overheating of the elements of the body radiator unit. In an article some directions of solving this problem are shown.

  5. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  6. Inviscid fluid in high frequency excitation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of high frequency excitations (HFE) on a fluid is investigated. The response to these excitations is decomposed in two parts: 'slow' motion, which practically remains unchanged during the vanishingly small period tau, and 'fast' motion whose value during this period is negligible in terms of displacements, but is essential in terms of the kinetic energy. After such a decomposition the 'slow' and 'fast' motions become nonlinearly coupled by the corresponding governing equations. This coupling leads to an 'effective' potential energy which imparts some 'elastic' properties to the fluid and stabilizes laminar flows.

  7. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  8. The effects of high-frequency oscillations in hippocampal electrical activities on the classification of epileptiform events using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Alan W. L.; Jahromi, Shokrollah S.; Khosravani, Houman; Carlen, Peter L.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2006-03-01

    The existence of hippocampal high-frequency electrical activities (greater than 100 Hz) during the progression of seizure episodes in both human and animal experimental models of epilepsy has been well documented (Bragin A, Engel J, Wilson C L, Fried I and Buzsáki G 1999 Hippocampus 9 137-42 Khosravani H, Pinnegar C R, Mitchell J R, Bardakjian B L, Federico P and Carlen P L 2005 Epilepsia 46 1-10). However, this information has not been studied between successive seizure episodes or utilized in the application of seizure classification. In this study, we examine the dynamical changes of an in vitro low Mg2+ rat hippocampal slice model of epilepsy at different frequency bands using wavelet transforms and artificial neural networks. By dividing the time-frequency spectrum of each seizure-like event (SLE) into frequency bins, we can analyze their burst-to-burst variations within individual SLEs as well as between successive SLE episodes. Wavelet energy and wavelet entropy are estimated for intracellular and extracellular electrical recordings using sufficiently high sampling rates (10 kHz). We demonstrate that the activities of high-frequency oscillations in the 100-400 Hz range increase as the slice approaches SLE onsets and in later episodes of SLEs. Utilizing the time-dependent relationship between different frequency bands, we can achieve frequency-dependent state classification. We demonstrate that activities in the frequency range 100-400 Hz are critical for the accurate classification of the different states of electrographic seizure-like episodes (containing interictal, preictal and ictal states) in brain slices undergoing recurrent spontaneous SLEs. While preictal activities can be classified with an average accuracy of 77.4 ± 6.7% utilizing the frequency spectrum in the range 0-400 Hz, we can also achieve a similar level of accuracy by using a nonlinear relationship between 100-400 Hz and <4 Hz frequency bands only.

  9. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  10. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  11. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  12. The current situation of meningococcal disease in Latin America and updated Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio P; O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela Bravo, Maria Teresa; Brandileone, Maria Cristina C; Gorla, Maria Cecília O; de Lemos, Ana Paula S; Moreno, Gabriela; Vazquez, Julio A; López, Eduardo L; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Borrow, Ray

    2015-11-27

    The Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) was established in 2009 and comprises an international team of scientists, clinicians, and public health officials with expertise in meningococcal disease (MD). Its primary goal is to promote global prevention of MD through education, research, international cooperation, and developing recommendations that include decreasing the burden of severe disease. The group held its first roundtable meeting with experts from Latin American countries in 2011, and subsequently proposed several recommendations to reduce the regional burden of MD. A second roundtable meeting was convened with Latin American representatives in June 2013 to reassess MD epidemiology, vaccination strategies, and unmet needs in the region, as well as to update the earlier recommendations. Special emphasis was placed on the emergence and spread of serogroup W disease in Argentina and Chile, and the control measures put in place in Chile were a particular focus of discussions. The impact of routine meningococcal vaccination programs, notably in Brazil, was also evaluated. There have been considerable improvements in MD surveillance systems and diagnostic techniques in some countries (e.g., Brazil and Chile), but the lack of adequate infrastructure, trained personnel, and equipment/reagents remains a major barrier to progress in resource-poor countries. The Pan American Health Organization's Revolving Fund is likely to play an important role in improving access to meningococcal vaccines in Latin America. Additional innovative approaches are needed to redress the imbalance in expertise and resources between countries, and thereby improve the control of MD. In Latin America, the GMI recommends establishment of a detailed and comprehensive national/regional surveillance system, standardization of laboratory procedures, adoption of a uniform MD case definition, maintaining laboratory-based surveillance, replacement of polysaccharide vaccines with conjugate

  13. [The effect of high-frequency ventilation of the lungs on the pulmonary and systemic circulations in microembolism of the pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Sanotskaia, N V; Vyzhigina, M A; Matsievskiĭ, D D; Luk'ianov, M V; Aleĭnikov, S O

    1993-11-01

    The linear and volumetric blood flow velocity in the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery conus, right-left ventricular ejection balance, pulmonary and femoral arterial blood pressures, pulmonary microcirculation in fat pulmonary microembolism induced during the routine and high-frequency jet lung ventilation (HFJLV) were studied by ultrasonic techniques in acute experiments on cats with open chest under nembutal narcosis. Pulmonary microembolism was shown to resulted in 487 and 252% increases in pulmonary vascular resistance during the routine and HFJLVs, respectively. There were also 167 and 127% increases in mean pulmonary pressure and 60 and 34% decreases in the volumetric velocity of pulmonary blood flow. The linear velocity of pulmonary blood flow was unchanged with routine lung ventilation, whereas it decreased by 68% with HFJLV. Microembolism impaired the balance between right and left ventricular ejections with blood being redistributed into the greater circulation. The imbalance lasted 5-7 min during HFJLV, while with the routine lung ventilation it was preserved up to the end of the experiment, and systemic blood pressure and total peripheral vascular resistance decreased. Alveolar edema developed in interstitial pulmonary edema. The animals' death occurred 40-60 min later. PMID:8312529

  14. Design, Development and Testing of the GMI Launch Locks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, Adam; Dayton, Chris; Wendland, Ron; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Ball Aerospace will deliver the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), to NASA as one of the 3 instruments to fly on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, for launch in 2013. The radiometer, when deployed, is over 8 feet tall and rotates at 32 revolutions per minute (RPM) can be described as a collection of mechanisms working to achieve its scientific objectives. This collection precisely positions a 1.2 meter reflector to a 48.5 degree off nadir angle while rotating, transferring electrical power and signals to and from the RF receivers, designs two very stable calibration sources, and provides the structural integrity of all the components. There are a total of 7 launch restraints coupling across the moving and stationary elements of the structure,. Getting from design to integration will be the focus of this paper.

  15. Detection of DNA hybridization and extension reactions by an extended-gate field-effect transistor: characterizations of immobilized DNA-probes and role of applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage onto a reference electrode.

    PubMed

    Kamahori, Masao; Ishige, Yu; Shimoda, Maki

    2008-02-28

    As we have already shown in a previous publication [Kamahori, M., Ihige, Y., Shimoda, M., 2007. Anal. Sci. 23, 75-79], an extended-gate field-effect transistor (FET) sensor with a gold electrode, on which both DNA probes and 6-hydroxyl-1-hexanethiol (6-HHT) molecules are immobilized, can detect DNA hybridization and extension reactions by applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage to a reference electrode. However, kinetic parameters such as the dissociation constant (K(d)(s)) and the apparent DNA-probe concentration (C(probe)(s)) on a surface were not clarified. In addition, the role of applying the superimposed high-frequency voltage was not considered in detail. In this study, the values of K(d)(s) and C(probe)(s) were estimated using a method involving single-base extension reaction combined with bioluminescence detection. The value of K(d)(s) on the surface was 0.38 microM, which was about six times that in a liquid phase. The value of C(probe)(s), which expressed the upper detection limit for the solid phase reaction, was 0.079 microM at a DNA-probe density of 2.6 x 10(12)molecules/cm(2). We found that applying the superimposed high-frequency voltage accelerated the DNA molecules to reach the gold surface. Also, the distance between the DNA-probes immobilized on the gold surface was controlled to be over 6 nm by applying a method of competitive reaction with DNA probes and 6-HHT molecules. This space was sufficient to enable the immobilized DNA-probes to lie down on the 6-HHT monolayer in the space between them. Thus, the FET sensor could detect DNA hybridization and extension reactions by applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage to the DNA-probes density-controlling gold surface. PMID:18054478

  16. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  17. The High Frequency Stabilization of a Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirdyashev, K.

    2004-10-01

    Experimental data on the high-frequency stabilization of the MPD thruster and the suppression of low-frequency oscillations in the frequency range from 20 to 100 kHz are presented. Conditions for the stabilizing effect of a high-frequency magnetic field at the frequency of 40 MHz on the plasma jet produced by the thruster are determined, and the efficiency of this action is evaluated. The action of high frequency field on the MPD thruster consists in the contention of two processes - the stabilization of the plasma drift instability by the magnetic component of high frequency field and the energy conversion of natural plasma oscillations excited by the external field to the ion-sound wave energy.

  18. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  19. High frequency electromagnetic response of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Schwartz, K.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the contribution of higher harmonics to the lunar transfer functions for the tangential components of the surface magnetic field is significant at frequencies greater than 0.01 Hz. The inclusion of the higher harmonics shows that there are two distinct transfer functions corresponding to the components of the tangential surface magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the wave vector of the external disturbance forcing the lunar induction. The dependences of these transfer functions on frequency and location are determined. The effects of the higher harmonics can: (1) account for a hitherto unexplained feature in the Apollo 12-Explorer 35 transfer functions, namely the rolloff at high frequencies; and (2) offer a possible explanation for the frequency dependence of the difference between the transfer functions for the two orthogonal components of the surface magnetic field. The harmonic response of a simple current layer model of the moon is derived.

  20. The anti-ictogenic effects of levetiracetam are mirrored by interictal spiking and high-frequency oscillation changes in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Maxime; Behr, Charles; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most prevalent type of partial epileptic disorders. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of levetiracetam (LEV) in the pilocarpine model of MTLE. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 19) were injected with pilocarpine (380 mg/kg, i.p.) to induce a status epilepticus. Twelve animals were used as controls and seven were treated with LEV. They were implanted with bipolar electrodes in the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex (EC), dentate gyrus (DG) and subiculum and EEG-video monitored continuously from day 4 to day 14 after SE. Results Only 29% of LEV-treated animals had seizures compared to all controls following a latent period that was similar in duration. Seizure rates were lower in LEV-treated animals. In LEV-treated animals without seizures, lower interictal spike rates were found in all regions compared to controls. Analysis of interictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) revealed that LEV-treated animals without seizures had lower rates of interictal spikes with ripples (80–200 Hz) in CA3, EC and subiculum (p < 0.01), whereas rates of interictal spikes with fast ripples (250–500 Hz) were significantly lower in CA3 and subiculum, compared to controls. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the anti-ictogenic properties of LEV are mirrored by decreases of interictal spike rate in temporal lobe regions, and are accompanied by subregion-specific decreases of HFO occurrence in CA3 and subiculum. Overall, this evidence suggest that LEV may inhibit neural network activity in regions that are known to play important roles in MTLE. PMID:25645630

  1. Characterizing Earthquake Rupture Properties Using Peak High-Frequency Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, L.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Teleseismic array back-projection (BP) of high frequency (~1Hz) seismic waves has been recently applied to image the aftershock sequence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The BP method proves to be effective in capturing early aftershocks that are difficult to be detected due to the contamination of the mainshock coda wave. Furthermore, since the event detection is based on the identification of the local peaks in time series of the BP power, the resulting event location corresponds to the peak high-frequency energy rather than the hypocenter. In this work, we show that the comparison between the BP-determined catalog and conventional phase-picking catalog provides estimates of the spatial and temporal offset between the hypocenter and the peak high-frequency radiation. We propose to measure this peak high-frequency shift of global earthquakes between M4.0 to M7.0. We average the BP locations calibrated by multiple reference events to minimize the uncertainty due to the variation of 3D path effects. In our initial effort focusing on the foreshock and aftershock sequence of the 2014 Iquique earthquake, we find systematic shifts of the peak high-frequency energy towards the down-dip direction. We find that the amount of the shift is a good indication of rupture length, which scales with the earthquake magnitude. Further investigations of the peak high frequency offset may provide constraints on earthquake source properties such as rupture directivity, rupture duration, rupture speed, and stress drop.

  2. Interface Strategy To Achieve Tunable High Frequency Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hualiang; Zhang, Haiqian; Ji, Guangbin; Xu, Zhichuan J

    2016-03-16

    Among all polarizations, the interface polarization effect is the most effective, especially at high frequency. The design of various ferrite/iron interfaces can significantly enhance the materials' dielectric loss ability at high frequency. This paper presents a simple method to generate ferrite/iron interfaces to enhance the microwave attenuation at high frequency. The ferrites were coated onto carbonyl iron and could be varied to ZnFe2O4, CoFe2O4, Fe3O4, and NiFe2O4. Due to the ferrite/iron interface inducing a stronger dielectric loss effect, all of these materials achieved broad effective frequency width at a coating layer as thin as 1.5 mm. In particular, an effective frequency width of 6.2 GHz could be gained from the Fe@NiFe2O4 composite. PMID:26918285

  3. High frequency oscillations in the intact brain

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György; da Silva, Fernando Lopes

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) constitute a novel trend in neurophysiology that is fascinating neuroscientists in general, and epileptologists in particular. But what are HFOs? What is the frequency range of HFOs? Are there different types of HFOs, physiological and pathological? How are HFOs generated? Can HFOs represent temporal codes for cognitive processes? These questions are pressing and this symposium volume attempts to give constructive answers. As a prelude to this exciting discussion, we summarize the physiological high frequency patterns in the intact brain, concentrating mainly on hippocampal patterns, where the mechanisms of high frequency oscillations are perhaps best understood. PMID:22449727

  4. The Similarities (and Familiarities) of Pseudowords and Extremely High-Frequency Words: Examining a Familiarity-Based Explanation of the Pseudoword Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozubko, Jason D.; Joordens, Steve

    2011-01-01

    The pseudoword effect is the finding that pseudowords (i.e., rare words or pronounceable nonwords) give rise to more hits and false alarms than words. Using the retrieving effectively from memory (REM) model of recognition memory, we tested a familiarity-based account of the pseudoword effect: Specifically, the pseudoword effect arises because…

  5. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  6. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  7. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  8. Pre-launch Assessment of the GPM DPR-GMI Combined Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munchak, S. J.; Grecu, M.; Olson, W. S.; Kuo, K.; Tian, L.; Haddad, Z.; Johnson, B. T.; Meneghini, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and microwave imager (GMI) on the core satellite of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission represent significant technological upgrades from GPM's predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and microwave imager (TMI). The DPR will measure at an additional Ka-band frequency in addition to the Ku-band measured by PR, and GMI will measure at 166 and 183 GHz in addition to the lower-frequency TMI channels with improved resolution (for example, the 10 GHz field-of-view will decrease to 32x19 km, approximately half the dimensions of the equivalent channel on TMI). These improvements require significant changes to the rainfall retrieval algorithms, particularly those that use the Ka-band radar data. Pre-launch algorithm development and testing for the combined algorithm has proceeded through three pathways. Data from field campaigns (using airborne radars and radiometers with similar frequencies to GPM) have been used to test the forward modeling components of the algorithm in one-dimensional retrievals. Data from TRMM have been used to test the algorithm with only the Ku band, which will be analogous to the GPM configuration in the outer swath of DPR. The additional GPM measurements (Ka band, high frequency radiometer channels) can be simulated from TRMM data with additional assumptions regarding the rain and ice particle size distributions. Testing the full algorithm capabilities with all measurements available on the GPM platform is only possible with these "enhanced" TRMM measurements and measurements synthesized from model output. The focus of this presentation will be on testing results from the applications to TRMM data and synthetic model data. The application of the GPM combined algorithm to TRMM data has numerous advantages in that it can be compared to the level 2 TRMM products, which have a long heritage of development and that themselves have been subjected to

  9. Condenser Microphone Protective Grid Correction for High Frequency Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Erik; Bennett, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    Use of a protective grid on small diameter microphones can prolong the lifetime of the unit, but the high frequency effects can complicate data interpretation. Analytical methods have been developed to correct for the grid effect at high frequencies. Specifically, the analysis pertains to quantifying the microphone protective grid response characteristics in the acoustic near field of a rocket plume noise source. A frequency response function computation using two microphones will be explained. Experimental and instrumentation setup details will be provided. The resulting frequency response function for a B&K 4944 condenser microphone protective grid will be presented, along with associated uncertainties

  10. Design of matching layers for high-frequency ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Chunlong; Ma, Jianguo; Chiu, Chi Tat; Williams, Jay A.; Fong, Wayne; Chen, Zeyu; Zhu, BenPeng; Xiong, Rui; Shi, Jing; Hsiai, Tzung K.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-09-01

    Matching the acoustic impedance of high-frequency (≥100 MHz) ultrasound transducers to an aqueous loading medium remains a challenge for fabricating high-frequency transducers. The traditional matching layer design has been problematic to establish high matching performance given requirements on both specific acoustic impedance and precise thickness. Based on both mass-spring scheme and microwave matching network analysis, we interfaced metal-polymer layers for the matching effects. Both methods hold promises for guiding the metal-polymer matching layer design. A 100 MHz LiNbO3 transducer was fabricated to validate the performance of the both matching layer designs. In the pulse-echo experiment, the transducer echo amplitude increased by 84.4% and its -6dB bandwidth increased from 30.2% to 58.3% comparing to the non-matched condition, demonstrating that the matching layer design method is effective for developing high-frequency ultrasonic transducers.

  11. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  12. High-frequency graphene voltage amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Jen; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes Garcia, Alberto; Franklin, Aaron D; Bol, Ageeth A; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-09-14

    While graphene transistors have proven capable of delivering gigahertz-range cutoff frequencies, applying the devices to RF circuits has been largely hindered by the lack of current saturation in the zero band gap graphene. Herein, the first high-frequency voltage amplifier is demonstrated using large-area chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. The graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has a 6-finger gate design with gate length of 500 nm. The graphene common-source amplifier exhibits ∼5 dB low frequency gain with the 3 dB bandwidth greater than 6 GHz. This first AC voltage gain demonstration of a GFET is attributed to the clear current saturation in the device, which is enabled by an ultrathin gate dielectric (4 nm HfO(2)) of the embedded gate structures. The device also shows extrinsic transconductance of 1.2 mS/μm at 1 V drain bias, the highest for graphene FETs using large-scale graphene reported to date. PMID:21805988

  13. Safety Problems of Electric and Magnetic Fields and Experimental Magnetic Fusion Facilities 4.Biolosical Effects of High-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Osamu

    With the expanding use of portable telephones, public concerns regarding potential health hazards due to the absorption of electromagnetic energy have been growing. In this article, electromagnetic waves and their resultant biological effects are reviewed. The thermal effects due to RF (radio-frequency) electromagnetic fields and basic proposals for safety standards are described in conjunction with whole-body / localized average SARs (specific absorption rates) being used as bioeffect evaluation measures. Our computed dosimetries of the human head for portable telephones are also shown.

  14. In vitro phonophoresis: effect of ultrasound intensity and mode at high frequency on NSAIDs transport across cellulose and rabbit skin membranes.

    PubMed

    Meshali, M M; Abdel-Aleem, H M; Sakr, F M; Nazzal, S; El-Malah, Y

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of intensity, mode, and duration of ultrasound application on the transport of three nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) across cellulose membrane and rabbit-skin. Ibuprofen, piroxicam and diclofenac sodium were used as the model drugs. Studies were performed in vitro using a modified Franz diffusion assembly adapted to a therapeutic ultrasound transducer. Ultrasound had a significant and positive effect on the transport of the model NSAIDs across cellulose and rabbit skin membranes. Increasing ultrasound intensity from 0.5 to 3.0 W/cm2 led to a proportional increase in drug transport. Continuous ultrasound mode was more effective in enhancing drug transport than the pulsed mode. Diclofenac sodium had the least flux and permeability coefficient. This was attributed to its comparatively lower pKa value that renders the drug more ionizable in the buffer solution, consequently reducing its selective penetration through the membranes. This study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of ultrasound in transdermal delivery of NSAIDs and the synergistic effect of temperature and ultrasound operational parameters on drug transport. PMID:18271303

  15. Quantum effect of intramolecular high-frequency vibrational modes on diffusion-controlled electron transfer rate: From the weak to the strong electronic coupling regions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Yi

    2007-05-14

    The Sumi-Marcus theory is extended by introducing two approaches to investigate electron transfer reactions from weak-to-strong electronic coupling regime. One of these approaches is the quantum R-matrix theory, useful for dealing with the intramolecular vibrational motions in the whole electronic coupling domain. The other is the split operator approach that is employed to solve the reaction-diffusion equation. The approaches are then applied to electron transfer in the Marcus inverted regime to investigate the nuclear tunneling effect on the long time rate and the survival probabilities. The numerical results illustrate that the adiabatic suppression obtained from the R-matrix approach is much smaller than that from the Landau-Zener theory whereas it cannot be predicted by the perturbation theory. The jointed effects of the electronic coupling and solvent relaxation time on the rates are also explored.

  16. Synergistic effects of high-frequency ultrasound on photocatalytic degradation of aldehydes and their intermediates using TiO2 suspension in water.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Chie; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of model substances, benzaldehyde (C(6)H(5)CHO) and formaldehyde (HCHO), were investigated under various conditions, namely, ultrasound (US) irradiation, TiO(2) photocatalysis with UV irradiation (UV/TiO(2)), and the combination of sonophotocatalysis and UV irradiation (US/UV/TiO(2)), in order to clarify the synergistic effects between US and UV/TiO(2). US and UV/TiO(2) primarily contribute to the degradation of highly hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances, respectively. However, the degradation rate was found to depend on the chemical properties and concentration of not only the substances initially present, but also their decomposition intermediates. Here, the essential information for accurately evaluating the synergistic effects on reaction rate under US/UV/TiO(2) conditions is reported, with a focus on the behavior of decomposition intermediates. PMID:20483201

  17. Tempo and scale of biogenic effects on high-frequency acoustic propagation near the marine sediment-water interface in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumars, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Organisms have natural scales, such as lifetimes, body sizes, frequencies of movement to new locations, and residence times of material in digestive systems, and each scale has potential implications for acoustic effects. The effects of groups of organisms, like organisms themselves, aggregate in space and time. This review, including an assortment of unpublished information, examines examples of such aggregations, many of them documented acoustically. Light synchronizes many activities. Macroscopic animals forage primarily under cover of darkness. This phasing applies both to animals that extend appendages above the sediment-water interface and to animals that leave the seabed at night. Whereas their bottom-modifying activities are concentrated in nocturnal or crepuscular fashion, the bottom-modifying activities of the visual feeders follow a different phasing and often dominate the rate of change in acoustic backscatter from the interface. Light also acts through its effects on primary production, often concentrated in a very thin surficial layer atop the seabed. The supersaturation of oxygen does, and microbubble nucleation may, result. Where tidal velocities are large, light-set patterns are often tidally modulated. Activities of animals living below the seabed, however, remain a mystery, whose primary hope for solution is acoustic. [Work supported by ONR and DEPSCoR.

  18. Power balancing effect on the performance of IMPACC modulator under critical coupling (CC), over coupling (OC), and under coupling (UC) conditions at high frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingel, Benjamin B.; Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Prescod, Andru; Madabhushi, R.

    2012-01-01

    IMPACC (Interferometric Modulator with Phase-modulating and Cavity-modulating Components) is ultra-linear optical consisting of a phase modulator and a ring resonator on different arms of a Mach Zehnder interferometer (MZI). External control of the RF power split ratio from an input radio frequency (RF) signal into the two separate arms of the interferometer has been shown to add (1) design flexibility, (2) the ability to achieve high spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) of more than 130 dB, when compared to the single-ring RAMZI (Resonator-assisted MZI) and (3) compensate parameter deviation due to manufacturing imperfection. Our previous reports have assumed that the Optical power split ratio of the input optical signal into the two arm of MZI is balanced with a 50:50 split ratio due to the optical splitter or optical coupler. Here, we investigate three issues. First, we report the negative effect of unbalanced power of the input optical signal on the SFDR performance of IMPACC. Second, we utilize the inherent compensate technique of IMPACC to counteract this effect. Third, the power unbalanced effect is reported at high RF modulation frequency (23GHz) for three different conditions of the ring resonator (RR) namely, critical coupling (CC), over coupling (OC), and under coupling (UC). Lastly, we compare the performance of IMPACC to the single-ring RAMZI with traveling-wave electrode design under sub-octave operations.

  19. High frequency monitoring of water fluxes and nutrient loads to assess the effects of controlled drainage on water storage and nutrient transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozemeijer, J. C.; Visser, A.; Borren, W.; Winegram, M.; van der Velde, Y.; Klein, J.; Broers, H. P.

    2015-06-01

    High nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fluxes from upstream agriculture threaten aquatic ecosystems in surface waters and estuaries, especially in areas characterized by high agricultural N and P inputs and densely drained catchments like the Netherlands. Controlled drainage has been recognized as an effective option to optimize soil moisture conditions for agriculture and to reduce unnecessary losses of fresh water and nutrients. We designed a small scale (1 ha) field experiment to investigate the hydrological and chemical changes after introducing controlled drainage. Precipitation rates and the response of water tables and drain fluxes were measured in the periods before the introduction of controlled drainage (2007-2008) and after (2009-2011). For the N and P concentration measurements, we combined auto-analysers for continuous records with passive samplers for time-average concentrations at individual drain outlets. Our experimental setup yielded continuous time series for all relevant hydrological and chemical parameters, which enabled us to quantify changes in the field water and solute balance after introducing controlled drainage. We concluded that controlled drainage reduced the drain discharge and increased the groundwater storage in the field. The introduction of controlled drainage did not have clear positive effects on nutrient losses to surface water.

  20. Effects of an intense, high-frequency laser field on bound states in Ga1 − xInxNyAs1 − y/GaAs double quantum well

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Within the envelope function approach and the effective-mass approximation, we have investigated theoretically the effect of an intense, high-frequency laser field on the bound states in a GaxIn1 − xNyAs1 − y/GaAs double quantum well for different nitrogen and indium mole concentrations. The laser-dressed potential, bound states, and squared wave functions related to these bound states in Ga1 − xInxNyAs1 − y/GaAs double quantum well are investigated as a function of the position and laser-dressing parameter. Our numerical results show that both intense laser field and nitrogen (indium) incorporation into the GaInNAs have strong influences on carrier localization. PMID:23113959

  1. High-frequency fluctuation measurements by far-infrared laser Faraday-effect polarimetry-interferometry and forward scattering system on MST

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X. Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Duff, J. R.

    2014-11-15

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced transport driven by global tearing modes has been measured by Faraday-effect polarimetry and interferometry (phase measurements) in the MST reversed field pinch. However, the role of small-scale broadband magnetic and density turbulence in transport remains unknown. In order to investigate broadband magnetic turbulence, we plan to upgrade the existing detector system by using planar-diode fundamental waveguide mixers optimized for high sensitivity. Initial tests indicate these mixers have ×10 sensitivity improvement compared to currently employed corner-cube Schottky-diode mixers and ×5 lower noise. Compact mixer design will allow us to resolve the wavenumbers up to k ∼ 1–2 cm{sup −1} for beam width w = 1.5 cm and 15 cm{sup −1} for beam width w = 2 mm. The system can also be used to measure the scattered signal (amplitude measurement) induced by both plasma density and magnetic fluctuations.

  2. Cognitive Effects of High-Frequency rTMS in Schizophrenia Patients With Predominant Negative Symptoms: Results From a Multicenter Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Guse, Birgit; Cordes, Joachim; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Winterer, Georg; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Langguth, Berthold; Landgrebe, Michael; Eichhammer, Peter; Frank, Elmar; Hajak, Göran; Ohmann, Christian; Verde, Pablo E; Rietschel, Marcella; Ahmed, Raees; Honer, William G; Malchow, Berend; Karch, Susanne; Schneider-Axmann, Thomas; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive impairments are one of the main contributors to disability and poor long-term outcome in schizophrenia. Proof-of-concept trials indicate that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has the potential to improve cognitive functioning. We analyzed the effects of 10-Hz rTMS to the left DLPFC on cognitive deficits in schizophrenia in a large-scale and multicenter, sham-controlled study. A total of 156 schizophrenia patients with predominant negative symptoms were randomly assigned to a 3-week intervention (10-Hz rTMS, 15 sessions, 1000 stimuli per session) with either active or sham rTMS. The Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Trail Making Test A and B, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Digit Span Test, and the Regensburg Word Fluency Test were administered before intervention and at day 21, 45, and 105 follow-up. From the test results, a neuropsychological composite score was computed. Both groups showed no differences in any of the outcome variables before and after intervention. Both groups improved markedly over time, but effect sizes indicate a numeric, but nonsignificant superiority of active rTMS in certain cognitive tests. Active 10-Hz rTMS applied to the left DLPFC for 3 weeks was not superior to sham rTMS in the improvement of various cognitive domains in schizophrenia patients with predominant negative symptoms. This is in contrast to previous preliminary proof-of-concept trials, but highlights the need for more multicenter randomized controlled trials in the field of noninvasive brain stimulation. PMID:26433217

  3. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of composite carbon nanotube macro-film at a high frequency range of 40 GHz to 60 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zi Ping; Cheng, De Ming; Ma, Wen Jing; Hu, Jing Wei; Yin, Yan Hong; Hu, Ying Yan; Li, Ye Sheng; Yang, Jian Gao; Xu, Qian Feng

    2015-06-01

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of carbon nanotube (CNT) macro-film that is adhered to common cloth to maintain the light weight, silk-like quality, and smooth surface of the material for EMI shielding is investigated. The results show that a high and stable EMI SE of 48 dB to 57 dB at 40 GHz to 60 GHz was obtained by the macro-film with a thickness of only ˜4 μm. The composite CNT macro-film is easily manipulated, and its EMI property is significantly different from that of traditional electromagnetic shielding materials that show a lower EMI SE with increasing frequency. For example, the EMI SE of Cu foils decrease from 75 dB to 35 dB as frequency increases from 25 GHz to 60 GHz. Considering their stable and outstanding EMI SE and easy manipulation, the composite CNT macro-films are expected to have potential applications in shielding against millimeter waves.

  4. High frequency stimulation can block axonal conduction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Alicia L; Durand, Dominique M

    2009-11-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) is used to control abnormal neuronal activity associated with movement, seizure, and psychiatric disorders. Yet, the mechanisms of its therapeutic action are not known. Although experimental results have shown that HFS suppresses somatic activity, other data has suggested that HFS could generate excitation of axons. Moreover it is unclear what effect the stimulation has on tissue surrounding the stimulation electrode. Electrophysiological and computational modeling literature suggests that HFS can drive axons at the stimulus frequency. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that unlike cell bodies, axons are driven by pulse train HFS. This hypothesis was tested in fibers of the hippocampus both in-vivo and in-vitro. Our results indicate that although electrical stimulation could activate and drive axons at low frequencies (0.5-25 Hz), as the stimulus frequency increased, electrical stimulation failed to continuously excite axonal activity. Fiber tracts were unable to follow extracellular pulse trains above 50 Hz in-vitro and above 125 Hz in-vivo. The number of cycles required for failure was frequency dependent but independent of stimulus amplitude. A novel in-vitro preparation was developed, in which, the alveus was isolated from the remainder of the hippocampus slice. The isolated fiber tract was unable to follow pulse trains above 75 Hz. Reversible conduction block occurred at much higher stimulus amplitudes, with pulse train HFS (>150 Hz) preventing propagation through the site of stimulation. This study shows that pulse train HFS affects axonal activity by: (1) disrupting HFS evoked excitation leading to partial conduction block of activity through the site of HFS; and (2) generating complete conduction block of secondary evoked activity, as HFS amplitude is increased. These results are relevant for the interpretation of the effects of HFS for the control of abnormal neural activity such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. PMID

  5. Performance of annular high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ivan A.

    This thesis presents studies of the behavior of miniature annular thermoacoustic prime movers and the imaging of the complex sound fields using PIV inside the small acoustic wave guides when driven by a temperature gradient. Thermoacoustic engines operating in the standing wave mode are limited in their acoustic efficiency by a high degree of irreversibility that is inherent in how they work. Better performance can be achieved by using traveling waves in the thermoacoustic devices. This has led to the development of an annular high frequency thermoacoustic prime mover consisting of a regenerator, which is a random stack in-between a hot and cold heat exchanger, inside an annular waveguide. Miniature devices were developed and studied with operating frequencies in the range of 2-4 kHz. This corresponds to an average ring circumference of 11 cm for the 3 kHz device, the resonator bore being 6 mm. A similar device of 11 mm bore, length of 18 cm was also investigated; its resonant frequency was 2 kHz. Sound intensities as high as 166.8 dB were generated with limited heat input. Sound power was extracted from the annular structure by an impedance-matching side arm. The nature of the acoustic wave generated by heat was investigated using a high speed PIV instrument. Although the acoustic device appears symmetric, its performance is characterized by a broken symmetry and by perturbations that exist in its structure. Effects of these are observed in the PIV imaging; images show axial and radial components. Moreover, PIV studies show effects of streaming and instabilities which affect the devices' acoustic efficiency. The acoustic efficiency is high, being of 40% of Carnot. This type of device shows much promise as a high efficiency energy converter; it can be reduced in size for microcircuit applications.

  6. High-frequency monitoring of water fluxes and nutrient loads to assess the effects of controlled drainage on water storage and nutrient transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozemeijer, J. C.; Visser, A.; Borren, W.; Winegram, M.; van der Velde, Y.; Klein, J.; Broers, H. P.

    2016-01-01

    High nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fluxes from upstream agriculture threaten aquatic ecosystems in surface waters and estuaries, especially in areas characterized by high agricultural N and P inputs and densely drained catchments like the Netherlands. Controlled drainage has been recognized as an effective option to optimize soil moisture conditions for agriculture and to reduce unnecessary losses of fresh water and nutrients. This is achieved by introducing control structures with adjustable overflow levels into subsurface tube drain systems. A small-scale (1 ha) field experiment was designed to investigate the hydrological and chemical changes after introducing controlled drainage. Precipitation rates and the response of water tables and drain fluxes were measured in the periods before the introduction of controlled drainage (2007-2008) and after (2009-2011). For the N and P concentration measurements, auto-analyzers for continuous records were combined with passive samplers for time-averaged concentrations at individual drain outlets. The experimental setup enabled the quantification of changes in the water and solute balance after introducing controlled drainage. The results showed that introducing controlled drainage reduced the drain discharge and increased the groundwater storage in the field. To achieve this, the overflow levels have to be elevated in early spring, before the drain discharge stops due to dryer conditions and falling groundwater levels. The groundwater storage in the field would have been larger if the water levels in the adjacent ditch were controlled as well by an adjustable weir. The N concentrations and loads increased, which was largely related to elevated concentrations in one of the three monitored tube drains. The P loads via the tube drains reduced due to the reduction in discharge after introducing controlled drainage. However, this may be counteracted by the higher groundwater levels and the larger contribution of N- and P

  7. Comparison of Puff Topography, Toxicant Exposure, and Subjective Effects in Low- and High-Frequency Waterpipe Users: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Caroline O.; Blank, Melissa D.; Morlett, Alejandra; Shihadeh, Alan; Jaroudi, Ezzat; Karaoghlanian, Nareg; Kilgalen, Barbara; Austin, Janet; Weaver, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical laboratory work among intermittent and daily waterpipe tobacco smokers has revealed significant risks for tobacco dependence and disease associated with waterpipe tobacco smoking (WTS). No studies have compared these groups directly. This study examined whether WTS frequency was associated with differential puff topography, toxicant exposure, and subjective response using a placebo-control design. Methods: Eighty participants reporting WTS of 2–5 episodes (LOW; n = 63) or ≥20 episodes (HIGH; n = 17) per month for ≥6 months completed 2 double-blind, counterbalanced 2-hr sessions that were preceded by ≥12hr of tobacco abstinence. Sessions differed by product smoked ad libitum for 45+ min: preferred brand/flavor of waterpipe tobacco (active) or a flavor-matched tobacco-free waterpipe product (placebo). Outcomes included puff topography, plasma nicotine, carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), and subjective response. Results: HIGH users had more puffs, shorter inter-puff-intervals, and a higher total puff volume for placebo relative to active, as well as relative to LOW users during placebo. Plasma nicotine concentrations increased when smoking active (but not placebo) with no significant differences between groups at 25min post-product administration. COHb increased significantly during all conditions; the largest increase was for HIGH users when smoking placebo. There was some evidence of higher baseline scores for nicotine/tobacco nicotine abstinence symptomology. Conclusions: Higher frequency waterpipe users may be more sensitive to the effects of waterpipe smoke nicotine content. Among HIGH users, higher baseline nicotine/tobacco abstinence symptoms may indicate greater nicotine dependence. These data support continued surveillance of WTS and development of dependence measures specific to this product. PMID:25257982

  8. High-frequency monitoring of water fluxes and nutrient loads to assess the effects of controlled drainage on water storage and nutrient transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rozemeijer, J. C.; Visser, A.; Borren, W.; Winegram, M.; van der Velde, Y.; Klein, J.; Broers, H. P.

    2016-01-19

    High nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fluxes from upstream agriculture threaten aquatic ecosystems in surface waters and estuaries, especially in areas characterized by high agricultural N and P inputs and densely drained catchments like the Netherlands. Controlled drainage has been recognized as an effective option to optimize soil moisture conditions for agriculture and to reduce unnecessary losses of fresh water and nutrients. This is achieved by introducing control structures with adjustable overflow levels into subsurface tube drain systems. A small-scale (1 ha) field experiment was designed to investigate the hydrological and chemical changes after introducing controlled drainage. Precipitation rates andmore » the response of water tables and drain fluxes were measured in the periods before the introduction of controlled drainage (2007–2008) and after (2009–2011). For the N and P concentration measurements, auto-analyzers for continuous records were combined with passive samplers for time-averaged concentrations at individual drain outlets. The experimental setup enabled the quantification of changes in the water and solute balance after introducing controlled drainage. The results showed that introducing controlled drainage reduced the drain discharge and increased the groundwater storage in the field. To achieve this, the overflow levels have to be elevated in early spring, before the drain discharge stops due to dryer conditions and falling groundwater levels. The groundwater storage in the field would have been larger if the water levels in the adjacent ditch were controlled as well by an adjustable weir. The N concentrations and loads increased, which was largely related to elevated concentrations in one of the three monitored tube drains. The P loads via the tube drains reduced due to the reduction in discharge after introducing controlled drainage. Furthermore, this may be counteracted by the higher groundwater levels and the larger contribution

  9. Assimilation of GPM GMI Rainfall Product with WRF GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international mission to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide. The GPM built on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) legacy, while the core observatory will extend the observations to higher latitudes. The GPM observations can help advance our understanding of precipitation microphysics and storm structures. Launched on February 27th, 2014, the GPM core observatory is carrying advanced instruments that can be used to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world. Therefore, the use of GPM data in numerical modeling work is a new area and will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The goal of this research is to examine the methodology of assimilation of the GPM retrieved products. The data assimilation system used in this study is the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed by the Development Testbed Center (DTC). The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this research explores regional assimilation of the GPM products with case studies. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on the assimilation of the GPM product 2AGPROFGMI, the retrieved Microwave Imager (GMI) rainfall rate data for initializing a real convective storm. WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast of precipitation fields and processes. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to other GPM products. Further details of the methodology of data assimilation, preliminary result and test on the impact of GPM data and the

  10. Trace Gas/Aerosol Interactions and GMI Modeling Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Das, Bigyani; Bergmann, Dan; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Strahan, Susan; Wang, Minghuai; Feng, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Current global aerosol models use different physical and chemical schemes and parameters, different meteorological fields, and often different emission sources. Since the physical and chemical parameterization schemes are often tuned to obtain results that are consistent with observations, it is difficult to assess the true uncertainty due to meteorology alone. Under the framework of the NASA global modeling initiative (GMI), the differences and uncertainties in aerosol simulations (for sulfate, organic carbon, black carbon, dust and sea salt) solely due to different meteorological fields are analyzed and quantified. Three meteorological datasets available from the NASA DAO GCM, the GISS-II' GCM, and the NASA finite volume GCM (FVGCM) are used to drive the same aerosol model. The global sulfate and mineral dust burdens with FVGCM fields are 40% and 20% less than those with DAO and GISS fields, respectively due to its heavier rainfall. Meanwhile, the sea salt burden predicted with FVGCM fields is 56% and 43% higher than those with DAO and GISS, respectively, due to its stronger convection especially over the Southern Hemispheric Ocean. Sulfate concentrations at the surface in the Northern Hemisphere extratropics and in the middle to upper troposphere differ by more than a factor of 3 between the three meteorological datasets. The agreement between model calculated and observed aerosol concentrations in the industrial regions (e.g., North America and Europe) is quite similar for all three meteorological datasets. Away from the source regions, however, the comparisons with observations differ greatly for DAO, FVGCM and GISS, and the performance of the model using different datasets varies largely depending on sites and species. Global annual average aerosol optical depth at 550 nm is 0.120-0.131 for the three meteorological datasets.

  11. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, S; ter Brake, H J M; Jansen, H V; Zhao, Y; Holland, H J; Burger, J F; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80 K, delivering a cooling power of 10 mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5 MPa and compression volume of about 22.6 mm(3) when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100 V at a frequency of 1 kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73 W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers. PMID:18447548

  12. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  13. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  14. Effects of preincubation application of low and high frequency ultrasound on eggshell microbial activity, hatchability, supply organ weights at hatch, and chick performance in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) hatching eggs.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Iskender; Aygun, Ali; Sert, Durmus

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to establish the effects of preincubation application of low and high frequency ultrasound on egg weight loss, hatchability, supply organ weights, chick performance, and eggshell microbial activity in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). A total of 630 fresh eggs were randomly divided into 3 groups. Treatments were no ultrasound but eggs were sprayed with benzalkonium chloride solution (B), 35 kHz ultrasound applied for 30 min (U35), and 130 kHz ultrasound applied for 30 min (U130). At the beginning of the incubation, the eggs in the U130 treatment had lower coliform, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus counts than those in the B group. However, no significant differences were found in coliform, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus counts among treatments at d 14 of incubation. Among treatments, there were no significant differences in egg weight loss, hatchability, embryonic mortality, supply organ weights, spread of hatch, or relative growth. PMID:25971949

  15. High frequency homogenization for structural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolde, E.; Craster, R. V.; Kaplunov, J.

    2011-03-01

    We consider a net created from elastic strings as a model structure to investigate the propagation of waves through semi-discrete media. We are particularly interested in the development of continuum models, valid at high frequencies, when the wavelength and each cell of the net are of similar order. Net structures are chosen as these form a general two-dimensional example, encapsulating the essential physics involved in the two-dimensional excitation of a lattice structure whilst retaining the simplicity of dealing with elastic strings. Homogenization techniques are developed here for wavelengths commensurate with the cellular scale. Unlike previous theories, these techniques are not limited to low frequency or static regimes, and lead to effective continuum equations valid on a macroscale with the details of the cellular structure encapsulated only through integrated quantities. The asymptotic procedure is based upon a two-scale approach and the physical observation that there are frequencies that give standing waves, periodic with the period or double-period of the cell. A specific example of a net created by a lattice of elastic strings is constructed, the theory is general and not reliant upon the net being infinite, none the less the infinite net is a useful special case for which Bloch theory can be applied. This special case is explored in detail allowing for verification of the theory, and highlights the importance of degenerate cases; the specific example of a square net is treated in detail. An additional illustration of the versatility of the method is the response to point forcing which provides a stringent test of the homogenized equations; an exact Green's function for the net is deduced and compared to the asymptotics.

  16. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  17. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  18. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period. PMID:12199947

  19. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  20. Global Microwave Imager (GMI) Spin Mechanism Assembly Design, Development, and Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, Michael; Woolaway, Scott; Guy, Larry; Dayton, Chris; Berdanier, Barry; Newell, David; Pellicciotti, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    The GMI Spin Mechanism Assembly (SMA) is a precision bearing and power transfer drive assembly mechanism that supports and spins the Global Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument at a constant rate of 32 rpm continuously for the 3 year plus mission life. The GMI instrument will fly on the core Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft and will be used to make calibrated radiometric measurements at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. The GPM mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological predictions through more accurate and frequent precipitation measurements [1]. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) was selected by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to design, build, and test the GMI instrument. The SMA design has to meet a challenging set of requirements and is based on BATC space mechanisms heritage and lessons learned design changes made to the WindSat BAPTA mechanism that is currently operating on-orbit and has recently surpassed 8 years of Flight operation.

  1. Automated Screening for High-Frequency Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Robert C.; Jansen, Marije; Moore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    tests was about 2.1 (HF-triplet) and 1.7 (HF-CVC) times less than that for the BB-triplet test. The effect on the HF-triplet test of varying presentation method (professional or cheap headphones and loudspeakers) was small for the NH group and somewhat larger, but nonsignificant for the hearing-impaired group. Test repetition produced a moderate, significant learning effect for the first and second retests, but was small and nonsignificant for further retesting. The learning effect was about two times larger for the HF-CVC test than for the HF-triplet test. The sensitivity of both new tests for high-frequency hearing loss was similar, with an 87% true-positive and 7% false-positive ratio for detecting an average high-frequency hearing loss of 20 dB or more. Conclusions: The new HF-triplet and HF-CVC tests provide a sensitive and accurate method for detecting high-frequency hearing loss. The tests may signal developing hearing impairment at an early stage. The HF-triplet is preferred over the HF-CVC test because of its smaller learning effect, smaller error rate, greater simplicity, and lower cultural dependency. PMID:25127323

  2. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  3. High frequency ultrasonic mitigation of microbial corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahamedh, Hussain H.; Meegan, G. Douglas; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.; Spear, John R.

    2012-05-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in oil industry facilities, and considerable effort has been spent to mitigate this costly issue. More environmentally benign methods are under consideration as alternatives to biocides, among which are ultrasonic techniques. In this study, a high frequency ultrasonic technique (HFUT) was used as a mitigation method for MIC. The killing percentages of the HFUT were higher than 99.8 percent and their corrosivity on steel was reduced by more than 50 percent. The practice and result will be discussed.

  4. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  5. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  6. High frequency and founder effect of the CYP3A4*20 loss-of-function allele in the Spanish population classifies CYP3A4 as a polymorphic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Apellániz-Ruiz, M; Inglada-Pérez, L; Naranjo, M E G; Sánchez, L; Mancikova, V; Currás-Freixes, M; de Cubas, A A; Comino-Méndez, I; Triki, S; Rebai, A; Rasool, M; Moya, G; Grazina, M; Opocher, G; Cascón, A; Taboada-Echalar, P; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Carracedo, A; Robledo, M; Llerena, A; Rodríguez-Antona, C

    2015-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is a key drug-metabolizing enzyme. Loss-of-function variants have been reported as rare events, and the first demonstration of a CYP3A4 protein lacking functional activity is caused by CYP3A4*20 allele. Here we characterized the world distribution and origin of CYP3A4*20 mutation. CYP3A4*20 was determined in more than 4000 individuals representing different populations, and haplotype analysis was performed using CYP3A polymorphisms and microsatellite markers. CYP3A4*20 allele was present in 1.2% of the Spanish population (up to 3.8% in specific regions), and all CYP3A4*20 carriers had a common haplotype. This is compatible with a Spanish founder effect and classifies CYP3A4 as a polymorphic enzyme. This constitutes the first description of a CYP3A4 loss-of-function variant with high frequency in a population. CYP3A4*20 results together with the key role of CYP3A4 in drug metabolism support screening for rare CYP3A4 functional alleles among subjects with adverse drug events in certain populations. PMID:25348618

  7. Epitaxial growth of GaN by radical-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (REMOCVD) in the downflow of a very high frequency (VHF) N2/H2 excited plasma - effect of TMG flow rate and VHF power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Oda, Osamu; Takeda, Keigo; Sekine, Makoto; Amano, Hiroshi; Hori, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films have been grown by using our newly developed Radical-Enhanced Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (REMOCVD) system. This system has three features: (1) application of very high frequency (60 MHz) power in order to increase the plasma density, (2) introduction of H2 gas together with N2 gas in the plasma discharge region to generate not only nitrogen radicals but also active NHx molecules, and (3) radical supply under remote plasma arrangement with suppression of charged ions and photons by employing a Faraday cage. Using this new system, we have studied the effect of the trimethylgallium (TMG) source flow rate and of the plasma generation power on the GaN crystal quality by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and double crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). We found that this REMOCVD allowed the growth of epitaxial GaN films of the wurtzite structure of (0001) orientation on sapphire substrates with a high growth rate of 0.42 μm/h at a low temperature of 800 °C. The present REMOCVD is a promising method for GaN growth at relatively low temperature and without using costly ammonia gas.

  8. High-Frequency (13)C and (29)Si NMR Chemical Shifts in Diamagnetic Low-Valence Compounds of Tl(I) and Pb(II): Decisive Role of Relativistic Effects.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2016-02-15

    The (13)C and (29)Si NMR signals of ligand atoms directly bonded to Tl(I) or Pb(II) heavy-element centers are predicted to resonate at very high frequencies, up to 400 ppm for (13)C and over 1000 ppm for (29)Si, outside the typical experimental NMR chemical-shift ranges for a given type of nuclei. The large (13)C and (29)Si NMR chemical shifts are ascribed to sizable relativistic spin-orbit effects, which can amount to more than 200 ppm for (13)C and more than 1000 ppm for (29)Si, values unexpected for diamagnetic compounds of the main group elements. The origin of the vast spin-orbit contributions to the (13)C and (29)Si NMR shifts is traced to the highly efficient 6p → 6p* metal-based orbital magnetic couplings and related to the 6p orbital-based bonding together with the low-energy gaps between the occupied and virtual orbital subspaces in the subvalent Tl(I) and Pb(II) compounds. New NMR spectral regions for these compounds are suggested based on the fully relativistic density functional theory calculations in the Dirac-Coulomb framework carefully calibrated on the experimentally known NMR data for Tl(I) and Pb(II) complexes. PMID:26820039

  9. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  10. Extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B.; Kirshbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (<20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts.

  11. Extracting Cardiac Myofiber Orientations from High Frequency Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B; Kishbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-29

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts. PMID:24392208

  12. High-frequency Broadband Modulations of Electroencephalographic Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Onton, Julie; Makeig, Scott

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency cortical potentials in electroencephalographic (EEG) scalp recordings have low amplitudes and may be confounded with scalp muscle activities. EEG data from an eyes-closed emotion imagination task were linearly decomposed using independent component analysis (ICA) into maximally independent component (IC) processes. Joint decomposition of IC log spectrograms into source- and frequency-independent modulator (IM) processes revealed three distinct classes of IMs that separately modulated broadband high-frequency (∼15–200 Hz) power of brain, scalp muscle, and likely ocular motor IC processes. Multi-dimensional scaling revealed significant but spatially complex relationships between mean broadband brain IM effects and the valence of the imagined emotions. Thus, contrary to prevalent assumption, unitary modes of spectral modulation of frequencies encompassing the beta, gamma, and high gamma frequency ranges can be isolated from scalp-recorded EEG data and may be differentially associated with brain sources and cognitive activities. PMID:20076775

  13. Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Anderw D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation tubes similar to a small pulse detonation engine (PDE). A high-speed valve injects a charge of a mixture of fuel and air at rates of up to 1000 Hz into a constant area tube closed at one end. The reactants detonate in the tube and the products exit as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers are used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device and thrust is measured with a balance. The effects of injection frequency, fuel and air flow rates, tube length, and injection location are considered. Both H2 and C2H4 fuels are considered. Optimum (maximum specific thrust) fuel-air compositions and resonant frequencies are identified. Results are compared to PDE calculations. Design rules are postulated and applications to aerodynamic flow control and propulsion are discussed.

  14. How High Frequency Trading Affects a Market Index

    PubMed Central

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Stanley, H. Eugene; gur-Gershgoren, Gitit

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between a market index and its constituent stocks is complicated. While an index is a weighted average of its constituent stocks, when the investigated time scale is one day or longer the index has been found to have a stronger effect on the stocks than vice versa. We explore how this interaction changes in short time scales using high frequency data. Using a correlation-based analysis approach, we find that in short time scales stocks have a stronger influence on the index. These findings have implications for high frequency trading and suggest that the price of an index should be published on shorter time scales, as close as possible to those of the actual transaction time scale. PMID:23817553

  15. The Origin of High-Frequency Hearing in Whales.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Morgan; Martinez-Caceres, Manuel; de Muizon, Christian; Mnieckowski, Jessica; Geisler, Jonathan H

    2016-08-22

    Odontocetes (toothed whales) rely upon echoes of their own vocalizations to navigate and find prey underwater [1]. This sensory adaptation, known as echolocation, operates most effectively when using high frequencies, and odontocetes are rivaled only by bats in their ability to perceive ultrasonic sound greater than 100 kHz [2]. Although features indicative of ultrasonic hearing are present in the oldest known odontocetes [3], the significance of this finding is limited by the methods employed and taxa sampled. In this report, we describe a new xenorophid whale (Echovenator sandersi, gen. et sp. nov.) from the Oligocene of South Carolina that, as a member of the most basal clade of odontocetes, sheds considerable light on the evolution of ultrasonic hearing. By placing high-resolution CT data from Echovenator sandersi, 2 hippos, and 23 fossil and extant whales in a phylogenetic context, we conclude that ultrasonic hearing, albeit in a less specialized form, evolved at the base of the odontocete radiation. Contrary to the hypothesis that odontocetes evolved from low-frequency specialists [4], we find evidence that stem cetaceans, the archaeocetes, were more sensitive to high-frequency sound than their terrestrial ancestors. This indicates that selection for high-frequency hearing predates the emergence of Odontoceti and the evolution of echolocation. PMID:27498568

  16. Inline high frequency ultrasonic particle sizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, F.; Petit, J.; Nassar, G.; Debreyne, P.; Delaplace, G.; Nongaillard, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the development of a new method of particle sizing in a liquid. This method uses high frequency focused ultrasounds to detect particles crossing the focal zone of an ultrasonic sensor and to determine their size distribution by processing the reflected echoes. The major advantage of this technique compared to optical sizing methods is its ability to measure the size of particles suspended in an opaque liquid without any dedicated sample preparation. Validations of ultrasonic measurements were achieved on suspensions of polymethyl methacrylate beads in a size range extending from a few micrometer to several hundred micrometer with a temporal resolution of 1 s. The inline detection of aggregate formation was also demonstrated.

  17. High-frequency resonant-tunneling oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Calawa, A. R.; Manfra, M. J.; Chen, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-frequency resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) oscillators are described. Oscillations up to a frequency of 420 GHz have been achieved in the GaAs/AlAs system. Recent results obtained with In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs and InAs/AlSb RTDs show a greatly increased power density and indicate the potential for fundamental oscillations up to about 1 THz. These results are consistent with a lumped-element equivalent circuit model of the RTD. The model shows that the maximum oscillation frequency of the GaAs/AlAs RTDs is limited primarily by series resistance, and that the power density is limited by low peak-to-valley current ratio.

  18. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI): Instrument Overview and Early On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, David W.; Newell, David A.; Wentz, Frank J.; Krimchansky, Sergey; Jackson, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international satellite mission that uses measurements from an advanced radar/radiometer system on a core observatory as reference standards to unify and advance precipitation estimates made by a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. The GPM core observatory was launched on February 27, 2014 at 18:37 UT in a 65? inclination nonsun-synchronous orbit. GPM focuses on precipitation as a key component of the Earth's water and energy cycle, and has the capability to provide near-real-time observations for tracking severe weather events, monitoring freshwater resources, and other societal applications. The GPM microwave imager (GMI) on the core observatory provides the direct link to the constellation radiometer sensors, which fly mainly in polar orbits. The GMI sensitivity, accuracy, and stability play a crucial role in unifying the measurements from the GPM constellation of satellites. The instrument has exhibited highly stable operations through the duration of the calibration/validation period. This paper provides an overview of the GMI instrument and a report of early on-orbit commissioning activities. It discusses the on-orbit radiometric sensitivity, absolute calibration accuracy, and stability for each radiometric channel. Index Terms-Calibration accuracy, passive microwave remote sensing, radiometric sensitivity.

  19. High frequency seismic waves and slab structures beneath Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Daoyuan; Miller, Meghan S.; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; Asimow, Paul D.; Li, Dunzhu

    2014-04-01

    Tomographic images indicate a complicated subducted slab structure beneath the central Mediterranean where gaps in fast velocity anomalies in the upper mantle are interpreted as slab tears. The detailed shape and location of these tears are important for kinematic reconstructions and understanding the evolution of the subduction system. However, tomographic images, which are produced by smoothed, damped inversions, will underestimate the sharpness of the structures. Here, we use the records from the Italian National Seismic Network (IV) to study the detailed slab structure. The waveform records for stations in Calabria show large amplitude, high frequency (f>5 Hz) late arrivals with long coda after a relatively low-frequency onset for both P and S waves. In contrast, the stations in the southern and central Apennines lack such high frequency arrivals, which correlate spatially with the central Apennines slab window inferred from tomography and receiver function studies. Thus, studying the high frequency arrivals provides an effective way to investigate the structure of slab and detect possible slab tears. The observed high frequency arrivals in the southern Italy are the strongest for events from 300 km depth and greater whose hypocenters are located within the slab inferred from fast P-wave velocity perturbations. This characteristic behavior agrees with previous studies from other tectonic regions, suggesting the high frequency energy is generated by small scale heterogeneities within the slab which act as scatterers. Furthermore, using a 2-D finite difference (FD) code, we calculate synthetic seismograms to search for the scale, shape and velocity perturbations of the heterogeneities that may explain features observed in the data. Our preferred model of the slab heterogeneities beneath the Tyrrhenian Sea has laminar structure parallel to the slab dip and can be described by a von Kármán function with a down-dip correlation length of 10 km and 0.5 km in

  20. Cross-correlation and time-lag analysis of high frequency monitoring data of the Vallcebre landslide (Eastern Pyrenees, Spain) to reveal cause-effect relationships between variables governing slope instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulas, Marco; Moya, Jose; Corsini, Alessandro; Corominas, Jordi

    2015-04-01

    The Vallcebre landslide is a slow moving large landslide located 140 km north of Barcelona in the Eastern Pyrenees. Monitoring data of the Vallcebre landslide represent a singular case of multi parameter high-frequency monitoring system set up in 1996 and still ongoing. Data of movements and groundwater levels are measured and recorded with a frequency of 20 minutes in 6 boreholes distributed in the landslide, each one equipped with a wire extensometer and a piezometer, while rainfall is recorded by a specific gauge at the site. Data from 3 boreholes recorded during three full years of measurements (from 1999 to 2001) have been analyzed by means of a cross-correlation function in order to determine the reciprocal interdependency and the relative time lag between rainfall, groundwater and movement rate maxima and, ultimately, to evidence cause-effect processes occurring along the slope. It should be pinpointed that, in this specific case, rainfall is also a proxy for the discharge level of the stream eroding the toe of the landslide, that is believed to be one of the main instability factors. The cross-correlation function is a quite simple signal processing tool for measuring similarities of waveforms as function of an applied time-lag. Specifically, it was applied to study: i) the relations between rainfall and movement rate, so to highlight the relative time lag for rainfall to produce an effect in different points of the landslide; ii) the inter-dependencies between different movement rates in the three boreholes in order to determine the pattern of mobilization of the landslide (from up to down slope and vice-versa); iii) the response of groundwater with respect to rainfall, which reflects the local permeability; iv) the evolution of groundwater levels in the three monitoring points. Altogether, results confirm and constrain in time the retrogressive trend of movements in the landslide (in agreement with a 2D numerical model previously developed by Ferrari et

  1. A randomised controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation against conventional artificial ventilation for adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome. The OSCAR (OSCillation in ARDS) study.

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Ranjit; Hamilton, Patrick; Young, Duncan; Hulme, Claire; Hall, Peter; Shah, Sanjoy; MacKenzie, Iain; Tunnicliffe, William; Rowan, Kathy; Cuthbertson, Brian; McCabe, Chris; Lamb, Sallie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) require artificial ventilation but this treatment may produce secondary lung damage. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may reduce this damage. OBJECTIVES To determine the clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of HFOV in patients with ARDS compared with standard mechanical ventilation. DESIGN A parallel, randomised, unblinded clinical trial. SETTING UK intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS Mechanically ventilated patients with a partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood/fractional concentration of inspired oxygen (P : F) ratio of 26.7 kPa (200 mmHg) or less and an expected duration of ventilation of at least 2 days at recruitment. INTERVENTIONS Treatment arm HFOV using a Novalung R100(®) ventilator (Metran Co. Ltd, Saitama, Japan) ventilator until the start of weaning. Control arm Conventional mechanical ventilation using the devices available in the participating centres. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary clinical outcome was all-cause mortality at 30 days after randomisation. The primary health economic outcome was the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. RESULTS One hundred and sixty-six of 398 patients (41.7%) randomised to the HFOV group and 163 of 397 patients (41.1%) randomised to the conventional mechanical ventilation group died within 30 days of randomisation (p = 0.85), for an absolute difference of 0.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) -6.1% to 7.5%]. After adjustment for study centre, sex, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and the initial P : F ratio, the odds ratio for survival in the conventional ventilation group was 1.03 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.40; p = 0.87 logistic regression). Survival analysis showed no difference in the probability of survival up to 12 months after randomisation. The average QALY at 1 year in the HFOV group was 0.302 compared to 0.246. This gives an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the cost to

  2. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  3. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  4. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  5. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  6. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  7. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  8. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  9. Diffractive Model of the high-frequency impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Heifets

    1989-06-12

    High frequency diffraction can be described by iterations based on an approximate formulation of the boundary conditions. The method formulated is analogous to the Born series of scattering theory. It is used to study the interaction of short bunches with the beam environment in terms of the impedances. The impedances of typical elements of an accelerator structure are obtained. The cross-talk between elements, the impedance of a periodic array, and the effect of a taper are discussed. The method can be applied to a cavity of an arbitrary shape.

  10. Explanation of persistent high frequency density structure in coalesced bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    1988-07-01

    It has been observed that after the Main Ring rf manipulation of coalescing (where 5 to 13 primary bunches are transferred into a single rf bucket) the new secondary bunch displays evidence of high frequency density structure superimposed on the approximately Gaussian longitudinal bunch length distribution. This structure is persistent over a period of many seconds (hundreds of synchrotron oscillation periods). With the help of multiparticle simulation programs, an explanation of this phenomenon is given in terms of single particle longitudinal phase space dynamics. No coherent effects need be taken into account. 6 refs., 10 figs.