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Sample records for high-frequency sedimentation cycles

  1. The impact of high-frequency sedimentation cycles on stratigraphic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, M.A.; Radovich, B.J.; Matthews, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    Global cyclostratigraphy, a methodology that utilizes climate change to evaluate sediment flux, characterizes the impact of sediment cycles on stratigraphy. Climatic succession, sediment yield cycles, and the phase relationship of sediment cycles to eustatic cycles are all determined in the early stages of basin analysis. Sedimentologic information is then used to assist in sequence evaluations. Climatic successions are intrinsically associated with global position (paleogeography) and are not necessarily synchronous with glacioeustatic sea-level cycles. A preliminary evaluation of the effect of climate on sediment supply from modem river systems indicates that sediment yield may vary by well over two orders of magnitude during one climate cycle. Consequently, basins in different climatic belts can have distinctly different volumes and lithologies for systems tracts that have similar base-level changes. The stratigraphic computer program Sedpak was utilized to examine the possible impact of different sedimentation cycles on sequence interpretation and reservoir forecasts. The effect of sedimentation cycles on reservoir distribution in real world sequences is demonstrated with a comparison of the Miocene section of the Surma basin, Bangladesh, and the Plio-Pleistocene section of the Gulf of Mexico. In the Surma basin, reservoirs are most likely to occur in transgressive and highstand systems tracts, while reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico are more likely in lowstand prograding complexes.

  2. High Frequency Time-series of the Dynamic Sedimentation Processes on the Western Shelf of the Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dail, M. B.; Corbett, D. R.; McKee, B.; Duncan, D.

    2004-12-01

    Rivers annually transport billions of tons of organic and inorganic sediment to coastal environments, making them an extremely important part of global biogeochemical cycles. However, the majority of the freshwater and suspended materials are delivered to the coastal ocean by only a few rivers. In these river-dominated ocean margins (RiOMar), sediments are deposited and re-suspended repeatedly before stable deposition. This sediment cycling is poorly understood and is critical to understanding how deltas and continental shelves, considered to be major repositories of organic carbon in marine sediments, manipulate the global carbon cycle and biogeochemical processes affecting coastal environments. During six cruises in the fall of 2003 (October, November, and December) and spring of 2004 (March, April, and May), on the shelf west of the Mississippi River Delta, sediment samples collected from cores were analyzed for particle reactive radionuclides (210Pb, 137Cs, and 234Th) to create a quantitative high frequency time-series of sediment deposition and erosion processes and evaluate the transport and fate of material on the shelf. Based on previous work completed by Corbett et al. (2004), seasonal variations in short-lived tracers could be explained by river flow and weather conditions. Inventories of the tracers collected during the fall cruises suggest increased deposition during the late summer months and that most sediment reworking and export occurs during the winter months, typically a period of low/increasing river discharge and increased weather forcing.

  3. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  4. Towards in situ and high frequency estimates of suspended sediment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Schwab, Michael Peter; Klaus, Julian; Hissler, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Sediment properties, including sediment-associated chemical constituents and sediment physical properties (as colour), can exhibit significant variations within and between storm runoff events. However, the number of samples included in suspended sediment studies is often limited by the time consuming and expensive laboratory procedures for suspended sediment analysis after stream water sampling. This, in turn, restricts high frequency sampling campaigns to a limited number of events and reduces accuracy when aiming to estimate fluxes and loads of sediment-associated chemical constituents. Our contribution addresses the potential for portable ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) light spectrometers (220-730 nm) to estimate suspended sediment properties in situ and at high temporal resolution. As far as we know, these instruments have primarily been developed and used to quantify solute concentrations (e.g. DOC and NO3-N), total concentrations of dissolved and particulate forms (e.g. TOC) and turbidity. Here we argue that light absorbance values can be calibrated to estimate solely sediment properties. For our proof-of-concept experiment, we measured light absorbance at 15-min intervals at the Weierbach catchment (NW Luxembourg, 0.46 km2) from December 2013 to January 2015. We then performed a local calibration using suspended sediment loss-on-ignition (LOI) measurements (n=34). We assessed the performance of several regression models that relate light absorbance measurements with the percentage weight LOI. The robust regression method presented the lowest standard error of prediction (0.48{%}) and was selected for calibration (adjusted r2 = 0.76 between observed and predicted values). This study demonstrates that spectrometers can be used to estimate suspended sediment properties at high temporal resolution and for long time spans in a simple, non-destructive and affordable manner. The advantages and disadvantages of the method compared to traditional approaches will be

  5. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 2: scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length- and amplitude-scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by geo-referenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum, and the intercept and slope from a power-law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision-tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration, and surveys made at calibration sites at different times, were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  6. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics: 2. Scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length and amplitude scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by georeferenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum and the intercept and slope from a power law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration and surveys made at calibration sites at different times were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well-understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  7. Quantifying Surface Processes and Stratigraphic Characteristics Resulting from Large Magnitude High Frequency and Small Magnitude Low Frequency Relative Sea Level Cycles: An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Li, Q.; Esposito, C. R.; Straub, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Relative Sea-Level (RSL) change, which is a primary control on sequence stratigraphic architecture, has a close relationship with climate change. In order to explore the influence of RSL change on the stratigraphic record, we conducted three physical experiments which shared identical boundary conditions but differed in their RSL characteristics. Specifically, the three experiments differed with respect to two non-dimensional numbers that compare the magnitude and periodicity of RSL cycles to the spatial and temporal scales of autogenic processes, respectively. The magnitude of RSL change is quantified with H*, defined as the peak to trough difference in RSL during a cycle divided by a system's maximum autogenic channel depth. The periodicity of RSL change is quantified with T*, defined as the period of RSL cycles divided by the time required to deposit one channel depth of sediment, on average, everywhere in the basin. Experiments performed included: 1) a control experiment lacking RSL cycles, used to define a system's autogenics, 2) a high magnitude, high frequency RSL cycles experiment, and 3) a low magnitude, low frequency cycles experiment. We observe that the high magnitude, high frequency experiment resulted in the thickest channel bodies with the lowest width-to-depth ratios, while the low magnitude, long period experiment preserves a record of gradual shoreline transgression and regression producing facies that are the most continuous in space. We plan to integrate our experimental results with Delft3D numerical experiments models that sample similar non-dimensional characteristics of RSL cycles. Quantifying the influence of RSL change, normalized as a function of the spatial and temporal scales of autogenic processes will strengthen our ability to predict stratigraphic architecture and invert stratigraphy for paleo-environmental conditions.

  8. High-frequency time-series of the dynamic sedimentation processes on the western shelf of the Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reide Corbett, D.; Dail, Michael; McKee, Brent

    2007-06-01

    Multiple box cores were collected on the continental shelf in the Mississippi Deltaic Region adjacent to Southwest Pass and analyzed for particle reactive radionuclides 234Th and 7Be to examine seasonal sediment dynamics associated with variations of river discharge and hydrodynamics. Three stations located along a line west of Southwest Pass were cored and reoccupied in October, November, and December of 2003 and March, April, and May of 2004. High-frequency sampling (˜monthly) comparable to the short half-life of the radiotracers ( 234Th t1/2=24.1 d; 7Be t1/2=53.3) enabled us to isolate the relative influence that various forcing agents (river discharge, waves, currents) had on sediment inventories of 7Be and 234Th. In addition, the primary source of 7Be (fluvial) differs from 234Th (marine), providing further insight into processes affecting sediment transport and supply. Monthly 7Be inventories showed a significant positive relationship to river discharge ( P=0.03) proximal to Southwest Pass. Sites further from Southwest Pass exhibited little to no relationship between 7Be inventories and river flow. At these sites, monthly 7Be inventories demonstrated a significant positive relationship with average wave orbital velocity ( P<0.01). During our sampling period, the transport of 7Be-rich sediments to sites located on the middle to outer shelf were dependent on sea conditions not river discharge. Relatively high wave orbital velocities potentially allow particles to remain in suspension longer and travel further distances before initial deposition. In addition, 234Th inventories showed evidence of sediment focusing during periods of high wave orbital velocities.

  9. High-frequency thermal-electrical cycles for pyroelectric energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Bikram; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Cho, Hanna; Martin, Lane W.; King, William P.

    2014-11-21

    We report thermal to electrical energy conversion from a 150 nm thick BaTiO{sub 3} film using pyroelectric cycles at 1 kHz. A microfabricated platform enables temperature and electric field control with temporal resolution near 1 μs. The rapid electric field changes as high as 11 × 10{sup 5 }kV/cm-s, and temperature change rates as high as 6 × 10{sup 5 }K/s allow exploration of pyroelectric cycles in a previously unexplored operating regime. We investigated the effect of phase difference between electric field and temperature cycles, and electric field and temperature change rates on the electrical energy generated from thermal-electrical cycles based on the pyroelectric Ericsson cycle. Complete thermodynamic cycles are possible up to the highest cycle rates tested here, and the energy density varies significantly with phase shifts between temperature and electric field waveforms. This work could facilitate the design and operation of pyroelectric cycles at high cycle rates, and aid in the design of new pyroelectric systems.

  10. Zero Voltage Soft Switching Duty Cycle Pulse Modulated High Frequency Inverter-Fed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitobi, Manabu; Matsushige, Takayuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo; Bessyo, Daisuke; Omori, Hideki; Terai, Haruo

    The utility grid voltage of commercial AC power source in Japan and USA is 100V, but in other Asian and European countries, it is 220V. In recent years, in Japan 200V outputted single-phase three-wire system begins to be used for high power applications. In 100V utility AC power applications and systems, an active voltage clamped quasi-resonant inverter circuit topology sing IGBTs has been effectively used so far for the consumer microwave oven. In this paper, presented is a half bridge type voltage-clamped asymmetrical soft switching PWM high-frequency inverter type AC-DC converter using IGBTs which is designed for consumer magnetron drive used as the consumer microwave oven in 200V utility AC power system. The zero voltage soft switching inverter treated here can use the same power rated switching semiconductor devices and three-winding high frequency transformer as those of the active voltage clamped quasi-resonant inverter using the IGBTs that has already been used for 100V utility AC power source. The operating performances of the voltage source single ended push pull (SEPP) type soft switching PWM inverter are evaluated and discussed for 100V and 200V common use consumer microwave oven. The harmonic line current components in the utility AC power side of the AC-DC power converter with ZVS-PWM SEPP inverter are reduced and improved on the basis of sine wave like pulse frequency modulation and sine wave like pulse width modulation for the utility AC voltage source.

  11. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake-sleep cycle.

    PubMed

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-08-16

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake-sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS. PMID:27482084

  12. New Seasonal Shift in In-Stream Diurnal Nitrate Cycles Identified by Mining High-Frequency Data.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Alice H; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of in-situ monitoring devices, such as UV-spectrometers, makes the study of short-term stream chemistry variation relevant, especially the study of diurnal cycles, which are not yet fully understood. Our study is based on high-frequency data from an agricultural catchment (Studienlandschaft Schwingbachtal, Germany). We propose a novel approach, i.e. the combination of cluster analysis and Linear Discriminant Analysis, to mine from these data nitrate behavior patterns. As a result, we observe a seasonality of nitrate diurnal cycles, that differs from the most common cycle seasonality described in the literature, i.e. pre-dawn peaks in spring. Our cycles appear in summer and the maximum and minimum shift to a later time in late summer/autumn. This is observed both for water- and energy-limited years, thus potentially stressing the role of evapotranspiration. This concluding hypothesis on the role of evapotranspiration on nitrate stream concentration, which was obtained through data mining, broadens the perspective on the diurnal cycling of stream nitrate concentrations. PMID:27073838

  13. New Seasonal Shift in In-Stream Diurnal Nitrate Cycles Identified by Mining High-Frequency Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of in-situ monitoring devices, such as UV-spectrometers, makes the study of short-term stream chemistry variation relevant, especially the study of diurnal cycles, which are not yet fully understood. Our study is based on high-frequency data from an agricultural catchment (Studienlandschaft Schwingbachtal, Germany). We propose a novel approach, i.e. the combination of cluster analysis and Linear Discriminant Analysis, to mine from these data nitrate behavior patterns. As a result, we observe a seasonality of nitrate diurnal cycles, that differs from the most common cycle seasonality described in the literature, i.e. pre-dawn peaks in spring. Our cycles appear in summer and the maximum and minimum shift to a later time in late summer/autumn. This is observed both for water- and energy-limited years, thus potentially stressing the role of evapotranspiration. This concluding hypothesis on the role of evapotranspiration on nitrate stream concentration, which was obtained through data mining, broadens the perspective on the diurnal cycling of stream nitrate concentrations. PMID:27073838

  14. Evolution of High-Frequency Turbulence During Limit-Cycle Oscillations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, J. C.; Marinoni, A.; Davis, E. M.; Porkolab, M.; Burrell, K. H.

    2014-10-01

    Limit-cycle oscillations (LCO) can provide insight into the interplay between shear and turbulence in triggering the H-mode transition. The Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic on DIII-D is particularly sensitive to density fluctuations in the highly sheared flow in the H-mode/LCO edge due to sensitivity to finite radial wave number (kr ~kθ) and large bandwidth (10 kHz < f < 2 MHz). Each roughly 1 ms oscillation in the LCO (10s of ms) exhibits a period of highly Doppler shifted, highly sheared turbulence which terminates at a burst of low-f turbulence. As the Doppler backscattering (DBS) diagnostic records a gradual increase in fluctuation amplitude rather than a burst, the PCI signal can be explained by a sudden decrease in radial correlation length caused by a burst in zonal flows. Both diagnostics are consistent with results of 1D models. Comparison of LCOs of different durations reveals a threshold-like behavior in mean flow. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-94ER54235 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. How important is subsidence in evaluating high frequency cycles in the interior of isolated carbonate platforms?

    SciTech Connect

    Lomando, A.J.; Ginsburg, R.

    1995-08-01

    Differential regional subsidence can play a strong role in determining facies composition of adjacent isolated platforms. In the majority of platform oil & gas fields, reservoir architecture is dominated by the composition and stratial geometries in the platform interiors rather than the platform rims. Most work to develop analogues from modern reef-rimmed isolated platforms has focused on the platform margins where reef growths rates are capable of keeping pace with the Holocene sea level rise plus tectonic subsidence. We have focused on platform interiors where accumulation rate and style may be more sensitive to accommodation space generated by regional passive margin subsidence. The Belize platforms are located on a series of parallel ridges which extend progressively eastward, farther from the regional subsidence hingeline near the coast. Greater regional subsidence is reflected in the open, deeper, patch reef and sand rich platform interiors in the outermost platform (Lighthouse and Glovers Platform) in comparison to the mud-dominated interior within the innermost platform (Turneffe), which has filled up due to lesser subsidence rate. The facies response to a portion of a single eustatic cycle produces a {open_quotes}keep-up{close_quotes} transgressive systems tract appearance at Lighthouse and Glovers but a {open_quotes}choked-up{close_quotes} high stand or regressive systems tract appearance within Turneffe. Chinchorro Bank, offshore Yucatan, is a special case where subsidence changes along the length of the platforms. The entire windward margin has a well developed reef system which has uniformly kept pace with the Holocene transgression. The northern platform interior contains a patch reef/sand rich character similar to Lighthouse Platform whereas the southern platform interior is {open_quotes}drowning{close_quotes} due to subsidence along a series of northwest trending faults which downstep southward.

  16. Phase reduction of a limit cycle oscillator perturbed by a strong amplitude-modulated high-frequency force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyragas, Kestutis; Novičenko, Viktor

    2015-07-01

    The phase reduction method for a limit cycle oscillator subjected to a strong amplitude-modulated high-frequency force is developed. An equation for the phase dynamics is derived by introducing a new, effective phase response curve. We show that if the effective phase response curve is everywhere positive (negative), then an entrainment of the oscillator to an envelope frequency is possible only when this frequency is higher (lower) than the natural frequency of the oscillator. Also, by using the Pontryagin maximum principle, we have derived an optimal waveform of the perturbation that ensures an entrainment of the oscillator with minimal power. The theoretical results are demonstrated with the Stuart-Landau oscillator and model neurons.

  17. Evidence of Increasing Acoustic Emissivity at High Frequency with Solar Cycle 23 in Sun-as-a-star Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.

    2009-09-16

    We used long high-quality unresolved (Sun-as-a-star observations) data collected by GOLF and VIRGO instruments on board the ESA/NASA SOHO satellite to investigate the amplitude variation with solar cycle 23 in the high-frequency band (5.7<{nu}<6.3 mHz). We found an enhancement of acoustic emissivity over the ascending phase of about 18{+-}3 in velocity observations and a slight enhancement of 3{+-}2 in intensity. Mode conversion from fast acoustic to fast magneto-acoustic waves could explain the enhancement in velocity observations. These findings open up the possibility to apply the same technique to stellar intensity data, in order to investigate stellar-magnetic activity.

  18. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  19. Interpreting Organic Carbon Cycling from High-Frequency Stream FDOM, Turbidity, and CO2 Measurements at the USGS WEBB Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Saraceno, J.; Pellerin, B. A.; Dornblaser, M.; Clow, D. W.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Walker, J. F.; Aiken, G.

    2013-12-01

    At the five forested and/or alpine headwater sites of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program, we measure fluorescing dissolved organic matter (FDOM), turbidity, and dissolved CO2 at high frequency with in-stream sensors. Goals of this effort are to compute accurate stream fluxes of DOC, POC, and CO2 and compare them to conventional sample-based approaches, as well as to exploit the variability in the signals - over temporal scales from event to season - to infer processes controlling these carbon phases in the watershed and the stream. We take discrete samples over a range of hydrologic conditions to verify the field measurements and test the proxy power of FDOM for DOC, and turbidity for POC. After correcting FDOM for water temperature, turbidity, and the inner filter effect (attenuation of signal by DOC itself), field and laboratory FDOM values agree closely and DOC-FDOM and POC-turbidity relations typically have an r2 > 0.9. We will present four examples of interpretation: (1) Diurnal cycles of FDOM occur during the cold-water snowmelt period before canopy leafout, underscoring the importance of light to stimulate algal and microbial activity; (2) The nature of hysteresis in the FDOM-stream discharge relation (e.g. size and direction of hysteretic loop) can reveal DOM sources and travel times within the catchment/stream system; (3) Seasonal FDOM patterns reveal the shifting importance of flushing in spring versus new production in summer and especially autumn (leaf fall); and (4) Event and seasonal shifts in stream CO2 concentrations suggest shifts in relative contributions from discrete zones within the shallow aquifer.

  20. The effective Q values inferred from the high-frequency decay parameter for the sediments in Taipei basin, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Wey; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Chang, Chi-Ling; Liu, Sheu-Yien

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the high-frequency decay parameter κ, proposed by Anderson and Hough (1984), are measured from the seismograms recorded by stations, which installed in the Taipei basin. The spectral amplitudes decay exponentially with frequency, f, which can be formulated as A(f)=A_0e‑πκf, for f > fe, where A(f) is the spectral amplitude, and A0 depends on the earthquake source and epicenter distance, and the value of κ is independent of frequency, unit in second. The time windows applied to seismograms are suggested to be shear waves that are transformed to spectra by the technique of Fourier transform. The seismograms from the downhole array in Taipei Basin by Academia Sinica since 1992, provide a good opportunity to estimate the attenuation factor of the sedimentary strata over the Tertiary base rock beneath the Taipei basin (Wang et al., 2004). The seismograms of 23 earthquakes with magnitude ranges of 5.1-7.1 over the period of 2003-2010 at 9 downhole array stations are taken into calculation of the κ values for the shear waves. The results show that the κ values vary with depth and are in the range of 0.009-0.095 sec. The averaged Δκ values from observations range +/- 0.02 seconds respective to Δκ values at surface of each of station. The effective Q values for the sedimentary layers are inferred from the varied Δκ at each downhole stations following the evaluation method of 1-D analytical transfer function (Safak, 1995).

  1. Temporal Variability and Annual Fluxes of Water, Sediment and Particulate Phosphorus from a Headwater River in the Tropical Andes: Results from a High-frequency Monitoring Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemple, B. C.; Schloegel, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Mazar River Project, a high-frequency hydrological monitoring program, aims to generate ecohydrological information to inform watershed management in high-mountain areas of southern Ecuador. Rapid development of hydropower, accompanied by new and improved road networks, has resulted in swift changes in land-use and land cover in Ecuador's tropical Andes, all of which underscore the need for detailed information on flow and sediment production from these river systems. National and regional payment for the protection of ecosystem services (PES) programs seek to target critical areas, such as these, for watershed conservation, but are often informed by minimal information on sustainable flows and impacts of land use activities. As part of a program to inform conservation and sustainable water management in the region, we established a hydrological monitoring station in southern Ecuador on the Mazar River, a tributary of the Paute River Basin, situated on the eastern Andean cordillera. The station is equipped with sensors to continuously monitor stream stage and turbidity and an automated sampler for event-based collection of stream water samples, providing high frequency data that reduces the uncertainty of observations. Here, we report observations of continuous runoff and turbidity over the first year of observation, present relationships between turbidity and concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) and total particulate phosphorus (TP), and provide estimates of annual loads of TSS and TP. Runoff was highly variable over the monitoring period with flows ranging from less than 3 m3/s during baseflow to nearly 80 m3/s during the flood of record. During measured storm events, TSS exceeded 1000 mg/l with maximum measured concentrations exceeding 13 g/l during storm peaks. Turbidity was highly correlated with TSS, which was in turn highly correlated with TP, providing a robust data set for load estimation. We compare our results to other montane rivers in the

  2. Pt/C catalyst degradation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to high-frequency potential cycling induced by switching power converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Koji

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are operated using switching power converters that produce high-frequency ripple currents. These ripples cause high-frequency potential cycling of cells, which is believed to lead premature deterioration in the electrochemical surface area (ECA) of Pt/C catalysts. The qualitative relationship between ECA losses and the frequency of potential cycling was investigated in the range of 1 Hz to 1 kHz. For frequencies higher than 100 Hz, ECA losses were comparable with those at the potential hold condition. However, for lower frequencies, ECA decreased significantly with decreasing frequency. TEM observations showed that there was marked Pt particle growth for the 1-Hz cycling condition, whereas particle size distributions at 100 Hz and potential hold conditions were comparable. The currents associated with Pt oxidation and reduction during potential cycling were also investigated at various potentials and frequencies, and the charges associated with Pt loss (Δ Q) were determined by integrating the measured current. A correlation between the ECA trend and Δ Q was observed. The results obtained in this study are considered informative for electrical engineering research, because it relates to the design of switching power converters that do not negatively influence the Pt/C catalyst durability.

  3. Relevance of different spectral techniques to describe estuarine suspended sediment dynamics based on a high-frequency, long-term turbidity dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalón Rojas, Isabel; Schmidt, Sabine; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Sediment dynamics in estuaries are complex and strongly variable over time scales ranging from seconds to years. Various forcings (turbulence, tides, river inflow, wind waves, morphological and climatic changes) may cause the temporal and spatial variability of suspended sediment (SS) concentrations. The evaluation of these SS dynamics by in-situ measurements have traditionally faced three difficulties: (1) the quantification of low-frequency variability that requires continuous measures over long time periods; (2) inevitable gaps in data limiting the post-processing; (3) the need for recording other environmental variables in the same period and at a coherent sampling frequency. To record a high-frequency and long-term turbidity dataset, an automatic monitoring network (MAGEST) has been implemented in the Gironde estuary, a macrotidal and highly turbid system in the South-West France, in 2004. This 10-year turbidity time series is rather unique in European estuaries, enabling the evaluation of SS dynamics at all the significant time scales in one single analysis of the dataset. To achieve this, several methodologies of data analysis using different approaches are available, but their relevance, especially for the more recently developed ones, is almost unexplored. In this work, we present the test of four spectral techniques to the analysis of a high-frequency turbidity time series of an estuary such as the Gironde, to discuss advantages and limitations of each method. We compare the Power Spectral Analysis (PSA), the Singular Spectral Analysis (SSA), the Wavelet Transform (WT) and the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Advantages and limitations of each method are evaluated on the basis of five criteria: efficiency for incomplete time series, appropriateness for time-varying analysis, ability to recognize processes without the need of complementary environmental variables, capacity to calculate the relative importance of processes, and capacity to identify long

  4. High-power high-frequency-induced Langmuir turbulence in the smooth ionosphere at Arecibo. II. Low duty cycle, altitude-resolved, observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, P. Y.; Sulzer, M. P.; DuBois, D. F.; Russell, D. A.

    2001-03-01

    This is the second of two papers comprising a theoretical and observational study of new, altitude-resolved, observations at Arecibo of Langmuir turbulence induced in the ionosphere by a new, more powerful, high frequency heater operated at very low duty cycles. Altitude resolution of 150 m in incoherent scatter radar spectra is made possible by the coded-long-pulse method. Here we present the first observation at Arecibo of the well-developed parametric decay instability and the Langmuir decay instability cascade features in the Thomson scatter radar power spectrum, of the plasma line, at the unmodified matching altitudes under near-cold start conditions. The dependence of the plasma line spectra on altitude, pump power, and density scale length have been studied. The temporal growth and saturation of the spectra during heating and the decay of the spectra in the afterglow of heating has also been studied in detail. Comparisons are made here with the theoretical predictions of the companion paper I [DuBois , Phys. Plasmas 8, 791 (2001)]. From these comparisons and a comparison with recent observations at both Arecibo and Tromso, we conclude that all the predictions of modern Langmuir turbulence theory for the radar spectral signatures of the turbulence in a smooth ionosphere have now been verified.

  5. TRANSIENT BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND SEDIMENT OXYGEN DEMAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Through this research, the effects of variable sediment accumulation and oxygen concentration on SOD and soluble chemical fluxes will be quantified. This study will enable correct estimates of “diffuser-induced” SOD to be made that will facilitate appropriate desig...

  6. High frequency peritidal cycles of the upper Araras Group: Implications for disappearance of the neoproterozoic carbonate platform in southern Amazon Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitzki, Isaac Daniel; Romero, Guilherme Raffaeli; Hidalgo, Renata; Nogueira, Afonso Cesar Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    The Araras Group is an extensive carbonate platform developed at the southeastern margin of the Amazon Craton during the Neoproterozoic. The Nobres Formation corresponds to the upper unit of the Neoproterozoic Araras Group. It is exposed in road cuts and quarries in the Northern Paraguay Belt, and is characterized by meter-scale shallowing upward cycles. Forty-four fourth-to fifth-order parasequence cycles are enclosed into three third order sequences/megacycles, unconformably overlain by siliciclastic deposits of the Alto Paraguay Group. The cycles are generally of peritidal type, limited by exposure surfaces composed of asymmetrical tidal flat/sabkha lithofacies in the basal Nobres Formation. They consist of fine dolostone, intraclastic dolostones with megaripples, stromatolites biostrome, sandy dolostone with enterolithic structures and silicified evaporite molds. Upsection, the cycles progressively become symmetrical, comprising arid tidal flat deposits with abundant stromatolite biostrome, fine-grained sandstone and rare evaporitic molds. The stacking patterns for hundreds of meters indicate continuous and recurrent generation of accommodation space, probably triggered by subsidence concomitant with relative sea-level changes. Palynomorphs found in the upper part of Nobres Formation comprehend spheroidal forms, such as Leiospharidia, rare filamentous and acanthomorphous acritarchs, mostly Tanarium correlated to the Ediacaran Complex Acantomorph Palynoflora of ˜580-570 Ma. Previous data of carbon isotopes and paleogeographic reconstructions, and also the presence of evaporites and storm-influenced deposits in the Araras Group, suggest a wet to tropical setting for Amazonia during the Mid-Ediacaran, which is incompatible with previous claims for Gaskiers-related glacial sedimentation in the region. During the final stages of evolution of the Araras carbonate platform, a progressive input of terrigenous has occurred in the peritidal setting likely due tectonic

  7. Sulfur and carbon cycling in organic-rich marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Nearshore, continental shelf, and slope sediments are important sites of microbially mediated carbon and sulfur cycling. Marine geochemists investigated the rates and mechanisms of cycling processes in these environments by chemical distribution studies, in situ rate measurements, and steady state kinetic modeling. Pore water chemical distributions, sulfate reduction rates, and sediment water chemical fluxes were used to describe cycling on a ten year time scale in a small, rapidly depositing coastal basin, Cape Lookout Bight, and at general sites on the upper continental slope off North Carolina, U.S.A. In combination with 210 Pb sediment accumulation rates, these data were used to establish quantitative carbon and sulfur budgets as well as the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methanogeneis as the last steps in the degradation of organic matter.

  8. Manganese cycles in Arctic marine sediments - Climate signals or diagenesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    März, C.; Stratmann, A.; Eckert, S.; Schnetger, B.; Brumsack, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    In comparison to sediments from other parts of the world ocean, the inorganic geochemistry of Arctic Ocean sediments is poorly investigated. However, marked light to dark brown layers are well-known features of Quaternary Arctic sediments, and have been related to variable Mn contents. Brown layers represent intervals relatively rich in Mn (often > 1 wt.%), while yellowish-greyish intervals contain less Mn. As these brown layers are widespread in pelagic Quaternary deposits of the Arctic Ocean, there are attempts to use them as stratigraphic, age-equivalent marker horizons that are genetically related to global climate changes (e.g. Jakobsson et al., 2000; Löwemark et al., 2008). In the Arctic Ocean, other conventional stratigraphic methods often fail, therefore the use of Mn-rich layers as a chemostratigraphic tool seems to be a promising approach. However, several inorganic-geochemical and modelling studies of Mn cycles in the Arctic as well as in other parts of the world ocean have shown that multiple Mn layers in marine sediments can be created by non-steady state diagenetic processes, i.e. secondary Mn redistribution in the sediment due to microbially mediated dissolution-reprecipitation reactions (e.g. Li et al., 1969; Gobeil et al., 1997; Burdige, 2006; Katsev et al., 2006). Such biogeochemical processes can lead to rapid migration or fixation of redox boundaries in the sediment, resulting in the formation or (partial) destruction of metal-rich layers several thousands of years after sediment deposition. As this clearly would alter primary paleoenvironmental signals recorded in the sediments, we see an urgent need to unravel the real stratigraphic potential of Arctic Mn cycles before they are readily established as standard tools. For this purpose, we are studying Mn cycles in Arctic Ocean sediments recovered during R/V Polarstern expedition ARK XXIII/3 on the Mendeleev Ridge (East Siberian Sea). First results of pore water and sediment composition

  9. Effects of sediments on the reproductive cycle of corals.

    PubMed

    Jones, R; Ricardo, G F; Negri, A P

    2015-11-15

    Dredging, river plumes and natural resuspension events can release sediments into the water column where they exert a range of effects on underlying communities. In this review we examine possible cause-effect pathways whereby light reduction, elevated suspended sediments and sediment deposition could affect the reproductive cycle and early life histories of corals. The majority of reported or likely effects (30+) were negative, including a suite of previously unrecognized effects on gametes. The length of each phase of the life-cycle was also examined together with analysis of water quality conditions that can occur during a dredging project over equivalent durations, providing a range of environmentally relevant exposure scenarios for future testing. The review emphasizes the need to: (a) accurately quantify exposure conditions, (b) identify the mechanism of any effects in future studies, and (c) recognize the close interlinking of proximate factors which could confound interpretation of studies. PMID:26384866

  10. Iron cycling microbial communities in sediments of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Carolina; Delwig, Olaf; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz; Dähnke, Kirstin; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2014-05-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of iron is a key early diagenetic process. However, limited information exists about the diversity and metabolic pathways of microorganisms linked to iron cycling in marine sediments. The goal of this study was to determine the bacterial community diversity in sediments showing ongoing dissimilatory iron reduction using 454-pyrosequencing as a first step in characterizing microorganisms potentially involved in iron reduction. For this purpose, two 35 cm cores were sampled from ferruginous sediments in the Skagerrak (SK) and the Bothnian Bay (BB) from the North-Sea Baltic Sea and the northern Baltic Sea respectively. Pore water profiles showed Fe2+ and Mn2+ levels of ~140-150 µM throughout the core below a 6 cm thick oxidized surface layer in SK sediments and ~300 µM below a 2 cm thick surface layer in BB sediments. Dissolved sulphide levels were below detection in both sediments. No significant depletion of SO42- occurred at both sites, further supported by stable S and O isotope analyses of dissolved sulfate at SK site. Only very minor net sulfate reduction is suggested here from the trend in sulphur isotope signatures, in agreement with previously reported gross microbial sulphate rate measurements (Canfield et al., 1993;GCA). Based on these biogeochemical constraints, Fe reduction in the studied sediments is therefore dominated by microbial dissimilatory iron reduction, while cryptic Fe-S-cycling can be largely excluded. 16S rRNA gene sequences indicate Proteobacteria as the dominating microbial group in these sediments. Potential iron and manganese reducing bacteria included Geobacteraceae, Pelobacteraceae, Shewanellaceae, and Oceanospirillales. Additionally, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were present. Also, Fe-oxidizers were present and their occurrence correlated in depth with a Fe-oxide-rich layer, most likely a former buried Fe-oxidation front. Gene sequences point to the presence of Mariprofundus in SK sediments and

  11. SULFUR CYCLING IN THALASSIA TESTUDINUM SEAGRASS BED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quarles, Robert L., Jessica A. Rivord and Richard Devereux. In press. Sulfur Cycling in Thalassia testudinum Seagrass Bed Sediments (Abstract). To be presented at the SWS/GERS Fall Joint Society Meeting: Communication and Collaboration: Coastal Systems of the Gulf of Mexico and S...

  12. Self-sedimentation of fossil phytoplankton blooms, laminated hemipelagic sediments and the oceanic carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.A.; Lange, C.B.

    1996-12-31

    The flux of phytoplankton-derived organic carbon from the surface ocean to the deep sea and underlying sediments is a nonuniform process that significantly impacts biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric pCO{sub 2} / O{sub 2} and organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. Some marine phytoplankton actively drive the sedimentation process by the formation of sticky transparent gels which facilitate aggregation, rapid sinking and efficient export flux. Here we present fossil evidence of unfragmented, low-diversity phytoplankton assemblages preserved as sedimentary laminations and as preserved aggregates that are attributable to a similar phytoplankton-driven sedimentary mechanism, here termed {open_quotes}self-sedimentation{close_quotes}. Heterogeneities in the texture and/or composition of sediment supply are necessary for the production of laminatedhemipelagic sediments; the absence of hydraulic and biological reworking permits preservation of these sedimentary laminae. Distinctly-laminated core intervals are characterized by large compositional contrasts between adjacent laminae; many such high-bimodality couplets are attributable to self-sedimentation of phytoplankton blooms. Self-sedimentation propels the formation of some conspicuous hemipelagic sedimentary laminations and results in efficient carbon and opal flux to the sediments. These records suggest that phytoplankton-mediated changes in the efficiency of the biological carbon pump may govern many accumulations of organic-rich hydrocarbon source rock as well as many abrupt changes in atmospheric pCO{sub 2} and climate.

  13. Self-sedimentation of fossil phytoplankton blooms, laminated hemipelagic sediments and the oceanic carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.A. ); Lange, C.B. )

    1996-01-01

    The flux of phytoplankton-derived organic carbon from the surface ocean to the deep sea and underlying sediments is a nonuniform process that significantly impacts biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric pCO[sub 2] / O[sub 2] and organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. Some marine phytoplankton actively drive the sedimentation process by the formation of sticky transparent gels which facilitate aggregation, rapid sinking and efficient export flux. Here we present fossil evidence of unfragmented, low-diversity phytoplankton assemblages preserved as sedimentary laminations and as preserved aggregates that are attributable to a similar phytoplankton-driven sedimentary mechanism, here termed [open quotes]self-sedimentation[close quotes]. Heterogeneities in the texture and/or composition of sediment supply are necessary for the production of laminatedhemipelagic sediments; the absence of hydraulic and biological reworking permits preservation of these sedimentary laminae. Distinctly-laminated core intervals are characterized by large compositional contrasts between adjacent laminae; many such high-bimodality couplets are attributable to self-sedimentation of phytoplankton blooms. Self-sedimentation propels the formation of some conspicuous hemipelagic sedimentary laminations and results in efficient carbon and opal flux to the sediments. These records suggest that phytoplankton-mediated changes in the efficiency of the biological carbon pump may govern many accumulations of organic-rich hydrocarbon source rock as well as many abrupt changes in atmospheric pCO[sub 2] and climate.

  14. Geochemical Evidence of Cryptic Sulfur Cycling in Salt Marsh Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, J. V.; Antler, G.; Turchyn, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    In modern marine and marginal marine sediments, bacterial sulfate reduction dominates the subsurface oxidation of organic carbon due to the abundance of sulfate in many surface environments. While bacterial sulfate reduction may control anaerobic organic carbon oxidation, there is increasing evidence that iron redox chemistry may be intimately linked to sulfur redox chemistry in the anoxic subsurface, with iron species acting as catalysts or electron shuttles for the microbial use of sulfur, and vice versa. We use stable isotope and geochemical techniques to explore the coupling of the iron and sulfur cycles in salt marsh sediments in North Norfolk, UK. Unique among previously studied environments, these sediments contain high concentrations of both sulfate (20-40mM) and ferrous iron (1-3mM). High ferrous iron concentrations require extended regions of bacterial iron reduction. Within these zones of iron reduction we would predict no sulfate reduction, and lack of change in sulfur isotopes and no loss of sulfate suggest that there is no net sulfate reduction in this zone. However, coincident with the increase in ferrous iron concentrations, the δ18Osulfate exhibits significant increases of up to 5‰. The decoupling of the sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate is suggestive of a cryptic sulfur cycle in which sulfate is reduced to an intermediate valence state sulfur species and subsequently reoxidized to sulfate; this cycle must by quasi-quantitative to produce the suite of geochemical observations. We further explore the nature of this cycling through a series of batch reactor incubation experiments. When sediments are incubated in 18O-enriched water, significant shifts (>15‰) in the δ18Osulfate are observed with no corresponding shift in sulfur isotopes. This provides direct evidence that microbial assemblages in these salt marsh sediments facilitate a cryptic cycling of sulfur, potentially mediated by iron species in the zone of iron reduction. We contrast

  15. Sediment flux modeling: Simulating nitrogen, phosphorus, and silica cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Jeremy M.; Brady, Damian C.; Di Toro, Dominic M.; Boynton, Walter R.; Cornwell, Jeffrey C.; Kemp, W. Michael

    2013-10-01

    Sediment-water exchanges of nutrients and oxygen play an important role in the biogeochemistry of shallow coastal environments. Sediments process, store, and release particulate and dissolved forms of carbon and nutrients and sediment-water solute fluxes are significant components of nutrient, carbon, and oxygen cycles. Consequently, sediment biogeochemical models of varying complexity have been developed to understand the processes regulating porewater profiles and sediment-water exchanges. We have calibrated and validated a two-layer sediment biogeochemical model (aerobic and anaerobic) that is suitable for application as a stand-alone tool or coupled to water-column biogeochemical models. We calibrated and tested a stand-alone version of the model against observations of sediment-water flux, porewater concentrations, and process rates at 12 stations in Chesapeake Bay during a 4-17 year period. The model successfully reproduced sediment-water fluxes of ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), and dissolved silica (Si(OH)4 or DSi) for diverse chemical and physical environments. A root mean square error (RMSE)-minimizing optimization routine was used to identify best-fit values for many kinetic parameters. The resulting simulations improved the performance of the model in Chesapeake Bay and revealed (1) the need for an aerobic-layer denitrification formulation to account for NO3- reduction in this zone, (2) regional variability in denitrification that depends on oxygen levels in the overlying water, (3) a regionally-dependent solid-solute PO43- partitioning that accounts for patterns in Fe availability, and (4) a simplified model formulation for DSi, including limited sorption of DSi onto iron oxyhydroxides. This new calibration balances the need for a universal set of parameters that remain true to biogeochemical processes with site-specificity that represents differences in physical conditions. This stand-alone model can be rapidly executed on a

  16. Life cycle assessment for dredged sediment placement strategies.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew E; Fox-Lent, Cate; Seymour, Linda; Wender, Ben A; Linkov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Dredging to maintain navigable waterways is important for supporting trade and economic sustainability. Dredged sediments are removed from the waterways and then must be managed in a way that meets regulatory standards and properly balances management costs and risks. Selection of a best management alternative often results in stakeholder conflict regarding tradeoffs between local environmental impacts associated with less expensive alternatives (e.g., open water placement), more expensive measures that require sediment disposal in constructed facilities far away (e.g., landfills), or beneficial uses that may be perceived as risky (e.g., beach nourishment or island creation). Current sediment-placement decisions often focus on local and immediate environmental effects from the sediment itself, ignoring a variety of distributed and long-term effects from transportation and placement activities. These extended effects have implications for climate change, resource consumption, and environmental and human health, which may be meaningful topics for many stakeholders not currently considered. Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a systematic and quantitative method for accounting for this wider range of impacts and benefits across all sediment management project stages and time horizons. This paper applies a cradle-to-use LCA to dredged-sediment placement through a comparative analysis of potential upland, open water, and containment-island placement alternatives in the Long Island Sound region of NY/CT. Results suggest that, in cases dealing with uncontaminated sediments, upland placement may be the most environmentally burdensome alternative, per ton-kilometer of placed material, due to the emissions associated with diesel fuel combustion and electricity production and consumption required for the extra handling and transportation. These results can be traded-off with the ecosystem impacts of the sediments themselves in a decision-making framework. PMID:25553545

  17. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  18. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  19. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  20. Molybdenum Cycling in Upwelling Sediments: An Example from Namibian Margin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, G. L.; Goldhammer, T.; Formolo, M.; Brunner, B.; Ferdelman, T.

    2008-12-01

    The paleo-redox application of molybdenum (Mo) isotopes is strongly tied to our knowledge of the modern marine Mo cycle. Elemental mass balance indicates that ~47% of the Mo supplied to the oceans is removed to deep sea sediments, leaving the remaining Mo to "near-shore" reducing sediments (1). The Black Sea is likely the best studied reducing environment with regards to Mo isotopes, yet accounts for only a small fraction of the Mo mass balance. The accumulation of Mo in continental margin sediments has been recently re-assessed and may account for a larger fraction of the marine Mo reservoir than previously thought (2). In the presence of sulfide, the molybdate anion is transformed, by the replacement of oxygen with sulfur, to particle reactive oxy-thiomolybdates (3). This is often cited as the mechanism by which Mo removal proceeds in the Black Sea where sulfide concentrations in the water are high. In contrast, in continental margin settings, the removal mechanism is poorly understood, and the extent to which sulfur cycling plays a role remains un-quantified. To better understand removal/cycling processes in a continental margin setting, where sulfide may only be present in the pore waters and not in the water column, Mo was studied in an array of marine settings off the Namibian coast. Surface sediments were collected across a transect from near-shore/high productivity to deep water/low productivity sediments. These sediments were incubated in bag experiments to study the relationship between sulfur and Mo cycling. Molybdenum concentrations in the Namibian sediments range from detrital values at the lowest productivity site to 25 ppm in surface sediments with high productivity. Preliminary results allude to a correlation between sulfate reduction rates and Mo accumulation in these sediments. Detailed studies of Mo, Mo isotopes, other trace metals, and sulfur investigations from both sediment cores and bag experiments will be presented. (1)Bertine and Turekian

  1. Working memory impairment in calcineurin knock-out mice is associated with alterations in synaptic vesicle cycling and disruption of high-frequency synaptic and network activity in prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Jeffrey R; Levenson, Jonathan M; Kim, Sung Hyun; Gibson, Helen E; Richardson, Kristen A; Sivula, Michael; Li, Bing; Ashford, Crystle J; Heindl, Karen A; Babcock, Ryan J; Rose, David M; Hempel, Chris M; Wiig, Kjesten A; Laeng, Pascal; Levin, Margaret E; Ryan, Timothy A; Gerber, David J

    2013-07-01

    Working memory is an essential component of higher cognitive function, and its impairment is a core symptom of multiple CNS disorders, including schizophrenia. Neuronal mechanisms supporting working memory under normal conditions have been described and include persistent, high-frequency activity of prefrontal cortical neurons. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of working memory dysfunction in the context of neuropsychiatric disorders. To elucidate synaptic and neuronal mechanisms of working memory dysfunction, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of a mouse model of schizophrenia, the forebrain-specific calcineurin knock-out mouse. Biochemical analyses of cortical tissue from these mice revealed a pronounced hyperphosphorylation of synaptic vesicle cycling proteins known to be necessary for high-frequency synaptic transmission. Examination of the synaptic vesicle cycle in calcineurin-deficient neurons demonstrated an impairment of vesicle release enhancement during periods of intense stimulation. Moreover, brain slice and in vivo electrophysiological analyses showed that loss of calcineurin leads to a gene dose-dependent disruption of high-frequency synaptic transmission and network activity in the PFC, correlating with selective working memory impairment. Finally, we showed that levels of dynamin I, a key presynaptic protein and calcineurin substrate, are significantly reduced in prefrontal cortical samples from schizophrenia patients, extending the disease relevance of our findings. Our data provide support for a model in which impaired synaptic vesicle cycling represents a critical node for disease pathologies underlying the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:23825400

  2. Manganese, iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereux, Richard; Lehrter, John C.; Beddick, David L.; Yates, Diane F.; Jarvis, Brandon M.

    2015-05-01

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cycling in the region. Sedimentary manganese, iron, and sulfur cycling were investigated on the LCS using a combined chemical analysis and sediment diagenesis modeling approach. Three stations situated 320 km across the LCS along the 20 m isobath were sampled up to five times between the spring of 2006 and summer of 2007. Bottom water oxygen levels at the stations ranged from 203 mmol m-3 in spring to 2.5 mmol m-3 in summer. Porewater Mn and Fe2+ concentrations (up to 275 and 300 μmol L-1, respectively), sulfate reduction rates (1.0-8.4 mmol m-2 d-1), and the fraction of total oxalate extracted iron obtained as Fe(II) (0.25-0.52) differed between station and season. Sediments at station Z02 on the eastern LCS, south of Terrebonne Bay, had higher organic matter content and sulfate reduction rates than sediments at Z03, 160 km further west. Sulfate reduction rates were higher in summer than spring at station Z02 but not at Z03 where porewater Mn and Fe concentrations were highest in summer. Porewater Fe2+ concentrations, solid phase oxalate-extractable Fe concentrations, and sediment incubation experiments suggested iron reduction at Z03 may account for 20% or more of organic carbon remineralization. LCS Fe(III) concentrations decreased and sulfate reduction rates increased in model simulations by lowering interfacial dissolved oxygen levels and increasing the rates of organic matter deposited on the sediment surface. Results from this study demonstrate that LCS sedimentary metal oxide cycling may be more important in organic carbon mineralization pathways than previously recognized.

  3. Arctic ocean sediment texture and the Pleistocene climate cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Morris, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Arctic Ocean sediment texture accurately reflects the Plio-Pleistocene climate cycle. The precision of paleoclimate interpretation is improved when deglaciation is recognized as a distinct climate stage, overlapping both glacial and interglacial stages, and for the later Pleistocene, perhaps never completed. Oxygen isotope stratigraphy and foraminifera productivity are out of phase but can be understood in the context of the transitional nature of the glacial, deglacial and interglacial climate stages of the Arctic Ocean.

  4. Ni cycling in mangrove sediments from New Caledonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Vincent; Morin, Guillaume; Juillot, Farid; Marchand, Cyril; Brest, Jessica; Bargar, John R.; Muñoz, Manuel; Marakovic, Grégory; Ardo, Sandy; Brown, Gordon E.

    2015-11-01

    sediment layers. Ni-incorporation in pyrite is especially observed beneath an inland Avicennia stand where anoxic conditions are dominant. In contrast, beneath a Rhizophora stand closer to the ocean, where the redox cycle is intensified due to the tide cycle, partial re-oxidation of Ni-bearing pyrites favors nickel mobility, as confirmed by Ni-mass balance estimates and by higher Ni concentration in the pore waters. These findings have important environmental implications for better evaluating the protective role of mangroves against trace metal dispersion into marine ecosystems. They may also help in predicting the response of mangrove ecosystems to increasing anthropogenic pressure on coastal areas.

  5. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  6. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  7. Temporal variability of exchange between groundwater and surface water based on high-frequency direct measurements of seepage at the sediment-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Sheibley, Richard W.; Cox, Stephen E.; Simonds, Frederic W.; Naftz, David L.

    2013-05-01

    Seepage at the sediment-water interface in several lakes, a large river, and an estuary exhibits substantial temporal variability when measured with temporal resolution of 1 min or less. Already substantial seepage rates changed by 7% and 16% in response to relatively small rain events at two lakes in the northeastern USA, but did not change in response to two larger rain events at a lake in Minnesota. However, seepage at that same Minnesota lake changed by 10% each day in response to withdrawals from evapotranspiration. Seepage increased by more than an order of magnitude when a seiche occurred in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Near the head of a fjord in Puget Sound, Washington, seepage in the intertidal zone varied greatly from -115 to +217 cm d-1 in response to advancing and retreating tides when the time-averaged seepage was upward at +43 cm d-1. At all locations, seepage variability increased by one to several orders of magnitude in response to wind and associated waves. Net seepage remained unchanged by wind unless wind also induced a lake seiche. These examples from sites distributed across a broad geographic region indicate that temporal variability in seepage in response to common hydrological events is much larger than previously realized. At most locations, seepage responded within minutes to changes in surface-water stage and within minutes to hours to groundwater recharge associated with rainfall. Likely implications of this dynamism include effects on water residence time, geochemical transformations, and ecological conditions at and near the sediment-water interface.

  8. σ2-Adaptin Facilitates Basal Synaptic Transmission and Is Required for Regenerating Endo-Exo Cycling Pool Under High-Frequency Nerve Stimulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Saumitra Dey; Mushtaq, Zeeshan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Balakrishnan, Sruthi S; Thakur, Rajan S; Krishnan, Kozhalmannom S; Raghu, Padinjat; Ramaswami, Mani; Kumar, Vimlesh

    2016-05-01

    The functional requirement of adapter protein 2 (AP2) complex in synaptic membrane retrieval by clathrin-mediated endocytosis is not fully understood. Here we isolated and functionally characterized a mutation that dramatically altered synaptic development. Based on the aberrant neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapse, we named this mutation angur (a Hindi word meaning "grapes"). Loss-of-function alleles of angur show more than twofold overgrowth in bouton numbers and a dramatic decrease in bouton size. We mapped the angur mutation to σ2-adaptin, the smallest subunit of the AP2 complex. Reducing the neuronal level of any of the subunits of the AP2 complex or disrupting AP2 complex assembly in neurons phenocopied the σ2-adaptin mutation. Genetic perturbation of σ2-adaptin in neurons leads to a reversible temperature-sensitive paralysis at 38°. Electrophysiological analysis of the mutants revealed reduced evoked junction potentials and quantal content. Interestingly, high-frequency nerve stimulation caused prolonged synaptic fatigue at the NMJs. The synaptic levels of subunits of the AP2 complex and clathrin, but not other endocytic proteins, were reduced in the mutants. Moreover, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling was altered in these mutants and was restored by normalizing σ2-adaptin in neurons. Thus, our data suggest that (1) while σ2-adaptin facilitates synaptic vesicle (SV) recycling for basal synaptic transmission, its activity is also required for regenerating SVs during high-frequency nerve stimulation, and (2) σ2-adaptin regulates NMJ morphology by attenuating TGFβ signaling. PMID:26920756

  9. Tempo and scale of biogenic effects on high-frequency acoustic propagation near the marine sediment-water interface in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumars, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Organisms have natural scales, such as lifetimes, body sizes, frequencies of movement to new locations, and residence times of material in digestive systems, and each scale has potential implications for acoustic effects. The effects of groups of organisms, like organisms themselves, aggregate in space and time. This review, including an assortment of unpublished information, examines examples of such aggregations, many of them documented acoustically. Light synchronizes many activities. Macroscopic animals forage primarily under cover of darkness. This phasing applies both to animals that extend appendages above the sediment-water interface and to animals that leave the seabed at night. Whereas their bottom-modifying activities are concentrated in nocturnal or crepuscular fashion, the bottom-modifying activities of the visual feeders follow a different phasing and often dominate the rate of change in acoustic backscatter from the interface. Light also acts through its effects on primary production, often concentrated in a very thin surficial layer atop the seabed. The supersaturation of oxygen does, and microbubble nucleation may, result. Where tidal velocities are large, light-set patterns are often tidally modulated. Activities of animals living below the seabed, however, remain a mystery, whose primary hope for solution is acoustic. [Work supported by ONR and DEPSCoR.

  10. Linking soil and sediment properties for research on biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2013-04-01

    Conventional perspectives on soil erosion include the on-site damage to soil and reductions in crop yield, as well as the resulting off-site effects on water quality, runoff and sediment loads in rivers. Our evolving understanding of the Earth System has added a new dimension to the role of soil erosion within the global geochemical cycles. First, the relevance of soil as a nutrient and Carbon (C) pool was recognized. Initially, the role of soils in the global C cycle was largely considered to be limited to a vertical exchange of greenhouse house gases (GHG) between vegetation, soil and atmosphere and thus mostly studied by soil scientists, plant ecologists and climatologists. Even Critical Zone research focused mostly on weathering and regolith properties and ignored lateral fluxes of dissolved or particulate organic matter. Since the late 1990s, a wider role of soils in biogeochemical cycles has emerged. Recent estimates place the lateral movement of C between soil and sediment pools in terrestrial ecosystems (including rivers and lakes) at approximately 0.6 to 1.5 Gt per year. Some of the eroded C is replaced by photosynthesis from the atmosphere, but at a cost of additional emissions, for example due to fertilizer production. The long-term fate of the eroded and deposited soil organic matter is subject to an open debate and suffers from a lack of reliable spatial information on lateral C fluxes and its subsequent fate in terrestrial ecosystems. The connection between soil C pool, GHG emissions and erosion illustrates the relevance of surface processes for the C fluxes between Earth's spheres. Accordingly, soil is now considered as mobile system to make accurate predictions about the consequences of global change for terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks. This expanded perspective on soils as dynamic pool of weathering regolith, sediment, nutrients and C at the interface between the geospheres requires the analysis of relevant soil properties

  11. Linking Soil and Sediment Properties for research on Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.

    2012-04-01

    Conventional perspectives on soil erosion include the on-site damage to soil and reductions in crop yield, as well as the resulting off-site effects on water quality, runoff and sediment loads in rivers. Our evolving understanding of the Earth System has added a new dimension to the role of soil erosion within the global geochemical cycles. First, the relevance of soil as a nutrient and Carbon (C) pool was recognized. Initially, the role of soils in the global C cycle was largely considered to be limited to a vertical exchange of greenhouse house gases (GHG) between vegetation, soil and atmosphere and thus mostly studied by soil scientists, plant ecologists and climatologists. Even Critical Zone research focused mostly on weathering and regolith properties and ignored lateral fluxes of dissolved or particulate organic matter. Since the late 1990s, a wider role of soils in biogeochemical cycles has emerged. Recent estimates place the lateral movement of C between soil and sediment pools in terrestrial ecosystems (including rivers and lakes) at approximately 0.6 to 1.5 Gt per year. Some of the eroded C is replaced by photosynthesis from the atmosphere, but at a cost of additional emissions, for example due to fertilizer production. The long-term fate of the eroded and deposited soil organic matter is subject to an open debate and suffers from a lack of reliable spatial information on lateral C fluxes and its subsequent fate in terrestrial ecosystems. The connection between soil C pool, GHG emissions and erosion illustrates the relevance of surface processes for the C fluxes between Earth's spheres. Accordingly, soil is now considered as mobile system to make accurate predictions about the consequences of global change for terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks. This expanded perspective on soils as dynamic pool of weathering regolith, sediment, nutrients and C at the interface between the geospheres requires the analysis of relevant soil properties

  12. Resource quality affects carbon cycling in deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Daniel J; Thornton, Barry; Hay, Steve; Zuur, Alain F; Nicol, Graeme W; McWilliam, Jenna M; Witte, Ursula F M

    2012-09-01

    Deep-sea sediments cover ~70% of Earth's surface and represent the largest interface between the biological and geological cycles of carbon. Diatoms and zooplankton faecal pellets naturally transport organic material from the upper ocean down to the deep seabed, but how these qualitatively different substrates affect the fate of carbon in this permanently cold environment remains unknown. We added equal quantities of (13)C-labelled diatoms and faecal pellets to a cold water (-0.7 °C) sediment community retrieved from 1080 m in the Faroe-Shetland Channel, Northeast Atlantic, and quantified carbon mineralization and uptake by the resident bacteria and macrofauna over a 6-day period. High-quality, diatom-derived carbon was mineralized >300% faster than that from low-quality faecal pellets, demonstrating that qualitative differences in organic matter drive major changes in the residence time of carbon at the deep seabed. Benthic bacteria dominated biological carbon processing in our experiments, yet showed no evidence of resource quality-limited growth; they displayed lower growth efficiencies when respiring diatoms. These effects were consistent in contrasting months. We contend that respiration and growth in the resident sediment microbial communities were substrate and temperature limited, respectively. Our study has important implications for how future changes in the biochemical makeup of exported organic matter will affect the balance between mineralization and sequestration of organic carbon in the largest ecosystem on Earth. PMID:22378534

  13. Anaerobic Redox Cycling of Iron by Freshwater Sediment Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Karrie A.; Urrutia, Matilde M.; Churchill, Perry F.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2006-01-01

    The potential for microbially-mediated anaerobic redox cycling of iron (Fe) was examined in a first-generation enrichment culture of freshwater wetland sediment microorganisms. MPN enumerations revealed the presence of significant populations of Fe(III)-reducing (ca. 108 cells mL-1) and Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organisms (ca. 105 cells mL-1) in the sediment used to inoculate the enrichment cultures. Nitrate reduction commenced immediately following inoculation of acetate-containing (ca. 1 mM) medium with a small quantity (1% vol/vol) of wetland sediment, and resulted in the transient accumulation of NO2- and production of a mixture of end-products including NH4+. Fe(III) oxide (high surface area goethite) reduction took place - after NO3- was depleted and continued until all the acetate was utilized. Addition of NO3 after Fe(III) reduction ceased resulted in the immediate oxidation of Fe(II) coupled to reduction of + NO3-to NH4 . No significant NO2- accumulation was observed during nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. No Fe(II) oxidation occurred in pasteurized controls. Microbial community structure in the enrichment was monitored by DGGE analysis of PCR amplified 16s rDNA and RT-PCR amplified 16S rRNA, as well as by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries for four different time points during the experiment. Strong similarities in dominant members of the microbial community were observed in the Fe(III) reduction and nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation phases of the experiment, specifically the common presence of organisms closely related (= 95% sequence similarity) to the genera Geobacter and Dechloromonas. These results indicate that the wetland sediments contained organisms such as Geobacter sp. which are capable of both + dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction and oxidation of Fe(II) with reduction of NO3-reduction to NH4 . Our findings suggest that microbially-catalyzed nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation has the potential to contribute to a dynamic

  14. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  15. Characterizing seasonal variability of storm events based on very high frequency monitoring of hydrological and chemical variables: comparing patterns in hot spots and hot moments for nutrient and sediment export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, Ophelie; Thelusma, Gilbert; Humbert, Guillaume; Dupas, Rémi; Faucheux, Mikael; Gilliet, Nicolas; Hamon, Yannick; Jaffrezic, Anne; Grimaldi, Catherine; Gruau, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Storm events are critical hot moments of emission for several dissolved and particulate chemical species at major stake for water quality (e.g. dissolved organic carbon DOC, suspended sediments, phosphorus). During such events, the solutes or particles are exported from heterogeneous sources through various pathways to stream leading to specific integrated signals at the outlet characterized by very short dynamics. This is merely true in headwater catchments where the total duration of such events ranges over 10h to 3 days, with very quick variations in stream flow and concentrations at the outlet occurring in a few hours. Thus for investigating properly event processes, high frequency monitoring of flow and water quality is required. We analysed 103 storm events in a 5 km2 agricultural headwater catchment, part of the AgrHys Observatory, on the basis of a 3-year-long data set which combined meterological (Rainfall), hydrological (flow and piezometry), and water quality (turbidity, conductivity, DOC and NO3 concentrations) data recorded at very high frequencies (from 1 to 20 min) thanks to dedicated sensors. We proposed a range of quantitative storm descriptors for characterizing input (rainfall), antecedent and initial conditions (groundwater levels and saturated area), and stream response in terms of level and dynamics of flow (Q), groundwater levels, and concentrations (C) but also the C-Q relationships. Three intra annual periods have been previously defined for base flow dynamic according to shallow groundwater table variations so that they correspond to different connectivity status in the catchment. The seasonal and inter-annual variability of the storm events have been analysed using the descriptors and based on these predefined periods. Results show that the hydrological flowpaths and the consequent storm chemistry were controlled by the hydrological base flow regime rather than by the rain input characteristics. This highlights that the exports of NO3

  16. Carbon and nitrogen cycling in thermally heated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Burton, M.; Vennelakanti, S.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrothermally heated sediment environments, such as are found in abundance throughout Yellowstone National Park, host fully functional microbial ecosystems. As with any ecosystem, both sources and sinks of carbon, nitrogen, and a myriad of other nutrients and energy-driving factors must be supplied. While we know microbial communities in hydrothermal environments can be surprisingly diverse, we know little about basic ecological functions such as carbon and nitrogen cycling. Previous work has shown that carbon cycling in one hot spring in Yellowstone National Park [“Bison Pool”] and its associated runoff channel functions as a complex system. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in sediments and biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient at this location revealed that the four best studied carbon fixation pathways [Calvin, reverse tricarboxylic acid, acetyl-CoA, 3-hydroxypropionate cycles] may all be functioning in this system, and nitrogen fixation varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [1]. Microcosm experiments using biofilms from this hot spring as inoculae with 13C labeled carbon substrates indicate heterotrophic growth [2]. In addition, metagenomic analysis of environmental DNA has indicated the presence of genes involved in carbon fixation [both phototrophic and autotrophic], and heterotrophy, as well as nitrogen fixation [3]. Studies from other Yellowstone locations have also found genetic evidence for carbon and nitrogen fixation [4, 5]. Of particular interest is the role of individuals in carbon and nitrogen cycling as environmental conditions suitable for chemosynthetic and photosynthetic growth vary. This study explores the diversity of cbbM/cbbL [Calvin cycle], aclB/oor/porA [rTCA cycle], nifH [nitrogen fixation], nirK [nitrite reduction] and amoA [ammonia oxidation] genes across a variety of Yellowstone environments. The transition of genetic diversity within sediments and biofilms is focused on the chemosynthetic

  17. Nitrogen cycling in Hot Spring Sediments and Biofilms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Burton, M. S.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past several decades, gene-targeted analyses have revealed that microbial communities in hydrothermal environments can be surprisingly diverse. However, we know shockingly little about basic ecological functions such as carbon and nitrogen cycling or community shifts over time, or environmental parameters such as growth criteria. Previous work has shown that carbon cycling in one hot spring in Yellowstone National Park [“Bison Pool”] and its associated runoff channel functions as a complex system. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient at this location revealed that multiple autotrophic carbon fixation pathways are functioning in this system, and nitrogen fixation varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [1]. Further, sequencing of metagenomes from multiple locations at “Bison Pool” has indicated the presence of genes involved in carbon fixation [both phototrophic and autotrophic], and heterotrophy, as well as nitrogen fixation [2]. Studies from other Yellowstone locations have also found genetic evidence for carbon and nitrogen fixation [3-5]. The role of individual microbes in nitrogen cycling as environmental conditions vary over space and time is the focus of this study. Here, we explore the diversity of nifH [nitrogen fixation], nirK [nitrite reduction] and amoA [ammonia oxidation] genes across a variety of Yellowstone environments. Environmental nucleic acids were extracted, and the presence/absence of Bacteria and Archaea determined by PCR. In addition, PCR-directed screens reveal the presence or absence of the aforementioned functional genes, indicating genetic capacity for nitrogen cycling. We have examined the transition of genetic diversity and genetic capacity within sediments and biofilms at the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone in several hot springs spanning ranges of pH and geochemical conditions. By sampling across this ecotone, changes in the genetic

  18. Nitrogen cycling in different types of sediments from Danish waters

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, T.H.; Henridsen, K.

    1983-05-01

    Variations in sediment N:C ratios were correlated with water depth and season. /sup 14/NH/sub 4//sup +/ was used to measure the rates of NH/sub 4//sup +/ production (d) and incorporation into bacterial cells (i) in sediments from different stations, at different seasons. The validity of the rates d and i was indicated by the predicted correlation of d:i ratios with N:C ratios of the sediment, and the predicted N:C ratio at which net NH/sub 4//sup +/; pore water NH/sub 4//sup +/, flux of NH/sub 4//sup +/ from sediment, and flux of NH/sub 4//sup +/ into exchangeable pool. The NO/sub 3//sup -/ flux from sediment was correlated with nitrification rate and with season. Benthic infauna increased the flux of NH/sub 4//sup +/ from the sediment by 50%. The rates of transfer of nitrogen (NO/sub 3//sup -/, NH/sub 4//sup +/, N/sub 2/) from sediment to water were 44-66% of the net rates of organic nitrogen mineralization (d-i). Flux of NO/sub 3//sup -/ + NH/sub 4//sup +/ from the sediment could supply 30-82% of the nitrogen requirement of the planktonic primary producers.

  19. Influence of the submersed plant, Potamogeton perfoliatus, on nitrogen cycling in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caffrey, J.M.; Kemp, W.M.

    1993-01-01

    Using 15N isotope techniques P. perfoliatus is shown to have a significant influence on sediment N cycling by direct uptake of NH4+ and NO3- and by indirect mechanisms leading to enhanced nitrification and denitrification. -from Authors

  20. Biogeochemical Cycle of Methanol in Anoxic Deep-Sea Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Tani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoya; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Kano, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Yohey

    2016-01-01

    The biological flux and lifetime of methanol in anoxic marine sediments are largely unknown. We herein reported, for the first time, quantitative methanol removal rates in subsurface sediments. Anaerobic incubation experiments with radiotracers showed high rates of microbial methanol consumption. Notably, methanol oxidation to CO2 surpassed methanol assimilation and methanogenesis from CO2/H2 and methanol. Nevertheless, a significant decrease in methanol was not observed after the incubation, and this was attributed to the microbial production of methanol in parallel with its consumption. These results suggest that microbial reactions play an important role in the sources and sinks of methanol in subseafloor sediments. PMID:27301420

  1. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  2. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  3. The carbon cycle and biogeochemical dynamics in lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    The concentrations of organic carbon (OC) and CaCO3 in lake sediments are often inversely related. This relation occurs in surface sediments from different locations in the same lake, surface sediments from different lakes, and with depth in Holocene sediments. Where data on accumulation rates are available, the relation holds for organic carbon and CaCO3 accumulation rates as well. An increase of several percent OC is accompanied by a decrease of several tens of percent CaCO3 indicating that the inverse relation is not due to simple dilution of one component by another. It appears from core data that once the OC concentration in the sediments becomes greater than about 12%, the CO2 produced by decomposition of that OC and production of organic acids lowers the pH of anoxic pore waters enough to dissolve any CaCO3 that reaches the sediment-water interface. In a lake with a seasonally anoxic hypolimnion, processes in the water column also can produce an inverse relation between OC and CaCO3 over time. If productivity of the lake increases, the rain rate of OC from the epilimnion increases. Biogenic removal of CO2 and accompanying increase in pH also may increase the production of CaCO3. However, the decomposition of organic matter in the hypolimnion will decrease the pH of the hypolimnion causing greater dissolution of CaCO3 and therefore a decrease in the rain rate of CaCO3 to the sediment-water interface.

  4. The impact of electrogenic sulfide oxidation on elemental cycling and solute fluxes in coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous sulfide oxidizing cable bacteria are capable of linking the oxidation of free sulfide in deep anoxic layers of marine sediments to the reduction of oxygen or nitrate in surface sediments by conducting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Previous studies have shown that this newly discovered microbial process, referred to as electrogenic sulfide oxidation (e-SOx), may alter elemental cycling in sediments, but the nature and rates of the resulting biogeochemical transformations and their influence on benthic-pelagic coupling remain largely unknown. Here we quantify changes in sediment geochemistry and solute fluxes at the sediment-water interface as e-SOx develops and declines over time in laboratory incubations of organic-rich sediments from a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin (Marine Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands). Our results show that e-SOx enhanced sediment O2 consumption and acidified subsurface sediment, resulting in the dissolution of calcium carbonate and iron sulfide minerals in deeper sediment horizons and the associated accumulation of dissolved iron, manganese, and calcium in porewater. Remobilized Fe diffusing upward was reoxidized at the sediment-water interface, producing an amorphous Fe oxide crust, while dissolved Fe diffusing downward was reprecipitated in the form of FeS as it encountered the free sulfide horizon. The development of e-SOx enhanced the diffusive release of dissolved Mn at the sediment-water interface, capped the phosphate efflux, generated a buildup of organic matter in surface sediments, and strongly stimulated the release of alkalinity from the sediment. About 75% of this alkalinity production was associated with net CaCO3 dissolution, while the remaining 25% was attributed to a pumping mechanism that transfers alkalinity from anodic H2S oxidation (an alkalinity sink) in deeper sediments to cathodic O2 reduction (an alkalinity source) near the sediment-water interface. The resulting sediment alkalinity

  5. [Geochemical cycling of mercury in the sediment of Hongfeng Reservior].

    PubMed

    He, Tian-Rong; Feng, Xin-Bin; Guo, Yan-Na; Meng, Bo; Li, Zhong-Gen; Qiu, Guang-Le; Liang, Lian

    2008-07-01

    Spatial and temporal distributions of total and methyl mercury and controlling factors were investigated based on cold vapor atomic fluorescence detection. Total mercury levels in the whole sediments are (0.392 +/- 0.070) microg/g, without significant variations between different seasons, but generally increase toward the sediment-water interface. Total mercury levels are higher compared to data reported in other uncontaminated reservoirs and Wujiangdu Reservoir. This indicates there are mercury contaminations in Hongfeng Reservoir. Methyl mercury concentrations are highest in spring, without significant variations in other seasons. The peak values of methyl mercury typically appear in the upper 8 cm of the sediment profiles which are also the zones of sulfate-reducing bacteria activities. The seasonal variation and maximum peak value distributions of methyl mercury in sediment are mainly controlled by seasonally migration of oxic/anoxic boundary layer. Total mercury concentrations in the pore water and partition coefficients for THg in solid phase and water phase are mainly controlled by temperature or redox potential. Total mercury concentrations in the pore water have no relationship with total mercury concentrations in solid phase. However, the methyl mercury concentrations in the pore water have a strong relationship with those in solid phase (r = 0.70, p < 0.001). The methyl mercury concentrations in solid phase and pore water are controlled by solid/water partition coefficient, as well as methyl mercury production. PMID:18828352

  6. Viral activities and life cycles in deep subseafloor sediments.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Tim; Orsi, William D; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-12-01

    Viruses are highly abundant in marine subsurface sediments and can even exceed the number of prokaryotes. However, their activity and quantitative impact on microbial populations are still poorly understood. Here, we use gene expression data from published continental margin subseafloor metatranscriptomes to qualitatively assess viral diversity and activity in sediments up to 159 metres below seafloor (mbsf). Mining of the metatranscriptomic data revealed 4651 representative viral homologues (RVHs), representing 2.2% of all metatranscriptome sequence reads, which have close translated homology (average 77%, range 60-97% amino acid identity) to viral proteins. Archaea-infecting RVHs are exclusively detected in the upper 30 mbsf, whereas RVHs for filamentous inoviruses predominate in the deepest sediment layers. RVHs indicative of lysogenic phage-host interactions and lytic activity, notably cell lysis, are detected at all analysed depths and suggest a dynamic virus-host association in the marine deep biosphere studied here. Ongoing lytic viral activity is further indicated by the expression of clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat-associated cascade genes involved in cellular defence against viral attacks. The data indicate the activity of viruses in subsurface sediment of the Peruvian margin and suggest that viruses indeed cause cell mortality and may play an important role in the turnover of subseafloor microbial biomass. PMID:26109514

  7. Enzymatic assays of sediments from North Pond (IODP Expedition 336) to elucidate microbial phosphorus cycling strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defforey, D.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a key macronutrient for living cells and its availability is limited in the deep subseafloor environment, a habitat estimated to contain up to 1% of Earth's total biomass. The existence and activity of deep subseafloor microbial populations have profound implications on global biogeochemical cycles and our understanding of the limits of life. However, little is known about the impact of the deep biosphere on sedimentary P cycling and P diagenetic processes. Our previous work has shown that sedimentary P at North Pond is mainly present in mineral phases, and that refractory organic P is detectable throughout the sediment column. The latter could constitute a P source to the deep biosphere. Alternatively, microorganisms could have mechanisms to harvest P from recalcitrant mineral phases. The aim of this study is to determine the presence and maximum potential activity of enzymes involved in microbial P uptake in deep-sea sediments. These include phosphomonoesterases, such as alkaline phosphatase, phosphodiesterases, pyrophosphatase and phosphonatases. The sediment samples used for this study were collected at North Pond, a sediment pond located on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, during IODP Expedition 336. This work will provide key insights into the microbial P uptake mechanisms at play in open ocean sediments, and their effects on sedimentary P cycling. These results, in conjunction with our previous work investigating P geochemistry at North Pond, will yield valuable information regarding the impact of the deep biosphere on P cycling in open ocean sediments.

  8. The Effect of Sediment Disturbance on the Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles Within Coastal Marine Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, A. R.; Wilson, S. R.; Jolley, D. F.

    2006-12-01

    A system allowing the ex situ quantification of the nitrogen cycle and various carbonaceous species (Organic Carbon, carbon dioxide, methane) in the air, water and sediment has been developed and used to monitor the effects of sediment disturbance on the nitrogen and carbon cycles. Measurements are made using standard wet chemical techniques for the sediment and water phases, and FTIR spectroscopy for the real-time monitoring of gas concentrations. Sediment collected from two temperate marine lakes on the eastern coast of Australia has been examined. In the laboratory it was found that the methane flux peaked three days after the initial disturbance; nitrous oxide flux peaked after 12 days while carbon dioxide flux varied throughout the experiment. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in the overlying water peaked at the end of the second and third weeks, respectively. The total quantity of nitrogen within the system increased by ~ 35%. Sediment disturbance led to an initial release of nitrogenous nutrients from the sediment to the overlying water that were rapidly readsorbed to sediment particles and sequestered back into the sediment phase. The same technology was also adapted to allow this research to be undertaken in the field and used to study three new temperate marine sites within Lake Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia.

  9. Mobile high frequency vibrator system

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, D.W.; Buller, P.L.

    1985-01-08

    A carrier mounted seismic vibrator system that is primarily adapted for generation of high force, high frequency seismic energy into an earth medium. The apparatus includes first and second vibrators as supported by first and second lift systems disposed in tandem juxtaposition generally centrally in said vehicle, and the lift systems are designed to maintain equal hold-down force on the vibrator coupling baseplates without exceeding the weight of the carrier vehicle. The juxtaposed vibrators are then energized in synchronized relationship to propagate increased amounts of higher frequency seismic energy into an earth medium.

  10. Evaluation of shallow sediment methane cycling in a pockmark field on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, R. B.; Rose, P. S.; Klaucke, I.; Bialas, J.; Pecher, I. A.; Gorman, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic studies have identified an extensive field (>20,000 km2) of seafloor depressions, or pockmarks, on the southwestern flank of the Chatham Rise, New Zealand. It has been suggested that these pockmarks result from gas hydrate dissociation linked to sea-level changes during glacial-interglacial cycles. Gas hydrates are predominately composed of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas. Surface sediment cores (~ 8 m) were collected from the pockmark field on the Chatham Rise during a research cruise in February 2013 to evaluate the association of the features with CH4 releases. A suite of geochemical parameters are interpreted to determine the methane contribution to solid phase sediment and pore water. The upward flux of CH4 in sediments is often quantified using pore water sulfate (SO42-) profiles, assuming steady-state consumption of SO42- and CH4 by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM): CH4 + SO42- → HCO3- + HS- + H2O. This reaction is one of the primary controls on CH4 distributions in sediments. This work will present pore water SO42-, sulfide (HS-) and chloride (Cl-) depth profiles in sediment collected from the pockmark field. Theoretical SO42- distributions in the absence of AOM are compared to observed SO42- profiles as a preliminary assessment of the influence of CH4 on sediment geochemistry in and around the seafloor depressions. In addition isotopically-light CH4 is incorporated into sediment carbon pools via AOM and subsequent CO2 fixation. Stable carbon isotope distributions in the organic and inorganic carbon pools are presented to determine the influence of CH4 in sediments in the vicinty of the pockmarks. Collectively, the geochemical data are used to assess the role of gas hydate dissociation in pockmark formation on the Chatham Rise. Despite sesimic data interpretation in this region there is no modern day contribution of CH4 to shallow sediment carbon cycling and data are presented to assess paleogeochemical methane cycling.

  11. Ni cycling in mangrove sediments from New Caledonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, V. S.; Morin, G.; Juillot, F.; Marchand, C.; Brest, J.; Bargar, J.; Munoz, M.; Ardo, S.; Brown, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    In New Caledonia, mangroves receive large inputs of lateritic materials eroded from massive ultramafic deposits enriched in Fe, Ni, Mn, Cr, and Co. Because of the major physicochemical gradients, especially redox gradients, that characterize these ecosystems, mineralogical transformations may influence the crystal-chemistry and bioavailability of Ni and its mobility towards a lagoon of over 20,000 km2. Bulk and spatially resolved chemical analyses by SEM-EDXS were coupled with Ni K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy analysis to characterize the vertical and lateral changes in Ni speciation across the intertidal zone of a mangrove forest in the Vavouto Bay (New Caledonia) where Ni concentrations range from 1000 to 5300 mg•kg-1. XAFS results indicate that phyllosilicates and goethite inherited from the eroded lateritic materials are the dominant Ni-bearing phases in the surface horizons of the mangrove sediments. They are fully preserved at depth in the dry and oxic salt flat area, located on the inland side of the coast. In contrast, beneath the vegetated Rhizophoras and Avicennias stands Ni-bearing goethites rapidly diminish with increasing depth in the anoxic horizons of the sediments, and pyrite and organic complexes become the dominant Ni-containing species. Moreover, Ni incorporation in pyrite is more developed in the sediments beneath the intermediate Avicennia stand than beneath the Rhizophora stand that is closest to the shore. Such lateral changes in Ni speciation may be related to reoxidation of Ni-bearing pyrites in the Rhizophora stand, which is subject to periodic alternation of reducing and oxidizing events due to tidal fluctuations. These major changes in Ni speciation could significantly influence Ni mobility across the interidal zone. Indeed, as estimated with respect to Ti concentration, which is taken as a geochemical invariant, Ni is found to be immobile in the salt flat, to accumulate beneath the Avicennia stand, and to

  12. Constraining magnesium cycling in marine sediments using magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.; Schrag, D. P.

    2010-09-01

    Magnesium concentrations in deep-sea sediment pore-fluids typically decrease down core due to net precipitation of dolomite or clay minerals in the sediments or underlying crust. To better characterize and differentiate these processes, we have measured magnesium isotopes in pore-fluids and sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program sites (1082, 1086, 1012, 984, 1219, and 925) that span a range of oceanographic settings. At all sites, magnesium concentrations decrease with depth. At sites where diagenetic reactions are dominated by the respiration of organic carbon, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values increase with depth by as much as 2‰. Because carbonates preferentially incorporate 24Mg (low δ 26Mg), the increase in pore-fluid δ 26Mg values at these sites is consistent with the removal of magnesium in Mg-carbonate (dolomite). In contrast, at sites where the respiration of organic carbon is not important and/or weatherable minerals are abundant, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values decrease with depth by up to 2‰. The decline in pore-fluid δ 26Mg at these sites is consistent with a magnesium sink that is isotopically enriched relative to the pore-fluid. The identity of this enriched magnesium sink is likely clay minerals. Using a simple 1D diffusion-advection-reaction model of pore-fluid magnesium, we estimate rates of net magnesium uptake/removal and associated net magnesium isotope fractionation factors for sources and sinks at all sites. Independent estimates of magnesium isotope fractionation during dolomite precipitation from measured δ 26Mg values of dolomite samples from sites 1082 and 1012 are very similar to modeled net fractionation factors at these sites, suggesting that local exchange of magnesium between sediment and pore-fluid at these sites can be neglected. Our results indicate that the magnesium incorporated in dolomite is 2.0-2.7‰ depleted in δ 26Mg relative to the precipitating fluid. Assuming local exchange of magnesium is minor at the rest of the

  13. Terrestrial sedimentation and the carbon cycle: coupling weathering and erosion to carbon burial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the linkages between the carbon cycle and sedimentary processes on land. Available data suggest that sedimentation on land can bury vast quantities of organic carbon, roughly 1015 g C yr-1. To evaluate the relative roles of various classes of processes in the burial of carbon on land, terrestrial sedimentation was modeled as a series of 864 scenarios. Each scenario represents a unique choice of intensities for seven classes of processes and two different global wetland distributions. Comparison was made with presumed preagricultural conditions. The classes of processes were divided into two major component parts: clastic sedimentation of soil-derived carbon and organic sedimentation of autochthonous carbon. For clastic sedimentation, masses of sediment were considered for burial as reservoir sediment, lake sediment, and combined colluvium, alluvium, and aeolian deposits. When the ensemble of models is examined, the human-induced burial of 0.6-1.5.1015 g yr-1 of carbon on land is entirely plausible. This sink reaches its maximum strength between 30 ?? and 50??N. Paddy lands stand out as a type of land use that warrants future study, but the many faces of rice agriculture limit generalization. In an extreme scenario, paddy lands alone could be made to bury about 1.1015 g C yr-1. Arguing that terrestrial sedimentation processes could be much of the sink for the so called 'missing carbon' is reasonable. Such a hypothesis, however, requires major redesign of how the carbon cycle is modeled. Unlike ecosystem processes that are amenable to satellite monitoring and parallel modeling, many aspects of terrestrial sedimentation are hidden from space.

  14. H2 cycling and microbial bioenergetics in anoxic sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of H2 is central to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. In anoxic sediments, the great majority of microbial redox processes involve H2 as a reactant, product, or potential by-product, and the thermodynamics of these processes are thus highly sensitive to fluctuations in environmental H2 concentrations. In turn, H2 concentrations are controlled by the activity of H2-consuming microorganisms, which efficiently utilize this substrate down to levels which correspond to their bioenergetic limitations. Consequently, any environmental change which impacts the thermodynamics of H2-consuming organisms is mirrored by a corresponding change in H2 concentrations. This phenomenon is illustrated in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA: H2 concentrations are controlled by a suite of environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, sulfate concentrations) in a fashion which can be quantitatively described by a simple thermodynamic model. These findings allow us to calculate the apparent minimum quantity of biologically useful energy in situ. We find that sulfate reducing bacteria are not active at energy yields below -18 kJ per mole sulfate, while methanogenic archaea exhibit a minimum close to -10 kJ per mole methane.

  15. CYCLING OF XENOBIOTICS THROUGH MARINE AND ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of five broadly defined projects are reported. Cycling of xenobiotics was studied with a photo-bioassay system that used time-lapse photography to evaluate effects of Kepone and sodium pentachlorophenate on feeding activity of the lugworm, Arenicola cristata. Radio-la...

  16. Sea-level responses to sediment transport over the last ice age cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, K.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2013-12-01

    Sea-level changes over the last ice age cycle were instrumental in steering Earth's topographic evolution. These sea-level variations were driven by changes in surface mass loads, including not only ice and ocean mass variations but also the transfer of rock from eroding mountains to sedimentary deposits. Here we use an extended numerical model of ice age sea level (Dalca et al., 2013) to explore how sediment erosion and deposition affected global sea-level variations over the last ice age cycle. The model takes histories of ice and sediment loads as inputs, and it computes gravitationally self-consistent sea level responses by accounting for the deformational, gravitational, and rotational perturbations in the Earth's viscoelastic form. In these model simulations, we use published estimates of erosion rates, sedimentation rates, and ice sheet variations to constrain sediment and ice loading since the Last Interglacial. We explore sea-level responses to several erosional and depositional scenarios, and in each we quantify the relative contributions of crustal deformation and gravitational perturbation to the computed sea-level change. We also present a case study to illustrate the effects that sediment transfer can have on sea level at the regional scale. In particular, we focus on the region surrounding the Indus River, where fluvial sediment fluxes are among the highest on Earth. Preliminary model results suggest that sediment fluxes from Asia to the ocean are large enough to produce a significant response in sea level along the northeastern coast of the Arabian Sea. Moreover, they suggest that modeled sea-level histories are sensitive to the timing and spatial distribution of sediment erosion and deposition. For instance, sediment deposition along the continental shelf - which may have been the primary site of Indus River sediment deposition during the Holocene - produces a different sea-level response than sediment deposition on the deep-sea Indus Fan, where

  17. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  18. New chronology for the southern Kalahari Group sediments with implications for sediment-cycle dynamics and early hominin occupation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matmon, Ari; Hidy, Alan J.; Vainer, Shlomy; Crouvi, Onn; Fink, David; Erel, Yigal; Arnold, M.; Aumaître, G.; Bourlès, D.; Keddadouche, K.; Horwitz, Liora K.; Chazan, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Kalahari Group sediments accumulated in the Kalahari basin, which started forming during the breakup of Gondwana in the early Cretaceous. These sediments cover an extensive part of southern Africa and form a low-relief landscape. Current models assume that the Kalahari Group accumulated throughout the entire Cenozoic. However, chronology has been restricted to early-middle Cenozoic biostratigraphic correlations and to OSL dating of only the past ~ 300 ka. We present a new chronological framework that reveals a dynamic nature of sedimentation in the southern Kalahari. Cosmogenic burial ages obtained from a 55 m section of Kalahari Group sediments from the Mamatwan Mine, southern Kalahari, indicate that the majority of deposition at this location occurred rapidly at 1-1.2 Ma. This Pleistocene sequence overlies the Archaean basement, forming a significant hiatus that permits the possibility of many Phanerozoic cycles of deposition and erosion no longer preserved in the sedimentary record. Our data also establish the existence of a shallow early-middle Pleistocene water body that persisted for > 450 ka prior to this rapid period of deposition. Evidence from neighboring archeological excavations in southern Africa suggests an association of high-density hominin occupation with this water body.

  19. New chronology for the southern Kalahari Group sediments - implications for sediment-cycle dynamics and basin development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matmon, Ari; Hidy, Alan; Vainer, Shlomy; Crouvi, Onn; Fink, David; Erel, Yigal; Aster Team; Horwitz, Liora; Chazan, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Kalahari Group sediments accumulated in the Kalahari basin, which started forming during the breakup of Gondwana in the early Cretaceous. These sediments cover an extensive part of southern Africa and form a low-relief landscape. Current models assume that the Kalahari Group accumulated throughout the entire Cenozoic. However, chronology has been restricted to early-middle Cenozoic biostratigraphic correlations and to OSL dating of only the past ~300 ka. We present a new chronological framework that reveals a dynamic nature of sedimentation in the southern Kalahari. Cosmogenic burial ages obtained from a 55 m section of Kalahari Group sediments from the Mamatwan Mine, southern Kalahari, indicate that the majority of deposition at this location occurred rapidly at 1-1.2 Ma. This Pleistocene sequence overlies the Archaean basement, forming a significant hiatus that permits the possibility of many Phanerozoic cycles of deposition and erosion no longer preserved in the sedimentary record. Our data also establish the existence of a shallow early-middle Pleistocene water body that persisted for >450 ka prior to this rapid period of deposition and suggesting an Okavango-like environment. Evidence from neighboring archaeological excavations in southern Africa suggests an association of high-density hominin occupation with this water body.

  20. Temperature and Cyanobacterial Bloom Biomass Influence Phosphorous Cycling in Eutrophic Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mo; Ye, Tian-Ran; Krumholz, Lee R.; Jiang, He-Long

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms frequently occur in freshwater lakes, subsequently, substantial amounts of decaying cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) settles onto the lake sediments where anaerobic mineralization reactions prevail. Coupled Fe/S cycling processes can influence the mobilization of phosphorus (P) in sediments, with high releases often resulting in eutrophication. To better understand eutrophication in Lake Taihu (PRC), we investigated the effects of CBB and temperature on phosphorus cycling in lake sediments. Results indicated that added CBB not only enhanced sedimentary iron reduction, but also resulted in a change from net sulfur oxidation to sulfate reduction, which jointly resulted in a spike of soluble Fe(II) and the formation of FeS/FeS2. Phosphate release was also enhanced with CBB amendment along with increases in reduced sulfur. Further release of phosphate was associated with increases in incubation temperature. In addition, CBB amendment resulted in a shift in P from the Fe-adsorbed P and the relatively unreactive Residual-P pools to the more reactive Al-adsorbed P, Ca-bound P and organic-P pools. Phosphorus cycling rates increased on addition of CBB and were higher at elevated temperatures, resulting in increased phosphorus release from sediments. These findings suggest that settling of CBB into sediments will likely increase the extent of eutrophication in aquatic environments and these processes will be magnified at higher temperatures. PMID:24682039

  1. Pyrosequencing evidence for iron-cycling microbial communities in sediments of the Skagerrak and Bothnian Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Carolina; Dellwig, Olaf; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz; Dähnke, Kirstin; Gehre, Matthias; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2015-04-01

    The diversity and metabolic pathways of microorganisms linked to Fe cycling in marine sediments are still poorly understood. Marine microorganisms in general are difficult to isolate and those that have been successfully isolated may not represent the main endogenous population. Various culture-independent techniques have been applied to characterize marine microbial communities, but only recently, has high throughput pyrosequencing been applied in marine sediment studies. Initial results are promising in capturing the full complexity of microbial communities in sediments. We performed a pyrosequencing-based study in marine and brackish sediments of the Baltic Sea; to our knowledge this is the first pyrosequencing study focused on the zone of Fe cycling. The goal of this study was to determine the bacterial and archaeal community composition near the sediment surface showing ongoing Fe cycling as a first step in characterizing the microorganisms potentially involved in Fe cycling. Two 35-cm-cores were sampled from ferruginous sediments in the Skagerrak, SK, North-Baltic Sea and the Bothnian Bay, BB, Northern Baltic Sea. Porewater (Fe2+, Mn2+, SO42-) and solid phase (Fe, Mn, total S) concentrations were measured and 16S rRNA genes were analysed using 454-pyrosequencing. Additionally, stable S and O isotope signatures of dissolved sulfate were measured at SK site. Sediment biogeochemistry indicated an intense suboxic zone with accumulation of dissolved Fe in the top 30 cm but only minor net sulfate (SO42-) reduction at both sites. Pore water profiles showed Fe2+ and Mn2+ levels of ~140-150 µM throughout the core below a 6 cm thick oxidized surface layer in SK sediments and ~300 µM below a 2 cm thick surface layer in BB sediments. Dissolved sulfide levels were below the detection limit in both sediments. Stable S and O isotope signatures suggest only minor net sulfate reduction. Fe reduction in the studied sediments is dominated by microbial dissimilatory Fe

  2. MODELING NITROGEN-CARBON CYCLING AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN BOTTOM SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model framework is presented for simulating nitrogen and carbon cycling at the sediment–water interface, and predicting oxygen consumption by oxidation reactions inside the sediments. Based on conservation of mass and invoking simplifying assumptions, a coupled system of diffus...

  3. High frequency dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K; Swager, Timothy M; Temkin, Richard J; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-09-17

    During the three decades 1980-2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical, and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = 1/2 species (13)C or (15)N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, such as (17)O or (27)Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime, roughly 150-660 GHz, and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades, scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  4. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 1980–2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = ½ species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime — roughly 150–660 GHz — and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  5. Special Aspects in Designing High - Frequency Betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, A. A.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to designing the high - frequency betatron. In high - frequency betatron most important problem is overheating of the elements of the body radiator unit. In an article some directions of solving this problem are shown.

  6. Hydraulic and sediment transport properties of autogenic avulsion cycles on submarine fans with supercritical distributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul B.; Strom, Kyle B.; Hoyal, David C. J. D.

    2015-07-01

    Submarine fans, like other distributive systems, are built by repeated avulsion cycles. However, relative to deltas and alluvial fans, much less is known about avulsions in subaqueous settings. In this study, we ran a set of subaqueous fan experiments to investigate the mechanics associated with autogenic avulsion cycles of self-formed channels and lobe deposits on steep slopes. The experiments used saline density currents with crushed plastic to emulate sustained turbidity currents and bed load transport. We collected detailed hydraulic and bathymetric measurements and made use of a 1-D laterally expanding density current model to better understand different aspects of the avulsion cycle. Our results reveal three major components of the avulsion cycles: (1) distributary channel incision, extension, and stagnation; (2) mouth bar aggradation and hydraulic jump initiation; and (3) hydraulic jump sedimentation and upstream retreat. Interestingly, in all but one experiment, the avulsion cycles led to fans that remained perched above the basin slope break. Experimental data and hydraulic theory were used to unravel actual mechanics associated with cycles. We found that channels stopped extending into the basin due to a decay in sediment transport capacity relative to sediment supply and that the reduction in capacity was primarily an outcome of expansion-driven velocity reduction; dilution played a secondary role. Once channel extension ceased, mouth bar deposits aggraded to a thickness approximately equal to the critical step height needed to create a choked flow condition. The choke then initiated a hydraulic jump on the upstream side of the bar. Once formed, the jump detained a majority of the incoming sediment and forced the channel-to-lobe transition upstream, filling the channel with steep backset bedding and capping the entire channel with a mounded lobate deposit. These intrinsic processes repeated through multiple avulsion cycles to build the fan.

  7. Short-chain alkane cycling in deep Gulf of Mexico cold-seep sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibert, R.; Joye, S. B.; Hunter, K.

    2015-12-01

    Mixtures of light hydrocarbon gases are common in deep Gulf of Mexico cold-seep sediments, and are typically dissolved in pore fluids, adsorbed to sediment particles, trapped in methane ice, or as free gas. The dominant component in these natural gas mixtures is usually methane (>80% C1), but ethane (C2) and propane (C3) are nearly always present in trace amounts (<1% total). The processes that control the concentration and isotopic signature of these gases in sediments are well explained for methane, but the controls for C2/C3 cycling are still a relative mystery. Methane production proceeds in deep anoxic sediments by either 1) thermocatalytic cracking of fossil organic matter, or 2) as a direct product of microbial metabolism, i.e. methanogenesis. In surface sediments, it appears that both microbial consumption and chemical deposition of methane (i.e. as methane clathrate) ensures that >95% of the methane produced at depth never reaches the water column. Production of C1 and C2 in deep-sea sediments has been historically attributed only to thermocatalytic processes, though limited data suggests production of C2/C3 compounds through the activity of archaea at depth. Furthermore, carbon isotopic data on ethane and propane from deep cores of Gulf of Mexico sediments suggest alkanogenesis at >3 m depth in the sediment column and alkane oxidation in uppermost oxidant-rich sediments. Additional studies have also isolated microorganisms capable of oxidizing ethane and propane in the laboratory, but field studies of microbial-driven dynamics of C2/C3 gases in cold-seep sediments are rare. Here, we present the results of a series of incubation experiments using sediment slurries culled from surface sediments from one of the most prolific natural oil and gas seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Rates of alkane oxidation were measured under a variety of conditions to assess the surface-driven microbial controls on C2/C3 cycling in cold-seep environments. Such microbial processes

  8. Organic matter remineralization predominates phosphorus cycling in the mid-Bay sediments in the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sunendra R; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Burdige, David J; Bowden, Mark E; Sparks, Donald L; Jaisi, Deb P

    2015-05-19

    Chesapeake Bay, the largest and most productive estuary in the U.S., suffers from varying degrees of water quality issues fueled by both point and nonpoint nutrient sources. Restoration of the Bay is complicated by the multitude of nutrient sources, their variable inputs, and complex interaction between imported and regenerated nutrients. These complexities not only restrict formulation of effective restoration plans but also open up debates on accountability issues with nutrient loading. A detailed understanding of sediment phosphorus (P) dynamics provides information useful in identifying the exchange of dissolved constituents across the sediment-water interface as well as helps to better constrain the mechanisms and processes controlling the coupling between sediments and the overlying waters. Here we used phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)O(P)) in concert with sediment chemistry, X-ray diffraction, and Mössbauer spectroscopy on sediments retrieved from an organic rich, sulfidic site in the mesohaline portion of the mid-Bay to identify sources and pathway of sedimentary P cycling and to infer potential feedbacks on bottom water hypoxia and surface water eutrophication. Authigenic phosphate isotope data suggest that the regeneration of inorganic P from organic matter degradation (remineralization) is the predominant, if not sole, pathway for authigenic P precipitation in the mid-Bay sediments. This indicates that the excess inorganic P generated by remineralization should have overwhelmed any pore water and/or bottom water because only a fraction of this precipitates as authigenic P. This is the first research that identifies the predominance of remineralization pathway and recycling of P within the Chesapeake Bay. Therefore, these results have significant implications on the current understanding of sediment P cycling and P exchange across the sediment-water interface in the Bay, particularly in terms of the sources and pathways of P that sustain hypoxia

  9. High-Frequency Inductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Finemet-type nanocrystalline alloy represents an advanced soft-magnetic metal-metal-type nanocomposite with an eddy-current-determined high- frequency limit. A survey of different heat treatments under tensile stress is presented to tailor the hysteresis loop by induced transversal anisotropy. The flattened loop having reduced effective permeability enhances the eddy- current limit in the MHz region; For example, continuous stress annealing in a tubular furnace of 1 m length at 650°C, pulling the ribbon with a velocity of 4 m/min under a tensile stress of 200 MPa, results in a wound core having a permeability of 120 and a frequency limit of 10 MHz. Careful annealing preserves the static coercivity below 10 A/m. The power loss at 0.1 T and 100 kHz is only 82 mW/cm3, which is an order of magnitude lower then the values obtained for Sendust™ cores in similar conditions.

  10. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  11. Organic Matter Remineralization Predominates Phosphorus Cycling in the Mid-Bay Sediments in the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Sunendra, Joshi R.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Burdige, David J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Sparks, Donald L.; Jaisi, Deb P.

    2015-05-19

    The Chesapeake Bay, the largest and most productive estuary in the US, suffers from varying degrees of water quality issues fueled by both point and non–point source nutrient sources. Restoration of the bay is complicated by the multitude of nutrient sources, their variable inputs and hydrological conditions, and complex interacting factors including climate forcing. These complexities not only restrict formulation of effective restoration plans but also open up debates on accountability issues with nutrient loading. A detailed understanding of sediment phosphorus (P) dynamics enables one to identify the exchange of dissolved constituents across the sediment- water interface and aid to better constrain mechanisms and processes controlling the coupling between the sediments and the overlying waters. Here we used phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ18Op) in concert with sediment chemistry, XRD, and Mössbauer spectroscopy on the sediment retrieved from an organic rich, sulfidic site in the meso-haline portion of the mid-bay to identify sources and pathway of sedimentary P cycling and to infer potential feedback effect on bottom water hypoxia and surface water eutrophication. Isotope data indicate that the regeneration of inorganic P from organic matter degradation (remineralization) is the predominant, if not sole, pathway for authigenic P precipitation in the mid-bay sediments. We interpret that the excess inorganic P generated by remineralization should have overwhelmed any bottom-water and/or pore-water P derived from other sources or biogeochemical processes and exceeded saturation with respect to authigenic P precipitation. It is the first research that identifies the predominance of remineralization pathway against remobilization (coupled Fe-P cycling) pathway in the Chesapeake Bay. Therefore, these results are expected to have significant implications for the current understanding of P cycling and benthic-pelagic coupling in the bay, particularly on the

  12. Pressurized high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas D.

    Acoustic heat engines show much promise for converting waste heat to electricity. Since most applications require high power levels, high frequency thermoacoustic engines can reach such performance by operating with a pressurized working gas. Results on a 3 kHz prime mover, consisting of a quarter-wave resonator and a random stack material between two heat exchangers, show that the acoustic power from such a device is raised substantially as the working gas is pressurized. At pressures up to approximately 10 bar, the increase in acoustic power is approximately linear to the increase in pressure, and thus is an effective way to increase the power output of thermoacoustic engines. Since the heat input was not changed during the experiments, the increases in acoustic power translate directly to increases in engine efficiency which is calculated as the output acoustic power divided by the input heat power. In most experiments run in this study, the engine efficiency increased by a factor of at least 4 as the pressure was increased from 2 bar up to about 10 bar. Further increases in pressure lead to acoustic power saturation and eventual attenuation. This is most likely due to a combination of several factors including the shrinking thermal penetration depth, and the fact that the losses increase faster with pressure in a random stack material than in traditional parallel plates. Pressurization also leads to a lower DeltaT for onset of oscillations in the range of 10 bar of mean pressure, potentially opening up even more heat sources that can power a thermoacoustic engine. Results from another 3 kHz engine, one that was pressurized itself as opposed to being placed in a pressurized chamber, are also presented. The configuration of this engine solves the problem of how to simultaneously pressurize the engine and inject heat into the hot heat exchanger. It was also noted that the geometry of the resonator cavity in the quarter wavelength pressurized engine plays an

  13. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-06-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  14. Use of life cycle assessments to evaluate the environmental footprint of contaminated sediment remediation.

    PubMed

    Sparrevik, Magnus; Saloranta, Tuomo; Cornelissen, Gerard; Eek, Espen; Fet, Annik Magerholm; Breedveld, Gijs D; Linkov, Igor

    2011-05-15

    Ecological and human risks often drive the selection of remedial alternatives for contaminated sediments. Traditional human and ecological risk assessment (HERA) includes assessing risk for benthic organisms and aquatic fauna associated with exposure to contaminated sediments before and after remediation as well as risk for human exposure but does not consider the environmental footprint associated with implementing remedial alternatives. Assessment of environmental effects over the whole life cycle (i.e., Life Cycle Assessment, LCA) could complement HERA and help in selecting the most appropriate sediment management alternative. Even though LCA has been developed and applied in multiple environmental management cases, applications to contaminated sediments and marine ecosystems are in general less frequent. This paper implements LCA methodology for the case of the polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/F)-contaminated Grenland fjord in Norway. LCA was applied to investigate the environmental footprint of different active and passive thin-layer capping alternatives as compared to natural recovery. The results showed that capping was preferable to natural recovery when analysis is limited to effects related to the site contamination. Incorporation of impacts related to the use of resources and energy during the implementation of a thin layer cap increase the environmental footprint by over 1 order of magnitude, making capping inferior to the natural recovery alternative. Use of biomass-derived activated carbon, where carbon dioxide is sequestered during the production process, reduces the overall environmental impact to that of natural recovery. The results from this study show that LCA may be a valuable tool for assessing the environmental footprint of sediment remediation projects and for sustainable sediment management. PMID:21520943

  15. High frequency microbubble-switched oscillations modulated by microfluidic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fanghao; Dai, Xianming; Li, Chen

    2012-08-01

    Creating high frequency two-phase oscillations (HF-TPOs) remains an important goal in advancing microscale fluidic logic devices, micro-mixers, micro-actuators, and flow controls. However, thermally driven TPO frequency has been hindered by confinements of compressible vapor bubbles and low thermal diffusivity in microfluidic systems. In this study, a mechanism creating high frequency microbubbles growth/collapse cycle has been developed to achieve HF-TPOs. A "microfluidic transistor" was conceptualized and fabricated to passively sustain and modulate HF-TPOs. Three orders of magnitude higher TPO frequency has been achieved compared to TPOs reported in literatures under similar working conditions.

  16. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  17. Effects of global climate change and organic pollution on nutrient cycling in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Lázaro, C.; Valdemarsen, T.; Holmer, M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing ocean temperature due to climate change is an important anthropogenic driver of ecological change in coastal systems, where sediments play a major role in nutrient cycling. Our ability to predict ecological consequences of climate change is enhanced by simulating real scenarios especially when the interactions among drivers may not be just additive. Based on predicted climate change scenarios, we tested the effect of temperature and organic pollution on nutrient release from coastal sediments to the water column in a mesocosm experiment. PO43- release rates from sediments followed the same trends as organic matter mineralization rates, and increased linearly with temperature and were significantly higher under organic pollution than under non-polluted conditions. NH4+ release only increased significantly when the temperature rise was above 6 °C, and was significantly higher in organic polluted compared to non-polluted sediments. Nutrient release to the water column was only a fraction from the mineralized organic matter, suggesting PO43- retention and NH4+ oxidation in the sediment. Bioturbation and bioirrigation appeared to be key processes responsible of this behaviour. Considering that the primary production of most marine basins is N-limited, the excess release of NH4+ at temperature rise >6 ° could enhance water column primary productivity, which may lead to the deterioration of the environmental quality. Climate change effects are expected to be accelerated in areas affected by organic pollution.

  18. Effects of temperature and organic pollution on nutrient cycling in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Lazaro, C.; Valdemarsen, T.; Holmer, M.

    2015-08-01

    Increasing ocean temperature due to climate change is an important anthropogenic driver of ecological change in coastal systems. In these systems sediments play a major role in nutrient cycling. Our ability to predict ecological consequences of climate change is enhanced by simulating real scenarios. Based on predicted climate change scenarios, we tested the effect of temperature and organic pollution on nutrient release from coastal sediments to the water column in a mesocosm experiment. PO43- release rates from sediments followed the same trends as organic matter mineralization rates, increased linearly with temperature and were significantly higher under organic pollution than under nonpolluted conditions. NH4+ release only increased significantly when the temperature rise was above 6 °C, and it was significantly higher in organic polluted compared to nonpolluted sediments. Nutrient release to the water column was only a fraction from the mineralized organic matter, suggesting PO43- retention and NH4+ oxidation in the sediment. Bioturbation and bioirrigation appeared to be key processes responsible for this behavior. Considering that the primary production of most marine basins is N-limited, the excess release of NH4+ at a temperature rise > 6 °C could enhance water column primary productivity, which may lead to the deterioration of the environmental quality. Climate change effects are expected to be accelerated in areas affected by organic pollution.

  19. Downslope Eulerian mean flow associated with high-frequency current fluctuations observed on the outer continental shelf and upper slope along the northeastern United States continental margin: implications for sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, B.

    1988-01-01

    Eulerian current measurements made 5-7 m above bottom at six stations along the United States east coast continental margin show a net downslope flow of 1-5 cm s-1. Although the scalar current speed decreases with water depth and toward the bottom, fluctuations in the cross-isobath flow were stronger and increasingly asymmetric near the bottom. Maximum downslope flow exceeded maximum upslope flow by a factor of two to three. The strength of the low-passed downslope flow was proportional to the upslope Reynolds flux of density as well as to the amplitude of the current fluctuations that have periods shorter than 30 h. These flow characteristics may be caused by differential vertical mixing in the bottom boundary layer where a stratified fluid flows upslope (unstable) and downslope (stable). The asymmetry in current strength clearly favors net downslope transport of sediments that move as bedload. ?? 1988.

  20. The Link between Microbial Diversity and Nitrogen Cycling in Marine Sediments Is Modulated by Macrofaunal Bioturbation

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani Foshtomi, Maryam; Braeckman, Ulrike; Derycke, Sofie; Sapp, Melanie; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Sabbe, Koen; Willems, Anne; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The marine benthic nitrogen cycle is affected by both the presence and activity of macrofauna and the diversity of N-cycling microbes. However, integrated research simultaneously investigating macrofauna, microbes and N-cycling is lacking. We investigated spatio-temporal patterns in microbial community composition and diversity, macrofaunal abundance and their sediment reworking activity, and N-cycling in seven subtidal stations in the Southern North Sea. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of the Microbial Communities Our results indicated that bacteria (total and β-AOB) showed more spatio-temporal variation than archaea (total and AOA) as sedimentation of organic matter and the subsequent changes in the environment had a stronger impact on their community composition and diversity indices in our study area. However, spatio-temporal patterns of total bacterial and β-AOB communities were different and related to the availability of ammonium for the autotrophic β-AOB. Highest bacterial richness and diversity were observed in June at the timing of the phytoplankton bloom deposition, while richness of β-AOB as well as AOA peaked in September. Total archaeal community showed no temporal variation in diversity indices. Macrofauna, Microbes and the Benthic N-Cycle Distance based linear models revealed that, independent from the effect of grain size and the quality and quantity of sediment organic matter, nitrification and N-mineralization were affected by respectively the diversity of metabolically active β-AOB and AOA, and the total bacteria, near the sediment-water interface. Separate models demonstrated a significant and independent effect of macrofaunal activities on community composition and richness of total bacteria, and diversity indices of metabolically active AOA. Diversity of β-AOB was significantly affected by macrofaunal abundance. Our results support the link between microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in marine sediments, and provided

  1. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  2. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  3. Ecophysiology of Fe-Cycling Bacteria in Acidic Sediments ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shipeng; Gischkat, Stefan; Reiche, Marco; Akob, Denise M.; Hallberg, Kevin B.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Using a combination of cultivation-dependent and -independent methods, this study aimed to elucidate the diversity of microorganisms involved in iron cycling and to resolve their in situ functional links in sediments of an acidic lignite mine lake. Using six different media with pH values ranging from 2.5 to 4.3, 117 isolates were obtained that grouped into 38 different strains, including 27 putative new species with respect to the closest characterized strains. Among the isolated strains, 22 strains were able to oxidize Fe(II), 34 were able to reduce Fe(III) in schwertmannite, the dominant iron oxide in this lake, and 21 could do both. All isolates falling into the Gammaproteobacteria (an unknown Dyella-like genus and Acidithiobacillus-related strains) were obtained from the top acidic sediment zones (pH 2.8). Firmicutes strains (related to Bacillus and Alicyclobacillus) were only isolated from deep, moderately acidic sediment zones (pH 4 to 5). Of the Alphaproteobacteria, Acidocella-related strains were only isolated from acidic zones, whereas Acidiphilium-related strains were isolated from all sediment depths. Bacterial clone libraries generally supported and complemented these patterns. Geobacter-related clone sequences were only obtained from deep sediment zones, and Geobacter-specific quantitative PCR yielded 8 × 105 gene copy numbers. Isolates related to the Acidobacterium, Acidocella, and Alicyclobacillus genera and to the unknown Dyella-like genus showed a broad pH tolerance, ranging from 2.5 to 5.0, and preferred schwertmannite to goethite for Fe(III) reduction. This study highlighted the variety of acidophilic microorganisms that are responsible for iron cycling in acidic environments, extending the results of recent laboratory-based studies that showed this trait to be widespread among acidophiles. PMID:20971876

  4. Microbial Populations Involved in Cycling of Dimethyl Sulfide and Methanethiol in Freshwater Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Lomans, Bart P.; Luderer, Rianne; Steenbakkers, Peter; Pol, Arjan; van der Drift, Chris; Vogels, Godfried D.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Although several microorganisms that produce and degrade methanethiol (MT) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) have been isolated from various habitats, little is known about the numbers of these microorganisms in situ. This study reports on the identification and quantification of microorganisms involved in the cycling of MT and DMS in freshwater sediments. Sediment incubation studies revealed that the formation of MT and DMS is well balanced with their degradation. MT formation depends on the concentrations of both sulfide and methyl group-donating compounds. A most-probable number (MPN) dilution series with syringate as the growth substrate showed that methylation of sulfide with methyl groups derived from syringate is a commonly occurring process in situ. MT appeared to be primarily degraded by obligately methylotrophic methanogens, which were found in the highest positive dilutions on DMS and mixed substrates (methanol, trimethylamine [TMA], and DMS). Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the total DNA isolated from the sediments and of the DNA isolated from the highest positive dilutions of the MPN series (mixed substrates) revealed that the methanogens that are responsible for the degradation of MT, DMS, methanol, and TMA in situ are all phylogenetically closely related to Methanomethylovorans hollandica. This was confirmed by sequence analysis of the product obtained from a nested PCR developed for the selective amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from M. hollandica. The data from sediment incubation experiments, MPN series, and molecular-genetics detection correlated well and provide convincing evidence for the suggested mechanisms for MT and DMS cycling and the common presence of the DMS-degrading methanogen M. hollandica in freshwater sediments. PMID:11229890

  5. Impacts of bioturbation on temporal variation in bacterial and archaeal nitrogen-cycling gene abundance in coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Laverock, B; Tait, K; Gilbert, J A; Osborn, A M; Widdicombe, S

    2014-02-01

    In marine environments, macrofauna living in or on the sediment surface may alter the structure, diversity and function of benthic microbial communities. In particular, microbial nitrogen (N)-cycling processes may be enhanced by the activity of large bioturbating organisms. Here, we study the effect of the burrowing mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura upon temporal variation in the abundance of genes representing key N-cycling functional guilds. The abundance of bacterial genes representing different N-cycling guilds displayed different temporal patterns in burrow sediments in comparison with surface sediments, suggesting that the burrow provides a unique environment where bacterial gene abundances are influenced directly by macrofaunal activity. In contrast, the abundances of archaeal ammonia oxidizers varied temporally but were not affected by bioturbation, indicating differential responses between bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to environmental physicochemical controls. This study highlights the importance of bioturbation as a control over the temporal variation in nitrogen-cycling microbial community dynamics within coastal sediments. PMID:24596269

  6. Impacts of bioturbation on temporal variation in bacterial and archaeal nitrogen-cycling gene abundance in coastal sediments

    PubMed Central

    Laverock, B; Tait, K; Gilbert, J A; Osborn, A M; Widdicombe, S

    2014-01-01

    In marine environments, macrofauna living in or on the sediment surface may alter the structure, diversity and function of benthic microbial communities. In particular, microbial nitrogen (N)-cycling processes may be enhanced by the activity of large bioturbating organisms. Here, we study the effect of the burrowing mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura upon temporal variation in the abundance of genes representing key N-cycling functional guilds. The abundance of bacterial genes representing different N-cycling guilds displayed different temporal patterns in burrow sediments in comparison with surface sediments, suggesting that the burrow provides a unique environment where bacterial gene abundances are influenced directly by macrofaunal activity. In contrast, the abundances of archaeal ammonia oxidizers varied temporally but were not affected by bioturbation, indicating differential responses between bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to environmental physicochemical controls. This study highlights the importance of bioturbation as a control over the temporal variation in nitrogen-cycling microbial community dynamics within coastal sediments. PMID:24596269

  7. Source of the Magnetic Susceptibility Variations in Southern Ocean Sediments Over the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, B.; Thompson, R.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the sources, mineralogy and rates of iron supply to the Southern Ocean may have global impact and significance, by influencing plankton growth rates and nutrient take-up in this, the largest of the high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the world ocean. Iron 'fertilization' in the Southern Ocean may increase rates of carbon export production and thus the ocean uptake flux of atmospheric CO2, and also diminish the northward flow of residual nutrients to the extra-polar ocean, especially the HNLC regions of the Pacific. Changes in Southern Ocean export production may contribute to global climate change over glacial-interglacial timescales. The key sources of iron for the Southern Ocean are reported to be windblown dust and sedimentary supply; their relative significance an issue of much long-standing debate. Links between aeolian dust fluxes to the Southern Ocean and to the Antarctic ice cores have been proposed for the Scotia Sea region of the Southern Ocean, downwind from the South American land mass. Regional downcore variations in the magnetic susceptibility of sediments from the Scotia Sea show remarkable similarity to variations in dust concentration and flux in East Antarctic ice cores (with glacial stages characterised by increases in ice dust and sediment magnetic susceptibility). Indeed, the strength of the ice dust/sediment magnetism correlations (r ~ 0.7) provides a pragmatic basis for use of the sedimentary magnetic susceptibility records as a chronostratigraphic proxy, a boon in the carbonate-free deep-sea sediments of the Southern Ocean. However, the source and causal basis of the sediment magnetism/ice dust co-variations remain controversial; aeolian dust, bacterial magnetite and wind-driven current transport of marine sediment have all been invoked as possible key sources. Here, we use magnetic and isotopic methods to resolve this debate, and identify and quantify the sources of magnetic material to the Scotia Sea for the last

  8. Natural Organobromine in Marine Sediments: New Evidence of Biogeochemical Br Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    A Leri; J Hakala; M Marcus; A Lanzirotti; C Reddy; S Myneni

    2011-12-31

    Organobromine (Br{sub org}) compounds, commonly recognized as persistent, toxic anthropogenic pollutants, are also produced naturally in terrestrial and marine systems. Several enzymatic and abiotic bromination mechanisms have been identified, as well as an array of natural Br{sub org} molecules associated with various marine organisms. The fate of the carbon-bromine functionality in the marine environment, however, remains largely unexplored. Oceanographic studies have noted an association between bromine (Br) and organic carbon (C{sub org}) in marine sediments. Even so, there has been no direct chemical evidence that Br in the sediments exists in a stable form apart from inorganic bromide (Br{sub inorg}), which is widely presumed conservative in marine systems. To investigate the scope of natural Br{sub org} production and its fate in the environment, we probed Br distribution and speciation in estuarine and marine sediments using in situ X-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy. We show that Br{sub org} is ubiquitous throughout diverse sedimentary environments, occurring in correlation with C{sub org} and metals such as Fe, Ca, and Zn. Analysis of sinking particulate carbon from the seawater column links the Br{sub org} observed in sediments to biologically produced Br{sub org} compounds that persist through humification of natural organic matter (NOM). Br speciation varies with sediment depth, revealing biogeochemical cycling of Br between organic and inorganic forms as part of the burial and degradation of NOM. These findings illuminate the chemistry behind the association of Br with Corg in marine sediments and cast doubt on the paradigmatic classification of Br as a conservative element in seawater systems.

  9. Iron Cycling in Marine Sediments - New Insights from Isotope Analysis on Sequentially Extracted Fe Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, S.; Kasten, S.; Poulton, S.; Hartmann, J.; Staubwasser, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive Fe (oxyhydr)oxides preferentially undergo early diagenetic cycling and may cause a diffusive flux of dissolved Fe2+ from sediments towards the sediment-water interface. The partitioning of Fe in sediments has traditionally been studied by applying sequential extractions based on reductive dissolution of Fe minerals. We complemented the sequential leaching method by Poulton and Canfield [1] in order to be able to gain δ56Fe data for specific Fe fractions, as such data are potentially useful to study Fe cycling in marine environments. The specific mineral fractions are Fe-carbonates, ferrihydrite + lepidocrocite, goethite + hematite, and magnetite. Leaching was performed with acetic acid, hydroxylamine-HCl, Na-dithionite and oxalic acid. The processing of leachates for δ56Fe analysis involved boiling the samples in HCl/HNO3/H2O2, Fe precipitation and anion exchange column chromatography. The new method was applied to short sediment cores from the North Sea and a bay of King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica). Downcore mineral-specific variations in δ56Fe revealed differing contributions of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides to redox cycling. A slight decrease in easily reducible Fe oxides correlating with a slight increase in δ56Fe for this fraction with depth, which is in line with progessive dissimilatory iron reduction [2,3], is visible in the top 10 cm of the North Sea core, but not in the antarctic sediments. Less reactive (dithionite and oxalate leachable) fractions did not reveal isotopic trends. The acetic acid-soluble fraction displayed pronounced δ56Fe trends at both sites that cannot be explained by acid volatile sulfides that are also extracted by acetic acid [1]. We suggest that low δ56Fe values in this fraction relative to the pool of easily reducible Fe oxides result from adsorbed Fe(II) that was open to isotopic exchange with oxide surfaces, affirming the experimental results of Crosby el al. [2]. Hence, δ56Fe analyses on marine

  10. Mechanisms for high-frequency cyclicity in the Upper Jurassic limestone of northeastern Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.R.; Ward, W.C. ); Goldhammer, R.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The 520 m of Upper Jurassic Zuloaga Limestone exposed in the Sierra de Bunuelos in southern Coahuila comprise 118 cycles of peritidal carbonate rock deposited on a gently dipping ramp. Field studies with Fischer plots and time-series analysis suggest that a Milankovitchian glacioeustasy mechanism is inadequate to describe the Zuloaga cycles. Autocyclic progradation may have been the major influence on depositional cyclicity. Depositional cycles in the Zuloaga Formation typically are a few meters thick and asymmetric with subtidal wackestone and packstone grading upward into subtidal grainstone or into intertidal stromatolites. Width of the carbonate ramp is estimated to have been about 150 km. Sedimentation rates for these peritidal carbonate environments apparently exceeded subsidence rates inasmuch as most of the carbonate platform remained near sea level during Zuloaga deposition. The area was tectonically quiescent during the late Jurassic. Autocyclic shoreline progradation is a feasible mechanism for producing the high-frequency cycles, as suggested by (1) poor correlation with predicted Milankovitch periodicity shown by time-series analysis, (2) little evidence of subaerial exposure, (3) development of complete peritidal cycles, (4) general progradational sequences within each third-order unit, and (5) absence of polar glaciation during Late Jurassic.

  11. Genomic reconstruction of novel sediment phyla enlightens roles in sedimentary biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B.; Lazar, C.; Seitz, K.; Teske, A.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive habitats on the planet. Microbes in estuary sediments control the turnover of organic carbon, and the anaerobic cycling of nitrogen and sulfur. These communities are complex and primarily made up of uncultured lineages, thus little is known about how ecological and metabolic processes are partitioned in sediments. We reconstructed 82 bacterial and 24 archaeal high-quality genomes from different redox regimes (sulfate-rich, sulfate-methane transition zone, and methane-rich zones) of estuary sediments. These bacteria belong to 23 distinct groups, including uncultured candidate phyla (eg. KSB1, TA06, and KD3-62), and three newly described phyla (WOR-1, and -2, and -3). The archaea encompass 8 widespread sediment lineages including MGB-D, RC-III and IV, Z7ME43, Parvarchaeota, Lokiarchoaeta (MBG-B), SAGMEG, Bathyarchaeota (groups MCG-1, -6, -7, and -15) and previously unrecognized deeply branched phylum "Thorarchaeota". The uncultured phyla mediate essential biogeochemical processes of the estuarine environment. Z7ME43 archaea have genes for S disproportionation (S0 reduction and thiosulfate reduction and oxidation). SAGMEG appear to be strict anaerobes capable of coupling CO/H2 oxidation to either S0 or nitrite reduction and have novel RubisCO genes for carbon fixation. Thorarchaeota contain pathways for acetate production from the degradation of detrital proteins and intermediate S cycling. Furthermore, the gene content of this group revealed links in the evolutionary histories of archaea and eukaryotes. This dataset extents our knowledge of the metabolic potential of several uncultured phyla. We were able to chart the flow of carbon and nutrients through the multiple layers of bacterial processing and reveal potential ecological interactions within the communities.

  12. High frequency oscillations in the intact brain

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György; da Silva, Fernando Lopes

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) constitute a novel trend in neurophysiology that is fascinating neuroscientists in general, and epileptologists in particular. But what are HFOs? What is the frequency range of HFOs? Are there different types of HFOs, physiological and pathological? How are HFOs generated? Can HFOs represent temporal codes for cognitive processes? These questions are pressing and this symposium volume attempts to give constructive answers. As a prelude to this exciting discussion, we summarize the physiological high frequency patterns in the intact brain, concentrating mainly on hippocampal patterns, where the mechanisms of high frequency oscillations are perhaps best understood. PMID:22449727

  13. Self-stressing test structures used for high-frequency electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, E.S.; Pierce, D.G.; Campbell, D.V.; Swanson, S.E.

    1994-02-01

    We demonstrate for the first time high frequency (500 mhz) electromigration at the wafer-level using on-chip, self-stressing test structures. Since the stress temperature, frequency, duty cycle and current are controlled by DC signals in these structures, we used conventional DC test equipment without any special modifications (such as high frequency cabling, high temperature probe cards, etc.). This structure significantly reduces the cost of performing realistic high frequency electromigration experiments.

  14. Oxygen, a regulating factor for nitrogen cycling in continental shelf sediments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubacher, E.; Parker, R.; Trimmer, M.

    2009-04-01

    Oxygen is a fundamental parameter in regulating the cycling of carbon and nitrogen in continental shelf seas. Recent studies and models have shown that some regions of coastal seas are prone to a lack of oxygen and under such conditions, the dynamics of the nitrogen cycle could be altered. We measured rates of denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), oxygen uptake, nutrient exchange and pore water profiles of oxygen in sediments of the southern North Sea experimentally exposed to different oxygen saturations. The incubation of sediment at 33% (of air-saturation) for oxygen reduced the penetration and consumption of oxygen by the sediment by of approximately 50%, with a new steady state being reached after approximately 75 min. The rates of the various processes showed strong seasonality over the survey period (2007-2008), with denitrification ranging from 0.6 to 21.2 mol N m-2 h-1, anammox 0.2 to 4.4 mol N m-2 h-1 and oxygen uptake 46.5 to 631.8 mol O2 m-2 h-1. At the reduced saturation for oxygen (~ 33%), denitrification increased significantly (30%) while anammox remained constant. On average anammox accounted for 14-28% of the total production of di-nitrogen (N2) gas. Under ambient oxygen saturation, the rates of oxygen uptake and total production of N2 were positively correlated with each other (r = 0.73, p = 0.01, n = 230). The increase in denitrification was coupled to a change in NO3- flux. Under ambient oxygen there was a net release of 10.5 mol NO3- m-2 h-1 from the sediment to the water column, whereas under reduced oxygen, the sediments became a sink for NO3- (-1.2 mol NO3- m-2 h-1) from the overlaying water. These results suggest that facultative denitrifying bacteria were able to exploit the newly extended suboxic sediment layer, while the monophyletic group of anammox bacteria were not as flexible.

  15. A microbial arsenic cycle in sediments of an acidic mine impoundment: Herman Pit, Clear Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Jodi S.; McCann, Shelley; Bennett, S.; Miller, Laurence G.; Stolz, J. R.; Stoneburner, B.; Saltikov, C.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of prokaryotes in the redox reactions of arsenic occurring between its +5 [arsenate; As(V)] and +3 [arsenite; As(III)] oxidation states has been well established. Most research to date has focused upon circum-neutral pH environments (e.g., freshwater or estuarine sediments) or arsenic-rich “extreme” environments like hot springs and soda lakes. In contrast, relatively little work has been conducted in acidic environments. With this in mind we conducted experiments with sediments taken from the Herman Pit, an acid mine drainage impoundment of a former mercury (cinnabar) mine. Due to the large adsorptive capacity of the abundant Fe(III)-rich minerals, we were unable to initially detect in solution either As(V) or As(III) added to the aqueous phase of live sediment slurries or autoclaved controls, although the former consumed added electron donors (i.e., lactate, acetate, hydrogen), while the latter did not. This prompted us to conduct further experiments with diluted slurries using the live materials from the first incubation as inoculum. In these experiments we observed reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anoxic conditions and reduction rates were enhanced by addition of electron donors. We also observed oxidation of As(III) to As(V) in oxic slurries as well as in anoxic slurries amended with nitrate. We noted an acid-tolerant trend for sediment slurries in the cases of As(III) oxidation (aerobic and anaerobic) as well as for anaerobic As(V) reduction. These observations indicate the presence of a viable microbial arsenic redox cycle in the sediments of this extreme environment, a result reinforced by the successful amplification of arsenic functional genes (aioA, and arrA) from these materials.

  16. Nitrite isotope dynamics in coastal sediments: An intricate link between nitrogen and oxygen cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charoenpong, C.; Buchwald, C.; Ziebis, W.; Wankel, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Marine sediments often exhibit strong redox gradients, hosting a range of important nitrogen transformation processes. While the interplay among these microbially catalyzed nitrogen transformations has been well studied in the water column, the sharp redox transition in sediments often makes it far more difficult to unravel the complexity underpinning the cycling of nitrogen. Although often low in concentration, nitrite represents an important 'crossroad' in the nitrogen cycle as a reactive intermediate of both reductive and oxidative N transformations, including nitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium and denitrification. Here we focus on the dual isotopic composition of nitrite (δ15N and δ18O), in concert with nitrate and ammonium data, as a means for constraining the sedimentary N cycling. Intact flow-through core incubations were performed on sediments collected from intertidal flats on the island of Sylt, Germany. Three types of substrate (i.e., sand, silt, and clay) were collected and subjected to different oxygen (i.e., ambient vs depleted) and nitrogen (i.e., ambient vs highly loaded) regimes. In addition to the measurement of natural abundance N and O stable isotopes, we also amended cores with nitrate having a positive ∆17O in our high nitrogen treatment, which offers yet an additional tracer to further constrain these transformations. While the concentration and isotopic composition (δ15N and δ18O) of nitrite act to integrate the influence of major N redox reactions, the N and O isotope systematics are decoupled. Although nitrogen atoms are generally conserved among these transformations, oxygen isotopes of nitrite are subject to a different set of processes. For example, the loss of an oxygen atom during the reductive processes of NO3- and NO2- reduction, the gain of oxygen atoms from O2 and water during nitrification, and oxygen isotopic equilibration between nitrite and water are all reflected in the δ18O of NO2-. Thus, the

  17. Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Rekha

    1995-01-01

    Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes during the solar cycle are calculated for a non-magnetic polytrope convection zone model. An isothermal chromospheric atmosphere threaded by a uniform horizontal magnetic field is correlated to this model. The relevant observations of such frequency changes are discussed. The calculated simultaneous changes in the field strength and chromospheric temperature result in the frequency shifts that are similar to those of the observations.

  18. Nitrogen cycling processes and microbial community composition in bed sediments in the Yukon River at Pilot Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repert, Deborah A.; Underwood, Jennifer C.; Smith, Richard L.; Song, Bongkeun

    2014-12-01

    Information on the contribution of nitrogen (N)-cycling processes in bed sediments to river nutrient fluxes in large northern latitude river systems is limited. This study examined the relationship between N-cycling processes in bed sediments and N speciation and loading in the Yukon River near its mouth at the Bering Sea. We conducted laboratory bioassays to measure N-cycling processes in sediment samples collected over distinct water cycle seasons. In conjunction, the microbial community composition in the bed sediments using genes involved in N-cycling (narG, napA, nosZ, and amoA) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences was examined. Temporal variation was observed in net N mineralization, nitrate uptake, and denitrification rate potentials and correlated strongly with sediment carbon (C) and extractable N content and microbial community composition rather than with river water nutrient concentrations. The C content of the bed sediment was notably impacted by the spring flood, ranging from 1.1% in the midst of an ice-jam to 0.1% immediately after ice-out, suggesting a buildup of organic material (OM) prior to scouring of the bed sediments during ice break up. The dominant members of the microbial community that explained differences in N-processing rates belonged to the genera Crenothrix, Flavobacterium, and the family of Comamonadaceae. Our results suggest that biogeochemical processing rates in the bed sediments appear to be more coupled to hydrology, nutrient availability in the sediments, and microbial community composition rather than river nutrient concentrations at Pilot Station.

  19. Nitrogen cycling processes and microbial community composition in bed sediments in the Yukon River at Pilot Station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repert, Deborah A.; Underwood, Jennifer C.; Smith, Richard L.; Song, Bongkeun

    2014-01-01

    Information on the contribution of nitrogen (N)-cycling processes in bed sediments to river nutrient fluxes in large northern latitude river systems is limited. This study examined the relationship between N-cycling processes in bed sediments and N speciation and loading in the Yukon River near its mouth at the Bering Sea. We conducted laboratory bioassays to measure N-cycling processes in sediment samples collected over distinct water cycle seasons. In conjunction, the microbial community composition in the bed sediments using genes involved in N-cycling (narG, napA, nosZ, and amoA) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences was examined. Temporal variation was observed in net N mineralization, nitrate uptake, and denitrification rate potentials and correlated strongly with sediment carbon (C) and extractable N content and microbial community composition rather than with river water nutrient concentrations. The C content of the bed sediment was notably impacted by the spring flood, ranging from 1.1% in the midst of an ice-jam to 0.1% immediately after ice-out, suggesting a buildup of organic material (OM) prior to scouring of the bed sediments during ice break up. The dominant members of the microbial community that explained differences in N-processing rates belonged to the genera Crenothrix,Flavobacterium, and the family of Comamonadaceae. Our results suggest that biogeochemical processing rates in the bed sediments appear to be more coupled to hydrology, nutrient availability in the sediments, and microbial community composition rather than river nutrient concentrations at Pilot Station.

  20. Sediment trapping in the Changjiang Estuary: Observations in the North Passage over a spring-neap tidal cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangyu; Zhu, Jianrong; Yuan, Rui; Qiu, Cheng; Wu, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Water current, salinity, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) were measured at three anchored boat sites along the North Passage (NP) of the Changjiang Estuary over a spring-neap tidal cycle, in order to study sediment trapping and siltation in the estuary. Pronounced stratification was observed during the late flood tide and the following early ebb tide, along with an advancing and retreating salt wedge, whereas strong vertical mixing occurred during the late ebb when the effect of the salt wedge faded. Therefore, the SSC in the flood-ebb tidal cycle tended to be asymmetric. In the upper reach of the NP, the seaward advective near-bed sediment transport dominated the total near-bed sediment transport, whereas in the middle reach of the NP, the landward tidal pumping component dominated. Accordingly, a notable convergent near-bed residual sediment transport was generated near the middle reach. Because the convergence of residual sediment transport in the region of a salt wedge is generally recognized as sediment trapping, convergent near-bed residual sediment transport is the cause of the high sedimentation rate in the NP.

  1. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  2. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  3. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  4. High frequency stimulation can block axonal conduction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Alicia L; Durand, Dominique M

    2009-11-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) is used to control abnormal neuronal activity associated with movement, seizure, and psychiatric disorders. Yet, the mechanisms of its therapeutic action are not known. Although experimental results have shown that HFS suppresses somatic activity, other data has suggested that HFS could generate excitation of axons. Moreover it is unclear what effect the stimulation has on tissue surrounding the stimulation electrode. Electrophysiological and computational modeling literature suggests that HFS can drive axons at the stimulus frequency. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that unlike cell bodies, axons are driven by pulse train HFS. This hypothesis was tested in fibers of the hippocampus both in-vivo and in-vitro. Our results indicate that although electrical stimulation could activate and drive axons at low frequencies (0.5-25 Hz), as the stimulus frequency increased, electrical stimulation failed to continuously excite axonal activity. Fiber tracts were unable to follow extracellular pulse trains above 50 Hz in-vitro and above 125 Hz in-vivo. The number of cycles required for failure was frequency dependent but independent of stimulus amplitude. A novel in-vitro preparation was developed, in which, the alveus was isolated from the remainder of the hippocampus slice. The isolated fiber tract was unable to follow pulse trains above 75 Hz. Reversible conduction block occurred at much higher stimulus amplitudes, with pulse train HFS (>150 Hz) preventing propagation through the site of stimulation. This study shows that pulse train HFS affects axonal activity by: (1) disrupting HFS evoked excitation leading to partial conduction block of activity through the site of HFS; and (2) generating complete conduction block of secondary evoked activity, as HFS amplitude is increased. These results are relevant for the interpretation of the effects of HFS for the control of abnormal neural activity such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. PMID

  5. Microbial cycling of mercury in contaminated pelagic and wetland sediments of San Pablo Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Agee, J.L.; Bouse, R.M.; Jaffe, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    San Pablo Bay is an estuary, within northern San Francisco Bay, containing elevated sediment mercury (Hg) levels because of historic loading of hydraulic mining debris during the California gold-rush of the late 1800s. A preliminary investigation of benthic microbial Hg cycling was conducted in surface sediment (0-4 cm) collected from one salt-marsh and three open-water sites. A deeper profile (0-26 cm) was evaluated at one of the open-water locations. Radiolabeled model Hg-compounds were used to measure rates of both methylmercury (MeHg) production and degradation by bacteria. While all sites and depths had similar total-Hg concentrations (0.3-0.6 ppm), and geochemical signatures of mining debris (as eNd, range: -3.08 to -4.37), in-situ MeHg was highest in the marsh (5.4??3.5 ppb) and ??? 0.7 ppb in all open-water sites. Microbial MeHg production (potential rate) in 0-4 surface sediments was also highest in the marsh (3.1 ng g-1 wet sediment day-1) and below detection (<0.06 ng g-1 wet sediment day-1) in open-water locations. The marsh exhibited a methylation/demethylation (M/D) ratio more than 25x that of all open-water locations. Only below the surface 0-4-cm horizon was significant MeHg production potential evident in the open-water sediment profile (0.2-1.1 ng g-1 wet sediment day-1). In-situ Hg methylation rates, calculated from radiotracer rate constants, and in-situ inorganic Hg(II) concentrations compared well with potential rates. However, similarly calculated in-situ rates of MeHg degradation were much lower than potential rates. These preliminary data indicate that wetlands surrounding San Pablo Bay represent important zones of MeHg production, more so than similarly Hg-contaminated adjacent open-water areas. This has significant implications for this and other Hg-impacted systems, where wetland expansion is currently planned.

  6. Magnetic Properties of Bermuda Rise Sediments Controlled by Glacial Cycles During the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments from ODP site 1063 (Bermuda Rise, North Atlantic) contain a high-resolution record of geomagnetic field behavior during the Brunhes Chron. We present rock magnetic data of the upper 160 mcd (<900 ka) from hole 1063D that show magnetic properties vary in concert with glacial cycles. Magnetite appears to be the main magnetic carrier in the carbonate-dominated interglacial horizons, yet exhibits contrasting grain size distributions depending on the redox state of the horizons. Higher contributions of single domain magnetite exist above the present day sulfate reduction zone (ca. 44 mcd) with relatively higher multidomain magnetite components below that likely arise from the partial dissolution of SD magnetite in the deeper, anoxic horizons. Glacial horizons on the other hand, characterized by enhanced terrigenous deposition, show no evidence for diagenetic dissolution but do indicate the presence of authigenic greigite close to glacial maxima (acquisition of gyro-remanence, strong magnetostatic interactions and SD properties). Glacial horizons contain hematite (maxima in HIRM and S-Ratio consistent with a reddish hue) and exhibit higher ARM anisotropy and pronounced sedimentary fabrics. We infer that post depositional processes affected the magnetic grain size and mineralogy of Bermuda rise sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene. Hematite concentration is interpreted to reflect primary terrigenous input that is likely derived from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. A close correlation between HIRM and magnetic foliation suggests that changes in sediment composition (terrigenous vs. marine biogenic) were accompanied by changes in the depositional processes at the site.

  7. Sulfur and iron cycling in deep-subsurface, coal bed-containing sediments off Shimokita (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, N.; Smirnoff, M. N.; Gilhooly, W.; Phillips, S. C.; Lyons, T. W.; 337 Scientific Party, I.

    2013-12-01

    The main goal of IODP Expedition 337 was the identification and characterization of the deep coal bed biosphere and hydrocarbon system off the Shimokita Peninsula (Japan) in the northwestern Pacific using the D/V Chikyu. To accomplish this scientific objective, it was also necessary to investigate the inorganic biogeochemistry in order to identify possible electron acceptors and bio-essential nutrients. These biogeochemical parameters greatly influence both, the composition and abundance of microbial communities as well as the organic carbon cycle. In turn, the microbially mediated carbon cycle influences the diagenetic reactions in the subsurface, thus, altering geochemical and physical characteristics of the material. Here we present results from metal and sulfur geochemical analyses from the deep-subsurface sediments (about 1250 to 2466 mbsf) at Site C0020 off Shimokita. The measured concentrations of acid volatile sulfur (AVS) as well as chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) reflect the alteration of iron oxides to iron sulfides and indicate that the main sulfur-bearing phase in the investigated sediments is pyrite. Concentrations of intermediate sulfur species are minor and occur mainly in the coal-bearing interval. Our data show that the uppermost sediments contain higher amounts of pyrite (up to 1.2 wt.%) with an average of 0.5 wt.% compared to the deeper deposits (below about 1800 mbsf), which show an average of 0.16 wt.%. In contrast, iron oxide concentrations are highest in the deeper sediment sections (up to 0.4%), where pyrite concentrations are low. The alteration of iron oxides to sulfides in theses lower section was probably governed by the amount of available sulfide in the pore water. The occurrence of (bio-)reactive iron phases in these deeply buried sediments has implications for the deep biosphere as those minerals have the potential to serve as electron acceptors during burial, including reactions involving deep sourced electron donors, such as

  8. Biogeography and diversity of methane and sulfur-cycling ecotypes in deep subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Biddle, J.; Girguis, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    The microbially mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is critical for regulating the flux of methane from the ocean. AOM is coupled to sulfate availability in many anoxic marine environments, which has been extensively studied at cold seeps, hydrothermal vents, and the sulfate-methane transition zone at the seafloor. The microbes known to catalyze AOM form phylogenetically distinct anaerobic methanotroph (ANME) clusters and sometimes live in concert with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Strikingly, certain ANME groups and subgroups have been shown to occupy different ecological niches in both hydrocarbon seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. However, the environmental parameters that select for certain phylogenetic variants or 'ecotypes' in a wide range of marine systems are still unknown. A marine environment that remains elusive to characterization of potential ANME and SRB ecotype diversity is methane hydrate formations in the deep subsurface. Current estimates indicate that seafloor hydrates may exceed 10,000 GtC at standard temperature and pressure conditions. However, only a handful of studies have investigated the potential for AOM in the deep subsurface associated with methane hydrates. To gain a better understanding of the distribution of methane- and sulfur- cycling ecotypes in biogeochemically distinct marine subsurface ecosystems, we generated a substantial library of 16S rRNA gene sequences for these uncultivable deep sea microorganisms using Illumina sequencing. Sediment strata were collected from the methane-hydrate associated deep subsurface of Hydrate Ridge (30 - 100 mbsf), hydrocarbon cold seeps of Monterey Bay, metalliferous sedimented hydrothermal vents of Juan de Fuca Ridge, and organic-rich hydrothermally influenced sediments of Guaymas Basin. We used the Illumina MiSeq sequencing platform to assess Archaeal and Bacterial richness in a total of 36 deep sea sediment samples followed by qPCR for quantification of ANME and SRB phylotype

  9. The effects of wastewater discharge on the microbiological nitrogen cycle of the lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarenheimo, Jatta; Aalto, Sanni L.; Tiirola, Marja

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic wastewater inputs alter the natural dynamics of nitrogen (N) cycle by providing high concentrations of nitrate and organic matter to the sediment microbes. It can also change the microbial community composition and N removal potential but this is currently not that well studied. To study these aspects, we conducted ecosystem-scale experiment in Lake Keurusselkä, Finland. In the experiment, the wastewater discharge to the recipient lake was optimized with sediment filtration, which increased the surface and retention time of the nitrified wastewater with the sediment. In addition to N transformation rates, which showed that optimization enhanced denitrification, we studied the microbial responses at the sediment. Genetic potential of nitrogen transformation processes, such as denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and nitrification were studied by targeting the functional genes (i.e. nirS, nirK, nosZI, nosZII, nrfA, amoAarchaea and amoAbacteria) with quantitative PCR and digital droplet PCR. In addition, changes in the microbial community composition along the wastewater gradient were examined by using next generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. In line with our hypothesis, the relative abundance of denitrifying genes followed the observed denitrification rates, being highest near the nitrate-rich wastewater discharge. Furthermore the microbial community composition in the discharge point differed clearly from the control and downstream sites, having also the highest numbers of rare OTUs. Abundance of nitrifying bacteria was higher than nitrifying archaea near the waste water discharge, whereas the opposite was seen at the control site. The results indicate that wastewater is not only increasing the denitrification rates, but can also alter the structure and genetic potential microbial communities.

  10. Time-dependent behavior of a placed bed of cohesive sediment subjected to erosion and deposition cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, G.; Valentine, K.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to explore the behavior of a cohesive sediment bed that undergoes cycles of erosion and deposition under diluted conditions. A bed of bentonite (montmorillonite) sediment was placed in two annular flumes and subjected to daily erosion tests for a period of 80 days, mimicking intermittent moderate-energy disturbances like tidal currents and wind waves. After each erosion test, the suspended sediment was allowed to settle back in the flumes. The amount of suspended sediment measured at the top of the water column at the end of each erosion test decreased in the first 5 days, concurrently with an increase in the bulk-settling velocity near the bed. This pattern is explained by turbulence-induced flocculation of clay particles and consequent formation of a surface floc layer. After about 20 days, the amount of suspended sediment measured at the top of the water column at the end of each erosion test increased and the settling velocity decreased, whereas the suspended sediment concentration measured near the bed remained nearly constant. We explain such trend by the cumulative release of slow-settling particles from the bed. This experiment suggests that the superficial layer of a placed bed that is periodically eroded and redeposited experiences competing processes: the sediment that is resuspended at every cycle becomes less erodible, but prolonged exposure to shear stress increases the pool of eroded sediment over time. The total amount of resuspended sediment seems to become constant after several tens of cycle, suggesting that the release of particles from the bed by cumulative erosion is balanced by the binding of such particles to the bed.

  11. Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment of Sediment Remediation at the London Olympic Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, D.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there is an emerging 'green and sustainable remediation' (GSR) movement. It is drawing increasing attention from both the government and the industry, because this GSR movement is promising in accelerating process in addressing the contaminated land issue, by overcoming regulatory barriers, encouraging technological innovation, and balancing life cycle environmental stewardship with economic vitality and social well-being. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been increasingly used by both researchers and industrial practitioners in an initiative to make environmental remediation greener and more sustainable. Life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA), aiming at expanding the traditional LCA model in both breadth and depth (e.g. to incorporate both environmental and social-economic sustainability), is an important research direction in the existing LCA research field. The present study intends to develop a LCSA method based on a hybrid LCA model and economic input-output (EIO) data. The LCSA method is applied to a contaminated sediment remediation project conducted at the London Olympic Park site.

  12. A geomorphic-geochemical framework for quantifying the cycling of sediment-associated contaminants in fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Patrick; Lopez-Tarazon, Jose; Williams, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Recent high-profile contamination events linked to extreme floods have underlined the persistent environmental risk posed by legacy metals stored in fluvial systems worldwide. While we understand that the fate of sediment-associated metals is largely determined by the dynamics of the fluvial transport system, we still lack a process-based understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms that affect the physical and geochemical transfer of metals through catchments. This interdisciplinary project will exploit advances in geomorphic and geochemical analyses to develop a methodological approach and conceptual framework to answer key questions related to the dynamics and timescales of metal cycling in fluvial systems. The approach will be tested in two reaches of the mining-impacted Afon Twymyn, Wales. The main objectives are: (i) quantify the physical transport of sediment and metals over a range of river flows and model sediment pathways; (ii) establish the geochemical mobility and speciation of sediment-associated metals and how this is modified through the sediment pathways. To achieve these objectives a geomorphic-geochemical combined methodology will be applied. It includes: (i) Aerial imagery that will be acquired from UAV surveys pre- and post-high flows and transformed into high-resolution DEMs using Structure-from-Motion; (ii) suspended sediment flux will be estimated indirectly by field calibration with a logging turbidimeter; (iii) 2D hydraulic and sediment transport model (Delft3D) will be used to quantify the transport of sediment and associated metals and to map the source, pathway and sink of contaminated sediment; (iv) soil and sediment samples (including suspended sediment) will be collected pre- and post-high flows for geochemical (concentration, speciation) and mineralogical (XRD, SEM) analyses; (v) finally, a geochemical model (Geochemists Workbench) will be developed to generate hypotheses that explain observed geochemical change as a function

  13. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, S; ter Brake, H J M; Jansen, H V; Zhao, Y; Holland, H J; Burger, J F; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80 K, delivering a cooling power of 10 mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5 MPa and compression volume of about 22.6 mm(3) when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100 V at a frequency of 1 kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73 W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers. PMID:18447548

  14. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  15. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  16. Linking Sediment Microbial Communities to Carbon Cycling in High-Latitude Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, J. B.; Varner, R. K.; Johnson, J. E.; Owusu-Dommey, A.; Binder, M.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Wik, M.; Freitas, N. L.; Boyd, J. A.; Crill, P. M.; Saleska, S. R.; Tyson, G. W.; Rich, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    It is well recognized that thawing permafrost peatlands are likely to provide a positive feedback to climate change via CH4 and CO2 emissions. High-latitude lakes in these landscapes have also been identified as sources of CH4 and CO2 loss to the atmosphere. To investigate microbial contributions to carbon loss from high-latitude lakes, we characterized sediment geochemistry and microbiota via cores collected from deep and shallow regions of two lakes (Inre Harrsjön and Mellersta Harrsjön) in Arctic Sweden in July, 2012. These lakes are within the Stordalen Mire long-term ecological area, a focal site for investigating the impacts of climate change-related permafrost thaw, and the lakes in this area are responsible for ~55% of the CH4 loss from this hydrologically interconnected system. Across 40 samples from 4 to 40 cm deep within four sediment cores, Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the sedimentary microbiota was dominated by candidate phyla OP9 and OP8 (Atribacteria and Aminicenantes, respectively, including putative fermenters and anaerobic respirers), predicted methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria, and predicted methanogenic archaea from the Thermoplasmata Group E2 clade. We observed some overlap in community structure with nearby peatlands, which tend to be dominated by methanogens and Acidobacteria. Sediment microbial communities differed significantly between lakes, by overlying lake depth (shallow vs. deep), and by depth within a core, with each trend corresponding to parallel differences in biogeochemical measurements. Overall, our results support the potential for significant microbial controls on carbon cycling in high-latitude lakes associated with thawing permafrost, and ongoing metagenomic analyses of focal samples will yield further insight into the functional potential of these microbial communities and their dominant members.

  17. Impacts of shrimp farming cultivation cycles on macrobenthic assemblages and chemistry of sediments.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Luisa F; Eça, Gilmara F; Barros, Francisco; Hatje, Vanessa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a shrimp farm cultivation cycle in the composition of sediments and on the structure of macrobenthic assemblages. Concentrations of nutrients, Zn and Cu were significantly higher in impact than control areas. In general, the level of contaminants was highest during the harvesting period and in sites closest to the discharge of effluents. Abundances and number of taxa of benthic invertebrates were at least one order of magnitude smaller in impacted areas than in controls. The structure of the benthic assemblages was significantly different at these two treatments. The combined use of biological and chemical data showed to be efficient to provide precise answers regarding the extent of impacts caused by shrimp cultivation. The results provide the basis for a better understanding of impacts of this activity and can subsidize the development of better management practices for coastal areas. PMID:26774777

  18. The link between marine sediment records and changes in Holocene Saharan landscape: simulating the dust cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerer, Sabine; Claussen, Martin; Reick, Christian; Stanelle, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment records reveal an abrupt and strong increase in dust deposition in the North Atlantic at the end of the African Humid Period about 4.9 to 5.5 ka ago. The change in dust flux has been attributed to varying Saharan land surface cover. Alternatively, the enhanced dust accumulation is linked to enhanced surface winds and a consequent intensification of coastal upwelling. Here we demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine cores and changes in Saharan land surface. We simulate the mid-Holocene (6 ka BP) and pre-industrial (1850 AD) dust cycle as a function of Saharan land surface cover and atmosphere-ocean conditions using the coupled atmosphere-aerosol model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.1. Mid-Holocene surface characteristics, including vegetation cover and lake surface area, are derived from proxy data and simulations. In agreement with data from marine sediment cores, our simulations show that mid-Holocene dust deposition fluxes in the North Atlantic were two to three times lower compared with pre-industrial fluxes. We identify Saharan land surface characteristics to be the main control on dust transport from North Africa to the North Atlantic. We conclude that the increase in dust accumulation in marine cores is directly linked to a transition of the Saharan landscape during the Holocene and not due to changes in atmospheric or ocean conditions alone.

  19. Marine Snow and Gels: Hot Spots of Biogeochemical Cycling, Biological Activity, and Sedimentation in the Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alldredge, A. L.

    2004-12-01

    Much of the organic carbon sequestered in the deep sea and ocean bottom sediments as relatively rare, large detrital particles generically known as marine snow. Because they are enriched in organic matter, microbes, and nutrients, these large particles also serve as hot spots for biological and chemical process in the water column. Recent evidence reveals that abundant carbohydrate gel particles in the ocean, formed from the dissolved exudates of phytoplankton and bacteria, are intricately involved in the formation of marine snow. These discoveries are changing the way we conceptualize the pelagic zone on small scales. We no longer imagine seawater as a relatively homogeneous fluid in which float a spectrum of dispersed molecules, particles, and organisms, but instead see it as a rich hydrated matrix of transparent organic gels, detritus, and cob-web like surfaces which provide microscale physical, chemical, and biological structure. This talk will focus on the origins, fate, and significance of marine snow and gels in the sea, including their role in carbon cycling, sedimentation and carbon flux , food webs, and chemical and biological transformation.

  20. Intense nitrogen cycling in permeable intertidal sediment revealed by a nitrous oxide hot spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Charles A.; Joye, Samantha B.; Wilson, Alicia M.; Evans, Tyler; Moore, Willard S.; Casciotti, Karen

    2015-10-01

    Approximately 40% of the total global rate of nitrogen fixation is the result of human activities, and most of this anthropogenic nitrogen is used to fertilize agricultural fields. Approximately 23% of the applied agricultural nitrogen is delivered to the coastal zone, often reducing water quality and driving eutrophication. Nitrogen cycling in coastal sediments can mitigate eutrophication by removing bioavailable nitrogen. However, some of these processes generate nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas, as a by-product. Here we report the discovery of a nitrous oxide production hot spot in shallow barrier island sands. Nitrous oxide concentrations, production and consumption rates, vertical diffusion fluxes, and flux to the atmosphere were measured across triplicate depth profiles. Using a mass balance approach, rates of net nitrous oxide production were estimated to be 40 µmol m-2 d-1. This production was driven by a hot spot of nitrate consumption that removed bioavailable nitrogen from the coastal environment at a rate of 10 mmol m-2 d-1, a rate that is comparable with the highest rates of denitrification reported for coastal sediments.

  1. Possible roles of uncultured archaea in carbon cycling in methane-seep sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Marcos Y.; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Elvert, Marcus; Lin, Yu-Shih; Zhu, Chun; Heuer, Verena B.; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Studies on microbial carbon cycling uniformly confirm that anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria represent the dominant and most active fraction of the sedimentary microbial community in methane-seep sediments. However, little is known about other frequently observed and abundant microbial taxa, their role in carbon cycling and association with the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we provide a comprehensive characterization of stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) from several intact polar lipid (IPL) classes and metabolite pools in a downcore profile at a cold seep within the oxygen minimum zone off Pakistan. We aimed to evaluate microbial carbon metabolism using IPLs in relation to redox conditions, metabolites and 16S rRNA gene libraries. The 13C-depleted signature of carbon pools and microbial metabolites in pore waters (e.g., dissolved inorganic carbon, lactate and acetate) demonstrated high accumulation of AOM-associated biomass and subsequent turnover thereof. ANMEs accounted for a small fraction of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene survey, whereas sequences of other uncultured benthic archaea dominated the clone libraries, particularly the Marine Benthic Group D. On the basis of lipid diversity and carbon isotope information, we suggest that structurally diverse phospho- and glycolipids, including the recently identified unsaturated tetraethers that are particularly abundant in this setting, are likely derived from archaea other than ANMEs. Through the evaluation of δ13C values of individual IPL, our results indicate heterotrophy as a possible metabolic pathway of archaea in these AOM-dominated sediments.

  2. Source-to-sink cycling of aeolian sediment in the north polar region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian sand dunes are prominent features on the landscapes of Earth, Mars, Venus and Titan and sedimentary deposits interpreted as aeolian in origin are found in the rock records of Earth and Mars. The widespread occurrence of aeolian dunes on the surface of these worlds and within their deep-time depositional records suggests that aeolian systems are and likely have been a default depositional environment for the Solar System. Within an aeolian source-to-sink context, we hypothesize that planet-specific boundary conditions strongly impact production, transport, accumulation and preservation of aeolian sediment, whereas dunes and dune-field patterns remain largely similar. This hypothesis is explored within the north polar region of Mars, which hosts the most extensive aeolian dune fields and aeolian sedimentary deposits yet recognized on Mars and appears to be a region of dynamic source-to-sink cycling of aeolian sediments. The Planum Boreum Cavi Unit rests beneath north polar ice cap of Mars and is composed of several hundred meters of niveo-aeolian dune cross-stratification. The overall architecture of the unit consists of sets of preserved dune topography with an upward increase in the abundance of ice. Dune sets are defined by stabilized, polygonally fractured bounding surfaces, erosional bounding surfaces and typical internal lee foresets made of sediment and ice. The accumulation of the Cavi Unit is interpreted as occurring through freezing and serves as an example of a cold temperature boundary condition on aeolian sediment accumulation. Preservation of the Cavi Unit arises because of deposition of the overlying ice cap and contrasts with preservation of aeolian sediment on Earth, which is largely driven by eustasy and tectonics. The Cavi Unit is thought to be one source of sediment for the north polar Olympia Undae Dune Field. The region of Olympia Undae near the Cavi Unit shows a reticulate dune field pattern composed of two sets of nearly orthogonal

  3. Microbial Fe cycling and mineralization in sediments of an acidic, hypersaline lake (Lake Tyrell, Victoria, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, E. E.; Blöthe, M.; Shelobolina, E.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Tyrrell is a variably acidic, hypersaline, Fe-rich lake located in Victoria, Australia. Terrestrial acid saline lakes like Lake Tyrrell may be analogs for ancient Martian surface environments, as well as possible extant subsurface environments. To investigate the potential for microbial Fe cycling under acidic conditions and high salt concentration, we collected sediment core samples during three field trips between 2006 and 2008 from the southern, acidic edge of the lake. Materials from the cores were used for chemical and mineralogical analyses, as well as for molecular (16S rRNA genes) and culture-based microbiological studies. Near-surface (< 1 m depth) pore fluids contained low but detectable dissolved oxygen (ca. 50 uM), significant dissolved Fe(II) (ca. 500 uM), and nearly constant pH of around 4 - conditions conducive to enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation. High concentrations of Fe(III) oxides begin accumulate at a depth of ca. 10 cm, and may reflect the starting point for formation of massive iron concretions that are evident at and beneath the sediment surface. MPN analyses revealed low (10-100 cells/mL) but detectable populations of aerobic, halophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms on the sediment surface and in the near-surface ground water. With culture-dependent methods at least three different halotolerant lithoautotrophic cultures growing on Fe(II), thiosulfate, or tetrathionate from different acidic sites were obtained. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that these organisms are similar to previous described gamma proteobacteria Thiobacillus prosperus (95%), Halothiobacillus kellyi (99%), Salinisphaera shabanense (95%) and a Marinobacter species. (98%). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data from two different sites with a pH range between 3 and 4.5 revealed a dominance of gamma proteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing libraries from both cores were dominated by sequences related to the Ectothiorhodospiraceae family, which includes the taxa

  4. Biostimulation induces syntrophic interactions that impact C, S and N cycling in a sediment microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Kim M; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Steefel, Carl I; Williams, Kenneth H; Sharon, Itai; Miller, Christopher S; Frischkorn, Kyle R; Chourey, Karuna; Thomas, Brian C; Shah, Manesh B; Long, Philip E; Hettich, Robert L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of subsurface microorganisms to induce reductive immobilization of metals is a promising approach for bioremediation, yet the overall microbial community response is typically poorly understood. Here we used proteogenomics to test the hypothesis that excess input of acetate activates complex community functioning and syntrophic interactions among autotrophs and heterotrophs. A flow-through sediment column was incubated in a groundwater well of an acetate-amended aquifer and recovered during microbial sulfate reduction. De novo reconstruction of community sequences yielded near-complete genomes of Desulfobacter (Deltaproteobacteria), Sulfurovum- and Sulfurimonas-like Epsilonproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Partial genomes were obtained for Clostridiales (Firmicutes) and Desulfuromonadales-like Deltaproteobacteria. The majority of proteins identified by mass spectrometry corresponded to Desulfobacter-like species, and demonstrate the role of this organism in sulfate reduction (Dsr and APS), nitrogen fixation and acetate oxidation to CO2 during amendment. Results indicate less abundant Desulfuromonadales, and possibly Bacteroidetes, also actively contributed to CO2 production via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Proteomic data indicate that sulfide was partially re-oxidized by Epsilonproteobacteria through nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation (using Nap, Nir, Nos, SQR and Sox), with CO2 fixed using the reverse TCA cycle. We infer that high acetate concentrations, aimed at stimulating anaerobic heterotrophy, led to the co-enrichment of, and carbon fixation in Epsilonproteobacteria. Results give an insight into ecosystem behavior following addition of simple organic carbon to the subsurface, and demonstrate a range of biological processes and community interactions were stimulated. PMID:23190730

  5. Determining the Effects of Oiled Sediment on Fish Life Cycle Endpoints using the Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of long-term effects of exposure to crude oil is critical for ascertaining population-level risk following spill events. A 19-week life-cycle experiment was conducted with the estuarine sheepshead minnow exposed to natural sediment spiked with weathered Louisiana S...

  6. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  7. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  8. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period. PMID:12199947

  9. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  10. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  11. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  12. Abrupt Climate Change During the Last Glacial Cycle Based on Gulf of Mexico Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Hastings, D. W.; Hill, H.; Quinn, T. M.

    2003-12-01

    Evidence is emerging that the tropical climate system played a major role in past global climate change during the last glacial cycle. However, existing studies indicate asynchronous temperature variability in the western equatorial Atlantic, complicating the identification of causal mechanisms. Because the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is linked to the equatorial Atlantic, sea-surface temperature (SST) records from the GOM help assess the phasing between low- and high-latitude Atlantic climate. High sedimentation rates of >40 cm/k.y. and laminated sediments in Orca Basin allow sub-centennial-scale resolution. Paired δ 18O and Mg/Ca data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from core EN32-PC6 are used to separate deglacial changes in SST and δ 18Oseawater due to low-salinity meltwater from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). Mg-SST increases by >3.0° C between 17.2 and 15.2 ka (calendar years) encompassing Heinrich Event 1 in the North Atlantic. Comparison to polar ice core records indicates GOM SST was not in phase with Greenland air temperature, consistent with thermohaline circulation modulation of Atlantic climate. This warming represents the bulk of the 4.2+/-0.9° C increase from the last glacial maximum (24.0+/-0.8° C) to early Holocene (29.0+/-0.4° C). Subtracting temperature and ice-volume effects from Gs. ruber δ 18O reveals two episodes of LIS meltwater input, one of >1.5% from ca. 16.2-15.7 ka and a second major spike of >2% from ca. 15.2-13.0 ka that encompassed meltwater pulse 1A (mwp-1A) and peaked at ca. 13.4 ka. These results suggest that (1) subtropical Atlantic SST warming preceded peak LIS decay and mwp-1A by >2 k.y., (2) thermohaline circulation may have modulated Atlantic climate on the millennial scale during the last deglaciation, and (3) major LIS meltwater input to the GOM ended before North Atlantic Deep Water suppression during the Younger Dryas. A new 31.79 m Calypso piston core collected in July 2002 on the R/V Marion Dufresne

  13. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    PubMed Central

    Benzine, Jason; Xiong, Mai Yia; Kennedy, David W.; McKinley, James P.; Lin, Xueju; Roden, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe) in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ “i-chip” enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria) and six Fe(II) phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8), Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5), and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31) were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II)-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II)-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II)-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments. PMID:24379809

  14. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Benzine, Jason; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xiong, Mai Yia; Kennedy, David W.; McKinley, James P.; Lin, Xueju; Roden, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe) in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ "i-chip" enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria) and six Fe(II) phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8), Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5), and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31) were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II)-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II)-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II)-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  15. Stable isotope biogeochemistry of the sulfur cycle in modern marine sediments: I. Seasonal dynamics in a temperate intertidal sandy surface sediment.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Michael; Hespenheide, Britta; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Bosselmann, Katja

    2004-12-01

    A biogeochemical and stable isotope geochemical study was carried out in surface sediments of an organic-matter poor temperate intertidal sandy surface sediment (German Wadden Sea of the North Sea) to investigate the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria and the dynamics of the vertical partitioning of sedimentary sulfur, iron, and manganese species in relation to the availability of total organic carbon (TOC) and mud contents. The contents and stable isotopic compositions ((34)S/(32)S) of total reduced inorganic sulfur species (TRIS) and dissolved sulfate were measured. Maximum oxygen penetration depths were estimated from the onset of a blackening of the sediments due to FeS accumulation and ranged from 5 to 10 mm below surface (mmbsf). A zone of relatively moderate relative organic-matter enrichment was found between 5 and 20 mmbsf leading to enhanced activities of sulfate-reducing bacteria with sulfate-reduction rates (SRR) up to 350 nmol cm(-3) d(-1). Below this zone, microbial SRR dropped significantly. Depth integrated SRR seem to depend not only on temperature but also on the availability of reactive organic matter. The sulfur-isotopic composition of TRIS was depleted in (34)S by 33-40 per thousand with respect to coexisting dissolved sulfate (constant at about +21 per thousand vs. Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT)). Since sulfate reduction is not limited by dissolved sulfate (open system), depth variations of the isotopic composition of TRIS reflect changes in overall isotope effect due to superimposed microbial and abiotic reactions. Most of the solid-phase iron and manganese was bonded to (non-reactive) heavy minerals. However, a layer of reactive Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxi(hydroxi)des was found in the uppermost sediment section due to re-oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) and Mn(II) species at the sediment-water interface. Metal cycling below the surface is at least partially coupled to intense sulfur cycling. PMID:15621745

  16. Role of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos insecticide use on diffuse Cd loss and sediment accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangli; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Jiao, Wei; Shan, Yushu; Lin, Chunye

    2016-01-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles are predicted to increase in cold temperate regions. The potential influence of the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and agrochemicals on the release of Cd into river water is unknown. In this study, the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos (FC) on Cd mobility in soils were analysed. The spatial variability of soil Cd under long-term intensive tillage in a freeze-thaw agro-system was also identified. The temporal variation of sediment Cd was detected based on analysis of the sediment geochemistry. The results showed that FC increased soil Cd mobility, with an increase of approximately 10% in CaCl2-extractable Cd. The increased mobile fractions of water-soluble and exchangeable Cd originated from the decreased fraction of Fe-Mn-oxide-associated Cd and organic matter-bound Cd. The total Cd content in the surface soil followed the zonally decreasing trend of dry land > paddy land > natural land. The Cd concentrations and sedimentation rates of the sediment core generally increased from 1943 to 2013 due to agricultural exploration and farmland irrigation system construction, indicating an increase of the Cd input flux into water. The results provide valuable information about the soil Cd transport response to the influence of climatic and anthropogenic factors in cold intensive agro-systems. PMID:27250820

  17. Role of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos insecticide use on diffuse Cd loss and sediment accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangli; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Jiao, Wei; Shan, Yushu; Lin, Chunye

    2016-01-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles are predicted to increase in cold temperate regions. The potential influence of the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and agrochemicals on the release of Cd into river water is unknown. In this study, the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos (FC) on Cd mobility in soils were analysed. The spatial variability of soil Cd under long-term intensive tillage in a freeze-thaw agro-system was also identified. The temporal variation of sediment Cd was detected based on analysis of the sediment geochemistry. The results showed that FC increased soil Cd mobility, with an increase of approximately 10% in CaCl2-extractable Cd. The increased mobile fractions of water-soluble and exchangeable Cd originated from the decreased fraction of Fe-Mn-oxide-associated Cd and organic matter-bound Cd. The total Cd content in the surface soil followed the zonally decreasing trend of dry land > paddy land > natural land. The Cd concentrations and sedimentation rates of the sediment core generally increased from 1943 to 2013 due to agricultural exploration and farmland irrigation system construction, indicating an increase of the Cd input flux into water. The results provide valuable information about the soil Cd transport response to the influence of climatic and anthropogenic factors in cold intensive agro-systems. PMID:27250820

  18. Role of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos insecticide use on diffuse Cd loss and sediment accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangli; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Jiao, Wei; Shan, Yushu; Lin, Chunye

    2016-06-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles are predicted to increase in cold temperate regions. The potential influence of the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and agrochemicals on the release of Cd into river water is unknown. In this study, the interactions of freeze-thaw cycles and chlorpyrifos (FC) on Cd mobility in soils were analysed. The spatial variability of soil Cd under long-term intensive tillage in a freeze-thaw agro-system was also identified. The temporal variation of sediment Cd was detected based on analysis of the sediment geochemistry. The results showed that FC increased soil Cd mobility, with an increase of approximately 10% in CaCl2-extractable Cd. The increased mobile fractions of water-soluble and exchangeable Cd originated from the decreased fraction of Fe-Mn-oxide-associated Cd and organic matter-bound Cd. The total Cd content in the surface soil followed the zonally decreasing trend of dry land > paddy land > natural land. The Cd concentrations and sedimentation rates of the sediment core generally increased from 1943 to 2013 due to agricultural exploration and farmland irrigation system construction, indicating an increase of the Cd input flux into water. The results provide valuable information about the soil Cd transport response to the influence of climatic and anthropogenic factors in cold intensive agro-systems.

  19. Biostimulation induces syntrophic interactions that impact C, S and N cycling in a sediment microbial community

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, KM; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Steefel, Carl I; Sharon, I; Williams, Ken; Miller, CS; Frischkorn, Kyle C; Chourey, Karuna; Thomas, Brian; Shah, Manesh B; Long, Phil; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of subsurface microorganisms to induce reductive immobilization of metals is a promising approach for bioremediation, yet the overall microbial community response is typically poorly understood. Here we used community proteogenomics to test the hypothesis that excess input of acetate activates syntrophic interactions among autotrophs and heterotrophs. A flow-through sediment column was incubated in a groundwater well of an acetate-amended aquifer. Genomic sequences from the community recovered during microbial sulfate reduction were used to econstruct, de novo, near-complete genomes for Desulfobacter (Deltaproteobacteria) and relatives of Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas (Epsilonproteobacteria), and Bacteroidetes. Partial genomes were obtained for Clostridiales (Firmicutes) and Desulfuromonadales-like Deltaproteobacteria. The majority of proteins identified by mass spectrometry corresponded to Desulfobacter-like species, and demonstrate the role of this organism in sulfate reduction (Dsr and APS), nitrogen-fixation (Nif) and acetate oxidation to CO2 during amendment. Results suggest less abundant Desulfuromonadales and Bacteroidetes also actively contributed to CO2 production via the TCA cycle. Proteomic data indicate that sulfide was partially re-oxidized by Epsilonproteobacteria through nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation (using Nap, Nir, Nos, SQR and Sox), with CO2 fixed using the reverse TCA cycle. Modeling shows that this reaction was thermodynamically possible, and kinetically favorable relative to acetate-dependent denitrification. We conclude that high-levels of carbon amendment aimed to stimulate anaerobic heterotrophy led to carbon fixation in co-dependent chemoautotrophs. These results have implications for understanding complex ecosystem behavior, and show that high levels of organic carbon supplementation can expand the range of microbial functionalities accessible for ecosystem manipulation.

  20. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  1. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  2. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  3. High frequency ultrasonic mitigation of microbial corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahamedh, Hussain H.; Meegan, G. Douglas; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.; Spear, John R.

    2012-05-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in oil industry facilities, and considerable effort has been spent to mitigate this costly issue. More environmentally benign methods are under consideration as alternatives to biocides, among which are ultrasonic techniques. In this study, a high frequency ultrasonic technique (HFUT) was used as a mitigation method for MIC. The killing percentages of the HFUT were higher than 99.8 percent and their corrosivity on steel was reduced by more than 50 percent. The practice and result will be discussed.

  4. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  5. Inviscid fluid in high frequency excitation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of high frequency excitations (HFE) on a fluid is investigated. The response to these excitations is decomposed in two parts: 'slow' motion, which practically remains unchanged during the vanishingly small period tau, and 'fast' motion whose value during this period is negligible in terms of displacements, but is essential in terms of the kinetic energy. After such a decomposition the 'slow' and 'fast' motions become nonlinearly coupled by the corresponding governing equations. This coupling leads to an 'effective' potential energy which imparts some 'elastic' properties to the fluid and stabilizes laminar flows.

  6. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model v2.0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2012-01-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. LOSCAR's configuration of ocean geometry is flexible and allows for easy switching between modern and paleo-versions. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  7. Molecular biological and isotopic biogeochemical prognoses of the nitrification-driven dynamic microbial nitrogen cycle in hadopelagic sediments.

    PubMed

    Nunoura, Takuro; Nishizawa, Manabu; Kikuchi, Tohru; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Hirai, Miho; Koide, Osamu; Miyazaki, Junichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2013-11-01

    There has been much progress in understanding the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters including the recent identification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, and in the comprehensive estimation in abundance and activity of these microbial populations. However, compared with the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters, there are fewer studies concerning the oceanic benthic nitrogen cycle. To further elucidate the dynamic nitrogen cycle in deep-sea sediments, a sediment core obtained from the Ogasawara Trench at a water depth of 9760 m was analysed in this study. The profiles obtained for the pore-water chemistry, and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopic compositions of pore-water nitrate in the hadopelagic sediments could not be explained by the depth segregation of nitrifiers and nitrate reducers, suggesting the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction in the shallowest nitrate reduction zone. The abundance of SSU rRNA and functional genes related to nitrification and denitrification are consistent with the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction observed in the geochemical analyses. This study presents the first example of cooperation between aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen metabolism in the deep-sea sedimentary environments. PMID:23718903

  8. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  9. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  10. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  11. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  12. Growth responses of an estuarine fish exposed to mixed trace elements in sediments over a full life cycle.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher L

    2003-02-01

    Hatchling Cyprinodon variegatus were raised in the presence or absence of sediments contaminated with mixed trace elements to examine lethal and sublethal bioenergetic effects (metabolic rate, lipid storage, growth, reproduction) over a full life cycle (>1 year). Contaminated sediments were derived from a site receiving coal combustion residues (CCR) and were elevated in numerous trace elements including Al, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, Se, and V. Exposures were conducted at two levels of salinity (5 and 36 ppt) to examine the potential interaction of this variable with contaminants. Salinity had no effect on responses measured. Over the course of the study, fish exposed to contaminated sediment accumulated several CCR-related trace elements, including As, Cd, Se, and V. There were no differences in fish survival for contaminated sediment treatments and uncontaminated sediment treatments, nor were there differences in metabolic expenditures. However, growth, male condition factor, and storage lipid content in females were reduced due to contaminant exposure. No significant effects on fecundity or the proportion of females that were gravid at the end of the study were observed, yet females raised under control conditions produced 12% larger eggs than did females raised on contaminated sediments. During the presumably most-sensitive early life stages, individuals were not noticeably affected by contaminants, but rather the effects of exposure became apparent later in life. Because many species inhabit contaminated areas for long periods of time, often encompassing the entire life cycle, exposures focused only on specific life stages may substantially underestimate the overall responses elicited by individuals. PMID:12550102

  13. Distribution and preservation of black carbon in the East China Sea sediments: Perspectives on carbon cycling at continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Ying; Wang, Jinlong

    2016-02-01

    We determined the concentrations and radiocarbon (14C) compositions of black carbon (BC) in the sediments of the East China Sea (ECS). The BC concentrations, which were in the range of 0.30-1.52 mg/g, accounted for 12-65% of the total organic carbon (TOC). The distribution of BC in ECS sediments was controlled by factors such as grain size, distance from the coast, and deposition rate. Radiocarbon measurements of BC yielded ages of 6350-10,440 years before present (BP), suggesting that the percentage of BC derived from biomass combustion was in the range of 29-48%. The BC burial flux in sediments of the ECS was estimated to be ∼1.39×106 t/yr, which was similar to burial fluxes reported for shelf sediments in other areas. However, the magnitude of the total BC sink was far greater than that of any other shelf regions studied to date, indicating the global importance of BC accumulation in the ECS, and the magnitude of BC input from large rivers (e.g., the Changjiang). The riverine delivery of BC to the ECS (73%) was far greater than that of atmospheric flux (27%). Further study of the BC cycle and the interactions of BC with other organic compounds in marginal seas was required to better understand the role of BC in the global carbon cycle.

  14. Inline high frequency ultrasonic particle sizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, F.; Petit, J.; Nassar, G.; Debreyne, P.; Delaplace, G.; Nongaillard, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the development of a new method of particle sizing in a liquid. This method uses high frequency focused ultrasounds to detect particles crossing the focal zone of an ultrasonic sensor and to determine their size distribution by processing the reflected echoes. The major advantage of this technique compared to optical sizing methods is its ability to measure the size of particles suspended in an opaque liquid without any dedicated sample preparation. Validations of ultrasonic measurements were achieved on suspensions of polymethyl methacrylate beads in a size range extending from a few micrometer to several hundred micrometer with a temporal resolution of 1 s. The inline detection of aggregate formation was also demonstrated.

  15. High frequency electromagnetic response of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Schwartz, K.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the contribution of higher harmonics to the lunar transfer functions for the tangential components of the surface magnetic field is significant at frequencies greater than 0.01 Hz. The inclusion of the higher harmonics shows that there are two distinct transfer functions corresponding to the components of the tangential surface magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the wave vector of the external disturbance forcing the lunar induction. The dependences of these transfer functions on frequency and location are determined. The effects of the higher harmonics can: (1) account for a hitherto unexplained feature in the Apollo 12-Explorer 35 transfer functions, namely the rolloff at high frequencies; and (2) offer a possible explanation for the frequency dependence of the difference between the transfer functions for the two orthogonal components of the surface magnetic field. The harmonic response of a simple current layer model of the moon is derived.

  16. High-frequency resonant-tunneling oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Calawa, A. R.; Manfra, M. J.; Chen, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-frequency resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) oscillators are described. Oscillations up to a frequency of 420 GHz have been achieved in the GaAs/AlAs system. Recent results obtained with In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs and InAs/AlSb RTDs show a greatly increased power density and indicate the potential for fundamental oscillations up to about 1 THz. These results are consistent with a lumped-element equivalent circuit model of the RTD. The model shows that the maximum oscillation frequency of the GaAs/AlAs RTDs is limited primarily by series resistance, and that the power density is limited by low peak-to-valley current ratio.

  17. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  18. The linkage between marine sediment records and changes in Holocene Saharan landscape: simulating the dust cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerer, Sabine; Claussen, Martin; Reick, Christian; Stanelle, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment records reveal an abrupt and strong increase in dust deposition in the North Atlantic at the end of the African Humid Period about 4.9 ka to 5.5 ka ago (deMenocal et al., 2000; McGee et al., 2013). The change in dust flux has been attributed to varying Saharan land surface cover. Alternatively, the enhanced dust accumulation is linked to enhanced surface winds and a consequent intensification of coastal upwelling. We present simulation results from a recent sensitivity study, where we demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine cores and changes in Saharan land surface during the Holocene. We have simulated timeslices of he mid-Holocene (6 ka BP) and pre-industrial (1850 AD) dust cycle as a function of Saharan land surface cover and atmosphere-ocean conditions using the coupled atmosphere-aerosol model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.1. We prescribe mid-Holocene vegetation cover based on a vegetation reconstruction from pollen data (Hoelzmann et al., 1998) and mid-Holocene lake surface area is determined using a water routing and storage model (Tegen et al., 2002). In agreement with data from marine sediment cores, our simulations show that mid-Holocene dust deposition fluxes in the North Atlantic were two to three times lower compared with pre-industrial fluxes. We identify Saharan land surface characteristics to be the main control on dust transport from North Africa to the North Atlantic. We conclude that the variation in dust accumulation in marine cores is likely related to a transition of the Saharan landscape during the Holocene and not due to changes in atmospheric or ocean conditions alone. Reference: deMenocal, P., Ortiz, J., Guilderson, T., Adkins, J., Sarnthein, M., Baker, L., and Yarusinsky, M.: Abrupt onset and termination of the African Humid Period:: rapid climate responses to gradual insolation forcing, Quaternary Science Reviews, 19, 347-361, 2000. Hoelzmann, P., Jolly, D., Harrison, S. P., Laarif, F

  19. Seasonal cycles in biogenic production and export in Northern Bay of Bengal sediment traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather M.; Arevalos, Alicia; Burke, Andrea; Ziveri, Patrizia; Mortyn, Graham; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Unger, Daniela

    2007-03-01

    Sediment traps in the northern and north central Bay of Bengal are characterized by highly seasonal fluxes and unusually high efficiency of organic carbon export. However, the mechanism for high export production remains under debate. To evaluate the relationships between production in the photic zone and export processes responsible for the fluxes into the traps, over an annual cycle we examine a series of indicators of production regime set in surface waters. These indicators include communities of planktic foraminifera and coccolithophores, stable isotopic chemistry of foraminifera and coccoliths, and the Sr/Ca ratios in coccoliths. Coccolith and foraminiferal assemblages confirm that the Bay of Bengal is a region of high productivity. Coccolithophore communities are dominated to an unusually high degree (90%) by the lower photic zone dweller Florisphaera profunda, a species adapted to high-nutrient and low-light conditions typical of stratified waters like those induced by the strong halocline in the Bay of Bengal. Cyclonic eddy pumping and strong winds during the southwest monsoon (SWM) increase the relative abundance of upwelling indicator species like foraminifera Globigerina bulloides and the upper photic coccolithophores Globigerina oceanica and Emiliania huxleyi. However, while upwelling and eddy pumping do coincide with high opal and coccolith export, in both traps peak organic carbon export precedes the onset of eddy pumping and upwelling indicators. These data suggest an alternate mode of production in the Bay of Bengal, which is not driven by upwelling but rather high production deeper in the water column, probably by taxa adapted to lower light levels. In both traps, the pulses of organic carbon export coincide with elevated fluxes of planktonic foraminifera, which likely reflect increased primary production. Consequently, while major export pulses of organic carbon coincide with pulses of lithogenic export, the pulses of organic carbon export are

  20. Effects of conventional and biodegradable microplastics on a marine ecosystem engineer (Arenicola marina) and sediment nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Green, Dannielle Senga; Boots, Bas; Sigwart, Julia; Jiang, Shan; Rocha, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Effects of microplastic pollution on benthic organisms and ecosystem services provided by sedimentary habitats are largely unknown. An outdoor mesocosm experiment was done to realistically assess the effects of three different types of microplastic pollution (one biodegradable type; polylactic acid and two conventional types; polyethylene and polyvinylchloride) at increasing concentrations (0.02, 0.2 and 2% of wet sediment weight) on the health and biological activity of lugworms, Arenicola marina (Linnaeus, 1758), and on nitrogen cycling and primary productivity of the sediment they inhabit. After 31 days, A. marina produced less casts in sediments containing microplastics. Metabolic rates of A. marina increased, while microalgal biomass decreased at high concentrations, compared to sediments with low concentrations or without microplastics. Responses were strongest to polyvinylchloride, emphasising that different materials may have differential effects. Each material needs to be carefully evaluated in order to assess their risks as microplastic pollution. Overall, both conventional and biodegradable microplastics in sandy sediments can affect the health and behaviour of lugworms and directly or indirectly reduce primary productivity of these habitats. PMID:26552519

  1. Community genomic analyses constrain the distribution of metabolic traits across the Chloroflexi phylum and indicate roles in sediment carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sediments are massive reservoirs of carbon compounds and host a large fraction of microbial life. Microorganisms within terrestrial aquifer sediments control buried organic carbon turnover, degrade organic contaminants, and impact drinking water quality. Recent 16S rRNA gene profiling indicates that members of the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi are common in sediment. Only the role of the class Dehalococcoidia, which degrade halogenated solvents, is well understood. Genomic sampling is available for only six of the approximate 30 Chloroflexi classes, so little is known about the phylogenetic distribution of reductive dehalogenation or about the broader metabolic characteristics of Chloroflexi in sediment. Results We used metagenomics to directly evaluate the metabolic potential and diversity of Chloroflexi in aquifer sediments. We sampled genomic sequence from 86 Chloroflexi representing 15 distinct lineages, including members of eight classes previously characterized only by 16S rRNA sequences. Unlike in the Dehalococcoidia, genes for organohalide respiration are rare within the Chloroflexi genomes sampled here. Near-complete genomes were reconstructed for three Chloroflexi. One, a member of an unsequenced lineage in the Anaerolinea, is an aerobe with the potential for respiring diverse carbon compounds. The others represent two genomically unsampled classes sibling to the Dehalococcoidia, and are anaerobes likely involved in sugar and plant-derived-compound degradation to acetate. Both fix CO2 via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, a pathway not previously documented in Chloroflexi. The genomes each encode unique traits apparently acquired from Archaea, including mechanisms of motility and ATP synthesis. Conclusions Chloroflexi in the aquifer sediments are abundant and highly diverse. Genomic analyses provide new evolutionary boundaries for obligate organohalide respiration. We expand the potential roles of Chloroflexi in sediment carbon cycling beyond

  2. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  3. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  4. Interactions Between Microbial Iron Reduction and Metal Geochemistry: Effect of Redox Cycling on Transition Metal Speciation in Iron Bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Craig Cooper; Flynn W. Picardal; Aaron J. Coby

    2006-02-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respect to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a ~3× increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by ~12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These data suggest

  5. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of Sediment Containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: Effect of Redox Cycling on Fe(III) Bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Komlos, John; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2007-07-01

    Microbial reduction of iron has been shown to be important in the transformation and remediation of contaminated sediments. Re-oxidation of microbially reduced iron may occur in sediments that experience oxidation-reduction cycling and can thus impact the extent of contaminant remediation. The purpose of this research was to quantify iron oxidation in a flow-through column filled with biologically-reduced sediment and to compare the iron phases in the re-oxidized sediment to both the pristine and biologically-reduced sediment. The sediment contained both Fe(III)-oxides (primarily goethite) and silicate Fe (illite/vermiculite) and was biologically reduced in phosphate buffered (PB) medium during a 497 day column experiment with acetate supplied as the electron donor. Long-term iron reduction resulted in partial reduction of silicate Fe(III) without any goethite reduction, based on Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. This reduced sediment was treated with an oxygenated PB solution in a flow-through column resulting in the oxidation of 38% of the biogenic Fe(II). Additional batch experiments showed that the Fe(III) in the oxidized sediment was more quickly reduced compared to the pristine sediment, indicating that oxidation of the sediment not only regenerated Fe(III) but also enhanced iron reduction compared to the pristine sediment. Oxidation-reduction cycling may be a viable method to extend iron-reducing conditions during in-situ bioremediation.

  6. Active Control of High-Frequency Combustor Instability Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities-high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the combustor and turbine safe operating life. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Propulsion and Power Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center in partnership with Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and Georgia Institute of Technology is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities.

  7. Specimen Design for Fatigue Testing at Very High Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MATIKAS, T. E.

    2001-11-01

    Components in rotational machinery such as turbine blades used in military aircraft engines are subjected to low-amplitude, high-frequency loads in the kHz range. Under high cycle fatigue (HCF), the initiation state of a crack consumes most of the life of the component. Vibratory stresses may therefore result in unexpected failures of the material. Hence, there is a need for HCF studies to address HCF-related failures of turbine engines and to develop a life prediction methodology. Ultrasonic fatigue provides accelerated HCF testing enabling the simulation of realistic loading conditions for testing materials used in structural components subjected to vibratory stresses. Specimen design is critical for optimum ultrasonic fatigue testing. The objective of this study is therefore to develop analytical modelling necessary for the design of test coupons to be fatigue tested at ultrasonic frequencies.

  8. Structure and diversity of functional guilds in the microbial nitrogen cycle of estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. B.; Francis, C. A.; Taroncher-Oldenburg, G.; Cornwell, J.

    2002-12-01

    Denitrification is a major flux of nitrogen in Chesapeake Bay, an estuary with a long residence time and high organic and inorganic nutrient inputs from the large surrounding watershed. The estuarine system spans a complex gradient of salinity and many correlated chemical constituents, from its upper bay and river freshwater end members to its nearly full strength seawater lower Bay. Denitrification rates in sediments, computed from net nitrogen fluxes in simulated in situ core incubations, show distinct reproducible patterns along the Bay. Highest rates are observed in sediments from the low salinity, high nitrate upper stations in the Bay and Choptank River. Lower rates occur in the low nitrate, oxygen depleted mid bay sediments and in the metabolically less active south Bay sediments. Gene sequences for nitrite reductase, the key enzyme in denitrification, show very high diversity in Bay and River sediments. On the basis of clone library sequences alone, however, there are distinct clades and patterns indicating highest diversity in the upper Bay and River sediments and lower diversity in the lower Bay sediments. Using a DNA microarray containing many individual nitrite reductase sequences, we investigated the population structure of denitrification genes along the estuarine gradient. Evaluation of gene expression patterns, in addition to presence/absence or abundance of individual genes, will allow a direct assessment of the links between diversity and biogeochemical transformation rates for particular functional guilds. The rate of denitrification and its regulation by environmental variables may be reflected in patterns of guild composition and activity.

  9. Linking sediment structure, hydrological functioning and biogeochemical cycling in disturbed coastal saltmarshes and implications for vegetation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kate; Harvey, Gemma; James, Tempest; Simon, Carr; Michelle, Morris

    2014-05-01

    with preferential horizontal flows. The undisturbed saltmarsh displayed typical vertical geochemical sediment profiles. However, in the restored sites total Fe and Mn are elevated at depth indicating an absence of diagenetic cycling, whilst porewater sulphate and nitrate increased at depth suggesting that vertical solute transport is impeded in restored sites. In surface sediments, though total Hg concentrations are similar, Hg methylation rates are significantly higher than in the undisturbed saltmarsh suggesting that surface anoxia and poor drainage may result in increased mobilization and bioavailability of Hg. These findings have implications for the wider biogeochemical ecosystem services offered by saltmarsh restoration and the water-logged, anoxic conditions produced are unsuitable for seedling germination and plant growth. This highlights the need for integrated understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes.

  10. Accelerated Rates of Nitrogen Cycling and N2O Production in Salt Marsh Sediments due to Long-Term Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, X.; Ji, Q.; Angell, J.; Kearns, P.; Bowen, J. L.; Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Intensified sedimentary production of nitrous oxide (N2O), one of the most potent greenhouse gases, is one of the many possible environmental consequences of elevated nitrogen (N) loading into estuarine ecosystems. This study investigates the response to over 40 years of fertilization of nitrogen removal processes in the sediments of the Great Sippewissett Marsh in Falmouth, MA. Sediment slurries were incubated (1.5 hr) with trace amounts (< 10% of ambient concentration) of 15NH4+ + 14NO3- or 15NO3- + 14NH4+. An additional parallel incubation with 15NH4+ + 14NO3- and 1 mM of allylthiourea (ATU) was included to measure rates of anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Well-homogenized slurries filled about 10% of the volume in the gas-tight incubation vials, and the rest of the volume was replaced with an O2/He (20%/80%) mixture. The production of 29N2, 44N2O and 45N2O were determined using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The rate of total N2O production in fertilized sediments (0.89 nmol hr-1 g-1 wet weight) was 30-fold higher than in unfertilized sediments. The ratio of N2O to N2 production was also significantly higher in fertilized sediments (2.9%) than in unfertilized sediments (1.2%). This highlights the disproportionally large effect of long-term fertilization on N2O production in salt marsh sediments. The reduced oxygen level and higher ammonium concentrations in situ probably contributed to the significant rise in N2O production as a result of long-term fertilization. When detected, anammox and coupled nitrification-denitrification accounted for 10% and 14% of the total N2 production in fertilized sediments (30.5 nmol hr-1 g-1 wet weight), respectively, whereas neither was detected in unfertilized sediments. Thus these experiments indicate that N loading has important effects on multiple N cycle processes that result in N loss and N2O production.

  11. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  12. High-frequency graphene voltage amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Jen; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes Garcia, Alberto; Franklin, Aaron D; Bol, Ageeth A; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-09-14

    While graphene transistors have proven capable of delivering gigahertz-range cutoff frequencies, applying the devices to RF circuits has been largely hindered by the lack of current saturation in the zero band gap graphene. Herein, the first high-frequency voltage amplifier is demonstrated using large-area chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. The graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has a 6-finger gate design with gate length of 500 nm. The graphene common-source amplifier exhibits ∼5 dB low frequency gain with the 3 dB bandwidth greater than 6 GHz. This first AC voltage gain demonstration of a GFET is attributed to the clear current saturation in the device, which is enabled by an ultrathin gate dielectric (4 nm HfO(2)) of the embedded gate structures. The device also shows extrinsic transconductance of 1.2 mS/μm at 1 V drain bias, the highest for graphene FETs using large-scale graphene reported to date. PMID:21805988

  13. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  14. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  15. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  16. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  17. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  18. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 2. Benthic methylmercury production and bed sediment - Pore water partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Lutz, M.A.; Brigham, M.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Aiken, G.R.; Orem, W.H.; Hall, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury speciation, controls on methylmercury (MeHg) production, and bed sediment - pore water partitioning of total Hg (THg) and MeHg were examined in bed sediment from eight geochemically diverse streams where atmospheric deposition was the predominant Hg input. Across all streams, sediment THg concentrations were best described as a combined function of sediment percent fines (%fines; particles < 63 ??m) and organic content. MeHg concentrations were best described as a combined function of organic content and the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and were comparable to MeHg concentrations in streams with Hg inputs from industrial and mining sources. Whole sediment tin-reducible inorganic reactive Hg (Hg(II)R) was used as a proxy measure for the Hg(II) pool available for microbial methylation. In conjunction with radiotracer-derived rate constants of 203Hg(II) methylation, Hg(II)R was used to calculate MeHg production potential rates and to explain the spatial variability in MeHg concentration. The %Hg(II)R (of THg) was low (2.1 ?? 5.7%) and was inversely related to both microbial sulfate reduction rates and sediment total reduced sulfur concentration. While sediment THg concentrations were higher in urban streams, %MeHg and %Hg(II)R were higher in nonurban streams. Sediment pore water distribution coefficients (log Kd's) for both THg and MeHg were inversely related to the log-transformed ratio of pore water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to bed sediment %fines. The stream with the highest drainage basin wetland density also had the highest pore water DOC ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  19. Analysis of high frequency geostationary ocean colour data using DINEOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvera-Azcárate, Aida; Vanhellemont, Quinten; Ruddick, Kevin; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions), a technique to reconstruct missing data, is applied to turbidity data obtained through the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board Meteosat Second Generation 2. The aim of this work is to assess if the tidal variability of the southern North Sea in 2008 can be accurately reproduced in the reconstructed dataset. Such high frequency data have not previously been analysed with DINEOF and present new challenges, like a strong tidal signal and long night-time gaps. An outlier detection approach that exploits the high temporal resolution (15 min) of the SEVIRI dataset is developed. After removal of outliers, the turbidity dataset is reconstructed with DINEOF. In situ Smartbuoy data are used to assess the accuracy of the reconstruction. Then, a series of tidal cycles are examined at various positions over the southern North Sea. These examples demonstrate the capability of DINEOF to reproduce tidal variability in the reconstructed dataset, and show the high temporal and spatial variability of turbidity in the southern North Sea. An analysis of the main harmonic constituents (annual cycle, daily cycle, M2 and S2 tidal components) is performed, to assess the contribution of each of these modes to the total variability of turbidity. The variability not explained by the harmonic fit, due to the natural processes and satellite processing errors as noise, is also assessed.

  20. The nature of high frequency sister chromatid exchange cells (HFCs).

    PubMed

    Ponzanelli, I; Landi, S; Bernacchi, F; Barale, R

    1997-09-01

    We employed the three-way differential staining technique (TWD), which allows SCEs to be distinguished on a per generation basis by scoring third metaphases (M3), in order to study the spontaneous levels of SCEs in normal and high frequency cells (HFCs) that occurred in the first (S1), second (S2) and third (S3) S phases. Fifty one of 900 lymphocytes from 37 healthy donors were defined as HFCs by calculating the 95th percentile of the distribution of SCEs in S1 + S2. 'Normal' cells presented almost the same number of SCEs after the first, second and third cell cycles (SCE averages of 2.43, 2.04 and 3.53 respectively). In contrast, HFCs showed a higher SCE count in S1, which decreased rapidly through the cycles and reached baseline level at S3 (SCE averages of 7.18, 4.29 and 3.45 respectively). This would suggest that the lesions responsible for the higher SCE frequency in HFCs were effectively removed after two cell cycles and strongly support the hypothesis that HFCs are lymphocytes which accumulate higher levels of DNA lesions through time. PMID:9379910

  1. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, MM; Hoarfrost, AL; Bose, A; Joye, SB; Girguis, PR

    2013-05-14

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C-2), propane (C-3), and butane (C-4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C-1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C-1-C-4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C-1-C-4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 degrees C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C-2-C-4 alkanes. Maximum C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 degrees C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C-3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C-4, C-2, and C-1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C-2-C(4)alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C-1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  2. Effects of Deepwater Algae on C-N-P Cycling in Permeable Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansone, F. J.; Spalding, H. L.; Smith, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    Extensive deepwater (50-100 m depth) meadows of native and introduced macroalgae occur offshore of the main Hawaiian Islands. Sediment porewater (to 25 cm sediment depth) and overlying seawater were collected during September and December 2004, and November and December 2006 from 13 vegetated and non-vegetated deepwater sites on sand and muddy-sand seafloors offshore from Oahu to Kaho'olawe. Porewater dissolved nutrient concentrations were comparable to those in nearshore permeable (sandy) sediments, with highly elevated concentrations at sediment depths available to algal holdfasts. Maximum observed concentrations were: 2.3 uM phosphate, 30 uM nitrate, 0.65 uM nitrite, 105 uM ammonium, and 88 uM silica. The sediment organic matter content was not correlated with the presence or absence of macroalgae. Vegetated sediments were consistently more oxidizing than non-vegetated sediments, judged from (nitrate + nitrite)/ammonium ratios. Halimeda-vegetated sediments had low DIN levels compared to other sites, suggesting algal uptake. These sands also exhibited dissolved inorganic carbon depletion at depth, perhaps also related to algal metabolism. In contrast, Udotea-vegetated sediments had high levels of DIN, indicating little or no algal DIN uptake and/or the presence of active N-fixation; these sands also had no DIC depletion at depth. Udotea-vegetated sediments also appeared highly oxidizing, evidenced by very high levels of dissolved nitrate and nitrite, along with low levels of ammonium. The calculated tracer N* was used to verify the conclusions regarding net DIN uptake; a similar calculated tracer, computed using Redfield-type N:Si ratios, was used to confirm the N* results. Unvegetated, nutrient- and organic-rich sandy mud along the flanks of Haleakala volcano showed near complete dissolved phosphate removal, perhaps due to adsorption onto freshly weathered iron oxy-hydroxides. Such phosphate removal was not seen at other sites, including a nearby non

  3. The Effect of Nitrogen Enrichment on C1-Cycling Microorganisms and Methane Flux in Salt Marsh Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Irina C.; Vivanco, Lucía; Bentley, Peris N.; Martiny, Jennifer B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux from ecosystems is driven by C1-cycling microorganisms – the methanogens and the methylotrophs. Little is understood about what regulates these communities, complicating predictions about how global change drivers such as nitrogen enrichment will affect methane cycling. Using a nitrogen addition gradient experiment in three Southern California salt marshes, we show that sediment CH4 flux increased linearly with increasing nitrogen addition (1.23 μg CH4 m−2 day−1 for each g N m−2 year−1 applied) after 7 months of fertilization. To test the reason behind this increased CH4 flux, we conducted a microcosm experiment altering both nitrogen and carbon availability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis appeared to be both nitrogen and carbon (acetate) limited. N and C each increased methanogenesis by 18%, and together by 44%. In contrast, methanotrophy was stimulated by carbon (methane) addition (830%), but was unchanged by nitrogen addition. Sequence analysis of the sediment methylotroph community with the methanol dehydrogenase gene (mxaF) revealed three distinct clades that fall outside of known lineages. However, in agreement with the microcosm results, methylotroph abundance (assayed by qPCR) and composition (assayed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis) did not vary across the experimental nitrogen gradient in the field. Together, these results suggest that nitrogen enrichment to salt marsh sediments increases methane flux by stimulating the methanogen community. PMID:22470369

  4. The Effects of Zebra Mussels on Nitrogen Cycling and Sediment Physiochemical Characteristics: A Laboratory Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruesewitz, D. A.; Tank, J. L.; Bernot, M. J.

    2005-05-01

    Many ecosystems experiencing anthropogenic nitrogen loading have also been invaded by zebra mussels (ZM), therefore it is important to understand how these human-induced changes interact. In particular, ZM may impact biogeochemical transformations. We hypothesized that high NH4+ waste from ZM will increase sediment nitrification rates, and increase NO3--N available for denitrification. To test this prediction, aquaria were stocked with either no ZM or 10,000 individuals m-2. Sediment nitrification (via nitrapyrin-inhibition technique), denitrification (via chloramphenicol-amended acetylene block technique), and sediment O2 profiles (using microelectrodes) were measured weekly for 1 month. The presence of ZM increased nitrification and denitrification rates over initial conditions throughout all weeks (RM ANOVA, p<0.05). Sediment nitrification in the ZM aquaria increased to 47 ± 2.1 μ g NH4+ -NgAFDM-1h-1 by the 3rd week in comparison to 24 ± 4.4 μ g NH4+ -NgAFDM-1h-1 in control aquaria. Sediment denitrification peaked at week 2 in the ZM aquaria at 330 ± 24 μ g N2O gAFDM-1h-1 but remained low in control aquaria throughout. There was a stronger correlation between nitrification and denitrification rates in the presence of ZM (R=0.32, 0.12 respectively). These results, in addition to more frequent hypoxia in sediment oxygen profiles, suggest closer coupling between nitrification and denitrification when ZM are present.

  5. High frequency homogenization for structural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolde, E.; Craster, R. V.; Kaplunov, J.

    2011-03-01

    We consider a net created from elastic strings as a model structure to investigate the propagation of waves through semi-discrete media. We are particularly interested in the development of continuum models, valid at high frequencies, when the wavelength and each cell of the net are of similar order. Net structures are chosen as these form a general two-dimensional example, encapsulating the essential physics involved in the two-dimensional excitation of a lattice structure whilst retaining the simplicity of dealing with elastic strings. Homogenization techniques are developed here for wavelengths commensurate with the cellular scale. Unlike previous theories, these techniques are not limited to low frequency or static regimes, and lead to effective continuum equations valid on a macroscale with the details of the cellular structure encapsulated only through integrated quantities. The asymptotic procedure is based upon a two-scale approach and the physical observation that there are frequencies that give standing waves, periodic with the period or double-period of the cell. A specific example of a net created by a lattice of elastic strings is constructed, the theory is general and not reliant upon the net being infinite, none the less the infinite net is a useful special case for which Bloch theory can be applied. This special case is explored in detail allowing for verification of the theory, and highlights the importance of degenerate cases; the specific example of a square net is treated in detail. An additional illustration of the versatility of the method is the response to point forcing which provides a stringent test of the homogenized equations; an exact Green's function for the net is deduced and compared to the asymptotics.

  6. High frequency of tumours in Mulibrey nanism.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Niklas; Karlberg, Susann; Karikoski, Riitta; Mikkola, Sakari; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Jalanko, Hannu

    2009-06-01

    Mulibrey nanism (MUL) is a monogenic disorder with prenatal-onset growth failure, typical clinical characteristics, cardiopathy and tendency for a metabolic syndrome. It is caused by recessive mutations in the TRIM37 gene encoding for the peroxisomal TRIM37 protein with ubiquitin-ligase activity. In this work, the frequency and pathology of malignant and benign tumours were analysed in a national cohort of 89 Finnish MUL patients aged 0.7-76 years. The subjects had a clinical and radiological evaluation, and histological and immunohistocemical analyses on specimens obtained from biopsy, surgery or autopsy, were performed. The results show that the MUL patients have disturbed architecture with ectopic tissues and a high frequency of both benign and malignant tumours detectable in several internal organs. A total of 210 tumorous lesions were detected in 66/89 patients (74%). Fifteen malignancies occurred in 13 patients (15%), seven of them in the kidney (five Wilms' tumours), three in the thyroid gland, two gynaecological cancers, one gastrointestinal carcinoid tumour, one neuropituitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and one case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Tumours detected by radiology in the liver and other organs mainly comprised strongly dilated blood vessels (peliosis), vascularized cysts and nodular lesions. The lesions showed strong expression of the endothelial cell markers CD34 and CD31 as well as the myocyte marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). Our findings show that MUL is associated with frequent malignant tumours and benign adenomatous and vascular lesions, as well as disturbed organ development. PMID:19334051

  7. Performance of annular high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ivan A.

    This thesis presents studies of the behavior of miniature annular thermoacoustic prime movers and the imaging of the complex sound fields using PIV inside the small acoustic wave guides when driven by a temperature gradient. Thermoacoustic engines operating in the standing wave mode are limited in their acoustic efficiency by a high degree of irreversibility that is inherent in how they work. Better performance can be achieved by using traveling waves in the thermoacoustic devices. This has led to the development of an annular high frequency thermoacoustic prime mover consisting of a regenerator, which is a random stack in-between a hot and cold heat exchanger, inside an annular waveguide. Miniature devices were developed and studied with operating frequencies in the range of 2-4 kHz. This corresponds to an average ring circumference of 11 cm for the 3 kHz device, the resonator bore being 6 mm. A similar device of 11 mm bore, length of 18 cm was also investigated; its resonant frequency was 2 kHz. Sound intensities as high as 166.8 dB were generated with limited heat input. Sound power was extracted from the annular structure by an impedance-matching side arm. The nature of the acoustic wave generated by heat was investigated using a high speed PIV instrument. Although the acoustic device appears symmetric, its performance is characterized by a broken symmetry and by perturbations that exist in its structure. Effects of these are observed in the PIV imaging; images show axial and radial components. Moreover, PIV studies show effects of streaming and instabilities which affect the devices' acoustic efficiency. The acoustic efficiency is high, being of 40% of Carnot. This type of device shows much promise as a high efficiency energy converter; it can be reduced in size for microcircuit applications.

  8. High frequency variability of particle size distribution and its dependency on turbulence over the sea bottom during re-suspension processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renosh, P. R.; Schmitt, François G.; Loisel, Hubert; Sentchev, Alexei; Mériaux, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    The impact of tidal current, waves and turbulence on particles re-suspension over the sea bottom is studied through Eulerian high frequency measurements of velocity and particle size distribution (PSD) during 5 tidal cycles (65 h) in a coastal environment of the eastern English Channel. High frequency variability of PSD is observed along with the velocity fluctuations. Power spectral analysis shows that turbulent velocity and PSD parameters have similarities in their spectral behaviour over the whole range of examined temporal scales. The low frequency variability of particles is controlled by turbulence (β≃-5/3) and the high frequency is partly driven by dynamical processes impacted by the sea bottom interactions with turbulence (wall turbulence). Stokes number (St), rarely measured in situ, exhibits very low values, emphasizing that these particles can be considered as passive tracers. The effect of tide and waves on turbidity and PSD is highlighted. During slack tide, when the current reaches its minimum value, we observe a higher proportion of small particles compared to larger ones. To a lower extent, high significant wave heights are also associated with a greater concentration of suspended sediments and the presence of larger particles (larger Sauter's diameter DA, and lower PSD slope ξ).

  9. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotopes in phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Stout, Lisa M.; Varga, Tamas; Blake, Ruth E.

    2011-07-06

    A key question to address in the development of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate (18Op) as a tracer of biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in ancient and modern environments is the nature of isotopic signatures associated with uptake and cycling of mineral-bound phosphate by microorganisms. Here we present experimental results aimed at understanding the biotic and abiotic pathway of P cycling during biological uptake of phosphate sorbed to ferrihydrite and the selective uptake of specific sedimentary phosphate phases by Escherichia coli, Vibrio fischeri and Marinobacter aquaeolei. Results indicate that a significant fraction of ferrihydrite-bound phosphate is biologically available. The fraction of phosphate taken up by E. coli attained an equilibrium isotopic composition in a short time (<50 hrs) due to efficient O-isotope exchange between phosphate and water (biotic pathway). The difference in isotopic composition between newly equilibrated aqueous and residual sorbed phosphate promoted the exchange of intact phosphate radicals (abiotic pathway) so that this difference gradually became negligible. In sediment containing different P phases, E. coli and V. fischeri ‘extracted’ loosely sorbed phosphate first while M. aquaeolei preferred iron-oxide bound phosphate. Each bacterium imprinted a biotic isotopic signature on each P phase that it took up and cycled. For example, the 18Op value of the sorbed phosphate phase shifted gradually towards equilibrium isotopic composition and the value of Fe oxide-bound phosphate showed slight changes at first, but when new iron oxides were formed, co-precipitated/occluded phosphate retained 18O values of aqueous phosphate at that time. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of authigenic and detrital phosphates did not change, suggesting that these phosphate phases were not utilized by bacteria. These findings support burgeoning applications of 18Op as a tracer of phosphorus cycling in sediments, soils and aquatic

  10. Three cycles of sedimentation in ancient sedimentary basins of southern Ireland: insights from detrital zircon U-Pb ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairey, Brenton; Kerrison, Aidan; Meere, Patrick; Mulchrone, Kieran; Linnemann, Ulf; Hofmann, Mandy; Gaertner, Andreas; Sonntag, Benita-Lisette; Byrne, Keith

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that sedimentary rocks from the Lower Devonian Dingle Basin were uplifted and recycled by Acadian orogenic activity into the Upper Devonian Munster Basin. This is particularly applicable for sediments deposited in the western part of the Munster Basin. In the present study, a new dataset of U-Pb ages for detrital zircons has been established that spans a large geographic area which includes the Dingle and Munster basins as well as the offshore Mesozoic North Celtic Sea, South Celtic Sea, 'Goban Spur' and Fastnet basins. The study is the first of its kind in any of these sedimentary basins. The aim is to investigate whether sediments deposited in the offshore basins during the Mesozoic reflect three erosion-deposition cycles. Detritus that has undergone three sedimentary cycles would yield super-mature sediments suitable for hydrocarbon storage. Detrital zircon age spectra for Lower Devonian Dingle Basin samples indicate strong sediment input from Avalonian (~600 Ma) and Laurentian (~1.7 Ga and ~1.1 Ga) sources with some input from Caledonian orogenic sources (400-480 Ma). Detrital zircon age spectra in the western Munster Basin largely reflect input from Caledonian-aged igneous crustal input (400-480 Ma) and Laurentian sources. An Avalonian component is not detected in any of the samples from the western Munster Basin. In the central and eastern parts of the Munster Basin, detrital zircon age spectra indicate that the dominant sources of detritus are derived from Laurentia and from Caledonian igneous rocks. In contrast to the western part of the basin, age components around 600 Ma are present in some samples and represent an Avalonian source. These signals are echoed, at varying degrees, in detrital age spectra from Jurassic and Cretaceous samples of the central North Celtic Sea Basin. These age spectra also indicate a significant contribution of detritus from Avalonian terrane. The Avalonian signature is completely absent from Jurassic

  11. Deposit-Feeding Sea Cucumbers Enhance Mineralization and Nutrient Cycling in Organically-Enriched Coastal Sediments

    PubMed Central

    MacTavish, Thomas; Stenton-Dozey, Jeanie; Vopel, Kay; Savage, Candida

    2012-01-01

    Background Bioturbators affect multiple biogeochemical interactions and have been suggested as suitable candidates to mitigate organic matter loading in marine sediments. However, predicting the effects of bioturbators at an ecosystem level can be difficult due to their complex positive and negative interactions with the microbial community. Methodology/Principal Findings We quantified the effects of deposit-feeding sea cucumbers on benthic algal biomass (microphytobenthos, MPB), bacterial abundance, and the sediment–seawater exchange of dissolved oxygen and nutrients. The sea cucumbers increased the efflux of inorganic nitrogen (ammonium, NH4+) from organically enriched sediments, which stimulated algal productivity. Grazing by the sea cucumbers on MPB (evidenced by pheopigments), however, caused a net negative effect on primary producer biomass and total oxygen production. Further, there was an increased abundance of bacteria in sediment with sea cucumbers, suggesting facilitation. The sea cucumbers increased the ratio of oxygen consumption to production in surface sediment by shifting the microbial balance from producers to decomposers. This shift explains the increased efflux of inorganic nitrogen and concordant reduction in organic matter content in sediment with bioturbators. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrates the functional role and potential of sea cucumbers to ameliorate some of the adverse effects of organic matter enrichment in coastal ecosystems. PMID:23209636

  12. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  13. The high frequency fatigue behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Nikhilesh

    Many potential applications for continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCMCs), such as gas turbines and heat exchangers, will involve high frequency cyclic loading (75 Hz or higher). While most of the work in the area of fatigue of CFCMCs has concentrated on low frequency behavior, it has been shown that fatigue at high frequencies can exacerbate the accumulation of microstructural damage and significantly decrease fatigue life. "Soft" matrix composites with strong interface bonding provided superior resistance to high frequency fatigue damage. Nicalon/SiCON composites with strong interfacial bonding between the fibers and matrix exhibited very little internal heating during high frequency fatigue loading. This composite system exhibited excellent fatigue life, with fatigue runout at 10sp7 cycles occurring for stresses close to 80% of the ultimate strength (at a loading frequency of 100 Hz). Thick fiber coatings may be more effective in reducing the amount of fiber wear and damage which occur during high frequency fatigue. More effective lubrication at the fiber/matrix interface was achieved with thicker carbon coatings in Nicalon/C/SiC composites subjected to high frequency fatigue loading. Composites with thicker coatings exhibited substantially lower frictional heating and had much higher fatigue lives. The effect of laminate stacking sequence had a significant effect on the high frequency fatigue behavior of CFCMCs. In SCS-6/Sisb3Nsb4 composites, frictional heating in angle-ply laminates (±45) was substantially higher than that in cross-ply laminates (0/90). Since the angle-ply had a lower stiffness, matrix microcracking in this composite was more predominant. Finally, preliminary fatigue damage mechanism maps for CFCMCs were developed. These maps provided a means to identify which fatigue mechanisms were operating at a given stress level and number of cycles.

  14. High power, high frequency helix TWT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloley, H. J.; Willard, J.; Paatz, S. R.; Keat, M. J.

    The design and performance characteristics of a 34-GHz pulse tube capable of 75 W peak power output at 30 percent duty cycle and a broadband CW tube are presented. Particular attention is given to the engineering problems encountered during the development of the tubes, including the suppression of backward wave oscillation, the design of electron guns for small-diameter high-current beams, and the thermal capability of small helix structures. The discussion also covers the effects of various design parameters and choice of engineering materials on the ultimate practical limit of power and gain at the operating frequencies. Measurements are presented for advanced experimental tubes.

  15. Development of a Complete Life Cycle Sediment Toxicity Test for the Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing sediment toxicity test methods are limited to acute and chronic exposure of invertebrates and acute exposure of vertebrates, with limited guidance on the chronic exposure of vertebrates, specifically fishes. A series of life stage-specific studies were conducted to dete...

  16. Numerical modelling of subglacial erosion and sediment transport and its application to the North American ice sheets over the Last Glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, Alexandre; Bell, Trevor; Tarasov, Lev

    2013-05-01

    Present-day sediment distribution offers a potentially strong constraint on past ice sheet evolution. Glacial system models (GSMs), however, cannot address this constraint while lacking appropriate representations of subglacial sediment production and transport. Incorporating these elements in GSMs is also required in order to quantify the impact of a changing sediment cover on glacial cycle dynamics. Towards these goals, we present a subglacial process model (hereafter referred to as the sediment model) that incorporates mechanisms for sediment production, entrainment, transport, and deposition. Bedrock erosion is calculated by both Hallet's and Boulton's abrasion laws separately, and by a novel quarrying law parametrized as a function of subglacial cavity extent. These process-oriented erosion laws are compared against a simple empirical relationship between erosion rate and the work done by basal stress. Sediment entrainment is represented by Philip's law for regelation intrusion and soft-bed deformation is included as a subglacial sediment transport mechanism. The model is driven by the data-calibrated MUN (3D) GSM and a newly developed subglacial hydrology module. The sediment model is applied to the last North American glacial cycle and predicts sediment thickness and cumulative erosion patterns. Results are obtained in the context of a sensitivity analysis and are compared against the present-day distribution of glacigenic sediment and geological estimates of Laurentide Ice Sheet erosion. Given plausible ranges for the sensitivity parameters, chosen a priori based on available literature or on heuristic arguments, the calculated erosion depths overlap with the geological estimates of Laurentide erosion. Most of the runs in the sensitivity set produce unrealistically thick and continuous moraines along the eastern, southern and western margins of the North American ice complex, which suggests that the model overestimates sediment entrainment and thus

  17. Microbial Nitrogen Cycling Associated with the Early Diagenesis of Organic Matter in Subseafloor Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.

    2015-12-01

    The early diagenesis of organic matter is the major energy source of marine sedimentary biosphere and thus controls its population size; however, the vertical distribution of any functional groups along with the diagenesis of organic matter is remained unclear, especially for those microbes involved in nitrogen transformation which serve as a major control on the nitrogen flux between reservoirs. Here we investigated the vertical distributions of various functional groups in five sediment cores retrieved from Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR), with emphasis on the nitrifiers, denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (anammox). We observed the clear geochemical zonation associated with organic matter diagenesis in the sediments based on the pore water profiles of oxygen, nitrate, ammonium, manganese and sulfate, with distinct geochemical transition zones at the boundaries of geochemical zones, including oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) and nitrate-manganese reduction zone (NMTZ). Nitrate was produced in surface oxygenated sediments and nitrate consumption mainly took place at the NMTZ, splitted between re-oxidation of ammonium and manganese (II). Abundances of ammonia oxidizers, nitrite oxidizers, and denitrifiers, estimated through quantitative PCR targeting their respective functional genes, generally decrease with depth, but constantly elevated around the OATZ, NMTZ, and manganese-reduction zone as well. Anammox bacteria were only detected around the NMTZ where both nitrate/nitrite and ammonium are available. These depth profiles of functional groups were also confirmed by the community structure profiling by prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing. Cell-specific rates of nitrification and denitrification, calculated from the bulk net reaction rates divided by functional group abundances, were similar to those values from oligotrophic sediments like North Pond and thus suggested that nitrifiers and denitirifiers populations were in maintenance

  18. Carbon, nutrient and trace metal cycling in sandy sediments: A comparison of high-energy beaches and backbarrier tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckhardt, Anja; Beck, Melanie; Seidel, Michael; Riedel, Thomas; Wehrmann, Achim; Bartholomä, Alexander; Schnetger, Bernhard; Dittmar, Thorsten; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    In order to evaluate the importance of coastal sandy sediments and their contribution to carbon, nutrient and metal cycling we investigated two beach sites on Spiekeroog Island, southern North Sea, Germany, and a tidal flat margin, located in Spiekeroog's backbarrier area. We also analyzed seawater and fresh groundwater on Spiekeroog Island, to better define endmember concentrations, which influence our study sites. Intertidal sandy flats and beaches are characterized by pore water advection. Seawater enters the sediment during flood and pore water drains out during ebb and at low tide. This pore water circulation leads to continuous supply of fresh organic substrate to the sediments. Remineralization products of microbial degradation processes, i.e. nutrients, and dissolved trace metals from the reduction of particulate metal oxides, are enriched in the pore water compared to open seawater concentrations. The spatial distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrients (PO43-, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, Si(OH)4 and total alkalinity), trace metals (dissolved Fe and Mn) as well as sulfate suggests that the exposed beach sites are subject to relatively fast pore water advection, which leads to organic matter and oxygen replenishment. Frequent pore water exchange further leads to comparatively low nutrient concentrations. Sulfate reduction does not appear to play a major role during organic matter degradation. High nitrate concentrations indicate that redox conditions are oxic within the duneward freshwater influenced section, while ammonification, denitrification, manganese and iron reduction seem to prevail in the ammonium-dominated seawater circulation zone. In contrast, the sheltered tidal flat margin site exhibits a different sedimentology (coarser beach sands versus finer tidal flat sands) and nutrients, dissolved manganese and DOC accumulate in the pore water. Ammonium is the dominant pore water nitrogen species and intense sulfate reduction leads to the formation

  19. Bacterial communities potentially involved in iron-cycling in Baltic Sea and North Sea sediments revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carolina; Dellwig, Olaf; Dähnke, Kirstin; Gehre, Matthias; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz E; Böttcher, Michael E; Meister, Patrick; Friedrich, Michael W

    2016-04-01

    To gain insight into the bacterial communities involved in iron-(Fe) cycling under marine conditions, we analysed sediments with Fe-contents (0.5-1.5 wt %) from the suboxic zone at a marine site in the Skagerrak (SK) and a brackish site in the Bothnian Bay (BB) using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Several bacterial families, including Desulfobulbaceae, Desulfuromonadaceae and Pelobacteraceae and genera, includingDesulfobacterandGeobacter, known to reduce Fe were detected and showed highest abundance near the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox boundary. Additional genera with microorganisms capable of coupling fermentation to Fe-reduction, includingClostridiumandBacillus, were observed. Also, the Fe-oxidizing families Mariprofundaceae and Gallionellaceae occurred at the SK and BB sites, respectively, supporting Fe-cycling. In contrast, the sulphate (SO4 (2-)) reducing bacteriaDesulfococcusandDesulfobacteriumwere more abundant at greater depths concurring with a decrease in Fe-reducing activity. The communities revealed by pyrosequencing, thus, match the redox stratification indicated by the geochemistry, with the known Fe-reducers coinciding with the zone of Fe-reduction. Not the intensely studied model organisms, such asGeobacterspp., but rather versatile microorganisms, including sulphate reducers and possibly unknown groups appear to be important for Fe-reduction in these marine suboxic sediments. PMID:26960392

  20. S and O Isotope Studies of Microbial S Cycling in the Deep Biosphere of Marine Sediments: Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R. E.; Bottcher, M. E.; Surkov, A. V.; Ferdelman, T. G.; Jorgensen, B. B.

    2004-12-01

    We have determined the oxygen (18O/16O) and sulfur (34S/32S) isotope ratios of porewater sulfate to depths of over 400 mbsf in sediments from open-ocean and upwelling sites in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific ocean. Sulfate δ 18O ranges from near-normal seawater values (9.5 permil) at organic-poor open-ocean sites, to approximately 30 permil at sites with higher organic matter content and higher associated microbial activity. Depth-correlative trends of δ 18O, δ 34S, alkalinity, methane, ammonium and the presence of sulfide, indicate significant oxidation of sedimentary organic matter by sulfate-reducing microbial populations as well as anaerobic oxidation of methane. δ 18O-SO4 values at low-activity sites reveal the presence of significant microbial sulfur-cycling activity despite relatively flat sulfate concentration and δ 34S profiles. This activity may include contributions from several processes including: enzyme-catalyzed equilibration between oxygen in sulfate and water superimposed upon microbial sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and bacterial disproportionation of sulfur intermediates. Large isotope enrichment factors observed at low-activity sites (40-80 permil) likely reflect concurrent processes of: kinetic isotope fractionation, equilibrium fractionation between sulfate and water, and sulfide oxidation at low rates of sulfate reduction. Results of this study indicate that coupled measurements of S and O isotope ratios of porewater sulfate are a powerful tool for tracing microbial activity and sulfur cycling in marine sediments.

  1. Life of fluorescent lamps operated at high frequencies with solid-state ballasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verderber, R. R.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F. M.

    1985-07-01

    Standard 40-watt, F-40, rapid-start, fluorescent lamps were operated with solid-state ballasts following the standard life-testing cycle of 3 hours on and 20 minutes off for more than 20,000 hours at high frequency. Lamp operating characteristics (starting voltage, filament voltage, arc current, and current-crest factor) were studied as factors affecting lamp life. Measurements show that fluorescent lamps can attain rated life at high frequency using solid-state ballasts. When lamps are operated in the dimmed mode, full filament power is required to sustain lamplife. The rate of lamp lumen depreciation is dependent on the lamp loading and not the operating frequency.

  2. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  3. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, E.S.; Campbell, D.V.

    1997-04-29

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer. 22 figs.

  4. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Eric S.; Campbell, David V.

    1997-01-01

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer.

  5. Reversible tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Walsh, R M; Bath, A P; Bance, M L

    2000-01-01

    We report an unusual case of tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity with subsequent clinical and objective evidence of functional recovery. In those patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of aminoglycoside-induced bilateral vestibular toxicity (ataxia and oscillopsia) and normal low-frequency (ENG-caloric) responses, high-frequency rotation chair testing should be performed to exclude a high-frequency vestibular deficit. PMID:10810261

  6. Sensor Measurements and Sediment Incubations Indicate Diurnal Redox Cycling Associate With Arsenic Mobilization at a Bangladeshi Rice Paddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T.; Lin, C.; Ramanathan, N.; Neumann, R.; Harvey, C.; Jay, J.

    2007-12-01

    The presence of arsenic in the groundwater has led to the largest environmental poisoning in history; tens of millions of people in the Ganges Delta continue to drink groundwater that is dangerously contaminated with arsenic (As). Rice fields receive large loads of arsenic with irrigation water and provide recharge to the underlying aquifer. It is currently not known whether rice fields are a sink or source of arsenic in the hydrologic system. In the dry season, as As(III)-containing minerals are oxidized, As(V) is released and will adhere to Fe hydr(oxide) minerals. When sediments are inundated with water, reducing conditions will then drive reduction of Fe hydr(oxides) and release of As. We have been intensively studying a field site in Munshiganj, Bangladesh with extremely high levels of arsenic in groundwater (up to 1.2 mg/L). To better understand geochemical and microbial processes leading to As mobilization in surface sediment, we deployed sensors to take temporally dense measurements across our experimental rice paddy. Data collected in both 2006 and 2007 showed trends in geochemical parameters indicating that diurnal, possibly plant-induced, processes may be important. Over a two month period, nitrate concentrations decrease consistently each day as ammonium levels increase, presumably through temperature driven reductive processes. Nitrate concentrations in the subsurface then increase while ammonium levels decrease, possibly due to root oxygen leakage or rapid infiltration of oxygen rich surface water. Using sediment from the rice paddy and artificial irrigation water, laboratory microcosms were constructed to simulate the diurnal cycles observed at the field site. In carbon-ammended treatments, Fe and As cycling can occur on the order of days. Oscillations in redox conditions on diurnal as well as seasonal time scales may be important in the mobilization of arsenic into aquifers. By elucidating As mobilization mechanisms at an experimental rice paddy

  7. Effects of sediment dredging on nitrogen cycling in Lake Taihu, China: Insight from mass balance based on a 2-year field study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juhua; Fan, Chengxin; Zhong, Jicheng; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Changhui; Yao, Xiaolong

    2016-02-01

    Sediment dredging can permanently remove pollutants from an aquatic ecosystem, which is considered an effective approach to aquatic ecosystem restoration. In this work, a 2-year field simulation test was carried out to investigate the effect of dredging on nitrogen cycling across the sediment-water interface (SWI) in Lake Taihu, China. The results showed that simulated dredging applied to an area rich in total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) slightly reduced the NH4(+)-N release from sediments while temporarily enhanced the NH4(+)-N release in an area with lower TOC and/or TN (in the first 180 days), although the application had a limited effect on the fluxes of NO2(-)-N and NO3(-)-N in both areas. Further analysis indicated that dredging induced decreases in nitrification, denitrification, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in sediments, notably by 76.9, 49.0, and 89.9%, respectively, in the TOC and/or TN-rich area. Therefore, dredging slowed down nitrogen cycling rates in sediments but did not increase N loading to overlying water. The main reason for the above phenomenon could be attributed to the removal of the surface sediments enriched with more TOC and/or TN (compared with the bottom sediments). Overall, to minimize internal N pollution, dredging may be more applicable to nutrient-rich sediments. PMID:26499196

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Melissa M.; Hoarfrost, Adrienne L.; Bose, Arpita; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C2), propane (C3), and butane (C4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV, Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C1–C4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C1–C4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75°C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C1–C4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C2–C4 alkanes. Maximum C1–C4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55°C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C4, C2, and C1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C2–C4alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C1 derived from these hydrothermal systems. PMID:23717305

  9. On the Importance of High Frequency Gravity Waves for Ice Nucleation in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations of the influence of atmospheric waves on ice nucleation in cirrus have identified a number of key processes and sensitivities: (1) ice concentrations produced by homogeneous freezing are strongly dependent on cooling rates, with gravity waves dominating upper tropospheric cooling rates; (2) rapid cooling driven by high-frequency waves are likely responsible for the rare occurrences of very high ice concentrations in cirrus; (3) sedimentation and entrainment tend to decrease ice concentrations as cirrus age; and (4) in some situations, changes in temperature tendency driven by high-frequency waves can quench ice nucleation events and limit ice concentrations. Here we use parcel-model simulations of ice nucleation driven by long-duration, constant-pressure balloon temperature time series, along with an extensive dataset of cold cirrus microphysical properties from the recent ATTREX high-altitude aircraft campaign, to statistically examine the importance of high-frequency waves as well as the consistency between our theoretical understanding of ice nucleation and observed ice concentrations. The parcel-model simulations indicate common occurrence of peak ice concentrations exceeding several hundred per liter. Sedimentation and entrainment would reduce ice concentrations as clouds age, but 1-D simulations using a wave parameterization (which underestimates rapid cooling events) still produce ice concentrations higher than indicated by observations. We find that quenching of nucleation events by high-frequency waves occurs infrequently and does not prevent occurrences of large ice concentrations in parcel simulations of homogeneous freezing. In fact, the high-frequency variability in the balloon temperature data is entirely responsible for production of these high ice concentrations in the simulations.

  10. Trace element cycling in a subterranean estuary: Part 1. Geochemistry of the permeable sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charette, Matthew A.; Sholkovitz, Edward R.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2005-04-01

    Subterranean estuaries are characterized by the mixing of terrestrially derived groundwater and seawater in a coastal aquifer. Subterranean estuaries, like their river water-seawater counterparts on the surface of the earth, represent a major, but less visible, hydrological and geochemical interface between the continents and the ocean. This article is the first in a two-part series on the biogeochemistry of the subterranean estuary at the head of Waquoit Bay (Cape Cod, MA, USA). The pore-water distributions of salinity, Fe and Mn establish the salt and redox framework of this subterranean estuary. The biogeochemistry of Fe, Mn, P, Ba, U and Th will be addressed from the perspective of the sediment composition. A second article will focus on the groundwater and pore-water chemistries of Fe, Mn, U and Ba. Three sediment cores were collected from the head of Waquoit Bay where the coastal aquifer consists of permeable sandy sediment. A selective dissolution method was used to measure the concentrations of P, Ba, U and Th that are associated with "amorphous (hydr)oxides of iron and manganese" and "crystalline Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides." The deeper sections of the cores are characterized by large amounts of iron (hydr)oxides that are precipitated onto organic C-poor quartz sand from high-salinity pore waters rich in dissolved ferrous iron. Unlike Fe (hydr)oxides, which increase with depth, the Mn (hydr)oxides display midcore maxima. This type of vertical stratification is consistent with redox-controlled diagenesis in which Mn (hydr)oxides are formed at shallower depths than iron (hydr)oxides. P and Th are enriched in the deep sections of the cores, consistent with their well-documented affinity for Fe (hydr)oxides. In contrast, the downcore distribution of Ba, especially in core 3, more closely tracks the concentration of Mn (hydr)oxides. Even though Mn (hydr)oxides are 200-300 times less abundant than Fe (hydr)oxides in the cores, Mn (hydr)oxides are known to have an

  11. Cycling of trace metals (Mn, Fe, Mo, U, V, Cr) in deep pore waters of intertidal flat sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Melanie; Dellwig, Olaf; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    Trace metals (Mn, Fe, Mo, U, Cr, V) were studied in pore waters of an intertidal flat located in the German Wadden Sea. The study system is an example of a permeable tidal flat system where pore water exchange is affected by tidal driven pressure gradients besides diffusion. Permanently installed in situ samplers were used to extract pore waters down to 5 m depth throughout one year. The samplers were either located close to the tidal flat margin or in central parts of the tidal flat. Despite dynamic sedimentological and hydrological conditions, the general trends with depth in deep tidal flat pore waters are remarkably similar to those observed in deep sea environments. Rates of trace metal cycling must be comparably large in order to maintain the observed pore water profiles. Trace metals further show similar general trends with depth close to the margin and in central parts of the tidal flat. Seasonal sampling revealed that V and Cr vary concurrent with seasonal changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. This effect is most notable close to the tidal flat margin where sulphate, DOC, and nutrients vary with season down to some metres depth. Seasonal variations of Mn, Fe, Mo, and U are by contrast limited to the upper decimetres of the sediment. Their seasonal patterns depend on organic matter supply, redox stratification, and particulate matter deposited on sediment surfaces. Pore water sampling within one tidal cycle provides evidence for pore water advection in margin sediments. During low tide pore water flow towards the creekbank is generated by a hydraulic gradient suggesting that deep pore waters may be seeping out of creekbank sediments. Owing to the enrichment of specific elements like Mn in pore water compared to sea water, seeping pore waters may have an impact on the chemistry of the open water column. Mass balance calculations reveal that the impact of deep pore waters on the Mn budget in the open water column is below 4%. Mn deep pore

  12. High Frequency Monitoring of the Aigion Fault Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Francois; Bourouis, Seid

    2013-04-01

    In 2007, a high frequency monitoring system was deployed in the 1000 m deep AIG10 well that intersects the Aigion fault at a depth of 760 m. This active 15 km long fault is located on the south shore of the Corinth rift, some 40 km east from Patras, in western central Greece. The borehole intersects quaternary sediments down to 495 m, then cretaceous and tertiary heavily tectonized deposits from the Pindos nappe. Below the fault encountered at 760 m, the borehole remains within karstic limestone of the Gavrovo Tripolitza nappe. The monitoring system involved two geophones located some 15 m above the fault, and two hydrophones located respectively at depths equal to 500 m and 250 m. The frequency domain for the data acquisition system ranged from a few Hz to 2500 Hz. The seismic velocity structure close to the borehole was determined through both sonic logs and vertical seismic profiles. This monitoring system has been active during slightly over six months and has recorded signals from microseismic events that occurred in the rift, the location of which was determined thanks to the local 11 stations, three components, short period (2 Hz), monitoring system. In addition, the borehole monitoring system has recorded more than 1000 events not identified with the regional network. Events were precisely correlated with pressure variations associated with two human interventions. These extremely low magnitude events occurred at distances that reached at least up to 1500 m from the well. They were associated, some ten days later, with some local rift activity. A tentative model is proposed that associates local short slip instabilities in the upper part of the fault close to the well, with a longer duration pore pressure diffusion process. Results demonstrate that the Aigion fault is continuously creeping down to a depth at least equal to 5 km but probably deeper.

  13. Effects of high frequency current in welding aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Uncontrolled high frequency current causes cracking in the heat-affected zone of aluminum alloy 6061 weldments during tungsten inert gas ac welding. Cracking developed when an improperly adjusted superimposed high frequency current was agitating the semimolten metal in the areas of grain boundary.

  14. Redox conditions and trace metal cycling in coastal sediments from the maritime Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monien, Patrick; Lettmann, Karsten Alexander; Monien, Donata; Asendorf, Sanja; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Lim, Chai Heng; Thal, Janis; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Redox-sensitive trace metals (Mn, Fe, U, Mo, Re), nutrients and terminal metabolic products (NO3-, NH4+, PO43-, total alkalinity) were investigated for the first time in pore waters of Antarctic coastal sediments. The results of this study reveal a high spatial variability in redox conditions in surface sediments from Potter Cove, King George Island, western Antarctic Peninsula. Particularly in the shallower areas of the bay the significant correlation between sulphate depletion and total alkalinity, the inorganic product of terminal metabolism, indicates sulphate reduction to be the major pathway of organic matter mineralisation. In contrast, dissimilatory metal oxide reduction seems to be prevailing in the newly ice-free areas and the deeper troughs, where concentrations of dissolved iron of up to 700 μM were found. We suggest a combination of several factors to be responsible for the domination of metal oxide reduction over sulphate reduction in these areas. These include the increased accumulation of fine-grained material with high amounts of reducible metal oxides, a reduced availability of metabolisable organic matter and an enhanced physical and biological disturbance by bottom water currents, ice scouring and burrowing organisms. Based on modelled iron fluxes we calculate the contribution of the Antarctic shelf to the pool of potentially bioavailable iron (Feb) to be 6.9 × 103 to 790 × 103 t yr-1. Consequently, these shelf sediments would provide an Feb flux of 0.35-39.5 mg m-2 yr-1 (median: 3.8 mg m-2 yr-1) to the Southern Ocean. This contribution is in the same order of magnitude as the flux provided by icebergs and significantly higher than the input by aeolian dust. For this reason suboxic shelf sediments form a key source of iron for the high nutrient-low chlorophyll (HNLC) areas of the Southern Ocean. This source may become even more important in the future due to rising temperatures at the WAP accompanied by enhanced glacier retreat and the

  15. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, H.D.

    1996-04-30

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device. 6 figs.

  16. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device.

  17. Nitrogen cycling between sediment and the shallow-water column in the transition zone of the Potomac River and estuary. I. Nitrate and ammonium fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, N. S.

    1988-05-01

    A three-year study of seasonal variation in water-column and sediment nitrogen species was conducted in the transition zone of the Potomac River 35 m from the Virginia shore at a site with an average water-column depth of approximately 1 m over sandy sediment. A diffusion-controlled sampler was used to collect water samples from the water column, at the interface between the water column and sediment, and at several tens of centimeters into the sediment. Nitrate was the predominant dissolved nitrogen species in the water column. The importance of denitrification was inferred by nitrate fluxes which were directed into the sediment from the water column during approximately 75% of the sampling periods and ranged from 0·02 to 0·69 mmol m -2 day -1. Flux of nitrate from the sediment into the water column, ⩾0·1 mmol m -2 day -1, due possibly to nitrification in surficial sediment, occurred during one spring and two summer sampling periods. Ammonium fluxes were less than 0·1 mmol m -2 day -1 during 90% of the sampling periods. Of the ammonium fluxes that were >0·05 mmol m -2 day -1, all were fluxes into the sediment during sampling periods when sediment resuspension occurred, and all were into the water column during periods of calm. The mean value of ammonium flux (0·005 ± 0·05 mmol m -2 day -1) from the sandy, shallow-water sediments was two orders of magnitude less than the ammonium fluxes from the deeper, silty channel sediments in the same reach of the river. Diffusive flux calculations suggest that approximately one order of magnitude more nitrate than ammonium is cycled between the shallow-water column and the sandy sediment in the transition zone of the Potomac River.

  18. Nitrogen cycling between sediment and the shallow-water column in the transition zone of the Potomac River and estuary. I. Nitrate and ammonium fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    A three-year study of seasonal variation in water-column and sediment nitrogen species was conducted in the transition zone of the Potomac River 35 m from the Virginia shore at a site with an average water-column depth of approximately 1 m over sandy sediment. A diffusion-controlled sampler was used to collect water samples from the water column, at the interface between the water column and sediment, and at several tens of centimeters into the sediment. Nitrate was the predominant dissolved nitrogen species in the water column. The importance of denitrification was inferred by nitrate fluxes which were directed into the sediment from the water column during approximately 75% of the sampling periods and ranged from 0??02 to 0??69 mmol m-2 day-1. Flux of nitrate from the sediment into the water column, ???0??1 mmol m-2 day-1, due possibly to nitrification in surficial sediment, occurred during one spring and two summer sampling periods. Ammonium fluxes were less than 0??1 mmol m-2 day-1 during 90% of the sampling periods. Of the ammonium fluxes that were >0??05 mmol m-2 day-1, all were fluxes into the sediment during sampling periods when sediment resuspension occurred, and all were into the water column during periods of calm. The mean value of ammonium flux (0??005 ?? 0??05 mmol m-2 day-1) from the sandy, shallow-water sediments was two orders of magnitude less than the ammonium fluxes from the deeper, silty channel sediments in the same reach of the river. Diffusive flux calculations suggest that approximately one order of magnitude more nitrate than ammonium is cycled between the shallow-water column and the sandy sediment in the transition zone of the Potomac River. ?? 1988.

  19. High-frequency cyclicity in the latest Messinian Adriatic foreland basin: Insight into palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironments of the Mediterranean Lago-Mare episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, D.; Cipollari, P.; Lo Mastro, S.; Giampaolo, C.

    2005-07-01

    Late Messinian Lago-Mare deposits show high-frequency cyclicity in the whole Mediterranean Basin. Both millimeter- and centimeter-scale cyclicities have been observed in several ODP sites as well as in stratigraphic sections from the Mediterranean borderland. We have analyzed a well-exposed late Messinian Lago-Mare section from the Adriatic side of the central Apennines (Italy). At the Fonte dei Pulcini section (SE Majella Mts.), millimeter- and centimeter-scale white-and-dark couplets have been observed in the field. A 50 cm regular-spaced sampling has been performed in the uppermost 53 m of the late Messinian Lago-Mare clays. On the 107 collected samples, geochemical (CaCO 3 content), mineralogical (XRD analyses), and micropalaeontological investigations have been performed. In addition, SEM and microprobe investigations as well as mineralogical and micropalaeontological analyses have been carried out on single lamina from a 34-cm-thick interval of millimeter-scale laminites. Besides the 10 3 cycles/m and 10 2 cycles/m frequencies observed in the field, spectral analyses performed on the CaCO 3 data set indicated other high-frequency cyclicities: 0.47 cycles/m, 0.35 cycles/m, and 0.17 cycles/m. Taking into account the estimated sedimentation rate, these frequencies correspond, respectively, to periodicities of: 1 year, 10 years, 2.1 kyr, 2.8 kyr, and 5.6 kyr. These sub-Milankovitch cyclicities have been related to annual and sunspot solar activity. The millimeter-scale couplets are interpreted as varves sedimented in an ephemeral water environment marginal to a perennial brackish water lagoonal basin. These varved sediments reflect a marked seasonality characterized by the alternation of arid and more humid climatic phases. The presence of high values of smectite (60-80%) in the clay minerals of the analyzed samples could be a consequence of these climatic oscillations from drier to moister conditions. The climatic scenario suggested in this paper for the late

  20. Polluted harbor sediment and the annual reproductive cycle of the female flounder, Platichthys fiesus (L.)

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, P.A.H.; Lambert, J.G.D.; Goos, H.J.T.; Wezel, A.P. van; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-12-31

    Compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs),and pesticides are metabolized by enzyme systems, which are also involved in steroid metabolism. Disturbances of reproduction may therefore occur through the interference of these compounds with the endocrine system. Several aspects of reproduction were studied in the flounder, Platichthys fiesus (L.), an euryhaline flatfish which inhabits coastal waters and is therefore a suitable biomonitor for the effects of chemical pollutants. Fish were kept during three years in mesocosm systems of which the first provided a control, while the second one contained polluted sediment, derived from the Rotterdam harbor. In November, all ovaries from both mesocosms contained vitellogenic oocytes. In May, all the control fish were previtellogenic, while the ovaries of fish from the polluted mesocosm contained, besides previtellogenic oocytes, a large number of vitellogenic oocytes, indicating that an estrogenic induction had occurred. The in vitro tissue incubations with androstenedione as precursor revealed that the ovarian capacity to synthesize testosterone (T), estrone (E{sub 2}) and 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) didn`t differ between both mesocosms. In May, however, the levels of T and E{sub 2} as well as the level of the yolk-precursor vitellogenin were significantly higher in the polluted mesocosm. The conclusion from this study was that polluted harbor sediment contains compounds that effect normal reproductive development, i.e. the induction of premature vitellogenesis.

  1. Acid-Tolerant Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Play a Major Role in Iron Cycling in Acidic Iron Rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, K. A.; Moreau, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change drives drying and acidification of many rivers and lakes. Abundant sedimentary iron in these systems oxidizes chemically and biologically to form iron-ox(yhydrox)ide crusts and "hardpans". Given generally high sulfate concentrations, the mobilization and cycling of iron in these environments can be strongly influenced by bacterial sulfate reduction. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) induce reductive dissolution of oxidized iron phases by producing the reductant bisulfide as a metabolic product. These environmentally ubiquitous microbes also recycle much of the fixed carbon in sediment-hosted microbial mat communities. With prevalent drying, the buffering capacity for protons liberated from iron oxidation is exceeded, and the activity of sulfate-reducers is restricted to those species capable of tolerating low pH (and generally highly saline, i.e. sulfate-rich) conditions. These species will sustain the recycling of iron from more crystalline phases to more bioavailable species, as well as act as the only source of bisulfide for photosynthesizing microbial communities. The phylogeny and physiology of acid-tolerant SRB is therefore important to Fe, S and C cycling in iron-rich sedimentary environments, particularly those on a geochemical trajectory towards acidification. Previous studies have shown that these SRB species tend to be highly novel. We studied two distinct environments along a geochemical continuum towards acidification. In both settings, iron redox transformations exert a major, if not controlling, influence on reduction potential. An acidified, iron- rich tidal marsh receiving acid-mine drainage (San Francisco Bay, CA, USA) contained abundant textural evidence for reductive dissolution of Fe(III) in sediments with pH values varying from 2.4 - 3.8. From these sediments, full-length novel dsrAB gene sequences from acid-tolerant SRB were recovered, and sulfur isotope profiles reflected biological fractionation of sulfur under even the most

  2. Sedimentation in Lake El'gygytgyn, Northeastern Siberia, During the Past Three Climate Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melles, M.; Anderson, P. M.; Apfelbaum, M.; Asikainen, C.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Cherepanova, M.; Kopsch, C.; Forman, S.; Juschus, O.; Lozhkin, A. V.; Minyuk, P.; Niessen, F.; Nowaczyk, N. R.; Snyder, J.

    2004-12-01

    Lake El'gygytgyn, located in central Chukotka, NE Siberia, is a 3.6 million year old impact crater lake with a diameter of 12 km and a water depth of 170 m. Sediment cores of 13 and 16 m length from the deepest part of the lake were investigated for chronology, physical properties, sedimentology, biogeochemistry, inorganic geochemistry, mineralogy, palynology and diatom assemblages. The cores are undisturbed and complete. With basal ages of approx. 250 and 300 ka, respectively, they represent the longest continuous climate records as yet available from the Arctic continent. Besides two ash layers and a number of distal, fine-grained turbidites, four "pelagic" sediment units of different composition can be distinguished. During warm periods (units 1 and 2), summer melt of the ice cover leads to high aquatic primary production, ventilation of the entire water column by annual turnover, decomposition of most of the settling particulate organic matter, and bioturbation of the sediments. Among these periods, MIS 5.5 (Eemian) and to a smaller degree late MIS 1 (Holocene) exhibited significantly higher organic matter accumulation (unit 1) than MIS 3, 5.1, 5.3, 6.1, 6.3, 6.5, 7.1, 7.3, and 7.5 (unit 2). This was probably due to enhanced nutrient and organic matter supply from a more dense vegetation cover in the catchment. The density and composition of the regional vegetation, in turn, was not only controlled by insolation, but also by precipitation and/or temperature changes due to alterations in the atmospheric circulation pattern. During cold periods (units 3 and 4), a persistent ice cover hampers primary production and leads to a stratified water column with anoxic bottom waters, good preservation of the settling organic matter, and the formation of laminated sediments due to the absence of bioturbating organisms. Among these periods, cold and particularly dry climates lead to the widespread absence of blanketing snow on the lake ice cover, enabling the formation of

  3. Impact of glacial/interglacial changes in water column geochemistry on the diagenetic cycling of barium in Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, S.; Henkel, S.; Mogollón, J. M.; Nöthen, K.; Franke, C.; Bogus, K.; Robin, E.; Bahr, A.; Blumenberg, M.; Pape, T.; Seifert, R.; Marz, C.; De Lange, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in depositional conditions and redox environment over time affect biogeochemical processes in the seabed and in this way control the variable and selective preservation, alteration and formation of various sediment constituents and attributes - including particulate organic matter, mineral assemblages and magnetic properties. As many of these solid-phase compounds are used as paleo-environmental tracers or stratigraphic tools an assessment of diagenetic influences on the sedimentary record is crucial for accurate environmental reconstructions. We present an integrated approach of pore-water and solid-phase geochemistry as well as transport reaction modeling for sediments of the Black Sea to assess the biogeochemical history of these deposits with particular emphasis on post-depositional redistribution of barium as a consequence of changes in water column geochemistry and redox (Henkel et al., 2012). High-resolution sedimentary records of major and minor elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Sr, Ti), total organic carbon (TOC), and profiles of pore-water constituents (SO42-, CH4, Ca2+, Ba2+, Mg2+, alkalinity) were obtained for two gravity cores (core 755, 501 m water depth and core 214, 1686 m water depth) from the northwestern Black Sea. The records were examined in order to gain insight into the cycling of Ba in anoxic marine sediments characterized by a shallow sulfate-methane transition (SMT) as well as the applicability of barite as a primary productivity proxy in such a setting. The Ba records are strongly overprinted by diagenetic barite (BaSO4) remobilization and precipitation; authigenic Ba enrichments were found at both sites at and slightly above the current SMT. Transport reaction modeling was applied to simulate the migration of the SMT during the changing geochemical conditions after the Holocene seawater intrusion into the Black Sea. Based on this, sediment intervals affected by diagenetic Ba redistribution were identified. Results reveal that the intense

  4. Variation in numbers and behaviour of waders during the tidal cycle: implications for the use of estuarine sediment flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granadeiro, José P.; Dias, Maria P.; Martins, Ricardo C.; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

    2006-05-01

    Estuarine sediment flats are essential feeding areas for waders, but their exploitation is constrained by the movements of tides. In this cyclic environment the exposure period of sediment flats decreases several fold from upper to lower flats, and the moving tidal waterline briefly creates particular conditions for waders and their prey. This study attempts to determine how the exposure period and the movement of the tide line influence the use of space and food resources by waders across the sediment flats. Wader counts and observations of feeding behaviour were carried out in all phases of the tidal cycle, in plots forming a transect from upper to lower flats, thus representing a gradient of exposure periods. Pecking, prey intake, and success rates varied little along the gradient. Some species actively followed the tide line while foraging, whereas others are evenly spread over the exposed flats. Black-tailed Godwit, Dunlin and Avocet were 'tide followers', whereas Grey Plover, Redshank and Bar-tailed Godwit were 'non-followers'. Densities of 'followers' near the tide line were up to five times higher than elsewhere. Species differed markedly in the way they used space on the flats, but in general the rate of biomass acquisition (in grams of ash-free dry weight per time exposed) was much higher in lower flats. However, this preference was insufficient to counter the much longer exposure of the upper flats, so the total amount of biomass consumed on the latter was greater. Therefore, it was in these upper flats that waders fulfilled most of their energetic needs. Consequently, upper flats are of particular importance for the conservation of wader assemblages, but because they are usually closer to shore they tend to suffer the highest pressure from disturbance and land reclamation.

  5. Mercury cycling and sequestration in salt marshes sediments: an ecosystem service provided by Juncus maritimus and Scirpus maritimus.

    PubMed

    Marques, B; Lillebø, A I; Pereira, E; Duarte, A C

    2011-07-01

    In this study two time scales were looked at: a yearlong study was completed, and a 180-day decay experiment was done. Juncus maritimus and Scirpus maritimus have different life cycles, and this seems to have implications in the Hg-contaminated salt marsh sediment chemical environment, namely Eh and pH. In addition, the belowground biomass decomposition rates were faster for J. maritimus, as well as the biomass turnover rates. Results show that all these species-specific factors have implications in the mercury dynamics and sequestration. Meaning that J. maritimus belowground biomass has a sequestration capacity for mercury per square metre approximately 4-5 times higher than S. maritimus, i.e., in S. maritimus colonized areas Hg is more extensively exchange between belowground biomass and the rhizosediment. In conclusion, J. maritimus seems to provide a comparatively higher ecosystem service through phytostabilization (Hg complexation in the rhizosediment) and through phytoaccumulation (Hg sequestration in the belowground biomass). PMID:21514707

  6. Hydrologic controls on nitrogen cycling processes and functional gene abundance in sediments of a groundwater flow-through lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Repert, Deborah A.; Smith, Richard L.; Song, Bongkeun; LeBlanc, Denis R.; McCobb, Timothy D.; Conaway, Christopher; Hyun, Sung Pil; Koh, Dong-Chan; Moon, Hee Sun; Kent, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    The fate and transport of inorganic nitrogen (N) is a critically important issue for human and aquatic ecosystem health because discharging N-contaminated groundwater can foul drinking water and cause algal blooms. Factors controlling N-processing were examined in sediments at three sites with contrasting hydrologic regimes at a lake on Cape Cod, MA. These factors included water chemistry, seepage rates and direction of groundwater flow, and the abundance and potential rates of activity of N-cycling microbial communities. Genes coding for denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and nitrification were identified at all sites regardless of flow direction or groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations. Flow direction was, however, a controlling factor in the potential for N-attenuation via denitrification in the sediments. Potential rates of denitrification varied from 6 to 4500 pmol N/g/h from the inflow to the outflow side of the lake, owing to fundamental differences in the supply of labile organic matter. The results of laboratory incubations suggested that when anoxia and limiting labile organic matter prevailed, the potential existed for concomitant anammox and denitrification. Where oxic lake water was downwelling, potential rates of nitrification at shallow depths were substantial (1640 pmol N/g/h). Rates of anammox, denitrification, and nitrification may be linked to rates of organic N-mineralization, serving to increase N-mobility and transport downgradient.

  7. Hydrologic Controls on Nitrogen Cycling Processes and Functional Gene Abundance in Sediments of a Groundwater Flow-Through Lake.

    PubMed

    Stoliker, Deborah L; Repert, Deborah A; Smith, Richard L; Song, Bongkeun; LeBlanc, Denis R; McCobb, Timothy D; Conaway, Christopher H; Hyun, Sung Pil; Koh, Dong-Chan; Moon, Hee Sun; Kent, Douglas B

    2016-04-01

    The fate and transport of inorganic nitrogen (N) is a critically important issue for human and aquatic ecosystem health because discharging N-contaminated groundwater can foul drinking water and cause algal blooms. Factors controlling N-processing were examined in sediments at three sites with contrasting hydrologic regimes at a lake on Cape Cod, MA. These factors included water chemistry, seepage rates and direction of groundwater flow, and the abundance and potential rates of activity of N-cycling microbial communities. Genes coding for denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and nitrification were identified at all sites regardless of flow direction or groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations. Flow direction was, however, a controlling factor in the potential for N-attenuation via denitrification in the sediments. Potential rates of denitrification varied from 6 to 4500 pmol N/g/h from the inflow to the outflow side of the lake, owing to fundamental differences in the supply of labile organic matter. The results of laboratory incubations suggested that when anoxia and limiting labile organic matter prevailed, the potential existed for concomitant anammox and denitrification. Where oxic lake water was downwelling, potential rates of nitrification at shallow depths were substantial (1640 pmol N/g/h). Rates of anammox, denitrification, and nitrification may be linked to rates of organic N-mineralization, serving to increase N-mobility and transport downgradient. PMID:26967929

  8. The effects of hypoxia on sediment nitrogen cycling in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Helena; Hietanen, Susanna

    2012-03-01

    Primary production in the eutrophic Baltic Sea is limited by nitrogen availability; hence denitrification (natural transformation of nitrate to gaseous N(2)) in the sediments is crucial in mitigating the effects of eutrophication. This study shows that dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) process, where nitrogen is not removed but instead recycled in the system, dominates nitrate reduction in low oxygen conditions (O(2) <110 μM), which have been persistent in the central Gulf of Finland during the past decade. The nitrogen removal rates measured in this study show that nitrogen removal has decreased in the Gulf of Finland compared to rates measured in mid-1990s and the decrease is most likely caused by the increased bottom water hypoxia. PMID:22246635

  9. The multiproxy analysis of a lacustrine-palustrine sediment core from Lebanon reveals four climate cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasse, F. A.; van Campo, E.; Demory, F.; Develle, A.; Tachikawa, K.; Buchet, N.; Sonzogni, C.; Thouveny, N.; Bard, E. G.; Vidal, L.

    2013-12-01

    The study of a sediment core retrieved from the small Yammouneh basin (34.06°N-34.09°N, 36.0°E-36.03°E, 1360 m a.s.l.), Lebanon, provides for the first time a nearly continuous record spanning approximately 360 ka in northern Levant. The basin, located on the eastern flank of Mount Lebanon, is mainly supplied by karstic springs which discharge snowmelt water infiltrated through the western highlands. Part of its water inputs is lost by seepage through its faulted bottom. The core, 73 m long, consists of four whitish carbonated intervals rich in lacustrine organism remains, interrupting a thick accumulation of colored silty clays almost devoid of shells but for ostracods. We analyzed sediment features (mineralogical and elemental composition, light microscopy and SEM observations, grain size), magnetic properties, pollen and calcite oxygen isotopes (δc) derived from ostracod shell composition. The chronological framework is based on 14C ages of wood fragments, U/Th dating, and a high resolution reconstruction of relative paleointensity variations correlated with regional (Portuguese margin) and global (Sint-800) master curves down to about 360 ka. Although the chronology still needs improvement, the 3 upper carbonated intervals undoubtedly fit Interglacials MIS 1, MIS 5.5 and MIS 7, respectively. The deepest one (49-60 m) is assigned to MIS 9 by its proxy analogies with dated Interglacials. The sequence covers a large part of MIS 10. Relationships between individual indicators are explored, in addition to visual comparisons of individual records, from the multiproxy matrix after resampling at a common depth scale of 25 cm. We compute simple linear coefficients between 20 variables, perform Principal Component Analyses based on all variables, on terrestrial pollen biomes, on all sedimentological proxies, and cross-correlations between them and δc. During Interglacial maxima, high local and regional efficient moisture is evidenced by dense arboreal vegetation of

  10. Anodes Stimulate Anaerobic Toluene Degradation via Sulfur Cycling in Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Daghio, Matteo; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Patil, Sunil A; Suárez-Suárez, Ana; Head, Ian M; Franzetti, Andrea; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released during oil spills are persistent in marine sediments due to the absence of suitable electron acceptors below the oxic zone. Here, we investigated an alternative bioremediation strategy to remove toluene, a model monoaromatic hydrocarbon, using a bioanode. Bioelectrochemical reactors were inoculated with sediment collected from a hydrocarbon-contaminated marine site, and anodes were polarized at 0 mV and +300 mV (versus an Ag/AgCl [3 M KCl] reference electrode). The degradation of toluene was directly linked to current generation of up to 301 mA m(-2) and 431 mA m(-2) for the bioanodes polarized at 0 mV and +300 mV, respectively. Peak currents decreased over time even after periodic spiking with toluene. The monitoring of sulfate concentrations during bioelectrochemical experiments suggested that sulfur metabolism was involved in toluene degradation at bioanodes. 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina sequencing of the bulk anolyte and anode samples revealed enrichment with electrocatalytically active microorganisms, toluene degraders, and sulfate-reducing microorganisms. Quantitative PCR targeting the α-subunit of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (encoded by dsrA) and the α-subunit of the benzylsuccinate synthase (encoded by bssA) confirmed these findings. In particular, members of the family Desulfobulbaceae were enriched concomitantly with current production and toluene degradation. Based on these observations, we propose two mechanisms for bioelectrochemical toluene degradation: (i) direct electron transfer to the anode and/or (ii) sulfide-mediated electron transfer. PMID:26497463

  11. Anodes Stimulate Anaerobic Toluene Degradation via Sulfur Cycling in Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Daghio, Matteo; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Patil, Sunil A.; Suárez-Suárez, Ana; Head, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released during oil spills are persistent in marine sediments due to the absence of suitable electron acceptors below the oxic zone. Here, we investigated an alternative bioremediation strategy to remove toluene, a model monoaromatic hydrocarbon, using a bioanode. Bioelectrochemical reactors were inoculated with sediment collected from a hydrocarbon-contaminated marine site, and anodes were polarized at 0 mV and +300 mV (versus an Ag/AgCl [3 M KCl] reference electrode). The degradation of toluene was directly linked to current generation of up to 301 mA m−2 and 431 mA m−2 for the bioanodes polarized at 0 mV and +300 mV, respectively. Peak currents decreased over time even after periodic spiking with toluene. The monitoring of sulfate concentrations during bioelectrochemical experiments suggested that sulfur metabolism was involved in toluene degradation at bioanodes. 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina sequencing of the bulk anolyte and anode samples revealed enrichment with electrocatalytically active microorganisms, toluene degraders, and sulfate-reducing microorganisms. Quantitative PCR targeting the α-subunit of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (encoded by dsrA) and the α-subunit of the benzylsuccinate synthase (encoded by bssA) confirmed these findings. In particular, members of the family Desulfobulbaceae were enriched concomitantly with current production and toluene degradation. Based on these observations, we propose two mechanisms for bioelectrochemical toluene degradation: (i) direct electron transfer to the anode and/or (ii) sulfide-mediated electron transfer. PMID:26497463

  12. High-frequency energy in singing and speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, Brian Bruce

    While human speech and the human voice generate acoustical energy up to (and beyond) 20 kHz, the energy above approximately 5 kHz has been largely neglected. Evidence is accruing that this high-frequency energy contains perceptual information relevant to speech and voice, including percepts of quality, localization, and intelligibility. The present research was an initial step in the long-range goal of characterizing high-frequency energy in singing voice and speech, with particular regard for its perceptual role and its potential for modification during voice and speech production. In this study, a database of high-fidelity recordings of talkers was created and used for a broad acoustical analysis and general characterization of high-frequency energy, as well as specific characterization of phoneme category, voice and speech intensity level, and mode of production (speech versus singing) by high-frequency energy content. Directionality of radiation of high-frequency energy from the mouth was also examined. The recordings were used for perceptual experiments wherein listeners were asked to discriminate between speech and voice samples that differed only in high-frequency energy content. Listeners were also subjected to gender discrimination tasks, mode-of-production discrimination tasks, and transcription tasks with samples of speech and singing that contained only high-frequency content. The combination of these experiments has revealed that (1) human listeners are able to detect very subtle level changes in high-frequency energy, and (2) human listeners are able to extract significant perceptual information from high-frequency energy.

  13. The impact of acid mine drainage on the methylmercury cycling at the sediment-water interface in Aha Reservoir, Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    He, Tianrong; Zhu, Yuzhen; Yin, Deliang; Luo, Guangjun; An, Yanlin; Yan, HaiYu; Qian, Xiaoli

    2015-04-01

    The methylmercury (MeHg) cycling at water-sediment interface in an acid mine drainage (AMD)-polluted reservoir (Aha Reservoir) and a reference site (Hongfeng Reservoir) were investigated and compared. Both reservoirs are seasonal anoxic and alkaline. The concentrations of sulfate, sulfide, iron, and manganese in Aha Reservoir were enriched compared to the reference levels in Hongfeng reservoir due to the AMD input. It was found that the MeHg accumulation layer in Aha Reservoir transitioned from the top sediment layer in winter to the water-sediment interface in spring and then to the overlying water above sediment in summer. It supported the assumption that spring methylation activity may start in sediments and migrate into the water column with seasonal variation. The weaker methylation in sediment during spring and summer was caused by the excessive sulfide (∼15-20 μM) that reduced the bioavailability of mercury, while sulfate reduction potential was in the optimal range for the methylation in the overlying water. This led to a transport flux of MeHg from water to sediment in spring and summer. In contrast, such inversion of MeHg accumulation layer did not occur in Hongfeng Reservoir. The sulfate reduction potential was in the optimal range for the methylation in top sediment, and dissolved MeHg was positively related to sulfide in pore water of Hongfeng Reservoir (r = 0.67, p < 0.001). This result suggested that accumulation of MeHg in lake water and cycling of MeHg at sediment-water interface associate with some sensitive environmental factors, such as sulfur. PMID:25483970

  14. Monitoring general corrosion of rebar embedded in mortar using high-frequency guided mechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervin, Benjamin L.; Bernhard, Jennifer T.; Kuchma, Daniel A.; Reis, Henrique

    2007-04-01

    High-frequency guided mechanical waves were used to ultrasonically monitor reinforced mortar specimens undergoing accelerated general corrosion damage. Waves were invoked, using both single-cycle and high-cycle tonebursts, at frequencies where the attenuation is at a local minimum. Results show that the high-frequency waves were sensitive to irregularities in the reinforcing rebar profile caused by corrosion. The sensitivity is thought to be due to scattering, reflections, and mode conversion at the irregularities. Certain frequencies show promise for being insensitive to the surrounding mortar, ingress of water, presence of additional rebar, stirrups, and rust product accumulation. This lack of sensitivity allows for changes in guided wave behavior from bar profile deterioration to be isolated from the effects of other surrounding interfaces.

  15. Exploring the effects of black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) expansions on nutrient cycling in smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) marsh sediments of southern Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, K. M.; Twilley, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    Located at the northernmost extent of mangroves in the Gulf of Mexico, coastal Louisiana (LA) provides an excellent opportunity to study the effects of a climate-induced vegetation shift on nutrient cycling within an ecosystem. Climate throughout the Gulf Coast region is experiencing a general warming trend and scientists predict both hotter summers (+1.5 to 4 °C) and warmer winters (+1.5 to 5.5 °C) by 2100. Over the last two decades, mild winter temperatures have facilitated the expansion of black mangrove trees (Avicennia germinans) into the smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) along parts of the LA coast. Due to differences in morphology and physiology between these two species, the expansion of Avicennia has the potential to greatly alter sediment biogeochemistry, especially nutrient cycling. With such an extensive history of coastal nutrient enrichment and eutrophication in the Mississippi River delta, it is important to understand how nutrient cycling, retention, and removal in this region will be affected by this climate-induced vegetation expansion. We examined the effect of this species shift on porewater salinity, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations (nitrite, nitrate, ammonium, and phosphate) as well as sediment oxidation-reduction potential, bulk density, and nutrient content (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus). We also measured net dinitrogen (N2:Ar), oxygen, and dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes on intact, non-vegetated sediment cores collected from both Spartina and Avicennia habitats. Spartina sediments were more reducing, with higher concentrations of sulfides and ammonium. We found no significant difference between Spartina and Avicennia sediment dinitrogen, oxygen, or dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes. Net dinitrogen fluxes for both habitat types were predominately positive, indicating higher rates of denitrification than nitrogen fixation at these sites. Sediments were primarily a nitrate sink, but functioned as both a

  16. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  17. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  18. The High Frequency Stabilization of a Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirdyashev, K.

    2004-10-01

    Experimental data on the high-frequency stabilization of the MPD thruster and the suppression of low-frequency oscillations in the frequency range from 20 to 100 kHz are presented. Conditions for the stabilizing effect of a high-frequency magnetic field at the frequency of 40 MHz on the plasma jet produced by the thruster are determined, and the efficiency of this action is evaluated. The action of high frequency field on the MPD thruster consists in the contention of two processes - the stabilization of the plasma drift instability by the magnetic component of high frequency field and the energy conversion of natural plasma oscillations excited by the external field to the ion-sound wave energy.

  19. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  20. High frequency jet ventilation in fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, A; Simpson, D

    1986-11-01

    The use of high frequency jet ventilation in the management of a patient with fat embolism syndrome is described. Its principal advantage over conventional intermittent positive pressure ventilation is a reduction in the amount of sedation necessary. PMID:3789371

  1. Electromagnetic inhibition of high frequency thermal bonding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong; Zhang, Qing-qing; Li, Hang; Zhang, Da-jian; Hou, Ming-feng; Zhu, Xian-wei

    2011-12-01

    The traditional high frequency thermal bonding machine had serious radiation problems at dominant frequency, two times frequency and three times frequency. Combining with its working principle, the problems of electromagnetic compatibility were studied, three following measures were adopted: 1.At the head part of the high frequency thermal bonding machine, resonant circuit attenuator was designed. The notch groove and reaction field can make the radiation being undermined or absorbed; 2.The electromagnetic radiation shielding was made for the high frequency copper power feeder; 3.Redesigned the high-frequency oscillator circuit to reduce the output of harmonic oscillator. The test results showed that these measures can make the output according with the national standard of electromagnetic compatibility (GB4824-2004-2A), the problems of electromagnetic radiation leakage can be solved, and good social, environmental and economic benefits would be brought.

  2. Shift of the shadow boundary in high frequency scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zworski, Maciej

    1991-02-01

    The microlocal theory of diffraction is used to establish the conjecture of Keller and Rubinow relating the shift of the shadow boundary in high frequency scattering to the directional curvatures of a strictly convex obstacle.

  3. Microbial Mercury Cycling in Sediments of the San Francisco Bay-Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Agee, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Microbial mercury (Hg) methylation and methylmercury (MeHg) degradation processes were examined using radiolabled model Hg compounds in San Francisco Bay-Delta surface sediments during three seasonal periods: late winter, spring, and fall. Strong seasonal and spatial differences were evident for both processes. MeHg production rates were positively correlated with microbial sulfate reduction rates during late winter only. MeHg production potential was also greatest during this period and decreased during spring and fall. This temporal trend was related both to an increase in gross MeHg degradation, driven by increasing temperature, and to a build-up in pore water sulfide and solid phase reduced sulfur driven by increased sulfate reduction during the warmer seasons. MeHg production decreased sharply with depth at two of three sites, both of which exhibited a corresponding increase in reduced sulfur compounds with depth. One site that was comparatively oxidized and alkaline exhibited little propensity for net MeHg production. These results support the hypothesis that net MeHg production is greatest when and where gross MeHg degradation rates are low and dissolved and solid phase reduced sulfur concentrations are low.

  4. High frequency, small signal MH loops of ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Ong, K. G.

    2000-01-01

    A method is presented for transforming the high frequency bias susceptibility measurements of ferromagnetic thin films into the form of a MH loop with, depending upon the measurement geometry, the y-axis zero crossing giving a measure of the coercive force or anisotropy field. The loops provide a measure of the quantitative and qualitative high frequency switching properties of ferromagnetic thin films. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. SEPP-ZVS High Frequency Inverter Incorporating Auxiliary Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Itoi, Misao; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents a novel circuit topology to attain ZVS operation of a high frequency inverter over a wide range output power regulation using a PWM control technique by connecting an auxiliary switch to the conventional single ended push-pull (SEPP) ZVS high frequency inverter. A switching current is injected into the main switches via the auxiliary switch only during the short period between its turn-on and off times to supply a current required for its ZVS operation.

  6. Soft Switching SEPP High Frequency Inverter for Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents a novel circuit topology to attain soft switching operation of a high frequency inverter. Its output power is regulated over a wide range using a PWM control technique by connecting an auxiliary resonant circuit to the conventional single ended push pull (SEPP) high frequency inverter for induction heating. All switching devices in the proposed inverter are operated soft switching mode. This paper describes its circuit constitution and obtained experimental results from a practical point of view.

  7. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  8. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  9. Hydrothermal Fe cycling and deep ocean organic carbon scavenging: Model-based evidence for significant POC supply to seafloor sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Legendre, L. L.; Sander, S. G.; Niquil, N.; Luther, G. W.; Bharati, L.; Han, X.; Le Bris, N.

    2015-06-01

    Submarine hydrothermal venting has recently been identified to have the potential to impact ocean biogeochemistry at the global scale. This is the case because processes active in hydrothermal plumes are so vigorous that the residence time of the ocean, with respect to cycling through hydrothermal plumes, is comparable to that of deep ocean mixing caused by thermohaline circulation. Recently, it has been argued that seafloor venting may provide a significant source of bio-essential Fe to the oceans as the result of a close coupling between Fe and organic carbon in hydrothermal plumes. But a complementary question remains to be addressed: does this same intimate Fe-Corg association in hydrothermal plumes cause any related impact to the global C cycle? To address this, SCOR-InterRidge Working Group 135 developed a modeling approach to synthesize site-specific field data from the East Pacific Rise 9°50‧ N hydrothermal field, where the range of requisite data sets is most complete, and combine those inputs with global estimates for dissolved Fe inputs from venting to the oceans to establish a coherent model with which to investigate hydrothermal Corg cycling. The results place new constraints on submarine Fe vent fluxes worldwide, including an indication that the majority of Fe supplied to hydrothermal plumes should come from entrainment of diffuse flow. While this same entrainment is not predicted to enhance the supply of dissolved organic carbon to hydrothermal plumes by more than ∼10% over background values, what the model does indicate is that scavenging of carbon in association with Fe-rich hydrothermal plume particles should play a significant role in the delivery of particulate organic carbon to deep ocean sediments, worldwide.

  10. Effects of near-bottom water oxygen concentration on biogeochemical cycling of C, N and S in sediments of the Gulf of Gdansk (southern Baltic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukawska-Matuszewska, Katarzyna; Kielczewska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Sediments from four sampling sites in the Gulf of Gdansk were sampled to test how different oxygen concentrations in near-bottom water affects biogeochemical cycling of C, N and S. Vertical distributions of content of organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN) and total sulfur (TS) and number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sediments were determined. Pore water total alkalinity (TA), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), sulfate, hydrogen sulfide, ammonium and phosphate were analyzed and benthic fluxes of DIC, hydrogen sulfide and ammonium were calculated. Concentrations of OC and TN decreased and concentration of TS increased with sediment depth. Highest concentrations of OC, TN and TS were observed in silty clay sediments from hypoxic and anoxic sediments below the permanent halocline. Organic matter (OM) accumulation in sediments and oxygen deficiency in near-bottom water stimulate preservation of OC and burial of TS in this area. Concentrations of TA, DIC, hydrogen sulfide, ammonium and phosphate in pore water increased, while concentration of sulfate decreased with sediment depth. Hydrogen sulfide, ammonium and phosphate was a significant additional source of TA in pore water under hypoxic and anoxic conditions. Mineralization of OM at oxygen concentrations <2 ml l-1 occurred mainly via bacterial sulfate reduction. Diurnal hydrogen sulfide fluxes under hypoxic conditions ranged from 400 to 1240 μmol m-2 d-1. Ammonium fluxes were estimated on 534 - 924 μmol m-2 d-1. Corresponding fluxes measured under anoxic conditions were 266 μmol m-2 d-1 and 106 μmol m-2 d-1. Sediments under oxic conditions became a place of the intensive regeneration of carbon - DIC flux from sediment reached 2775 μmol m-2 day-1. Sediment-water DIC fluxes under hypoxic and anoxic conditions were much lower and ranged from 1015 to 1208 μmol m-2 d-1.

  11. Characterizing Earthquake Rupture Properties Using Peak High-Frequency Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, L.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Teleseismic array back-projection (BP) of high frequency (~1Hz) seismic waves has been recently applied to image the aftershock sequence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The BP method proves to be effective in capturing early aftershocks that are difficult to be detected due to the contamination of the mainshock coda wave. Furthermore, since the event detection is based on the identification of the local peaks in time series of the BP power, the resulting event location corresponds to the peak high-frequency energy rather than the hypocenter. In this work, we show that the comparison between the BP-determined catalog and conventional phase-picking catalog provides estimates of the spatial and temporal offset between the hypocenter and the peak high-frequency radiation. We propose to measure this peak high-frequency shift of global earthquakes between M4.0 to M7.0. We average the BP locations calibrated by multiple reference events to minimize the uncertainty due to the variation of 3D path effects. In our initial effort focusing on the foreshock and aftershock sequence of the 2014 Iquique earthquake, we find systematic shifts of the peak high-frequency energy towards the down-dip direction. We find that the amount of the shift is a good indication of rupture length, which scales with the earthquake magnitude. Further investigations of the peak high frequency offset may provide constraints on earthquake source properties such as rupture directivity, rupture duration, rupture speed, and stress drop.

  12. High-frequency depositional sequences and stratal stacking patterns in lower pliocene coastal deltas, mid-Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, S.; Weimer, P.

    1996-12-01

    Extensive deltaic and coastal progradation occurred along the mid-Norwegian continental shelf during the early Pliocene. Thirty-eight well-developed, high-frequency (fourth-order) sequences are identified within the deltaic complex on multifold seismic data. The fourth-order sequences are arranged in four oblique progradational and two sigmoid progradational sequence sets. Deposition of the high-frequency sequences and their stacking patterns probably were in response to high-frequency cycles of relative changes in sea level cycles produced by variable rates of subsidence and uplift, superimposed on ;high-frequency eustatic cycles within a lower frequency eustatic system. The mixed aggrading/prograding sequence sets are interpreted to represent increased space-added accommodation rates and deposition within third-order highstand systems tracts. Conversely, the progradational sequence sets are interpreted to represent decreasing space-added accommodation rates and deposition within the third-order low-stand systems tracts. The recognition of multiple sequence sets likely reflects the effect of long-term relative fall in sea level (tectonic uplift?) super-imposed on high-frequency eustatic cycles.

  13. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease Using 12-Lead High-Frequency Electrocardiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian

    2006-01-01

    method is the presence versus the absence of reduced-amplitude zones (RAZs). In terms that must be simplified for the sake of brevity, an RAZ comprises several cycles of a high-frequency QRS signal during which the amplitude of the high-frequency oscillation in a portion of the signal is abnormally low (see figure). A given signal sample exhibiting an interval of reduced amplitude may or may not be classified as an RAZ, depending on quantitative criteria regarding peaks and troughs within the reduced-amplitude portion of the high-frequency QRS signal. This analysis is performed in all 12 leads in real time.

  14. Ultrasonic Measurements of Unconsolidated Saline Sediments During Freeze/Thaw Cycles: The Seismic Properties of Cryopeg Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Saline permafrost and cryopegs (hypersaline unfrozen layers/zones within permafrost) are widespread in the Arctic coastal area as a result of marine transgression and regression in recent geological history. Owing to the freezing-point depression effect of soluble salts, they contain more unfrozen water than non-saline frozen sediments when subjected to the same permafrost temperatures (e.g., from 0 to -15 °C). Mapping subsurface cryopeg structure remains a challenging geophysical task due to the poor penetration of GPR in highly conductive fluids and related limitations for lower frequency EM techniques. Seismic profiling, particularly surface wave characterization, provides one possible approach to delineate the extent of cryopeg bodies. However, interpretation of such surveys is currently limited by the sparse database of measurements examining the seismic properties of unconsolidated materials saturated with saline fluids at sub-zero temperatures. We present the results of experiments examining seismic velocity in the ultrasonic range for both synthetic and natural permafrost sediments during freeze/thaw cycles; in these experiments, use of a range of brine salinities allows us to evaluate the properties of cryopeg sediments at in-situ conditions, a prerequisite for quantitative interpretation of seismic imaging results. Because of the abundant unfrozen water and less developed inter-granular ice structure, the seismic properties of saline permafrost typically falls between frozen and unfrozen soils. We conducted ultrasonic measurements of a freeze-thaw cycle on 20-30 Ottawa sand (grain size 590-840 μm) as well as natural mineral soils from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) saturated with brines of different salinities (0-2.5 M NaCl). For each salinity, seismic properties were measured using the ultrasonic (~1 MHz) pulse-transmission method in the temperature range from 20 to -30 °C. Similar to sediments saturated with low salinity fluids, seismic

  15. ON THE FLARE INDUCED HIGH-FREQUENCY GLOBAL WAVES IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Brajesh; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Mathur, Savita; GarcIa, R. A. E-mail: pvk@prl.res.in E-mail: rafael.garcia@cea.fr

    2010-03-01

    Recently, Karoff and Kjeldsen presented evidence of strong correlation between the energy in the high-frequency part (5.3 < {nu} < 8.3 mHz) of the acoustic spectrum of the Sun and the solar X-ray flux. They have used disk-integrated intensity observations of the Sun obtained from the Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations instrument on board Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. Similar signature of flares in velocity observations has not been confirmed till now. The study of low-degree high-frequency waves in the Sun is important for our understanding of the dynamics of the deeper solar layers. In this Letter, we present the analysis of the velocity observations of the Sun obtained from the Michelson and Doppler Imager (MDI) and the Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies (GOLF) instruments on board SOHO for some major flare events of the solar cycle 23. Application of wavelet techniques to the time series of disk-integrated velocity signals from the solar surface using the full-disk Dopplergrams obtained from the MDI clearly indicates that there is enhancement of high-frequency global waves in the Sun during the flares. This signature of flares is also visible in the Fourier Power Spectrum of these velocity oscillations. On the other hand, the analysis of disk-integrated velocity observations obtained from the GOLF shows only marginal evidence of effects of flares on high-frequency oscillations.

  16. The Arsenic Cycle in Searles Lake, California: An Arsenic-Rich, Salt-Saturated Soda Lake: I. Sediment Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, T. R.; Hoeft, S. E.; Miller, L. G.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2004-12-01

    Searles Lake is a residual playa of what once was the end-member of a series of soda lakes that were connected during the Pleistocene. Brinewaters are saturated (300 g/L), alkaline (pH = 9.8), and rich in arsenic (3.9 mM). Porewater profiles (max. depth = 25 cm.) show the speciation of arsenic changes from arsenate [As(V)] in the slightly oxic (DO = 6.2 uM) surface to predominantly arsenite [As(III)] in the sediments. Porewaters also contained ammonia (0.4 - 1.2 mM), sulfide (0.1 - 0.2 mM), and methane (0.05 - 0.6 uM). Sediment slurries incubated with artificial brinewater (salinity = 346 g/L) demonstrated reduction of As(V) to As(III). The rate of As(V) reduction (40 umol/L/day) increased 50 percent with addition of lactate. Addition of sulfide or hydrogen to slurries stimulated this rate by 2.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. This suggests that chemoautotrophs are important agents of As(V)-respiration in this system. The rate of As(V)-reduction responded inversely with increased salinity, decreasing from 470 umol/L/day at 50 g/L to 40 umol/L/day at 346 g/L. A similar relationship to salinity was found for methane production. Slurries incubated under aerobic conditions showed a rapid biological oxidization of As(III) (rate = 220 umol/L/day). These results show that a microbiological arsenic cycle occurs in this extreme environment. The anaerobes in this ecosystem, however, seem best adapted to lower salinities. Nonetheless, significant dissimilatory As(V) reduction still occurs at the condition of salt-saturation.

  17. Experimental approaches to marine and meteoric dissolution-to-repreciptiation cycles of fine-grained marine carbonate sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Riechelmann, Sylvia; Kwiecien, Ola; Lokier, Stephen; Neuser, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained carbonate (carbonate ooze), or microcrystalline carbonate (micrite), its lithified counterpart, forms a main constituent of limestones throughout much of Earth's history. Fine-grained carbonates are deposited below the permanent fair-weather wave base in neritic lagoonal environments or below the storm-wave base in basinal settings. The origin of components forming these fine-grained carbonates often remains poorly understood and represents a major challenge in carbonate sedimentology, particularly when these materials are used as carbonate archives (bulk micrite geochemistry). Here we present a novel experimental approach exposing natural, fine-grained carbonate sediments to dissolution-reprecipitation cycles under non-sterile conditions that mimick earth-surface conditions. In a first stage, the experiment simulated subaerial exposure of an ooid (aragonite) shoal and leaching and carbonate dissolution under meteoric phreatic conditions. In a second stage, CO2 was added to the experimental fluid (natural rainwater) representing soil-zone activity. In a third stage, partly dissolved (micro-karstified) sediments were exposed to marine phreatic conditions simulating renewed flooding of the shoal carbonates. During the third stage, precipitation was induced by degassing the CO2 in the fluid with N2. Degassing induced nucleation and growth of a diagenetic inorganic aragonite (and subordinate calcite) phase upon the surface of carbonate particles. The outcome of these first experiments is promising. The CO2 concentration of the fluid and the air are low under atmospheric conditions and increase as expected due to adding CO2 to the experiment resulting in a lower pH. Carbonate dissolution increases conductivity, alkalinity, and calcium concentration reaching a plateau at the end of the first experimental phase. Small surficial damages to ooids represent zones of weakness and form the preferred sites of dissolution leading to a deepening and widening of these

  18. Thaumarchaeotal Signature Gene Distribution in Sediments of the Northern South China Sea: an Indicator of the Metabolic Intersection of the Marine Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Cycles?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haixia; Yang, Jinying; Ge, Huangmin; Jiao, Nianzhi; Luan, Xiwu; Klotz, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Thaumarchaeota are abundant and active in marine waters, where they contribute to aerobic ammonia oxidation and light-independent carbon fixation. The ecological function of thaumarchaeota in marine sediments, however, has rarely been investigated, even though marine sediments constitute the majority of the Earth's surface. Thaumarchaeota in the upper layer of sediments may contribute significantly to the reservoir of nitrogen oxides in ocean waters and thus to productivity, including the assimilation of carbon. We tested this hypothesis in the northern South China Sea (nSCS), a section of a large oligotrophic marginal sea with limited influx of nutrients, including nitrogen, by investigating the diversity, abundance, community structure, and spatial distribution of thaumarchaeotal signatures in surface sediments. Quantitative real-time PCR using primers designed to detect 16S rRNA and amoA genes in sediment community DNA revealed a significantly higher abundance of pertinent thaumarchaeotal than betaproteobacterial genes. This finding correlates with high levels of hcd genes, a signature of thaumarchaeotal autotrophic carbon fixation. Thaumarchaeol, a signature lipid biomarker for thaumarchaeota, constituted the majority of archaeal lipids in marine sediments. Sediment temperature and organic P and silt contents were identified as key environmental factors shaping the community structure and distribution of the monitored thaumarchaeotal amoA genes. When the pore water PO43− concentration was controlled for via partial-correlation analysis, thaumarchaeotal amoA gene abundance significantly correlated with the sediment pore water NO2− concentration, suggesting that the amoA-bearing thaumarchaeota contribute to nitrite production. Statistical analyses also suggest that thaumarchaeotal metabolism could serve as a pivotal intersection of the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in marine sediments. PMID:23335759

  19. High-frequency gravity waves and homogeneous ice nucleation in tropical tropopause layer cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Ueyama, Rei; Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Theopaul V.; Alexander, M. Joan; Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Woods, Sarah; Lawson, R. Paul; Kim, Ji-Eun; Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of high-frequency gravity waves on homogeneous-freezing ice nucleation in cold cirrus clouds is examined using parcel model simulations driven by superpressure balloon measurements of temperature variability experienced by air parcels in the tropical tropopause region. We find that the primary influence of high-frequency waves is to generate rapid cooling events that drive production of numerous ice crystals. Quenching of ice nucleation events by temperature tendency reversal in the highest-frequency waves does occasionally produce low ice concentrations, but the overall impact of high-frequency waves is to increase the occurrence of high ice concentrations. The simulated ice concentrations are considerably higher than indicated by in situ measurements of cirrus in the tropical tropopause region. One-dimensional simulations suggest that although sedimentation reduces mean ice concentrations, a discrepancy of about a factor of 3 with observed ice concentrations remains. Reconciliation of numerical simulations with the observed ice concentrations will require inclusion of physical processes such as heterogeneous nucleation and entrainment.

  20. Application of high frequency ultrasound in the destruction of DDT in contaminated sand and water.

    PubMed

    Thangavadivel, Kandasamy; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Smart, Roger St C; Lesniewski, Peter J; Naidu, Ravi

    2009-09-15

    High frequency ultrasound, as an alternative to high cost incineration, has been investigated to remediate DDT from sand and soil slurries. In this study, low power high frequency ultrasound (1.6 MHz; 150 W/L), with operating costs much lower than low frequency ultrasound, has been used to remediate DDT in liquid solution and in sand slurries. At 1.6 MHz, the wavelength, cycle time, bubble size and bubble life time are much smaller and the number of bubbles per litre is much larger than at frequencies below 50 kHz. These large differences affect the effective mass transfer to the bubbles and subsequent energy release, hydrolysis of water and degradation mechanism. Based on DDT measurement, using high frequency ultrasound, 90% of 8 mg/L of DDT from liquid solution was destroyed in 90 min. Removal efficiency from 32.6 mg/L of DDT in a 40 wt.% sand slurry was 22% in 90 min. Other slurry and DDT combinations are reported. Incremental chloride measurements indicated that combination of ultrasound and iron powder helps to increase the remediation rate of DDT from sand slurry, e.g. 46% cf. 32% for a 20 wt.% slurry. The results show that high frequency ultrasound is effective in degrading the non-polar pollutant DDT dispersed in water and in sand slurry. In practice, due to intensity limitations in currently available equipment and higher attenuation of energy, high frequency ultrasound has a low volume coverage and would require circulation of the slurry past the sonotrode, multiple sonotrodes, larger sonotrode area and lower slurry densities may still be required. PMID:19346068

  1. High frequency ultrasound imaging in pupillary block glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Aslanides, I M; Libre, P E; Silverman, R H; Reinstein, D Z; Lazzaro, D R; Rondeau, M J; Harmon, G K; Coleman, D J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The diagnosis of pupillary block glaucoma requires sufficient clarity of the ocular media. This is particularly important for assessment of both the presence and patency of an iridotomy, and the determination of central anterior chamber depth. METHODS--High frequency ultrasonography was used in three patients with suspected pupillary block to determine iris configuration, posterior chamber volume, and ciliary body conformation. RESULTS--All patients demonstrated high frequency ultrasonographic findings consistent with pupillary block: iris bombé, a formed posterior chamber, and a lack of anterior rotation of the ciliary processes. CONCLUSION--High frequency ultrasound imaging appears to be a valuable adjunct in making or corroborating the diagnosis of pupillary block glaucoma. Images PMID:8534666

  2. Switch over to the high frequency rf systems near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Wei, J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to point out that since bunch narrowing naturally occurs in the acceleration process in the vicinity of transition, it should be possible to switch over to the high frequency system close to transition when the bunch has narrowed enough to fit directly into the high frequency bucket. The advantage of this approach is the simplicity, no extra components or gymnastics are required of the low frequency system. The disadvantage, of course, is for protons which do not go through transition. But on the other hand, there is no shortage of intensity for protons and so it should be possible to keep the phase space area low for protons, and then matching to the high frequency bucket should be easily accomplished by adiabatic compression. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Design of matching layers for high-frequency ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Chunlong; Ma, Jianguo; Chiu, Chi Tat; Williams, Jay A.; Fong, Wayne; Chen, Zeyu; Zhu, BenPeng; Xiong, Rui; Shi, Jing; Hsiai, Tzung K.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-09-01

    Matching the acoustic impedance of high-frequency (≥100 MHz) ultrasound transducers to an aqueous loading medium remains a challenge for fabricating high-frequency transducers. The traditional matching layer design has been problematic to establish high matching performance given requirements on both specific acoustic impedance and precise thickness. Based on both mass-spring scheme and microwave matching network analysis, we interfaced metal-polymer layers for the matching effects. Both methods hold promises for guiding the metal-polymer matching layer design. A 100 MHz LiNbO3 transducer was fabricated to validate the performance of the both matching layer designs. In the pulse-echo experiment, the transducer echo amplitude increased by 84.4% and its -6dB bandwidth increased from 30.2% to 58.3% comparing to the non-matched condition, demonstrating that the matching layer design method is effective for developing high-frequency ultrasonic transducers.

  4. A digital multigate Doppler method for high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Ye, Zongying; Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Yan; Chi, Liyang; Mu, Peitian; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive visualization of blood flow with high frequency Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used to assess the morphology and hemodynamics of the microcirculation. A completely digital implementation of multigate pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler method was proposed in this paper for high frequency ultrasound applications. Analog mixer was eliminated by a digital demodulator and the same data acquisition path was shared with traditional B-mode imaging which made the design compact and flexible. Hilbert transform based quadrature demodulation scheme was employed to achieve the multigate Doppler acquisition. A programmable high frequency ultrasound platform was also proposed to facilitate the multigate flow visualization. Experimental results showed good performance of the proposed method. Parabolic velocity gradient inside the vessel and velocity profile with different time slots were acquired to demonstrate the functionality of the multigate Doppler. Slow wall motion was also recorded by the proposed method. PMID:25061836

  5. Interface Strategy To Achieve Tunable High Frequency Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hualiang; Zhang, Haiqian; Ji, Guangbin; Xu, Zhichuan J

    2016-03-16

    Among all polarizations, the interface polarization effect is the most effective, especially at high frequency. The design of various ferrite/iron interfaces can significantly enhance the materials' dielectric loss ability at high frequency. This paper presents a simple method to generate ferrite/iron interfaces to enhance the microwave attenuation at high frequency. The ferrites were coated onto carbonyl iron and could be varied to ZnFe2O4, CoFe2O4, Fe3O4, and NiFe2O4. Due to the ferrite/iron interface inducing a stronger dielectric loss effect, all of these materials achieved broad effective frequency width at a coating layer as thin as 1.5 mm. In particular, an effective frequency width of 6.2 GHz could be gained from the Fe@NiFe2O4 composite. PMID:26918285

  6. A Digital Multigate Doppler Method for High Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Weibao; Ye, Zongying; Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Yan; Chi, Liyang; Mu, Peitian; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive visualization of blood flow with high frequency Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used to assess the morphology and hemodynamics of the microcirculation. A completely digital implementation of multigate pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler method was proposed in this paper for high frequency ultrasound applications. Analog mixer was eliminated by a digital demodulator and the same data acquisition path was shared with traditional B-mode imaging which made the design compact and flexible. Hilbert transform based quadrature demodulation scheme was employed to achieve the multigate Doppler acquisition. A programmable high frequency ultrasound platform was also proposed to facilitate the multigate flow visualization. Experimental results showed good performance of the proposed method. Parabolic velocity gradient inside the vessel and velocity profile with different time slots were acquired to demonstrate the functionality of the multigate Doppler. Slow wall motion was also recorded by the proposed method. PMID:25061836

  7. Search for a high frequency stochastic background of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampanis, Stefanos

    Over the past decades significant efforts have been made worldwide in the search for gravitational waves. Ground-based interferometry, primarily with the LIGO detectors, has reached a crucial point and it is believed that over the next few years a detection will take place. LIGO interferometers have recently completed collecting data from the longest science run that has been attempted so far. This thesis describes the search for a stochastic gravitational wave background radiation at high frequencies using data from the LIGO detectors located in Hanford, Washington USA. This is the first ever search for a stochastic signal at high frequencies by using data from two co-located interferometers. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to gravitational radiation as predicted by the general theory of relativity and the expected sources of gravitational waves with an emphasis on the stochastic background. Chapter 2 discusses the basic principles of laser interferometry and the experimental techniques used in modern ground-based interferometers such as the LIGO interferometers. Chapter 3 discusses in more detail the configuration, validation and characterization of the set of channels, "Fast Channels", that are used in the search for a high frequency stochastic background radiation. Chapter 4 is an introduction to the LIGO calibration and a more formal discussion on the calibration of the "Fast Channels". Chapter 5 introduces the cross-correlation analysis technique used in the search for a stochastic background and gives a thorough description of the data selection and analysis in searching for a high frequency stochastic signal with data from LIGO's fifth science run (S5). Chapter 6 concludes with the results obtained from the stochastic high frequency S5 analysis, discusses upper limits set at low and high frequencies from other searches and makes connection with Chapter 1 and the theoretical predictions and experimental bounds set within LIGO's frequency band of

  8. Carrier Tunneling in High-Frequency Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ganichev, S.D.; Ziemann, E.; Gleim, T.; Prettl, W.; Ganichev, S.D.; Yassievich, I.N.; Perel, V.I.; Wilke, I.; Haller, E.E.

    1998-03-01

    An enhancement of tunnel ionization of deep impurities in semiconductors in an alternating field as compared to static fields has been observed. The transition between the quasistatic and the high-frequency regime is determined by the tunneling time. For the case of deep impurities this is the time of redistribution of the defect vibrational system which depends strongly on temperature and the impurity structure. A theory of tunnel ionization of deep impurities by high-frequency fields has been developed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Real-Time, High-Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; DePalma, Jude L.; Moradi, Saeed

    2003-01-01

    An electronic system that performs real-time analysis of the low-amplitude, high-frequency, ordinarily invisible components of the QRS portion of an electrocardiographic signal in real time has been developed. Whereas the signals readily visible on a conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) have amplitudes of the order of a millivolt and are characterized by frequencies <100 Hz, the ordinarily invisible components have amplitudes in the microvolt range and are characterized by frequencies from about 150 to about 250 Hz. Deviations of these high-frequency components from a normal pattern can be indicative of myocardial ischemia or myocardial infarction

  10. Condenser Microphone Protective Grid Correction for High Frequency Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Erik; Bennett, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    Use of a protective grid on small diameter microphones can prolong the lifetime of the unit, but the high frequency effects can complicate data interpretation. Analytical methods have been developed to correct for the grid effect at high frequencies. Specifically, the analysis pertains to quantifying the microphone protective grid response characteristics in the acoustic near field of a rocket plume noise source. A frequency response function computation using two microphones will be explained. Experimental and instrumentation setup details will be provided. The resulting frequency response function for a B&K 4944 condenser microphone protective grid will be presented, along with associated uncertainties

  11. The Seasonal Cycles of Temperature, Salinity, Nutrients and Suspended Sediment in the Southern North Sea in 1988 and 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandle, D.; Hydes, D. J.; Jarvis, J.; McManus, J.

    1997-11-01

    Simple statistical analyses are used to summarize the large data set available from the 15 consecutive monthly surveys of the U.K. North Sea Project (NSP). The seasonal cycles of temperature, salinity, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, ammonium and suspended particulate matter (SPM) are approximated by a mean value plus a year-long cosine wave. The mean concentrations, with standard deviationcgiven in parentheses, for each of these water quality parameters covering the whole area throughout the 15-month period are: salinity 34·26 (±0·74), ammonia 1·3 (±1·0) μM, nitrate 4·9 (±6·0) μM, nitrite 0·4 (±0·5) μM, phosphate 0·5 (0·3) μM, silicate 2·5 (±2·5) μM and suspended sediment 2·6 (±3·5) mg l-1. This approximate seasonal cycle accounts for most of the variance in temperature and nutrients. The spatially-averaged seasonal amplitudes for both nitrate and silicate are approximately equal to their mean values-this is consistent with these being limiting nutrients. Salinity shows little seasonality. Spatial distributions are shown of the mean values, the seasonal amplitudes and the percentage variances accounted for by a combination of these mean values and seasonal amplitudes. Correlations between the determinands are calculated; these confirm the similarity in the spatial distributions for the nutrients, especially between nitrate, phosphate and silicate. Maximum concentrations are confined to the coastal regions, except for ammonium and nitrite for which they occur offshore. Spatial distributions of the anomalous (non-seasonal) components can be interpreted to indicate the effect of specific riverine and oceanic exchanges. Correlations between nitrate, nitrite and ammonium correspond to the interconversion of these compounds. The oceanic/riverine inflow rates of phosphate, nitrate and silicate are shown to be insufficient to support their seasonal variability, suggesting that internal recycling is required to maintain the seasonal cycle.

  12. Compound specific amino acid δ15N in marine sediments: A new approach for studies of the marine nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Fabian C.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Crusius, John; Casso, Michael A.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-10-01

    The nitrogen (N) isotopic composition (δ15N) of bulk sedimentary N (δ15Nbulk) is a common tool for studying past biogeochemical cycling in the paleoceanographic record. Empirical evidence suggests that natural fluctuations in the δ15N of surface nutrient N are reflected in the δ15N of exported planktonic biomass and in sedimentary δ15Nbulk. However, δ15Nbulk is an analysis of total combustible sedimentary N, and therefore also includes mixtures of N sources and/or selective removal or preservation of N-containing compounds. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analyses of individual amino acids (δ15NAA) are novel measurements with the potential to decouple δ15N changes in nutrient N from trophic effects, two main processes that can influence δ15Nbulk records. As a proof of concept study to examine how δ15NAA can be applied in marine sedimentary systems, we compare the δ15NAA signatures of surface and sinking POM sources with shallow surface sediments from the Santa Barbara Basin, a sub-oxic depositional environmental that exhibits excellent preservation of sedimentary organic matter. Our results demonstrate that δ15NAA signatures of both planktonic biomass and sinking POM are well preserved in such surface sediments. However, we also observed an unexpected inverse correlation between δ15N value of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe; the best AA proxy for N isotopic value at the base of the food web) and calculated trophic position. We used a simple N isotope mass balance model to confirm that over long time scales, δ15NPhe values should in fact be directly dependent on shifts in ecosystem trophic position. While this result may appear incongruent with current applications of δ15NAA in food webs, it is consistent with expectations that paleoarchives will integrate N dynamics over much longer timescales. We therefore propose that for paleoceanographic applications, key δ15NAA parameters are ecosystem trophic position, which determines relative partitioning of 15N

  13. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    excitation and sustainment of the discharge. As the pressure decreases the discharge operates in so-called 'alpha-mode' where the sheath expansion is responsible for discharge sustainment. Decreasing the pressure towards the limit of operation (below 1 Pa) the discharge operates in a regime where kinetic effects dominate plasma sustainment. Wave particle interactions resulting from the flux of highly energetic electrons interacting with thermal bulk electrons give rise to a series of oscillations in the electron excitation phase space at the sheath edge. This instability is responsible for a significant energy deposit in the plasma when so-called 'ohmic heating' is no longer efficient. In addition to this an interesting electron acceleration mechanism occurs during the sheath collapse. The large sheath width, due to low plasma densities at the lower pressure, and electron inertia allows the build up of a local electric field accelerating electrons towards the electrode. Multi-frequency plasmas, provide additional process control for technological applications, and through investigating the excitation dynamics in such discharges the limitations of functional separation is observed. Non-linear frequency coupling is observed in plasma boundary sheaths governed by two frequencies simultaneously. In an alpha-operated discharge the sheath edge velocity governs the excitation and ionisation within the plasma, and it will be shown that this is determined by the time varying sheath width. The nature of the coupling effects strongly depends on the ratio of the applied voltages. Under technologically relevant conditions (low frequency voltage >> high frequency voltage) interesting phenomena depending on the phase relation of the voltages are also observed and will be discussed.

  14. Geochemical cycles in sediments deposited on the slopes of the Guaymas and Carmen Basins of the Gulf of California over the last 180 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.; Pride, C.; Thunell, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sediments deposited on the slopes of the Guaymas and Carmen Basins in the central Gulf of California were recovered in two box cores. Q-mode factor analyses identified detrital-clastic, carbonate, and redox associations in the elemental composition of these sediments. The detrital-clastic fraction appears to contain two source components, a more mafic component presumably derived from the Sierra Madre Occidental along the west coast of Mexico, and a more felsic component most likely derived from sedimentary rocks (mostly sandstones) of the Colorado Plateau and delivered by the Colorado River. The sediments also contain significant siliceous biogenic components and minor calcareous biogenic components, but those components were not quantified in this study. Redox associations were identified in both cores based on relatively high concentrations of molybdenum, which is indicative of deposition under conditions of sulfate reduction. Decreases in concentrations of molybdenum in younger sediments suggest that the bottom waters of the Gulf have became more oxygenated over the last 100 years. Many geochemical components in both box cores exhibit distinct cyclicity with periodicities of 10-20 years. The most striking are 20-year cycles in the more mafic components (e.g., titanium), particularly in sediments deposited during the 19th century. In that century, the titanium cycles are in very good agreement with warm phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, implying that at times of greater influx of titanium-rich volcanic debris, there were more El Nin??os and higher winter precipitation. The cycles are interpreted as due to greater and lesser riverine influx of volcanic rock debris from the Sierra Madre. There is also spectral evidence for periodicities of 4-8 and 8-16 years, suggesting that the delivery of detrital-clastic material is responding to some multiannual (ENSO?) forcing.

  15. Piezoelectric films for high frequency ultrasonic transducers in biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifa; Lau, Sienting; Wu, Dawei; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric films have recently attracted considerable attention in the development of various sensor and actuator devices such as nonvolatile memories, tunable microwave circuits and ultrasound transducers. In this paper, an overview of the state of art in piezoelectric films for high frequency transducer applications is presented. Firstly, the basic principles of piezoelectric materials and design considerations for ultrasound transducers will be introduced. Following the review, the current status of the piezoelectric films and recent progress in the development of high frequency ultrasonic transducers will be discussed. Then details for preparation and structure of the materials derived from piezoelectric thick film technologies will be described. Both chemical and physical methods are included in the discussion, namely, the sol–gel approach, aerosol technology and hydrothermal method. The electric and piezoelectric properties of the piezoelectric films, which are very important for transducer applications, such as permittivity and electromechanical coupling factor, are also addressed. Finally, the recent developments in the high frequency transducers and arrays with piezoelectric ZnO and PZT thick film using MEMS technology are presented. In addition, current problems and further direction of the piezoelectric films for very high frequency ultrasound application (up to GHz) are also discussed. PMID:21720451

  16. High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

  17. Collocations of High Frequency Noun Keywords in Prescribed Science Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Sujatha; Mukundan, Jayakaran

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the discourse of science through the study of collocational patterns of high frequency noun keywords in science textbooks used by upper secondary students in Malaysia. Research has shown that one of the areas of difficulty in science discourse concerns lexis, especially that of collocations. This paper describes a corpus-based…

  18. High frequency eddy current device for near surface material characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmann, S.; Heuer, H.; Meyendorf, N.

    2009-03-01

    For near surface characterization a new high frequency eddy current device was been developed. By using a measurement frequency up to 100 MHz information of near surface areas can be acquired. Depending on the investigated material high resolution depth profiles can be derived. The obtained data with the new device were compared to those obtained with a high precision impedance analyser. It could be demonstrated that the new device measures the eddy current conductivity signal in the high frequencies much better than the impedance analyser. By sweeping the frequency from 100 kHz up to 100 MHz the technique delivers a depth profile of the electrical conductivity of the material. This kind of high frequency eddy current technique can be used for quality assurance, surface contamination control or near surface material characterization e.g. microstructure and cold work influences. It can be a powerful tool to obtain information for process control or a good / bad decision in mass production processes like for example rolling, coating, and surface treatments. The big advantage of the high frequency eddy current method is that it is fast und precise. This paper presents results with a new developed prototype Eddy-Current-Device for measurement frequencies up to 100 MHz which is first time suitable in rough industrial environment and makes expensive lab network analysers unnecessary for this kind of investigations.

  19. High-frequency hearing in seals and sea lions.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Kane A; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Existing evidence suggests that some pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) can detect underwater sound at frequencies well above the traditional high-frequency hearing limits for their species. This phenomenon, however, is not well studied: Sensitivity patterns at frequencies beyond traditional high-frequency limits are poorly resolved, and the nature of the auditory mechanism mediating hearing at these frequencies is unknown. In the first portion of this study, auditory sensitivity patterns in the 50-180 kHz range were measured for one California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), one harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and one spotted seal (Phoca largha). Results show the presence of two distinct slope-regions at the high-frequency ends of the audiograms of all three subjects. The first region is characterized by a rapid decrease in sensitivity with increasing frequency-i.e. a steep slope-followed by a region of much less rapid sensitivity decrease-i.e. a shallower slope. In the second portion of this study, a masking experiment was conducted to investigate how the basilar membrane of a harbor seal subject responded to acoustic energy from a narrowband masking noise centered at 140 kHz. The measured masking pattern suggests that the initial, rapid decrease in sensitivity on the high-frequency end of the subject's audiogram is not due to cochlear constraints, as has been previously hypothesized, but rather to constraints on the conductive mechanism. PMID:26519092

  20. Factors Affecting the Benefits of High-Frequency Amplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Amy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the extent to which high-frequency amplification helped or hindered speech recognition as a function of hearing loss, gain-frequency response, and background noise. Method: Speech recognition was measured monaurally under headphones for nonsense syllables low-pass filtered in one-third-octave steps…

  1. Effects of antecedent hydrologic conditions, time dependence, and climate cycles on the suspended sediment load of the Salinas River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Andrew B.; Pasternack, Gregory B.; Watson, Elizabeth B.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Goñi, Miguel A.

    2015-06-01

    Previous estimations of sediment flux for the Salinas River of central California were based on data collected in the 1970s and assumptions of time invariant suspended sediment-discharge behavior. The goals of this study were to estimate sediment flux from the Salinas River using data from 1967-2011 by incorporating time dependent behavior and reassess the role of El Niño Southern Oscillation patterns in inter-decadal sediment load. This study builds on previous findings that time-dependent suspended sediment behavior in this system is controlled in part by antecedent hydrologic conditions. The condition of temporal dependence was further tested herein through comparison of flux estimates obtained using time-dependent formulations and a multivariate approach incorporating hydrologic factors. Longer sampling records and incorporation of decadal scale behavior or antecedent hydrologic conditions resulted in average annual load estimates of 2.0-2.9 Mt/yr with 95% confidence intervals of ±25 to 202%, in comparison to earlier estimates of ∼3.3 Mt/yr. Previous overestimation of sediment load is due largely to the extrapolation of suspended sediment behavior from a decade of high sediment concentrations to the entire record, and the use of log-linear regression techniques on a non-linear system. The use of LOESS methods lowered QSS estimates and decreased confidence interval size. The inclusion of time-stratified and antecedent flow indices further decreased QSS estimates, but increased confidence interval size. However, temporal dependence of the CSS-Q relationship violates the assumptions of single base period regression, which suggests that time-stratified rating curves provide more realistic estimates of sediment flux means and uncertainty. The majority of suspended sediment was transported by flows of ∼25-90 times mean discharge depending on transport constituent (fines or sand) and estimation method. Periods of differential suspended sediment behavior changed

  2. Carbon cycling on the continental margin evidence from sediment 14-C and nutrient elements. Progress report, October 1992--October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This progress report discusses field equipment acquisition, fabrication, sample collection and sample analysis of sea bottom sediments. Investigators also discussed the Neuse River Estuary Experiment.

  3. Diversity of Methane-Cycling Archaea in Hydrothermal Sediment Investigated by General and Group-Specific PCR Primers

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas P.

    2014-01-01

    The zonation of anaerobic methane-cycling Archaea in hydrothermal sediment of Guaymas Basin was studied by general primer pairs (mcrI, ME1/ME2, mcrIRD) targeting the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) and by new group-specific mcrA and 16S rRNA gene primer pairs. The mcrIRD primer pair outperformed the other general mcrA primer pairs in detection sensitivity and phylogenetic coverage. Methanotrophic ANME-1 Archaea were the only group detected with group-specific primers only. The detection of 14 mcrA lineages surpasses the diversity previously found in this location. Most phylotypes have high sequence similarities to hydrogenotrophs, methylotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs previously detected at Guaymas Basin or at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, and oil reservoirs worldwide. Additionally, five mcrA phylotypes belonging to newly defined lineages are detected. Two of these belong to deeply branching new orders, while the others are new species or genera of Methanopyraceae and Methermicoccaceae. Downcore diversity decreases from all groups detected in the upper 6 cm (∼2 to 40°C, sulfate measurable to 4 cm) to only two groups below 6 cm (>40°C). Despite the presence of hyperthermophilic genera (Methanopyrus, Methanocaldococcus) in cooler surface strata, no genes were detected below 10 cm (≥60°C). While mcrA-based and 16S rRNA gene-based community compositions are generally congruent, the deeply branching mcrA cannot be assigned to specific 16S rRNA gene lineages. Our study indicates that even among well-studied metabolic groups and in previously characterized model environments, major evolutionary branches are overlooked. Detecting these groups by improved molecular biological methods is a crucial first step toward understanding their roles in nature. PMID:25527539

  4. Automated Screening for High-Frequency Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Robert C.; Jansen, Marije; Moore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hearing loss at high frequencies produces perceptual difficulties and is often an early sign of a more general hearing loss. This study reports the development and validation of two new speech-based hearing screening tests in English that focus on detecting hearing loss at frequencies above 2000 Hz. Design: The Internet-delivered, speech-in noise tests used closed target-word sets of digit triplets or consonant–vowel–consonant (CVC) words presented against a speech-shaped noise masker. The digit triplet test uses the digits 0 to 9 (excluding the disyllabic 7), grouped in quasi-random triplets. The CVC test uses simple words (e.g., “cat”) selected for the high-frequency spectral content of the consonants. During testing, triplets or CVC words were identified in an adaptive procedure to obtain the speech reception threshold (SRT) in noise. For these new, high-frequency (HF) tests, the noise was low-pass filtered to produce greater masking of the low-frequency speech components, increasing the sensitivity of the test for HF hearing loss. Individual test tokens (digits, CVCs) were first homogenized using a group of 10 normal-hearing (NH) listeners by equalizing intelligibility across tokens at several speech-in-noise levels. Both tests were then validated and standardized using groups of 24 NH listeners and 50 listeners with hearing impairment. Performance on the new high frequency digit triplet (HF-triplet) and CVC (HF-CVC) tests was compared with audiometric hearing loss, and with that on the unfiltered, broadband digit triplet test (BB-triplet) test, and the ASL (Adaptive Sentence Lists) speech-in-noise test. Results: The HF-triplet and HF-CVC test results (SRT) both correlated positively and highly with high-frequency audiometric hearing loss and with the ASL test. SRT for both tests as a function of high-frequency hearing loss increased at nearly three times the rate as that of the BB-triplet test. The intraindividual variability (SD) on the

  5. 77 FR 8222 - Notice Requesting Nominations for the Subcommittee on Automated and High Frequency Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... COMMISSION Notice Requesting Nominations for the Subcommittee on Automated and High Frequency Trading AGENCY... Automated and High Frequency Trading within the Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Commodity... Automated and High Frequency Trading (Subcommittee) under the auspices of the Technology Advisory...

  6. High frequency switched-mode stimulation can evoke post synaptic responses in cerebellar principal neurons

    PubMed Central

    van Dongen, Marijn N.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; Koekkoek, S. K. E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Serdijn, Wouter A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the efficacy of high frequency switched-mode neural stimulation. Instead of using a constant stimulation amplitude, the stimulus is switched on and off repeatedly with a high frequency (up to 100 kHz) duty cycled signal. By means of tissue modeling that includes the dynamic properties of both the tissue material as well as the axon membrane, it is first shown that switched-mode stimulation depolarizes the cell membrane in a similar way as classical constant amplitude stimulation. These findings are subsequently verified using in vitro experiments in which the response of a Purkinje cell is measured due to a stimulation signal in the molecular layer of the cerebellum of a mouse. For this purpose a stimulator circuit is developed that is able to produce a monophasic high frequency switched-mode stimulation signal. The results confirm the modeling by showing that switched-mode stimulation is able to induce similar responses in the Purkinje cell as classical stimulation using a constant current source. This conclusion opens up possibilities for novel stimulation designs that can improve the performance of the stimulator circuitry. Care has to be taken to avoid losses in the system due to the higher operating frequency. PMID:25798105

  7. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  8. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  9. Study of the succession of microbial communities for sulfur cycle response to ecological factors change in sediment of sewage system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchen; Dong, Qian; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Xiaohong; Shi, Hanchang

    2015-06-01

    The biological reaction process of sulfur in biofilms and sediments causes serious problems of corrosion and odor in sewage systems. This study aims to reveal the distribution and shift of microbial diversity that survives inside the sediment in response to surrounding changes in sewage systems. The successions of microbial community were compared via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and by constructing phylogenetic trees via maximum likelihood method. The results indicated that the shift of microbial diversity is not significant along the vertical layer inside the sediment. The influences of sediment accumulation time on the shift in microbial diversity are evident, particularly with the switch of the accumulation stage. Implementing a control strategy for oxygen injection and nitrate addition evidently inhibits and stimulates some dominant sulfate-reducing bacterial strains in the sediment. The diversity in the total bacteria is positively related with ORP, dissolved oxygen, and sulfide concentration. PMID:25592909

  10. On applications of high-frequency asymptotics in aeroacoustics.

    PubMed

    Peake, N

    2004-03-15

    The aim of this paper is to survey a range of applications of high-frequency asymptotic methods in aeroacoustics. Specifically, we are concerned with problems associated with noise generation, propagation and scattering as found in large modern aeroengines. With regard to noise generation, we consider the interaction between high-frequency vortical waves and thin aerofoils, with particular emphasis being placed on the way in which the vortical waves act on the non-uniform mean flow around the aerofoil. A ray-theoretic description of the resulting sound as it propagates along the engine intake is then presented, followed by consideration of the diffraction of these rays by the (possibly asymmetric) intake lip to produce sound in the far field. A range of more detailed possible extensions is also presented. PMID:15306513

  11. High Frequency Amplitude Detector for GMI Magnetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Asfour, Aktham; Zidi, Manel; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    A new concept of a high-frequency amplitude detector and demodulator for Giant-Magneto-Impedance (GMI) sensors is presented. This concept combines a half wave rectifier, with outstanding capabilities and high speed, and a feedback approach that ensures the amplitude detection with easily adjustable gain. The developed detector is capable of measuring high-frequency and very low amplitude signals without the use of diode-based active rectifiers or analog multipliers. The performances of this detector are addressed throughout the paper. The full circuitry of the design is given, together with a comprehensive theoretical study of the concept and experimental validation. The detector has been used for the amplitude measurement of both single frequency and pulsed signals and for the demodulation of amplitude-modulated signals. It has also been successfully integrated in a GMI sensor prototype. Magnetic field and electrical current measurements in open- and closed-loop of this sensor have also been conducted. PMID:25536003

  12. Extracting Cardiac Myofiber Orientations from High Frequency Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B; Kishbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-29

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts. PMID:24392208

  13. High-frequency Broadband Modulations of Electroencephalographic Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Onton, Julie; Makeig, Scott

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency cortical potentials in electroencephalographic (EEG) scalp recordings have low amplitudes and may be confounded with scalp muscle activities. EEG data from an eyes-closed emotion imagination task were linearly decomposed using independent component analysis (ICA) into maximally independent component (IC) processes. Joint decomposition of IC log spectrograms into source- and frequency-independent modulator (IM) processes revealed three distinct classes of IMs that separately modulated broadband high-frequency (∼15–200 Hz) power of brain, scalp muscle, and likely ocular motor IC processes. Multi-dimensional scaling revealed significant but spatially complex relationships between mean broadband brain IM effects and the valence of the imagined emotions. Thus, contrary to prevalent assumption, unitary modes of spectral modulation of frequencies encompassing the beta, gamma, and high gamma frequency ranges can be isolated from scalp-recorded EEG data and may be differentially associated with brain sources and cognitive activities. PMID:20076775

  14. Extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B.; Kirshbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (<20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts.

  15. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson’s disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  16. A high frequency transformer model for the EMTP

    SciTech Connect

    Morched, A.; Marti, L.; Ottevangers, J. )

    1993-07-01

    A model to simulate the high frequency behavior of a power transformer is presented. This model is based on the frequency characteristics of the transformer admittance matrix between its terminals over a given range of frequencies. The transformer admittance characteristics can be obtained from measurements or from detailed internal models based on the physical layout of the transformer. The elements of the nodal admittance matrix are approximated with rational functions consisting of real as well as complex conjugate poles and zeros. These approximations are realized in the form of an RLC network in a format suitable for direct use with EMTP. The high frequency transformer model can be used as a stand-alone linear model or as an add-on module of a more comprehensive model where iron core nonlinearities are represented in detail.

  17. High-frequency oscillation of the airway and chest wall.

    PubMed

    Fink, James B; Mahlmeister, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    High-frequency oscillation (HFO), applied to either the airway or chest wall, has been associated with changes in sputum attributes and clearance. The evolution of evidence, both in vitro and in vivo, supporting the use of HFO is reviewed. Devices that apply HFO to the airway range from the relatively simple mechanical Flutter and Acapella devices to the more complex Percussionaire Intrapercussive Ventilators. and the Hayek Oscillator are designed to provide high-frequency chest wall compression. Operation and use of these devices are described with examples of differentiation of device types by characterization of flows, and airway and esophageal pressures. Although HFO devices span a broad range of costs, they provide a reasonable therapeutic option to support secretion clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:12088550

  18. How High Frequency Trading Affects a Market Index

    PubMed Central

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Stanley, H. Eugene; gur-Gershgoren, Gitit

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between a market index and its constituent stocks is complicated. While an index is a weighted average of its constituent stocks, when the investigated time scale is one day or longer the index has been found to have a stronger effect on the stocks than vice versa. We explore how this interaction changes in short time scales using high frequency data. Using a correlation-based analysis approach, we find that in short time scales stocks have a stronger influence on the index. These findings have implications for high frequency trading and suggest that the price of an index should be published on shorter time scales, as close as possible to those of the actual transaction time scale. PMID:23817553

  19. Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Anderw D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation tubes similar to a small pulse detonation engine (PDE). A high-speed valve injects a charge of a mixture of fuel and air at rates of up to 1000 Hz into a constant area tube closed at one end. The reactants detonate in the tube and the products exit as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers are used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device and thrust is measured with a balance. The effects of injection frequency, fuel and air flow rates, tube length, and injection location are considered. Both H2 and C2H4 fuels are considered. Optimum (maximum specific thrust) fuel-air compositions and resonant frequencies are identified. Results are compared to PDE calculations. Design rules are postulated and applications to aerodynamic flow control and propulsion are discussed.

  20. Gravitational wave detection with high frequency phonon trapping acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Tobar, Michael E.

    2014-11-01

    There are a number of theoretical predictions for astrophysical and cosmological objects, which emit high frequency (1 06-1 09 Hz ) gravitation waves (GW) or contribute somehow to the stochastic high frequency GW background. Here we propose a new sensitive detector in this frequency band, which is based on existing cryogenic ultrahigh quality factor quartz bulk acoustic wave cavity technology, coupled to near-quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers at 20 mK. We show that spectral strain sensitivities reaching 1 0-22 per √{Hz } per mode is possible, which in principle can cover the frequency range with multiple (>100 ) modes with quality factors varying between 1 06 and 1 010 allowing wide bandwidth detection. Due to its compactness and well-established manufacturing process, the system is easily scalable into arrays and distributed networks that can also impact the overall sensitivity and introduce coincidence analysis to ensure no false detections.

  1. High frequency impedance spectra on the chromium dioxide thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C. M.; Lai, C. J.; Wu, J. S.; Huang, J. C. A.; Wu, C.-C.; Shyu, S.-G.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the study of high frequency magnetotransport properties of the chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin films, grown on Si substrate using chemical vapor deposition. The film exhibits a ferromagnetic transition with a Curie temperature near 390 K. The temperature dependent spontaneous magnetization follows Bloch{close_quote}s law. The impedance spectra, being analyzed based on the fundamental electrodynamics, are demonstrated to be in a low-loss dielectric limit along with the occurrence of dielectric relaxation and magnetization response. The specific features of impedance spectra, distinct from the usual metallic ferromagnet, are attributed to the half metallic nature of CrO{sub 2}. The results explore the possibility for high frequency device applications.

  2. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-12-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson's disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  3. Transformation ray method: controlling high frequency elastic waves (L).

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai; Hu, Jin

    2012-10-01

    Elastic ray theory is a high frequency asymptotic approximation of solution of elastodynamic equation, and is widely used in seismology. In this paper, the form invariance under a general spatial mapping and high frequency wave control have been examined by transformation method. It is showed that with the constraint of major and minor symmetry of the transformed elastic tensor, the eikonal equation keeps its form under a general mapping, however, the transport equation loses its form except for conformal mapping. Therefore, the elastic ray path can be controlled in an exact manner by a transformation method, whereas energy distribution along the ray is only approximately controlled. An elastic rotator based on ray tracing method is also provided to illustrate the method and to access the approximation. PMID:23039561

  4. High Frequency Ultrasound of Armor-Grade Alumina Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiglieri, S.; Haber, R. A.

    2009-03-01

    Different lots of high density, commercial, armor-grade alumina (Al2O3) were tested using high frequency ultrasound in order to determine any correlation between measured properties and ballistic performance. C-scan images were taken using a 15 MHz ultrasonic transducer in order to form attenuation coefficient and elastic property maps. These samples were further characterized by using quantitative analysis. The results indicate that attenuation coefficient values appear to have the strongest correlation, of every property measured, to ballistic classifications.

  5. Microstrip antenna modeling and measurement at high frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Bevensee, R.M.

    1986-04-30

    This report addresses the task C(i) of the Proposal for Microstrip Antenna Modeling and Measurement at High Frequencies by the writer, July 1985. The task is: Assess the advantages and disadvantages of the three computational approaches outlined in the Proposal, including any difficulties to be resolved and an estimate of the time required to implement each approach. The three approaches are (1) Finite Difference, (2) Sommerfeld-GTD-MOM, and (3) Surface Intergral Equations - MOM. These are discussed in turn.

  6. High frequency fatigue testing of Udimet 700 at 1400 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conn, A. F.; Rudy, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation pertaining to the development of life prediction methods for materials subjected to high temperature creep/fatigue conditions is presented. High frequency (13.4 kHz) fatigue data were measured at 1400 F on specimens of the nickel-based alloy Udimet 700. Tests were conducted on the virgin material, as well as on specimens which had received prior exposures to high temperature, fatigue, and creep.

  7. Automated composite ellipsoid modelling for high frequency GTD analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sze, K. Y.; Rojas, R. G.; Klevenow, F. T.; Scheick, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a scheme currently being developed to fit a composite ellipsoid to the fuselage of a helicopter in the vicinity of the antenna location are discussed under the assumption that the antenna is mounted on the fuselage. The parameters of the close-fit composite ellipsoid would then be utilized as inputs into NEWAIR3, a code programmed in FORTRAN 77 for high frequency Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) Analysis of the radiation of airborne antennas.

  8. Should High-Frequency Ventilation in the Adult Be Abandoned?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Albert P; Schmidt, Ulrich H; MacIntyre, Neil R

    2016-06-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) can improve ventilation-perfusion matching without excessive alveolar tidal stretching or collapse-reopening phenomenon. This is an attractive feature in the ventilation of patients with ARDS. However, two recent large multi-center trials of HFOV failed to show benefits in this patient population. The following review addresses whether, in view of these trails, HFOV should be abandoned in the adult population? PMID:27235314

  9. The Origin of High-Frequency Hearing in Whales.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Morgan; Martinez-Caceres, Manuel; de Muizon, Christian; Mnieckowski, Jessica; Geisler, Jonathan H

    2016-08-22

    Odontocetes (toothed whales) rely upon echoes of their own vocalizations to navigate and find prey underwater [1]. This sensory adaptation, known as echolocation, operates most effectively when using high frequencies, and odontocetes are rivaled only by bats in their ability to perceive ultrasonic sound greater than 100 kHz [2]. Although features indicative of ultrasonic hearing are present in the oldest known odontocetes [3], the significance of this finding is limited by the methods employed and taxa sampled. In this report, we describe a new xenorophid whale (Echovenator sandersi, gen. et sp. nov.) from the Oligocene of South Carolina that, as a member of the most basal clade of odontocetes, sheds considerable light on the evolution of ultrasonic hearing. By placing high-resolution CT data from Echovenator sandersi, 2 hippos, and 23 fossil and extant whales in a phylogenetic context, we conclude that ultrasonic hearing, albeit in a less specialized form, evolved at the base of the odontocete radiation. Contrary to the hypothesis that odontocetes evolved from low-frequency specialists [4], we find evidence that stem cetaceans, the archaeocetes, were more sensitive to high-frequency sound than their terrestrial ancestors. This indicates that selection for high-frequency hearing predates the emergence of Odontoceti and the evolution of echolocation. PMID:27498568

  10. High frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy

    2013-12-01

    A new method for the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is developed based on the characteristic matrix method. This method is useful for studying planar samples or stack of planar samples. The terahertz radiation was generated by optical rectification in a ZnTe crystal and detected by another ZnTe crystal via electro-optic sampling method. In this new characteristic matrix based method, the spectra of the sample and reference waveforms will be modeled by using characteristic matrices. We applied this new method to measure the optical constants of air. The terahertz transmission through the layered systems air-Teflon-air-Quartz-air and Nitrogen gas-Teflon-Nitrogen gas-Quartz-Nitrogen gas was modeled by the characteristic matrix method. A transmission coefficient is derived from these models which was optimized to fit the experimental transmission coefficient to extract the optical constants of air. The optimization of an error function involving the experimental complex transmission coefficient and the theoretical transmission coefficient was performed using patternsearch algorithm of MATLAB. Since this method takes account of the echo waveforms due to reflections in the layered samples, this method allows analysis of longer time-domain waveforms giving rise to very high frequency resolution in the frequency-domain. We have presented the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of air and compared the results with the literature values. We have also fitted the complex susceptibility of air to the Lorentzian and Gaussian functions to extract the linewidths.

  11. High-frequency ultrasound in parotid gland disease.

    PubMed

    Onkar, Prashant Madhukar; Ratnaparkhi, Chetana; Mitra, Kajal

    2013-12-01

    Parotid gland is involved in many inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. Many a times, it is difficult to ascertain the type of swelling by clinical examination. The anatomy and various abnormalities of the glands are very easily visualized by high-frequency ultrasound. Ultrasound can confirm the presence of the mass with sensitivity up to 100%. It can demonstrate whether a lesion is located in the parotid gland or outside. It can help in differentiating benign from malignant neoplasms and local staging of the mass in malignant lesions. In addition, ultrasound can identify those entities that may not need surgical intervention. The glands appear enlarged and show altered echopattern in acute inflammation and may be normal or reduce in size in chronic inflammation. Other pathologies that involve salivary glands are sialolithiasis and various benign and malignant neoplasms. Ultrasound many times suggests final diagnosis or supplies important differential diagnosis. In this article, the use of high-frequency ultrasound in parotid disease is discussed, and sonographic features of different parotid pathologies are reviewed with examples illustrated. High-frequency ultrasound is the first and many a times the only imaging investigation done for evaluation of parotid glands. PMID:24263755

  12. Interictal high-frequency oscillations in focal human epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Cimbalnik, Jan; Kucewicz, Michal T.; Worrell, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Localization of focal epileptic brain is critical for successful epilepsy surgery and focal brain stimulation. Despite significant progress, roughly half of all patients undergoing focal surgical resection, and most patients receiving focal electrical stimulation, are not seizure free. There is intense interest in high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) recorded with intracranial electroencephalography as potential biomarkers to improve epileptogenic brain localization, resective surgery, and focal electrical stimulation. The present review examines the evidence that HFOs are clinically useful biomarkers. Recent findings Performing the PubMed search ‘High-Frequency Oscillations and Epilepsy’ for 2013–2015 identifies 308 articles exploring HFO characteristics, physiological significance, and potential clinical applications. Summary There is strong evidence that HFOs are spatially associated with epileptic brain. There remain, however, significant challenges for clinical translation of HFOs as epileptogenic brain biomarkers: Differentiating true HFO from the high-frequency power changes associated with increased neuronal firing and bandpass filtering sharp transients. Distinguishing pathological HFO from normal physiological HFO. Classifying tissue under individual electrodes as normal or pathological. Sharing data and algorithms so research results can be reproduced across laboratories. Multicenter prospective trials to provide definitive evidence of clinical utility. PMID:26953850

  13. High frequency seismic waves and slab structures beneath Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Daoyuan; Miller, Meghan S.; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; Asimow, Paul D.; Li, Dunzhu

    2014-04-01

    Tomographic images indicate a complicated subducted slab structure beneath the central Mediterranean where gaps in fast velocity anomalies in the upper mantle are interpreted as slab tears. The detailed shape and location of these tears are important for kinematic reconstructions and understanding the evolution of the subduction system. However, tomographic images, which are produced by smoothed, damped inversions, will underestimate the sharpness of the structures. Here, we use the records from the Italian National Seismic Network (IV) to study the detailed slab structure. The waveform records for stations in Calabria show large amplitude, high frequency (f>5 Hz) late arrivals with long coda after a relatively low-frequency onset for both P and S waves. In contrast, the stations in the southern and central Apennines lack such high frequency arrivals, which correlate spatially with the central Apennines slab window inferred from tomography and receiver function studies. Thus, studying the high frequency arrivals provides an effective way to investigate the structure of slab and detect possible slab tears. The observed high frequency arrivals in the southern Italy are the strongest for events from 300 km depth and greater whose hypocenters are located within the slab inferred from fast P-wave velocity perturbations. This characteristic behavior agrees with previous studies from other tectonic regions, suggesting the high frequency energy is generated by small scale heterogeneities within the slab which act as scatterers. Furthermore, using a 2-D finite difference (FD) code, we calculate synthetic seismograms to search for the scale, shape and velocity perturbations of the heterogeneities that may explain features observed in the data. Our preferred model of the slab heterogeneities beneath the Tyrrhenian Sea has laminar structure parallel to the slab dip and can be described by a von Kármán function with a down-dip correlation length of 10 km and 0.5 km in

  14. Understanding past climatic and hydrological variability in the Mediterranean from Lake Prespa sediment isotope and geochemical record over the Last Glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Melanie J.; Wagner, Bernd; Boehm, Anne; Panagiotopoulos, Konstantinos; Vane, Christopher H.; Snelling, Andrea; Haidon, Cheryl; Woodley, Ewan; Vogel, Hendrik; Zanchetta, Gianni; Baneschi, Ilaria

    2013-04-01

    Here we present stable isotope and geochemical data from Lake Prespa (Macedonia/Albania border) over the Last Glacial cycle (Marine Isotope Stages 5-1) and discuss past lake hydrology and climate (TIC, oxygen and carbon isotopes), as well as responses to climate of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation (TOC, Rock Eval pyrolysis, carbon isotopes, pollen). The Lake Prespa sediments broadly fall into 5 zones based on their sedimentology, geochemistry, palynology and the existing chronology. The Glacial sediments suggest low supply of carbon to the lake, but high summer productivity; intermittent siderite layers suggest that although the lake was likely to have mixed regularly leading to enhanced oxidation of organic matter, there must have been within sediment reducing conditions and methanogenesis. MIS 5 and 1 sediments suggest much more productivity, higher rates of organic material preservation possibly due to more limited mixing with longer periods of oxygen-depleted bottom waters. We also calculated lakewater δ18O from siderite (authigenic/Glacial) and calcite (endogenic/Holocene) and show much lower lakewater δ18O values in the Glacial when compared to the Holocene, suggesting the lake was less evaporative in the Glacial, probably as a consequence of cooler summers and longer winter ice cover. In the Holocene the oxygen isotope data suggests general humidity, with just 2 marked arid phases, features observed in other Eastern and Central Mediterranean lakes.

  15. Low- and high-frequency insulin secretion pulses in normal subjects and pancreas transplant recipients: role of extrinsic innervation.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, G E; Hoffmann, R G; Johnson, C P; Kissebah, A H

    1992-01-01

    Low-frequency ultradian and high-frequency insulin secretion pulses were studied in normal subjects and in metabolically stable pancreas transplant recipients. Insulin secretion pulsatility was evaluated after deconvoluting the pulsatile plasma C peptide concentrations with its kinetic coefficients. In normal subjects, ultradian insulin secretion pulses with periodicities of 75-115 min were consistently observed during the 24-h secretory cycle. Pulse period and relative amplitude during the overnight rest (95 +/- 4 min and 27.6 +/- 2.4%) were similar to those during the steady state of continuous enteral feeding (93 +/- 5 min and 32.6 +/- 3.3%). Sampling at 2-min intervals revealed the presence of high-frequency insulin secretion pulses with periodicities of 14-20 min and an average amplitude of 46.6 +/- 5.4%. Pancreas transplant recipients had normal fasting and fed insulin secretion rates. Both low- and high-frequency insulin secretion pulses were present. The high-frequency pulse characteristics were identical to normal. Low-frequency ultradian pulse periodicity was normal but pulse amplitude was increased. Thus, ultradian insulin secretory pulsatility is a consistent feature in normal subjects. The low- and high-frequency secretion pulsatilities are generated independent of extrinsic innervation. Autonomic innervation might modulate low-frequency ultradian pulse amplitude exerting a dampening effect. PMID:1644923

  16. Climatic control of sediment transport from the Himalayas to the proximal NE Bengal Fan during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joussain, Ronan; Colin, Christophe; Liu, Zhifei; Meynadier, Laure; Fournier, Léa; Fauquembergue, Kelly; Zaragosi, Sébastien; Schmidt, Frédéric; Rojas, Virginia; Bassinot, Franck

    2016-09-01

    Clay mineralogy, siliciclastic grain-size, major elements, 87Sr/86Sr, and εNd analyses of deep-sea sediments cored in the north-eastern Bay of Bengal are used to reconstruct evolution of detrital sources and sediment transport to the proximal part of the Bengal deep-sea fan during the last climatic cycle. εNd values (-13.3 to -9.7) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.721-0.733) indicate a mixture of sediments originating from the Ganges-Brahmaputra rivers and the Indo-Burman ranges. Interglacial Marine Isotopic Stages (MIS) 5 and 1 are associated with a higher contribution of sediments from the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system than is the case for glacial MIS 6, 4, 3, and 2. Siliciclasitic grain-size combined with Si/Al and Si/Fe ratios indicate coarser glacial sediments with numerous turbidite layers. Glacial turbidite layers display similar clay mineralogical compositions to hemipelagic sediments. Only few of turbidite layers (MIS 6, 4, and 2) are slightly unradiogenic (εNd -13.3), suggesting a higher contribution of Ganges-Brahmaputra river sediments. Independently of changes in the sedimentary sources, the smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratio of cores located on the NE Bengal Fan indicates higher inputs of primary minerals (illite and chlorite) from the highlands of the river basins (relief) during glacial MIS 6, 4, 3, and 2 and an increased contribution of pedogenic minerals (smectite and kaolinite) during interglacial MIS 5 and 1. Maximum smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratios during the warm sub-stages of MIS 5 suggest an intensification of summer monsoon rainfall associated with higher rates of physical erosion of the Indo-Gangetic flood-plain and/or dominant summer hydrological conditions transporting a higher proportion of sediments deriving from the Ganges-Brahmaputra rivers to the NE Bengal Fan. In addition, a higher production of smectite in soils of the Indo-Gangetic flood-plain during periods of intensification of monsoon rainfall cannot be excluded.

  17. Quantifying manganese and nitrogen cycle coupling in manganese-rich, organic carbon-starved marine sediments: Examples from the Clarion-Clipperton fracture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogollón, José M.; Mewes, Konstantin; Kasten, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Extensive deep-sea sedimentary areas are characterized by low organic carbon contents and thus harbor suboxic sedimentary environments where secondary (autotrophic) redox cycling becomes important for microbial metabolic processes. Simulation results for three stations in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific with low organic carbon content (<0.5 dry wt %) and low sedimentation rates (10-1-100 mm ky-1) show that ammonium generated during organic matter degradation may act as a reducing agent for manganese oxides below the oxic zone. Likewise, at these sedimentary depths, dissolved reduced manganese may act as a reducing agent for oxidized nitrogen species. These manganese-coupled transformations provide a suboxic conversion pathway of ammonium and nitrate to dinitrogen. These manganese-nitrogen interactions further explain the presence and production of dissolved reduced manganese (up to tens of μM concentration) in sediments with high nitrate (>20 μM) concentrations.

  18. High frequency radar measurements of tidal currents flowing through San Pablo Strait, San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maresca, Joseph W., Jr.; Padden, Robin R.; Cheng, Ralph T.; Seibel, Erwin

    1980-01-01

    High frequency (HF) radar measurements of the surface current averaged over the upper 0.5 m in San Pablo Strait were compared with current meter measurements of the subsurface current made at 9.4 m below mean lower low water (MLLW) over two 12.4-h tidal cycles. After averaging the radar and current meter data over two tidal cycles, a southerly (ebbing direction) surface current of 32 cm·s−1 was deduced from the radar measurements and a northerly (flooding direction) subsurface current of 7 cm·s−1 from the current meter measurements. This nontidal flow is maintained by freshwater discharge from the Sacramento–San Joaquin Rivers into Suisun and San Pablo Bays. The radar measurement technique provides quantitative estimates of the surface currents that previously were determined only from surface drifter studies.

  19. Study of switching transients in high frequency converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinger, Donald S.; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Lee, Tony

    1993-01-01

    As the semiconductor technologies progress rapidly, the power densities and switching frequencies of many power devices are improved. With the existing technology, high frequency power systems become possible. Use of such a system is advantageous in many aspects. A high frequency ac source is used as the direct input to an ac/ac pulse-density-modulation (PDM) converter. This converter is a new concept which employs zero voltage switching techniques. However, the development of this converter is still in its infancy stage. There are problems associated with this converter such as a high on-voltage drop, switching transients, and zero-crossing detecting. Considering these problems, the switching speed and power handling capabilities of the MOS-Controlled Thyristor (MCT) makes the device the most promising candidate for this application. A complete insight of component considerations for building an ac/ac PDM converter for a high frequency power system is addressed. A power device review is first presented. The ac/ac PDM converter requires switches that can conduct bi-directional current and block bi-directional voltage. These bi-directional switches can be constructed using existing power devices. Different bi-directional switches for the converter are investigated. Detailed experimental studies of the characteristics of the MCT under hard switching and zero-voltage switching are also presented. One disadvantage of an ac/ac converter is that turn-on and turn-off of the switches has to be completed instantaneously when the ac source is at zero voltage. Otherwise shoot-through current or voltage spikes can occur which can be hazardous to the devices. In order for the devices to switch softly in the safe operating area even under non-ideal cases, a unique snubber circuit is used in each bi-directional switch. Detailed theory and experimental results for circuits using these snubbers are presented. A current regulated ac/ac PDM converter built using MCT's and IGBT's is

  20. High frequency planar accelerating structures for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Ben-Menahem, S.; Wilson, P.; Miller, R.; Ruth, R.; Nassiri, A.

    1994-12-31

    Modern microfabrication techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography, e.g., LIGA, can be used to produce large-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high-frequency RF acceleration of charged particle beams. Specifically, these techniques offer significant advantages over conventional manufacturing methods for future linear colliders (beyond NLC, the Next Linear Collider) because of several unique systems requirements. First, to have the required ac wall plug power within reasonable limits, such future linear colliders (5 TeV) must operate at high frequency (30 GHz). Secondly, luminosity requirements suggest the use of multi-bunch acceleration of electrons and positrons in the linear collider. Thirdly, in order to clearly discriminate physics events in the final interaction point at which electrons and positrons collide, it is required that secondary particle production from beamstrahlung be minimized. Flat electron and positron beams with a large aspect ratio will be beneficial in reducing beamstrahlung in the final focus region, but cause the beam to be more sensitive to wakefields in the vertical dimension. In principle, a flat beam can be accelerated in a planar structure with reduced wakefield in the vertical direction for the entire length of the accelerator. The LIGA process is particularly suitable for manufacturing miniaturized, planar, asymmetric cavities at high frequency. The main advantages of the LIGA process are fabrication of structures with high aspect ratio, small dimensional tolerances, and arbitrary mask shape (cross-section). Other advantages include mass-production with excellent repeatability and precision of up to an entire section of an accelerating structure consisting of a number of cells. It eliminates the need of tedious machining and brazing, for example, of individual disks and cups in conventional disk-loaded structures. Also, planar input/output couplers for the accelerating structure can be easily

  1. High-Frequency Shear Viscosity of Low-Viscosity Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatze, U.; Behrends, R.

    2014-11-01

    A thickness shear quartz resonator technique is described to measure the shear viscosity of low-viscosity liquids in the frequency range from 6 MHz to 130 MHz. Examples of shear-viscosity spectra in that frequency range are presented to show that various molecular processes are accompanied by shear-viscosity relaxation. Among these processes are conformational variations of alkyl chains, with relaxation times of about 0.3 ns for -pentadecane and -hexadecane at 25 C. These variations can be well represented in terms of a torsional oscillator model. Also featured briefly are shear-viscosity relaxations associated with fluctuations of hydrogen-bonded clusters in alcohols, for which values between 0.3 ns (-hexanol) and 1.5 ns (-dodecanol) have been found at 25 C. In addition, the special suitability of high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy to the study of critically demixing mixtures is demonstrated by some illustrative examples. Due to slowing, critical fluctuations do not contribute to the shear viscosity at sufficiently high frequencies of measurements so that the non-critical background viscosity of critical systems can be directly determined from high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy. Relaxations in appear also in the shear-viscosity spectra with, for example, 2 ns for the critical triethylamine-water binary mixture at temperatures between 10 C and 18 C. Such relaxations noticeably influence the relaxation rate of order parameter fluctuations. They may be also the reason for the need of a special mesoscopic viscosity when mutual diffusion coefficients of critical polymer solutions are discussed in terms of mode-coupling theory.

  2. Engineering Graphene Conductivity for Flexible and High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2015-10-14

    Advances in lightweight, flexible, and conformal electronic devices depend on materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity coupled with high mechanical strength. Defect-free graphene is one such material that satisfies both these requirements and which offers a range of attractive and tunable electrical, optoelectronic, and plasmonic characteristics for devices that operate at microwave, terahertz, infrared, or optical frequencies. Essential to the future success of such devices is therefore the ability to control the frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. Looking to accelerate the development of high-frequency applications of graphene, here we demonstrate how readily accessible and processable organic and organometallic molecules can efficiently dope graphene to carrier densities in excess of 10(13) cm(-2) with conductivities at gigahertz frequencies in excess of 60 mS. In using the molecule 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyanoquinodimethane (F2-HCNQ), a high charge transfer (CT) of 0.5 electrons per adsorbed molecule is calculated, resulting in p-type doping of graphene. n-Type doping is achieved using cobaltocene and the sulfur-containing molecule tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) with a CT of 0.41 and 0.24 electrons donated per adsorbed molecule, respectively. Efficient CT is associated with the interaction between the π electrons present in the molecule and in graphene. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity shows dispersion-less behavior of the real component of the conductivity over a wide range of gigahertz frequencies. Potential high-frequency applications in graphene antennas and communications that can exploit these properties and the broader impacts of using molecular doping to modify functional materials that possess a low-energy Dirac cone are also discussed. PMID:26387636

  3. Porosity and Organic Carbon Controls on Naturally Reduced Zone (NRZ) Formation Creating Microbial ';Hotspots' for Fe, S, and U Cycling in Subsurface Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. E.; Janot, N.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have illustrated the importance of Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZs) within saturated sediments for the cycling of metals and redox sensitive contaminants. NRZs can provide a source of reducing equivalents such as reduced organic compounds or hydrogen to stimulate subsurface microbial communities. These NRZ's are typically characterized by low permeability and elevated concentrations of organic carbon and trace metals. However, both the formation of NRZs and their importance to the overall aquifer carbon remineralization is not fully understood. Within NRZs the hydrolysis of particulate organic carbon (POC) and subsequent fermentation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to form low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon (LMW-DOC) provides electron donors necessary for the respiration of Fe, S, and in the case of the Rifle aquifer, U. Rates of POC hydrolysis and subsequent fermentation have been poorly constrained and rates in excess and deficit to the rates of subsurface anaerobic respiratory processes have been suggested. In this study, we simulate the development of NRZ sediments in diffusion-limited aggregates to investigate the physical and chemical conditions required for NRZ formation. Effects of sediment porosity and POC loading on Fe, S, and U cycling on molecular and nanoscale are investigated with synchrotron-based Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are used to characterize the transformations in POC and DOC. Sediment aggregates are inoculated with the natural microbial biota from the Rifle aquifer and population dynamics are monitored by 16S RNA analysis. Overall, establishment of low permeability NRZs within the aquifer stimulate microbial respiration beyond the diffusion-limited zones and can limit the transport of U through a contaminated aquifer. However, the long-term stability of

  4. Dynamics and sensitivity analysis of high-frequency conduction block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Gerges, Meana; Thomas, Peter J.

    2011-10-01

    The local delivery of extracellular high-frequency stimulation (HFS) has been shown to be a fast acting and quickly reversible method of blocking neural conduction and is currently being pursued for several clinical indications. However, the mechanism for this type of nerve block remains unclear. In this study, we investigate two hypotheses: (1) depolarizing currents promote conduction block via inactivation of sodium channels and (2) the gating dynamics of the fast sodium channel are the primary determinate of minimal blocking frequency. Hypothesis 1 was investigated using a combined modeling and experimental study to investigate the effect of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents on high-frequency block. The results of the modeling study show that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents play an important role in conduction block and that the conductance to each of three ionic currents increases relative to resting values during HFS. However, depolarizing currents were found to promote the blocking effect, and hyperpolarizing currents were found to diminish the blocking effect. Inward sodium currents were larger than the sum of the outward currents, resulting in a net depolarization of the nodal membrane. Our experimental results support these findings and closely match results from the equivalent modeling scenario: intra-peritoneal administration of the persistent sodium channel blocker ranolazine resulted in an increase in the amplitude of HFS required to produce conduction block in rats, confirming that depolarizing currents promote the conduction block phenomenon. Hypothesis 2 was investigated using a spectral analysis of the channel gating variables in a single-fiber axon model. The results of this study suggested a relationship between the dynamical properties of specific ion channel gating elements and the contributions of corresponding conductances to block onset. Specifically, we show that the dynamics of the fast sodium inactivation gate are

  5. A fast directional algorithm for high-frequency electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Paul; Ying Lexing

    2011-06-20

    This paper is concerned with the fast solution of high-frequency electromagnetic scattering problems using the boundary integral formulation. We extend the O(N log N) directional multilevel algorithm previously proposed for the acoustic scattering case to the vector electromagnetic case. We also detail how to incorporate the curl operator of the magnetic field integral equation into the algorithm. When combined with a standard iterative method, this results in an almost linear complexity solver for the combined field integral equations. In addition, the butterfly algorithm is utilized to compute the far field pattern and radar cross section with O(N log N) complexity.

  6. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium.

  7. Motor monitoring method and apparatus using high frequency current components

    DOEpatents

    Casada, Donald A.

    1996-01-01

    A motor current analysis method and apparatus for monitoring electrical-motor-driven devices. The method and apparatus utilize high frequency portions of the motor current spectra to evaluate the condition of the electric motor and the device driven by the electric motor. The motor current signal produced as a result of an electric motor is monitored and the low frequency components of the signal are removed by a high-pass filter. The signal is then analyzed to determine the condition of the electrical motor and the driven device.

  8. Novel vortex-transform for high frequency modulated patterns.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Sosa, Daniel; Angel-Toro, Luciano; Bolognini, Nestor; Tebaldi, Myrian

    2013-10-01

    A novel vortex-transform is proposed. This transform allows for generating complex-valued functions from modulated intensity patterns, including high frequency components from modulation, without the generation of unstable phase singularities. From these complex-valued functions it is possible to obtain intensity and pseudo-phase maps to analyze the intensity recordings without the necessity of phase retrieval techniques. The intensity and pseudo-phase maps obtained by using this transform preserve the modulation structure onto the intensity and phase modulo 2π maps, including stable phase singularities. PMID:24104283

  9. Motor monitoring method and apparatus using high frequency current components

    DOEpatents

    Casada, D.A.

    1996-05-21

    A motor current analysis method and apparatus for monitoring electrical-motor-driven devices are disclosed. The method and apparatus utilize high frequency portions of the motor current spectra to evaluate the condition of the electric motor and the device driven by the electric motor. The motor current signal produced as a result of an electric motor is monitored and the low frequency components of the signal are removed by a high-pass filter. The signal is then analyzed to determine the condition of the electrical motor and the driven device. 16 figs.

  10. Investigation of iron cobalt nanocomposites for high frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelsy J.

    FeCo-based nanocomposite soft magnetic materials were developed in collaboration with Magnetics, Division of Spang and Co., for high frequency and high temperature application. Excellent soft magnetic properties include: low coercivity, high permeability, low energy losses, etc. These and large saturation inductions make these alloys attractive for fundamental studies and industrial applications. In this thesis, nanocrystalline composites will be developed from amorphous precursors for applications in two frequency regimes: 1) High frequency (0.01-30 MHz) such as high temperature power inductors, pulsed power transformers, and radio frequency (rf) magnetic heating; and 2) Ultra high frequency (30 MHz - 30 GHz) for radio frequency materials and electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI) absorption. New nanocomposites with higher saturation induction and high-temperature stability were developed with reduced glass forming elements such as Zr, Nb, Si and B. The amounts of the magnetic transition metals and early transition metal growth inhibitors were varied to determine trade-offs between higher inductions and fine microstructures and consequently low magnetic losses. Alloys having (Fe1-xCox)80+y+zNb4-y B13-zSi2Cu1 (25 ≤ x ≤ 50 and y = 0-4 and z = 0-3) nominal compositions were cast using planar flow casting (PFC) at Magnetics. Technical magnetic properties: permeability, maximum induction, remanence ratio, coercive field and high frequency magnetic losses as a function of composition and annealing temperature are reported after primary crystallization for 1 hr in a transverse magnetic field (TMF). Of note is the development of inductor cores with maximum inductions in excess of 1.76 T and 1.67 T in cores that exhibit power losses comparable with state of the art commercial soft magnetic alloys. For application in EMI/RFI absorption, FeCo-based alloys have the largest saturation induction and a tunable magnetic anisotropy which may

  11. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-11-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  12. Diffractive Model of the high-frequency impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Heifets

    1989-06-12

    High frequency diffraction can be described by iterations based on an approximate formulation of the boundary conditions. The method formulated is analogous to the Born series of scattering theory. It is used to study the interaction of short bunches with the beam environment in terms of the impedances. The impedances of typical elements of an accelerator structure are obtained. The cross-talk between elements, the impedance of a periodic array, and the effect of a taper are discussed. The method can be applied to a cavity of an arbitrary shape.

  13. Kapitza thermal resistance studied by high-frequency photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horny, Nicolas; Chirtoc, Mihai; Fleming, Austin; Hamaoui, Georges; Ban, Heng

    2016-07-01

    Kapitza thermal resistance is determined using high-frequency photothermal radiometry (PTR) extended for modulation up to 10 MHz. Interfaces between 50 nm thick titanium coatings and silicon or stainless steel substrates are studied. In the used configuration, the PTR signal is not sensitive to the thermal conductivity of the film nor to its optical absorption coefficient, thus the Kapitza resistance is directly determined from single thermal parameter fits. Results of thermal resistances show the significant influence of the nature of the substrate, as well as of the presence of free electrons at the interface.

  14. High-frequency nonreciprocal reflection from magnetic films with overlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Nie, Yan; Camley, R. E.

    2013-11-14

    We perform a theoretical study of the nonreciprocal reflection of high-frequency microwave radiation from ferromagnetic films with thin overlayers. Reflection from metallic ferromagnetic films is always near unity and shows no nonreciprocity. In contrast, reflection from a structure which has a dielectric overlayer on top of a film composed of insulated ferromagnetic nanoparticles or nanostructures can show significant nonreciprocity in the 75–80 GHz frequency range, a very high value. This can be important for devices such as isolators or circulators.

  15. Dynamics and sensitivity analysis of high frequency conduction block

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Gerges, Meana; Thomas, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The local delivery of extracellular high frequency stimulation (HFS) has been shown to be a fast acting and quickly reversible method of blocking neural conduction, and is currently being pursued for several clinical indications. However, the mechanism for this type of nerve block remains unclear. In this study, we investigate two hypotheses: 1) That depolarizing currents promote conduction block via inactivation of sodium channels, and 2) that the gating dynamics of the fast sodium channel are the primary determinate of minimal blocking frequency. Hypothesis 1 was investigated using a combined modeling and experimental study to investigate the effect of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents on high frequency block. The results of the modeling study show that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents play an important role in conduction block and that the conductance to each of three ionic currents increases relative to resting values during HFS. However, depolarizing currents were found to promote the blocking effect, and hyperpolarizing currents were found to diminish the blocking effect. Inward sodium currents were larger than the sum of the outward currents, resulting in a net depolarization of the nodal membrane. Our experimental results support these findings and closely match results from the equivalent modeling scenario: intra-peritoneal administration of the persistent sodium channel blocker ranolazine resulted in an increase in the amplitude of HFS required to produce conduction block in rats, confirming that depolarizing currents promote the conduction block phenomenon. Hypothesis 2 was investigated using a spectral analysis of the channel gating variables in a single fiber axon model. The results of this study suggested a relationship between the dynamical properties of specific ion channel gating elements and the contributions of corresponding conductances to block onset. Specifically, we show that the dynamics of the fast sodium inactivation

  16. A dynamical structure of high frequency currency exchange market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazuka, Naoya; Ohira, Toru; Marumo, Kouhei; Shimizu, Tokiko; Takayasu, Misako; Takayasu, Hideki

    2003-06-01

    We analyze tick-by-tick data, the most high frequency data available, of yen-dollar currency exchange rates. We show that a dynamical structure can be observed in binarized data indicating the direction of up and down movement of prices, which is not apparently seen from the price change itself. This result is consistent with our previous study that there exists a conditional probabilistic structure in binarized data. The dynamical and probabilistic structure which we found could indicate that dealers’ decision making is based on a binary strategy, even if they are unconscious of this fact.

  17. Phoneme categorization relying solely on high-frequency energy.

    PubMed

    Vitela, A Davi; Monson, Brian B; Lotto, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception studies generally focus on the acoustic information present in the frequency regions below 6 kHz. Recent evidence suggests that there is perceptually relevant information in the higher frequencies, including information affecting speech intelligibility. This experiment examined whether listeners are able to accurately identify a subset of vowels and consonants in CV-context when only high-frequency (above 5 kHz) acoustic information is available (through high-pass filtering and masking of lower frequency energy). The findings reveal that listeners are capable of extracting information from these higher frequency regions to accurately identify certain consonants and vowels. PMID:25618101

  18. Phoneme categorization relying solely on high-frequency energy

    PubMed Central

    Vitela, A. Davi; Monson, Brian B.; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception studies generally focus on the acoustic information present in the frequency regions below 6 kHz. Recent evidence suggests that there is perceptually relevant information in the higher frequencies, including information affecting speech intelligibility. This experiment examined whether listeners are able to accurately identify a subset of vowels and consonants in CV-context when only high-frequency (above 5 kHz) acoustic information is available (through high-pass filtering and masking of lower frequency energy). The findings reveal that listeners are capable of extracting information from these higher frequency regions to accurately identify certain consonants and vowels. PMID:25618101

  19. High frequency drift instabilities in a dusty plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Krall, N. A.

    1994-01-01

    High frequency drift instabilities with omega(sub ce) much greater than omega which is greater than omega(sub ci) are investigated in a dusty magnetized plasma in which locally there is an electron density gradient which is opposite in sign to a dust density gradient. Two different equilibria are considered, characterized by rho(sub d) greater than L(sub d) and less than L(sub d), where rho(sub d) is the dust gyroradius and L(sub nd) is the dust density scale length. Possible application to Saturn's F-ring is discussed.

  20. HIGH FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND OF ARMOR-GRADE ALUMINA CERAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bottiglieri, S.; Haber, R. A.

    2009-03-03

    Different lots of high density, commercial, armor-grade alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were tested using high frequency ultrasound in order to determine any correlation between measured properties and ballistic performance. C-scan images were taken using a 15 MHz ultrasonic transducer in order to form attenuation coefficient and elastic property maps. These samples were further characterized by using quantitative analysis. The results indicate that attenuation coefficient values appear to have the strongest correlation, of every property measured, to ballistic classifications.

  1. Explanation of persistent high frequency density structure in coalesced bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    1988-07-01

    It has been observed that after the Main Ring rf manipulation of coalescing (where 5 to 13 primary bunches are transferred into a single rf bucket) the new secondary bunch displays evidence of high frequency density structure superimposed on the approximately Gaussian longitudinal bunch length distribution. This structure is persistent over a period of many seconds (hundreds of synchrotron oscillation periods). With the help of multiparticle simulation programs, an explanation of this phenomenon is given in terms of single particle longitudinal phase space dynamics. No coherent effects need be taken into account. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  2. External high-frequency control of combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Kozar, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of combustion instability in the pulse combustor. Propane-air mixture is burned in the chamber with the flame holder. It was experimentally found that feeding high-frequency sound vibrations into the combustion chamber causes the suppression of pulsating combustion. The oscillation frequency ranges in 870 to 1400 Hz. This corresponds to 9-12 resonance frequencies of oscillations in the combustor. The physical mechanism of the observed phenomenon consists in changing the conditions of formation and destruction of fuel jets in the vortex zone behind the flame holder.

  3. Iron and manganese speciation and cycling in glacially influenced high-latitude fjord sediments (West Spitsbergen, Svalbard): Evidence for a benthic recycling-transport mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrmann, Laura M.; Formolo, Michael J.; Owens, Jeremy D.; Raiswell, Robert; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Riedinger, Natascha; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-09-01

    Glacial environments may provide an important but poorly constrained source of potentially bioavailable iron and manganese phases to the coastal ocean in high-latitude regions. Little is known about the fate and biogeochemical cycling of glacially derived iron and manganese in the coastal marine realm. Sediment and porewater samples were collected along transects from the fjord mouths to the tidewater glaciers at the fjord heads in Smeerenburgfjorden, Kongsfjorden, and Van Keulenfjorden along Western Svalbard. Solid-phase iron and manganese speciation, determined by sequential chemical extraction, could be linked to the compositions of the local bedrock and hydrological/weathering conditions below the local glaciers. The concentration and sulfur isotope composition of chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) in Kongs- and Van Keulenfjorden sediments largely reflect the delivery rate and isotope composition of detrital pyrite originating from adjacent glaciers. The varying input of reducible iron and manganese oxide phases and the input of organic matter of varying reactivity control the pathways of organic carbon mineralization in the sediments of the three fjords. High reducible iron and manganese oxide concentrations and elevated metal accumulation rates coupled to low input of “fresh” organic matter lead to a strong expression of dissimilatory metal oxide reduction evidenced in very high porewater iron (up to 800 μM) and manganese (up to 210 μM) concentrations in Kongsfjorden and Van Keulenfjorden. Sediment reworking by the benthic macrofauna and physical sediment resuspension via iceberg calving may be additional factors that promote extensive benthic iron and manganese cycling in these fjords. On-going benthic recycling of glacially derived dissolved iron into overlying seawater, where partial re-oxidation and deposition occurs, facilitates the transport of iron across the fjords and potentially into adjacent continental shelf waters. Such iron-dominated fjord

  4. Organic matter characterization by infrared spectroscopic methods in lake sediment records from boreal and subarctic Sweden: Implications for long-term carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Jacob, Carsten; Rosén, Peter; Bindler, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater systems play an important role in the global carbon cycle. In this dynamic system, inorganic and organic carbon can be incorporated into biota, effluxed to the atmosphere or accumulated in sediments. The amount and composition of the carbon, derived from both aquatic and terrestrial sources, accumulated in sediments depend on the climatic and environmental conditions present in the lake and its catchment, and are thus sensitive to changes in, e.g., temperature, precipitation, vegetation and hydrological flow patterns. In this study, we show the application of infrared spectroscopic methods to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize organic matter stored in lake sediments with a focus on changes in the source of terrestrial-derived organic matter. Infrared spectroscopic methods facilitate a fast, cost-efficient and non-destructive analysis of minerogenic as well as organic sediment components. We applied three different infrared spectroscopic analyses - visible-near infrared spectroscopy (VNIRS; 25000-4000 cm-1), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in the mid-IR region (FTIR; 3750-400 cm-1) and a combined Fourier-transformed infrared - thermal programmed desorption technique (FTIR-TPD; 3750-400 cm-1) - to Holocene sediment records from two Swedish lakes, Lång-Älgsjön and Lake Koukkel, to reconstruct past changes in the organic matter composition. The infrared spectral information of these records indicate sections of different organic matter composition reflecting varying stages of the lake and landscape development. An early-Holocene mire development around the boreal lake Lång-Älgsjön led to an increased input of organic matter from the catchment into the lake initiating an early natural lake acidification, whereas the subarctic Lake Koukkel has been affected by mire and potentially late-Holocene permafrost dynamics, which caused an increased and less variable input of allochthonous organic matter. Overall, variations in organic matter

  5. Cycling of mercury across the sediment-water interface in seepage lakes: Chapter 13, Advances in Chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurley, James P.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Babiarz, C.L.; Andren, Anders

    1994-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of Hg fluxes across the sediment—water interface were estimated by groundwater, dry bulk sediment, sediment pore water, sediment trap, and water-column analyses in two northern Wisconsin seepage lakes. Little Rock Lake (Treatment Basin) received no groundwater discharge during the study period (1988—1990), and Follette Lake received continuous groundwater discharge. In Little Rock Lake, settling of particulate matter accounted for the major Hg delivery mechanism to the sediment—water interface. Upward diffusion of Hg from sediment pore waters below 2—4-cm sediment depth was apparently a minor source during summer stratification. Time-series comparisons suggested that the observed buildup of Hg in the hypolimnion of Little Rock Lake was attributable to dissolution and diffusion of Hg from recently fallen particulate matter close to the sediment—water interface. Groundwater inflow represented an important source of new Hg, and groundwater outflow accounted for significant removal of Hg from Pallette Lake. Equilibrium speciation calculations revealed that association of Hg with organic matter may control solubility in well-oxygenated waters, whereas in anoxic environments sulfur (polysulfide and bisulfide) complexation governs dissolved total Hg levels.

  6. High-frequency monitoring reveals nutrient sources and transport processes in an agriculture-dominated lowland water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, Bas; Broers, Hans Peter; Berendrecht, Wilbert; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Osté, Leonard; Griffioen, Jasper

    2016-05-01

    Many agriculture-dominated lowland water systems worldwide suffer from eutrophication caused by high nutrient loads. Insight in the hydrochemical functioning of embanked polder catchments is highly relevant for improving the water quality in such areas or for reducing export loads to downstream water bodies. This paper introduces new insights in nutrient sources and transport processes in a polder in the Netherlands situated below sea level using high-frequency monitoring technology at the outlet, where the water is pumped into a higher situated lake, combined with a low-frequency water quality monitoring programme at six locations within the drainage area. Seasonal trends and short-scale temporal dynamics in concentrations indicated that the NO3 concentration at the pumping station originated from N loss from agricultural lands. The NO3 loads appear as losses via tube drains after intensive rainfall events during the winter months due to preferential flow through the cracked clay soil. Transfer function-noise modelling of hourly NO3 concentrations reveals that a large part of the dynamics in NO3 concentrations during the winter months can be related to rainfall. The total phosphorus (TP) concentration and turbidity almost doubled during operation of the pumping station, which points to resuspension of particulate P from channel bed sediments induced by changes in water flow due to pumping. Rainfall events that caused peaks in NO3 concentrations did not results in TP concentration peaks. The rainfall induced and NO3 enriched quick interflow, may also be enriched in TP but retention of TP due to sedimentation of particulate P then results in the absence of rainfall induced TP concentration peaks. Increased TP concentrations associated with run-off events is only observed during a rainfall event at the end of a freeze-thaw cycle. All these observations suggest that the P retention potential of polder water systems is primarily due to the artificial pumping regime

  7. High-frequency monitoring reveals nutrient sources and transport processes in an agriculture-dominated lowland water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, B.; Broers, H. P.; Berendrecht, W. L.; Rozemeijer, J. C.; Osté, L. A.; Griffioen, J.

    2015-08-01

    Many agriculture-dominated lowland water systems worldwide suffer from eutrophication caused by high nutrient loads. Insight in the hydrochemical functioning of embanked polder catchments is highly relevant for improving the water quality in such areas. This paper introduces new insights in nutrient sources and transport processes in a low elevated polder in the Netherlands using high-frequency monitoring technology at the outlet, where the water is pumped into a higher situated lake, combined with a low-frequency water quality monitoring program at six locations within the drainage area. Seasonal trends and short scale temporal dynamics in concentrations indicated that the NO3 concentration at the pumping station originated from N-loss from agricultural lands. The NO3 loads appear as losses with drain water discharge after intensive rainfall events during the winter months due to preferential flow through the cracked clay soil. Transfer function-noise modelling of hourly NO3 concentrations reveals that a large part of the dynamics in NO3 concentrations during the winter months can be related to rainfall. The total phosphorus (TP) concentration almost doubled during operation of the pumping station which points to resuspension of particulate P from channel bed sediments induced by changes in water flow due to pumping. Rainfall events that caused peaks in NO3 concentrations did not results in TP concentration peaks. The by rainfall induced and NO3 enriched quick interflow, may also be enriched in TP but this is then buffered in the water system due to sedimentation of particulate P. Increased TP concentrations associated with run-off events is only observed during a rainfall event at the end of a freeze-thaw cycle. All these observations suggest that the P retention potential of polder water systems is highly due to the artificial pumping regime that buffers high flows. As the TP concentration is affected by operation of the pumping station, timing of sampling

  8. High-frequency oscillations and the neurobiology of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Uhlhaas, Peter J.; Singer, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Neural oscillations at low- and high-frequency ranges are a fundamental feature of large-scale networks. Recent evidence has indicated that schizophrenia is associated with abnormal amplitude and synchrony of oscillatory activity, in particular, at high (beta/gamma) frequencies. These abnormalities are observed during task-related and spontaneous neuronal activity which may be important for understanding the pathophysiology of the syndrome. In this paper, we shall review the current evidence for impaired beta/gamma-band oscillations and their involvement in cognitive functions and certain symptoms of the disorder. In the first part, we will provide an update on neural oscillations during normal brain functions and discuss underlying mechanisms. This will be followed by a review of studies that have examined high-frequency oscillatory activity in schizophrenia and discuss evidence that relates abnormalities of oscillatory activity to disturbed excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance. Finally, we shall identify critical issues for future research in this area. PMID:24174902

  9. Very High Frequency (Beyond 100 MHz) PZT Kerfless Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Da-Wei; Zhou, Qifa; Geng, Xuecang; Liu, Chang-Geng; Djuth, Frank; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and measurements of very high frequency kerfless linear arrays prepared from PZT film and PZT bulk material. A 12-µm PZT thick film fabricated from PZT-5H powder/solution composite and a piece of 15-µm PZT-5H sheet were used to fabricate 32-element kerfless high-frequency linear arrays with photolithography. The PZT thick film was prepared by spin-coating of PZT sol-gel composite solution. The thin PZT-5H sheet sample was prepared by lapping a PZT-5H ceramic with a precision lapping machine. The measured results of the 2 arrays were compared. The PZT film array had a center frequency of 120 MHz, a bandwidth of 60% with a parylene matching layer, and an insertion loss of 41 dB. The PZT ceramic sheet array was found to have a center frequency of 128 MHz with a poorer bandwidth (40% with a parylene matching layer) but a better sensitivity (28 dB insertion loss). PMID:19942516

  10. Saltating Snow Mechanics: High Frequency Particle Response to Mountain Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksamit, N. O.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Blowing snow transport theory is currently limited by its dependency on the coupling of time-averaged measurements of particle saltation and suspension and wind speed. Details of the stochastic process of particle transport and complex bed interactions in the saltation layer, along with the influence of boundary-layer turbulence are unobservable with classic measurement techniques. In contrast, recent advances in two-phase sand transport understanding have been spurred by development of high-frequency wind and particle velocity measurement techniques. To advance the understanding of blowing snow, laser illuminated high-speed videography and ultrasonic anemometry were deployed in a mountain environment to examine saltation of snow over a natural snowpack in detail. A saltating snow measurement site was established at the Fortress Mountain Snow Laboratory, Alberta, Canada and instrumented with two Campbell CSAT3 ultrasonic anemometers, four Campbell SR50 ultrasonic snow depth sounders and a two dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) system. Measurements were collected during nighttime blowing snow events, quantifying snow particle response to high frequency wind gusts. This novel approach permits PTV to step beyond mean statistics of snow transport by identifying sub-species of saltation motion in the first 20 mm above the surface, as well as previously overlooked initiation processes, such as tumbling aggregate snow crystals ejecting smaller grains, then eventually disintegrating and bouncing into entrainment. Spectral characteristics of snow particle ejection and saltation dynamics were also investigated. These unique observations are starting to inform novel conceptualizations of saltating snow transport mechanisms.

  11. High-frequency wave normals in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, F.; Smith, L.D.; Sonett, C.P.

    1984-05-01

    High-frequency (0.01--0.04 Hz) magnetic fluctuations in 506 ten-minute intervals of contemporaneous Explorer 35 and Apollo 12 measurements made in the solar wind near the morning side of the Earth's bow shock show the presence of a large population of disturbances resembling Alfven waves. Each wavefront normal n is systematically aligned (median deviation = 35/sup 0/) with , the associated ten-minute average of the magnetic field. Because of variability in the direction of from one interval to another, the coupled distribution of n is nearly isotropic in solar ecliptic coordinates, in contrast with the results of other studies of waves at much lower frequency indicating outward propagation from the sun. Presumably the high frequency waves discussed here are stirred into isotropy (in solar ecliptic coordinates) by following the low frequency fluctuations. As these waves maintain their alignement of n with despite the great variation of , a strong physical alignment constraint is inferred.

  12. High frequency dielectrophoretic response of microalgae over time

    PubMed Central

    Hadady, Hanieh; Wong, Johnson J.; Hiibel, Sage R.; Redelman, Doug; Geiger, Emil J.

    2015-01-01

    The high frequency dielectrophoresis (>20 MHz) response of microalgae cells with different lipid content was monitored over time. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was cultured in regular medium and under nitrogen-depleted conditions in order to produce populations of cells with low and high lipid content, respectively. The electrical conductivity (EC) of the culture media was also monitored over the same time. The upper crossover frequency (UCOF) decreased for high-lipid cells over time. The single-shell model predicts that the upper crossover frequency is dictated primarily by the dielectric properties of the cytoplasm. The high frequency DEP response of the high-lipid cells’ cytoplasm was changed by lipid accumulation. DEP response of the low-lipid cells also varied with the conductivity of the culture media due to nutrient consumption. Relative lipid content was estimated with BODIPY 505/515 dye by calculating the area-weighted intensity average of fluorescent images. Finally, microalgae cells were successfully separated based on lipid content at 41 MHz and DEP media conductivity 106 ± 1 µS/cm. PMID:25229637

  13. High-frequency filtering of strong-motion records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, J.; Boore, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of noise in strong-motion records is most problematic at low and high frequencies where the signal to noise ratio is commonly low compared to that in the mid-spectrum. The impact of low-frequency noise (5 Hz) on computed pseudo-absolute response spectral accelerations (PSAs). In contrast to the case of low-frequency noise our analysis shows that filtering to remove high-frequency noise is only necessary in certain situations and that PSAs can often be used up to 100 Hz even if much lower high-cut corner frequencies are required to remove the noise. This apparent contradiction can be explained by the fact that PSAs are often controlled by ground accelerations associated with much lower frequencies than the natural frequency of the oscillator because path and site attenuation (often modelled by Q and κ, respectively) have removed the highest frequencies. We demonstrate that if high-cut filters are to be used, then their corner frequencies should be selected on an individual basis, as has been done in a few recent studies.

  14. Print protection using high-frequency fractal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Khaled W.; Blackledge, Jonathon M.; Datta, Sekharjit; Flint, James A.

    2004-06-01

    All digital images are band-limited to a degree that is determined by a spatial extent of the point spread function; the bandwidth of the image being determined by the optical transfer function. In the printing industry, the limit is determined by the resolution of the printed material. By band limiting the digital image in such away that the printed document maintains its fidelity, it is possible to use the out-of-band frequency space to introduce low amplitude coded data that remains hidden in the image. In this way, a covert signature can be embedded into an image to provide a digital watermark, which is sensitive to reproduction. In this paper a high frequency fractal noise is used as a low amplitude signal. A statistically robust solution to the authentication of printed material using high-fractal noise is proposed here which is based on cross-entropy metrics to provide a statistical confidence test. The fractal watermark is based on application of self-affine fields, which is suitable for documents containing high degree of texture. In principle, this new approach will allow batch tracking to be performed using coded data that has been embedded into the high frequency components of the image whose statistical characteristics are dependent on the printer/scanner technology. The details of this method as well as experimental results are presented.

  15. High-Frequency Normal Mode Propagation in Aluminum Cylinders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic measurements made using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) transducers in aluminum cylinders reveal waveform features with high amplitudes and with velocities that depend on the feature's dominant frequency. In a given waveform, high-frequency features generally arrive earlier than low-frequency features, typical for normal mode propagation. To analyze these waveforms, the elastic equation is solved in a cylindrical coordinate system for the high-frequency case in which the acoustic wavelength is small compared to the cylinder geometry, and the surrounding medium is air. Dispersive P- and S-wave normal mode propagations are predicted to exist, but owing to complex interference patterns inside a cylinder, the phase and group velocities are not smooth functions of frequency. To assess the normal mode group velocities and relative amplitudes, approximate dispersion relations are derived using Bessel functions. The utility of the normal mode theory and approximations from a theoretical and experimental standpoint are demonstrated by showing how the sequence of P- and S-wave normal mode arrivals can vary between samples of different size, and how fundamental normal modes can be mistaken for the faster, but significantly smaller amplitude, P- and S-body waves from which P- and S-wave speeds are calculated.

  16. High Frequency Elastic Wave Propagation in Media with a Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, B.; Aubry, D.; Mouronval, A.-S.; Solas, D.; Thébault, J.; Tian, B.-Y.

    2010-05-01

    This contribution deals with the theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of elastic wave propagation in media with a microstructure. Two kinds of media are considered: polycrystalline material and honeycomb core sandwich shells, in which elastic waves are triggered by transient signals that result in large frequency ranges including high frequencies. Our theoretical and numerical investigations aim at understanding and simulating the interactions between the microstructure of those media and the wave propagation phenomena, when the characteristic lengths of the microstructure and the involved shortest wavelengths have roughly the same scale. In this paper, some key mechanisms of interaction between the considered microstructures and the elastic waves are highlighted. In polycrystalline superalloys, the misorientation distribution and the average grain size are considered, as they can alter pressure/shear wave propagation and also the permeability to ultrasonic waves monitored to perform non-destructive testing. For the flexure behavior of honeycomb core sandwich shells, the fundamental role played by the honeycomb cells, especially in high frequency domain, is analyzed. Relevant numerical modeling that provides a promising way to quantify micro-structure/wave interactions is presented. The important issue of how to take into account these micro-scale interactions in a homogenized macro-scale modeling is also discussed.

  17. 10 K high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sixue; Chen, Liubiao; Wu, Xianlin; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    A high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling (HPTCP) has been developed and tested to meet the requirement of weak magnetic signals measurement, and the performance characteristics are presented in this article. The HPTCP is a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler with the precooling-stage replaced by liquid nitrogen. Two regenerators completely filled with stainless steel (SS) meshes are used in the cooler. Together with cold inertance tubes and cold gas reservoir, a cold double-inlet configuration is used to control the phase relationship of the HPTCP. The experimental result shows that the cold double-inlet configuration has improved the performance of the cooler obviously. The effects of operation parameters on the performance of the cooler are also studied. With a precooling temperature of 78.5 K, the maximum refrigeration capacity is 0.26 W at 15 K and 0.92 W at 20 K when the input electric power are 174 W and 248 W respectively, and the minimum no-load temperature obtained is 10.3 K, which is a new record on refrigeration temperature for high frequency pulse tube cryocooler reported with SS completely used as regenerative matrix.

  18. A high-frequency electrospray driven by gas volume charges

    SciTech Connect

    Lastochkin, Dmitri; Chang, H.-C.

    2005-06-15

    High-frequency (>10 kHz) ac electrospray is shown to eject volatile dielectric liquid drops by an entirely different mechanism from dc sprays. The steady dc Taylor conic tip is absent and continuous spraying of submicron drops is replaced by individual dynamic pinchoff events involving the entire drop. We attribute this spraying mechanism to a normal Maxwell force produced by an undispersed plasma cloud in front of the meniscus that produces a visible glow at the spherical tip. The volume charge within the cloud is formed by electron-induced gas ionization of the evaporated liquid and produces a large normal field that is much higher than the nominal applied field such that drop ejection occurs at a voltage (at high frequencies) that is as much as ten times lower than that for dc sprays. The ejection force is sensitive to the liquid properties (but not its electrolyte composition), the ac frequency and trace amounts of inert gases, which are believed to catalyze the ionization reactions. As electroneutral drops are ejected, due to the large (>100) ratio between individual drop ejection time and the ac frequency, this mechanism can produce large (microns) electroneutral drops at relatively low voltages.

  19. High Frequency PIN-Diode Switches for Radiometer Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Reising, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Internally calibrated radiometers are needed for ocean topography and other missions. Typically internal calibration is achieved with Dicke switching as one of the techniques. We have developed high frequency single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) that can be easily integrated into Dicke switched radiometers that utilize microstrip technology. In particular, the switches we developed can be used for a radiometer such as the one proposed for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Satellite Mission whose three channels at 92, 130, and 166 GHz would allow for wet-tropospheric path delay correction near coastal zones and over land. This feat is not possible with the current Jason-class radiometers due to their lower frequency signal measurement and thus lower resolution. The MMIC chips were fabricated at NGST using their InP PIN diode process and measured at JPL using high frequency test equipment. Measurement and simulation results will be presented.

  20. Planck 2013 results. VI. High Frequency Instrument data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herent, O.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melot, F.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    Wedescribe the processing of the 531 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI), which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 473 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.´7 to 4.´6. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively, 10, 6 , 12, and 39 μK in the four lowest HFI frequency channels (100-353GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy sr-1 in the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Relative to the 143 GHz channel, these two high frequency channels are calibrated to within 5% and the 353 GHz channel to the percent level. The 100 and 217 GHz channels, which together with the 143 GHz channel determine the high-multipole part of the CMB power spectrum (50 <ℓ < 2500), are calibrated relative to 143 GHz to better than 0.2%.

  1. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics.

  2. A perspective on high-frequency ultrasound for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Aristizába, Orlando; Silverman, Ronald H.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >15 MHz) is a rapidly developing field. HFU is currently used and investigated for ophthalmologic, dermatologic, intravascular, and small-animal imaging. HFU offers a non-invasive means to investigate tissue at the microscopic level with resolutions often better than 100 μm. However, fine resolution is only obtained over the limited depth-of-field (˜1 mm) of single-element spherically-focused transducers typically used for HFU applications. Another limitation is penetration depth because most biological tissues have large attenuation at high frequencies. In this study, two 5-element annular arrays with center frequencies of 17 and 34 MHz were fabricated and methods were developed to obtain images with increased penetration depth and depth-of-field. These methods were used in ophthalmologic and small-animal imaging studies. Improved blood sensitivity was obtained when a phantom mimicking a vitreous hemorrhage was imaged. Central-nervous systems of 12.5-day-old mouse embryos were imaged in utero and in three dimensions for the first time.

  3. High-frequency vibrations of sandwich plates and delamination detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Alf E.; Irgens, Fridtjov

    1998-06-01

    In multi-hull marine vehicles assembled by FRP sandwich composite materials problems with delamination and skin/core debonding are reported. High frequency vibrations in foam core sandwich materials are investigated to see if it was possible to apply them, together with bending vibrations, in an early damage warning system for delamination detection in marine vessels. This manuscript presents a theory for high frequency vibration in sandwich plates and beams. The core is modeled as a two parameter foundation with shearing interaction effects as well as normal stress effects in the core included. The skins are modeled as ordinary plates or beams on a foundation. Expressions for both anti-symmetric and symmetric modes are given. In addition to the theoretical development, experiments with a simply supported sandwich beam, using a TV-Holography technic, were performed and good accordance between theory and experiments were achieved. The results indicates that disappearance of symmetric modes may be used a parameter for delamination detection. The anti-symmetric modes may be interchangeable with higher bending modes by an early damage warning system. To avoid this, the theory presented may be applied to determine the anti-symmetric frequency values in forehand.

  4. High-frequency-link based power electronics in power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, Hari

    Power quality has become a serious concern to many utility customers in recent times. Among the many power quality problems, voltage sags are one of the most common and most mischievous, affecting industrial and commercial customers. They are primarily caused by power system faults at the transmission and distribution level, and thus, are mostly unavoidable. Their effect depends on the equipment sensitivities to the magnitude and duration of these sags and each can cost an industry up to few million dollars. To counter these limitations, many solutions at the customer end have been proposed which include Constant Voltage Transformers (CVT's), UPS and line frequency transformer based Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR). These approaches have their respective limitations with regard to capabilities, size and cost. This research proposes a new approach to mitigating these voltage sags involving the use of high frequency transformer link. Suitable switching logic and control strategies have been implemented. The proposed approach in a one-phase application is verified with computer simulations and by a hardware proof-of-concept prototype. Application to three-phase system is verified through simulations. Application of high frequency transformers in other utility applications such as active filters and static compensators is also looked at.

  5. Novel tissue mimicking materials for high frequency breast ultrasound phantoms.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Louise M; Fagan, Andrew J; Browne, Jacinta E

    2011-01-01

    The development and acoustical characterisation of a range of novel agar-based tissue mimicking material (TMMs) for use in clinically relevant, quality assurance (QA) and anthropomorphic breast phantoms are presented. The novel agar-based TMMs described in this study are based on a comprehensive, systematic variation of the ingredients in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) TMM. A novel, solid fat-mimicking material was also developed and acoustically characterised. Acoustical characterisation was carried out using an in-house scanning acoustic macroscope at low (7.5 MHz) and high frequencies (20 MHz), using the pulse-echo insertion technique. The speeds of sound range from 1490 to 1570 m. s(-1), attenuation coefficients range from 0.1 to 0.9 dB. cm(‑1). MHz(-1) and relative backscatter ranges from 0 to -20 dB. It was determined that tissues can be mimicked in terms of independently controllable speeds of sound and attenuation coefficients. These properties make these novel TMMs suitable for use in clinically relevant QA and anthropomorphic phantoms and would potentially be useful for other high frequency applications such as intravascular and small animal imaging. PMID:21084158

  6. High-frequency dynamics of heterogeneous slender structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Éric

    2013-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of the theoretical modeling of high-frequency linear dynamics of built-up structures including the influence of uncertainties by a probabilistic approach. Its analytical developments are enlightened by a preliminary discussion on the vibrational responses of such systems as observed from some experiments conducted in a broad frequency range of excitation. The paper first reviews the main engineering approaches used so far to address the higher frequency domain, namely the statistical energy analysis and the vibrational conductivity analogy. Both methods establish heuristic steady diffusion equations to describe the spatial distribution of the vibrational energy. It is then argued that several limitations and assumptions which restrict their range of validity may be released if a wave transport model is invoked. The latter describes the multiple reflections of high-frequency elastic waves in heterogeneous (possibly random) media adopting a kinetic point of view pertaining to the associated energy density. Transient transport equations evolve into unsteady diffusion equations after long times, supporting in this respect the engineering approaches. Thus the second part of the paper is devoted to a generic presentation of some recent works on kinetic transport models for application to structural dynamics. This objective requires the extension of the existing results of that theory to include dissipation and boundary effects. The proposed models are illustrated by a numerical example showing their consistency with an SEA computation, and the concurrence of a time domain simulation with a frequency domain result.

  7. Osteogenic Effect of High-frequency Acceleration on Alveolar Bone

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani, M.; Khoo, E.; Alyami, B.; Raptis, M.; Salgueiro, J.M.; Oliveira, S.M.; Boskey, A.; Teixeira, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation contributes to the health of alveolar bone, but no therapy using the osteogenic effects of these stimuli to increase alveolar bone formation has been developed. We propose that the application of high-frequency acceleration to teeth in the absence of significant loading is osteogenic. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided among control, sham, and experimental groups. The experimental group underwent localized accelerations at different frequencies for 5 min/day on the occlusal surface of the maxillary right first molar at a very low magnitude of loading (4 µε). Sham rats received a similar load in the absence of acceleration or frequency. The alveolar bone of the maxilla was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (µCT), histology, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR imaging), and RT-PCR for osteogenic genes. Results demonstrate that application of high-frequency acceleration significantly increased alveolar bone formation. These effects were not restricted to the area of application, and loading could be replaced by frequency and acceleration. These studies propose a simple mechanical therapy that may play a significant role in alveolar bone formation and maintenance. PMID:22337699

  8. A model for microbial phosphorus cycling in bioturbated marine sediments: Significance for phosphorus burial in the early Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Andrew W.; Boyle, Richard A.; Lenton, Timothy M.; Ingall, Ellery D.; Wallmann, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    A diagenetic model is used to simulate the diagenesis and burial of particulate organic carbon (Corg) and phosphorus (P) in marine sediments underlying anoxic versus oxic bottom waters. The latter are physically mixed by animals moving through the surface sediment (bioturbation) and ventilated by burrowing, tube-dwelling organisms (bioirrigation). The model is constrained using an empirical database including burial ratios of Corg with respect to organic P (Corg:Porg) and total reactive P (Corg:Preac), burial efficiencies of Corg and Porg, and inorganic carbon-to-phosphorus regeneration ratios. If Porg is preferentially mineralized relative to Corg during aerobic respiration, as many previous studies suggest, then the simulated Porg pool is found to be completely depleted. A modified model that incorporates the redox-dependent microbial synthesis of polyphosphates and Porg (termed the microbial P pump) allows preferential mineralization of the bulk Porg pool relative to Corg during both aerobic and anaerobic respiration and is consistent with the database. Results with this model show that P burial is strongly enhanced in sediments hosting fauna. Animals mix highly labile Porg away from the aerobic sediment layers where mineralization rates are highest, thereby mitigating diffusive PO43- fluxes to the bottom water. They also expand the redox niche where microbial P uptake occurs. The model was applied to a hypothetical shelf setting in the early Paleozoic; a time of the first radiation of benthic fauna. Results show that even shallow bioturbation at that time may have had a significant impact on P burial. Our model provides support for a recent study that proposed that faunal radiation in ocean sediments led to enhanced P burial and, possibly, a stabilization of atmospheric O2 levels. The results also help to explain Corg:Porg ratios in the geological record and the persistence of Porg in ancient marine sediments.

  9. Glacial-interglacial cycles of erosion and sediment transport along the western North American margin constrained by reconciling geologic and climate model data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlaningham, S.; Pisias, N. G.; Duncan, R. A.; Hostetler, S. W.; Wilson, K. L.

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to determine whether observed shifts in sediment source (indicated by bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar and Nd isotopic tracers) at a northeast Pacific core site are in response to variations in river basin erosion or transport pathways of terrigenous sediment once it reaches the ocean. We synthesize geologic and climate model data sets to evaluate whether climate model (REGCM2) outputs of precipitation-evaporation (P-E) can be linked to observed changes in erosion and landscape evolution along the western North American margin (core site EW9504-17PC, offshore southern Oregon) over the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This site is ideally located to test this new approach as it captures the combined sediment fluxes from coastal N. California/S. Oregon and the interior Cascade Volcanic Ranges, which have drastically different 40Ar-39Ar bedrock ages (130-147 Ma versus 10-30 Ma, respectively) and different climate responses occurring on glacial-interglacial timescales. We perturb a watershed-scale model of bedrock 40Ar-39Ar ages by the P-E changes to reproduce the total range of variability observed in downcore, bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar ages and Nd isotopic values at the core site. We find that climate model percent changes in P-E values cannot reproduce the total range of variability seen in the provenance record before 22 ka without invoking drastic reductions in Klamath Mountain and Eel River sediment sources. A relatively unconstrained variable in the source area at this time is the presence of a large pluvial lake, Lake Modoc. It is possible that discharges from it could carry large volumes of young, Cascade Mountain-derived sediments offshore. Alternatively, an offshore switch in ocean current direction or reduction (relative to present-day) could explain the downcore sedimentological changes, as material discharged from the Eel River (the largest sediment source south of the core site) would not be carried north. To reproduce the observed downcore shift in

  10. The lacustrine carbon cycle as illuminated by the waters and sediments of two hydrologically distinct headwater lakes in North-Central Minnesota, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Schwalb, A.

    2002-01-01

    The accumulation rates of CaCO3 and organic carbon (OC) in lake sediments are delicately balanced between production in the epilimnion and destruction in the hypolimnion. The cycling of these two forms of carbon makes a "carbon pump" that greatly affects the biogeochemical cycles of other elements. To further understand these biogeochemical dynamics, the lakes, streams, and wetlands of the Shingobee River headwater area of north-central Minnesota have been subjected to intensive hydrologic and biogeochemical studies. Williams Lake, situated close to the highest point in the regional flow system, is hydrologically closed, with no surface inlet or outlet, and ground water and precipitation as the only sources of water. Shingobee Lake, situated at the lowest point in the regional flow system, has the Shingobee River as an inlet and outlet. The surface waters of both lakes are oversaturated, and the bottom waters undersaturated, with respect to CaCO3 during the summer. The small amount of CaCO3 that is precipitated in the epilimnion of Williams Lake during the summer is dissolved in the undersaturated hypolimnion and sediments with the result that no CaCO3 is incorporated into the profundal surface sediments. Because of the high phytoplankton productivity of Shingobee Lake, sufficient CaCO3 is produced in the epilimnion that large amounts survive the corrosive hypolimnion and sediments, and an average of 46 wt. % accumulates in surface sediments. Another consequence of higher phytoplankton productivity in Shingobee Lake is that the hypolimnion becomes oxygen deficient within a month after overturn in both the spring and fall. Because of reducing conditions that develop in the hypolimnion of Shingobee Lake, high concentrations of dissolved Fe and Mn accumulate there during summer stratification. Precipitation of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides during periods of fall and spring overturn results in high concentrations of Fe and Mn in surface sediments. In Williams Lake, high

  11. Sediment resuspension by coastal waters: a potential mechanism for nutrient re-cycling on the ocean's margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanning, Kent A.; Carder, Kendall L.; Betzer, Peter R.

    1982-08-01

    Nutrient profiles from the continental shelf of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico indicated considerable near-bottom enrichment in silica and nitrate above coarse sediments east of the Mississippi delta. In contrast, near-bottom water of the carbonate-rich West Florida Shelf showed no such enrichmmets. Storm-related suspension apparently produced the enrichments because, in near-bottom waters south of Mobile Bay, silica, nitrate plus nitrite, and suspended load increased subbtantially as a winter storm front passed. Also, laboratory simulation of resuspension by stirring the supernatant seawater over a clay-rich core produced similar increase in silica and nitrate plus nitrite, with ammonia being the apparent precursor to the nitrate and nitrite. Most of the nutrient increase appeared to come from previously deposited sediments in the early stages of resuspension. Using the ratios of nutrients released to sediments resuspended, calculations indicate that resuspension of as little as 1 mm of shelf sediment could intermittenly augment overlying productivity by as much as 100 to 200%. Thus, resuspension may accelerate nutrient recycling on continental margins.

  12. Inaudible high-frequency sounds affect brain activity: hypersonic effect.

    PubMed

    Oohashi, T; Nishina, E; Honda, M; Yonekura, Y; Fuwamoto, Y; Kawai, N; Maekawa, T; Nakamura, S; Fukuyama, H; Shibasaki, H

    2000-06-01

    Although it is generally accepted that humans cannot perceive sounds in the frequency range above 20 kHz, the question of whether the existence of such "inaudible" high-frequency components may affect the acoustic perception of audible sounds remains unanswered. In this study, we used noninvasive physiological measurements of brain responses to provide evidence that sounds containing high-frequency components (HFCs) above the audible range significantly affect the brain activity of listeners. We used the gamelan music of Bali, which is extremely rich in HFCs with a nonstationary structure, as a natural sound source, dividing it into two components: an audible low-frequency component (LFC) below 22 kHz and an HFC above 22 kHz. Brain electrical activity and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured as markers of neuronal activity while subjects were exposed to sounds with various combinations of LFCs and HFCs. None of the subjects recognized the HFC as sound when it was presented alone. Nevertheless, the power spectra of the alpha frequency range of the spontaneous electroencephalogram (alpha-EEG) recorded from the occipital region increased with statistical significance when the subjects were exposed to sound containing both an HFC and an LFC, compared with an otherwise identical sound from which the HFC was removed (i.e., LFC alone). In contrast, compared with the baseline, no enhancement of alpha-EEG was evident when either an HFC or an LFC was presented separately. Positron emission tomography measurements revealed that, when an HFC and an LFC were presented together, the rCBF in the brain stem and the left thalamus increased significantly compared with a sound lacking the HFC above 22 kHz but that was otherwise identical. Simultaneous EEG measurements showed that the power of occipital alpha-EEGs correlated significantly with the rCBF in the left thalamus. Psychological evaluation indicated that the subjects felt the sound containing an HFC to be more

  13. High-Frequency Wave Propagation by the Segment Projection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engquist, Björn; Runborg, Olof; Tornberg, Anna-Karin

    2002-05-01

    Geometrical optics is a standard technique used for the approximation of high-frequency wave propagation. Computational methods based on partial differential equations instead of the traditional ray tracing have recently been applied to geometrical optics. These new methods have a number of advantages but typically exhibit difficulties with linear superposition of waves. In this paper we introduce a new partial differential technique based on the segment projection method in phase space. The superposition problem is perfectly resolved and so is the problem of computing amplitudes in the neighborhood of caustics. The computational complexity is of the same order as that of ray tracing. The new algorithm is described and a number of computational examples are given, including a simulation of waveguides.

  14. High-frequency waves generated by auroral electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Boehm, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of marginally unstable electron distribution functions and high-frequency plasma waves were made on a sounding rocket flight through a quiet auroral arc. The waves appeared near the electron plasma frequency and had a large parallel electric field component such that k-parallel is greater than k-perpendicular. The appearance of these waves was correlated with the presence of marginally unstable parallel electron distributions. Analysis has shown that the waves were produced by parallel electron distribution function greater than 0 rather than the small perpendicular electron distribution function greater than 0 features. Wave levels and growth rates inside the arc were small, and nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle interactions appear to have been minimal.

  15. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.

    1991-01-01

    Several different high-frequency methods for modeling the radar cross sections (RCSs) of plate geometries are examined. The Method of Equivalent Currents and a numerically derived corner diffraction coefficient are used to model the RCS of a rectangular, perfectly conducting plate in nonprincipal planes. The Uniform Theory of Diffraction is used to model the RCS of a rectangular, perfectly conducting plate in principal planes. For the soft polarization case, first-order and slope-diffraction terms are included. For the hard polarization case, up to four orders of diffraction are included. Finally, the Uniform Theory of Diffraction for impedance wedges and the Impedance Boundary Condition are used to model the RCS of a coated, rectangular plate in principal planes. In most of the cases considered, comparisons are made between theoretical and experimental results.

  16. Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. T.; Wang, L.; Long, L. X.; Dong, J. Q.; He, Zhixiong; Liu, Y.; Tang, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks is developed. It is found that the breakdown of the invariants by perturbed electromagnetic fields drives microinstability. The obtained diamagnetic frequency, ω∗, is proportional to only the toroidal mode number rather than transverse mode numbers. Therefore, there is no nonadiabatic drive for axisymmetrical modes in gyrokinetics. Meanwhile, the conventional eikonal Ansatz breaks down for the axisymmetrical modes. The ion drift-cyclotron instability discovered in a mirror machine is found for the first time in the toroidal system. The growth rates are proportional to ρi/Ln, and the slope changes with magnetic curvature. In spherical torus, where magnetic curvature is greater than that of traditional tokamaks, instability poses a potential danger to such devices.

  17. High-Frequency, High-Temperature Fretting Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlik, J. F.; Farris, T. N.; Haake, F. K.; Swanson, G. R.; Duke, G. C.

    2005-01-01

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism observed when two nominally clamped surfaces are subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high-temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation and propagation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). To diagnose the threat that small and relatively undetectable fretting cracks pose to damage tolerance and structural integrity of in-service components, the objective of this work is to develop a well-characterized experimental fretting rig capable of investigating fretting behavior of advanced aerospace alloys subjected to load and temperature conditions representative of such turbomachinery components.

  18. Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. T.; Long, L. X.; Dong, J. Q.; He, Zhixiong; Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Tang, C. J.

    2012-07-15

    Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks is developed. It is found that the breakdown of the invariants by perturbed electromagnetic fields drives microinstability. The obtained diamagnetic frequency, {omega}{sup *}, is proportional to only the toroidal mode number rather than transverse mode numbers. Therefore, there is no nonadiabatic drive for axisymmetrical modes in gyrokinetics. Meanwhile, the conventional eikonal Ansatz breaks down for the axisymmetrical modes. The ion drift-cyclotron instability discovered in a mirror machine is found for the first time in the toroidal system. The growth rates are proportional to {rho}{sub i}/L{sub n}, and the slope changes with magnetic curvature. In spherical torus, where magnetic curvature is greater than that of traditional tokamaks, instability poses a potential danger to such devices.

  19. Development of high frequency and wide bandwidth Johnson noise thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crossno, Jesse; Liu, Xiaomeng; Kim, Philip; Ohki, Thomas A.; Fong, Kin Chung

    2015-01-12

    We develop a high frequency, wide bandwidth radiometer operating at room temperature, which augments the traditional technique of Johnson noise thermometry for nanoscale thermal transport studies. Employing low noise amplifiers and an analog multiplier operating at 2 GHz, auto- and cross-correlated Johnson noise measurements are performed in the temperature range of 3 to 300 K, achieving a sensitivity of 5.5 mK (110 ppm) in 1 s of integration time. This setup allows us to measure the thermal conductance of a boron nitride encapsulated monolayer graphene device over a wide temperature range. Our data show a high power law (T ∼ 4) deviation from the Wiedemann-Franz law above T ∼ 100 K.

  20. High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in undoped single walled achiral Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) under the influence of ac-dc driven fields was considered. We investigated semi-classically Boltzmann's transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons' source by deriving the current densities in CNTs. Plots of the normalized current density versus frequency of ac-field revealed an increase in both the minimum and maximum peaks of normalized current density at lower frequencies as a result of a strong injection of hot electrons. The applied ac-field plays a twofold role of suppressing the space-charge instability in CNTs and simultaneously pumping an energy for lower frequency generation and amplification of THz radiations. These have enormous promising applications in very different areas of science and technology.

  1. Recording and analysis techniques for high-frequency oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Worrell, G.A.; Jerbi, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Lina, J.M.; Zelmann, R.; Le Van Quyen, M.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, new recording technologies have advanced such that, at high temporal and spatial resolutions, high-frequency oscillations (HFO) can be recorded in human partial epilepsy. However, because of the deluge of multichannel data generated by these experiments, achieving the full potential of parallel neuronal recordings depends on the development of new data mining techniques to extract meaningful information relating to time, frequency and space. Here, we aim to bridge this gap by focusing on up-to-date recording techniques for measurement of HFO and new analysis tools for their quantitative assessment. In particular, we emphasize how these methods can be applied, what property might be inferred from neuronal signals, and potentially productive future directions. PMID:22420981

  2. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  3. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  4. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approximately 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  5. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approx. 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  6. Parallel quantum-point-contacts as high-frequency-mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubrich, A. G. C.; Wharam, D. A.; Kriegelstein, H.; Manus, S.; Lorke, A.; Kotthaus, J. P.; Gossard, A. C.

    1997-06-01

    The results of high-frequency mixing experiments performed upon parallel quantum point contacts defined in the two-dimensional electron gas of an AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructure are presented. The parallel geometry, fabricated using a novel double-resist technology, enables the point-contact device to be impedance matched over a wide frequency range and, in addition, increases the power levels of the mixing signal while simultaneously reducing the parasitic source-drain capacitance. Here, we consider two parallel quantum point-contact devices with 155 and 110 point contacts, respectively; both devices operated successfully at liquid helium and liquid nitrogen temperatures with a minimal conversion loss of 13 dB.

  7. Gaussian beam decomposition of high frequency wave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tanushev, Nicolay M. Engquist, Bjoern; Tsai, Richard

    2009-12-10

    In this paper, we present a method of decomposing a highly oscillatory wave field into a sparse superposition of Gaussian beams. The goal is to extract the necessary parameters for a Gaussian beam superposition from this wave field, so that further evolution of the high frequency waves can be computed by the method of Gaussian beams. The methodology is described for R{sup d} with numerical examples for d=2. In the first example, a field generated by an interface reflection of Gaussian beams is decomposed into a superposition of Gaussian beams. The beam parameters are reconstructed to a very high accuracy. The data in the second example is not a superposition of a finite number of Gaussian beams. The wave field to be approximated is generated by a finite difference method for a geometry with two slits. The accuracy in the decomposition increases monotonically with the number of beams.

  8. Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, T.; Mukasa, S.; Takemori, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kurokawa, K.; Toyota, H.; Nomura, S.; Kawashima, A.; Iwamae, A.

    2009-03-15

    Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency (hf) plasma were performed under high pressure conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc) CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). Temperature evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) increased from 3600 to 4600 K with an increase in pressure. The first observation of broadening and shifting of the O I line profile (3p {sup 5} P{sub 3,2,1}{yields}3s {sup 5} S{sub 2}{sup 0}) of hf plasma under sc CO{sub 2} conditions was carried out. However, the origin of broadening and the shifting cannot be understood because the present theory explaining them is not valid for such high pressure conditions.

  9. High-frequency extensions of magnetorotational instability in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Churikov, A. P.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Erokhin, N. N.; Tsypin, V. S.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2008-08-15

    High-frequency extensions of magnetorotational instability driven by the Velikhov effect beyond the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regime are studied. The existence of the well-known Hall regime and a new electron inertia regime is demonstrated. The electron inertia regime is realized for a lesser plasma magnetization of rotating plasma than that in the Hall regime. It includes the subregime of nonmagnetized electrons. It is shown that, in contrast to the standard MHD regime and the Hall regime, magnetorotational instability in this subregime can be driven only at positive values of dln{Omega}/dlnr, where {Omega} is the plasma rotation frequency and r is the radial coordinate. The permittivity of rotating plasma beyond the standard MHD regime, including both the Hall regime and the electron inertia regime, is calculated.

  10. Influence of pore roughness on high-frequency permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortis, Andrea; Smeulders, David M. J.; Guermond, Jean Luc; Lafarge, Denis

    2003-06-01

    The high-frequency behavior of the fluid velocity patterns for smooth and corrugated pore channels is studied. The classical approach of Johnson et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 176, 379 (1987)] for smooth geometries is obtained in different manners, thus clarifying differences with Sheng and Zhou [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1591 (1988)] and Avellaneda and Torquato [Phys. Fluids A 3, 2529 (1991)]. For wedge-shaped pore geometries, the classical approach is modified by a nonanalytic extension proposed by Achdou and Avellaneda [Phys. Fluids A 4, 2561 (1992)]. The dependency of the nonanalytic extension on the apex angle of the wedge was derived. Precise numerical computations for various apex angles in two-dimensional channels confirmed this theoretical dependency, which is somewhat different from the original Achdou and Avellaneda predictions. Moreover, it was found that the contribution of the singularities does not alter the parameters of the classical theory by Johnson et al..

  11. Disruption of microalgal cells using high-frequency focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao; Jiang, Xiaoning; Jing, Yun; Wang, Zhuochen

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of high-frequency focused ultrasound (HFFU) in microalgal cell disruption. Two microalgal species including Scenedesmus dimorphus and Nannochloropsis oculata were treated by a 3.2-MHz, 40-W focused ultrasound and a 100-W, low-frequency (20kHz) non-focused ultrasound (LFNFU). The results demonstrated that HFFU was effective in the disruption of microalgal cells, indicated by significantly increased lipid fluorescence density, the decrease of cell sizes, and the increase of chlorophyll a fluorescence density after treatments. Compared with LFNFU, HFFU treatment was more energy efficient. The combination of high and low frequency treatments was found to be even more effective than single frequency treatment at the same processing time, indicating that frequency played a critical role in cell disruption. In both HFFU and LFNFU treatments, the effectiveness of cell disruption was found to be dependent on the cell treated. PMID:24374364

  12. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2002-01-01

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  13. ICD lead failure detection through high frequency impedance.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, Daniel T; Swerdlow, Charles D; Kroll, Mark W; Seifert, Gregory J; Lichter, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    Abrasion-induced insulation breach is a common failure mode of silicone-body, transvenous, implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. It is caused either by external compression or internal motion of conducting cables. The present method of monitoring lead integrity measures low frequency conductor impedance. It cannot detect insulation failures until both the silicone lead body and inner fluoropolymer insulation have been breached completely, exposing conductors directly to blood or tissue. Thus the first clinical presentation may be either failure to deliver a life-saving shock or painful, inappropriate shocks in normal rhythm. We present a new method for identifying lead failure based on high frequency impedance measurements. This method was evaluated in 3D electromagnetic simulation and bench testing to identify insulation defects in the St. Jude Medical Riata® lead, which is prone to insulation breach. PMID:25571482

  14. High-Frequency Cutoff in Type III Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.; Koval, A. A.

    In this article we report about a group of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff, observed on 19 August of 2012 near 8:23 UT, simultaneously by three different radio telescopes: the Ukrainian decameter radio telescope (8-33 MHz), the French Nancay Decametric Array (10-70 MHz) and the Italian San Vito Solar Observatory of RSTN (25-180 MHz). Morphologically the bursts are very similar to the type III bursts. The solar activity is connected with the emergency of a new group of solar spots on the far side of the Sun with respect to observers on Earth. The solar bursts accompany many moderate flares over eastern limb. The refraction of the behind-limb radio bursts towards the Earth is favorable, if CMEs generate low-density cavities in solar corona.

  15. Design and development of mode launcher for high frequency Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K.; Khatun, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and development of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher for high frequency and high power Gyrotron. A Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for converting TE22,6 mode to a Gaussian mode has been designed for 120 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron. The initial design of mode launcher has been optimized using LOT/SURF-3D software. The mode launcher diameter and length are optimized considering the minimum return loss and the minimum insertion loss by using CST microwave studio. The return loss (S11) and insertion loss (S21) performance of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher have been obtained using CST-Microwave Studio. The fabrication of Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for 120 GHz Gyrotron has also been carried out.

  16. Graphene Quantum Capacitors for High Frequency Tunable Analog Applications.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Clara F; Vitale, Wolfgang A; Sharma, Pankaj; Tamagnone, Michele; Mosig, Juan R; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2016-08-10

    Graphene quantum capacitors (GQC) are demonstrated to be enablers of radio-frequency (RF) functions through voltage-tuning of their capacitance. We show that GQC complements MEMS and MOSFETs in terms of performance for high frequency analog applications and tunability. We propose a CMOS compatible fabrication process and report the first experimental assessment of their performance at microwaves frequencies (up to 10 GHz), demonstrating experimental GQCs in the pF range with a tuning ratio of 1.34:1 within 1.25 V, and Q-factors up to 12 at 1 GHz. The figures of merit of graphene variable capacitors are studied in detail from 150 to 350 K. Furthermore, we describe a systematic, graphene specific approach to optimize their performance and predict the figures of merit achieved if such a methodology is applied. PMID:27387370

  17. Black phosphorus nanoelectromechanical resonators vibrating at very high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xuqian; Yang, Rui; Wang, Zefang; Ye, G J; Chen, X H; Shan, Jie; Feng, Philip X-L

    2015-01-21

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a new type of nanoelectromechanical resonator based on black phosphorus crystals. Facilitated by a highly efficient dry transfer technique, crystalline black phosphorus flakes are harnessed to enable drumhead resonators vibrating at high and very high frequencies (HF and VHF bands, up to ∼100 MHz). We investigate the resonant vibrational responses from the black phosphorus crystals by devising both electrical and optical excitation schemes, in addition to measuring the undriven thermomechanical motions in these suspended nanostructures. Flakes with thicknesses from ∼200 nm down to ∼20 nm clearly exhibit elastic characteristics transitioning from the plate to the membrane regime. Both frequency- and time-domain measurements of the nanomechanical resonances show that very thin black phosphorus crystals hold interesting potential for moveable and vibratory devices and for semiconductor transducers where high-speed mechanical motions could be coupled to the attractive electronic and optoelectronic properties of black phosphorus. PMID:25385657

  18. An experimental investigation of helicopter rotor high frequency broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A.; Aravamudan, K. S.; Bauer, P.; Harris, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes experiments involving a 4.17 foot diameter model rotor operating in a 5 times 7.5 ft open jet wind tunnel enclosed in an anechoic chamber. The effects of rotor thrust, advance ratio, and the number of blades on the intensity and spectrum of high frequency broadband noise (HFBN) have been investigated. The effects of each parameter were determined by keeping the other two constant. The directivities of the two- and three-bladed rotors were measured in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the rotor disk. The effects of heading edge, pressure side, and suction side serrations on HFBN were measured under several operating conditions, and the effects of the serrations on the mean thrust generated by the rotor were studied. A scaling law is proposed to determine the location of the peak frequency and intensity of HFBN.

  19. High frequency ultrasonic characterization of sintered SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Generazio, Edward R.; Kiser, James D.

    1987-01-01

    High frequency (60 to 160 MHz) ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation was used to characterize variations in density and microstructural constituents of sintered SiC bars. Ultrasonic characterization methods included longitudinal velocity, reflection coefficient, and precise attenuation measurements. The SiC bars were tailored to provide bulk densities ranging from 90 to 98 percent of theoretical, average grain sizes ranging from 3.0 to 12.0 microns, and average pore sizes ranging from 1.5 to 4.0 microns. Velocity correlated with specimen bulk density irrespective of specimen average grain size, average pore size, and average pore orientation. Attenuation coefficient was found to be sensitive to both density and average pore size variations, but was not affected by large differences in average grain size.

  20. Development of a Multi-Channel, High Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DePalma, Jude L.

    2003-01-01

    With the advent of the ISS era and the potential requirement for increased cardiovascular monitoring of crewmembers during extended EVAs, NASA flight surgeons would stand to benefit from an evolving technology that allows for a more rapid diagnosis of myocardial ischemia compared to standard electrocardiography. Similarly, during the astronaut selection process, NASA flight surgeons and other physicians would also stand to benefit from a completely noninvasive technology that, either at rest or during maximal exercise tests, is more sensitive than standard ECG in identifying the presence of ischemia. Perhaps most importantly, practicing cardiologists and emergency medicine physicians could greatly benefit from such a device as it could augment (or even replace) standard electrocardiography in settings where the rapid diagnosis of myocardial ischemia (or the lack thereof) is required for proper clinical decision-making. A multi-channel, high-frequency QRS electrocardiograph is currently under development in the Life Sciences Research Laboratories at JSC. Specifically the project consisted of writing software code, some of which contained specially-designed digital filters, which will be incorporated into an existing commercial software program that is already designed to collect, plot and analyze conventional 12-lead ECG signals on a desktop, portable or palm PC. The software will derive the high-frequency QRS signals, which will be analyzed (in numerous ways) and plotted alongside of the conventional ECG signals, giving the PC-viewing clinician advanced diagnostic information that has never been available previously in all 12 ECG leads simultaneously. After the hardware and software for the advanced digital ECG monitor have been fully integrated, plans are to use the monitor to begin clinical studies both on healthy subjects and on patients with known coronary artery disease in both the outpatient and hospital settings. The ultimate goal is to get the technology

  1. The Influence of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves Upon Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Lawrence S.; Baker, Robert M. L.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a theory for the possible influence of high-frequency gravitational waves or HFGWs and pulsed micro-current electromagnetic waves or EMs on biological matter specifically on muscle cells and myofibroblasts. The theory involves consideration of the natural frequency of contractions and relaxations of muscles, especially underlying facial skin, and the possible influence of HFGWs on that process. GWs pass without attenuation through all material thus conventional wisdom would dictate that GWs would have no influence on biological matter. On the other hand, GWs can temporarily modify a gravitational field in some locality if they are of high frequency and such a modification might have an influence in changing the skin muscles' natural frequency. Prior to the actual laboratory generation of HFGWs their influence can be emulated by micro-current EM pulses to the skin and some evidence presented here on that effect may predict the influence of HFGWs. We believe that the HFGW pulsations lead to increased muscle activity and may serve to reverse the aging process. A novel theoretical framework concerning these relaxation phenomena is one result of the paper. Another result is the analysis of the possible delivery system of the FBAR-generated HFGWs, the actual power of the generated HFGWs, and the system's application to nanostructural modification of the skin or muscle cells. It is concluded that a series of non-evasive experiments, which are identified, will have the potential to test theory by detecting and analyzing the possible HFGWs change in polarization, refraction, etc. after their interaction with the muscle cells.

  2. Multitaper spectral analysis of high-frequency seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeffrey; Lindberg, Craig R.; Vernon, Frank L., III

    1987-11-01

    Spectral estimation procedures which employ several prolate spheroidal sequences as tapers have been shown to yield better results than standard single-taper spectral analysis when used on a variety of engineering data. We apply the adaptive multitaper spectral estimation method of Thomson (1982) to a number of high-resolution digital seismic records and compare the results to those obtained using standard single-taper spectral estimates. Single-taper smoothed-spectrum estimates are plagued by a trade-off between the variance of the estimate and the bias caused by spectral leakage. Applying a taper to reduce bias discards data, increasing the variance of the estimate. Using a taper also unevenly samples the record. Throwing out data from the ends of the record can result in a spectral estimate which does not adequately represent the character of the spectrum of nonstationary processes like seismic waveforms. For example, a discrete Fourier transform of an untapered record (i.e., using a boxcar taper) produces a reasonable spectral estimate of the large-amplitude portion of the seismic source spectrum but cannot be trusted to provide a good estimate of the high-frequency roll-off. A discrete Fourier transform of the record multiplied by a more severe taper (like the Hann taper) which is resistant to spectral leakage leads to a reliable estimate of high-frequency spectral roll-off, but this estimate weights the analyzed data unequally. Therefore single-taper estimators which are less affected by leakage not only have increased variance but also can misrepresent the spectra of nonstationary data. The adaptive multitaper algorithm automatically adjusts between these extremes. We demonstrate its advantages using 16-bit seismic data recorded by instruments in the Anza Telemetered Seismic Network. We also present an analysis demonstrating the superiority of the multitaper algorithm in providing low-variance spectral estimates with good leakage resistance which do not

  3. High Frequency Dynamics in Hemoglobin Measured by Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Ken; Van-Quynh, Alexandra; Bryant, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles for formate, acetate, and water protons are reported for aqueous solutions of hemoglobin singly and doubly labeled with a nitroxide and mercury(II) ion at cysteines at β-93. Using two spin labels, one nuclear and one electron spin, a long intramolecular vector is defined between the two β-93 positions in the protein. The paramagnetic contributions to the observed 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate constant are isolated from the magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles obtained on a dual-magnet apparatus that provides spectral density functions characterizing fluctuations sensed by intermoment dipolar interactions in the time range from the tens of microseconds to ∼1 ps. Both formate and acetate ions are found to bind specifically within 5 Å of the β-93 spin-label position and the relaxation dispersion has inflection points corresponding to correlation times of 30 ps and 4 ns for both ions. The 4-ns motion is identified with exchange of the anions from the site, whereas the 30-ps correlation time is identified with relative motions of the spin label and the bound anion in the protein environment close to β-93. The magnetic field dependence of the paramagnetic contributions in both cases is well described by a simple Lorentzian spectral density function; no peaks in the spectral density function are observed. Therefore, the high frequency motions of the protein monitored by the intramolecular vector defined by the electron and nuclear spin are well characterized by a stationary random function of time. Attempts to examine long vector fluctuations by employing electron spin and nuclear spin double-labeling techniques did not yield unambiguous characterization of the high frequency motions of the vector between β-93 positions on different chains. PMID:15475581

  4. The Influence of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves Upon Muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, Lawrence S.; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr

    2007-01-30

    The objective of this paper is to present a theory for the possible influence of high-frequency gravitational waves or HFGWs and pulsed micro-current electromagnetic waves or EMs on biological matter specifically on muscle cells and myofibroblasts. The theory involves consideration of the natural frequency of contractions and relaxations of muscles, especially underlying facial skin, and the possible influence of HFGWs on that process. GWs pass without attenuation through all material thus conventional wisdom would dictate that GWs would have no influence on biological matter. On the other hand, GWs can temporarily modify a gravitational field in some locality if they are of high frequency and such a modification might have an influence in changing the skin muscles' natural frequency. Prior to the actual laboratory generation of HFGWs their influence can be emulated by micro-current EM pulses to the skin and some evidence presented here on that effect may predict the influence of HFGWs. We believe that the HFGW pulsations lead to increased muscle activity and may serve to reverse the aging process. A novel theoretical framework concerning these relaxation phenomena is one result of the paper. Another result is the analysis of the possible delivery system of the FBAR-generated HFGWs, the actual power of the generated HFGWs, and the system's application to nanostructural modification of the skin or muscle cells. It is concluded that a series of non-evasive experiments, which are identified, will have the potential to test theory by detecting and analyzing the possible HFGWs change in polarization, refraction, etc. after their interaction with the muscle cells.

  5. [Technological characteristics of endoscopic high frequency current and laser interventions].

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1993-01-01

    High frequency current and laser radiation perform two possibilities to generate therapeutic and surgical heat. The integration of these two technologies into endoscopy resulted in important ancillary techniques in the hands of a surgeon. Starting from the principal methods for coagulation and dissection of tissue the respective technological aspects at the interaction of high frequency currents and intensive laser radiation with different wavelengths on biological tissue are illustrated. Mono- and bipolar HF-techniques as well as the light-guide assisted laser method in the contact and non-contact mode are explained. The special problems in endoscopy arising from the reduction in visibility by haemorrhages and the development of smoke at the thermally induced coagulation may be overcome successfully by the simultaneous instillation of a nearly isolating liquid during the HF-treatment. The so-called electrohydrothermosation (EHT) method is presented and several probes and instruments for endoscopic hemostasis and microsurgery are explained. For an increase in safety at the endoscopic application of HF-current the use of the bipolar technique is recommended and several technological developments used in this mode are pointed out. It is shown that the absorption of radiation through the water-content of the tissue is mainly responsible for the reactions which may be produced with laser-light. Furthermore it is mentioned that the range of lasers which might be used has a large spectrum of medical applications which had been even increased especially by the new erbium and holmium solid state lasers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8147152

  6. Electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Schnitzer, Ory

    2013-01-01

    We provide a macroscale description of electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies, where chemical reactions at the electrodes are negligible. Using a thin-double-layer approximation, our starting point is the set of macroscale equations governing the “bounded” configuration comprising of a particle suspended between two electrodes, wherein the electrodes are governed by a capacitive charging condition and the imposed voltage is expressed as an integral constraint. In the large-cell limit the bounded model is transformed into an effectively equivalent “unbounded” model describing the interaction between the particle and a single electrode, where the imposed-voltage condition is manifested in a uniform field at infinity together with a Robin-type condition applying at the electrode. This condition, together with the standard no-flux condition applying at the particle surface, leads to a linear problem governing the electric potential in the fluid domain in which the dimensionless frequency ω of the applied voltage appears as a governing parameter. In the high-frequency limit ω≫1 the flow is dominated by electro-osmotic slip at the particle surface, the contribution of electrode electro-osmosis being O(ω-2) small. That simplification allows for a convenient analytical investigation of the prevailing case where the clearance between the particle and the adjacent electrode is small. Use of tangent-sphere coordinates allows to calculate the electric and flows fields as integral Hankel transforms. At large distances from the particle, along the electrode, both fields decay with the fourth power of distance.

  7. High-Frequency Testing of Composite Fan Vanes With Erosion-Resistant Coating Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Sutter, James K.; Naik, Subhash; Otten, Kim D.; Perusek, Gail P.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical integrity of hard, erosion-resistant coatings were tested using the Structural Dynamics Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Under the guidance of Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch personnel, fixturing and test procedures were developed at Glenn to simulate engine vibratory conditions on coated polymer-matrix- composite bypass vanes using a slip table in the Structural Dynamics Laboratory. Results from the high-frequency mechanical bench testing, along with concurrent erosion testing of coupons and vanes, provided sufficient confidence to engine-endurance test similarly coated vane segments. The knowledge gained from this program will be applied to the development of oxidation- and erosion-resistant coatings for polymer matrix composite blades and vanes in future advanced turbine engines. Fan bypass vanes from the AE3007 (Rolls Royce America, Indianapolis, IN) gas turbine engine were coated by Engelhard (Windsor, CT) with compliant bond coatings and hard ceramic coatings. The coatings were developed collaboratively by Glenn and Allison Advanced Development Corporation (AADC)/Rolls Royce America through research sponsored by the High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Project (HITEMP) and the Higher Operating Temperature Propulsion Components (HOTPC) project. High-cycle fatigue was performed through high-frequency vibratory testing on a shaker table. Vane resonant frequency modes were surveyed from 50 to 3000 Hz at input loads from 1g to 55g on both uncoated production vanes and vanes with the erosion-resistant coating. Vanes were instrumented with both lightweight accelerometers and strain gauges to establish resonance, mode shape, and strain amplitudes. Two high-frequency dwell conditions were chosen to excite two strain levels: one approaching the vane's maximum allowable design strain and another near the expected maximum strain during engine operation. Six specimens were tested per dwell condition. Pretest and posttest

  8. High-frequency observations of δ2H and δ18O in storm rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoecker, F.; Klaus, J.; Pangle, L. A.; Garland, C.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Stable isotopes ratios of hydrogen (2H/1H) and oxygen (18O/16O) are indispensable tools for investigation of the hydrologic cycle. Recent technological advances with laser spectroscopy now enable high-frequency measurement of key water cycle components. While the controls on rainfall isotope composition have been known generally for some time, our understanding of the effect of inter- and intra-storm processes on fine scale rainfall isotope composition is poorly understood. Here we present a new approach to observe inter- and intra-storm isotope variability in precipitation in high-frequency. We investigate the temporal development of δ2H and δ18O within and between discrete rainstorm. δ2H and δ18O in precipitation was measured from November 2011 to February 2012 in Corvallis, OR using a flow-cell combined with a Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer (LWIA-24d, Los Gatos Research, Inc.). The average sample frequency was 15 samples per hour, resulting in more than 3100 samples during the observation period. 27 separate rainstorms were identified in the dataset based on minimum inter-event time, minimum precipitation depth, and minimum number of isotope measurements. Event meteoric water lines were developed for each event. We observed short-term isotopic patterns (e.g., V-shaped trends), high-rate changes (5.3‰/h) and large absolute changes in isotopic composition (20‰) on intra-event scale. V-shaped trends appeared to be related to individual storm fronts detected by air temperature, cloud heights (NEXRAD radar echo tops) and cloud trajectories (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT)). Despite this, we could detect no linear correlation between event-based isotopic variables (slope, δ2H-intercept, δ2H, δ18O) and the event meteoric water line. Furthermore, the composite event meteoric water line (i.e. the local meteoric water line) showed a wider spread for heavy isotopes than for light isotopes, caused presumably by different

  9. Trace metal cycling and 238U/235U in New Zealand's fjords: Implications for reconstructing global paleoredox conditions in organic-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Jessica L.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Reid, Malcolm R.; Moy, Christopher M.; Wilson, Gary S.

    2016-04-01

    Reconstructing the history of ocean oxygenation provides insight into links between ocean anoxia, biogeochemical cycles, and climate. Certain redox-sensitive elements respond to changes in marine oxygen content through phase shifts and concomitant isotopic fractionation, providing new diagnostic proxies of past ocean hypoxia. Here we explore the behavior and inter-dependence of a suite of commonly utilized redox-sensitive trace metals (U, Mo, Fe, and Mn) and the emerging "stable" isotope system of U (238U/235U, or δ238U) in New Zealand fjords. These semi-restricted basins have chemical conditions spanning the complete redox spectrum from fully oxygenated to suboxic to intermittently anoxic/euxinic. In the anoxic water column, U and Mo concentrations decrease, while Fe and Mn concentrations increase. Similarly, signals of past euxinic conditions can be found by U, Mo, Fe, and Mn enrichment in the underlying sediments. The expected U isotopic shift toward a lower δ238U in the anoxic water column due to U(VI)-U(IV) reduction is not observed; instead, water column δ238U profiles are consistent in fjords of all oxygen content, falling within previously reported ranges for open ocean seawater (δ238U = -0.42 ± 0.07‰). Additionally, surface sediment δ238U results show evidence for competing U isotope fractionation processes. One site indicates increased export of 238U from seawater to the underlying sediments (fractionation between aqueous seawater U and particulate sediment U, or ΔU(aq)-U(solid) = -0.25‰), consistent with redox-driven fractionation. Another site suggests potential U(VI) adsorption-driven fractionation, reflecting increased export of 235U from seawater to sediments (ΔU(aq)-U(solid) = 0.25‰). We discuss several potential factors that could alter δ238U in waters and sediments beyond redox-driven shifts, including adsorption to organic matter in waters of high primary productivity, reaction rates for competing processes of U adsorption and

  10. A noninvasive high frequency oscillation ventilator: Achieved by utilizing a blower and a valve.

    PubMed

    Yuan, YueYang; Sun, JianGuo; Wang, Baicun; Feng, Pei; Yang, ChongChang

    2016-02-01

    After the High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (HFOV) has been applied in the invasive ventilator, the new technique of noninvasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (nHFOV) which does not require opening the patient's airway has attracted much attention from the field. This paper proposes the design of an experimental positive pressure-controlled nHFOV ventilator which utilizes a blower and a special valve and has three ventilation modes: spontaneous controlled ventilation combining HFOV, time-cycled ventilation combining HFOV (T-HFOV), and continuous positive airway pressure ventilation combining HFOV. Experiments on respiratory model are conducted and demonstrated the feasibility of using nHFOV through the control of fan and valve. The experimental ventilator is able to produce an air flow with small tidal volume (VT) and a large minute ventilation volume (MV) using regular breath tubes and nasal mask (e.g., under T-HFOV mode, with a maximum tidal volume of 100 ml, the minute ventilation volume reached 14 400 ml). In the process of transmission, there is only a minor loss of oscillation pressure. (Under experimental condition and with an oscillation frequency of 2-10 Hz, peak pressure loss was around 0%-50% when it reaches the mask.). PMID:26931897

  11. Single Stock Dynamics on High-Frequency Data: From a Compressed Coding Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fushing, Hsieh; Chen, Shu-Chun; Hwang, Chii-Ruey

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS), and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors. PMID:24586235

  12. Single stock dynamics on high-frequency data: from a compressed coding perspective.

    PubMed

    Fushing, Hsieh; Chen, Shu-Chun; Hwang, Chii-Ruey

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS), and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors. PMID:24586235

  13. A noninvasive high frequency oscillation ventilator: Achieved by utilizing a blower and a valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, YueYang; Sun, JianGuo; Wang, Baicun; Feng, Pei; Yang, ChongChang

    2016-02-01

    After the High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (HFOV) has been applied in the invasive ventilator, the new technique of noninvasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (nHFOV) which does not require opening the patient's airway has attracted much attention from the field. This paper proposes the design of an experimental positive pressure-controlled nHFOV ventilator which utilizes a blower and a special valve and has three ventilation modes: spontaneous controlled ventilation combining HFOV, time-cycled ventilation combining HFOV (T-HFOV), and continuous positive airway pressure ventilation combining HFOV. Experiments on respiratory model are conducted and demonstrated the feasibility of using nHFOV through the control of fan and valve. The experimental ventilator is able to produce an air flow with small tidal volume (VT) and a large minute ventilation volume (MV) using regular breath tubes and nasal mask (e.g., under T-HFOV mode, with a maximum tidal volume of 100 ml, the minute ventilation volume reached 14 400 ml). In the process of transmission, there is only a minor loss of oscillation pressure. (Under experimental condition and with an oscillation frequency of 2-10 Hz, peak pressure loss was around 0%-50% when it reaches the mask.)

  14. High-frequency ultrasound M-mode monitoring of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, R. E.; Gudur, M. S. R.; Zhou, Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2012-10-01

    Effective real-time HIFU lesion detection is important for expanded use of HIFU in interventional electrophysiology (e.g., epicardial ablation of cardiac arrhythmia). The goal of this study was to investigate rapid, high-frequency M-mode ultrasound imaging for monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tissue during HIFU application. The HIFU application (4.33 MHz, 1000 Hz PRF, 50% duty cycle, 1 s exposure, 6100 W/cm2) was perpendicularly applied to porcine cardiac tissue with a high-frequency imaging system (Visualsonics Vevo 770, 55 MHz, 4.5 mm focal distance) confocally aligned. Radiofrequency (RF) M-mode data (1 kHz PRF, 4 s × 7 mm) was acquired before, during, and after HIFU treatment. Gross lesions were compared with M-mode data to correlate lesion and cavity formation. Integrated backscatter, echo-decorrelation parameters, and their cumulative extrema over time were analyzed for automatically identifying lesion width and bubble formation. Cumulative maximum integrated backscatter showed the best results for identifying the final lesion width, and a criterion based on line-to-line decorrelation was proposed for identification of transient bubble activity.

  15. Endogenic carbonate sedimentation in Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho, over the last two glacial-interglacial cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Sediments deposited over the past 220,000 years in Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho, are predominantly calcareous silty clay, with calcite as the dominant carbonate mineral. The abundance of siliciclastic sediment indicates that the Bear River usually was connected to Bear Lake. However, three marl intervals containing more than 50% CaCO3 were deposited during the Holocene and the last two interglacial intervals, equivalent to marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 5 and 7, indicating times when the Bear River was not connected to the lake. Aragonite is the dominant mineral in two of these three high-carbonate intervals. The high-carbonate, aragonitic intervals coincide with warm interglacial continental climates and warm Pacific sea-surface temperatures. Aragonite also is the dominant mineral in a carbonate-cemented microbialite mound that formed in the southwestern part of the lake over the last several thousand years. The history of carbonate sedimentation in Bear Lake is documented through the study of isotopic ratios of oxygen, carbon, and strontium, organic carbon content, CaCO3 content, X-ray diffraction mineralogy, and HCl-leach chemistry on samples from sediment traps, gravity cores, piston cores, drill cores, and microbialites. Sediment-trap studies show that the carbonate mineral that precipitates in the surface waters of the lake today is high-Mg calcite. The lake began to precipitate high-Mg calcite sometime in the mid-twentieth century after the artificial diversion of Bear River into Bear Lake that began in 1911. This diversion drastically reduced the salinity and Mg2+:Ca2+ of the lake water and changed the primary carbonate precipitate from aragonite to high-Mg calcite. However, sediment-trap and core studies show that aragonite is the dominant mineral accumulating on the lake floor today, even though it is not precipitating in surface waters. The isotopic studies show that this aragonite is derived from reworking and redistribution of shallow-water sediment

  16. Organic carbon cycling in sediments of the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent shelf: Implication for the influence of Three Gorges Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Yao, Peng; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Zhang, Tingting; Zhao, Bin; Pan, Huihui; Wang, Jinpeng; Yu, Zhigang

    2014-11-01

    Surface sediments collected from the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent shelf were analyzed for elemental and stable carbon isotopic composition, and lignin-phenols to investigate spatial variability of the sources, transport and decay of sedimentary organic carbon (OC). Bulk and molecular proxy data indicated a mixed marine/terrestrial OC sources in the study area. A three end-member mixing model using Monte-Carlo simulation showed that marine OC was the predominant OC source, accounting for an increasing fraction along the coast and seaward, while soil-derived OC and C3 vascular plant detrital OC decreased seaward and southward. Large fragments of lignin-rich C3 vascular plant OC were deposited mainly near the river mouth, whereas fine-grained lignin-poor soil-derived OC was delivered further south alongshore. Higher values of lignin decay indices, seaward and southward, were attributed to selective transport of terrestrial OC on fine-grained particles and efficient remineralization in mobile muds. Λ8 of OC in Changjiang Estuary sediments has slightly decreased in recent years, which could in part be due to the trapping of terrestrial coarse particles by the Three Gorges Dam (TGD). Also, we propose that there has been an increasing input of phytodetritus derived from freshwater phytoplankton to coastal sediments after the construction of the TGD.

  17. Sub-MIlankovitch millennial and decadal cyclicity in Middle Eocene deep-marine laminated sediments, Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotchman, J. I.; Pickering, K. T.; Robinson, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    James I. Scotchman1, Kevin T. Pickering1 & Stuart A. Robinson1 1Department of Earth Sciences, UCL (University College London), Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, U.K. Climate variability on the scale of millennia has become conspicuous within Quaternary records with far fewer such records existing within the pre-Pleistocene geological record. We identify millennial and decadal cyclicity in deep-marine siliciclastic (turbiditic and hemipelagic) sediments from a core in the middle Eocene Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Outcrop spectral gamma-ray data from laterally adjacent and age-equivalent strata to the core, together with a re-analysis of bioturbation data from the core, identifies the three main Milankovitch orbital periods. From this data, we derive a robust sediment accumulation rate for these sediments of 27.5 cm/kyr. Spectral analysis of data from high-resolution multi-element XRF scanning of a ~10 m-thick stratigraphic interval of fine-grained laminated sediments reveals the presence of various high-frequency cycles mainly above the 99% confidence level. Applying our derived sediment accumulation rate yields sub-Milankovitch millennial-scale cycles (~5,400, ~2,800, and ~1,000 yr) and decadal (~90, ~50, and ~30 yr) cycles split between allogenic and authigenic deposition. These cycles are manifest in the core as grain-size variations. The ~5,400 and ~2,800 yr cycles, recorded by elemental (Al, K, Ca and Fe) and element/Al ratios (Si/Al, Ca/Al and Zr/Al) are interpreted as representing climatically-driven variation in sediment supply to the deep-marine Ainsa basin. Higher-frequency decadal cycles are coincident with well-known Gleissberg solar cycles or possible multiples of the 11-year Schwabe cycle although how these cycles are expressed within these sediments remains unclear.

  18. High resolution chronology of late Cretaceous-early Tertiary events determined from 21,000 yr orbital-climatic cycles in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, Timothy D.; Dhondt, Steven

    1988-01-01

    A number of South Atlantic sites cored by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) recovered late Cretaceous and early Tertiary sediments with alternating light-dark, high-low carbonate content. The sedimentary oscillations were turned into time series by digitizing color photographs of core segments at a resolution of about 5 points/cm. Spectral analysis of these records indicates prominent periodicity at 25 to 35 cm in the Cretaceous intervals, and about 15 cm in the early Tertiary sediments. The absolute period of the cycles that is determined from paleomagnetic calibration at two sites is 20,000 to 25,000 yr, and almost certainly corresponds to the period of the earth's precessional cycle. These sequences therefore contain an internal chronometer to measure events across the K/T extinction boundary at this scale of resolution. The orbital metronome was used to address several related questions: the position of the K/T boundary within magnetic chron 29R, the fluxes of biogenic and detrital material to the deep sea immediately before and after the K/T event, the duration of the Sr anomaly, and the level of background climatic variability in the latest Cretaceous time. The carbonate/color cycles that were analyzed contain primary records of ocean carbonate productivity and chemistry, as evidenced by bioturbational mixing of adjacent beds and the weak lithification of the rhythmic sequences. It was concluded that sedimentary sequences that contain orbital cyclicity are capable of providing resolution of dramatic events in earth history with much greater precision than obtainable through radiometric methods. The data show no evidence for a gradual climatic deterioration prior to the K/T extinction event, and argue for a geologically rapid revolution at this horizon.

  19. Black phosphorus nanoelectromechanical resonators vibrating at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xuqian; Yang, Rui; Wang, Zefang; Ye, G. J.; Chen, X. H.; Shan, Jie; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a new type of nanoelectromechanical resonator based on black phosphorus crystals. Facilitated by a highly efficient dry transfer technique, crystalline black phosphorus flakes are harnessed to enable drumhead resonators vibrating at high and very high frequencies (HF and VHF bands, up to ~100 MHz). We investigate the resonant vibrational responses from the black phosphorus crystals by devising both electrical and optical excitation schemes, in addition to measuring the undriven thermomechanical motions in these suspended nanostructures. Flakes with thicknesses from ~200 nm down to ~20 nm clearly exhibit elastic characteristics transitioning from the plate to the membrane regime. Both frequency- and time-domain measurements of the nanomechanical resonances show that very thin black phosphorus crystals hold interesting potential for moveable and vibratory devices and for semiconductor transducers where high-speed mechanical motions could be coupled to the attractive electronic and optoelectronic properties of black phosphorus.We report on the experimental demonstration of a new type of nanoelectromechanical resonator based on black phosphorus crystals. Facilitated by a highly efficient dry transfer technique, crystalline black phosphorus flakes are harnessed to enable drumhead resonators vibrating at high and very high frequencies (HF and VHF bands, up to ~100 MHz). We investigate the resonant vibrational responses from the black phosphorus crystals by devising both electrical and optical excitation schemes, in addition to measuring the undriven thermomechanical motions in these suspended nanostructures. Flakes with thicknesses from ~200 nm down to ~20 nm clearly exhibit elastic characteristics transitioning from the plate to the membrane regime. Both frequency- and time-domain measurements of the nanomechanical resonances show that very thin black phosphorus crystals hold interesting potential for moveable and vibratory

  20. Novel high frequency devices with graphene and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei

    This work focuses on exploring new materials and new device structures to develop novel devices that can operate at very high speed. In chapter 2, the high frequency performance limitations of graphene transistor with channel length less than 100 nm are explored. The simulated results predict that intrinsic cutoff frequency fT of graphene transistor can be close to 2 THz at 15 nm channel length. In chapter 3, we explored the possibility of developing a 2D materials based vertical tunneling device. An analytical model to calculate the channel potentials and current-voltage characteristics in a Symmetric tunneling Field-Effect-Transistor (SymFET) is presented. The symmetric resonant peak in SymFET is a good candidate for high-speed analog applications. Rest of the work focuses on Gallium Nitride (GaN), several novel device concepts based on GaN heterostructure have been proposed for high frequency and high power applications. In chapter 4, we compared the performance of GaN Schottky diodes on bulk GaN substrates and GaN-on-sapphire substrates. In addition, we also discussed the lateral GaN Schottky diode between metal/2DEGs. The advantage of lateral GaN Schottky diodes is the intrinsic cutoff frequency is in the THz range. In chapter 5, a GaN Heterostructure barrier diode (HBD) is designed using the polarization charge and band offset at the AlGaN/GaN heterojunction. The polarization charge at AlGaN/GaN interface behaves as a delta-doping which induces a barrier without any chemical doping. The IV characteristics can be explained by the barrier controlled thermionic emission current. GaN HBDs can be directly integrated with GaN HEMTs, and serve as frequency multipliers or mixers for RF applications. In chapter 6, a GaN based negative effective mass oscillator (NEMO) is proposed. The current in NEMO is estimated under the ballistic limits. Negative differential resistances (NDRs) can be observed with more than 50% of the injected electrons occupied the negative

  1. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Corrado; J.E. Bondaryk; V. Godino

    1998-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and Ieaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containment in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify a technique(s) for inspection of inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary. Acoustic imaging has been identified as one of these potential techniques. A numerical feasibility study investigated the use of high-frequency bistatic acoustic imaging techniques for inspection of inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary of nuclear power plant containment. The range-dependent version of the OASES Code developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was utilized to perform a series of numerical simulations. OASES is a well developed and extensively tested code for evaluation of the acoustic field in a system of stratified fluid and/or elastic layers. Using the code, an arbitrary number of fluid or solid elastic layers are interleaved, with the outer layers modeled as halfspaces. High frequency vibrational sources were modeled to simulate elastic waves in the steel. The received field due to an arbitrary source array can be calculated at arbitrary depth and range positions. In this numerical study, waves that reflect and scatter from surface roughness caused by modeled degradations (e.g., corrosion) are detected and used to identify and map the steel degradation. Variables in the numerical study included frequency, flaw size, interrogation distance, and sensor incident angle.Based on these analytical simulations, it is considered unlikely that acoustic imaging technology can be used to investigate embedded steel liners of reinforced concrete containment. The thin steel liner and high signal losses to the concrete make this application difficult. Results for portions of steel containment

  2. Impact of longer-term modest climate shifts on architecture of high-frequency sequences (Cyclothems), Pennsylvanian of midcontinent U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feldman, H.R.; Franseen, E.K.; Joeckel, R.M.; Heckel, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Pennsylvanian glacioeustatic cyclothems exposed in Kansas and adjacent areas provide a unique opportunity to test models of the impact of relative sea level and climate on stratal architecture. A succession of eight of these high-frequency sequences, traced along dip for 500 km, reveal that modest climate shifts from relatively dry-seasonal to relatively wet-seasonal with a duration of several sequences (???600,000 to 1 million years) had a dominant impact on facies, sediment dispersal patterns, and sequence architecture. The climate shifts documented herein are intermediate, both in magnitude and duration, between previously documented longer-term climate shifts throughout much of the Pennsylvanian and shorter-term shifts described within individual sequences. Climate indicators are best preserved at sequence boundaries and in incised-valley fills of the lowstand systems tracts (LST). Relatively drier climate indicators include high-chroma paleosols, typically with pedogenic carbonates, and plant assemblages that are dominated by gymnosperms, mostly xerophytic walchian conifers. The associated valleys are small (4 km wide and >20 m deep), and dominated by quartz sandstones derived from distant source areas, reflecting large drainage networks. Transgressive systems tracts (TST) in all eight sequences gen erally are characterized by thin, extensive limestones and thin marine shales, suggesting that the dominant control on TST facies distribution was the sequestration of siliciclastic sediment in updip positions. Highstand systems tracts (HST) were significantly impacted by the intermediate-scale climate cycle in that HSTs from relatively drier climates consist of thin marine shales overlain by extensive, thick regressive limestones, whereas HSTs from relatively wetter climates are dominated by thick marine shales. Previously documented relative sea-level changes do not track the climate cycles, indicating that climate played a role distinct from that of relative sea

  3. Mercury Cycling in Agricultural and Non-agricultural Wetlands of the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, California: Sediment Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvin-Dipasquale, M. C.; Windham-Myers, L.; Alpers, C. N.; Agee, J. L.; Cox, M. H.; Kakouros, E.; Wren, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area (YBWA) is part of the larger Yolo Bypass floodwater protection zone associated with the Sacramento River and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. Land use in the YBWA consists of white and wild rice fields, seasonally flooded fallow agricultural fields, and permanently and seasonally flooded non-agricultural wetlands used for resident and migratory waterfowl. A recent assessment of mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) loads indicates that the Yolo Bypass is responsible for a high proportion of the aqueous MeHg entering the Delta, and that biota from the Yolo Bypass are considerably elevated in MeHg. The current study examines benthic MeHg production and biogeochemical controls on this process, as a function of YBWA land use, wetland management, and agricultural practices during the 2007 rice growing season (June to October). Preliminary results indicate that in the week following initial flooding of agricultural fields, prior to the establishment of rice plants, the microbial community in the 0-2 cm surface sediment zone exhibited very little potential Hg(II)-methylation activity compared to the permanent wetland habitat (as assessed via the 203Hg(II)- methylation assay). Approximately 1 month after flooding, rice plants were established and the activity of the resident Hg(II)-methylating microbial community had increased substantially in all agricultural fields, although the observed rates of MeHg production were still much lower than those observed in the permanent wetland setting. Ongoing field sampling includes analysis of reactive Hg(II) in sediments and of iron and sulfur redox species in sediments and pore waters.

  4. Release of Ni from birnessite during transformation of birnessite to todorokite: Implications for Ni cycling in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Amy L.; Shaw, Samuel; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2016-09-01

    The phyllomanganate birnessite is the main Mn-bearing phase in oxic marine sediments where it exerts a primary control on the concentration of micronutrient trace metals in seawater. However, during sediment diagenesis and under mild hydrothermal conditions birnessite transforms into the tectomanganate todorokite. We have recently shown that the transformation of birnessite to todorokite proceeds via a four-stage nucleation and growth mechanism, beginning with todorokite nucleation, then crystal growth from solution to form todorokite primary particles, followed by their self-assembly and oriented growth via oriented attachment to form crystalline todorokite laths, culminating in traditional crystal ripening (Atkins et al., 2014). Here we determine the fate and mobility of Ni sorbed by birnessite during this transformation process. Specifically, in our recent work we predict that the presence of Ni within the phyllomanganate matrix will disrupt the formation of todorokite primary particles. As such, contrary to current understanding, we suggest that Ni sorbed by birnessite will slow the transformation of birnessite to todorokite and/or be released to marine porewaters during sediment diagenesis. Here we transform a synthetic, poorly crystalline, Ni-sorbed (∼1 wt% Ni) hexagonal birnessite, analogous to marine birnessite, into todorokite under a mild reflux procedure, developed to mimic marine diagenesis and mild hydrothermal conditions. We characterise our birnessite and reflux products as a time series, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In addition we determine Ni speciation and mineral phase associations in a suite of natural marine ferromanganese precipitates, containing intermixed phyllomanganate and todorokite. Our work shows for the first time that Ni significantly slows the transformation of birnessite to todorokite and reduces the

  5. Investigations on the "Extreme" Microbial Arsenic Cycle within the Sediments of an Acidic Impoundment of the Former Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine: Herman Pit, Clear Lake, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J. S.; Hoeft McCann, S. E.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Stoneburner, B.; Saltikov, C.; Oremland, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    results indicate the presence of a viable microbial As(V)/As(III) redox cycle in the sediments of this extreme environment. Further investigations using culture-independent protocols to identify participant prokaryotes and their functional arsenic genes (e.g., aioA, arrA, arxA) are underway at this time.

  6. Prediction of high frequency gust response with airfoil thickness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysak, Peter D.; Capone, Dean E.; Jonson, Michael L.

    2013-05-01

    The unsteady lift forces that act on an airfoil in turbulent flow are an undesirable source of vibration and noise in many industrial applications. Methods to predict these forces have traditionally treated the airfoil as a flat plate. At higher frequencies, where the relevant turbulent length scales are comparable to the airfoil thickness, the flat plate approximation becomes invalid and results in overprediction of the unsteady force spectrum. This work provides an improved methodology for the prediction of the unsteady lift forces that accounts for the thickness of the airfoil. An analytical model was developed to calculate the response of the airfoil to high frequency gusts. The approach is based on a time-domain calculation with a sharp-edged gust and accounts for the distortion of the gust by the mean flow around the airfoil leading edge. The unsteady lift is calculated from a weighted integration of the gust vorticity, which makes the model relatively straightforward to implement and verify. For routine design calculations of turbulence-induced forces, a closed-form gust response thickness correction factor was developed for NACA 65 series airfoils.

  7. Detection of high frequency oscillations from space experiments and eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Dipankar; Singh, Jagdev; Hasan, Siraj; Gupta, Girjesh R.; Nagaraju, K.

    We performed high resolution spectroscopy of the solar corona during the total solar eclipse of July 22, 2009 in two emission lines, namely the red line at 530.3 nm due to [Fe xiv] and the green line at 637.4 nm due to [Fex] simultaneously from Anji, China. Two mirror coelostat with 100 cm focal length lens made 9.2 mm image of the sun. The spectrograph using 140 cm focal length lens in Littrow mode and a grating with 600 lines per mm blazed at 2 micron provided a dispersion of 30 mA and 42 mA per pixel in the 4th order around green line and 3rd order red emission line, respectively. Two Peltier cooled 1K x 1K CCD cameras with pixel size of 13 micron square and 14-bit read out at 10 MHz operated in frame transfer mode, were used to obtain the time sequence spectra in each emission lines simultaneously. We detected presence of high frequency oscillations in intensity, velocity and line widths. We also studied the variation of line widths with height. The results will be discussed in terms of different MHD waves. Possibility of detecting these oscillations from space based experiments will be addressed. India is going to launch a emission line coronagraph on a small satellite platform called Aditya. The scientific goals of Aditya in pursuit to wave detection will be presented.

  8. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  9. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry K.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  10. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-30

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials.

  11. Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  12. High Frequency Mechanical Pyroshock Simulations for Payload Systems

    SciTech Connect

    BATEMAN,VESTA I.; BROWN,FREDERICK A.; CAP,JEROME S.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.

    1999-12-15

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with components that must survive high frequency shock environments including pyrotechnic shock. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past at the payload system level because of weight limitations of traditional pyroshock mechanical simulations using resonant beams and plates. A new concept utilizing tuned resonators attached to the payload system and driven with the impact of an airgun projectile allow these simulations to be performed in the laboratory with high precision and repeatability without the use of explosives. A tuned resonator has been designed and constructed for a particular payload system. Comparison of laboratory responses with measurements made at the component locations during actual pyrotechnic events show excellent agreement for a bandwidth of DC to 4 kHz. The bases of comparison are shock spectra. This simple concept applies the mechanical pyroshock simulation simultaneously to all components with the correct boundary conditions in the payload system and is a considerable improvement over previous experimental techniques and simulations.

  13. High-frequency instability of the sheath-plasma resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    Coherent high frequency oscillations near the electron plasma frequency (omega approx. less than omega sub p) are generated by electrodes with positive dc bias immersed in a uniform Maxwellian afterglow plasma. The instability occurs at the sheath-plasma resonance and is driven by a negative RF sheath resistance associated with the electron inertia in the diode-like electron-rich sheath. With increasing dc bias, i.e., electron transit time, the instability exhibits a hard threshold, downward frequency pulling, line broadening and copious harmonics. The fundamental instability is a bounded oscillation due to wave evanescence, but the harmonics are radiated as electromagnetic waves from the electrodes acting like antennas. Wavelength and polarization measurements confirm the emission process. Electromagnetic waves are excited by electrodes of various geometries (planes, cylinders, spheres) which excludes other radiation mechanisms such as orbitrons or beam-plasma instabilities. The line broadening mechanism was identified as a frequency modulation via the electron transit time by dynamic ions. Ion oscillations at the sheath edge give rise to burst-like RF emissions. These laboratory observations of a new instability are important for antennas in space plasmas, generation of coherent beams with diodes, and plasma diagnostics.

  14. High Frequency Scattering from Arbitrarily Oriented Dielectric Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Meneghini, R.; Lang, R. H.; Seker, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations have been made of electromagnetic wave scattering from dielectric disks of arbitrary shape and orientation in the high frequency (physical optics) regime. The solution is obtained by approximating the fields inside the disk with the fields induced inside an identically oriented slab (i.e. infinite parallel planes) with the same thickness and dielectric properties. The fields inside the disk excite conduction and polarization currents which are used to calculate the scattered fields by integrating the radiation from these sources over the volume of the disk. This computation has been executed for observers in the far field of the disk in the case of disks with arbitrary orientation and for arbitrary polarization of the incident radiation. The results have been expressed in the form of a dyadic scattering amplitude for the disk. The results apply to disks whose diameter is large compared to wavelength and whose thickness is small compared to diameter, but the thickness need not be small compared to wavelength. Examples of the dependence of the scattering amplitude on frequency, dielectric properties of the disk and disk orientation are presented for disks of circular cross section.

  15. Low temperature high frequency coaxial pulse tube for space application

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, Aurelia; Charles, Ivan; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-29

    The 4K stage is a critical step for space missions. The Hershel mission is using a helium bath, which is consumed day by day (after depletion, the space mission is over) while the Plank mission is equipped with one He4 Joule-Thomson cooler. Cryogenic chain without helium bath is a challenge for space missions and 4.2K Pulse-Tube working at high frequency (around 30Hz) is one option to take it up. A low temperature Pulse-Tube would be suitable for the ESA space mission EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, expected launch in 2022), which requires around 30mW cooling power at 6K; and for the ESA space mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics), to pre-cool the sub-kelvin cooler (few hundreds of mW at 15K). The test bench described in this paper combines a Gifford-McMahon with a coaxial Pulse-Tube. A thermal link is joining the intercept of the Pulse-Tube and the second stage of the Gifford-McMahon. This intercept is a separator between the hot and the cold regenerators of the Pulse-Tube. The work has been focused on the cold part of this cold finger. Coupled with an active phase shifter, this Pulse-Tube has been tested and optimized and temperatures as low as 6K have been obtained at 30Hz with an intercept temperature at 20K.

  16. High frequency volume coils for clinical NMR imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J T; Hetherington, H P; Otu, J O; Pan, J W; Pohost, G M

    1994-08-01

    A tuned transmission line resonator has been developed in theory and in practical design for the clinical NMR volume coil application at 4.1 tesla. The distributed circuit transmission line resonator was designed for high frequency, large conductive volume applications where conventional lumped element coil designs perform less efficiently. The resonator design has made use of a resonant coaxial cavity, which could be variably tuned to the Larmor frequency of interest by tunable transmission line elements. Large head- and body-sized volumes, high efficiencies, and broad tuning ranges have been shown to be characteristic of the transmission line resonator to frequencies of 500 MHz. The B1 homogeneity of the resonator has been demonstrated to be a function of the electromagnetic properties of the load itself. By numerically solving Maxwell's equations for the fully time-dependent B1 field, coil homogeneity was predicted with finite-element models of anatomic structure, and inhomogeneities corrected for. A how-to exposition of coil design and construction has been included. Simple methods of quadrature driving and double tuning the transmission line resonator have also been presented. Human head images obtained with a tuned transmission line resonator at 175 MHz have clearly demonstrated uncompromised high field advantages of signal-to-noise and spatial resolution. PMID:7968443

  17. Refraction of high frequency noise in an arbitrary jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Krejsa, Eugene A.

    1994-01-01

    Refraction of high frequency noise by mean flow gradients in a jet is studied using the ray-tracing methods of geometrical acoustics. Both the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) formulations are considered. In the former case, the mean flow is assumed parallel and the governing propagation equations are described by a system of four first order ordinary differential equations. The 3D formulation, on the other hand, accounts for the jet spreading as well as the axial flow development. In this case, a system of six first order differential equations are solved to trace a ray from its source location to an observer in the far field. For subsonic jets with a small spreading angle both methods lead to similar results outside the zone of silence. However, with increasing jet speed the two prediction models diverge to the point where the parallel flow assumption is no longer justified. The Doppler factor of supersonic jets as influenced by the refraction effects is discussed and compared with the conventional modified Doppler factor.

  18. High frequency alternating current chip nano calorimeter with laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shoifet, E.; Schick, C.; Chua, Y. Z.; Huth, H.

    2013-07-15

    Heat capacity spectroscopy at frequencies up to 100 kHz is commonly performed by thermal effusivity measurements applying the 3ω-technique. Here we show that AC-calorimetry using a thin film chip sensor allows for the measurement of frequency dependent heat capacity in the thin film limit up to about 1 MHz. Using films thinner than the thermal length of the thermal wave (∼1 μm) at such frequencies is advantageous because it provides heat capacity alone and not in combination with other quantities like thermal conductivity, at least on a qualitative basis. The used calorimetric sensor and the sample are each less than 1 μm thick. For high frequency AC-calorimetry, high cooling rates at very small temperature differences are required. This is realized by minimizing the heated spot to the size of the on chip thermocouple (3 × 6 μm{sup 2}). A modulated laser beam shaped and positioned by a glass fiber is used as the heat source. The device was used to measure the complex heat capacity in the vicinity of the dynamic glass transition (structural relaxation) of poly(methyl methacrylate). Combining different calorimeters finally provides data between 10{sup −3} Hz and 10{sup 6} Hz. In this frequency range the dynamic glass transition shifts about 120 K.

  19. Clinical applications of very high frequency ultrasound in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Ronald H.; Coleman, D. Jackson; Reinstein, Dan Z.; Lizzi, Frederic L.

    2001-05-01

    The eye is ideally suited for diagnostic imaging with very high frequency (>35 MHz) ultrasound (VHFU) because of its peripheral location and cystic structure. VHFU allows high resolution visualization of pathologies affecting the anterior segment of the eye, including tumors, cysts, foreign bodies, and corneal pathologies. We developed a series of prototype instruments suitable for ophthalmic studies using both polymer and lithium niobate transducers, with digitization of radiofrequency echo data at up to 500 MHz. While initially using linear scan geometries, we subsequently developed an arc-shaped scan matched to the curvature of the 0.5-mm-thick cornea to circumvent the effect of specular deflection of the ultrasound beam produced by the corneas curved surface. This technique allowed us to obtain data across the entire cornea and determination of the thickness of each corneal layer, including the epithelium (approximately 50 microns in thickness) and the surgically induced interface produced in LASIK, the most common form of refractive surgery. By scanning in a series of meridians, and applying optimized signal processing strategies (deconvolution, analytic signal envelope determination), corneal pachymetric maps representing the local thickness of each layer can be generated and aid in diagnosis of surgically induced defects or refractive abnormalities.

  20. Extremely high-frequency micro-Doppler measurements of humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Silvious, Jerry L.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Green, Jeremy A.; Wikner, David A.

    2014-05-01

    The development of sensors that are capable of penetrating smoke, dust, fog, clouds, and rain is critical for maintaining situational awareness in degraded visual environments and for providing support to the Warfighter. Atmospheric penetration properties, the ability to form high-resolution imagery with modest apertures, and available source power make the extremely high-frequency (EHF) portion of the spectrum promising for the development of radio frequency (RF) sensors capable of penetrating visual obscurants. Comprehensive phenomenology studies including polarization and backscatter properties of relevant targets are lacking at these frequencies. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing a fully-polarimetric frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) instrumentation radar to explore polarization and backscatter properties of in-situ rain, scattering from natural and man-made surfaces, and the radar cross section and micro-Doppler signatures of humans at EHF frequencies, specifically, around the 220 GHz atmospheric window. This work presents an overview of the design and construction of the radar system, hardware performance, data acquisition software, and initial results including an analysis of human micro-Doppler signatures.

  1. Identifying High Frequency Peakers using the Korean VLBI Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Y.; Sohn, B. W.; Chung, A.; Park, S.; Park, P.

    2016-02-01

    High Frequency Peakers (HFPs) are known to be promising targets to study the AGN properties at their very early evolutionary stage. To date, HFP classification has been usually relied on the spectral shape with the relatively sparse or short time range monitoring. However, HFP samples are often contaminated by blazars which are compact and highly variable, and hence may behave in similar ways to HFPs. In this work, we challenge to identify genuine young AGNs by long-term monitoring of HFP candidates at high radio frequencies. We performed single-dish monitoring of 19 candidates in 18 epochs over 2.5 years at 22 and 43 GHz simultaneously, using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). Also, using the KVN and VERA array (KaVA), we carried out 22 and 43 GHz VLBI observations of seven candidates from our sample, and investigated their parsec-scale (milli-arcsecond scale) morphology. We discuss the results of the source classification from our long-term single dish monitoring observation and the preliminary results of follow-up VLBI observation.

  2. High-frequency electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, T. S. T.

    1973-01-01

    High-frequency electrostatic microinstabilities in magnetospheric plasmas are considered in detail. Rather special plasma parameters are found to be required to match the theoretical wave spectrum with satellite observations in the magnetosphere. In particular, it is necessary to have a cold and a warm species of electrons such that (1) the warm component has an anomalous velocity distribution function that is nonmonotonic in the perpendicular component of velocity and is the source of free energy driving the instabilities, (2) the density ratio of the cold component to the hot component is greater than about 0.01, and (3) the temperature ratio of the two components for cases of high particle density is no less than 0.1. These requirements and the corresponding instability criteria are satisfied only in the trapping region; this is also the region in which the waves are most frequently observed. The range of unstable wavelengths and an estimate of the diffusion coefficient are also obtained. The wave are found to induce strong diffusion in velocity space for low-energy electrons during periods of moderate wave amplitude.

  3. High frequency radar software reference manual for Product Two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, D. C.; Winkelman, J. R.; Matheson, L. D.; Grubb, R. N.

    1984-03-01

    The Space Environment Laboratory (SEL) of NOAA developed a general purpose High Frequency (HF) Radar system capable of making most of the measurements of the ionosphere that can be made by coherent monostatic or bistatic radio wave sounding. This capability is provided by combining a very flexible, frequency-agile transmitter and receiver system with a digital control and signal processing system containing a general purpose 16-bit minicomputer for operator interaction and control. A manual is given which describes the software operating system written by the SEL staff to permit the Radar to be used for quite a wide range of standard measurements under simple operator control. The control language enables the user to exploit most of the capabilities of the instrument without having to program the system in detail. The manual is primarily directed at the user who needs to understand and use this capability. Secondarily, if used in conjunction with the computer manufacturer's system and language manuals, the SEL HF Radar Hardware manuals and the SEL source code listings, it should enable an experienced user to customize the software for special purposes or to produce new operating software.

  4. Theory of High Frequency Rectification by Silicon Crystals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bethe, H. A.

    1942-10-29

    The excellent performance of British "red dot" crystals is explained as due to the knife edge contact against a polished surface. High frequency rectification depends critically on the capacity of the rectifying boundary layer of the crystal, C. For high conversion efficiency, the product of this capacity and of the "forward" (bulk) resistance R {sub b} of the crystal must be small. For a knife edge, this product depends primarily on the breadth of the knife edge and very little upon its length. The contact can therefore have a rather large area which prevents burn-out. For a wavelength of 10 cm. the computations show that the breadth of the knife edge should be less than about 10 {sup -3} cm. For a point contact the radius must be less than 1.5 x 10 {sup -3} cm. and the resulting small area is conducive to burn-out. The effect of "tapping" is probably to reduce the area of contact. (auth)

  5. Scattering of high-frequency surface waves in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBeth, Colin; Snieder, Roel

    1989-02-01

    High-frequency (≤5 Hz) coda waves for velocities of arrival less than 3 km/s, recorded on vertical component instruments and generated from a local earthquake in Scotland, are analyzed to ascertain their cause. The adaption of existing velocity models and scattering from near-surface irregularities in Scotland such as mountains and lochs are considered as possible causes of the observed behavior. The former mechanism is not feasible, as it implies a significant alteration of the velocities in the upper 2 km crust, contradicting previous seismic surveys in the area. An analysis of the effects of scattering is performed using a formalism derived from the Born approximation. The scattered wave field is computed for interactions between first six Rayleigh and Love modes. The general character of the synthetic seismograms for these scattered waves agrees with the observations on a qualitative basis. The apparent absence of the fundamental mode energy from the records is also explained by the synthetic seismograms. The calculations imply that scatterers with a scale length of less than 300 m are applicable to these data from the northernmost stations but around 2 km for the more southern areas. It is thought that the scale length relates to the size of a region on the slopes of the mountains or lochs where there is a sharp gradient. This study emphasises the effectiveness of linear scattering theory in accounting, on a qualitative basis for many of the observed features of the apparently complex coda waves.

  6. Turbofan Noise Propagation and Radiation at High Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Danielle (Technical Monitor); Eversman, Walter

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes progress on NASA Glenn Research Center Grant NAG3-2718 to the University of Missouri at Rolla This grant was awarded on February 22, 2002 and this report covers the performance period to September 30, 2002. There is considerable overlap in research effort with previous NASA Glenn Grant NAG3-2340, as the current effort represents a continuation and extension of this previous grant, which with a no cost supplement terminated on January 31, 2002. This report outlines progress on each task in the original proposal. In addition to progress on several of the specifically proposed tasks, considerable progress has been made in FEM algorithm development with the intent of introducing computational efficiencies required to model high frequency propagation and radiation and to open the possibility of expanding the scope of the modeling capability to three dimensional duct and nacelle geometries. Appended to this document is a paper presented at the 8th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference in June 2002. This paper overlaps the present grant and the previous grant identified above, and it is noted that this paper has also been appended to the final report for NAG3-2304.

  7. High Frequency of Imprinted Methylation Errors in Human Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    White, Carlee R.; Denomme, Michelle M.; Tekpetey, Francis R.; Feyles, Valter; Power, Stephen G. A.; Mann, Mellissa R. W.

    2015-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) represent the best chance for infertile couples to conceive, although increased risks for morbidities exist, including imprinting disorders. This increased risk could arise from ARTs disrupting genomic imprints during gametogenesis or preimplantation. The few studies examining ART effects on genomic imprinting primarily assessed poor quality human embryos. Here, we examined day 3 and blastocyst stage, good to high quality, donated human embryos for imprinted SNRPN, KCNQ1OT1 and H19 methylation. Seventy-six percent day 3 embryos and 50% blastocysts exhibited perturbed imprinted methylation, demonstrating that extended culture did not pose greater risk for imprinting errors than short culture. Comparison of embryos with normal and abnormal methylation didn’t reveal any confounding factors. Notably, two embryos from male factor infertility patients using donor sperm harboured aberrant methylation, suggesting errors in these embryos cannot be explained by infertility alone. Overall, these results indicate that ART human preimplantation embryos possess a high frequency of imprinted methylation errors. PMID:26626153

  8. High frequency MoS2 nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaesung; Wang, Zenghui; He, Keliang; Shan, Jie; Feng, Philip X-L

    2013-07-23

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a layered semiconducting material in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), as thin as a monolayer (consisting of a hexagonal plane of Mo atoms covalently bonded and sandwiched between two planes of S atoms, in a trigonal prismatic structure), has demonstrated unique properties and strong promises for emerging two-dimensional (2D) nanodevices. Here we report on the demonstration of movable and vibrating MoS2 nanodevices, where MoS2 diaphragms as thin as 6 nm (a stack of 9 monolayers) exhibit fundamental-mode nanomechanical resonances up to f0 ~ 60 MHz in the very high frequency (VHF) band, and frequency-quality (Q) factor products up to f0 × Q ~ 2 × 10(10)Hz, all at room temperature. The experimental results from many devices with a wide range of thicknesses and lateral sizes, in combination with theoretical analysis, quantitatively elucidate the elastic transition regimes in these ultrathin MoS2 nanomechanical resonators. We further delineate a roadmap for scaling MoS2 2D resonators and transducers toward microwave frequencies. This study also opens up possibilities for new classes of vibratory devices to exploit strain- and dynamics-engineered ultrathin semiconducting 2D crystals. PMID:23738924

  9. Challenges in graphene integration for high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannazzo, F.; Fisichella, G.; Greco, G.; Roccaforte, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of the state-of-the-art research on graphene (Gr) for high-frequency (RF) devices. After discussing current limitations of lateral Gr RF transistors, novel vertical devices concepts such as the Gr Base Hot Electron Transistor (GBHET) will be introduced and the main challenges in Gr integration within these architectures will be discussed. In particular, a GBHET device based on Gr/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure will be considered. An approach to the fabrication of this heterostructure by transfer of CVD grown Gr on copper to the AlGaN surface will be presented. The morphological and electrical properties of this system have been investigated at nanoscale by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM). In particular, local current-voltage measurements by the CAFM probe revealed the formation of a Schottky contact with low barrier height (˜0.41 eV) and excellent lateral uniformity between Gr and AlGaN. Basing on the electrical parameters extracted from this characterization, the theoretical performances of a GBHET formed by a metal/Al2O3/Gr/AlGaN/GaN stack have been evaluated.

  10. High-frequency modes of a magnetic antivortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmat-Uceda, Martin; Riley, Grant; Haldar, Arabinda; Buchanan, Kristen

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic vortices have attracted considerable attention in recent years not only because of their interesting physical properties but also due to their potential for applications. The magnetic antivortex (AV), the topological counterpart of the magnetic vortex, possesses similarly rich dynamics and its spin configuration may prove advantageous for spin-wave-based devices, however, it has not been studied as intensely. Recent experiments show that AV's will form naturally at the intersections of patterned pound-key-like nanostructures that are magnetically soft. Here we present micromagnetic simulations of the dynamics of AV's in these structures. The simulations show that pound-key-like structures made of 30-nm thick Permalloy exhibit a complex dynamic profile that includes a number of discrete high-frequency modes (>1 GHz). Spatial maps of the dynamic modes that were constructed using Fourier analysis of the simulation results show modes that are in similar in character to the radial and azimuthal modes observed for magnetic vortices but the spin dynamics also differ from those of a vortex due to the presence of the elongated nanowires in the pound-key-like structure. The frequencies of the observed modes tend to decrease with increasing sample size, however, the general features of the modes remains relatively unaffected by the structure size. The simulations will be compared to Brillouin Light Scattering (BLS) experimental results. This work was supported by the US DOE-BES Award #ER 46854.

  11. High-frequency Ultrasound Imaging of Mouse Cervical Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) is widely employed as a non-invasive method for imaging internal anatomic structures in experimental small animal systems. HFUS has the ability to detect structures as small as 30 µm, a property that has been utilized for visualizing superficial lymph nodes in rodents in brightness (B)-mode. Combining power Doppler with B-mode imaging allows for measuring circulatory blood flow within lymph nodes and other organs. While HFUS has been utilized for lymph node imaging in a number of mouse  model systems, a detailed protocol describing HFUS imaging and characterization of the cervical lymph nodes in mice has not been reported. Here, we show that HFUS can be adapted to detect and characterize cervical lymph nodes in mice. Combined B-mode and power Doppler imaging can be used to detect increases in blood flow in immunologically-enlarged cervical nodes. We also describe the use of B-mode imaging to conduct fine needle biopsies of cervical lymph nodes to retrieve lymph tissue for histological  analysis. Finally, software-aided steps are described to calculate changes in lymph node volume and to visualize changes in lymph node morphology following image reconstruction. The ability to visually monitor changes in cervical lymph node biology over time provides a simple and powerful technique for the non-invasive monitoring of cervical lymph node alterations in preclinical mouse models of oral cavity disease. PMID:26274059

  12. Resting high frequency heart rate variability selectively predicts cooperative behavior.

    PubMed

    Beffara, Brice; Bret, Amélie G; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Mermillod, Martial

    2016-10-01

    This study explores whether the vagal connection between the heart and the brain is involved in prosocial behaviors. The Polyvagal Theory postulates that vagal activity underlies prosocial tendencies. Even if several results suggest that vagal activity is associated with prosocial behaviors, none of them used behavioral measures of prosociality to establish this relationship. We recorded the resting state vagal activity (reflected by High Frequency Heart Rate Variability, HF-HRV) of 48 (42 suitale for analysis) healthy human adults and measured their level of cooperation during a hawk-dove game. We also manipulated the consequence of mutual defection in the hawk-dove game (severe vs. moderate). Results show that HF-HRV is positively and linearly related to cooperation level, but only when the consequence of mutual defection is severe (compared to moderate). This supports that i) prosocial behaviors are likely to be underpinned by vagal functioning ii) physiological disposition to cooperate interacts with environmental context. We discuss these results within the theoretical framework of the Polyvagal Theory. PMID:27343804

  13. High frequency dynamic engine simulation. [TF-30 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerman, J. A.; Fischer, K. E.; Mclaughlin, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    A digital computer simulation of a mixed flow, twin spool turbofan engine was assembled to evaluate and improve the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation to disturbance frequencies of at least 100 Hz. One dimensional forms of the dynamic mass, momentum and energy equations were used to model the engine. A TF30 engine was simulated so that dynamic characteristics could be evaluated against results obtained from testing of the TF30 engine at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation were improved by modifying the compression system model. Modifications to the compression system model were established by investigating the influence of size and number of finite dynamic elements. Based on the results of this program, high frequency engine simulations using finite dynamic elements can be assembled so that the engine dynamic configuration is optimum with respect to dynamic characteristics and computer execution time. Resizing of the compression systems finite elements improved the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation but showed that additional refinements are required to obtain close agreement simulation and actual engine dynamic characteristics.

  14. High-frequency nano-optomechanical disk resonators in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Santos, E.; Baker, C.; Nguyen, D. T.; Hease, W.; Gomez, C.; Lemaître, A.; Ducci, S.; Leo, G.; Favero, I.

    2015-09-01

    Nano- and micromechanical resonators are the subject of research that aims to develop ultrasensitive mass sensors for spectrometry, chemical analysis and biomedical diagnosis. Unfortunately, their merits generally diminish in liquids because of an increased dissipation. The development of faster and lighter miniaturized devices would enable improved performances, provided the dissipation was controlled and novel techniques were available to drive and readout their minute displacement. Here we report a nano-optomechanical approach to this problem using miniature semiconductor disks. These devices combine a mechanical motion at high frequencies (gigahertz and above) with an ultralow mass (picograms) and a moderate dissipation in liquids. We show that high-sensitivity optical measurements allow their Brownian vibrations to be resolved directly, even in the most-dissipative liquids. We investigate their interaction with liquids of arbitrary properties, and analyse measurements in light of new models. Nano-optomechanical disks emerge as probes of rheological information of unprecedented sensitivity and speed, which opens up applications in sensing and fundamental science.

  15. Protection Circuits for Very High Frequency Ultrasound Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of protection circuits in ultrasound applications is to block noise signals from the transmitter from reaching the transducer and also to prevent unwanted high voltage signals from reaching the receiver. The protection circuit using a resistor and diode pair is widely used due to its simple architecture, however, it may not be suitable for very high frequency (VHF) ultrasound transducer applications (>100 MHz) because of its limited bandwidth. Therefore, a protection circuit using MOSFET devices with unique structure is proposed in this paper. The performance of the designed protection circuit was compared with that of other traditional protection schemes. The performance characteristics measured were the insertion loss (IL), total harmonic distortion (THD) and transient response time (TRT). The new protection scheme offers the lowest IL (−1.0 dB), THD (−69.8 dB) and TRT (78 ns) at 120 MHz. The pulse-echo response using a 120 MHz LiNbO3 transducer with each protection circuit was measured to validate the feasibility of the protection circuits in VHF ultrasound applications. The sensitivity and bandwidth of the transducer using the new protection circuit improved by 252.1 and 50.9 %, respectively with respect to the protection circuit using a resistor and diode pair. These results demonstrated that the new protection circuit design minimizes the IL, THD and TRT for VHF ultrasound transducer applications. PMID:24682684

  16. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks.

  17. High-frequency Ultrasound Imaging of Mouse Cervical Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Walk, Elyse L; McLaughlin, Sarah L; Weed, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) is widely employed as a non-invasive method for imaging internal anatomic structures in experimental small animal systems. HFUS has the ability to detect structures as small as 30 µm, a property that has been utilized for visualizing superficial lymph nodes in rodents in brightness (B)-mode. Combining power Doppler with B-mode imaging allows for measuring circulatory blood flow within lymph nodes and other organs. While HFUS has been utilized for lymph node imaging in a number of mouse  model systems, a detailed protocol describing HFUS imaging and characterization of the cervical lymph nodes in mice has not been reported. Here, we show that HFUS can be adapted to detect and characterize cervical lymph nodes in mice. Combined B-mode and power Doppler imaging can be used to detect increases in blood flow in immunologically-enlarged cervical nodes. We also describe the use of B-mode imaging to conduct fine needle biopsies of cervical lymph nodes to retrieve lymph tissue for histological  analysis. Finally, software-aided steps are described to calculate changes in lymph node volume and to visualize changes in lymph node morphology following image reconstruction. The ability to visually monitor changes in cervical lymph node biology over time provides a simple and powerful technique for the non-invasive monitoring of cervical lymph node alterations in preclinical mouse models of oral cavity disease. PMID:26274059

  18. Photodetachment of H- from intense, short, high-frequency pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study the photodetachment of an electron from the hydrogen anion due to short, high-frequency laser pulses by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Simulations are performed to investigate the dependence of the photoelectron spectra on the duration, chirp, and intensity of the pulses. Specifically, we concentrate on the low-energy distributions in the spectra that result from the Raman transitions of the broadband pulses. Contrary to the one-photon ionization, the low-energy distribution maintains a similar width as the laser bandwidth is expanded by chirping the pulses. In addition, we study the transitions of the ionization dynamics from the perturbative to strong-field regime. At high intensities, the positions of the net one- and two-photon absorption peaks in the spectrum shifts and the peaks split to multiple subpeaks because of the multiphoton effects. Moreover, although the one- and two-photon peaks and low-energy distribution exhibit saturation of the ionization yields, the latter shows relatively mild saturation. This work has been supported by DOE under Award No. DE-SC0012193.

  19. Cobalt Nanoparticle Inks for Printed High Frequency Applications on Polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelo, Mikko; Myllymäki, Sami; Juuti, Jari; Uusimäki, Antti; Jantunen, Heli

    2015-12-01

    In this work the high frequency properties of low curing temperature cobalt nanoparticle inks printed on polycarbonate substrates were investigated. The inks consisted of 30-70 vol.% metallic cobalt nanoparticles and poly (methylene methacrylate) polymer, having excellent adhesion on polycarbonate and a curing temperature of 110°C. The influence of binder material content on the electromagnetic properties of the ink was investigated using the shorted microstrip transmission-line perturbation method. Changes in mechanical properties were evaluated with adhesion tests using the pull-out strength test and the ASTM D 3359-B cross-hatch tape peel test. The microstructure of the printed patterns was investigated with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The inks remained mechanically durable with metal contents up to 60 vol.%, achieving pull-off strength of up to 5.2 MPa and the highest marks in adhesion of the tape peel test. The inks obtained a relative permeability of 1.5-3 in the 45 MHz-10 GHz band with a magnetic loss tangent of 0.01-0.06. The developed inks can be utilized in various printed electronics applications such as antenna miniaturization, antenna substrates and magnetic sensors or sensing.

  20. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.

    1991-01-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) prediction of several rectangular plate geometries is discussed using high-frequency techniques such as the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) for perfectly conducting and impedance wedges and the Method of Equivalent Currents (MEC). Previous reports have presented detailed solutions to the principal-plane scattering by a perfectly conducting and a coated rectangular plate and nonprincipal-plane scattering by a perfectly conducting plate. These solutions are briefly reviewed and a modified model is presented for the coated plate. Theoretical and experimental data are presented for the perfectly conducting geometries. Agreement between theory and experiment is very good near and at normal incidence. In regions near and at grazing incidence, the disagreement between the data vary according to diffraction distances and angles involved. It is these areas of disagreement which are of extreme interest as an explanation for the disagreement will yield invaluable insight into scattering mechanisms which are not yet identified as major contributors near and at grazing incidence. Areas of disagreement between theory and experiment are identified and examined in an attempt to better understand and predict near-grazing incidence, grazing incidence, and nonprincipal-plane diffractions.

  1. Applications of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.

    2005-02-01

    Applications to space technology of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves, (HFGWs), defined as having frequencies in excess of 100 kHz, are discussed. The applications to be specifically addressed include: providing (1) multi-channel communications (both point to point and point to multipoint through all normal material things - the ultimate wireless system) (2) a remote means for causing perturbations to the motion of objects such as missiles (bullets to ICBMs), spacecraft, land or water vehicles or craft; (3) remote coalescing of clouds of hazardous vapors, radioactive dust, etc. by changing the gravitational field in their vicinity; (4) the potential for through-earth or through-water ``X-rays'' in order to observe subterranean structures, geological formations, create a transparent ocean, view three-dimensional building interiors, buried devices, etc.; and (5) the potential for remotely disrupting the gravitational field in a specific region of space. The utilization of a possible HFGW telescope as a navigational aid by viewing the anisotropic or patterned HFGW relic cosmic background above, on, or under the ground without reliance on GPS satellite signals is also noted. Many of the applications are discussed in the context of space technology and several approaches to the generation and possible focusing of HFGWs are referenced. A derivation of the ``jerk'' formulation of the quadrupole approximation for HFGW power is included in an appendix.

  2. Fault-zone attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeslee, S.; Malin, P.; Alvarez, M. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors have developed a technique to measure seismic attenuation within an active fault-zone at seismogenic depths. Utilizing a pair of stations and pairs of earthquakes, spectral ratios are performed to isolate attenuation produced by wave-propagation within the fault-zone. The empirical approach eliminates common source, propagation, instrument and near-surface site effects. The technique was applied to a cluster of 19 earthquakes recorded by a pair of downhole instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at Parkfield, California. Over the 1-40 Hz bandwidth used in this analysis, amplitudes are found to decrease exponentially with frequency. Furthermore, the fault-zone propagation distance correlates with severity of attenuation. Assuming a constant Q attenuation operator, the S-wave quality factor within the fault-zone at a depth of 5-6 kilometers is 31 (+7,{minus}5). If fault-zones are low-Q environments, then near-source attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves may help to explain phenomenon such as f{sub max}. Fault-zone Q may prove to be a valuable indicator of the mechanical behavior and rheology of fault-zones. Specific asperities can be monitored for precursory changes associated with the evolving stress-field within the fault-zone. The spatial and temporal resolution of the technique is fundamentally limited by the uncertainty in earthquake location and the interval time between earthquakes.

  3. HIGH FREQUENCY POWER TRANSMISSION LINE FOR CYCLOTRONS AND THE LIKE

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, W.J.

    1954-04-20

    High-frequency power transmission systems, particularly a stacked capacitance alternating power current transmission line wherein maximum utilization of the effective conductios skin of the line conductors is achieved while enabling a low impedance to be obtained are reported. The transmission line consists of a number of flat metal strips with interleaved dielectric strips. The metal dielectric strips are coiled spirally with the axis of the spiral extending along the length of the strips, and the alternating metal strips at the output end have outwardly extending aligned lugs which are directly strapped together and connected to the respective terminals on the load. At the input end of the transmission line, similarly, the alternate metal strips are directly strapped together and connected to an altereating current source. With the arrangement described each metal strip conducts on both sides, so that the metal strips are designed to have a thickness corresponding to twice the depth of the "skin effect" conducting lamina of each conductor at the source frequency.

  4. High Frequency Supercapacitors for Piezo-based Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervin, Matthew; Pereira, Carlos; Miller, John; Outlaw, Ronald; Rastegar, Jay; Murray, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Energy harvesting is being investigated as an alternative to batteries for powering munition guidance and fuzing functions during flight. A piezoelectric system that generates energy from the oscillation of a mass on a spring (set in motion by the launch acceleration) is being developed. Original designs stored this energy in an electrolytic capacitor for use during flight. Here we replace the electrolytic capacitor with a smaller, lighter, and potentially more reliable electrochemical double layer capacitor (aka, supercapacitor). The potential problems with using supercapacitors in this application are that the piezoelectric output greatly exceeds the supercapacitor electrolyte breakdown voltage, and the frequency greatly exceeds the operating frequency of commercial supercapacitors. Here we have investigated the use of ultrafast vertically oriented graphene array-based supercapacitors for storing the energy in this application. We find that the electrolyte breakdown is not a serious limitation as it is either kinetically limited by the relatively high frequency of the piezoelectric output, or it is overcome by the self-healing nature of supercapacitors. We also find that these supercapacitors have sufficient dynamic response to efficiently store the generated energy.

  5. Design, analysis, and testing of high frequency passively damped struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yiu, Y. C.; Davis, L. Porter; Napolitano, Kevin; Ninneman, R. Rory

    1993-01-01

    Objectives of the research are: (1) to develop design requirements for damped struts to stabilize control system in the high frequency cross-over and spill-over range; (2) to design, fabricate and test viscously damped strut and viscoelastically damped strut; (3) to verify accuracy of design and analysis methodology of damped struts; and (4) to design and build test apparatus, and develop data reduction algorithm to measure strut complex stiffness. In order to meet the stringent performance requirements of the SPICE experiment, the active control system is used to suppress the dynamic responses of the low order structural modes. However, the control system also inadvertently drives some of the higher order modes unstable in the cross-over an