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Sample records for high-grade serous ovarian

  1. Rethinking ovarian cancer II: reducing mortality from high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, David D; Böhm, Steffen; Ahmed, Ahmed A; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Bast, Robert C; Beral, Valerie; Berek, Jonathan S; Birrer, Michael J; Blagden, Sarah; Bookman, Michael A; Brenton, James D; Chiappinelli, Katherine B; Martins, Filipe Correia; Coukos, George; Drapkin, Ronny; Edmondson, Richard; Fotopoulou, Christina; Gabra, Hani; Galon, Jérôme; Gourley, Charlie; Heong, Valerie; Huntsman, David G; Iwanicki, Marcin; Karlan, Beth Y; Kaye, Allyson; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A; Lu, Karen H; McNeish, Iain A; Menon, Usha; Narod, Steven A; Nelson, Brad H; Nephew, Kenneth P; Pharoah, Paul; Powell, Daniel J; Ramos, Pilar; Romero, Iris L; Scott, Clare L; Sood, Anil K; Stronach, Euan A; Balkwill, Frances R

    2015-11-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) accounts for 70-80% of ovarian cancer deaths, and overall survival has not changed significantly for several decades. In this Opinion article, we outline a set of research priorities that we believe will reduce incidence and improve outcomes for women with this disease. This 'roadmap' for HGSOC was determined after extensive discussions at an Ovarian Cancer Action meeting in January 2015. PMID:26493647

  2. Rethinking ovarian cancer II: reducing mortality from high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bowtell, David D.; Böhm, Steffen; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Bast, Robert C.; Beral, Valerie; Berek, Jonathan S.; Birrer, Michael J.; Blagden, Sarah; Bookman, Michael A.; Brenton, James; Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Martins, Filipe Correia; Coukos, George; Drapkin, Ronny; Edmondson, Richard; Fotopoulou, Christina; Gabra, Hani; Galon, Jérôme; Gourley, Charlie; Heong, Valerie; Huntsman, David G.; Iwanicki, Marcin; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kaye, Allyson; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; Lu, Karen H.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Narod, Steve A.; Nelson, Brad H.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Pharoah, Paul; Powell, Daniel J.; Ramos, Pilar; Romero, Iris L.; Scott, Clare L.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) accounts for 70-80% of ovarian cancer deaths, and overall survival has not changed significantly for several decades. In this Opinion article, we outline a set of research priorities that we believe will reduce incidence and improve outcomes for women with this disease. This ‘roadmap’ for HGSOC was determined after extensive discussions at an Ovarian Cancer Action meeting in January 2015. PMID:26493647

  3. Connective tissue growth factor as a novel therapeutic target in high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Moran-Jones, Kim; Gloss, Brian S; Murali, Rajmohan; Chang, David K; Colvin, Emily K; Jones, Marc D; Yuen, Samuel; Howell, Viive M; Brown, Laura M; Wong, Carol W; Spong, Suzanne M; Scarlett, Christopher J; Hacker, Neville F; Ghosh, Sue; Mok, Samuel C; Birrer, Michael J; Samimi, Goli

    2015-12-29

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among women with gynecologic cancer. We examined molecular profiles of fibroblasts from normal ovary and high-grade serous ovarian tumors to identify novel therapeutic targets involved in tumor progression. We identified 2,300 genes that are significantly differentially expressed in tumor-associated fibroblasts. Fibroblast expression of one of these genes, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. CTGF protein expression in ovarian tumor fibroblasts significantly correlated with gene expression levels. CTGF is a secreted component of the tumor microenvironment and is being pursued as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. We examined its effect in in vitro and ex vivo ovarian cancer models, and examined associations between CTGF expression and clinico-pathologic characteristics in patients. CTGF promotes migration and peritoneal adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. These effects are abrogated by FG-3019, a human monoclonal antibody against CTGF, currently under clinical investigation as a therapeutic agent. Immunohistochemical analyses of high-grade serous ovarian tumors reveal that the highest level of tumor stromal CTGF expression was correlated with the poorest prognosis. Our findings identify CTGF as a promoter of peritoneal adhesion, likely to mediate metastasis, and a potential therapeutic target in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. These results warrant further studies into the therapeutic efficacy of FG-3019 in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26575166

  4. Connective tissue growth factor as a novel therapeutic target in high grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moran-Jones, Kim; Gloss, Brian S.; Murali, Rajmohan; Chang, David K.; Colvin, Emily K.; Jones, Marc D.; Yuen, Samuel; Howell, Viive M.; Brown, Laura M.; Wong, Carol W.; Spong, Suzanne M.; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Hacker, Neville F.; Ghosh, Sue; Mok, Samuel C.; Birrer, Michael J.; Samimi, Goli

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among women with gynecologic cancer. We examined molecular profiles of fibroblasts from normal ovary and high-grade serous ovarian tumors to identify novel therapeutic targets involved in tumor progression. We identified 2,300 genes that are significantly differentially expressed in tumor-associated fibroblasts. Fibroblast expression of one of these genes, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. CTGF protein expression in ovarian tumor fibroblasts significantly correlated with gene expression levels. CTGF is a secreted component of the tumor microenvironment and is being pursued as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. We examined its effect in in vitro and ex vivo ovarian cancer models, and examined associations between CTGF expression and clinico-pathologic characteristics in patients. CTGF promotes migration and peritoneal adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. These effects are abrogated by FG-3019, a human monoclonal antibody against CTGF, currently under clinical investigation as a therapeutic agent. Immunohistochemical analyses of high-grade serous ovarian tumors reveal that the highest level of tumor stromal CTGF expression was correlated with the poorest prognosis. Our findings identify CTGF as a promoter of peritoneal adhesion, likely to mediate metastasis, and a potential therapeutic target in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. These results warrant further studies into the therapeutic efficacy of FG-3019 in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26575166

  5. Divergent modes of clonal spread and intraperitoneal mixing in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Andrew; Roth, Andrew; Laks, Emma; Masud, Tehmina; Bashashati, Ali; Zhang, Allen W; Ha, Gavin; Biele, Justina; Yap, Damian; Wan, Adrian; Prentice, Leah M; Khattra, Jaswinder; Smith, Maia A; Nielsen, Cydney B; Mullaly, Sarah C; Kalloger, Steve; Karnezis, Anthony; Shumansky, Karey; Siu, Celia; Rosner, Jamie; Chan, Hector Li; Ho, Julie; Melnyk, Nataliya; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; Moore, Richard; Mungall, Andrew J; Marra, Marco A; Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre; Gilks, C Blake; Huntsman, David G; McAlpine, Jessica N; Aparicio, Samuel; Shah, Sohrab P

    2016-07-01

    We performed phylogenetic analysis of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (68 samples from seven patients), identifying constituent clones and quantifying their relative abundances at multiple intraperitoneal sites. Through whole-genome and single-nucleus sequencing, we identified evolutionary features including mutation loss, convergence of the structural genome and temporal activation of mutational processes that patterned clonal progression. We then determined the precise clonal mixtures comprising each tumor sample. The majority of sites were clonally pure or composed of clones from a single phylogenetic clade. However, each patient contained at least one site composed of polyphyletic clones. Five patients exhibited monoclonal and unidirectional seeding from the ovary to intraperitoneal sites, and two patients demonstrated polyclonal spread and reseeding. Our findings indicate that at least two distinct modes of intraperitoneal spread operate in clonal dissemination and highlight the distribution of migratory potential over clonal populations comprising high-grade serous ovarian cancers. PMID:27182968

  6. Origin and molecular pathogenesis of ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurman, R J

    2013-12-01

    A new paradigm for the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer has recently been proposed which helps to explain persistent problems in describing the development and diverse morphology of these neoplasms. The paradigm incorporates recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of epithelial 'ovarian' cancer with new insights into the origin of these tumors. Correlated clinicopathologic and molecular genetic studies led to the development of a dualistic model that divides all the various histologic types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas into two broad categories designated 'type I' and 'type II'. The prototypic type I tumor is low-grade serous carcinoma and the prototypic type II tumor is high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs). As the serous tumors comprise ∼70% of all epithelial ovarian tumors and account for the majority of deaths, the serous tumors will be the subject of this review. There are marked differences between the low-grade and high-grade serous tumors. Briefly, the former are indolent, present in stage I (tumor confined to the ovary) and develop from well-established precursors, so-called 'atypical proliferative (borderline) tumors,' which are characterized by specific mutations, including KRAS, BRAF and ERBB2; they are relatively genetically stable. In contrast, HGSCs are aggressive, present in the advanced stage, and develop from intraepithelial carcinomas in the fallopian tube. They harbor TP53 mutations in over 95% of cases, but rarely harbor the mutations detected in the low-grade serous tumors. At the time of diagnosis they demonstrate marked chromosomal aberrations but over the course of the disease these changes remain relatively stable. Along with the recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of these tumors, studies have demonstrated that the long sought for precursor of ovarian HGSC appears to develop from an occult intraepithelial carcinoma in the fimbrial region of the fallopian tube designated 'serous tubal

  7. Advances in Tumor Screening, Imaging, and Avatar Technologies for High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohman, Anders W.; Hasan, Noor; Dinulescu, Daniela M.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma cases are detected in advanced stages when treatment options are limited. Surgery is less effective at eradicating the disease when it is widespread, resulting in high rates of disease relapse and chemoresistance. Current screening techniques are ineffective for early tumor detection and consequently, BRCA mutations carriers, with an increased risk for developing high-grade serous ovarian cancer, elect to undergo risk-reducing surgery. While prophylactic surgery is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of cancer development, it also results in surgical menopause and significant adverse side effects. The development of efficient early-stage screening protocols and imaging technologies is critical to improving the outcome and quality of life for current patients and women at increased risk. In addition, more accurate animal models are necessary in order to provide relevant in vivo testing systems and advance our understanding of the disease origin and progression. Moreover, both genetically engineered and tumor xenograft animal models enable the preclinical testing of novel imaging techniques and molecularly targeted therapies as they become available. Recent advances in xenograft technologies have made possible the creation of avatar mice, personalized tumorgrafts, which can be used as therapy testing surrogates for individual patients prior to or during treatment. High-grade serous ovarian cancer may be an ideal candidate for use with avatar models based on key characteristics of the tumorgraft platform. This review explores multiple strategies, including novel imaging and screening technologies in both patients and animal models, aimed at detecting cancer in the early-stages and improving the disease prognosis. PMID:25478323

  8. Integrated Proteogenomic Characterization of Human High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Zhen; Payne, Samuel H; Zhang, Bai; McDermott, Jason E; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Chen, Li; Ray, Debjit; Sun, Shisheng; Yang, Feng; Chen, Lijun; Wang, Jing; Shah, Punit; Cha, Seong Won; Aiyetan, Paul; Woo, Sunghee; Tian, Yuan; Gritsenko, Marina A; Clauss, Therese R; Choi, Caitlin; Monroe, Matthew E; Thomas, Stefani; Nie, Song; Wu, Chaochao; Moore, Ronald J; Yu, Kun-Hsing; Tabb, David L; Fenyö, David; Bafna, Vineet; Wang, Yue; Rodriguez, Henry; Boja, Emily S; Hiltke, Tara; Rivers, Robert C; Sokoll, Lori; Zhu, Heng; Shih, Ie-Ming; Cope, Leslie; Pandey, Akhilesh; Zhang, Bing; Snyder, Michael P; Levine, Douglas A; Smith, Richard D; Chan, Daniel W; Rodland, Karin D

    2016-07-28

    To provide a detailed analysis of the molecular components and underlying mechanisms associated with ovarian cancer, we performed a comprehensive mass-spectrometry-based proteomic characterization of 174 ovarian tumors previously analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), of which 169 were high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs). Integrating our proteomic measurements with the genomic data yielded a number of insights into disease, such as how different copy-number alternations influence the proteome, the proteins associated with chromosomal instability, the sets of signaling pathways that diverse genome rearrangements converge on, and the ones most associated with short overall survival. Specific protein acetylations associated with homologous recombination deficiency suggest a potential means for stratifying patients for therapy. In addition to providing a valuable resource, these findings provide a view of how the somatic genome drives the cancer proteome and associations between protein and post-translational modification levels and clinical outcomes in HGSC. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27372738

  9. Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor With High-Grade Serous Carcinoma in a 62-Year-Old Woman.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Whitney A; Masand, Ramya P

    2016-06-01

    Ovarian yolk sac tumors are germ cell tumors that usually present in children and young women. Rarely, these tumors can arise in older women, usually in conjunction with surface epithelial tumors, suggesting divergent differentiation from the latter. The combination of mixed ovarian yolk sac tumor and high-grade serous carcinoma is rare, with only one case documented in the literature. We present a case of mixed ovarian yolk sac tumor and high-grade serous carcinoma in a postmenopausal woman, including a brief discussion of the immunohistochemical findings and differential diagnosis. Despite the rarity of mixed ovarian yolk sac tumor and surface epithelial tumors, it is important to recognize the biphasic nature of the tumor, which should prompt a thorough immunohistochemical evaluation. The therapeutic and prognostic implications of proper diagnosis cannot be overemphasized. PMID:26782153

  10. The NER-related gene GTF2H5 predicts survival in high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamieniak, Marta M.; Muñoz-Repeto, Ivan; Borrego, Salud; Hernando, Susana; Hernández-Agudo, Elena; Heredia Soto, Victoria; Márquez-Rodas, Ivan; Echarri, María José; Lacambra-Calvet, Carmen; Sáez, Raquel; Redondo, Andrés; Benítez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the prognostic and predictive value of the nucleotide excision repair-related gene GTF2H5, which is localized at the 6q24.2-26 deletion previously reported by our group to predict longer survival of high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients. Methods In order to test if protein levels of GTF2H5 are associated with patients' outcome, we performed GTF2H5 immunohistochemical staining in 139 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas included in tissue microarrays. Upon stratification of cases into high- and low-GTF2H5 staining categories (> and ≤ median staining, respectively) Kaplan-Meier and log-rank test were used to estimate patients’ survival and assess statistical differences. We also evaluated the association of GTF2H5 with survival at the transcriptional level by using the on-line Kaplan-Meier plotter tool, which includes gene expression and survival data of 855 high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients from 13 different datasets. Finally, we determined whether stable short hairpin RNA-mediated GTF2H5 downregulation modulates cisplatin sensitivity in the SKOV3 and COV504 cell lines by using cytotoxicity assays. Results Low expression of GTF2H5 was associated with longer 5-year survival of patients at the protein (hazard ratio [HR], 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.93; p=0.024) and transcriptional level (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.97; p=0.023) in high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients. We confirmed the association with 5-year overall survival (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.78; p=0.0007) and also found an association with progression-free survival (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.96; p=0.026) in a homogenous group of 388 high-stage (stages III-IV using the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging system), optimally debulked high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients. GTF2H5-silencing induced a decrease of the half maximal inhibitory concentration upon cisplatin treatment in GTF2H5-silenced ovarian cancer cells. Conclusion Low

  11. Efficient molecular subtype classification of high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Leong, Huei San; Galletta, Laura; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; George, Joshy; Köbel, Martin; Ramus, Susan J; Bowtell, David

    2015-07-01

    High-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) account for approximately 70% of all epithelial ovarian cancers diagnosed. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we previously identified four molecular subtypes of HGSC: C1 (mesenchymal), C2 (immunoreactive), C4 (differentiated), and C5 (proliferative), which correlate with patient survival and have distinct biological features. Here, we describe molecular classification of HGSC based on a limited number of genes to allow cost-effective and high-throughput subtype analysis. We determined a minimal signature for accurate classification, including 39 differentially expressed and nine control genes from microarray experiments. Taqman-based (low-density arrays and Fluidigm), fluorescent oligonucleotides (Nanostring), and targeted RNA sequencing (Illumina) assays were then compared for their ability to correctly classify fresh and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. All platforms achieved > 90% classification accuracy with RNA from fresh frozen samples. The Illumina and Nanostring assays were superior with fixed material. We found that the C1, C2, and C4 molecular subtypes were largely consistent across multiple surgical deposits from individual chemo-naive patients. In contrast, we observed substantial subtype heterogeneity in patients whose primary ovarian sample was classified as C5. The development of an efficient molecular classifier of HGSC should enable further biological characterization of molecular subtypes and the development of targeted clinical trials. PMID:25810134

  12. The Molecular Fingerprint of High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Reflects Its Fallopian Tube Origin

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Mirjana; Fotopoulou, Christina; Meyer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    High grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC), the most lethal and frequent type of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), has poor long term prognosis due to a combination of factors: late detection, great metastatic potential and the capacity to develop resistance to available therapeutic drugs. Furthermore, there has been considerable controversy concerning the etiology of this malignancy. New studies, both clinical and molecular, strongly suggest that HGSC originates not from the surface of the ovary, but from the epithelial layer of the neighboring fallopian tube fimbriae. In this paper we summarize data supporting the central role of fallopian tube epithelium in the development of HGSC. Specifically, we address cellular pathways and regulatory mechanisms which are modulated in the process of transformation, but also genetic changes which accumulate during disease progression. Similarities between fallopian tube mucosa and the malignant tissue of HGSC warrant a closer analysis of homeostatic mechanisms in healthy epithelium in order to elucidate key steps in disease development. Finally, we highlight the importance of the cancer stem cell (CSC) identification and understanding of its niche regulation for improvement of therapeutic strategies. PMID:23528888

  13. Aberrant MUC1-TRIM46-KRTCAP2 Chimeric RNAs in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Kalpana; Kordestani, Gona Karimi; Galagoda, Anika; Coarfa, Cristian; Yen, Laising

    2015-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) is among the most lethal forms of cancer in women. By analyzing the mRNA-seq reads from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we uncovered a novel cancer-enriched chimeric RNA as the result of splicing between MUC1, a highly glycosylated transmembrane mucin, TRIM46, a tripartite motif containing protein, and KRTCAP2, a keratinocyte associated protein. Experimental analyses by RT-PCR (reverse transcription PCR) and Sanger sequencing using an in-house cohort of 59 HGSC patient tumors revealed a total of six MUC1-TRIM46-KRTCAP2 isoforms joined by different annotated splice sites between these genes. These chimeric isoforms are not detected in non-cancerous ovaries, yet are present in three out of every four HGSC patient tumors, a significant frequency given the exceedingly heterogeneous nature of this disease. Transfection of the cDNA of MUC1-TRIM46-KRTCAP2 isoforms in mammalian cells led to the translation of mutant MUC1 fusion proteins that are unglycosylated and cytoplasmically localized as opposed to the cell membrane, a feature resembling the tumor-associated MUC1. Because the parental MUC1 is overexpressed in 90% of HGSC tumors and has been proposed as a clinical biomarker and therapeutic target, the chimeric MUC1-TRIM46-KRTCAP2 isoforms identified in this report could represent significantly better MUC1 variants for the same clinical utilities. PMID:26492273

  14. A genetically engineered ovarian cancer mouse model based on fallopian tube transformation mimics human high-grade serous carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Sherman-Baust, Cheryl A; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Valle, Blanca L; Shih, Ie-Ming; Kurman, Robert J; Wang, Tian-Li; Amano, Tomokazu; Ko, Minoru S H; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Araki, Yoshihiko; Lehrmann, Elin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Morin, Patrice J

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) originates from the epithelium of the fallopian tube. However, most mouse models are based on the previous prevailing view that ovarian cancer develops from the transformation of the ovarian surface epithelium. Here, we report the extensive histological and molecular characterization of the mogp-TAg transgenic mouse, which expresses the SV40 large T-antigen (TAg) under the control of the mouse müllerian-specific Ovgp-1 promoter. Histological analysis of the fallopian tubes of mogp-TAg mice identified a variety of neoplastic lesions analogous to those described as precursors to ovarian HGSC. We identified areas of normal-appearing p53-positive epithelium that are similar to 'p53 signatures' in the human fallopian tube. More advanced proliferative lesions with nuclear atypia and epithelial stratification were also identified that were morphologically and immunohistochemically reminiscent of human serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), a potential precursor of ovarian HGSC. Beside these non-invasive precursor lesions, we also identified invasive adenocarcinoma in the ovaries of 56% of the mice. Microarray analysis revealed several genes differentially expressed between the fallopian tube of mogp-TAg and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6. One of these genes, Top2a, which encodes topoisomerase IIα, was shown by immunohistochemistry to be concurrently expressed with elevated p53 and was specifically elevated in mouse STICs but not in the surrounding tissues. TOP2A protein was also found elevated in human STICs, low-grade and high-grade serous carcinoma. The mouse model reported here displays a progression from normal tubal epithelium to invasive HGSC in the ovary, and therefore closely simulates the current emerging model of human ovarian HGSC pathogenesis. This mouse therefore has the potential to be a very useful new model for elucidating the mechanisms of serous ovarian tumourigenesis, as well as

  15. The peritoneal tumour microenvironment of high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Leinster, D Andrew; Kulbe, Hagen; Everitt, Gemma; Thompson, Richard; Perretti, Mauro; Gavins, Felicity N E; Cooper, Dianne; Gould, David; Ennis, Darren P; Lockley, Michelle; McNeish, Iain A; Nourshargh, Sussan; Balkwill, Frances R

    2012-06-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) disseminates early and extensively throughout the peritoneal space, causing multiple lesions that are a major clinical problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular composition of peritoneal tumour deposits in patient biopsies and their evolution in mouse models using immunohistochemistry, intravital microscopy, confocal microscopy, and 3D modelling. Tumour deposits from the omentum of HGSC patients contained a prominent leukocyte infiltrate of CD3(+) T cells and CD68(+) macrophages, with occasional neutrophils. Alpha-smooth muscle actin(+) (α-SMA(+) ) pericytes and/or fibroblasts surrounded these well-vascularized tumour deposits. Using the murine bowel mesentery as an accessible mouse peritoneal tissue that could be easily imaged, and two different transplantable models, we found multiple microscopic tumour deposits after i.p. injection of malignant cells. Attachment to the peritoneal surface was rapid (6-48 h) with an extensive CD45(+) leukocyte infiltrate visible by 48 h. This infiltrate persisted until end point and in the syngeneic murine ID8 model, it primarily consisted of CD3(+) T lymphocytes and CD68(+) macrophages with α-SMA(+) cells also involved from the earliest stages. A majority of tumour deposits developed above existing mesenteric blood vessels, but in avascular spaces new blood vessels tracked towards the tumour deposits by 2-3 weeks in the IGROV-1 xenografts and 6 weeks in the ID8 syngeneic model; a vigorous convoluted blood supply was established by end point. Inhibition of tumour cell cytokine production by stable expression of shRNA to CXCR4 in IGROV-1 cells did not influence the attachment of cells to the mesentery but delayed neovascularization and reduced tumour deposit size. We conclude that the multiple peritoneal tumour deposits found in HGSC patients can be modelled in the mouse. The techniques described here may be useful for assessing treatments that target the disseminated

  16. Molecular Mechanism Linking BRCA1 Dysfunction to High Grade Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancers with Peritoneal Permeability and Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Desai, A; Xu, J; Aysola, K; Akinbobuyi, O; White, M; Reddy, VE; Okoli, J; Clark, C; Partridge, EE; Childs, Ed; Beech, DJ; Rice, MV; Reddy, ESP; Rao, VN

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer constitutes the second most common gynecological cancer with a five-year survival rate of 40%. Among the various histotypes associated with hereditary ovarian cancer, high-grade serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma (HGSEOC) is the most predominant and women with inherited mutations in BRCA1 have a lifetime risk of 40–60%. HGSEOC is a challenge for clinical oncologists, due to late presentation of patient, diagnosis and high rate of relapse. Ovarian tumors have a wide range of clinical presentations including development of ascites as a result of deregulated endothelial function thereby causing increased vascular permeability of peritoneal vessels. The molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Studies have shown that fallopian tube cancers develop in women with BRCA1 gene mutations more often than previously suspected. Recent studies suggest that many primary peritoneal cancers and some high-grade serous epithelial ovarian carcinomas actually start in the fallopian tubes. In this article we have addressed the molecular pathway of a recently identified potential biomarker Ubc9 whose deregulated expression due to BRCA1 dysfunction can result in HGSEOC with peritoneal permeability and formation of ascites. We also discuss the role of downstream targets Caveolin-1 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in the pathogenesis of ascites in ovarian carcinomas. Finally we hypothesize a signaling axis between Ubc9 over expression, loss of Caveolin-1 and induction of VEGF in BRCA1 mutant HGSEOC cells. We suggest that Ubc9-mediated stimulation of VEGF as a novel mechanism underlying ovarian cancer aggressiveness and ascites formation. Agents that target Ubc9 and VEGF signaling may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to impede peritoneal growth and spread of HGSEOC. PMID:26665166

  17. Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer: A Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland F.; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Cooke, Susanna L.; Newman, Scott; Temple, Jillian; Piskorz, Anna M.; Gale, Davina; Sayal, Karen; Murtaza, Muhammed; Baldwin, Peter J.; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Earl, Helena M.; Sala, Evis; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Parkinson, Christine A.; Markowetz, Florian; Brenton, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The major clinical challenge in the treatment of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the development of progressive resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. The objective of this study was to determine whether intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity resulting from clonal evolution and the emergence of subclonal tumour populations in HGSOC was associated with the development of resistant disease. Methods and Findings Evolutionary inference and phylogenetic quantification of heterogeneity was performed using the MEDICC algorithm on high-resolution whole genome copy number profiles and selected genome-wide sequencing of 135 spatially and temporally separated samples from 14 patients with HGSOC who received platinum-based chemotherapy. Samples were obtained from the clinical CTCR-OV03/04 studies, and patients were enrolled between 20 July 2007 and 22 October 2009. Median follow-up of the cohort was 31 mo (interquartile range 22–46 mo), censored after 26 October 2013. Outcome measures were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). There were marked differences in the degree of clonal expansion (CE) between patients (median 0.74, interquartile range 0.66–1.15), and dichotimization by median CE showed worse survival in CE-high cases (PFS 12.7 versus 10.1 mo, p = 0.009; OS 42.6 versus 23.5 mo, p = 0.003). Bootstrap analysis with resampling showed that the 95% confidence intervals for the hazard ratios for PFS and OS in the CE-high group were greater than 1.0. These data support a relationship between heterogeneity and survival but do not precisely determine its effect size. Relapsed tissue was available for two patients in the CE-high group, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the prevalent clonal population at clinical recurrence arose from early divergence events. A subclonal population marked by a NF1 deletion showed a progressive increase in tumour allele fraction during chemotherapy. Conclusions This study demonstrates that

  18. Nadir CA-125 level as prognosis indicator of high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The capacity of nadir CA-125 levels to predict the prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer remains controversial. This study aimed to explore whether the nadir CA-125 serum levels could predict the durations of overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC) from the USA and PRC. Materials and methods A total of 616 HG-SOC patients from the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC, USA) between 1990 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. The results of 262 cases from the Jiangsu Institute of Cancer Research (JICR, PRC) between 1992 and 2011 were used to validate the MDACC data. The CA-125 immunohistochemistry assay was performed on 280 tissue specimens. The Cox proportional hazards model and the log-rank test were used to assess the associations between the clinicopathological characteristics and duration of survival. Results The nadir CA-125 level was an independent predictor of OS and PFS (p < 0.01 for both) in the MDACC patients. Lower nadir CA-125 levels (≤10 U/mL) were associated with longer OS and PFS (median: 61.2 and 16.8 months with 95% CI: 52.0–72.4 and 14.0–19.6 months, respectively) than their counterparts with shorter OS and PFS (median: 49.2 and 10.5 months with 95% CI: 41.7–56.7 and 6.9–14.1 months, respectively). The nadir CA-125 levels in JICR patients were similarly independent when predicting the OS and PFS (p < 0.01 for both). Nadir CA-125 levels less than or equal to 10 U/mL were associated with longer OS and PFS (median: 59.9 and 15.5 months with 95% CI: 49.7–70.1 and 10.6–20.4 months, respectively), as compared with those more than 10 U/mL (median: 42.0 and 9.0 months with 95% CI: 34.4–49.7 and 6.6–11.2 months, respectively). Baseline serum CA-125 levels, but not the CA-125 expression in tissues, were associated with the OS and PFS of HG-SOC patients in the MDACC and JICR groups. However, these values were not independent. Nadir CA-125

  19. Metastatic ovarian papillary cystadenocarcinoma to the small intestine serous surface: report of a case of high-grade histopathologic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cystadenocarcinoma is characterized by marked heterogeneity and may be composed of an admixture of histologic growth patterns, including acinar, papillary and solid. In the present study, a case of isolated small intestine metastasis of ovarian papillary cystadenocarcinoma was reported. A 7-year-old female mixed-breed dog presented with a mass in the left upper quadrant with progressive enlargement of the abdomen, periodic bloody discharge from the vulva and incontinence. The tumor was histologically characterized by the presence of cysts and proliferation of papillae, both lined by single- or multi-layered pleomorphic epithelial cells. Furthermore, the mass was composed by intense cellular and nuclear pleomorphism and numerous mitotic figures. These findings indicate a tumor of high-grade malignancy with infiterative tumor cells resembling the papillary ovarian tumor in the serosal surface of the small intestine along with an intact serosa. Immunohistochemically, tumor was positive for CK7 and negative immunoreactivity for CK20. The histopathologic features coupled with the CK7 immunoreactivity led to a diagnosis of high grade ovarian papillary cystadenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of small intestine serousal surface metastasis from ovarian papillary cystadenocarcinoma. PMID:24636424

  20. Adopting a Uniform Approach to Site Assignment in Tubo-Ovarian High-Grade Serous Carcinoma: The Time has Come.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naveena; Gilks, C Blake; Hirshowitz, Lynn; Wilkinson, Nafisa; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-05-01

    There is currently sufficient evidence that nonuterine high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) originates in the fallopian tube in the majority of cases, but this is not uniformly reflected in our diagnostic terminology. This is because there remains wide variation in awareness and acceptance of this evidence, which conflicts with traditional views on origin. Accurate disease classification is fundamental to routine clinical practice and research, particularly at a time when exciting new approaches to therapy, early detection, and prevention are appearing on the horizon. We feel the time has come to minimize individual and institutional variations in practice, and agree on an evidence-based approach to uniform terminology and primary site assignment. In this paper we put forward a proposal for a unified approach based on published research evidence and discuss the reasons why it is vital to agree on a uniform protocol. We propose the term "Tubo-ovarian HGSC" in preference to "pelvic" or "Müllerian," as it accurately reflects the origin of this disease in the vast majority of cases, and is unambiguous, distinguishing it clearly from uterine serous carcinoma and ovarian low-grade serous carcinomas. A detailed protocol for primary site assignment is presented for different scenarios, which is easy to follow and has been developed with a view to promoting a uniform approach worldwide. PMID:26977579

  1. Genomic Characterization of High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer: Dissecting Its Molecular Heterogeneity as a Road Towards Effective Therapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Mittempergher, Lorenza

    2016-07-01

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) accounts for the majority of the ovarian cancer deaths, but over the last years little improvement in overall survival has been achieved. HGSOC is a molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease. At genomic level, it represents a C-class malignancy having frequent gene losses (NF1, RB1, PTEN) and gains (CCNE1, MYC). HGSOC shows a simple mutational profile with TP53 nearly always mutated and with other genes mutated at low frequency. Importantly, 50 % of all HGSOCs have genetic features indicating a homologous recombination (HR) deficiency. HR deficient tumors are highly sensitive to PARP inhibitor anticancer agents, which exhibit synthetic lethality with a defective HR pathway. Transcriptionally, HGSOCs can be grouped into different molecular subtypes with distinct biology and prognosis. Molecular stratification of HGSOC based on these genomic features may result in improved therapeutic strategies. PMID:27241520

  2. Multiple direct and indirect mechanisms drive estrogen-induced tumor growth in high grade serous ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ciucci, Alessandra; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Buttarelli, Marianna; Lisi, Lucia; Travaglia, Daniele; Martinelli, Enrica; Scambia, Giovanni; Gallo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The notion that menopausal estrogen replacement therapy increases ovarian cancer risk, but only for the two more common types (i.e. serous and endometrioid), while possibly decreasing risk for clear cell tumors, is strongly suggestive of causality. However, whether estradiol (E2) is tumorigenic or promotes development of occult preexisting disease is unknown. The present study investigated molecular and cellular mechanisms by which E2 modulates the growth of high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Results showed that ERα expression was necessary and sufficient to induce the growth of HGSOC cells in in vitro models. Conversely, in vivo experimental studies demonstrated that increasing the levels of circulating estrogens resulted in a significant growth acceleration of ERα-negative HGSOC xenografts, as well. Tumors from E2-treated mice had significantly higher proliferation rate, angiogenesis, and density of tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) compared to ovariectomized females. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analysis of ERα-negative tissue specimens from HGSOC patients showed a significantly greater TAM infiltration in premenopausal compared to postmenopausal women. This study describes novel insights into the impact of E2 on tumor microenvironment, independently of its direct effect on tumor cell growth, thus supporting the idea that multiple direct and indirect mechanisms drive estrogen-induced tumor growth in HGSOC. PMID:26797759

  3. E2Fs mediate a fundamental cell-cycle deregulation in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, T; Bijsmans, I T G W; Van de Vijver, K K; Bekaert, S; Oosting, J; Van Criekinge, W; van Engeland, M; Sieben, N L G

    2009-01-01

    Several studies described a role for the E2F/Rb pathway in ovarian serous carcinomas (SCAs). Since E2F/Rb pathway deregulation is a general hallmark of human cancer, it remains unclear whether this deregulation is of particular importance in SCAs or whether it reflects a common oncological feature. Here, we have clarified this issue by the examination of microarray expression profiles of SCAs and particularly by the comparison with another, less malignant, ovarian cancer type, serous borderline tumours (SBTs). Results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR, both on the microarray samples and on an independent panel, and TP53 mutation analysis was performed. This integrated analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of the transcription factors E2F1 and E2F3 in SCAs, when compared to SBTs. This was associated with vast overexpression of E2F target genes in SCAs compared to SBTs. High-grade SCAs in particular exhibited a major deregulated E2F target expression pattern. Generally, overexpression of E2F targets in SCAs appeared to be well structured since those targets considered negative regulators of the cell cycle or promoters of apoptosis were usually not overexpressed in SCAs. Similar to E2F target deregulation, TP53 mutations were identified in SCA3s, to a lesser extent in SCA1s, and not in SBTs. These results suggest that a structured, generally up-regulated E2F transcription factor activity is associated with a global cell-cycle disturbance in high-grade SCAs and exceeds typical E2F/Rb pathway disruption in tumours, at least compared with SBTs. PMID:18991331

  4. Utility of ovarian biopsy in pancreatic metastasis of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KOHEI; NAKAYAMA, KENTARO; ISHIKAWA, MASAKO; ISHIKAWA, NORIYOSHI; NAGASE, MAMIKO; KATAGIRI, HIROSHI; ISHIBASHI, TOMOKA; SATO, EMI; IIDA, KOHJI; SULTANA, RAZIA; KYO, SATORU

    2016-01-01

    It is very rare that ovarian carcinoma metastasizes to the pancreas, and pathological diagnosis is required to confirm the primary site. The present study reported a 73-year-old woman with serous carcinoma of the ovary that metastasized to the tail of the pancreas. Metastasis was confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical examination of a biopsy of the ovarian tumor, an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreatic tumor and computerized tomography-guided paraaortic lymph node biopsy. A biopsy of the ovarian tumor is useful to make a precise diagnosis and to determine proper treatment when ovarian and pancreatic tumors are identified at the same time and the primary neoplasm is uncertain. PMID:27330762

  5. Preclinical 89Zr Immuno-PET of High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer and Lymph Node Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Sevak, Kuntal K.; Monette, Sebastien; Carlin, Sean D.; Knight, James C.; Wuest, Frank R.; Sala, Evis; Zeglis, Brian M.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    The elevation of cancer antigen 125 (CA125) levels in the serum of asymptomatic patients precedes the radiologic detection of high-grade serous ovarian cancer by at least 2 mo and the final clinical diagnosis by 5 mo. PET imaging of CA125 expression by ovarian cancer cells may enhance the evaluation of the extent of disease and provide a roadmap to surgery as well as detect recurrence and metastases. Methods 89Zr-labeled mAb-B43.13 was synthesized to target CA125 and evaluated via PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice bearing OVCAR3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma xenografts. Ex vivo analysis of tumors and lymph nodes was performed via autoradiography, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Results PET imaging using 89Zr-DFO-mAb-B43.13 (DFO is desferrioxamine) clearly delineated CA125-positive OVCAR3 xenografts as early as 24 h after the administration of the radioimmunoconjugate. Biodistribution studies revealed accretion of 89Zr-DFO-mAb-B43.13 in the OVCAR3 tumors, ultimately reaching 22.3 ± 6.3 percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 72 h after injection. Most interestingly, activity concentrations greater than 50 %ID/g were observed in the ipsilateral lymph nodes of the xenograft-bearingmice. Histopathologic analysis of the immuno-PET–positive lymph nodes revealed the presence of grossly metastasized ovarian cancer cells within the lymphoid tissues. In control experiments, only low-level, non-specific uptake of 89Zr-labeled isotype IgG was observed in OVCAR3 tumors; similarly, low-activity concentrations of 89Zr-DFO-mAb-B43.13 accumulated in CA125-negative SKOV3 tumors. Conclusion Immuno-PET with 89Zr-labeled mAb-B43.13 is a potential strategy for the noninvasive delineation of extent of disease and may add value in treatment planning and treatment monitoring of high-grade serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26837339

  6. Accumulated Metabolites of Hydroxybutyric Acid Serve as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Ovarian High-Grade Serous Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hilvo, Mika; de Santiago, Ines; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Schmitt, Wolfgang D; Budczies, Jan; Kuhberg, Marc; Dietel, Manfred; Aittokallio, Tero; Markowetz, Florian; Denkert, Carsten; Sehouli, Jalid; Frezza, Christian; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Braicu, Elena Ioana

    2016-02-15

    Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease of low prevalence, but poor survival. Early diagnosis is critical for survival, but it is often challenging because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are subtle and become apparent only during advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the identification of robust biomarkers of early disease is a clinical priority. Metabolomic profiling is an emerging diagnostic tool enabling the detection of biomarkers reflecting alterations in tumor metabolism, a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we performed metabolomic profiling of serum and tumor tissue from 158 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and 100 control patients with benign or non-neoplastic lesions. We report metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid (HBA) as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers associated with tumor burden and patient survival. The accumulation of HBA metabolites caused by HGSOC was also associated with reduced expression of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by ALDH5A1), and with the presence of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition gene signature, implying a role for these metabolic alterations in cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings represent the first comprehensive metabolomics analysis in HGSOC and propose a new set of metabolites as biomarkers of disease with diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. PMID:26685161

  7. Accumulated metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hilvo, Mika; de Santiago, Ines; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Schmitt, Wolfgang D.; Budczies, Jan; Kuhberg, Marc; Dietel, Manfred; Aittokallio, Tero; Markowetz, Florian; Denkert, Carsten; Sehouli, Jalid; Frezza, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease of low prevalence, but poor survival. Early diagnosis is critical for survival, but is often challenging because the symptoms of ovarian cancer are subtle and become apparent only during advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the identification of robust biomarkers of early disease is a clinical priority. Metabolomic profiling is an emerging diagnostic tool enabling the detection of biomarkers reflecting alterations in tumor metabolism, a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we performed metabolomic profiling of serum and tumor tissue from 158 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and 100 control patients with benign or non-neoplastic lesions. We report metabolites of hydroxybutyric acid (HBA) as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers associated with tumor burden and patient survival. The accumulation of HBA metabolites caused by HGSOC was also associated with reduced expression of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by ALDH5A1), and with the presence of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) gene signature, implying a role for these metabolic alterations in cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings represent the first comprehensive metabolomics analysis in HGSOC and propose a new set of metabolites as biomarkers of disease with diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. PMID:26685161

  8. Cis-eQTL analysis and functional validation of candidate susceptibility genes for high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Li, Qiyuan; Kar, Siddhartha; Seo, Ji-Heui; Tyrer, Jonathan; Spindler, Tassja J.; Lee, Janet; Chen, Yibu; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Aben, Katja K. H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bowtell, David; Webb, Penelope M.; deFazio, Anna; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Berchuck, Andrew; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Anne; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kruger Kjaer, Susanne; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Sellers, Thomas A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Monteiro, Alvaro; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have reported 11 regions conferring risk of high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses can identify candidate susceptibility genes at risk loci. Here we evaluate cis-eQTL associations at 47 regions associated with HGSOC risk (P≤10−5). For three cis-eQTL associations (P<1.4 × 10−3, FDR<0.05) at 1p36 (CDC42), 1p34 (CDCA8) and 2q31 (HOXD9), we evaluate the functional role of each candidate by perturbing expression of each gene in HGSOC precursor cells. Overexpression of HOXD9 increases anchorage-independent growth, shortens population-doubling time and reduces contact inhibition. Chromosome conformation capture identifies an interaction between rs2857532 and the HOXD9 promoter, suggesting this SNP is a leading causal variant. Transcriptomic profiling after HOXD9 overexpression reveals enrichment of HGSOC risk variants within HOXD9 target genes (P=6 × 10−10 for risk variants (P<10−4) within 10 kb of a HOXD9 target gene in ovarian cells), suggesting a broader role for this network in genetic susceptibility to HGSOC. PMID:26391404

  9. Cis-eQTL analysis and functional validation of candidate susceptibility genes for high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Li, Qiyuan; Kar, Siddhartha; Seo, Ji-Heui; Tyrer, Jonathan; Spindler, Tassja J; Lee, Janet; Chen, Yibu; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berchuck, Andrew; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Anne; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kruger Kjaer, Susanne; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Schwaab, Ira; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Monteiro, Alvaro; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Freedman, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have reported 11 regions conferring risk of high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses can identify candidate susceptibility genes at risk loci. Here we evaluate cis-eQTL associations at 47 regions associated with HGSOC risk (P≤10(-5)). For three cis-eQTL associations (P<1.4 × 10(-3), FDR<0.05) at 1p36 (CDC42), 1p34 (CDCA8) and 2q31 (HOXD9), we evaluate the functional role of each candidate by perturbing expression of each gene in HGSOC precursor cells. Overexpression of HOXD9 increases anchorage-independent growth, shortens population-doubling time and reduces contact inhibition. Chromosome conformation capture identifies an interaction between rs2857532 and the HOXD9 promoter, suggesting this SNP is a leading causal variant. Transcriptomic profiling after HOXD9 overexpression reveals enrichment of HGSOC risk variants within HOXD9 target genes (P=6 × 10(-10) for risk variants (P<10(-4)) within 10 kb of a HOXD9 target gene in ovarian cells), suggesting a broader role for this network in genetic susceptibility to HGSOC. PMID:26391404

  10. Identification of Prognostic Groups in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Treated with Platinum-Taxane Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huhtinen, Kaisa; Kaipio, Katja; Mikkonen, Piia; Aittomäki, Viljami; Lindell, Rony; Hynninen, Johanna; Auranen, Annika; Grénman, Seija; Lehtonen, Rainer; Carpén, Olli; Hautaniemi, Sampsa

    2015-08-01

    Disseminated high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGS-OvCa) is an aggressive disease treated with platinum and taxane combination therapy. While initial response can be favorable, the disease typically relapses and becomes resistant to treatment. As genomic alterations in HGS-OvCa are heterogeneous, identification of clinically meaningful molecular markers for outcome prediction is challenging. We developed a novel computational approach (PSFinder) that fuses transcriptomics and clinical data to identify HGS-OvCa prognostic subgroups for targeted treatment. Application of PSFinder to transcriptomics data from 180 HGS-OvCa patients treated with platinum-taxane therapy revealed 61 transcript isoforms that characterize two poor and one good survival-associated groups (P = 0.007). These groups were validated in eight independent data sets, including a prospectively collected ovarian cancer cohort. Two poor prognostic groups have distinct expression profiles and are characteristic by increased hypermethylation and stroma-related genes. Integration of the PSFinder signature and BRCA1/2 mutation status allowed even better stratification of HGS-OvCa patients' prognosis. The herein introduced novel and generally applicable computational approach can identify outcome-related subgroups and facilitate the development of precision medicine to overcome drug resistance. A limited set of biomarkers divides HGS-OvCa into three prognostic groups and predicts patients in need of targeted therapies. PMID:26122843

  11. ADAM12 is a prognostic factor associated with an aggressive molecular subtype of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Dong-Joo; Li, Andrew J; Beach, Jessica A; Walts, Ann E; Tran, Hang; Lester, Jenny; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra

    2015-07-01

    ADAM metallopeptidase domain 12 (ADAM12) is a promising biomarker because of its low expression in normal tissues and high expression in a variety of human cancers. However, ADAM12 levels in ovarian cancer have not been well characterized. We previously identified ADAM12 as one of the signature genes associated with poor survival in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC). Here, we sought to determine if high levels of the ADAM12 protein and/or messenger RNA (mRNA) are associated with clinical variables in HGSOC. We show that high protein levels of ADAM12 in banked preoperative sera are associated with shorter progression-free and overall survival. Tumor levels of ADAM12 mRNA were also associated with shorter progression-free and overall survival as well as with lymphatic and vascular invasion, and residual tumor volume following cytoreductive surgery. The majority of genes co-expressed with ADAM12 in HGSOC were transforming growth factor (TGF)β signaling targets that function in collagen remodeling and cell-matrix adhesion. In tumor sections, the ADAM12 protein and mRNA were expressed in epithelial cancer cells and surrounding stromal cells. In vitro data showed that ADAM12 mRNA levels can be increased by TGFβ signaling and direct contact between epithelial and stromal cells. High tumor levels of ADAM12 mRNA were characteristic of the mesenchymal/desmoplastic molecular subtype of HGSOC, which is known to have the poorest prognosis. Thus, ADAM12 may be a useful biomarker of aggressive ovarian cancer for which standard treatment is not effective. PMID:25926422

  12. Assessing mutant p53 in primary high-grade serous ovarian cancer using immunohistochemistry and massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Alexander J.; Dwight, Trisha; Gill, Anthony J.; Dickson, Kristie-Ann; Zhu, Ying; Clarkson, Adele; Gard, Gregory B.; Maidens, Jayne; Valmadre, Susan; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Marsh, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is mutated in cancer, including over 96% of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Mutations cause loss of wild-type p53 function due to either gain of abnormal function of mutant p53 (mutp53), or absent to low mutp53. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) enables increased accuracy of detection of somatic variants in heterogeneous tumours. We used MPS and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to characterise HGSOCs for TP53 mutation and p53 expression. TP53 mutation was identified in 94% (68/72) of HGSOCs, 62% of which were missense. Missense mutations demonstrated high p53 by IHC, as did 35% (9/26) of non-missense mutations. Low p53 was seen by IHC in 62% of HGSOC associated with non-missense mutations. Most wild-type TP53 tumours (75%, 6/8) displayed intermediate p53 levels. The overall sensitivity of detecting a TP53 mutation based on classification as ‘Low’, ‘Intermediate’ or ‘High’ for p53 IHC was 99%, with a specificity of 75%. We suggest p53 IHC can be used as a surrogate marker of TP53 mutation in HGSOC; however, this will result in misclassification of a proportion of TP53 wild-type and mutant tumours. Therapeutic targeting of mutp53 will require knowledge of both TP53 mutations and mutp53 expression. PMID:27189670

  13. Establishment of a Novel Histopathological Classification of High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma Correlated with Prognostically Distinct Gene Expression Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ryusuke; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Nakai, Hidekatsu; Yamanoi, Koji; Abiko, Kaoru; Yoshioka, Yumiko; Hamanishi, Junzo; Yamaguchi, Ken; Baba, Tsukasa; Koshiyama, Masafumi; Enomoto, Takayuki; Okamoto, Aikou; Murphy, Susan K; Mori, Seiichi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Konishi, Ikuo

    2016-05-01

    Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas data revealed four molecular subtypes of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) exhibiting distinct prognoses. We developed four novel HGSOC histopathological subtypes by focusing on tumor microenvironment: mesenchymal transition, defined by a remarkable desmoplastic reaction; immune reactive by lymphocytes infiltrating the tumor; solid and proliferative by a solid growth pattern; and papilloglandular by a papillary architecture. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed four clusters correlated with histopathological subtypes in both Kyoto and Niigata HGSOC transcriptome data sets (P < 0.001). Gene set enrichment analysis revealed pathways enriched in our histopathological classification significantly overlapped with the four molecular subtypes: mesenchymal, immunoreactive, proliferative, and differentiated (P < 0.0001, respectively). In 132 HGSOC cases, progression-free survival and overall survival were best in the immune reactive, whereas overall survival was worst in the mesenchymal transition (P < 0.001, respectively), findings reproduced in 89 validation cases (P < 0.05, respectively). The CLOVAR_MES_UP single-sample gene set enrichment analysis scores representing the mesenchymal molecular subtype were higher in paclitaxel responders than nonresponders (P = 0.002) in the GSE15622 data set. Taxane-containing regimens improved survival of cases with high MES_UP scores compared with nontaxane regimens (P < 0.001) in the GSE9891 data set. Our novel histopathological classification of HGSOC correlates with distinct prognostic transcriptome subtypes. The mesenchymal transition subtype might be particularly sensitive to taxane. PMID:26993207

  14. Modeling the Dynamics of High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Progression for Transvaginal Ultrasound-Based Screening and Early Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Min; Levy, Doron

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) represents the majority of ovarian cancers and accounts for the largest proportion of deaths from the disease. A timely detection of low volume HGSOC should be the goal of any screening studies. However, numerous transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) detection-based population studies aimed at detecting low-volume disease have not yielded reduced mortality rates. A quantitative invalidation of TVU as an effective HGSOC screening strategy is a necessary next step. Herein, we propose a mathematical model for a quantitative explanation on the reported failure of TVU-based screening to improve HGSOC low-volume detectability and overall survival.We develop a novel in silico mathematical assessment of the efficacy of a unimodal TVU monitoring regimen as a strategy aimed at detecting low-volume HGSOC in cancer-positive cases, defined as cases for which the inception of the first malignant cell has already occurred. Our findings show that the median window of opportunity interval length for TVU monitoring and HGSOC detection is approximately 1.76 years. This does not translate into reduced mortality levels or improved detection accuracy in an in silico cohort across multiple TVU monitoring frequencies or detection sensitivities. We demonstrate that even a semiannual, unimodal TVU monitoring protocol is expected to miss detectable HGSOC. Lastly, we find that circa 50% of the simulated HGSOC growth curves never reach the baseline detectability threshold, and that on average, 5–7 infrequent, rate-limiting stochastic changes in the growth parameters are associated with reaching HGSOC detectability and mortality thresholds respectively. Focusing on a malignancy poorly studied in the mathematical oncology community, our model captures the dynamic, temporal evolution of HGSOC progression. Our mathematical model is consistent with recent case reports and prospective TVU screening population studies, and provides support to the empirical

  15. Markers of T Cell Infiltration and Function Associate with Favorable Outcome in Vascularized High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Katelin N.; Spowart, Jaeline E.; Huwait, Hassan; Eshragh, Sima; West, Nathan R.; Elrick, Mary A.; Kalloger, Steve E.; Anglesio, Michael; Watson, Peter H.; Huntsman, David G.; Lum, Julian J.

    2013-01-01

    Background When T cells infiltrate the tumor environment they encounter a myriad of metabolic stressors including hypoxia. Overcoming the limitations imposed by an inadequate tumor vasculature that contributes to these stressors may be a crucial step to immune cells mounting an effective anti-tumor response. We sought to determine whether the functional capacity of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) could be influenced by the tumor vasculature and correlated this with survival in patients with ovarian cancer. Methodology and Principal Findings In 196 high-grade serous ovarian tumors, we confirmed that the tumor vascularity as measured by the marker CD31 was associated with improved patient disease-specific survival. We also found that tumors positive for markers of TIL (CD8, CD4 and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)) and T cell function (granzyme B and T-cell restricted intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1)) correlated significantly with elevated vascularity. In vitro, hypoxic CD8 T cells showed reduced cytolytic activity, secreted less effector cytokines and upregulated autophagy. Survival analysis revealed that patients had a significant improvement in disease-specific survival when FoxP3 expressing cells were present in CD31-high tumors compared to patients with FoxP3 expressing cells in CD31-low tumors [HR: 2.314 (95% CI 1.049–5.106); p = 0.0377]. Patients with high vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressing tumors containing granzyme B positive cells had improved survival compared to patients with granzyme B positive cells in VEGF-low tumors [HR: 2.522 (95% CI 1.097–5.799); p = 0.0294]. Significance Overall, this data provides a rationale for developing strategies aimed at improving the adaptability and function of TIL to hypoxic tumor conditions. PMID:24376535

  16. Aurora Kinase A expression predicts platinum-resistance and adverse outcome in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mignogna, Chiara; Staropoli, Nicoletta; Botta, Cirino; De Marco, Carmela; Rizzuto, Antonia; Morelli, Michele; Di Cello, Annalisa; Franco, Renato; Camastra, Caterina; Presta, Ivan; Malara, Natalia; Salvino, Angela; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Barni, Tullio; Donato, Giuseppe; Di Vito, Anna

    2016-01-01

    High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma (HGSOC) is the predominant histotype of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), characterized by advanced stage at diagnosis, frequent TP53 mutation, rapid progression, and high responsiveness to platinum-based-chemotherapy. To date, standard first-line-chemotherapy in advanced EOC includes platinum salts and paclitaxel with or without bevacizumab. The major prognostic factor is the response duration from the end of the platinum-based treatment (platinum-free interval) and about 10-0 % of EOC patients bear a platinum-refractory disease or develop early resistance (platinum-free interval shorter than 6 months). On these bases, a careful selection of patients who could benefit from chemotherapy is recommended to avoid unnecessary side effects and for a better disease outcome. In this retrospective study, an immunohistochemical evaluation of Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) was performed on 41 cases of HGSOC according to platinum-status. Taking into account the number and intensity of AURKA positive cells we built a predictive score able to discriminate with high accuracy platinum-sensitive patients from platinum-resistant patients (p < 0.001). Furthermore, we observed that AURKA overexpression correlates to worse overall survival (p = 0.001; HR 0.14). We here suggest AURKA as new effective tool to predict the biological behavior of HGSOC. Particularly, our results indicate that AURKA has a role both as predictor of platinum-resistance and as prognostic factor, that deserves further investigation in prospective clinical trials. Indeed, in the era of personalized medicine, AURKA could assist the clinicians in selecting the best treatment and represent, at the same time, a promising new therapeutic target in EOC treatment. PMID:27209210

  17. Studying platinum sensitivity and resistance in high-grade serous ovarian cancer: Different models for different questions.

    PubMed

    Alkema, Nicolette G; Wisman, G Bea A; van der Zee, Ate G J; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; de Jong, Steven

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) has the highest mortality rate among all gynecological cancers. Patients are generally diagnosed in an advanced stage with the majority of cases displaying platinum resistant relapses. Recent genomic interrogation of large numbers of HGSOC patient samples indicated high complexity in terms of genetic aberrations, intra- and intertumor heterogeneity and underscored their lack of targetable oncogenic mutations. Sub-classifications of HGSOC based on expression profiles, termed 'differentiated', 'immunoreactive', 'mesenchymal' and 'proliferative', were shown to have prognostic value. In addition, in almost half of all HGSOC patients, a deficiency in homologous recombination (HR) was found that potentially can be targeted using PARP inhibitors. Developing precision medicine requires advanced experimental models. In the current review, we discuss experimental HGSOC models in which resistance to platinum therapy and the use of novel therapeutics can be carefully studied. Panels of better-defined primary cell lines need to be established to capture the full spectrum of HGSOC subtypes. Further refinement of cell lines is obtained with a 3-dimensional culture model mimicking the tumor microenvironment. Alternatively, ex vivo ovarian tumor tissue slices are used. For in vivo studies, larger panels of ovarian cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are being established, encompassing all expression subtypes. Ovarian cancer PDXs grossly retain tumor heterogeneity and clinical response to platinum therapy is preserved. PDXs are currently used in drug screens and as avatars for patient response. The role of the immune system in tumor responses can be assessed using humanized PDXs and immunocompetent genetically engineered mouse models. Dynamic tracking of genetic alterations in PDXs as well as patients during treatment and after relapse is feasible by sequencing circulating cell-free tumor DNA and analyzing circulating tumor cells. We

  18. CDKN2D-WDFY2 Is a Cancer-Specific Fusion Gene Recurrent in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakshe, Kimal; Hawkins, Shannon M.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Yen, Laising

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in women. Almost 70% of ovarian cancer deaths are due to the high-grade serous subtype, which is typically detected only after it has metastasized. Characterization of high-grade serous cancer is further complicated by the significant heterogeneity and genome instability displayed by this cancer. Other than mutations in TP53, which is common to many cancers, highly recurrent recombinant events specific to this cancer have yet to be identified. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of seven patient samples combined with experimental validation at DNA, RNA and protein levels, we identified a cancer-specific and inter-chromosomal fusion gene CDKN2D-WDFY2 that occurs at a frequency of 20% among sixty high-grade serous cancer samples but is absent in non-cancerous ovary and fallopian tube samples. This is the most frequent recombinant event identified so far in high-grade serous cancer implying a major cellular lineage in this highly heterogeneous cancer. In addition, the same fusion transcript was also detected in OV-90, an established high-grade serous type cell line. The genomic breakpoint was identified in intron 1 of CDKN2D and intron 2 of WDFY2 in patient tumor, providing direct evidence that this is a fusion gene. The parental gene, CDKN2D, is a cell-cycle modulator that is also involved in DNA repair, while WDFY2 is known to modulate AKT interactions with its substrates. Transfection of cloned fusion construct led to loss of wildtype CDKN2D and wildtype WDFY2 protein expression, and a gain of a short WDFY2 protein isoform that is presumably under the control of the CDKN2D promoter. The expression of short WDFY2 protein in transfected cells appears to alter the PI3K/AKT pathway that is known to play a role in oncogenesis. CDKN2D-WDFY2 fusion could be an important molecular signature for understanding and classifying sub-lineages among heterogeneous high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas. PMID

  19. Preoperative Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio as a Predictive and Prognostic Factor for High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Rui; Ju, Xingzhu; Chen, Xiaojun; Yang, Wentao; Wu, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to demonstrate the clinical and prognostic significance of the preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). Methods We retrospectively investigated 875 patients who underwent primary staging or debulking surgery for HGSC between April 2005 and June 2013 at our institution. None of these patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. NLR was defined as the absolute neutrophil count divided by the absolute lymphocyte count. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank tests for univariate analyses. For multivariate analyses, Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of the prognostic factors, which were expressed as hazard ratios (HRs). Results The NLRs ranged from 0.30 to 24.0. The median value was 3.24 and used as the cutoff value to discriminate between the high-NLR (≥3.24) and low-NLR (<3.24) groups. A high preoperative NLR level was associated with an advanced FIGO stage, increased CA125 level, more extensive ascites, worse cytoreduction outcome and chemoresistance. For univariate analyses, a high NLR was associated with reduced PFS (p<0.001) and OS (p<0.001). In multivariate analyses, a high NLR was still an independent predictor of PFS (p = 0.011), but not OS (p = 0.148). Conclusion Our study demonstrated that NLR could reflect tumor burden and clinical outcomes to a certain extent and should be regarded as a predictive and prognostic parameter for HGSC. PMID:27203425

  20. Comprehensive Mutation Profiling by Next-Generation Sequencing of Effusion Fluids From Patients With High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ronak H.; Scott, Sasinya N.; Brannon, A. Rose; Levine, Douglas A.; Lin, Oscar; Berger, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mutation analysis for personalized treatment has become increasingly important in the management of different types of cancer. The advent of new DNA extraction protocols and sequencing platforms with reduced DNA input requirements might allow the use of cytology specimens for high-throughput mutation analysis. In this study, the authors evaluated the use of effusion fluid for next-generation sequencing-based, multigene mutation profiling. METHODS Four specimens from each of 5 patients who had at least stage III, high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma were selected: effusion fluid; frozen tumor; formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tumor; and matched normal blood. Frozen tumors from each patient were previously characterized by The Cancer Genomic Atlas (TCGA). DNA was extracted from all specimens and was sequenced using a custom hybridization capture-based assay. Genomic alterations were compared among all specimens from each patient as well as with mutations reported in TCGA for the same tumors. RESULTS In total, 17 distinct somatic mutations were identified in the cohort. Ten of 17 mutations were reported in TCGA and were called in all 3 malignant specimens procured from the patients. Of the remaining 7 mutations, 2 were called in all 3 specimens, and the other 5 were sample-specific. Two mutations were detected only in the cytology specimens. Copy number profiles were concordant among the tumors analyzed. CONCLUSIONS Cytology specimens represent suitable material for high-throughput sequencing, because all mutations described by TCGA were independently identified in the effusion fluid. Differences in mutations detected in samples procured from the same patient may reflect tumor heterogeneity. PMID:25655233

  1. Underestimation of Risk of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation in Women With High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer by BRCAPRO: A Multi-Institution Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Molly S.; Babb, Sheri A.; King, Robin H.; Urbauer, Diana L.; Batte, Brittany A.L.; Brandt, Amanda C.; Amos, Christopher I.; Buchanan, Adam H.; Mutch, David G.; Lu, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Identification of the 10% to 15% of patients with ovarian cancer who have germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations is important for management of both patients and relatives. The BRCAPRO model, which estimates mutation likelihood based on personal and family cancer history, can inform genetic testing decisions. This study's purpose was to assess the accuracy of BRCAPRO in women with ovarian cancer. Methods BRCAPRO scores were calculated for 589 patients with ovarian cancer referred for genetic counseling at three institutions. Observed mutations were compared with those predicted by BRCAPRO. Analysis of variance was used to assess factors impacting BRCAPRO accuracy. Results One hundred eighty (31%) of 589 patients with ovarian cancer tested positive. At BRCAPRO scores less than 40%, more mutations were observed than expected (93 mutations observed v 34.1 mutations expected; P < .001). If patients with BRCAPRO scores less than 10% had not been tested, 51 (28%) of 180 mutations would have been missed. BRCAPRO underestimated the risk for high-grade serous ovarian cancers but overestimated the risk for other histologies (P < .001), underestimation increased as age at diagnosis decreased (P = .02), and model performance varied by institution (P = .02). Conclusion Patients with ovarian cancer classified as low risk by BRCAPRO are more likely to test positive than predicted. The risk of a mutation in patients with low BRCAPRO scores is high enough to warrant genetic testing. This study demonstrates that assessment of family history by a validated model cannot effectively target testing to a high-risk ovarian cancer patient population, which strongly supports the recommendation to offer BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing to all patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer regardless of family history. PMID:24638001

  2. Systematic Analysis of Immune Infiltrates in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Reveals CD20, FoxP3 and TIA-1 as Positive Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Katy; Köbel, Martin; Kalloger, Steven E.; Barnes, Rebecca O.; Gao, Dongxia; Gilks, C. Blake; Watson, Peter H.; Nelson, Brad H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumor-infiltrating T cells are associated with survival in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but their functional status is poorly understood, especially relative to the different risk categories and histological subtypes of EOC. Methodology/Principal Findings Tissue microarrays containing high-grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell tumors were analyzed immunohistochemically for the presence of lymphocytes, dendritic cells, neutrophils, macrophages, MHC class I and II, and various markers of activation and inflammation. In high-grade serous tumors from optimally debulked patients, positive associations were seen between intraepithelial cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45RO, CD25, TIA-1, Granzyme B, FoxP3, CD20, and CD68, as well as expression of MHC class I and II by tumor cells. Disease-specific survival was positively associated with the markers CD8, CD3, FoxP3, TIA-1, CD20, MHC class I and class II. In other histological subtypes, immune infiltrates were less prevalent, and the only markers associated with survival were MHC class II (positive association in endometrioid cases) and myeloperoxidase (negative association in clear cell cases). Conclusions/Significance Host immune responses to EOC vary widely according to histological subtype and the extent of residual disease. TIA-1, FoxP3 and CD20 emerge as new positive prognostic factors in high-grade serous EOC from optimally debulked patients. PMID:19641607

  3. Deletion at 6q24.2-26 predicts longer survival of high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kamieniak, Marta M; Rico, Daniel; Milne, Roger L; Muñoz-Repeto, Ivan; Ibáñez, Kristina; Grillo, Miguel A; Domingo, Samuel; Borrego, Salud; Cazorla, Alicia; García-Bueno, José M; Hernando, Susana; García-Donas, Jesús; Hernández-Agudo, Elena; Y Cajal, Teresa Ramón; Robles-Díaz, Luis; Márquez-Rodas, Ivan; Cusidó, Maite; Sáez, Raquel; Lacambra-Calvet, Carmen; Osorio, Ana; Urioste, Miguel; Cigudosa, Juan C; Paz-Ares, Luis; Palacios, José; Benítez, Javier; García, María J

    2015-02-01

    Standard treatments for advanced high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs) show significant side-effects and provide only short-term survival benefits due to disease recurrence. Thus, identification of novel prognostic and predictive biomarkers is urgently needed. We have used 42 paraffin-embedded HGSOCs, to evaluate the utility of DNA copy number alterations, as potential predictors of clinical outcome. Copy number-based unsupervised clustering stratified HGSOCs into two clusters of different immunohistopathological features and survival outcome (HR = 0.15, 95%CI = 0.03-0.81; Padj = 0.03). We found that loss at 6q24.2-26 was significantly associated with the cluster of longer survival independently from other confounding factors (HR = 0.06, 95%CI = 0.01-0.43, Padj = 0.005). The prognostic value of this deletion was validated in two independent series, one consisting of 36 HGSOCs analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (P = 0.04) and another comprised of 411 HGSOCs from the Cancer Genome Atlas study (TCGA) (HR = 0.67, 95%CI = 0.48-0.93, Padj = 0.019). In addition, we confirmed the association of low expression of the genes from the region with longer survival in 799 HGSOCs (HR = 0.74, 95%CI = 0.61-0.90, log-rank P = 0.002) and 675 high-FIGO stage HGSOCs (HR = 0.76, 95%CI = 0.61-0.96, log-rank P = 0.02) available from the online tool KM-plotter. Finally, by integrating copy number, RNAseq and survival data of 296 HGSOCs from TCGA we propose a few candidate genes that can potentially explain the association. Altogether our findings indicate that the 6q24.2-26 deletion is an independent marker of favorable outcome in HGSOCs with potential clinical value as it can be analyzed by FISH on tumor sections and guide the selection of patients towards more conservative therapeutic strategies in order to reduce side-effects and improve quality of life. PMID:25454820

  4. A clinically applicable molecular classification for high-grade serous ovarian cancer based on hormone receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zheng; Wen, Hao; Bi, Rui; Ju, Xingzhu; Chen, Xiaojun; Yang, Wentao; Wu, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    To establish an effective hormone receptor-based molecular classification of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC), we retrospectively examined 875 consecutive HGSC patients who underwent primary surgery at our hospital and constructed tissue microarrays from these specimens. The expression levels of the hormone receptors were as follows: ER 64.4%, PR 12.6%, AR 35.6%, FSHR 54.5%, LHR 34.8%, and GnRHR 88.3%. Based on clustering of their expression patterns, we classified patients into five subgroups with distinctive clinical features (PR+, PR − ER + AR+, PR − ER + AR−, PR − ER − AR+, and PR − ER − AR−). Patients in the PR + group were younger compared to those in the other groups (p < 0.001). More patients were of advanced stage in the PR − ER + AR− group than the other groups (p = 0.020). A greater proportion of patients were sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy in the PR − ER − AR + group compared with the other groups (p = 0.034). A trend of increasing risk of death was observed among these subgroups (p < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, patients also had orderly increased hazard ratios for death in the PR + (HR = 2.256, 95% CI, 0.983–5.175), PR − ER + AR + (HR = 2.188, 95% CI, 1.004–4.796), PR − ER − AR− (HR = 2.316, 95% CI, 1.097–5.082) and PR − ER + AR− (HR = 2.928, 95% CI, 1.366–6.276) subgroups compared to the PR − ER − AR+ subgroup. Our classification could help predict patient clinical outcomes, guide individual treatments and stratify patients in future clinical trials. PMID:27139372

  5. Clinically occult tubal and ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas presenting in uterine samples: diagnostic pitfalls and clues to improve recognition of tumor origin.

    PubMed

    Bagby, Christina; Ronnett, Brigitte M; Yemelyanova, Anna; Maleki, Zahra; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Vang, Russell

    2013-09-01

    We report the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features in 8 patients with tubal or ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma that was present in uterine samples, in which there was the potential for clinical and morphologic misinterpretation as a primary uterine lesion before hysterectomy/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Patients ranged in age from 45 to 70 yr (mean, 57 yr). The initial presentation was variable, ranging from incidental findings on routine Pap smears to pleural effusion. During the preoperative clinical investigation, 7 of 8 patients did not have evidence of an adnexal tumor based on physical examination and radiologic imaging, and serum CA-125 levels were normal to low in 4 of 5 patients. Six patients required multiple rounds of uterine samples, and the preoperative uterine specimens that contained lesional tissue and were available for rereview in all 8 patients included endometrial biopsies/curettages (n=6), endocervical curettages (n=3), Pap smears (n=2), and a hysteroscopic myomectomy specimen (n=1). The amount of carcinoma in these specimens was typically scanty. The lesions in most cases were characterized by detached and minute epithelial clusters, small papillae, and/or individual cells. The constituent glandular cells exhibited notable atypia. Psammoma bodies were identified in only 2 cases. Immunostains for WT-1 were positive in 3 of 4 preoperative specimens. All patients ultimately underwent a hysterectomy/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, which revealed an invasive high-grade serous carcinoma of tubal (n=6) or ovarian (n=2) origin. The mean/median tumor size was 3.2/1.7 cm. Transtubal spread was considered the most likely mechanism resulting in tubal/ovarian carcinoma being found in the preoperative uterine samples. These findings highlight the deceptive clinical features of some tubal/ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas, and demonstrate that small and clinically undetectable adnexal high-grade serous carcinomas can initially

  6. Randomized trial of oral cyclophosphamide and veliparib in high-grade serous ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancers, or BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kummar, Shivaani; Oza, Amit M.; Fleming, Gini F.; Sullivan, Daniel M.; Gandara, David R.; Naughton, Michael J.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.; Morgan, Robert J.; Szabo, Peter M.; Youn, Ahrim; Chen, Alice P.; Ji, Jiuping; Allen, Deborah E.; Lih, Chih-Jian; Mehaffey, Michele G.; Walsh, William D.; McGregor, Paul M.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Williams, Paul M.; Kinders, Robert J.; Conley, Barbara A.; Simon, Richard M.; Doroshow, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Veliparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, demonstrated clinical activity in combination with oral cyclophosphamide in patients with BRCA-mutant solid tumors in a phase 1 trial. To define the relative contribution of PARP inhibition to the observed clinical activity, we conducted a randomized phase 2 trial to determine the response rate of veliparib in combination with cyclophosphamide compared to cyclophosphamide alone in patients with pretreated BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer or in patients with pretreated primary peritoneal, fallopian tube, or high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC). Methods Adult patients were randomized to receive cyclophosphamide alone (50 mg orally once daily) or with veliparib (60 mg orally once daily) in 21-day cycles. Crossover to the combination was allowed at disease progression. Results Seventy-five patients were enrolled and 72 were evaluable for response; 38 received cyclophosphamide alone and 37 the combination as their initial treatment regimen. Treatment was well tolerated. One complete response was observed in each arm, with three partial responses (PR) in the combination arm and six PRs in the cyclophosphamide alone arm. Genetic sequence and expression analyses were performed for 211 genes involved in DNA repair; none of the detected genetic alterations were significantly associated with treatment benefit. Conclusion This is the first trial that evaluated single agent, low dose cyclophosphamide in HGSOC, peritoneal, fallopian tube, and BRCA-mutant ovarian cancers. It was well tolerated and clinical activity was observed; the addition of veliparib at 60 mg daily did not improve either the response rate or the median progression free survival. PMID:25589624

  7. MAP3K8/TPL-2/COT is a potential predictive marker for MEK inhibitor treatment in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gruosso, Tina; Garnier, Camille; Abelanet, Sophie; Kieffer, Yann; Lemesre, Vincent; Bellanger, Dorine; Bieche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Mieulet, Virginie; Mechta-Grigoriou, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a silent disease with a poor prognosis that urgently requires new therapeutic strategies. In low-grade ovarian tumours, mutations in the MAP3K BRAF gene constitutively activate the downstream kinase MEK. Here we demonstrate that an additional MAP3K, MAP3K8 (TPL-2/COT), accumulates in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSCs) and is a potential prognostic marker for these tumours. By combining analyses on HGSC patient cohorts, ovarian cancer cells and patient-derived xenografts, we demonstrate that MAP3K8 controls cancer cell proliferation and migration by regulating key players in G1/S transition and adhesion dynamics. In addition, we show that the MEK pathway is the main pathway involved in mediating MAP3K8 function, and that MAP3K8 exhibits a reliable predictive value for the effectiveness of MEK inhibitor treatment. Our data highlight key roles for MAP3K8 in HGSC and indicate that MEK inhibitors could be a useful treatment strategy, in combination with conventional chemotherapy, for this disease. PMID:26456302

  8. Promoter CpG Island Methylation of Genes in Key Cancer Pathways Associates with Clinical Outcome in High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Masrour, Nahal; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Paul, James; Brown, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to identify DNA methylation biomarkers of progression free survival (PFS) to platinum-based chemotherapy in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) within biologically relevant ovarian cancer associated pathways. Experimental Design Association with PFS of CpG island (CGI) promoter DNA methylation at genes in the pathways Akt/mTOR, p53, redox and homologous recombination DNA repair was sought with PFS as the primary objective in a prospectively collected ovarian cancer cohort (n=150). Significant loci were validated for associations between PFS, methylation and gene expression in an independent TCGA data set of HGSOC (n=311). Results DNA methylation at 29 CGI loci linked to 28 genes was significantly associated with PFS, independent from conventional clinical prognostic factors (adjusted p<0.05). Of 17 out of the 28 genes represented in the TCGA data set, methylation of VEGFB, VEGFA, HDAC11, FANCA, E2F1, GPX4, PRDX2, RAD54L and RECQL4 was prognostic in this independent patient cohort (one-sided p<0.05, FDR<10%). A multivariate Cox model was constructed, with clinical parameters (age, stage, grade and histological type) and significant loci. The final model included NKD1, VEGFB and PRDX2 as the three best predictors of PFS (p=6.62x10-6, permutation test p<0.05). Focussing only on known VEGFs in the TCGA cohort showed that methylation at promoters of VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFC was significantly associated with PFS. Conclusions A three loci model of DNA methylation could identify two distinct prognostic groups of ovarian cancer patients (PFS: HR=2.29, p=3.34×10-5; Overall Survival: HR= 1.87, p=0.007) and patients more likely to have poor response to chemotherapy (OR=3.45, p=0.012). PMID:23965899

  9. Low MAD2 expression levels associate with reduced progression-free survival in patients with high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furlong, Fiona; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; O'Toole, Sharon; Phelan, Sine; McGrogan, Barbara; Maguire, Aoife; O'Grady, Anthony; Gallagher, Michael; Prencipe, Maria; McGoldrick, Aloysius; McGettigan, Paul; Brennan, Donal; Sheils, Orla; Martin, Cara; W Kay, Elaine; O'Leary, John; McCann, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has an innate susceptibility to become chemoresistant. Up to 30% of patients do not respond to conventional chemotherapy [paclitaxel (Taxol®) in combination with carboplatin] and, of those who have an initial response, many patients relapse. Therefore, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate cellular chemotherapeutic responses in EOC cells has the potential to impact significantly on patient outcome. The mitotic arrest deficiency protein 2 (MAD2), is a centrally important mediator of the cellular response to paclitaxel. MAD2 immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 82 high-grade serous EOC samples. A multivariate Cox regression analysis of nuclear MAD2 IHC intensity adjusting for stage, tumour grade and optimum surgical debulking revealed that low MAD2 IHC staining intensity was significantly associated with reduced progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.0003), with a hazard ratio of 4.689. The in vitro analyses of five ovarian cancer cell lines demonstrated that cells with low MAD2 expression were less sensitive to paclitaxel. Furthermore, paclitaxel-induced activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and apoptotic cell death was abrogated in cells transfected with MAD2 siRNA. In silico analysis identified a miR-433 binding domain in the MAD2 3′ UTR, which was verified in a series of experiments. Firstly, MAD2 protein expression levels were down-regulated in pre-miR-433 transfected A2780 cells. Secondly, pre-miR-433 suppressed the activity of a reporter construct containing the 3′-UTR of MAD2. Thirdly, blocking miR-433 binding to the MAD2 3′ UTR protected MAD2 from miR-433 induced protein down-regulation. Importantly, reduced MAD2 protein expression in pre-miR-433-transfected A2780 cells rendered these cells less sensitive to paclitaxel. In conclusion, loss of MAD2 protein expression results in increased resistance to paclitaxel in EOC cells. Measuring MAD2 IHC staining intensity may predict

  10. NGS-based BRCA1/2 mutation testing of high-grade serous ovarian cancer tissue: results and conclusions of the first international round robin trial.

    PubMed

    Endris, Volker; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Pfarr, Nicole; Penzel, Roland; Möbs, Markus; Lenze, Dido; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Hummel, Michael; Sabine-Merkelbach-Bruse; Jung, Andreas; Lehmann, Ulrich; Kreipe, Hans; Kirchner, Thomas; Büttner, Reinhard; Jochum, Wolfram; Höfler, Gerald; Dietel, Manfred; Weichert, Wilko; Schirmacher, Peter

    2016-06-01

    With the approval of olaparib as monotherapy treatment in platinum-sensitive, relapsed high-grade serous ovarian cancer by the European Medical Agency (EMA), comprehensive genotyping of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in tumor tissue has become a mandatory pre-therapeutic test. This requires significant advances in routine tumor test methodologies due to the large size of both genes and the lack of mutational hot spots. Classical focused screening approaches, like Sanger sequencing, do not allow for a sensitive, rapid, and economic analysis of tumor tissue. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches employing targeted panels for BRCA1/2 to interrogate formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor samples from either surgical resection or biopsy specimens can overcome these limitations. Although focused NGS methods have been implemented by few centers in routine molecular diagnostics for the analysis of some druggable oncogenic mutations, the reliable diagnostic testing of the entire coding regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was a new challenge requiring extensive technological improvement and quality management. Here, we describe the implementation and results of the first round robin trial for BRCA1/2 mutation testing in tumor tissue that was conducted in central Europe on May 2015, shortly after the approval and prior to the official release of olaparib. The high success rate of 81 % (21/26 test centers) demonstrates that BRCA1/2 multicenter mutation testing is well feasible in FFPE tumor tissue, extending to other tumor entities beyond ovarian cancer. The high number of test centers passing the trial demonstrates the success of the concerted efforts by German, Swiss, and Austrian pathology centers to ensure quality-controlled NGS-based testing and proves the potential of this technology in routine molecular pathology. On the basis of our results, we provide recommendations for predictive testing of tumor tissue for BRCA1/2 to clinical decision making in ovarian cancer patients. PMID

  11. Novel high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines that reflect the molecular diversity of both the sporadic and hereditary disease

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Euridice; Portelance, Lise; Arcand, Suzanna L.; Rahimi, Kurosh; Tonin, Patricia N.; Provencher, Diane; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Few cell line models of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have been developed for the high-grade serous (HGS) subtype, which is the most common and lethal form of gynaecological cancer. Here we describe the establishment of six new EOC cell lines spontaneously derived from HGS tumors (TOV2978G, TOV3041G and TOV3291G) or ascites (OV866(2), OV4453 and OV4485). Exome sequencing revealed somatic TP53 mutations in five of the cell lines. One cell line has a novel BRCA1 splice-site mutation, and another, a recurrent BRCA2 nonsense mutation, both of germline origin. The novel BRCA1 mutation induced abnormal splicing, mRNA instability, resulting in the absence of BRCA1 protein. None of the cell lines harbor mutations in KRAS or BRAF, which are characteristic of other EOC subtypes. SNP arrays showed that all of the cell lines exhibited structural chromosomal abnormalities, copy number alterations and regions of loss of heterozygosity, consistent with those described for HGS. Four cell lines were able to produce 3D-spheroids, two exhibited anchorage-independent growth, and three (including the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutated cell lines) formed tumors in SCID mice. These novel HGS EOC cell lines and their detailed characterization provide new research tools for investigating the most common and lethal form of EOC. PMID:26622941

  12. The Essential Role of H19 Contributing to Cisplatin Resistance by Regulating Glutathione Metabolism in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Hong; Suo, Sha-Sha; Xu, Xiao-Li; Ni, Mao-Wei; Gu, Lin-Hui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Liang-Yan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yue-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Primary and acquired drug resistance is one of the main obstacles encountered in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) chemotherapy. Cisplatin induces DNA damage through cross-linking and long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play an important role in chemical induced DNA-damage response, which suggests that lincRNAs may be also associated with cisplatin resistance. However, the mechanism of long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) acting on cisplatin resistance is not well understood. Here, we showed that expression of lin-RECK-3, H19, LUCAT1, LINC00961, and linc-CARS2-2 was enhanced in cisplatin-resistant A2780-DR cells, while transcriptome sequencing showed decreased Linc-TNFRSF19-1 and LINC00515 expression. Additionally, we verified that different H19 expression levels in HGSC tissues showed strong correlation with cancer recurrence. H19 knockdown in A2780-DR cells resulted in recovery of cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that six NRF2-targeted proteins, including NQO1, GSR, G6PD, GCLC, GCLM and GSTP1 involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway, were reduced in H19-knockdown cells. Furthermore, H19-knockdown cells were markedly more sensitive to hydrogen-peroxide treatment and exhibited lower glutathione levels. Our results reveal a previously unknown link between H19 and glutathione metabolism in the regulation of cancer-drug resistance. PMID:27193186

  13. The Essential Role of H19 Contributing to Cisplatin Resistance by Regulating Glutathione Metabolism in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Hong; Suo, Sha-Sha; Xu, Xiao-Li; Ni, Mao-Wei; Gu, Lin-Hui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Liang-Yan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yue-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Primary and acquired drug resistance is one of the main obstacles encountered in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) chemotherapy. Cisplatin induces DNA damage through cross-linking and long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play an important role in chemical induced DNA-damage response, which suggests that lincRNAs may be also associated with cisplatin resistance. However, the mechanism of long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) acting on cisplatin resistance is not well understood. Here, we showed that expression of lin-RECK-3, H19, LUCAT1, LINC00961, and linc-CARS2-2 was enhanced in cisplatin-resistant A2780-DR cells, while transcriptome sequencing showed decreased Linc-TNFRSF19-1 and LINC00515 expression. Additionally, we verified that different H19 expression levels in HGSC tissues showed strong correlation with cancer recurrence. H19 knockdown in A2780-DR cells resulted in recovery of cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that six NRF2-targeted proteins, including NQO1, GSR, G6PD, GCLC, GCLM and GSTP1 involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway, were reduced in H19-knockdown cells. Furthermore, H19-knockdown cells were markedly more sensitive to hydrogen-peroxide treatment and exhibited lower glutathione levels. Our results reveal a previously unknown link between H19 and glutathione metabolism in the regulation of cancer-drug resistance. PMID:27193186

  14. Chromatin H3K27me3/H3K4me3 histone marks define gene sets in high-grade serous ovarian cancer that distinguish malignant, tumour-sustaining and chemo-resistant ovarian tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Chapman-Rothe, N; Curry, E; Zeller, C; Liber, D; Stronach, E; Gabra, H; Ghaem-Maghami, S; Brown, R

    2013-09-19

    In embryonic stem (ES) cells, bivalent chromatin domains containing H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 marks silence developmental genes, while keeping them poised for activation following differentiation. We have identified gene sets associated with H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 marks at transcription start sites in a high-grade ovarian serous tumour and examined their association with epigenetic silencing and malignant progression. This revealed novel silenced bivalent marked genes, not described previously for ES cells, which are significantly enriched for the PI3K (P<10(-7)) and TGF-β signalling pathways (P<10(-5)). We matched histone marked gene sets to gene expression sets of eight normal fallopian tubes and 499 high-grade serous malignant ovarian samples. This revealed a significant decrease in gene expression for the H3K27me3 and bivalent gene sets in malignant tissue. We then correlated H3K27me3 and bivalent gene sets to gene expression data of ovarian tumour 'stem cell-like' sustaining cells versus non-sustaining cells. This showed a significantly lower expression for the H3K27me3 and bivalent gene sets in the tumour-sustaining cells. Similarly, comparison of matched chemo-sensitive and chemo-resistant ovarian cell lines showed a significantly lower expression of H3K27me3/bivalent marked genes in the chemo-resistant compared with the chemo-sensitive cell line. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that bivalent marks are associated with epigenetic silencing in ovarian cancer. However it also suggests that additional tumour specific bivalent marks, to those known in ES cells, are present in tumours and may potentially influence the subsequent development of drug resistance and tumour progression. PMID:23128397

  15. Expression profile of COL2A1 and the pseudogene SLC6A10P predicts tumor recurrence in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ganapathi, Mahrukh K; Jones, Wendell D; Sehouli, Jalid; Michener, Chad M; Braicu, Ioana E; Norris, Eric J; Biscotti, Charles V; Vaziri, Susan A J; Ganapathi, Ram N

    2016-02-01

    Tumor recurrence, following initial response to adjuvant chemotherapy, is a major problem in women with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Microarray analysis of primary tumors has identified genes that may be useful in risk stratification/overall survival, but are of limited value in predicting the >70% rate for tumor recurrence. In this study, we performed RNA-Seq analysis of primary and recurrent HGSOC to first identify unique differentially expressed genes. From this dataset, we selected 21 archetypical coding genes and one noncoding RNA, based on statistically significant differences in their expression profile between tumors, for validation by qPCR in a larger cohort of 110 ovarian tumors (71 primary and 39 recurrent) and for testing association of specific genes with time-to-recurrence (TTR). Kaplan-Meier tests revealed that high expression of collagen type II, alpha 1 (COL2A1) was associated with delayed TTR (HR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.27-0.82, p = 0.008), whereas low expression of the pseudogene, solute carrier family 6 member 10 (SLC6A10P), was associated with longer TTR (HR = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-0.93, p = 0.027). Notably, TTR was significantly delayed for tumors that simultaneously highly expressed COL2A1 and lowly expressed SLC6A10P (HR = 0.21, 95% CI: 0.082-0.54, p = 0.0011), an estimated median of 95 months as compared to an estimated median of 16 months for subjects expressing other levels of COL2A1 and SLC6A10P. Thus, evaluating expression levels of COL2A1 and SLC6A10P at primary surgery could be beneficial for clinically managing recurrence of HGSOC. PMID:26311224

  16. Transferrin facilitates the formation of DNA double-strand breaks via transferrin receptor 1: the possible involvement of transferrin in carcinogenesis of high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, S; Toyoshima, M; Kitatani, K; Ishibashi, M; Usui, T; Yaegashi, N

    2016-07-01

    Fallopian tubal epithelium is a candidate for the origin of high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Transferrin-containing follicular fluid and/or retrograde menstrual blood are possible risk factors for carcinogenesis. Accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) in the fallopian tubal epithelium is considered to play an important role in the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms by which DNA-DSBs accumulate have not yet been fully elucidated. The hydroxyl radical, which is produced in a Fenton reaction catalyzed by an iron ion, serves as a potent DNA-DSB-inducing molecule, raising the potential of an iron ion transporter of transferrin in the formation of DNA-DSBs. We studied the potential involvement of transferrin in DNA damage and the development of ovarian cancer. Treatment with transferrin facilitated the formation of histone 2AX phosphorylated at Serine 139 (γH2AX), which is known as a DNA-DSB marker, in human fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. Knockdown of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), but not transferrin receptor 2, suppressed the transferrin uptake and consequent formation of γH2AX. As hydroxyl radicals in reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in DNA-DSBs, the formation of ROS was determined. Treatment with TfR1-specific small interference RNAs significantly diminished transferrin-induced formation of ROS. Moreover, TfR1-dependent uptake of transferrin was revealed to augment the formation of DNA-DSBs in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, which served as a substrate for the Fenton reaction. An ex vivo study with murine fallopian tubes further demonstrated that transferrin treatment introduced DNA-DSBs in the fallopian tubal epithelium. Collectively, these data suggested that the transferrin-TfR1 axis accounts for the induction of DNA-DSBs that potentially lead to DNA damage/genome instability. These findings also suggested that exposure to transferrin initiates and promotes the development of

  17. The modularity and dynamicity of miRNA-mRNA interactions in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas and the prognostic implication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wensheng; Edwards, Andrea; Fan, Wei; Flemington, Erik K; Zhang, Kun

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the fifth-leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States. Major reasons for this persistent mortality include the poor understanding of the underlying biology and a lack of reliable biomarkers. Previous studies have shown that aberrantly expressed MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression by post-transcriptionally regulating gene expression. However, the interference of miRNAs in tumorigenesis is quite complicated and far from being fully understood. In this work, by an integrative analysis of mRNA expression, miRNA expression and clinical data published by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we studied the modularity and dynamicity of miRNA-mRNA interactions and the prognostic implications in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas. With the top transcriptional correlations (Bonferroni-adjusted p-value<0.01) as inputs, we identified five miRNA-mRNA module pairs (MPs), each of which included one positive-connection (correlation) module and one negative-connection (correlation) module. The number of miRNAs or mRNAs in each module varied from 3 to 7 or from 2 to 873. Among the four major negative-connection modules, three fit well with the widely accepted miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation theory. These modules were enriched with the genes relevant to cell cycle and immune response. Moreover, we proposed two novel algorithms to reveal the group or sample specific dynamic regulations between these two RNA classes. The obtained miRNA-mRNA dynamic network contains 3350 interactions captured across different cancer progression stages or tumor grades. We found that those dynamic interactions tended to concentrate on a few miRNAs (e.g. miRNA-936), and were more likely present on the miRNA-mRNA pairs outside the discovered modules. In addition, we also pinpointed a robust prognostic signature consisting of 56 modular protein-coding genes, whose co-expression patterns were predictive for the survival

  18. A distinct pre-existing inflammatory tumour microenvironment is associated with chemotherapy resistance in high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koti, M; Siu, A; Clément, I; Bidarimath, M; Turashvili, G; Edwards, A; Rahimi, K; Masson, A-M M; Squire, J A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy resistance is a major determinant of poor overall survival rates in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). We have previously shown that gene expression alterations affecting the NF-κB pathway characterise chemotherapy resistance in HGSC, suggesting that the regulation of an immune response may be associated with this phenotype. Methods: Given that intrinsic drug resistance pre-exists and is governed by both tumour and host factors, the current study was performed to examine the cross-talk between tumour inflammatory microenvironment and cancer cells, and their roles in mediating differential chemotherapy response in HGSC patients. Expression profiling of a panel of 184 inflammation-related genes was performed in 15 chemoresistant and 19 chemosensitive HGSC tumours using the NanoString nCounter platform. Results: A total of 11 significantly differentially expressed genes were found to distinguish the two groups. As STAT1 was the most significantly differentially expressed gene (P=0.003), we validated the expression of STAT1 protein by immunohistochemistry using an independent cohort of 183 (52 resistant and 131 sensitive) HGSC cases on a primary tumour tissue microarray. Relative expression levels were subjected to Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression models. Conclusions: This study confirms that higher STAT1 expression is significantly associated with increased progression-free survival and that this protein together with other mediators of tumour–host microenvironment can be applied as a novel response predictive biomarker in HGSC. Furthermore, an overall underactive immune microenvironment suggests that the pre-existing state of the tumour immune microenvironment could determine response to chemotherapy in HGSC. PMID:25826225

  19. The role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and IL-8 receptors in platinum response in high grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stronach, Euan A; Cunnea, Paula; Turner, Christina; Guney, Tankut; Aiyappa, Radhika; Jeyapalan, Senthuran; de Sousa, Camila H; Browne, Alacoque; Magdy, Nesreen; Studd, James B; Sriraksa, Ruethairat; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2015-10-13

    Platinum based drugs are the cornerstone of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer, however the development of chemoresistance hinders its success. IL-8 is involved in regulating several pro-survival pathways in cancer. We studied the expression of IL-8 and IL-8 receptors in platinum sensitive and resistant cell lines. Using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, both platinum sensitive (PEA1, PEO14) and resistant (PEA2, PEO23) show increased expression of IL-8 and IL-8 receptors. IL-8RA shows nuclear and cytoplasmic expression, whilst IL-8RB is present solely in the cytoplasm. Knockdown of IL-8 increased sensitivity to cisplatin in platinum sensitive and reversed platinum resistance in resistant cell lines, decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and decreased inhibitory phosphorylation of pro-apoptotic Bad. IL-8 receptor antagonist treatment also enhanced platinum sensitivity. Nuclear localisation of IL-8RA was only detected in platinum resistant tumours. Inhibition of IL-8 signalling can enhance response in platinum sensitive and resistant disease. Nuclear IL-8RA may have potential as a biomarker of resistant disease. PMID:26267317

  20. The role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and IL-8 receptors in platinum response in high grade serous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stronach, Euan A.; Cunnea, Paula; Turner, Christina; Guney, Tankut; Aiyappa, Radhika; Jeyapalan, Senthuran; de Sousa, Camila H.; Browne, Alacoque; Magdy, Nesreen; Studd, James B.; Sriraksa, Ruethairat; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Platinum based drugs are the cornerstone of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer, however the development of chemoresistance hinders its success. IL-8 is involved in regulating several pro-survival pathways in cancer. We studied the expression of IL-8 and IL-8 receptors in platinum sensitive and resistant cell lines. Using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, both platinum sensitive (PEA1, PEO14) and resistant (PEA2, PEO23) show increased expression of IL-8 and IL-8 receptors. IL-8RA shows nuclear and cytoplasmic expression, whilst IL-8RB is present solely in the cytoplasm. Knockdown of IL-8 increased sensitivity to cisplatin in platinum sensitive and reversed platinum resistance in resistant cell lines, decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and decreased inhibitory phosphorylation of pro-apoptotic Bad. IL-8 receptor antagonist treatment also enhanced platinum sensitivity. Nuclear localisation of IL-8RA was only detected in platinum resistant tumours. Inhibition of IL-8 signalling can enhance response in platinum sensitive and resistant disease. Nuclear IL-8RA may have potential as a biomarker of resistant disease. PMID:26267317

  1. FOXM1 is a downstream target of LPA and YAP oncogenic signaling pathways in high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qipeng; Cai, Qingchun; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-29

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a prototypical ligand for G protein coupled receptors, and Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1), a transcription factor that regulates expression of a wide array of genes involved in cancer initiation and progression, are two important oncogenic signaling molecules in human epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC). We conducted in vitro mechanistic studies using pharmacological inhibitors, genetic forms of the signaling molecules, and RNAi-mediated gene knock-down to uncover the molecular mechanisms of how these two molecules interact in EOC cells. Additionally, in vivo mouse studies were performed to confirm the functional involvement of FOXM1 in EOC tumor formation and progression. We show for the first time that LPA up-regulates expression of active FOXM1 splice variants in a time- and dose-dependent manner in the human EOC cell lines OVCA433, CAOV3, and OVCAR5. Gi-PI3K-AKT and G12/13-Rho-YAP signaling pathways were both involved in the LPA receptor (LPA1-3) mediated up-regulation of FOXM1 at the transcriptional level. In addition, down-regulation of FOXM1 in CAOV3 xenografts significantly reduced tumor and ascites formation, metastasis, and expression of FOXM1 target genes involved in cell proliferation, migration, or invasion. Collectively, our data link the oncolipid LPA, the oncogene YAP, and the central regulator of cell proliferation/mutagenesis FOXM1 in EOC cells. Moreover, these results provide further support for the importance of these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in EOC. PMID:26299613

  2. Identification of the IGF1/PI3K/NF κB/ERK gene signalling networks associated with chemotherapy resistance and treatment response in high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy remains a major impediment in the treatment of serous epithelial ovarian cancer. The objective of this study was to use gene expression profiling to delineate major deregulated pathways and biomarkers associated with the development of intrinsic chemotherapy resistance upon exposure to standard first-line therapy for ovarian cancer. Methods The study cohort comprised 28 patients divided into two groups based on their varying sensitivity to first-line chemotherapy using progression free survival (PFS) as a surrogate of response. All 28 patients had advanced stage, high-grade serous ovarian cancer, and were treated with standard platinum-based chemotherapy. Twelve patient tumours demonstrating relative resistance to platinum chemotherapy corresponding to shorter PFS (< eight months) were compared to sixteen tumours from platinum-sensitive patients (PFS > eighteen months). Whole transcriptome profiling was performed using an Affymetrix high-resolution microarray platform to permit global comparisons of gene expression profiles between tumours from the resistant group and the sensitive group. Results Microarray data analysis revealed a set of 204 discriminating genes possessing expression levels which could influence differential chemotherapy response between the two groups. Robust statistical testing was then performed which eliminated a dependence on the normalization algorithm employed, producing a restricted list of differentially regulated genes, and which found IGF1 to be the most strongly differentially expressed gene. Pathway analysis, based on the list of 204 genes, revealed enrichment in genes primarily involved in the IGF1/PI3K/NF κB/ERK gene signalling networks. Conclusions This study has identified pathway specific prognostic biomarkers possibly underlying a differential chemotherapy response in patients undergoing standard platinum-based treatment of serous epithelial ovarian cancer. In addition, our

  3. Profile of differentially expressed miRNAs in high-grade serous carcinoma and clear cell ovarian carcinoma, and the expression of miR-510 in ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XINCHEN; GUO, GORDON; WANG, GUANG; ZHAO, JINYAO; WANG, BO; YU, XIAOTANG; DING, YANFANG

    2015-01-01

    Improved insight into the molecular and genetic profile of different types of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is required for understanding the carcinogenesis of EOC and may potentially be exploited by future targeted therapies. The aim of the present study was to identify a unique microRNA (miRNA) patterns and key miRNAs, which may assist in predicting progression and prognosis in high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) and clear cell carcinoma (CCC). To identify unique miRNA patterns associated with HGSC and CCC, a miRNA microarray was performed using Chinese tumor bank specimens of patients with HGSC or CCC in a retrospective analysis. The expression levels of four deregulated miRNAs were further validated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in an external cohort of 42 cases of HGSC and 36 cases of CCC. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to analyze the correlation between the expression levels of the four miRNAs and patient prognosis. Among these validated miRNAs, miR-510 was further examined in another cohort of normal ovarian tissues, as well as the HGSC, low-grade serous carcinoma (LGSC) and CCC specimens using RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization. The results revealed that, of the 768 miRNAs analyzed in the microarray, 33 and 50 miRNAs were significantly upregulated and downregulated, respectively, with at least a 2-fold difference in HGSC, compared with CCC. The quantitative analysis demonstrated that miR-510 and miR-129-3p were significantly downregulated, and that miR-483-5p and miR-miR-449a were significantly upregulated in CCC, compared with HGSC (P<0.05), which was consistent with the microarray results. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed low expression levels of miR-510 and low expression levels of miR-129-3p, advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, lymphatic metastasis and that HGSC was significantly associated with the poorer overall survival rates (P<0.05). The expression of miR-510

  4. Prognostic impact of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in cancer cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian high grade serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulbe, Hagen; Sehouli, Jalid; Wienert, Stephan; Lindner, Judith; Budczies, Jan; Bockmayr, Michael; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten; Braicu, Ioana; Jöhrens, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    Aims Antibodies targeting the checkpoint molecules programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand PD-L1 are emerging cancer therapeutics. We systematically investigated PD-1 and PD-L1 expression patterns in the poor-prognosis tumor entity high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Methods PD-1 and PD-L1 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays from 215 primary cancers both in cancer cells and in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). mRNA expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. An in silico validation of mRNA data was performed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset. Results PD-1 and PD-L1 expression in cancer cells, CD3+, PD-1+, and PD-L1+ TILs densities as well as PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA levels were positive prognostic factors for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS), with all factors being significant for PFS (p < 0.035 each), and most being significant for OS. Most factors also had prognostic value that was independent from age, stage, and residual tumor. Moreover, high PD-1+ TILs as well as PD-L1+ TILs densities added prognostic value to CD3+TILs (PD-1+: p = 0.002,; PD-L1+: p = 0.002). The significant positive prognostic impact of PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA expression could be reproduced in the TCGA gene expression datasets (p = 0.02 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions Despite their reported immune-modulatory function, high PD-1 and PD-L1 levels are indicators of a favorable prognosis in ovarian cancer. Our data indicate that PD-1 and PD-L1 molecules are biologically relevant regulators of the immune response in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, which is an argument for the evaluation of immune checkpoint inhibiting drugs in this tumor entity. PMID:26625204

  5. The secondary Müllerian system, field effect, BRCA, and tubal fimbria: our evolving understanding of the origin of tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma and why assignment of primary site matters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naveena; Gilks, C Blake; Wilkinson, Nafisa; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2015-08-01

    It has long been held that most epithelial ovarian carcinomas arise from the ovarian surface epithelium. Theories on origin were based on the assumption that there was a common cell of origin for all ovarian carcinoma histotypes, and that these histotypes were closely related and frequently admixed. It is now recognised that the histotypes are distinct diseases. Recent studies on early, organ-confined, non-uterine high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) have led to a change in our understanding of their anatomical site of origin. These studies were initially on patients at high risk of developing HGSC but more recently have been extended to cases without family history or genetic markers of increased risk. These have shown that incidental HGSC, when detected before dissemination, is most commonly identified in the tubal fimbria. As a result, we have had to revisit theories on the cell and site of origin of HGSC. This progress in our understanding has necessitated a change in how we handle cases in clinical practice, as it impacts on primary site assignment, which in turn has implications for staging. In this review we will discuss the evolution of our understanding of the cell of origin of HGSC, the evidence for the tubal fimbria as the anatomical site of origin of most non-uterine HGSC, and the clinical implications of these recent developments. PMID:26126051

  6. FOXO3a loss is a frequent early event in high-grade pelvic serous carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Levanon, K; Sapoznik, S; Bahar-Shany, K; Brand, H; Shapira-Frommer, R; Korach, J; Hirsch, M S; Roh, M H; Miron, A; Liu, J F; Vena, N; Ligon, A H; Fotheringham, S; Bailey, D; Flavin, R J; Birrer, M J; Drapkin, R I

    2014-08-28

    Serous ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecological malignancy in Western countries. The molecular events that underlie the development of the disease have been elusive for many years. The recent identification of the fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs) as the cell-of-origin for most cases of this disease has led to studies aimed at elucidating new candidate therapeutic pathways through profiling of normal FTSECs and serous carcinomas. Here we describe the results of transcriptional profiles that identify the loss of the tumor suppressive transcription factor FOXO3a in a vast majority of high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas. We show that FOXO3a loss is a hallmark of the earliest stages of serous carcinogenesis and occurs both at the DNA, RNA and protein levels. We describe several mechanisms responsible for FOXO3a inactivity, including chromosomal deletion (chromosome 6q21), upregulation of miRNA-182 and destabilization by activated PI3K and MEK. The identification of pathways involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer can advance the management of this disease from being dependant on surgery and cytotoxic chemotherapy alone to the era of targeted therapy. Our data strongly suggest FOXO3a as a possible target for clinical intervention. PMID:24077281

  7. Ovarian serous cystadenofibromas associated with a low-grade serous carcinoma of the peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Stacy A; Silva, Elvio G; Pinto, K

    2013-06-01

    Ovarian serous cystadenofibromas are benign neoplasms that sometimes have focal areas of borderline serous tumor and rarely have been associated with epithelial proliferations in the peritoneum, resembling implants. We are reporting 2 cases of ovarian serous cystadenofibromas with serous peritoneal lesions of higher grade than the ovarian tumor: 1 case had a serous carcinoma and another 1 a serous borderline tumor. PMID:22921726

  8. Femoral metastases from ovarian serous/endometroid adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beresford–Cleary, NJA; Mehdi, SA; Magowan, B

    2012-01-01

    Bony metastases from ovarian cancer are rare, tend to affect the axial skeleton and are associated with abdomino-pelvic disease. The median time interval between diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma and presentation of bony metastases is 44 months (1). We describe a rare case of high grade left ovarian serous / endometrioid adenocarcinoma presenting with a pathological right femoral fracture 4 weeks following diagnosis and optimal debulking of the ovarian tumour. Orthopaedic surgeons must be vigilant when planning treatment of fractures presenting in patients with a history of ovarian cancer. PMID:24960734

  9. Association and prognostic significance of BRCA1/2-mutation status with neoantigen load, number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and expression of PD-1/PD-L1 in high grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kyle C.; Howitt, Brooke E.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Rodig, Scott; Ritterhouse, Lauren L.; Liu, Joyce F.; Garber, Judy E.; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Wu, Catherine J.; D'Andrea, Alan D.; Matulonis, Ursula A.; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (e.g., anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies) have demonstrated remarkable efficacy against hypermutated cancers such as melanomas and lung carcinomas. One explanation for this effect is that hypermutated lesions harbor more tumor-specific neoantigens that stimulate recruitment of an increased number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), which is counterbalanced by overexpression of immune checkpoints such as PD-1 or PD-L1. Given that BRCA1/2-mutated high grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) exhibit a higher mutational load and a unique mutational signature with an elevated number of larger indels up to 50 bp, we hypothesized that they may also harbor more tumor-specific neoantigens, and, therefore, exhibit increased TILs and PD-1/PD-L1 expression. Here, we report significantly higher predicted neoantigens in BRCA1/2-mutated tumors compared to tumors without alterations in homologous recombination (HR) genes (HR-proficient tumors). Tumors with higher neoantigen load were associated with improved overall survival and higher expression of immune genes associated with tumor cytotoxicity such as genes of the TCR, the IFN-gamma and the TNFR pathways. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that BRCA1/2-mutated tumors exhibited significantly increased CD3+ and CD8+ TILs, as well as elevated expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 in tumor-associated immune cells compared to HR-proficient tumors. Survival analysis showed that both BRCA1/2-mutation status and number of TILs were independently associated with outcome. Of note, two distinct groups of HGSOCs, one with very poor prognosis (HR proficient with low number of TILs) and one with very good prognosis (BRCA1/2-mutated tumors with high number of TILs) were defined. These findings support a link between BRCA1/2-mutation status, immunogenicity and survival, and suggesting that BRCA1/2-mutated HGSOCs may be more sensitive to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors compared to HR-proficient HGSOCs. PMID

  10. YAP induces high-grade serous carcinoma in fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hua, G; Lv, X; He, C; Remmenga, S W; Rodabough, K J; Dong, J; Yang, L; Lele, S M; Yang, P; Zhou, J; Karst, A; Drapkin, R I; Davis, J S; Wang, C

    2016-04-28

    Accumulating evidence indicates that ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) originates from fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of HGSC derived from FTSECs remains unclear. In this study, we found that the Hippo/Yes-associated protein (YAP) signaling pathway has a critical role in the initiation and progression of fallopian tube and ovarian HGSC. Importantly, YAP was overexpressed in inflammatory and cancerous fallopian tube tissues. Further, overexpression of wild-type YAP, or constitutively active YAP in immortalized FTSECs, induced cell proliferation, migration, colony formation and tumorigenesis. Moreover, the Hippo/YAP and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways formed an autocrine/paracrine-positive feedback loop to drive the progression of the FTSEC-derived HGSC. Evidence in this study strongly suggests that combined therapy with inhibitors of YAP (such as verteporfin) and FGF receptors (such as BGJ398) can provide a novel therapeutic strategy to treat fallopian tube and ovarian HGSC. PMID:26364602

  11. YAP Induces High-Grade Serous Carcinoma in Fallopian Tube Secretory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Guohua; Lv, Xiangmin; He, Chunbo; Remmenga, Steven W.; Rodabough, Kerry J.; Dong, Jixin; Yang, Liguo; Lele, Subodh M.; Yang, Peixin; Zhou, Jin; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Davis, John S.; Wang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) originates from Fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of HGSC derived from FTSECs remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the Hippo/YAP signaling pathway plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of Fallopian tube and ovarian HGSC. Importantly, YAP was overexpressed in inflammatory and cancerous Fallopian tube tissues. Further, overexpression of wild-type YAP, or constitutively active YAP in immortalized FTSECs, induced cell proliferation, migration, colony formation, and tumorigenesis. Moreover, the Hippo/YAP and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways formed an autocrine/paracrine positive feedback loop to drive the progression of the FTSECs-derived HGSC. Evidence in this study strongly suggests that combined therapy with inhibitors of YAP (such as verteporfin) and FGFRs (such as BGJ398) can provide a novel therapeutic strategy to treat Fallopian tube and ovarian HGSC. PMID:26364602

  12. Precursors of ovarian cancer in the fallopian tube: Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma – an update

    PubMed Central

    Zeppernick, Felix; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian tumors comprise a wide variety of entities. The largest group, epithelial ovarian carcinoma, can be classified into two main groups, type I and type II tumors. Recent advances in the understanding of ovarian cancer development have resulted in the finding of ‘serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma’, which is believed to represent the precursor lesion in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. In this review, lines of evidence for this are discussed and possible future implications for clinical and research settings are outlined. PMID:25330822

  13. Early detection of high-grade tubal serous carcinoma in women at low risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome by systematic examination of fallopian tubes incidentally removed during benign surgery.

    PubMed

    Rabban, Joseph T; Garg, Karuna; Crawford, Beth; Chen, Lee-may; Zaloudek, Charles J

    2014-06-01

    Early detection of sporadic pelvic serous carcinoma remains an elusive goal. In women at high risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome who undergo prophylactic salpingectomy, systematic pathologic examination of the fallopian tubes will detect occult tubal cancer, mostly in the fimbriae, of a minority of women. Such tubal cancers are the putative precursor to advanced-stage pelvic cancer. We hypothesized that early tubal cancer detection can also be accomplished in women at low risk using a similar approach. In this study, we performed complete and systematic examination of the fallopian tubes removed during surgery performed for benign indications. Among 522 women, 4 cases of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) were identified. Three of these cases would have gone undetected using the current standard of care of sampling only a single random section of the tube. The fourth case was accompanied by occult ovarian carcinoma. The fimbriae contained STIC in 3 of the 4 cases and atypical mucosa in 1 case in which the STIC was in the nonfimbriated portion of the tube. The morphologic and immunohistochemical features (aberrant p53 and MIB-1) of these STICs were similar to those expected in high-risk women. All 4 patients with STIC underwent BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing; no germline mutations were identified in any patient. An additional 11 specimens contained atypical mucosal proliferations that fell short of morphologic and immunohistochemical criteria for STIC. Two of these 11 fulfilled criteria for a serous tubal intraepithelial lesion, and the remaining atypical proliferations exhibited normal p53 and MIB-1. For most specimens, the fimbriae could be completely submitted in 1 or 2 cassettes per tube. These results demonstrate that systematic examination of the tubal fimbriae can serve as a form of early detection of sporadic tubal cancer without incurring significant labor or cost. We propose that the tubal fimbriae should be completely examined

  14. Olaparib and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  15. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Atezolizumab and/or Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  16. MiR-29a is a candidate biomarker of better survival in metastatic high-grade serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nymoen, Dag Andre; Slipicevic, Ana; Holth, Arild; Emilsen, Elisabeth; Hetland Falkenthal, Thea E; Tropé, Claes G; Reich, Reuven; Flørenes, Vivi Ann; Davidson, Ben

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical role of 9 microRNAs (miRs) previously found to be overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma effusions compared with primary ovarian carcinomas. High-grade serous carcinoma effusions (n=148) were analyzed for expression of miR-29a, miR-31, miR-99b, miR-182, miR-210, miR-221, miR-222, miR-224, and miR-342 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Expression levels were analyzed for association with clinicopathological parameters and survival. miR-29a and miR-31 levels were further assessed for association with protein expression of their targets Stathmin and DNA methyltransferase-3A (DNMT3A) by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. miRNA levels were unrelated to clinicopathological parameters. However, higher miR-29a levels were significantly related to longer overall survival in univariate (P=.007) and Cox multivariate survival analysis (P=.045). miR-29a levels were inversely related to those of its target DNMT3A (P=.048), and higher DNMT3A expression was significantly related to poor overall survival in univariate (P=.03) and Cox multivariate (P=.016) survival analysis. In contrast, miR-31 levels were directly related to cytoplasmic phospho-Stathmin expression (P=.029) and unrelated to Stathmin and nuclear phospho-Stathmin, and both Stathmin and phospho-Stathmin expressions were unrelated to survival. miR-29a and its target DNMT3A are novel candidate biomarkers of longer and shorter survival, respectively, in metastatic high-grade serous carcinoma. PMID:27063471

  17. Differential expression of argininosuccinate synthetase in serous and non‐serous ovarian carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Dong‐Joo; Walts, Ann E; Beach, Jessica A; Lester, Jenny; Bomalaski, John S; Walsh, Christine S; Ruprecht Wiedemeyer, W; Karlan, Beth Y

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The current standard of care for epithelial ovarian cancer does not discriminate between different histologic subtypes (serous, clear cell, endometrioid and mucinous) despite the knowledge that ovarian carcinoma subtypes do not respond uniformly to conventional platinum/taxane‐based chemotherapy. Exploiting addictions and vulnerabilities in cancers with distinguishable molecular features presents an opportunity to develop individualized therapies that may be more effective than the current ‘one size fits all' approach. One such opportunity is arginine depletion therapy with pegylated arginine deiminase, which has shown promise in several cancer types that exhibit low levels of argininosuccinate synthetase including hepatocellular and prostate carcinoma and melanoma. Based on the high levels of argininosuccinate synthetase previously observed in ovarian cancers, these tumours have been considered unlikely candidates for arginine depletion therapy. However, argininosuccinate synthetase levels have not been evaluated in the individual histologic subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. The current study is the first to examine the expression of argininosuccinate synthetase at the mRNA and protein levels in large cohorts of primary and recurrent ovarian carcinomas and ovarian cancer cell lines. We show that the normal fallopian tube fimbria and the majority of primary high‐grade and low‐grade serous ovarian carcinomas express high levels of argininosuccinate synthetase, which tend to further increase in recurrent tumours. In contrast to the serous subtype, non‐serous ovarian carcinoma subtypes (clear cell, endometrioid and mucinous) frequently lack detectable argininosuccinate synthetase expression. The in vitro sensitivity of ovarian cancer cell lines to arginine depletion with pegylated arginine deiminase was inversely correlated with argininosuccinate synthetase expression. Our data suggest that the majority of serous ovarian carcinomas are not susceptible

  18. Sonographic findings of an ovarian serous surface papillary borderline tumor.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yohan; Park, Sung Bin; Lee, Jong Beum; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Sonographic findings of a serous surface papillary borderline tumor of the ovary have rarely been reported in the English literature. Here, we describe a case of serous surface papillary borderline tumor, which was depicted on gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography as smoothly lobulated and polypoid heterogeneous echoic bilateral adnexal masses encased or surrounded by what was presumed to be normal-appearing ovarian follicles with increased vascular flow. PMID:23938140

  19. Mammary serine protease inhibitor and CD138 immunohistochemical expression in ovarian serous and clear cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hasby, Eiman Adel

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of mammary serine protease inhibitor (maspin) and CD138 in primary ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSC) as compared to low-grade serous carcinomas (LGSC) and clear cell carcinomas and investigate if the studied markers have a correlation to International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, Ki67 proliferation index, and to each other. Maspin cellular location varied significantly between studied groups with only nuclear expression seen in 46.7 % of LGSC group, mixed nuclear and cytoplasmic in 13.3, 28.6, and 20 % of LGSC, HGSC, and clear cell carcinoma, respectively, and was only cytoplasmic in 26.7, 71.4, and 80 % of LGSC, HGSC, and clear cell carcinoma, respectively. Mean maspin and CD138 counts were significantly higher in HGSC and clear cell carcinoma compared to LGSC. Both maspin and CD138 scores varied significantly between studied groups and were positively correlated with adverse prognostic factors in studied carcinomas including FIGO stage and Ki67 proliferation index. Besides, both maspin and CD138 had significant correlation to each other. These findings suggest that epithelial cytoplasmic expression of maspin and CD138 may have a significant role in tumorigenesis in ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas and clear cell carcinomas; these markers may regulate tumor cell proliferation, and their significant correlation to each other may suggest that CD138 probably induces maspin expression to protect tumor growth factors from being lysed by proteolytic enzymes. PMID:26526579

  20. Serous Ovarian Carcinoma Recurring as Malignant Mixed Mullerian Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Demir; Senem, Demiroz Ahu; Ovgu, Aydin; Hakan, Erenel; Sennur, Ilvan; Zerrin, Calay; Fuat, Demirkiran

    2015-01-01

    Only five cases of recurrence of malignant mixed Mullerian tumor (carcinosarcoma) from the ovarian carcinoma have been published in the literature to our knowledge. A 64-year-old woman first underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy because of pelvic mass. Histological diagnosis was serous papillary carcinoma of the left ovary. After six courses of chemotherapy, CA125 level returned to normal range. However, she had persistent multiple mediastinal and para-aortic lymphadenopathies in spite of additional six courses of chemotherapy. Then she underwent the second operation about 2 years after primary surgery. Multiple excisional biopsies were taken from subcutaneous tissue, over the bowels and the left external iliac artery. The histopathological diagnosis which was confirmed by immunohistochemical study was malignant mixed Mullerian tumor for all metastatic foci. A rare case of ovarian serous papillary carcinoma recurring as malignant mixed Mullerian tumor is reported. PMID:26713165

  1. The significance of the alteration of 8-OHdG in serous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxidative damage and DNA repair dysfunction are associated with carcinogenesis. 8-OHdG is one of the major oxidative DNA adducts. Present work aims to investigate whether the expression of 8-OHdG and its key repair gene hOGG1 play distinctive role in two types of serous ovarian cancer. Materials and methods 8-OHdG level in DNA from tumor and matched tumor-adjacent normal tissue in 48 high-grade papillary serous carcinomas (HG-SOC), 24 low-grade papillary serous carcinomas (LG-SOC), 20 serous cystadenomas, and 16 non-tumor control ovaries was tested. The Cox proportional hazards model and the log-rank test were used to assess the associations between the 8-OHdG level in two types of serous cancer and patients’ survival. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and protein immunoblot were employed to detect hOGG1 mRNA and protein levels in tumor and adjacent normal tissues. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of hOGG1 and p53. Results There was no difference of average 8-OHdG/106dG DNA level either between HG-SOC (27.8 ± 8.9), LG-SOC (25.2 ± 7.4) and benign serous cystadenoma (26.5 ± 7.7, p = 0.35); or between the tumor-adjacent normal tissue of HG-SOC (18.8 ± 5.2), LG-SOC (21.4 ± 6.5), benign serous cystadenoma (20.5 ± 9.1) and non-tumor ovary (21.6 ± 4.9, p = 0.62). The 8-OHdG/106dG level was significantly higher in tumor comparing to that in matched normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma in HG-SOC (1.52 ± 0.52, p = 0.02), but not in LG-SOC or benign serous cystadenoma. Increased level of 8-OHdG in tumor DNA was an independent factor of overall survival in serous ovarian carcinoma upon multivariate analysis (p < 0.01). Increased level of 8-OHdG in tumor DNA indicates poorer overall and progression-free survival durations than counterparts (47.3 vs 105.7 months and 13.5 vs 45.3 months, respectively). Protein levels of hOGG1 were remarkably decreased in HG-SOC (p < 0.01), but not in LG

  2. Papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneal surface: matched-case comparison with papillary serous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Killackey, M A; Davis, A R

    1993-11-01

    Between 1984 and 1991, 199 patients underwent laparotomy for epithelial "ovarian" malignancy. In 29 cases (15%) normal-sized ovaries (< 4 cm in diameter) with minimal invasion by papillary serous carcinoma were found. This entity in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis has been previously described and is reported here as papillary serous cancer of the peritoneal surface (PSPS). The clinical, surgical, and pathologic features of PSPS are compared with a group of age-, grade-, and stage-matched cases with papillary serous ovarian carcinomas (PSOC). PSPS was also characterized by ascites (mean = 3036 cc), malignant washings (91%), and omental involvement with bulky infiltration and/or multiple tumor nodules (96%). Mean cytoreduction in the PSPS group was 65.5% compared to 79% in the PSOC group (P = 0.049). Patients received combination chemotherapy with platinum-based regimens. In general, there was a poor response to treatment with a disease-free interval of 3.4 and median survival time of 19 months in PSPS compared to 11.7 and 31 months in the PSOC patients. Patients with PSPS have more limited cytoreduction, shorter disease-free interval, and shorter overall survival time. Such differences prompt re-evaluation of treatment modalities for PSPS and recognition that this is a condition distinct from PSOC. PMID:8276289

  3. Urinary microRNA-30a-5p is a potential biomarker for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Gong, Guanghui; Tan, Hong; Dai, Furong; Zhu, Xin; Chen, Yile; Wang, Junpu; Liu, Ying; Chen, Puxiang; Wu, Xiaoying; Wen, Jifang

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can serve as biomarkers in human cancer. To determine the clinical value of urinary miRNAs for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, we collected urine samples from 39 ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients, 26 patients with benign gynecological disease and 30 healthy controls. The miRNA microarray data showed that only miR-30a-5p was upregulated and 37 miRNAs were downregulated in the urine samples of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients, when compared to healthy controls, which was confirmed after conducting quantitative PCR. The upregulation of urinary miR-30a-5p was closely associated with early stage of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma as well as lymphatic metastasis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis demonstrated the potential use of urinary miR-30a-5p as a diagnostic marker for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, a lower urine level of miR-30a-5p was found in 20 gastric cancer and 20 colon carcinoma patients when compared to ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, suggesting that the upregulation of urinary miR-30a-5p may be specific for ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. miR-30a-5p was also upregulated in ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tissues and cell lines, while urinary miR-30a-5p from ovarian cancer patients was notably reduced following the surgical removal of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, suggesting that urinary miR-30a-5p was derived from the ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tissue. Notably, miR-30a-5p was concentrated with exosomes from the ovarian cancer cell supernatant or urine from ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients, supporting a pathway for excretion into the urine. The results also showed that the knockdown of miR-30a-5p significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provided the first evidence of increased miR-30a-5p in the urine of ovarian serous adeno-carcinoma patients, while the inhibition of miR-30a-5p suppressed the

  4. The O-Linked Glycome and Blood Group Antigens ABO on Mucin-Type Glycoproteins in Mucinous and Serous Epithelial Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vitiazeva, Varvara; Kattla, Jayesh J.; Flowers, Sarah A.; Lindén, Sara K.; Premaratne, Pushpa; Weijdegård, Birgitta; Sundfeldt, Karin; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins where the glycosylation has been shown to play an important role in cancer. Normal epithelial ovarian cells do not express secreted mucins, but their abnormal expression has previously been described in epithelial ovarian cancer and may relate to tumor formation and progression. The cyst fluids were shown to be a rich source for acidic glycoproteins. The study of these proteins can potentially lead to the identification of more effective biomarkers for ovarian cancer. Methods In this study, we analyzed the expression of the MUC5AC and the O-glycosylation of acidic glycoproteins secreted into ovarian cyst fluids. The samples were obtained from patients with serous and mucinous ovarian tumors of different stages (benign, borderline, malignant) and grades. The O-linked oligosaccharides were released and analyzed by negative-ion graphitized carbon Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to Electrospray Ionization tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MSn). The LC-ESI-MSn of the oligosaccharides from ovarian cyst fluids displayed differences in expression of fucose containing structures such as blood group ABO antigens and Lewis-type epitopes. Results The obtained data showed that serous and mucinous benign adenomas, mucinous low malignant potential carcinomas (LMPs, borderline) and mucinous low-grade carcinomas have a high level of blood groups and Lewis type epitopes. In contrast, this type of fucosylated structures were low abundant in the high-grade mucinous carcinomas or in serous carcinomas. In addition, the ovarian tumors that showed a high level of expression of blood group antigens also revealed a strong reactivity towards the MUC5AC antibody. To visualize the differences between serous and mucinous ovarian tumors based on the O-glycosylation, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using mass spectrometry average compositions (MSAC). Conclusion Mucinous benign and LMPs along with mucinous low-grade carcinomas

  5. Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 in Treating Patients With Recurrent and Metastatic Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  6. Ovarian Cancer Proteomic, Phosphoproteomic, and Glycoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have just released a comprehensive dataset of the proteomic analysis of high grade serous ovarian tumor samples,

  7. High levels of genomic aberrations in serous ovarian cancers are associated with better survival.

    PubMed

    Baumbusch, Lars O; Helland, Åslaug; Wang, Yun; Liestøl, Knut; Schaner, Marci E; Holm, Ruth; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Alsop, Kathryn; Brown, Pat; Mitchell, Gillian; Fereday, Sian; DeFazio, Anna; Bowtell, David D L; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    Genomic instability and copy number alterations in cancer are generally associated with poor prognosis; however, recent studies have suggested that extreme levels of genomic aberrations may be beneficial for the survival outcome for patients with specific tumour types. We investigated the extent of genomic instability in predominantly high-grade serous ovarian cancers (SOC) using two independent datasets, generated in Norway (n = 74) and Australia (n = 70), respectively. Genomic instability was quantified by the Total Aberration Index (TAI), a measure of the abundance and genomic size of copy number changes in a tumour. In the Norwegian cohort, patients with TAI above the median revealed significantly prolonged overall survival (p<0.001) and progression-free survival (p<0.05). In the Australian cohort, patients with above median TAI showed prolonged overall survival (p<0.05) and moderately, but not significantly, prolonged progression-free survival. Results were confirmed by univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses with TAI as a continuous variable. Our results provide further evidence supporting an association between high level of genomic instability and prolonged survival of high-grade SOC patients, possibly as disturbed genome integrity may lead to increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:23372714

  8. Paired box gene 2 is associated with estrogen receptor α in ovarian serous tumors: Potential theory basis for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Ma, Haifen

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that Paired box gene (PAX)2 is activated by estradiol via estrogen receptor (ER)α in breast and endometrial cancer. The expression of PAX2 was restricted to ovarian serous tumors and only one case was positive in borderline mucinous tumor in our previous study. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was performed to assess the expression of ERα in 58 cases of ovarian serous tumors, including 30 serous cystadenomas, 16 borderline serous cystadenomas, 12 serous carcinomas and 67 cases of ovarian mucinous tumors, including 29 mucinous cystadenoma, 23 borderline mucinous cystadenoma and 15 mucinous carcinoma, which were the same specimens with detection of PAX2 expression. The results demonstrated that ERα was expressed in 10% (3/30) of serous cystadenomas, 62.5% (10/16) borderline serous cystadenomas and 66.7% (8/12) serous carcinomas. The expression of ERα in borderline serous cystadenomas and serous carcinomas were significantly higher compared with that in serous cystadenomas (P<0.01). ERα was detected in 3.4% (1/29) mucinous cystadenoma, 26.1% (6/23) borderline mucinous cystadenoma and only 6.7% (1/15) mucinous carcinoma. Furthermore, a scatter plot of the expression of PAX2 and ERα revealed a linear correlation between them in ovarian serous tumors (P<0.0001). With few positive results, no correlation was determined in ovarian mucinous tumors. It was demonstrated that PAX2 is associated with ERα in ovarian serous tumors, and this may become a potential theory basis for targeted therapy for ovarian serous tumors. Further research is required to determine how PAX2 and ERα work together, and the role of targeted therapy in ovarian serous tumors. PMID:27446571

  9. Detection of the BRAF V600E mutation in serous ovarian tumors: a comparative analysis of immunohistochemistry with a mutation-specific monoclonal antibody and allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Bösmüller, Hans; Fischer, Anna; Pham, Deborah L; Fehm, Tanja; Capper, David; von Deimling, Andreas; Bonzheim, Irina; Staebler, Annette; Fend, Falko

    2013-03-01

    Mutations of components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, mainly BRAF, are common in serous ovarian borderline tumors, whereas high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas rarely show this feature. With the advent of specific kinase inhibitors active against BRAF-mutated cancers, rapid and sensitive detection of the BRAF V600E, by far the most common mutation of this gene, is of great practical relevance. Currently, BRAF mutations are detected by DNA-based techniques. Recently, a monoclonal antibody (VE1) specific for the BRAF V600E protein suitable for archival tissues has been described. In this study, we compared detection of the V600E mutation in serous ovarian tumors by VE1 immunostaining and by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. All 141 cases of high-grade serous ovarian cancer showed negative or rarely weak, diffuse background VE1 immunostaining, and BRAF wild type was confirmed by molecular analysis in all tested cases. In contrast, 1 (14%) of 7 low-grade serous carcinomas and 22 (71%) of 31 serous borderline tumors revealed moderate to strong VE1 positivity. Immunostaining was clearly evaluable in all cases with sufficient tumor cells, and only rare cases with narrow cytoplasm were difficult to interpret. The V600E mutation was confirmed by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and sequencing in all VE1-positive cases. Two VE1-positive cases with low epithelial cell content required repeat microdissection to confirm the presence of the mutation. Immunohistochemistry with the VE1 antibody is a specific and sensitive tool for detection of the BRAF V600E mutation in serous ovarian tumors and may provide a practical screening test, especially in tumor samples with low epithelial content. PMID:23089489

  10. Biological role and clinical implications of homeobox genes in serous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Katherine R; Patel, Jai N; Ganapathi, Mahrukh K; Tait, David L; Ganapathi, Ram N

    2016-06-01

    Homeobox (HOX) genes are a family of transcription factors that are essential regulators of development. HOX genes play important roles in normal reproductive physiology, as well as in the development and progression of serous carcinomas, the predominant and most aggressive subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). This review discusses aberrant HOX gene expression in serous EOC and its impact on tumor development and progression. Further identification of HOX target genes may facilitate the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to improve the prognosis of patients with serous EOC. PMID:26957480

  11. A Five-Gene Expression Signature Predicts Clinical Outcome of Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenna

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma is a common malignant tumor of female genital organs. Treatment is generally less effective as patients are usually diagnosed in the late stage. Therefore, a well-designed prognostic marker provides valuable data for optimizing therapy. In this study, we analyzed 303 samples of ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma and the corresponding RNA-seq data. We observed the correlation between gene expression and patients' survival and eventually established a risk assessment model of five factors using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. We found that the survival time in high-risk patients was significantly shorter than in low-risk patients in both training and testing sets after Kaplan-Meier analysis. The AUROC value was 0.67 when predicting the survival time in testing set, which indicates a relatively high specificity and sensitivity. The results suggest diagnostic and therapeutic applications of our five-gene model for ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. PMID:27478834

  12. Endosalpingiosis in Conjunction with Ovarian Serous Cystadenoma Mimicking Metastatic Ovarian Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Singhania, Namrata; Janakiraman, Neha; Coslett, Douglas; Ahmad, Navid

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 26 Final Diagnosis: Endosalpingiosis Symptoms: Chronic pelvic pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Diagnostic laproscopy (conservative management) Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Interesting and unusual case of endosalpingiosis mimicking ovarian malignancy presentation. Case Report: A 26-year-old G0P0 white female presented to our office with chronic pelvic pain. On vaginal examination, a nontender mass in left the adnexal region was palpable. Transvaginal ultrasound showed a left ovarian cyst. Laparoscopy was performed, which revealed diffuse bilateral ovarian excrescences with unusual multiple studdings throughout the peritoneum and abdominal cavity. Due to a suspicion of malignancy, a biopsy specimen was obtained for frozen sectioning. The specimen proved to be consistent with benign papillary serous cystadenofibroma. Gross appearance was still suspicious for malignancy and therefore left paraovarian cystectomy was performed. Additional specimens showed ovarian adenofibroma and endosalpingiosis. The patient’s complaint of pelvic pain improved after laparoscopy. Due to diffuse presentation of endosalpingiosis in the peritoneum, serial CT scan of abdomen and pelvis at 6-month intervals was recommended. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is an unusual case of a young, nulliparous female presenting with diffuse-presentation endosalpingiosis in the abdomen and peritoneum, which on gross examination was suspicious for malignancy. By following a conservative approach and performing serial CT scans, the patient will be clinically monitored. PMID:25180540

  13. Morphological and Immunohistochemical Reevaluation of Tumors Initially Diagnosed as Ovarian Endometrioid Carcinoma With Emphasis on High-grade Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Diana; Murali, Rajmohan; Murray, Melissa P; Veras, Emanuela; Park, Kay J; Soslow, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Ovarian endometrioid carcinomas (OEC) of low grade have characteristic morphologic features, but high-grade tumors can mimic high-grade serous and undifferentiated carcinomas. We reviewed tumors initially diagnosed as OEC to determine whether a combination of pathologic and immunohistochemical features can improve histologic subclassification. Tumors initially diagnosed as OEC were reviewed using World Health Organization criteria. We also noted the presence of associated confirmatory endometrioid features (CEFs): (i) squamous metaplasia; (ii) endometriosis; (iii) adenofibromatous background; and (iv) borderline endometrioid or mixed Mullerian component. A tissue microarray was constructed from 27 representative tumors with CEF and 14 without CEF, and sections were stained for WT-1, p16, and p53. Of 109 tumors initially diagnosed as OEC, 76 (70%) tumors were classified as OEC. The median patient age was 55 years, and 75% of patients were younger than 60 years. Ninety-two percent presented with disease confined to the pelvis, and 87% of tumors were unilateral. The median tumor size was 11.8 cm. Only 3% of tumors were high grade (grade 3of 3). Eighty percent of cases had at least 1 CEF, and 59% had at least 2 CEFs. Eleven percent overexpressed p16, 0% overexpressed p53, and 3% expressed WT-1. Only 10% of patients died of disease at last follow-up. Thirty-three (33) tumors, or 30% of tumors originally classified as endometrioid, were reclassified as serous carcinoma (OSC). The median patient age was 54.5 years, and 59% of patients were younger than 60 years of age. Only 27% had disease confined to the pelvis at presentation, 52% of tumors were unilateral, and the median tumor size was 8 cm. Associated squamous differentiation, endometrioid adenofibroma, and endometrioid or mixed Mullerian borderline tumor (CEFs) were not present in any case, but 6% of patients had endometriosis. Approximately one half of the reclassified OSC demonstrated SET-pattern morphology

  14. P53 AUTOANTIBODIES AS POTENTIAL DETECTION AND PROGNOSTIC BIOMARKERS IN SEROUS OVARIAN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Wong, Jessica; Vitonis, Allison; Crum, Christopher P.; Sluss, Patrick M.; LaBaer, Joshua; Cramer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study examined the value of serum p53 autoantibodies (p53-AAb) as detection and prognostic biomarkers in ovarian cancer. Methods: p53-AAb were detected by ELISA in sera obtained pre-operatively from women undergoing surgery for a pelvic mass. This group included women subsequently diagnosed with invasive serous ovarian cancer (N=60), non-serous ovarian cancers (N=30), and women with benign disease (N=30). Age-matched controls were selected from the general population (N=120). Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to compare the values of p53-AAb, CA 125, and HE4 as a screening biomarker. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to assess its prognostic value on survival. Results: p53-AAb were detected in 25/60 (41.7%) of serous cases, 4/30 (13.3%) non-serous cases, 3/30 (10%) benign disease cases, and 10/120 (8.3%) controls (combined p=0.0002). p53-AAb did not significantly improve detection of cases (AUC=0.69) or discrimination of benign versus malignant disease (AUC=0.64) compared with CA 125 (AUC=0.99) or HE4 (AUC=0.98). In multivariate analysis among cases, p53-AAb correlated only with a family history of breast cancer (p=0.01). Detectable p53 antibodies in pre-treatment sera were correlated with improved overall survival (p=0.04, HR=0.57 (95% CI=0.33, 0.97)) in serous ovarian cancer. Conclusions: Antibodies to p53 are detected in the sera of 42% of patients with advanced serous ovarian cancer. Impact: Although their utility as a pre-operative diagnostic biomarker, beyond CA 125 and HE4, is limited, they are prognostic for improved overall survival. PMID:20200435

  15. CD44 Splice Variant v8-10 as a Marker of Serous Ovarian Cancer Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Sosulski, Amanda; Horn, Heiko; Zhang, Lihua; Coletti, Caroline; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Castro, Cesar M; Birrer, Michael J; Nagano, Osamu; Saya, Hideyuki; Lage, Kasper; Donahoe, Patricia K; Pépin, David

    2016-01-01

    CD44 is a transmembrane hyaluronic acid receptor gene that encodes over 100 different tissue-specific protein isoforms. The most ubiquitous, CD44 standard, has been used as a cancer stem cell marker in ovarian and other cancers. Expression of the epithelial CD44 variant containing exons v8-10 (CD44v8-10) has been associated with more chemoresistant and metastatic tumors in gastrointestinal and breast cancers, but its role in ovarian cancer is unknown; we therefore investigated its use as a prognostic marker in this disease. The gene expression profiles of 254 tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas RNAseqV2 were analyzed for the presence of CD44 isoforms. A trend for longer survival was observed in patients with high expression of CD44 isoforms that include exons v8-10. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of tumors for presence of CD44v8-10 was performed on an independent cohort of 210 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer using a tumor tissue microarray. Patient stratification based on software analysis of staining revealed a statistically significant increase in survival in patients with the highest levels of transmembrane protein expression (top 10 or 20%) compared to those with the lowest expression (bottom 10 and 20%) (p = 0.0181, p = 0.0262 respectively). Expression of CD44v8-10 in primary ovarian cancer cell lines was correlated with a predominantly epithelial phenotype characterized by high expression of epithelial markers and low expression of mesenchymal markers by qPCR, Western blot, and IHC. Conversely, detection of proteolytically cleaved and soluble extracellular domain of CD44v8-10 in patient ascites samples was correlated with significantly worse prognosis (p<0.05). Therefore, presence of transmembrane CD44v8-10 on the surface of primary tumor cells may be a marker of a highly epithelial tumor with better prognosis while enzymatic cleavage of CD44v8-10, as detected by presence of the soluble extracellular domain in ascites fluid, may be

  16. CD44 Splice Variant v8-10 as a Marker of Serous Ovarian Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Coletti, Caroline; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Castro, Cesar M.; Birrer, Michael J.; Nagano, Osamu; Saya, Hideyuki; Lage, Kasper; Donahoe, Patricia K.; Pépin, David

    2016-01-01

    CD44 is a transmembrane hyaluronic acid receptor gene that encodes over 100 different tissue-specific protein isoforms. The most ubiquitous, CD44 standard, has been used as a cancer stem cell marker in ovarian and other cancers. Expression of the epithelial CD44 variant containing exons v8-10 (CD44v8-10) has been associated with more chemoresistant and metastatic tumors in gastrointestinal and breast cancers, but its role in ovarian cancer is unknown; we therefore investigated its use as a prognostic marker in this disease. The gene expression profiles of 254 tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas RNAseqV2 were analyzed for the presence of CD44 isoforms. A trend for longer survival was observed in patients with high expression of CD44 isoforms that include exons v8-10. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of tumors for presence of CD44v8-10 was performed on an independent cohort of 210 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer using a tumor tissue microarray. Patient stratification based on software analysis of staining revealed a statistically significant increase in survival in patients with the highest levels of transmembrane protein expression (top 10 or 20%) compared to those with the lowest expression (bottom 10 and 20%) (p = 0.0181, p = 0.0262 respectively). Expression of CD44v8-10 in primary ovarian cancer cell lines was correlated with a predominantly epithelial phenotype characterized by high expression of epithelial markers and low expression of mesenchymal markers by qPCR, Western blot, and IHC. Conversely, detection of proteolytically cleaved and soluble extracellular domain of CD44v8-10 in patient ascites samples was correlated with significantly worse prognosis (p<0.05). Therefore, presence of transmembrane CD44v8-10 on the surface of primary tumor cells may be a marker of a highly epithelial tumor with better prognosis while enzymatic cleavage of CD44v8-10, as detected by presence of the soluble extracellular domain in ascites fluid, may be

  17. Invasion Patterns of Metastatic Extrauterine High-grade Serous Carcinoma With BRCA Germline Mutation and Correlation With Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Yaser R; Ducie, Jennifer A; Arnold, Angela G; Kauff, Noah D; Vargas-Alvarez, Hebert A; Sala, Evis; Levine, Douglas A; Soslow, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Characteristic histopathologic features have been described in high-grade serous carcinoma associated with BRCA abnormalities (HGSC-BRCA), which are known to have relatively favorable clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of invasion patterns in metastatic HGSC-BRCA cases. Of the 37 cases of advanced-stage HGSC with known BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation retrieved from our institutional files, 23 patients had a germline mutation of BRCA1 and 14 had a BRCA2 mutation. The pattern of invasion at metastatic sites was recorded and classified as a pushing pattern (either predominantly or exclusively), an exclusively micropapillary infiltrative pattern, or an infiltrative pattern composed of papillae, micropapillae, glands, and nests (mixed infiltrative pattern). Histologic evaluation of metastases was performed without knowledge of genotype or clinical outcome. Clinical data were abstracted from medical records. Median age was 56 years (range, 31 to 73 y). All patients presented at stage IIIC or IV and underwent complete surgical staging followed by chemotherapy. All 37 HGSC-BRCA cases showed either pushing pattern metastases (30; 81%) or infiltrative micropapillary metastases (7; 19%). No HGSC-BRCA case exhibited metastases composed solely of mixed infiltrative patterns. Among the 7 infiltrative micropapillary cases, 6 had a BRCA1 germline mutation versus 1 with a BRCA2 mutation. The median time of follow-up was 26 months (range, 13 to 49 mo). All 7 patients with infiltrative micropapillary metastases either experienced recurrence or died of disease (5 recurrences and 2 deaths), which was significantly worse than what was seen in patients with predominantly pushing pattern metastases, of whom 16 of 30 (53%) experienced recurrence (n=14) or died of disease (n=2) (P=0.03). In conclusion, the recognition of different invasion patterns of metastatic extrauterine HGSC-BRCA has prognostic implications. The infiltrative

  18. KRAS/BRAF Analysis in Ovarian Low-Grade Serous Carcinoma Having Synchronous All Pathological Precursor Regions

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kohei; Nakayama, Kentaro; Ishibashi, Tomoka; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Ishikawa, Masako; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Minamoto, Toshiko; Sato, Emi; Sanuki, Kaori; Yamashita, Hitomi; Iida, Kouji; Sultana, Razia; Kyo, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma is thought to begin as a serous cystadenoma or adenofibroma that progresses in a slow stepwise fashion. Among the low-grade serous carcinomas, there is a high frequency of activating mutations in the KRAS or BRAF genes; however, it remains unclear as to how these mutations contribute to tumor progression. This is the first report to track the histopathological progression of serous adenofibroma to low-grade serous carcinoma. Each stage was individually analyzed by pathological and molecular genetic methods to determine what differences occur between the distinct stages of progression. PMID:27128903

  19. Obesity increases tumor aggressiveness in a genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Liza; Zhou, Chunxiao; Zhong, Yan; Kuan, Pei Fen; Fan, Cheng; Sampey, Brante P.; Difurio, Megan; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is associated with increased risk and worse outcomes for ovarian cancer. Thus, we examined the effects of obesity on ovarian cancer progression in a genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer. Methods We utilized a unique serous ovarian cancer mouse model that specifically deletes the tumor suppressor genes, Brca1 and p53, and inactivates the retinoblastoma (Rb) proteins in adult ovarian surface epithelial cells, via injection of an adenoviral vector expressing Cre (AdCre) into the ovarian bursa cavity of adult female mice (KpB mouse model). KpB mice were subjected to a 60% calories-derived from fat in a high fat diet (HFD) versus 10% calories from fat in a low fat diet (LFD) to mimic diet-induced obesity. Tumors were isolated at 6 months after AdCre injection and evaluated histologically. Untargeted metabolomic and gene expression profiling was performed to assess differences in the ovarian tumors from obese versus non-obese KpB mice. Results At sacrifice, mice on the HFD (obese) were twice the weight of mice on the LFD (non-obese) (51 g versus 31 g, p = 0.0003). Ovarian tumors were significantly larger in the obese versus non-obese mice (3.7 cm2 versus 1.2 cm2, p = 0.0065). Gene expression and metabolomic profiling indicated statistically significant differences between the ovarian tumors from the obese versus non-obese mice, including metabolically relevant pathways. PMID:24680597

  20. Peritoneal tumor spread in serous ovarian cancer-epithelial mesenchymal status and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Katharina; Bachmayr-Heyda, Anna; Aust, Stefanie; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Reiner, Agnes Teresa; Grimm, Christoph; Horvat, Reinhard; Zeillinger, Robert; Pils, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    In this study we aimed to analyze the biological mechanisms underlying apparently different modes of peritoneal tumor spread in serous ovarian cancer: miliary (widespread, millet-like lesions) versus non-miliary (bigger, exophytically growing implants). Tumor tissues and ascites from 23 chemotherapy naive patients were analyzed by RNA-sequencing and flow cytometry. On the basis of differential gene expression between miliary and non-miliary, gene signatures were developed. A calculated tumor spread factor revealed a significant independent negative impact of miliary spread on overall survival (HR 3.77; CI95 1.14–12.39; p = 0.029) in an independent cohort of 165 serous ovarian cancer patients. Comparing previously published epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) gene signatures, non-miliary spread correlated significantly with a reduced epithelial status. We conclude that serous ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease with distinct modes of peritoneal tumor spread, differing not only in clinical appearance, but also in molecular characteristics and outcome.. EMT, peritoneal inflammation status, and therapeutic options are discussed. Significance More than half of serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients present with a newly described type of intraperitoneal tumor spread, associated with differences in the inflammation status, activated oncogenic pathways, lack of EMT, and thus reduced overall survival. Both, the diminished immune reaction and the enhanced epithelial and malignant characteristics of the tumor cells open new avenues for therapeutic options and strategies, like Catumaxomab, already in clinical use. PMID:25991672

  1. Lysophosphatidic Acid-Induced Transcriptional Profile Represents Serous Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma and Worsened Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Murph, Mandi M.; Liu, Wenbin; Yu, Shuangxing; Lu, Yiling; Hall, Hassan; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Lahad, John; Schaner, Marci; Helland, Åslaug; Kristensen, Gunnar; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Mills, Gordon B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) governs a number of physiologic and pathophysiological processes. Malignant ascites fluid is rich in LPA, and LPA receptors are aberrantly expressed by ovarian cancer cells, implicating LPA in the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. However, there is an absence of systematic data critically analyzing the transcriptional changes induced by LPA in ovarian cancer. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, gene expression profiling was used to examine LPA-mediated transcription by exogenously adding LPA to human epithelial ovarian cancer cells for 24 h to mimic long-term stimulation in the tumor microenvironment. The resultant transcriptional profile comprised a 39-gene signature that closely correlated to serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Hierarchical clustering of ovarian cancer patient specimens demonstrated that the signature is associated with worsened prognosis. Patients with LPA-signature-positive ovarian tumors have reduced disease-specific and progression-free survival times. They have a higher frequency of stage IIIc serous carcinoma and a greater proportion is deceased. Among the 39-gene signature, a group of seven genes associated with cell adhesion recapitulated the results. Out of those seven, claudin-1, an adhesion molecule and phenotypic epithelial marker, is the only independent biomarker of serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Knockdown of claudin-1 expression in ovarian cancer cells reduces LPA-mediated cellular adhesion, enhances suspended cells and reduces LPA-mediated migration. Conclusions The data suggest that transcriptional events mediated by LPA in the tumor microenvironment influence tumor progression through modulation of cell adhesion molecules like claudin-1 and, for the first time, report an LPA-mediated expression signature in ovarian cancer that predicts a worse prognosis. PMID:19440550

  2. Up-regulation of stromal versican expression in advanced stage serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sue; Albitar, Lina; LeBaron, Richard; Welch, William R.; Samimi, Goli; Birrer, Michael J.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Mok, Samuel C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the role of versican (VCAN) in advanced stage serous ovarian cancer by investigating its expression, its function, and its correlation with clinical outcomes. Methods Microarray analysis was performed on RNA isolated from tumor and stromal components of advanced stage serous ovarian cancer and normal ovarian epithelial tissue to identify genes up-regulated in ovarian tumor stroma. Validation studies using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR) was performed on one of the up-regulated genes, VCAN. Immunolocalization of VCAN (n=111) and CD31 (n= 56) were done on serous ovarian tumors. CD31 staining was performed to examine microvessel density (MVD). Q-RT-PCR was performed on 65 samples to evaluate the differential expression of VCAN isoforms. Cell proliferation and invasion assays were performed to examine how V1-treated ovarian cancer cell lines and an endothelial cell line would differ from controls. Univariate survival analyses were done with VCAN expression. Correlation analysis was done with CD31, platinum resistance, and clinical data. Results Validation studies using Q-RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry showed significantly higher VCAN V1 isoform expression in ovarian cancer stroma compared with normal ovarian stroma and ovarian cancer cells. Correlation studies showed stromal VCAN expression was associated with poorer overall and progression free survival, platinum resistance, and increased MVD. VCAN-treated ovarian cancer and endothelial cells showed increased invasion potential. Conclusions VCAN overexpression is associated with increased MVD and invasion potential, which may lead to poorer overall and progression free survival and platinum resistance. PMID:20619446

  3. Ultrasound diagnosis of serous surface papillary borderline ovarian tumor: A case series with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ludovisi, Manuela; Foo, Xulin; Mainenti, Sara; Testa, Antonia Carla; Arora, Rupali; Jurkovic, Davor

    2015-01-01

    Serous surface papillary borderline ovarian tumors (SSPBOTs) are a rare morphologic variant of serous ovarian tumors that are typically confined to the ovarian surface, while the ovaries themselves tend to appear normal in size and shape. In this report, we describe the findings from five premenopausal women diagnosed with SSPBOTs, in whom ultrasound showed grossly normal ovaries that were partially or wholly covered with irregular solid tumors. In all five cases, histologic examination showed evidence of borderline serous tumors. These findings demonstrate that SSPBOTs can be diagnosed on a preoperative sonographic examination, which could facilitate conservative, fertility-sparing surgery in young women affected by this condition. PMID:25706035

  4. The optimal time for surgery in women with serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Jocelyn M.; Tone, Alicia A.; Jiang, Haiyan; Bernardini, Marcus Q.; Ferguson, Sarah; Laframboise, Stephane; Murphy, K. Joan; Rosen, Barry; May, Taymaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC) is commonly treated with surgery and chemotherapy. We investigated the survival of patients treated with primary or interval surgery at different times following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Their survival was compared with that of patients treated with primary cytoreductive surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Patients with stage III or IV HGSC were included in this retrospective cohort study. Clinical data were obtained from patient records. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreductive surgery (NAC) or with primary cytoreductive surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy (PCS). Study groups were stratified by several clinical variables. Results We included 334 patients in our study: 156 in the NAC and 178 in the PCS groups. Survival of patients in the NAC group was independent of when they underwent interval cytoreductive surgery following initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (p < 0.001). Optimal surgical cytoreduction had no impact on overall survival in the NAC group (p < 0.001). Optimal cytoreduction (p < 0.001) and platinum sensitivity (p < 0.001) were independent predictors of improved survival in the PCS but not in the NAC group. Patients in the NAC group had significantly worse overall survival than those in the PCS group (31.6 v. 61.3 mo, p < 0.001). Conclusion Women with advanced HGSC who underwent PCS had better survival than those who underwent interval NAC, regardless of the number of cycles of neoadjuvant therapy. Optimal cytoreduction did not provide a survival advantage in the NAC group. PMID:27240134

  5. Functional Proteomic Analysis of Advanced Serous Ovarian Cancer using Reverse Phase Protein Array: TGFβ Pathway Signaling Indicates Response to Primary Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Mark S.; Agarwal, Roshan; Gilks, Blake; Swenerton, Kenneth; Kalloger, Steve; Santos, Jennifer; Ju, Zhenlin; Lu, Yiling; Zhang, Fan; Coombes, Kevin; Miller, Dianne; Huntsman, David; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Using Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) we measured protein expression associated with response to primary chemotherapy in patients with advanced-stage high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Experimental Design: Tumor samples were obtained from forty-five patients with advanced high-grade serous cancers from the Gynecology Tumor Bank at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Treatment consisted of platinum-based chemotherapy following debulking surgery. Protein lysates were prepared from fresh frozen tumor samples and 80 validated proteins from signaling pathways implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis were measured by RPPA. Normalization of Ca-125 by the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy was chosen as the primary outcome measure of chemotherapy response. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis to identify protein predictors of Ca-125 normalization, and Cox regression to test for the association between protein expression and PFS. A significance level of p ≤ 0.05 was used. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 56.8 years. EGFR, YKL-40 and several TGFβ pathway proteins (c-Jun N-terminal kinase JNK, JNK phosphorylated at residues 183 and 185, PAI-1, Smad3, TAZ) showed significant associations with Ca-125 normalization on univariate testing. On multivariate analysis, EGFR (p < 0.02), JNK (p < 0.01), and Smad3 (p < 0.04) were significantly associated with normalization of Ca-125. Contingency table analysis of pathway-classified proteins revealed that the selection of TGFβ pathway proteins was unlikely due to false discovery (p < 0.007, Bonferroni-adjusted). Conclusion: TGFβ pathway signaling likely plays an important role as a marker or mediator of chemoresistance in advanced serous ovarian cancer. On this basis, future studies to develop and validate a useful predictor of treatment failure are warranted. PMID:20460476

  6. ALDH1-High Ovarian Cancer Stem-Like Cells Can Be Isolated from Serous and Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma Cells, and ALDH1 High Expression Is Associated with Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Takafumi; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Yasuda, Kazuyo; Takahashi, Akari; Asanuma, Hiroko; Morita, Rena; Mariya, Tasuku; Asano, Takuya; Mizuuchi, Masahito; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are defined as a small population of cancer cells that have high tumorigenicity. Furthermore, CSCs/CICs are resistant to several cancer therapies, and CSCs/CICs are therefore thought to be responsible for cancer recurrence after treatment and distant metastasis. In epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cases, disease recurrence after chemotherapy is frequently observed, suggesting ovarian CSCs/CICs are involved. There are four major histological subtypes in EOC, and serous adenocarcinoma and clear cell adenocarcinoma are high-grade malignancies. We therefore analyzed ovarian CSCs/CICs from ovarian carcinoma cell lines (serous adenocarcinoma and clear cell adenocarcinoma) and primary ovarian cancer cells in this study. We isolated ovarian CSCs/CICs as an aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 high (ALDH1high) population from 6 EOC cell lines (3 serous adenocarcinomas and 3 clear cell adenocarcinomas) by the ALDEFLUOR assay. ALDH1high cells showed greater sphere-forming ability, higher tumorigenicity and greater invasive capability, indicating that ovarian CSCs/CICs are enriched in ALDH1high cells. ALDH1high cells could also be isolated from 8 of 11 primary ovarian carcinoma samples. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that higher ALDH1 expression levels in ovary cancer cases are related to poorer prognosis in both serous adenocarcinoma cases and clear cell adenocarcinoma cases. Taken together, the results indicate that ALDH1 is a marker for ovarian CSCs/CICs and that the expression level of ALDH1 might be a novel biomarker for prediction of poor prognosis. PMID:23762304

  7. KRAS (but not BRAF) mutations in ovarian serous borderline tumor are associated with recurrent low-grade serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Yvonne T.; Deavers, Michael T.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Kwan, Suet-Yan; Kuo, Eric; Malpica, Anais; Mok, Samuel C.; Gershenson, David M.; Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2014-01-01

    BRAF and KRAS mutations in ovarian serous borderline tumors (OSBTs) and ovarian low-grade serous carcinomas (LGSCs) have been previously described. However, whether those OSBTs would progress to LGSCs or those LGSCs were developed from OSBT precursors in previous studies is unknown. Therefore, we assessed KRAS and BRAF mutations in tumor samples from 23 recurrent LGSC patients with known initial diagnosis of OSBT. Paraffin blocks from both OSBT and LGSC samples were available for 5 patients, and either OSBT or LGSC were available for another 18 patients. Tumor cells from paraffin-embedded tissues were dissected out for mutation analysis by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Sanger sequencing. Tumors that appeared to have wild-type KRAS by conventional PCR–Sanger sequencing were further analyzed by full COLD (coamplification at lower denaturation temperature)-PCR and deep sequencing. Full COLD-PCR was able to enrich the amplification of mutated alleles. Deep sequencing was performed with the Ion Torrent personal genome machine (PGM). By conventional PCR–Sanger sequencing, BRAF mutation was detected only in one patient and KRAS mutations were detected in 10 patients. Full COLD-PCR deep sequencing detected low-abundance KRAS mutations in eight additional patients. Three of the five patients with both OSBT and LGSC samples available had the same KRAS mutations detected in both OSBT and LGSC samples. The remaining two patients had only KRAS mutations detected in their LGSC samples. For patients with either OSBT or LGSC samples available, KRAS mutations were detected in 7 OSBT samples and 6 LGSC samples. To our surprise, patients with the KRAS G12V mutation appeared to have shorter survival times. In summary, KRAS mutations are very common in recurrent LGSC, while BRAF mutations are rare. The findings indicate that recurrent LGSC can arise from proliferation of OSBT tumor cells with or without detectable KRAS mutations. PMID:24549645

  8. Synergetic regulatory networks mediated by oncogene-driven microRNAs and transcription factors in serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Although high-grade serous ovarian cancer (OVC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in women, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms in the cellular processes that lead to this cancer. Recently, accumulated lines of evidence have shown that the interplay between transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) is critical in cellular regulation during tumorigenesis. A comprehensive investigation of TFs and miRNAs, and their target genes, may provide a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in the pathology of OVC. In this study, we have integrated three complementary algorithms into a framework, aiming to infer the regulation by miRNAs and TFs in conjunction with gene expression profiles. We demonstrated the utility of our framework by inferring 67 OVC-specific regulatory feed-forward loops (FFL) initiated by miRNAs or TFs in high-grade serous OVC. By analyzing these regulatory behaviors, we found that all the 67 FFLs are consistent in their regulatory effects on genes that jointly targeted by miRNAs and TFs. Remarkably, we unveiled an unbalanced distribution of FFLs with different oncogenic effects. In total, 31 of the 67 coherent FFLs were mainly initiated by oncogenes. On the contrary, only 4 of the FFLs were initiated by tumor suppressor genes. These overwhelmingly observed oncogenic genes were further detected in a sub-network with 32 FFLs centered by miRNA let-7b and TF TCF7L1 to regulate cell differentiation. Closer inspection of 32 FFLs revealed that 75% of the miRNAs reportedly play functional roles in cell differentiation, especially when enriched in epithelial–mesenchymal transitions. This study provides a comprehensive pathophysiological overview of recurring coherent circuits in OVC that are co-regulated by miRNAs and TFs. The prevalence of oncogenic coherent FFLs in serous OVC suggests that oncogene-driven regulatory motifs could cooperatively act upon critical cellular process such as cell differentiation in a highly

  9. Detection of serous precursor lesions in resected fallopian tubes from patients with benign diseases and a relatively low risk for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoyo; Murakami, Fumihiro; Higaki, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    The frequency of ovarian cancers in Japan has increased; however, doubts have been raised concerning the mechanism by which high-grade serous adenocarcinomas (HGSCs) arise. Conventionally, HGSC is thought to originate from the ovarian surface epithelium or epithelial inclusion cyst. However, recent data indicate that HGSCs may in fact develop from precursor lesions in the fallopian tube, including epithelia with a p53 signature, serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs), secretory cell outgrowths (SCOUTs), and tubal intraepithelial lesions in transition (TILT). Here, we determined the frequency of these fallopian tube precursors in surgically excised samples from 123 patients with benign pelvic diseases. We identified 12 cases with a p53 signature (9.7%), 26 with observable SCOUTs (21.1%), and 4 with TILT (3.2%), but no STIC cases. Although the lifetime risk for developing ovarian cancer is only around 1.4% for women without germ-line mutations, it is important to evaluate the presence of precursor lesions to understand HGSC pathogenesis better. Taken together, salpingectomy appears to be an option for women who are past their childbearing age and plan to undergo elective pelvic surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the presence of these specific precursors post-salpingectomy in low-risk patients. PMID:27250113

  10. Augmentation of Response to Chemotherapy by microRNA-506 Through Regulation of RAD51 in Serous Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoyan; Yang, Da; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pecot, Chad V.; Sun, Yan; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Li, Xia; Ji, Ping; Cogdell, David; Hu, Limei; Wang, Yingmei; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Shmulevich, Ilya; De Cecco, Loris; Chen, Kexin; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Xue, Fengxia; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemoresistance is a major challenge in cancer treatment. miR-506 is a potent inhibitor of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is also associated with chemoresistance. We characterized the role of miR-506 in chemotherapy response in high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Methods: We used Kaplan-Meier and log-rank methods to analyze the relationship between miR-506 and progression-free and overall survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 468) and Bagnoli (n = 130) datasets, in vitro experiments to study whether miR-506 is associated with homologous recombination, and response to chemotherapy agents. We used an orthotopic ovarian cancer mouse model (n = 10 per group) to test the effect of miR-506 on cisplatin and PARP inhibitor sensitivity. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: MiR-506 was associated with better response to therapy and longer progression-free and overall survival in two independent epithelial ovarian cancer patient cohorts (PFS: high vs low miR-506 expression; Bagnoli: hazard ratio [HR] = 3.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.90 to 4.70, P < .0001; TCGA: HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.00 to 2.25, P = 0.04). MiR-506 sensitized cells to DNA damage through directly targeting the double-strand DNA damage repair gene RAD51. Systemic delivery of miR-506 in 8–12 week old female athymic nude mice statistically significantly augmented the cisplatin and olaparib response (mean tumor weight ± SD, control miRNA plus cisplatin vs miR-506 plus cisplatin: 0.36±0.05g vs 0.07±0.02g, P < .001; control miRNA plus olaparib vs miR-506 plus olaparib: 0.32±0.13g vs 0.05±0.02g, P = .045, respectively), thus recapitulating the clinical observation. Conclusions: MiR-506 is a robust clinical marker for chemotherapy response and survival in serous ovarian cancers and has important therapeutic value in sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapy. PMID:25995442

  11. Ovarian Low-grade Serous Carcinoma: A Clinicopathologic Study of 33 Cases With Primary Surgery Performed at a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Okoye, Ekene; Euscher, Elizabeth D; Malpica, Anais

    2016-05-01

    Ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma (LGSC) is an entity with distinct pathologic and clinical features. The number of studies on this type of tumor is limited. In this article, we present our experience with 33 cases of ovarian LGSC with primary surgical treatment at our institution. For comparison, a cohort of ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) was also studied. Clinical information was obtained from the patients' charts or from the treating physicians. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed of 28 available LGSCs, and the following parameters were recorded: presence/absence of a serous borderline tumor (SBT), presence/absence of micropapillary/cribriform pattern (MP/CP), architectural pattern in the invasive component, and presence/absence of desmoplasia or fibrosis. The incidence of ovarian LGSC was 4.7%. LGSC patients ranged in age from 19 to 79 years (mean, 52 y), with 21.2% younger than 40 years. HGSC patients ranged in age from 38 to 90 years (mean, 62 y), with 1.6% younger than 40 years. LGSCs were staged as follows: stage I (2), stage III (23), and stage IV (8). Twenty-eight of 33 LGSC cases had concurrent SBT, with this component accounting for >50% of the neoplasm in 15 cases. In addition, MP/CP was noted in 19 cases. Invasion patterns included micropapillae (93%), cribriform nests (74%), elongated papillae (26%), glandular (44.4%), medium-sized papillae (33.3%), solid nests (22.2%), macropapillae (19%), and single cells (19%). In addition, desmoplasia (44.4%) and fibrosis (37%) were noted. Follow-up data ranging from 13 to 195 months (median 61.2 mo) were available on 30/33 LGSC patients: 18 (60%) were dead of disease; 1 (3.3%) was dead of other cause; 5 (16.7%) were alive with disease; and 6 (20%) had no evidence of disease. Follow-up data from 1 to 169 months (median 48 mo) were available on 185 HGSC patients: 132 (71.4%) were dead of disease; 3 (1.6%) were dead of other cause; 21 (11.4%) were alive with disease; and 29 (15.7%) had no

  12. Annexin A2 and S100A10 are independent predictors of serous ovarian cancer outcome.

    PubMed

    Lokman, Noor A; Pyragius, Carmen E; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew; Oehler, Martin K; Ricciardelli, Carmela

    2016-05-01

    Annexin A2, a calcium phospholipid binding protein, has been shown to play an important role in ovarian cancer metastasis. This study examined whether annexin A2 and S100A10 can be used as prognostic markers in serous ovarian cancer. ANXA2 and S100A10 gene expressions were assessed in publicly available ovarian cancer data sets and annexin A2 and S100A10 protein expressions were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a uniform cohort of stage III serous ovarian cancers (n = 109). Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between annexin A2 or S100A10 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions with clinical outcome. High ANXA2 mRNA levels in stage III serous ovarian cancers were associated with reduced progression-free survival (PFS; P = 0.023) and overall survival (OS; P = 0.0038), whereas high S100A10 mRNA levels predicted reduced OS (P = 0.0019). Using The Cancer Genome Atlas data sets, ANXA2 but not S100A10 expression was associated with higher clinical stage (P = 0.005), whereas both ANXA2 and S100A10 expressions were associated with the mesenchymal molecular subtype (P < 0.0001). Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses showed that high stromal annexin A2 immunostaining was significantly associated with reduced PFS (P = 0.013) and OS (P = 0.044). Moreover, high cytoplasmic S100A10 staining was significantly associated with reduced OS (P = 0.027). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed stromal annexin A2 (P = 0.009) and cytoplasmic S100A10 (P = 0.016) levels to be independent predictors of OS. Patients with high stromal annexin A2 and high cytoplasmic S100A10 expressions had a 3.4-fold increased risk of progression (P = 0.02) and 7.9-fold risk of ovarian cancer death (P = 0.04). Our findings indicate that together annexin A2 and S100A10 expressions are powerful predictors of serous ovarian cancer outcome. PMID:26925708

  13. Effect of Tubal Sterilization Technique on Risk of Serous Ovarian and Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LESSARD-ANDERSON, Collette R.; HANDLOGTEN, Kathryn S.; MOLITOR, Rochelle J.; DOWDY, Sean C.; CLIBY, William A.; WEAVER, Amy L.; SAUVER, Jennifer ST.; BAKKUM-GAMEZ, Jamie N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of excisional tubal sterilization on subsequent development of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) or primary peritoneal cancer (PPC). Methods We performed a population-based, nested case-control study using the Rochester Epidemiology Project. We identified all patients with a diagnosis of serous EOC or PPC from 1966 through 2009. Each case was age-matched to 2 controls without either diagnosis. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% CIs were estimated from conditional logistic regression models. Models were adjusted for prior hysterectomy, prior salpingo-oophorectomy, oral contraceptive use, endometriosis, infertility, gravidity, and parity. Results In total, we identified 194 cases of serous EOC and PPC during the study period and matched them with 388 controls (mean [SD] age, 61.4 [15.2] years). Fourteen cases (7.2%) and 46 controls (11.9%) had undergone tubal sterilization. Adjusted risk of serous EOC or PPC was slightly lower after any tubal sterilization (OR, 0.59 [95% CI, 0.29–1.17]; P=.13). The rate of excisional tubal sterilization was lower in cases than controls (2.6% vs 6.4%). Adjusted risk of serous EOC and PPC was decreased by 64% after excisional tubal sterilization (OR, 0.36 [95% CI, 0.13–1.02]; P=.054) compared with those without sterilization or with nonexcisional tubal sterilization. Conclusions We present a population-based investigation of the effects of excisional tubal sterilization on the risk of serous EOC and PPC. Excisional methods may confer greater risk reduction than other sterilization methods. PMID:25316178

  14. Low expression of the X-linked ribosomal protein S4 in human serous epithelial ovarian cancer is associated with a poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The X-linked ribosomal protein S4 (RPS4X), which is involved in cellular translation and proliferation, has previously been identified as a partner of the overexpressed multifunctional protein YB-1 in several breast cancer cells. Depletion of RPS4X results in consistent resistance to cisplatin in such cell lines. Methods As platinum-based chemotherapy is a standard first line therapy used to treat patients with ovarian cancer, we evaluated the prognostic value of RPS4X and YB-1 at the protein level in specimen from 192 high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Results Immunohistochemistry studies indicated that high expression of RPS4X was associated with a lower risk of death and later disease progression (HR = 0.713, P = 0.001 and HR = 0.761, P = 0.001, respectively) as compared to low expression of RPS4X. In contrast, YB-1 was not significantly associated with either recurrence or survival time in this cohort. Finally, the depletion of RPS4X with different siRNAs in two different ovarian cancer cell lines reduced their proliferative growth rate but more importantly increased their resistance to cisplatin. Conclusion Altogether, these results suggest that the levels of RPS4X could be a good indicator for resistance to platinum-based therapy and a prognostic marker for ovarian cancer. Our study also showed that RPS4X is an independent prognostic factor in patients with serous epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:23800275

  15. Molecular subtypes of serous borderline ovarian tumor show distinct expression patterns of benign tumor and malignant tumor-associated signatures.

    PubMed

    Curry, Edward W J; Stronach, Euan A; Rama, Nona R; Wang, Yuepeng Y P; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors show heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Most have excellent prognosis, although a small percentage show recurrence or progressive disease, usually to low-grade serous carcinoma. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular relationship between these entities and identify potential markers of tumor progression and therapeutic targets. We studied gene expression using Affymetrix HGU133plus2 GeneChip microarrays in 3 low-grade serous carcinomas, 13 serous borderline tumors and 8 serous cystadenomas. An independent data set of 18 serous borderline tumors and 3 low-grade serous carcinomas was used for validation. Unsupervised clustering revealed clear separation of benign and malignant tumors, whereas borderline tumors showed two distinct groups, one clustering with benign and the other with malignant tumors. The segregation into benign- and malignant-like borderline molecular subtypes was reproducible on applying the same analysis to an independent publicly available data set. We identified 50 genes that separate borderline tumors into their subgroups. Functional enrichment analysis of genes that separate borderline tumors to the two subgroups highlights a cell adhesion signature for the malignant-like subset, with Claudins particularly prominent. This is the first report of molecular subtypes of borderline tumors based on gene expression profiling. Our results provide the basis for identification of biomarkers for the malignant potential of borderline ovarian tumor and potential therapeutic targets for low-grade serous carcinoma. PMID:23948749

  16. Ruxolitinib Phosphate, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. Molecular Subtyping of Serous Ovarian Cancer Based on Multi-omics Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Huang, Ke; Gu, Chenglei; Zhao, Luyang; Wang, Nan; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Chenggang; Lu, Yiming; Meng, Yuanguang

    2016-01-01

    Classification of ovarian cancer by morphologic features has a limited effect on serous ovarian cancer (SOC) treatment and prognosis. Here, we proposed a new system for SOC subtyping based on the molecular categories from the Cancer Genome Atlas project. We analyzed the DNA methylation, protein, microRNA, and gene expression of 1203 samples from 599 serous ovarian cancer patients. These samples were divided into nine subtypes based on RNA-seq data, and each subtype was found to be associated with the activation and/or suppression of the following four biological processes: immunoactivity, hormone metabolic, mesenchymal development and the MAPK signaling pathway. We also identified four DNA methylation, two protein expression, six microRNA sequencing and four pathway subtypes. By integrating the subtyping results across different omics platforms, we found that most RNA-seq subtypes overlapped with one or two subtypes from other omics data. Our study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of SOC and provides a new perspective for the more accurate stratification of its subtypes. PMID:27184229

  18. Principles of Treatment for Borderline, Micropapillary Serous, and Low-Grade Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Kari E; Uppal, Shitanshu; Johnston, Carolyn

    2016-09-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) are less common than epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs). Low-grade EOCs (LG-EOCs) occur even less frequently than BOTs. After primary therapy, recurrence rates of BOTs and LG-EOCs are significantly lower and the stage-adjusted survival is higher than for high-grade EOCs. Thus, determining the best management in terms of traditional ovarian cancer staging and debulking procedures is more challenging and has been recently brought to question. This article reviews the particulars of BOTs and LG-EOCs, their similarities and differences, and how they are best managed and treated, and emphasizes the major role of surgery and the controversial role of chemotherapy. Because these tumors disproportionately affect younger women, this review addresses ovarian preservation in circumstances when fertility or hormonal preservation is desired. PMID:27587627

  19. Late Isolated Central Nervous System Relapse from Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    de Castria, Tiago Biachi; Rodrigues, Sylvia Regina Quintanilha; Diz, Maria del Pilar Estevez

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement by ovarian serous adenocarcinoma is rare. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman that developed brain metastasis as isolated site of relapse 4.5 years after a complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy for a stage Ic disease. She proceeded to a craniotomy with resection of the lesion and, subsequently, to a whole brain radiotherapy. Nineteen months later, she developed carcinomatous meningitis as isolated site of recurrence. Patient was submitted to intrathecal chemotherapy with methotrexate; however, she died from progressive neurologic involvement disease few weeks later. PMID:25506007

  20. MUS81 is associated with cell proliferation and cisplatin sensitivity in serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Suhong; Zheng, Hui; Wen, Xuemei; Sun, Jiajun; Wang, Yanchun; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin; Lu, Renquan

    2016-08-01

    The dysfunction of DNA damage repair (DDR) pathway contributes to tumorigenesis and drug-resistance in cancer. MUS81 is a member of the conserved xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF) family protein of endonucleases, which is important to the DDR pathway. However, the role of MUS81 in the development of ovarian cancer remains uncertain. To explore the expression of MUS81 and its association to serous ovarian cancer (SOC), 43 biopsies of SOC patients were detected by qRT-PCR, and 29 specimens were further performed by immunohistochemistry analysis. Here, we observed that MUS81 was over-expressed in SOC tissues at both transcript and protein levels, and the expression level of MUS81 protein in ovarian cancer cell lines was also higher than that in human normal ovarian surface epithelial cell line (HOSEpiC). We also found that down-regulation of MUS81 expression in ovarian cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation ability, and influenced cell cycle progression. Moreover, inhibition of MUS81 expression induced cellular senescence and enhanced the antitumor effect of cisplatin. Down-regulation of MUS81 expression could suppress the growth and development of SOC. These results indicate that MUS81 might play important roles in the progression of SOC and influence the antitumor effect of cisplatin. PMID:27255997

  1. Extrauterine Pelvic Serous Carcinomas: Current Update on Pathology and Cross-sectional Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Amanullah, Farhan S; Menias, Christine O; Chen, Melissa M; Valente, Philip T; Chintapalli, Kedar N; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of extrauterine pelvic serous carcinomas includes ovarian serous carcinoma, primary peritoneal serous carcinoma, and primary fallopian tube carcinoma. Ovarian serous carcinoma, the most common ovarian malignant epithelial neoplasm, consists of two distinct entities: high-grade and low-grade serous carcinomas. Primary peritoneal serous carcinoma and primary fallopian tube carcinoma are rare malignancies that share many characteristics of high-grade serous carcinomas. Recent advances in the genetics and molecular biology of gynecologic cancers have suggested a common origin of many extrauterine pelvic serous carcinomas from fallopian tube epithelium. With the exception of low-grade serous carcinomas, which arise from cortical inclusion cysts lined by tubal epithelium, most extrauterine pelvic serous carcinomas are believed to originate from serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas and show similar clinical-biologic behaviors and natural histories. Indeed, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Committee on Gynecologic Oncology recently recognized that these cancers should be considered collectively, with a common system of staging and management strategies for ovarian, primary peritoneal, and fallopian tube cancers. A paradigm shift has occurred in our understanding of the pathogenesis of extrauterine pelvic serous carcinomas that has the potential to change current strategies for screening, prevention, diagnosis, and management. Ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and combined positron emission tomography and CT are pivotal in screening, initial diagnosis, and treatment follow-up; however, because of this paradigm shift, new radiologic techniques, such as contrast material-enhanced US and molecular US imaging, and various optical imaging techniques are being investigated as important screening and diagnostic tools. Because of evolving knowledge of genetic and molecular changes underlying the

  2. Pathway-Specific Engineered Mouse Allograft Models Functionally Recapitulate Human Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabova, Ludmila; Bupp, Sujata; Kamal, Muhaymin; Householder, Deborah B.; Hernandez, Lidia; Schlomer, Jerome J.; Baran, Maureen L.; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Martin, Philip L.; Van Dyke, Terry A.

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rate from ovarian cancers can be attributed to late-stage diagnosis and lack of effective treatment. Despite enormous effort to develop better targeted therapies, platinum-based chemotherapy still remains the standard of care for ovarian cancer patients, and resistance occurs at a high rate. One of the rate limiting factors for translation of new drug discoveries into clinical treatments has been the lack of suitable preclinical cancer models with high predictive value. We previously generated genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models based on perturbation of Tp53 and Rb with or without Brca1 or Brca2 that develop serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) closely resembling the human disease on histologic and molecular levels. Here, we describe an adaptation of these GEM models to orthotopic allografts that uniformly develop tumors with short latency and are ideally suited for routine preclinical studies. Ovarian tumors deficient in Brca1 respond to treatment with cisplatin and olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, whereas Brca1-wild type tumors are non-responsive to treatment, recapitulating the relative sensitivities observed in patients. These mouse models provide the opportunity for evaluation of effective therapeutics, including prediction of differential responses in Brca1-wild type and Brca1–deficient tumors and development of relevant biomarkers. PMID:24748377

  3. Ovarian Cancer in Hereditary Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nakonechny, Quentin B; Gilks, C Blake

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome and Lynch syndrome (LS) are associated with increased risk of developing ovarian carcinoma. Patients with HBOC have a lifetime risk of up to 50% of developing high-grade serous carcinoma of tube or ovary; patients with LS have a 10% lifetime risk of developing endometrioid or clear cell carcinoma of the ovary. Testing all patients with tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma for mutations associated with HBOC syndrome, and all patients presenting with endometrioid or clear cell carcinoma of the ovary for mutations associated with LS can identify patients with undiagnosed underlying hereditary cancer susceptibility syndromes. PMID:27241103

  4. Ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma involving the cervix mimicking a cervical primary.

    PubMed

    Malpica, Anais; Deavers, Michael T

    2011-11-01

    We describe the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of the first reported case of an ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma metastatic to the cervix mimicking a cervical primary. The patient, a 55-year-old woman, was found to have an abnormal cervix and an abnormal Pap smear during a preoperative workup for a rectocele repair. A subsequent cervical biopsy contained moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma and the patient underwent a cold knife conization. An infiltrating adenocarcinoma was found in the anterior cervical lip, the neoplasm reached the surface of the endocervical canal and was composed of mildly to moderately atypical, eosinophilic or amphophilic columnar cells arranged in glands and papillae. Mitotic figures were rare and no apoptotic bodies were seen. Psammoma bodies and intraglandular mucinous material were also noted. There was extensive vascular/lymphatic invasion. The tumor extended to all margins and was interpreted as a moderately differentiated (grade 2) adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix with a linear spread of at least 1.4 cm and a depth of at least 0.6 cm (FIGO stage 1B1). The patient was treated with radiotherapy and cisplatin. Six months later, surveillance imaging studies showed that the patient's ovaries seemed to be enlarging. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, right pelvic lymph node sampling, omentectomy, peritoneal biopsies, and pelvic washings. The ovaries contained bilateral cystic tumors. There was gross tumor involving multiple peritoneal sites. Microscopic examination of the ovaries showed the typical features of low-grade serous carcinoma associated with a serous neoplasm of low malignant potential with a cribriform pattern. Metastatic low-grade serous carcinoma was detected in multiple peritoneal sites and in the pelvic washings. A consultation was obtained, with the consultant concurring that the tumors represented independent primaries. The patient received

  5. Identification of differentially expressed genes using an annealing control primer system in stage III serous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most patients with ovarian cancer are diagnosed with advanced stage disease (i.e., stage III-IV), which is associated with a poor prognosis. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in stage III serous ovarian carcinoma compared to normal tissue were screened by a new differential display method, the annealing control primer (ACP) system. The potential targets for markers that could be used for diagnosis and prognosis, for stage III serous ovarian cancer, were found by cluster and survival analysis. Methods The ACP-based reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR) technique was used to identify DEGs in patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma. The DEGs identified by the ACP system were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Cluster analysis was performed on the basis of the expression profile produced by quantitative real-time PCR and survival analysis was carried out by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards multivariate model; the results of gene expression were compared between chemo-resistant and chemo-sensitive groups. Results A total of 114 DEGs were identified by the ACP-based RT PCR technique among patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma. The DEGs associated with an apoptosis inhibitory process tended to be up-regulated clones while the DEGs associated with immune response tended to be down-regulated clones. Cluster analysis of the gene expression profile obtained by quantitative real-time PCR revealed two contrasting groups of DEGs. That is, a group of genes including: SSBP1, IFI6 DDT, IFI27, C11orf92, NFKBIA, TNXB, NEAT1 and TFG were up-regulated while another group of genes consisting of: LAMB2, XRCC6, MEF2C, RBM5, FOXP1, NUDCP2, LGALS3, TMEM185A, and C1S were down-regulated in most patients. Survival analysis revealed that the up-regulated genes such as DDAH2, RNase K and TCEAL2 might be associated with a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the prognosis of patients with chemo-resistance was predicted to be

  6. Estimation of Prognostic Marker Genes by Public Microarray Data in Patients with Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, San-Duk; Jang, Se-Song; Han, Jeong A.; Park, Hyun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lymphatic invasion (LI) is regarded as a predictor of the aggressiveness of ovarian cancer (OC). However, LI is not always the major determinant of long-term patient survival. To establish proper diagnosis and treatment for OC, we analyzed differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for patients with serous epithelial OC, with or without LI, who did or did not survive for 5 years. Materials and Methods Gene expression data from 63 patients with OC and LI, and 35 patients with OC but without LI, were investigated using an Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Array and analyzed using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Among these 98 patients, 16 survived for 5 years or more. DEGs were identified using the Bioconductor R package, and their functions were analyzed using the DAVID web tool. Results We found 55 significant DEGs (p<0.01) from the patients with LI and 20 highly significant DEGs (p<0.001) from those without it. Pathway analysis showed that DEGs associated with carbohydrate metabolism or with renal cell carcinoma pathways were enriched in the patients with and without LI, respectively. Using the top five prognostic marker genes, we generated survival scores that could be used to predict the 5-year survival of patients with OC without LI. Conclusion The DEGs identified in this study could be used to elucidate the mechanism of tumor progression and to guide the prognosis and treatment of patients with serous OC but without LI. PMID:27189279

  7. Establishment of human ovarian serous carcinomas cell lines in serum free media.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhuangyu; Hooley, Jeffrey; Smith, Douglas H; Young, Peter; Roberts, Penelope E; Mather, Jennie P

    2012-03-01

    Ovarian cancers are the fifth leading cause of cancer death among US woman. The majority of ovarian cancers belong to a category of serous adenocarcinomas. This type of cancer is often diagnosed at a late stage of the disease. Surgical debulking, followed by chemotherapy is the current treatment. Half of all patients will die within 5 years of diagnosis of the disease. Poor survival may be due to disease progression as a consequence of development of drug resistance, cancer cell heterogeneity within the tumor, or the persistence of cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) are defined as a minority cell type in the tumor, which retains the capacity, through asymmetric division, for self-renewal as well as differentiation into multiple cell types. Through this process, CSC can regenerate the entire tumor phenotype and subsequent metastases. Initial in vitro work in the area of solid tumor CSC biology has focused on the isolation and propagation of cells with CSC-like properties from breast and colon tumors. Breast and colon cell lines with CSC-like properties have been isolated and maintained in vitro for extended periods of time. The in vitro maintenance of these CSC requires growth in hormone-supplemented serum-free media and the use of matrix or growth as tumor spheres (Roberts, Ricci-Vitiani et al., Cammareri et al.). Based on the pioneering work generating breast and colon CSC, our lab has begun to develop methods for the establishment cell lines with CSC-like properties from additional solid tumors. In this article, we describe methods, using defined medium, which allow for the successful establishment of continuous cell cultures from a minority cell type within serous ovarian cancers. The cell lines established using these methods grow in serum-free hormone-supplemented medium either as a monolayer on a matrix, or as tumor spheres in suspension. These cells express markers previously reported for tumor stem cells, including CD44 and CD133, and form tumors

  8. An IL6-correlated signature in serous epithelial ovarian cancer associates with growth factor response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the most lethal gynecological cancers; the majority of EOC is the serous histotype and diagnosed at advanced stage. IL6 is the cytokine that has been found most frequently associated with carcinogenesis and progression of serous EOCs. IL6 is a growth-promoting and anti-apoptotic factor, and high plasma levels of IL6 in advanced stage EOCs correlate with poor prognosis. The objective of the present study was to identify IL6 co-regulated genes and gene network/s in EOCs. Results We applied bioinformatics tools on 7 publicly available data sets containing the gene expression profiles of 1262 EOC samples. By Pearson's correlation analysis we identified, in EOCs, an IL6-correlated gene signature containing 40 genes mainly associated with proliferation. 33 of 40 genes were also significantly correlated in low malignant potential (LMP) EOCs, while 7 genes, named C5AR1, FPR1, G0S2, IL8, KLF2, MMP19, and THBD were IL6-correlated only in advanced stage EOCs. Among the 40-gene signature EGFR ligand HBEGF, genes of the EGR family members and genes encoding for negative feedback regulators of growth factor signaling were included. The results obtained by Gene Set Enrichment and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses enabled the identification, respectively, of gene sets associated with ‘early growth factor response’ for the 40-gene signature, and a biological network related to ‘thrombosis and cardiovascular disease’ for the 7-gene signature. In agreement with these results, selected genes from the identified signatures were validated in vitro by real time RT-PCR in serous EOC cell lines upon stimulation with EGF. Conclusions Serous EOCs, independently of their aggressiveness, co-regulate IL6 expression together with that of genes associated to growth factor signaling, arguing for the hypothesis that common mechanism/s driven by EGFR ligands characterize both advanced-stage and LMP EOCs. Only advanced-stage EOCs appeared to be

  9. Immunophenotype and K-RAS mutation in mucinous ovarian adenocarcinoma with mural nodule of high-grade sarcoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Desouki, Mohamed M; Fadare, Oluwole; Kanbour, Anisa; Kanbour-Shakir, Amal

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian mucinous tumors with mural nodules are rare. The mural nodules are microscopically divergent neoplasms of varying sizes that may be benign (eg, sarcoma-like and carcinosarcoma-like), or malignant (eg, anaplastic carcinoma and sarcoma). The K-RAS gene mutation in ovarian mucinous neoplasms with mural nodules has not been previously reported. This is a case report of a 25-year-old female diagnosed with ovarian invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma with mural nodule of high-grade sarcoma. The mucinous tumor component demonstrated a K-RAS codon 12/13 mutation (p.G12V, c.35 G>T), whereas the sarcomatous component demonstrated a K-RAS codon 12/13 mutation (p.G12D, c.35 G>A). Although both tumor components revealed a mutation in codon 12 of K-RAS, they were of different nucleotide substitutions, indicating that these 2 tumor components were of different clonal origins. However, the fact that the 2 mutations identified in the tumor components are the most common mutations reported in mucinous tumors of the ovary, raises the possibility that sarcomatous mural nodules simply represent a form of dedifferentiation in mucinous tumors. PMID:24487474

  10. Herpes Virus MicroRNA Expression and Significance in Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Deep; Mariani, Marisa; McHugh, Mark; Andreoli, Mirko; Sieber, Steven; He, Shiquan; Dowell-Martino, Candice; Fiedler, Paul; Scambia, Giovanni; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    Serous ovarian cancer (SEOC) is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs which regulate gene expression and protein translation. MiRNAs are also encoded by viruses with the intent of regulating their own genes and those of the infected cells. This is the first study assessing viral miRNAs in SEOC. MiRNAs sequencing data from 487 SEOC patients were downloaded from the TCGA website and analyzed through in-house sequencing pipeline. To cross-validate TCGA analysis, we measured the expression of miR-H25 by quantitative immunofluorescence in an additional cohort of 161 SEOC patients. Gene, miRNA expression, and cytotoxicity assay were performed on multiple ovarian cancer cell lines transfected with miR-H25 and miR-BART7. Outcome analysis was performed using multivariate Cox and Kaplan-Meier method. Viral miRNAs are more expressed in SEOC than in normal tissues. Moreover, Herpetic viral miRNAs (miR-BART7 from EBV and miR-H25 from HSV-2) are significant and predictive biomarkers of outcome in multivariate Cox analysis. MiR-BART7 correlates with resistance to first line chemotherapy and early death, whereas miR-H25 appears to impart a protective effect and long term survival. Integrated analysis of gene and viral miRNAs expression suggests that miR-BART7 induces directly cisplatin-resistance, while miR-H25 alters RNA processing and affects the expression of noxious human miRNAs such as miR-143. This is the first investigation linking viral miRNA expression to ovarian cancer outcome. Viral miRNAs can be useful to develop biomarkers for early diagnosis and as a potential therapeutic tool to reduce SEOC lethality. PMID:25485872

  11. Multidrug Resistance-Linked Gene Signature Predicts Overall Survival of Patients With Primary Ovarian Serous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Varma, Sudhir; Davidson, Ben; Bunkholt Elstrand, Mari; Ganapathi, Ram; Kamat, Aparna A.; Sood, Anil K.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Seiden, Michael V.; Rueda, Bo R.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study assesses the ability of multidrug resistance (MDR)-associated gene expression patterns to predict survival in patients with newly diagnosed carcinoma of the ovary. The scope of this research differs substantially from that of previous reports, as a very large set of genes was evaluated whose expression has been shown to affect response to chemotherapy. Experimental Design We applied a customized TaqMan Low Density Array, a highly sensitive and specific assay, to study the expression profiles of 380 MDR-linked genes in 80 tumor specimens collected at initial surgery to debulk primary serous carcinoma. The RNA expression profiles of these drug resistance genes were correlated with clinical outcomes. Results Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to estimate the ability of MDR gene expression to predict survival. Although gene expression alone does not predict overall survival (P=0.06), four covariates (age, stage, CA125 level and surgical debulking) do (P=0.03). When gene expression was added to the covariates, we found an 11-gene signature that provides a major improvement in overall survival prediction (log-rank statistic P<0.003). The predictive power of this 11-gene signature was confirmed by dividing high and low risk patient groups, as defined by their clinical covariates, into four specific risk groups based on expression levels. Conclusion This study reveals an 11-gene signature that allows a more precise prognosis for patients with serous cancer of the ovary treated with carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based therapy. These 11 new targets offer opportunities for new therapies to improve clinical outcome in ovarian cancer. PMID:22492981

  12. The E3 ubiquitin ligase EDD is an adverse prognostic factor for serous epithelial ovarian cancer and modulates cisplatin resistance in vitro.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P M; Davies, M J; Scurry, J P; Smith, A N; Barton, C A; Henderson, M J; Saunders, D N; Gloss, B S; Patterson, K I; Clancy, J L; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A; Murali, Rajmohan; Scolyer, R A; Zeng, Y; Williams, E D; Scurr, L; Defazio, A; Quinn, D I; Watts, C K W; Hacker, N F; Henshall, S M; Sutherland, R L

    2008-03-25

    Despite a high initial response rate to first-line platinum/paclitaxel chemotherapy, most women with epithelial ovarian cancer relapse with recurrent disease that becomes refractory to further cytotoxic treatment. We have previously shown that the E3 ubiquitin ligase, EDD, a regulator of DNA damage responses, is amplified and overexpressed in serous ovarian carcinoma. Given that DNA damage pathways are linked to platinum resistance, the aim of this study was to determine if EDD expression was associated with disease recurrence and platinum sensitivity in serous ovarian cancer. High nuclear EDD expression, as determined by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 151 women with serous ovarian carcinoma, was associated with an approximately two-fold increased risk of disease recurrence and death in patients who initially responded to first-line chemotherapy, independently of disease stage and suboptimal debulking. Although EDD expression was not directly correlated with relative cisplatin sensitivity of ovarian cancer cell lines, sensitivity to cisplatin was partially restored in platinum-resistant A2780-cp70 ovarian cancer cells following siRNA-mediated knockdown of EDD expression. These results identify EDD as a new independent prognostic marker for outcome in serous ovarian cancer, and suggest that pathways involving EDD, including DNA damage responses, may represent new therapeutic targets for chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:18349819

  13. Identification of predictive factors of response to the BH3-mimetic molecule ABT-737: an ex vivo experiment in human serous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lheureux, Stéphanie; N'Diaye, Monique; Blanc-Fournier, Cécile; Dugué, Audrey Emmanuelle; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Dutoit, Soizic; Giffard, Florence; Abeilard, Edwige; Briand, Mélanie; Labiche, Alexandre; Grellard, Jean-Michel; Crouet, Hubert; Martin, Sandrine; Joly, Florence; Poulain, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    Ovarian cancers are addicted to Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Bcl-xL can be inhibited by the BH3-mimetic ABT-737. In vitro, ABT-737 can induce apoptosis of cancer cells, and its activity is potentiated by Mcl-1 inactivation. Herein, we assessed the sensitivity of human ovarian tumor nodes to ABT-737 when combined with carboplatin, which can indirectly inhibit Mcl-1. Fresh samples from 25 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) who were chemo-naïve and had undergone surgery were prospectively exposed ex vivo to ABT-737 ± carboplatin. The treatment effect was studied on sliced tumor nodes by assessment of cleaved-caspase 3 immunostaining. We also studied the association between baseline Bcl-2 family protein expression (via immunohistochemistry) and the response of nodes to treatment. ABT-737 induced apoptosis as a single agent but its efficacy was not improved by the addition of carboplatin. Bim was frequently expressed (20/25) and its absence or low expression was associated with the absence of response to ABT-737, p value = 0.019 by Fisher's test and sensitivity = 93%, (95% confidence interval, 66-100). Moreover, we observed that in tumors in which Bim was expressed, a low expression of phospho-Erk1/2 or Mcl-1 improved the proportion of responses. This pilot study showed that ABT-737 has promise as monotherapy for HGSOC in a specific subgroup of tumors. Bim, Mcl-1, and phospho-Erk1/2 appeared to be relevant biomarkers that could be used for the selection of patients in the design of clinical trials using Navitoclax (an orally available compound related to ABT-737). PMID:25066666

  14. Novel Axl-driven signaling pathway and molecular signature characterize high-grade ovarian cancer patients with poor clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Katia; Pinciroli, Patrizia; Sensi, Marialuisa; Alciato, Federica; Bisaro, Brigitte; Lozneanu, Ludmila; Raspagliesi, Francesco; Centritto, Floriana; Cabodi, Sara; Defilippi, Paola; Avanzi, Gian Carlo; Canevari, Silvana; Tomassetti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    High-grade epithelial ovarian cancer (HGEOC) is a clinically diverse and molecularly heterogeneous disease comprising subtypes with distinct biological features and outcomes. The receptor tyrosine kinases, expressed by EOC cells, and their ligands, present in the microenvironment, activate signaling pathways, which promote EOC cells dissemination. Herein, we established a molecular link between the presence of Gas6 ligand in the ascites of HGEOCs, the expression and activation of its receptor Axl in ovarian cancer cell lines and biopsies, and the progression of these tumors. We demonstrated that Gas6/Axl signalling converges on the integrin β3 pathway in the presence of the adaptor protein p130Cas, thus inducing tumor cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix and invasion. Accordingly, Axl and p130Cas were significantly co-expressed in HGEOC samples. Clinically, we identified an Axl-associated signature of 62 genes able to portray the HGEOCs with the shortest overall survival. These data biologically characterize a group of HGEOCs and could help guide a more effective therapeutic approach to be taken for these patients. PMID:26356564

  15. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Robert L; Gourley, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research. PMID:27458531

  16. Efficacy of Postoperative Hormone Replacement Therapy on Prognosis of Patients with Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Li; Chen, Jin-Hong; Lu, Wen; Li, Bi-Lan; Zhu, Qin-Yi; Wan, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of gynecological cancer-associated death. Iatrogenic menopause might adversely affect the quality of life and health outcomes in young female cancer survivors. We evaluated whether postoperative hormone replacement therapy (HRT) had a negative influence on the progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with papillary serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with papillary SOC, treated from January 1980 to December 2009, who suffered from menopause with or without HRT. Clinical characteristics of patients were compared between the two groups (HRT and non-HRT). Blood samples were collected from all the participants to detect serum cancer antigen (CA) 125. Hazard ratios with 95% confidential intervals for each variable were calculated by univariable and multivariable conditional Logistic regression analyses. Results: Among 112 identified patients, 31 were HRT users and 81 were not. The two groups did not significantly differ in median age at diagnosis (t = 0.652, P = 0.513), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (χ2 = 0.565, P = 0.754), differentiation (χ2 = 1.728, P = 0.422), resection status (χ2 = 0.070, P = 0.791), relapse (χ2 = 0.109, P = 0.741), chemotherapy course (t = −1.079, P = 0.282), follow-up interval (t = 0.878, P = 0.382), or PFS (t = 0.580, P = 0.562). Median Kupperman score at the onset of HRT was 30.81 and 12.19 after the therapy (t = 3.302, P = 0.001). According to the analysis, the strongest independent variables in predicting PFS were FIGO stage and disease that was not optimally debulked. Conclusions: Postoperative HRT is not a prognostic factor for PFS of patients with papillary SOC. However, multicenter studies are needed to verify and extend our findings. PMID:27231169

  17. Primary peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma: a study of 25 cases and comparison with stage III-IV ovarian papillary serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ben-Baruch, G; Sivan, E; Moran, O; Rizel, S; Menczer, J; Seidman, D S

    1996-03-01

    The clinical characteristics and treatment outcome of patients with primary peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma (PPSC) (n = 22) was compared with stage III-IV papillary serous ovarian carcinoma (PSOC) patients (n = 63). There were no statistically significant differences between the PPSC and PSOC patients with regard to the mean age, menopausal status, parity, ascites fluid volume, proportion of stage IV disease, and the rate of optimal debulking achieved. The median disease-free interval was 15 and 18 months; the median survival was 21 and 26 months; and the 5-year survival was 18 and 24% for the PPSC and PSOC groups, respectively. The median survival time for patients with a residual tumor > or = 2 cm was 20.5 and 24 months, and for residual tumor > or = 2 cm was 46 and 41 months, in PPSC and PSOC patients, respectively. Survival was thus better, in both groups, when residual disease at the end of the operation was < 2 cm, though this was statistically significant only for PSOC (P < 0.02). We conclude that patients with PPSC should be treated as other stage II-IV PSOC patients. Combining optimal debulking with a platinum-based chemotherapy may offer the patient the most effective treatment. PMID:8774644

  18. Gene Expression Profile for Predicting Survival in Advanced-Stage Serous Ovarian Cancer Across Two Independent Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Kosuke; Tajima, Atsushi; Yahata, Tetsuro; Kodama, Shoji; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mitsuaki; Onishi, Yoshitaka; Hatae, Masayuki; Sueyoshi, Kazunobu; Fujiwara, Hisaya; Kudo, Yoshiki; Kotera, Kohei; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Inoue, Ituro; Tanaka, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients are generally treated with platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy after primary debulking surgery. However, there is a wide range of outcomes for individual patients. Therefore, the clinicopathological factors alone are insufficient for predicting prognosis. Our aim is to identify a progression-free survival (PFS)-related molecular profile for predicting survival of patients with advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer tissues from 110 Japanese patients who underwent primary surgery and platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. We selected 88 PFS-related genes by a univariate Cox model (p<0.01) and generated the prognostic index based on 88 PFS-related genes after adjustment of regression coefficients of the respective genes by ridge regression Cox model using 10-fold cross-validation. The prognostic index was independently associated with PFS time compared to other clinical factors in multivariate analysis [hazard ratio (HR), 3.72; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.66–5.43; p<0.0001]. In an external dataset, multivariate analysis revealed that this prognostic index was significantly correlated with PFS time (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.20–1.98; p = 0.0008). Furthermore, the correlation between the prognostic index and overall survival time was confirmed in the two independent external datasets (log rank test, p = 0.0010 and 0.0008). Conclusions/Significance The prognostic ability of our index based on the 88-gene expression profile in ridge regression Cox hazard model was shown to be independent of other clinical factors in predicting cancer prognosis across two distinct datasets. Further study will be necessary to improve predictive accuracy of the prognostic index toward clinical application for evaluation of the risk of recurrence in patients with advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer. PMID:20300634

  19. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without WEE1 Inhibitor MK-1775 in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. Ovarian carcinomas with genetic and epigenetic BRCA1 loss have distinct molecular abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Gilks, C. Blake; Press, Joshua Z.; De Luca, Alessandro; Boyd, Niki; Young, Sean; Troussard, Armelle; Ridge, Yolanda; Kaurah, Pardeep; Kalloger, Steve E.; Blood, Katherine A.; Smith, Margaret; Spellman, Paul T.; Wang, Yuker; Miller, Dianne M.; Horsman, Doug; Faham, Malek; Gilks, C. Blake; Gray, Joe; Huntsman, David G.

    2008-05-02

    Subclassification of ovarian carcinomas can be used to guide treatment and determine prognosis. Germline and somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and epigenetic events such as promoter hypermethylation can lead to decreased expression of BRCA1/2 in ovarian cancers. The mechanism of BRCA1/2 loss is a potential method of subclassifying high grade serous carcinomas. A consecutive series of 49 ovarian cancers was assessed for mutations status of BRCA1 and BRCA2, LOH at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci, methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, and PIK3CA transcript levels, PIK3CA gene copy number, and BRCA1, p21, p53, and WT-1 immunohistochemistry. Eighteen (37%) of the ovarian carcinomas had germline or somatic BRCA1 mutations, or epigenetic loss of BRCA1. All of these tumors were high-grade serous or undifferentiated type. None of the endometrioid (n=5), clear cell (n=4), or low grade serous (n=2) carcinomas showed loss of BRCA1, whereas 47% of the 38 high-grade serous or undifferentiated carcinomas had loss of BRCA1. It was possible to distinguish high grade serous carcinomas with BRCA1 mutations from those with epigenetic BRCA1 loss: tumors with BRCA1 mutations typically had decreased PTEN mRNA levels while those with epigenetic loss of BRCA1 had copy number gain of PIK3CA. Overexpression of p53 with loss of p21 expression occurred significantly more frequently in high grade serous carcinomas with epigenetic loss of BRCA1, compared to high grade serous tumors without loss of BRCA1. High grade serous carcinomas can be subclassified into three groups: BRCA1 loss (genetic), BRCA1 loss (epigenetic), and no BRCA1 loss. Tumors in these groups show distinct molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT and p53 pathways.

  1. Ovarian carcinomas with genetic and epigenetic BRCA1 loss havedistinct molecular abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Press, Joshua Z.; De Luca, Alessandro; Boyd, Niki; Young, Sean; Troussard, Armelle; Ridge, Yolanda; Kaurah, Pardeep; Kalloger, Steve E.; Blood, Katherine A.; Smith, Margaret; Spellman, Paul T.; Wang, Yuker; Miller, Dianne M.; Horsman, Doug; Faham, Malek; Gilks, C. Blake; Gray,Joe; Huntsman, David G.

    2007-07-23

    Subclassification of ovarian carcinomas can be used to guide treatment and determine prognosis. Germline and somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and epigenetic events such as promoter hypermethylation can lead to decreased expression of BRCA1/2 in ovarian cancers. The mechanism of BRCA1/2 loss is a potential method of subclassifying high grade serous carcinomas. A consecutive series of 49 ovarian cancers was assessed for mutations status of BRCA1 and BRCA2, LOH at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci, methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, and PIK3CA transcript levels, PIK3CA gene copy number, and BRCA1, p21, p53, and WT-1 immunohistochemistry. Eighteen (37%) of the ovarian carcinomas had germline or somatic BRCA1 mutations, or epigenetic loss of BRCA1. All of these tumors were high-grade serous or undifferentiated type. None of the endometrioid (n = 5), clear cell (n = 4), or low grade serous (n = 2) carcinomas showed loss of BRCA1, whereas 47% of the 38 high-grade serous or undifferentiated carcinomas had loss of BRCA1. It was possible to distinguish high grade serous carcinomas with BRCA1 mutations from those with epigenetic BRCA1 loss: tumors with BRCA1 mutations typically had decreased PTEN mRNA levels while those with epigenetic loss of BRCA1 had copy number gain of PIK3CA. Overexpression of p53 with loss of p21 expression occurred significantly more frequently in high grade serous carcinomas with epigenetic loss of BRCA1, compared to high grade serous tumors without loss of BRCA1. High grade serous carcinomas can be subclassified into three groups: BRCA1 loss (genetic), BRCA1 loss (epigenetic), and no BRCA1 loss. Tumors in these groups show distinct molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT and p53 pathways.

  2. Fallopian tube secretory cell expansion: a sensitive biomarker for ovarian serous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiying; Li, Li; Wang, Yue; Tang, Sarah Ngocvi; Zheng, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances suggest that precancerous lesions of pelvic serous carcinoma originate from tubal secretory cells. The purpose of our study was to determine if an increased number of secretory cells vary with age or location in the fallopian tube and to examine its association with serous neoplasia. Three groups (benign control, high-risk, and pelvic serous carcinoma) of age-matched patients were studied. The age data were stratified into 10-year intervals ranging from 20-29 to older than 80. The number of secretory and ciliated cells from both tubal fimbria and ampulla segments was counted by microscopy and immunohistochemical staining methods. The data were analyzed by standard contingency table and Poisson distribution methods after age justification. We found that the absolute number of tubal secretory cells increased significantly with age in all three groups. But a more dramatic increase of secretory cells was observed in high-risk and pelvic serous carcinoma patients. Secretory cell expansion is more prevalent than secretory cell outgrowth in both fimbria and ampulla tubal segments and is significantly associated with serous neoplasia (p < 0.001). Furthermore, age remained a significant risk factor for serous neoplasia after age adjustment. These findings suggest that secretory cell expansion could serve as a potential sensitive biomarker for early serous carcinogenesis within the fallopian tube. The study also supports a relationship between serous neoplasia and increased secretory to ciliated cell ratios, and the relationship between frequency of secretory cell expansion within the fallopian tube and increasing age and-more significantly-presence of high-risk factors or co-existing serous cancers. PMID:27069556

  3. Fallopian tube secretory cell expansion: a sensitive biomarker for ovarian serous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiying; Li, Li; Wang, Yue; Tang, Sarah Ngocvi; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances suggest that precancerous lesions of pelvic serous carcinoma originate from tubal secretory cells. The purpose of our study was to determine if an increased number of secretory cells varies with age or location in the fallopian tube and to examine its association with serous neoplasia. Three groups (benign control, high-risk, and pelvic serous carcinoma) of age-matched patients were studied. The age data were stratified into 10-year intervals ranging from 20-29 to older than 80. The number of secretory and ciliated cells from both tubal fimbria and ampulla segments was counted by microscopy and immunohistochemical staining methods. The data were analyzed by standard contingency table and Poisson distribution methods after age justification. We found that the absolute number of tubal secretory cells increased significantly with age in all three groups. But a more dramatic increase of secretory cells was observed in high-risk and pelvic serous carcinoma patients. Secretory cell expansion is more prevalent than secretory cell outgrowth in both fimbria and ampulla tubal segments and is significantly associated with serous neoplasia (P < 0.001). Furthermore, age remained a significant risk factor for serous neoplasia after age adjustment. These findings suggest that secretory cell expansion could serve as a potential sensitive biomarker for early serous carcinogenesis within the fallopian tube. The study also supports a relationship between serous neoplasia and increased secretory to ciliated cell ratios, and the relationship between frequency of secretory cell expansion within the fallopian tube and increasing age and-more significantly-presence of high-risk factors or co-existing serous cancers. PMID:26692952

  4. Addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage IV ovarian serous adenocarcinoma with multiple lymph node metastases: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Shi, Y; Zhang, G N; Song, S Q; Hu, T

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old female patient was diagnosed with Stage IV ovarian serous adenocarcinoma with multiple lymph node metastases. The CA-125 level normalized after four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) using paclitaxel, nedaplatin, and bevacizumab (BEV) before surgery. A positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan showed significantly reduced bilateral adnexal masses after NACT fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) metabolism in multiple lymph nodes was inhibited significantly, and the number and sites of metastatic lesions were decreased. The patient underwent optimal cytoreductive surgery. Chemotherapy was continued after surgery and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) (40 Gy) was applied for the remaining lymph nodes in the pelvic cavity and cervicothoracic region. No sign of recurrence has been observed in this patient nine months after surgery. The patient achieved a satisfactory outcome and no serious side effects were observed. Therefore, addition of BEV to NACT is a new method for the pre-operative treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26189267

  5. Genomic similarities between breast and ovarian cancers

    Cancer.gov

    One subtype of breast cancer shares many genetic features with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a cancer that is very difficult to treat, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that the two cancers a

  6. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  7. Recent concepts of ovarian carcinogenesis: type I and type II.

    PubMed

    Koshiyama, Masafumi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Konishi, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Type I ovarian tumors, where precursor lesions in the ovary have clearly been described, include endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous, low grade serous, and transitional cell carcinomas, while type II tumors, where such lesions have not been described clearly and tumors may develop de novo from the tubal and/or ovarian surface epithelium, comprise high grade serous carcinomas, undifferentiated carcinomas, and carcinosarcomas. The carcinogenesis of endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma (CCC) arising from endometriotic cysts is significantly influenced by the free iron concentration, which is associated with cancer development through the induction of persistent oxidative stress. A subset of mucinous carcinomas develop in association with ovarian teratomas; however, the majority of these tumors do not harbor any teratomatous component. Other theories of their origin include mucinous metaplasia of surface epithelial inclusions, endometriosis, and Brenner tumors. Low grade serous carcinomas are thought to evolve in a stepwise fashion from benign serous cystadenoma to a serous borderline tumor (SBT). With regard to high grade serous carcinoma, the serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs) of the junction of the fallopian tube epithelium with the mesothelium of the tubal serosa, termed the "tubal peritoneal junction" (TPJ), undergo malignant transformation due to their location, and metastasize to the nearby ovary and surrounding pelvic peritoneum. Other theories of their origin include the ovarian hilum cells. PMID:24868556

  8. Classification of Extraovarian Implants in Patients With Ovarian Serous Borderline Tumors (Tumors of Low Malignant Potential) Based on Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Jesse K; Gilks, C Blake; Kalloger, Steve; Longacre, Teri A

    2016-09-01

    The classification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants predicts patient outcome in patients with high-stage ovarian serous borderline tumors (tumors of low malignant potential). However, the morphologic criteria used to classify implants vary between studies. To date, there has been no large-scale study with follow-up data comparing the prognostic significance of competing criteria. Peritoneal and/or lymph node implants from 181 patients with high-stage serous borderline tumors were evaluated independently by 3 pathologists for the following 8 morphologic features: micropapillary architecture; glandular architecture; nests of epithelial cells with surrounding retraction artifact set in densely fibrotic stroma; low-power destructive tissue invasion; single eosinophilic epithelial cells within desmoplastic stroma; mitotic activity; nuclear pleomorphism; and nucleoli. Follow-up of 156 (86%) patients ranged from 11 to 264 months (mean, 89 mo; median, 94 mo). Implants with low-power destructive invasion into underlying tissue were the best predictor of adverse patient outcome with 69% overall and 59% disease-free survival (P<0.01). In the evaluation of individual morphologic features, the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion also had excellent reproducibility between observers (κ=0.84). Extraovarian implants with micropapillary architecture or solid nests with clefts were often associated with tissue invasion but did not add significant prognostic value beyond destructive tissue invasion alone. Implants without attached normal tissue were not associated with adverse outcome and appear to be noninvasive. Because the presence of invasion in an extraovarian implant is associated with an overall survival analogous to that of low-grade serous carcinoma, the designation low-grade serous carcinoma is recommended. Even though the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion has excellent interobserver reproducibility, it is further

  9. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  10. [Dualistic classification of epithelial ovarian cancer: Is it clinically relevant?].

    PubMed

    Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Genestie, Catherine; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    Malignant epithelial tumors (carcinomas) are the most common ovarian cancers and the most lethal gynecological malignancies. Based on their heterogeneous morphology, a dualistic model of carcinogenesis was proposed in 2004. Type I carcinomas, composed of low grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell carcinomas and malignant Brenner tumors, were distinct from type II carcinomas (high grade serous, undifferentiated carcinomas and carcinosarcomas). However, clinical studies failed to demonstrate the prognostic value of such a classification. The main reproach to this dualistic model was that it lumped together in type I tumors, heterogeneous lesions such as clear cell and mucinous carcinomas. Recent advances on molecular genetic alterations and precursor lesions favor the classification of ovarian carcinomas as five distinct diseases. The dualistic model of carcinogenesis in type I and II can finally be applied only to serous ovarian carcinomas (low grade and high grade). PMID:26853278

  11. Surgical staging and prognosis in serous borderline ovarian tumours (BOT): A subanalysis of the AGO ROBOT study

    PubMed Central

    Trillsch, F; Mahner, S; Vettorazzi, E; Woelber, L; Reuss, A; Baumann, K; Keyver-Paik, M-D; Canzler, U; Wollschlaeger, K; Forner, D; Pfisterer, J; Schroeder, W; Muenstedt, K; Richter, B; Fotopoulou, C; Schmalfeldt, B; Burges, A; Ewald-Riegler, N; de Gregorio, N; Hilpert, F; Fehm, T; Meier, W; Hillemanns, P; Hanker, L; Hasenburg, A; Strauss, H-G; Hellriegel, M; Wimberger, P; Kommoss, S; Kommoss, F; Hauptmann, S; du Bois, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Incomplete surgical staging is a negative prognostic factor for patients with borderline ovarian tumours (BOT). However, little is known about the prognostic impact of each individual staging procedure. Methods: Clinical parameters of 950 patients with BOT (confirmed by central reference pathology) treated between 1998 and 2008 at 24 German AGO centres were analysed. In 559 patients with serous BOT and adequate ovarian surgery, further recommended staging procedures (omentectomy, peritoneal biopsies, cytology) were evaluated applying Cox regression models with respect to progression-free survival (PFS). Results: For patients with one missing staging procedure, the hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence was 1.25 (95%-CI 0.66–2.39; P=0.497). This risk increased with each additional procedure skipped reaching statistical significance in case of two (HR 1.95; 95%-CI 1.06–3.58; P=0.031) and three missing steps (HR 2.37; 95%-CI 1.22–4.64; P=0.011). The most crucial procedure was omentectomy which retained a statistically significant impact on PFS in multiple analysis (HR 1.91; 95%-CI 1.15–3.19; P=0.013) adjusting for previously established prognostic factors as FIGO stage, tumour residuals, and fertility preservation. Conclusion: Individual surgical staging procedures contribute to the prognosis for patients with serous BOT. In this analysis, recurrence risk increased with each skipped surgical step. This should be considered when re-staging procedures following incomplete primary surgery are discussed. PMID:25562434

  12. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, chronic fallopian tube injury, and serous carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Karin; Klynning, Charlotta; Flöter-Rådestad, Angelique; Carlson, Joseph W

    2016-06-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the deadliest gynecological malignancy. Previous studies have suggested that the fallopian tube may be the primary site for high-grade serous carcinoma. In prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomies from women with hereditary high risk for ovarian cancer, precursors can be assessed prior to onset and studied as a model for serous cancer precursor lesions. Epidemiologic studies indicate that carcinogenesis may be a result of chronic fallopian tube injury. The aims of this study were to (1) to examine the incidence of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) in relation to other clinical parameters and (2) to evaluate whether chronic fallopian tube injury was related to cancer development. This study enrolled 101 women, comprising the following three groups: hereditary (n = 60), sporadic serous cancer (n = 18; endometrial cancers were excluded), and control (n = 23). The cases were histologically examined and clinical risk factors were collected. The histological changes were compared between different patients and correlated to clinical risk factors. STICs were identified primarily on the fallopian tube fimbria. The incidence of STIC was 3 % in the hereditary patients. In sporadic serous cancer cases, 61 % were associated with STIC and tubal carcinoma (p < 0.001). No differences in tubal injury or inflammation were seen when comparing the sporadic serous cancer group and the control group or within the hereditary group. STIC and invasive cancer were seen more often in the older patients than in the younger patients (p = 0.528). This small study, no correlation with chronic tubal injury or inflammation was identified. PMID:27003156

  13. Ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Matulonis, Ursula A; Sood, Anil K; Fallowfield, Lesley; Howitt, Brooke E; Sehouli, Jalid; Karlan, Beth Y

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a single disease and can be subdivided into at least five different histological subtypes that have different identifiable risk factors, cells of origin, molecular compositions, clinical features and treatments. Ovarian cancer is a global problem, is typically diagnosed at a late stage and has no effective screening strategy. Standard treatments for newly diagnosed cancer consist of cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. In recurrent cancer, chemotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors are used, and immunological therapies are currently being tested. High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most commonly diagnosed form of ovarian cancer and at diagnosis is typically very responsive to platinum-based chemotherapy. However, in addition to the other histologies, HGSCs frequently relapse and become increasingly resistant to chemotherapy. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms underlying platinum resistance and finding ways to overcome them are active areas of study in ovarian cancer. Substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that are associated with a high risk of ovarian cancer (such as BRCA1 and BRCA2), as well as a precursor lesion of HGSC called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, which holds promise for identifying individuals at high risk of developing the disease and for developing prevention strategies. PMID:27558151

  14. Molecular profiling uncovers a p53-associated role for microRNA-31 in inhibiting the proliferation of serous ovarian carcinomas and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Creighton, Chad J; Fountain, Michael D; Yu, Zhifeng; Nagaraja, Ankur K; Zhu, Huifeng; Khan, Mahjabeen; Olokpa, Emuejevoke; Zariff, Azam; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Matzuk, Martin M; Anderson, Matthew L

    2010-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) regulate complex patterns of gene expression, and the relevance of altered miRNA expression to ovarian cancer remains to be elucidated. By comprehensively profiling expression of miRNAs and mRNAs in serous ovarian tumors and cell lines and normal ovarian surface epithelium, we identified hundreds of potential miRNA-mRNA targeting associations underlying cancer. Functional overexpression of miR-31, the most underexpressed miRNA in serous ovarian cancer, repressed predicted miR-31 gene targets including the cell cycle regulator E2F2. MIR31 and CDKN2A, which encode p14(ARF) and p16(INK4A), are located at 9p21.3, a genomic region commonly deleted in ovarian and other cancers. p14(ARF) promotes p53 activity, and E2F2 overexpression in p53 wild-type cells normally leads via p14(ARF) to an induction of p53-dependent apoptosis. In a number of serous cancer cell lines with a dysfunctional p53 pathway (i.e., OVCAR8, OVCA433, and SKOV3), miR-31 overexpression inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis; however, in other lines (i.e., HEY and OVSAYO) with functional p53, miR-31 had no effect. Additionally, the osteosarcoma cell line U2OS and the prostate cancer cell line PC3 (p14(ARF)-deficient and p53-deficient, respectively) were also sensitive to miR-31. Furthermore, miR-31 overexpression induced a global gene expression pattern in OVCAR8 associated with better prognosis in tumors from patients with advanced stage serous ovarian cancer, potentially affecting many genes underlying disease progression. Our findings reveal that loss of miR-31 is associated with defects in the p53 pathway and functions in serous ovarian cancer and other cancers, suggesting that patients with cancers deficient in p53 activity might benefit from therapeutic delivery of miR-31. PMID:20179198

  15. Ovarian-type epithelial tumours of the testis: immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of two serous borderline tumours of the testis.

    PubMed

    Bürger, Tobias; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Inniger, Reinhard; Hansen, Joachim; Mayer, Peter; Schweyer, Stefan; Radzun, Heinz Joachim; Ströbel, Philipp; Bremmer, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Tumours of ovarian-epithelial type of the testis, including serous borderline tumours, represent very rare entities. They are identical to the surface epithelial tumours of the ovary and have been reported in patients from 14 to 68 years of age. We describe two cases of a 46- and a 39-year old man with incidental findings of intratesticular masses of the left respectively right testis. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour the patients were subjected to inguinal orchiectomy. Histologically, the tumours were identical to their ovarian counterparts: They showed a cystic configuration with a fibrous wall and irregular papillary structures lined by partially multistratified columnar cells and areas of hobnail cells. Furthermore, there was mild cytological atypia with a proliferative activity of below 5% as proved by Ki67 staining; mitoses could not be detected. Immunohistochemically, the tumour cells displayed expression of pan-cytokeratin AE3, progesterone receptor, Wilms' tumour protein (WT1), and PAX8 (Paired box gene 8). Estrogen receptor was expressed in one case. Octamer-binding transcription factor-4 (OCT4), calretinin, thrombomodulin, and D2-40 were not expressed. Mutation testing of BRAF revealed a BRAF V600E mutation in one case, while testing for KRAS mutations proved to be negative in both. The BRAF mutated tumour showed strong cytosolic and membranous positivity for B-Raf also on immunohistochemical analysis. Comparative genomic hybridization of one case could not reveal any chromosomal aberrations. PMID:26197800

  16. Everolimus and Letrozole in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor Positive Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in Patients With Serous Ovarian Carcinoma and Their Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Reza; Nejatollahi, Foroogh; Nedaei Ahmadi, Ahmad Sina; Hafezi, Hossein; Safaie, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has an essential role in tumor metastasis by inducing the construction of abnormal blood vessels. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in different parts of cancer growth such as tumor initiation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of VEGF and EGFR in ovarian cancer in southern Iran and to assess the correlation between expression of these two markers and patients’ age, tumor stage, and grade. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 50 paraffin blocks of serous ovarian adenocarcinomas and 50 paraffin-embedded specimens from control individuals operated for reasons other than malignancy were immunohistochemically stained using anti-human VEGF and EGFR antibodies. Results: A significant difference in the frequency of positive expression of VEGF was observed in ovarian cancer patients (25.0%) compared with the control group (8.0%) (P = 0.023). A significant difference between EGFR expression in patients (56.8%) and controls (24.0%) was also obtained (P = 0.001). No significant correlation between VEGF and EGFR expression and patients’ age, tumor grade and stage were detected (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The significant increase in both VEGF and EGFR in the patients with ovarian cancer compared to healthy individuals could have prognostic value. Identifying these markers may be useful for chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic strategies for patients with serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26478789

  18. BRCA somatic mutations and epigenetic BRCA modifications in serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Moschetta, M; George, A; Kaye, S B; Banerjee, S

    2016-08-01

    The significant activity of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in the treatment of germline BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer, which represents ∼15% of HGS cases, has recently led to European Medicines Agency and food and drug administration approval of olaparib. Accumulating evidence suggests that PARP inhibitors may have a wider application in the treatment of sporadic ovarian cancers. Up to 50% of HGS ovarian cancer patients may exhibit homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) through mechanisms including germline BRCA mutations, somatic BRCA mutations, and BRCA promoter methylation. In this review, we discuss the role of somatic BRCA mutations and BRCA methylation in ovarian cancer. There is accumulating evidence for routine somatic BRCA mutation testing, but the relevance of BRCA epigenetic modifications is less clear. We explore the challenges that need to be addressed if the full potential of these markers of HRD is to be utilised in clinical practice. PMID:27037296

  19. Hormone Receptors in Serous Ovarian Carcinoma: Prognosis, Pathogenesis, and Treatment Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A.

    2016-01-01

    A few breakthroughs have been accomplished for the treatment of ovarian cancer, the most deadly gynecologic carcinoma, in the current era of targeted oncologic treatment. The estrogen receptor was the first target of such treatments with the introduction of tamoxifen four decades ago in breast cancer therapeutics. Attempts to duplicate the success of hormonal therapies in ovarian cancer met with mixed results, which may be due to an inferior degree of hormone dependency in this cancer. Alternatively, this may be due to the failure to clearly identify the subsets of ovarian cancer with hormone sensitivity. This article reviews the expression of hormone receptors by ovarian cancer cells, the prognostic value of these expressions, and their predictive capacity for response to hormonal agents. The possible ways ahead are briefly discussed. PMID:27053923

  20. Targeting Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer with Designer Zinc Finger Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Haydee; Wang, Yuhua; Beltran, Adriana S.; Juárez-Moreno, Karla; Yuan, Xinni; Kato, Sumie; Leisewitz, Andrea V.; Cuello Fredes, Mauricio; Licea, Alexei F.; Connolly, Denise C.; Huang, Leaf; Blancafort, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynecological malignancies. It is detected at late stages when the disease is spread through the abdominal cavity in a condition known as peritoneal carcinomatosis. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutic interventions to target advanced stages of ovarian cancer. Mammary serine protease inhibitor (Maspin) represents an important metastasis suppressor initially identified in breast cancer. Herein we have generated a sequence-specific zinc finger artificial transcription factor (ATF) to up-regulate the Maspin promoter in aggressive ovarian cancer cell lines and to interrogate the therapeutic potential of Maspin in ovarian cancer. We found that although Maspin was expressed in some primary ovarian tumors, the promoter was epigenetically silenced in cell lines derived from ascites. Transduction of the ATF in MOVCAR 5009 cells derived from ascitic cultures of a TgMISIIR-TAg mouse model of ovarian cancer resulted in tumor cell growth inhibition, impaired cell invasion, and severe disruption of actin cytoskeleton. Systemic delivery of lipid-protamine-RNA nanoparticles encapsulating a chemically modified ATF mRNA resulted in inhibition of ovarian cancer cell growth in nude mice accompanied with Maspin re-expression in the treated tumors. Gene expression microarrays of ATF-transduced cells revealed an exceptional specificity for the Maspin promoter. These analyses identified novel targets co-regulated with Maspin in human short-term cultures derived from ascites, such as TSPAN12, that could mediate the anti-metastatic phenotype of the ATF. Our work outlined the first targeted, non-viral delivery of ATFs into tumors with potential clinical applications for metastatic ovarian cancers. PMID:22782891

  1. Evaluation of Candidate Stromal Epithelial Cross-Talk Genes Identifies Association between Risk of Serous Ovarian Cancer and TERT, a Cancer Susceptibility “Hot-Spot”

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Macgregor, Stuart; Duffy, David L.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; deFazio, Anna; Gava, Natalie; Webb, Penelope M.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Goodman, Marc T.; Lurie, Galina; Thompson, Pamela J.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Ness, Roberta B.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Yang, Hannah; Lissowska, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Song, Honglin; Whitemore, Alice S.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Hogdall, Claus; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Rider, David N.; Goode, Ellen L.; Haviv, Izhak; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that variants in genes expressed as a consequence of interactions between ovarian cancer cells and the host micro-environment could contribute to cancer susceptibility. We therefore used a two-stage approach to evaluate common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 173 genes involved in stromal epithelial interactions in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). In the discovery stage, cases with epithelial ovarian cancer (n = 675) and controls (n = 1,162) were genotyped at 1,536 SNPs using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. Based on Positive Predictive Value estimates, three SNPs—PODXL rs1013368, ITGA6 rs13027811, and MMP3 rs522616—were selected for replication using TaqMan genotyping in up to 3,059 serous invasive cases and 8,905 controls from 16 OCAC case-control studies. An additional 18 SNPs with Pper-allele<0.05 in the discovery stage were selected for replication in a subset of five OCAC studies (n = 1,233 serous invasive cases; n = 3,364 controls). The discovery stage associations in PODXL, ITGA6, and MMP3 were attenuated in the larger replication set (adj. Pper-allele≥0.5). However genotypes at TERT rs7726159 were associated with ovarian cancer risk in the smaller, five-study replication study (Pper-allele = 0.03). Combined analysis of the discovery and replication sets for this TERT SNP showed an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer among non-Hispanic whites [adj. ORper-allele 1.14 (1.04–1.24) p = 0.003]. Our study adds to the growing evidence that, like the 8q24 locus, the telomerase reverse transcriptase locus at 5p15.33, is a general cancer susceptibility locus. PMID:20628624

  2. Regulation of microRNA biosynthesis and expression in 2102Ep embryonal carcinoma stem cells is mirrored in ovarian serous adenocarcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumours with high proportions of differentiated cells are considered to be of a lower grade to those containing high proportions of undifferentiated cells. This property may be linked to the differentiation properties of stem cell-like populations within malignancies. We aim to identify molecular mechanism associated with the generation of tumours with differing grades from malignant stem cell populations with different differentiation potentials. In this study we assessed microRNA (miRNA) regulation in two populations of malignant Embryonal Carcinoma (EC) stem cell, which differentiate (NTera2) or remain undifferentiated (2102Ep) during tumourigenesis, and compared this to miRNA regulation in ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC) patient samples. Methods miRNA expression was assessed in NTera2 and 2102Ep cells in the undifferentiated and differentiated states and compared to that of OSC samples using miRNA qPCR. Results Our analysis reveals a substantial overlap between miRNA regulation in 2102Ep cells and OSC samples in terms of miRNA biosynthesis and expression of mature miRNAs, particularly those of the miR-17/92 family and clustering to chromosomes 14 and 19. In the undifferentiated state 2102Ep cells expressed mature miRNAs at up to 15,000 fold increased levels despite decreased expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes Drosha and Dicer. 2102Ep cells avoid differentiation, which we show is associated with consistent levels of expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes and mature miRNAs while expression of miRNAs clustering to chromosomes 14 and 19 is deemphasised. OSC patient samples displayed decreased expression of miRNA biosynthesis genes, decreased expression of mature miRNAs and prominent clustering to chromosome 14 but not 19. This indicates that miRNA biosynthesis and levels of miRNA expression, particularly from chromosome 14, are tightly regulated both in progenitor cells and in tumour samples. Conclusion miRNA biosynthesis and expression of mature mi

  3. Fine needle aspiration cytology of cervical lymph node involvement by ovarian serous borderline tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Longwen; Butler, Kristina A.; Bell, Debra A.

    2016-01-01

    Serous borderline tumor (SBT) involving a cervical lymph node is extremely rare. In addition, fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology of the involved cervical lymph node shares tremendous morphologic similarity with other low-grade papillary carcinomas. Thus, it can be easily misdiagnosed as metastatic carcinoma. A 42-year-old female had a history of bilateral SBT and postbilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She presented with left cervical lymphadenopathy 6 months later. FNA cytology showed a low-grade papillary neoplasm with psammoma bodies. Needle core biopsy along with immunostains was diagnostic of cervical lymph node involvement (LNI) of SBT. although extremely rare, cervical LNI can be found in patients with SBTs. FNA cytology, sometimes, is indistinguishable from metastatic papillary adenocarcinoma. Cell block or needle core biopsy is essential to make the correct diagnosis.

  4. The C3G/Rap1 pathway promotes secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and is involved in serous ovarian cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Che, Ya-Ling; Luo, Shu-Juan; Li, Gang; Cheng, Min; Gao, Yi-Meng; Li, Xue-Mei; Dai, Jie-Min; He, Huan; Wang, Jin; Peng, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Yu; Li, Wen-Yan; Wang, Hui; Liu, Bin; Linghu, Hua

    2015-04-10

    Complete resection is pivotal to improve survival to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Crk SH3-domain-binding guanine nucleotide-releasing factor (C3G) is involved in multiple signaling pathways and it has opposite roles in different cancers. The present study aimed to identify C3G expression in ovarian tissue samples from patients with EOC and to explore its association with tumor grade. Eighty-seven archival paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed, ovarian cancer tissues with serous histology were stained for C3G by immunohistochemistry. To evaluate the contribution of C3G to Rap1 activity, 36 patients with serous ovarian cancer (SOC) were investigated. Additionally, C3G was knocked down in SKOV3 and HEY cells. C3G regulated Rap1 activity and high Rap1 activity was correlated with poor differentiation, advanced FIGO stage, and unsuccessful cytoreductive surgery of SOC. Knockdown of C3G suppressed cell invasion, intravasation and extravasation, and reduced Rap1 activity and secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. C3G-mediated activation of Rap1 could direct the tumor pattern of human SOC by promoting the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. These results suggest that C3G is involved in the metastatic spread of EOC. PMID:25617801

  5. The RUNX1 transcription factor is expressed in serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma and contributes to cell proliferation, migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Mamadou; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Morin, Chantale; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have identified the RUNX1 gene as hypomethylated and overexpressed in post-chemotherapy (CT) primary cultures derived from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients, when compared with primary cultures derived from matched primary (prior to CT) tumors. Here we show that RUNX1 displays a trend of hypomethylation, although not significant, in omental metastases compared with primary EOC tumors. Surprisingly, RUNX1 displayed significantly higher expression not only in metastatic tissue, but also in high-grade primary tumors and even in low malignant potential tumors. The RUNX1 expression levels were almost identical in primary tumors and omental metastases, suggesting that RUNX1 hypomethylation might have a limited impact on its overexpression in advanced (metastatic) stage of the disease. Knockdown of the RUNX1 expression in EOC cells led to sharp decrease of cell proliferation and induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Moreover, RUNX1 suppression significantly inhibited EOC cell migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses confirmed these findings, as numerous genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, including EOC tumor invasion and metastasis, were found to be downregulated upon RUNX1 suppression, while a number of pro-apoptotic genes and some EOC tumor suppressor genes were induced. Taken together, our data are indicative for a strong oncogenic potential of the RUNX1 gene in EOC progression and suggest that RUNX1 might be a novel EOC therapeutic target. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the functional implications of RUNX1 and other members of the RUNX gene family in ovarian tumorigenesis. PMID:23442798

  6. Recognition of serous ovarian tumors in human samples by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Costa, Leverson F. L.; Pietro, Luciana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Almeida, Diogo B.; Bottcher-Luiz, Fatima; Andrade, Liliana A. L. A.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2011-09-01

    We used a multimodal nonlinear optics microscopy, specifically two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second and third harmonic generation (SHG/THG) microscopies, to observe pathological conditions of ovarian tissues obtained from human samples. We show that strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals can be obtained in fixed samples stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stored for a very long time, and that H&E staining enhanced the THG signal. We then used the multimodal TPEF-SHG-THG microscopies in a stored file of H&E stained samples of human ovarian cancer to obtain complementary information about the epithelium/stromal interface, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillary tissue architecture (SHG). This multicontrast nonlinear optics microscopy is able to not only differentiate between cancerous and healthy tissue, but can also distinguish between normal, benign, borderline, and malignant specimens according to their collagen disposition and compression levels within the extracellular matrix. The dimensions of the layers of epithelia can also be measured precisely and automatically. Our data demonstrate that optical techniques can detect pathological changes associated with ovarian cancer.

  7. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, Veliparib, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Network-based integration of GWAS and gene expression identifies a HOX-centric network associated with serous ovarian cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Siddhartha P.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Li, Qiyuan; Lawrenson, Kate; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Berchuck, Andrew; Bisogna, Maria; Bjørge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Yian Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas F.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E.; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far reported 12 loci associated with serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. We hypothesized that some of these loci function through nearby transcription factor (TF) genes and that putative target genes of these TFs as identified by co-expression may also be enriched for additional EOC risk associations. Methods We selected TF genes within 1 Mb of the top signal at the 12 genome-wide significant risk loci. Mutual information, a form of correlation, was used to build networks of genes strongly co-expressed with each selected TF gene in the unified microarray data set of 489 serous EOC tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genes represented in this data set were subsequently ranked using a gene-level test based on results for germline SNPs from a serous EOC GWAS meta-analysis (2,196 cases/4,396 controls). Results Gene set enrichment analysis identified six networks centered on TF genes (HOXB2, HOXB5, HOXB6, HOXB7 at 17q21.32 and HOXD1, HOXD3 at 2q31) that were significantly enriched for genes from the risk-associated end of the ranked list (P<0.05 and FDR<0.05). These results were replicated (P<0.05) using an independent association study (7,035 cases/21,693 controls). Genes underlying enrichment in the six networks were pooled into a combined network. Conclusion We identified a HOX-centric network associated with serous EOC risk containing several genes with known or emerging roles in serous EOC development. Impact Network analysis integrating large, context-specific data sets has the potential to offer mechanistic insights into cancer susceptibility and prioritize genes for experimental characterization. PMID:26209509

  9. MV-NIS Infected Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Polyglutamate Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. New insights in the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer and implications for screening and prevention.

    PubMed

    Nezhat, Farr R; Apostol, Radu; Nezhat, Camran; Pejovic, Tanja

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in medicine, ovarian cancer remains the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies. Herein we present the latest information on the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer and its significance for ovarian cancer screening and prevention. A new paradigm for ovarian cancer pathogenesis presupposes 2 distinct types of ovarian epithelial carcinoma with distinct molecular profiles: type I and type II carcinomas. Type I tumors include endometrioid, clear-cell carcinoma, and low-grade serous carcinoma and mostly arise via defined sequence either from endometriosis or from borderline serous tumors, mostly presenting in an early stage. More frequent type II carcinomas are usually high-grade serous tumors, and recent evidence suggests that the majority arise from the fimbriated end of the fallopian tube. Subsequently, high-grade serous carcinomas usually present at advanced stages, likely as a consequence of the rapid peritoneal seeding from the open ends of the fallopian tubes. On the other hand, careful clinical evaluation should be performed along with risk stratification and targeted treatment of women with premalignant conditions leading to type I cancers, most notably endometriosis and endometriomas. Although the chance of malignant transformation is low, an understanding of this link offers a possibility of prevention and early intervention. This new evidence explains difficulties in ovarian cancer screening and helps in forming new recommendations for ovarian cancer risk evaluation and prophylactic treatments. PMID:25818671

  12. Sox10 expression in ovarian epithelial tumors is associated with poor overall survival.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ah-Young; Heo, Ilyeong; Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Gwangil; Kang, Haeyoun; Heo, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Tae Hoen; An, Hee Jung

    2016-05-01

    Sox10 is a transcription factor regulating the development of several cell lineages and is involved in tumor development. However, the clinicopathological relevance of Sox10 expression in ovarian cancer has not been examined. We assessed expression of Sox10 in ovarian epithelial tumors by immunohistochemistry and assessed its prognostic value by analyzing the correlation between its expression and clinicopathological factors. We used tissue microarrays including 244 ovarian epithelial tumors. Sox10 staining was found in the cytoplasm or nucleus of tumor cells. Malignant serous, mucinous, and endometrioid tumors were significantly more likely to express Sox10 than benign and borderline tumors. Expression patterns in adenocarcinomas were different for histologic subtypes: nuclear Sox10 staining was common in clear-cell adenocarcinomas and serous adenocarcinomas, whereas all cases of mucinous and endometrioid tumors were negative for nuclear staining. Nuclear Sox10 staining was also associated with chemoresistance and shorter overall survival in ovarian adenocarcinomas, notably in high-grade serous adenocarcinoma. Sox10 is expressed in many ovarian carcinomas, suggesting that it might be involved in oncogenesis of ovarian carcinoma. Expression pattern of Sox10 differs between histological subtypes. Nuclear Sox10 expression is an independent indicator of poor prognosis in ovarian adenocarcinomas, notably in high-grade serous adenocarcinomas. PMID:26951260

  13. Aberrant Expression of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Ovarian Carcinoma Independent of Gene Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaoxian; Yang, Fei; Du, Xiang; Lu, Yongming; Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. The oncogenic role of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is well characterized in many hematopoietic and solid tumors. ALK expression in ovarian carcinoma has been reported but the exact status of ALK protein and its association with clinicopathologic features requires further investigation. ALK expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in 110 primary ovarian carcinomas, including 85 cases of serous carcinoma and 25 cases of mucinous carcinoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used for evaluating ALK translocation in ALK-positive ovarian carcinomas. Among 110 ovarian carcinomas, 23 (20.9%) cases were ALK positive by immunohistochemistry. All ALK-positive cases were ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma. ALK expression was detected in 23/85 (27.1%) ovarian serous carcinoma and 0/25 (0%) in ovarian mucinous carcinoma. None of the 23 ALK IHC-positive cases harbored ALK gene translocations by FISH or RT-PCR. ALK protein expression was associated with patient age, tumor stage, and histologic type. Specifically, the probability of ALK protein expression was significantly higher in high-grade serous carcinomas in older patients (above 50 y) with advanced disease (FIGO stage III and IV) compared with the low-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas in younger patients with relatively early disease. In conclusion, aberrant ALK expression is observed in ovarian serous carcinoma but not in mucinous carcinoma, is independent of gene translocation, and might be associated with progression and prognosis. PMID:27271776

  14. Obesity is associated with worse overall survival in women with low grade papillary serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Previs, Rebecca; Kilgore, Joshua; Craven, Renatta; Broadwater, Gloria; Bean, Sarah; Wobker, Sara; DiFurio, Megan; Bae-Jump, Victoria; Gehrig, Paola A.; Secord, Angeles Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate prognostic risk factors for survival in women with low grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer (LGSC). Methods A multicenter retrospective analysis of patients with LGSC was conducted. Potential epidemiologic risk factors evaluated included obesity, age, parity, race, smoking, oral contraceptive pill and/or hormonal replacement therapy use, and previous hysterectomy or surgery on fallopian tubes and/or ovaries. Additional factors included stage, extent of debulking, residual disease, and disease status. Results Eighty-one patients were identified, and pathological diagnosis was independently confirmed. Median age of diagnosis was 56 years (range: 21 to 86). Thirty-four percent were obese, and 80% had optimally debulked disease. Forty-six percent were alive, 14% with disease; while 25% were dead of disease; 2% died of intercurrent disease; and 27% had an unknown status. In a univariate analysis, optimal surgical debulking was associated with improved PFS (p=0.01), DSS (p=0.03), and OS (p<0.001 and BMI with worse OS (p=0.05). On multivariate analysis, obesity (HR=2.8; 95% CI=1.05-7.3; p=0.04) and optimal tumor debulking (HR=0.05; 95% CI=0.008-0.29; p=0.001) were a significant predictor of OS. Conclusions In a multivariate analysis, obesity and optimal tumor cytoreduction were significant predictors of OS. However, obesity was not associated with worse DSS, suggesting that mortality of obese patients with LGSC may result from other co-morbidities. Interventions addressing obesity may improve survival for women diagnosed with LGSC and further study is warranted to address the role of obesity in LGSC. PMID:24614825

  15. Adenovirus‑mediated overexpression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator enhances invasiveness and motility of serous ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiao; Lin, Liangbo; Yong, Min; Dong, Xiaojing; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) belongs to the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette transporter family, members of which are involved in several types of cancer. Previous studies by our group reported that CFTR was highly expressed in serous ovarian cancer (SOC) tissues, and that knockdown of CFTR suppressed the proliferation of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the aim of the present study was to construct a recombinant adenoviral vector for the expression of the human CFTR gene in order to study the role of CFTR overexpression in the malignant invasion and migration of SOC cells in vitro. The present study then focused on the mechanisms of the role of CFTR in the migratory and invasive malignant properties of SOC cells. The CFTR gene was inserted into an adenoviral vector by using the AdEasy system in order to obtain the Ad‑CFTR overexpression vector, which was used to transfect the A2780 SOC cell line. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were performed to detect the expression and localization of CFTR. Cell invasion and motility of the transfected cells compared with those of control cells were observed using Transwell and wound healing assays. A ~4,700 bp fragment of the CFTR gene was confirmed to be correctly cloned in the adenoviral vector and amplification of Ad‑CFTR was observed in HEK293 cells during package. After 48 h of transfection with Ad‑CFTR, ~90% of A2780 cells were red fluorescence protein‑positive. Immunofluorescence showed that following transfection, CFTR expression was increased and CFTR was located in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. CFTR overexpression was shown to enhance the invasion and motility of A2780 cells in vitro. Furthermore, the effects of CFTR overexpression on the activation c‑Src signaling were observed by western blot analysis. CFTR overexpressing cells showed the lowest activity of phospho‑Src (Tyr530

  16. Integrated genomic analyses of ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    2011-06-30

    A catalogue of molecular aberrations that cause ovarian cancer is critical for developing and deploying therapies that will improve patients' lives. The Cancer Genome Atlas project has analysed messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, promoter methylation and DNA copy number in 489 high-grade serous ovarian adenocarcinomas and the DNA sequences of exons from coding genes in 316 of these tumours. Here we report that high-grade serous ovarian cancer is characterized by TP53 mutations in almost all tumours (96%); low prevalence but statistically recurrent somatic mutations in nine further genes including NF1, BRCA1, BRCA2, RB1 and CDK12; 113 significant focal DNA copy number aberrations; and promoter methylation events involving 168 genes. Analyses delineated four ovarian cancer transcriptional subtypes, three microRNA subtypes, four promoter methylation subtypes and a transcriptional signature associated with survival duration, and shed new light on the impact that tumours with BRCA1/2 (BRCA1 or BRCA2) and CCNE1 aberrations have on survival. Pathway analyses suggested that homologous recombination is defective in about half of the tumours analysed, and that NOTCH and FOXM1 signalling are involved in serous ovarian cancer pathophysiology. PMID:21720365

  17. Imprint cytology of high-grade immature ovarian teratoma: a case report, literature review, and distinction from other ovarian small round cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Preetha; Teague, Daniel; Reid-Nicholson, Michelle

    2008-08-01

    Immature ovarian teratoma (IOT) is a rare and aggressive malignant neoplasm characterized by immature neural tissue. The cytomorphologic features have only rarely been described. We herein describe an additional case and review the literature regarding this entity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case with imprint cytology. A 35-year-old woman presented with a pelvic mass which was resected and sent for frozen section evaluation. Imprint smears and frozen section of the mass were diagnostic of IOT. IOT has diagnostic cytologic features which show complete concordance with histology. Differential diagnoses include other small round cell neoplasms such as ovarian neuroblastoma, small cell carcinoma of hypercalcemic type, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, Wilm's tumor, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Distinguishing IOT from these tumors can be challenging however if diligent morphologic study and/or ancillary studies are performed accurate diagnosis is possible. PMID:18618728

  18. Erlotinib Plus Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Ovarian Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  19. Markers of fibroblast-rich tumor stroma and perivascular cells in serous ovarian cancer: Inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity and impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    Corvigno, Sara; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Mezheyeuski, Artur; van der Zee, Ate G.J.; Nijman, Hans W.; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Östman, Arne; Dahlstrand, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Inter- and intra-patient variations in tumor microenvironment of serous ovarian cancer are largely unexplored. We aimed to explore potential co-regulation of tumor stroma characteristics, analyze their concordance in primary and metastatic lesions, and study their impact on survival. A tissue microarray (TMA) with 186 tumors and 91 matched metastases was subjected to immunohistochemistry double staining with endothelial cell marker CD34 and fibroblast and pericyte markers α-SMA, PDGFβR and desmin. Images were digitally analyzed to yield “metrics” related to vasculature and stroma features. Intra-case analyses showed that PDGFβR in perivascular cells and fibroblasts were strongly correlated. Similar findings were observed concerning α-SMA. Most stroma characteristics showed large variations in intra-case comparisons of primary tumors and metastasis. Large PDGFβR-positive stroma fraction and high PDGFβFR positive perivascular intensity were both significantly associated with shorter survival in uni- and multi-variate analyses (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.5; HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.8). In conclusion, we found PDGFβR- and α-SMA-expression to be largely independent of each other but concordantly activated in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts within the primary tumor. Stromal characteristics differed between primary tumors and metastases. PDGFβR in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts may be novel prognostic markers in serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26918345

  20. Denileukin Diftitox Used in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma, or Epithelial Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  1. Mucins MUC16 and MUC1 are major carriers of SLe(a) and SLe(x) in borderline and malignant serous ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Sara; Marcos-Silva, Lara; Valente, Cristina; Coelho, Ricardo; Gomes, Rosa; David, Leonor

    2016-06-01

    Mucins are heavily glycosylated proteins overexpressed and associated with truncated or sialylated glycans upon malignant transformation. We previously identified a panel of four glyco-mucin profiles (MUC16/Tn, MUC16/STn, MUC1/Tn, and MUC1/STn) with 100 % specificity and 100 % positive predictive value for detection of borderline/malignant serous tumors of the ovary, using proximity ligation assay (PLA). In the present work, using the same method, we studied other mucin glycosylation profiles that might add relevant information for diagnostic purposes. We used PLA probes to MUC16, MUC1, sialyl Lewis(a) (SLe(a)), and sialyl Lewis(x) (SLe(x)) to study a series of 39 ovarian serous tumors (14 adenocarcinomas, 10 borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs), and 15 cystadenomas). Our results demonstrated that, in adenocarcinomas and BOTs, the major carriers of SLe(a) and SLe(x) are MUC16 and/or MUC1 (100 and 92 % for SLe(a) and 64 and 70 % for SLe(x), respectively). In cystadenomas, SLe(a) and SLe(x) are mainly carried by unidentified proteins (85 and 78 %, respectively). Our study identified, for the first time, the major protein carriers of SLe(a) and SLe(x) in ovarian adenocarcinomas and BOTs, MUC1 and MUC16, and also that distinct unidentified carriers are involved in cystadenomas. These results emphasize the relevance of multiple biomarker recognition provided by multiplex assays, such as PLA, to enhance sensitivity and specificity of serum and tissue assays. PMID:27003157

  2. Label-Free LC-MSe in Tissue and Serum Reveals Protein Networks Underlying Differences between Benign and Malignant Serous Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wegdam, Wouter; Argmann, Carmen A.; Kramer, Gertjan; Vissers, Johannes P.; Buist, Marrije R.; Kenter, Gemma G.; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; Meijer, Danielle; Moerland, Perry D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify proteins and (molecular/biological) pathways associated with differences between benign and malignant epithelial ovarian tumors. Experimental Procedures Serum of six patients with a serous adenocarcinoma of the ovary was collected before treatment, with a control group consisting of six matched patients with a serous cystadenoma. In addition to the serum, homogeneous regions of cells exhibiting uniform histology were isolated from benign and cancerous tissue by laser microdissection. We subsequently employed label-free liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSe) to identify proteins in these serum and tissues samples. Analyses of differential expression between samples were performed using Bioconductor packages and in-house scripts in the statistical software package R. Hierarchical clustering and pathway enrichment analyses were performed, as well as network enrichment and interactome analysis using MetaCore. Results In total, we identified 20 and 71 proteins that were significantly differentially expressed between benign and malignant serum and tissue samples, respectively. The differentially expressed protein sets in serum and tissue largely differed with only 2 proteins in common. MetaCore network analysis, however inferred GCR-alpha and Sp1 as common transcriptional regulators. Interactome analysis highlighted 14-3-3 zeta/delta, 14-3-3 beta/alpha, Alpha-actinin 4, HSP60, and PCBP1 as critical proteins in the tumor proteome signature based on their relative overconnectivity. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001084. Discussion Our analysis identified proteins with both novel and previously known associations to ovarian cancer biology. Despite the small overlap between differentially expressed protein sets in serum and tissue, APOA1 and Serotransferrin were significantly lower expressed in both serum and cancer tissue samples, suggesting a tissue-derived effect in serum. Pathway and subsequent

  3. Non-classical HLA-class I expression in serous ovarian carcinoma: Correlation with the HLA-genotype, tumor infiltrating immune cells and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Emilia; Poschke, Isabel; Villabona, Lisa; Carlson, Joseph W; Lundqvist, Andreas; Kiessling, Rolf; Seliger, Barbara; Masucci, Giuseppe V

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies, we have shown that patients with serous ovarian carcinoma in advanced surgical stage disease have a particularly poor prognosis if they carry the HLA-A*02 genotype. This represent a stronger prognostic factor than loss or downregulation of the MHC class I heavy chain (HC) on tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of the non-classical, immune tolerogenic HLA -G and -E on the tumor cells along with the infiltration of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. FFPE primary tumors from 72 patients with advanced stages of serous adenocarcinoma and metastatic cells present in ascites fluid from 8 additional patients were included in this study. Both expression of HLA-G and aberrant expression of HLA-E were correlated to a significant worse prognosis in patients with HLA-A*02, but not with different HLA genotypes. Focal cell expression of HLA-G correlated to a site-specific downregulation of classical MHC class I HC products and aberrant HLA-E expression, showing a poor survival. HLA-G was more frequently expressed in metastatic cells than in primary tumor lesions and the expression of HLA-G inversely correlated with the frequency of tumor infiltrating immune cells. All these parameters can contribute together to identify and discriminate subpopulations of patients with extremely poor prognosis and can give them the opportunity to receive, and benefit of individually tailored treatments. PMID:26942060

  4. A6 in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-27

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  5. PIMASERTIB AND SEROUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS

    PubMed Central

    AlAli, Alaa; Bushehri, Ahmad; Park, Jonathan C.; Krema, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of multifocal serous retinal detachments associated with pimasertib. Methods: The authors report a 26-year-old patient who developed bilateral multifocal serous retinal detachments appearing 2 days after starting pimasertib (as part of a clinical trial investigating its use in low-grade metastatic ovarian cancer) and rapidly resolving 3 days after stopping it. Conclusion: The mechanism of MEK inhibitor induced visual toxicity remains unclear. The pathophysiology of multifocal serous retinal detachments as a complication of pimasertib is still poorly understood. PMID:26444523

  6. Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib or Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Platinum-Resistant or -Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-13

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  7. The life and times of low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Gershenson, David M

    2013-01-01

    For the past several years, all women with epithelial ovarian cancer have been treated identically, whether in a clinical trial or off protocol. Over the past decade, we have come to appreciate the magnitude of the heterogeneity of ovarian cancer. The development of the binary grading system for serous carcinoma was a major advance, leading to separate clinical trials for patients with this subtype, originating from the Gynecologic Oncology Group's Rare Tumor Committee. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway appears to play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of this subtype. Approximately 20% to 40% of low-grade serous carcinomas have a KRAS mutation, while BRAF mutations are rare-approximately 5%. In genomic profiling studies, these tumors appear to cluster with serous tumors of low malignant potential. Compared with high-grade serous carcinomas, low-grade serous carcinomas are also characterized by a low frequency of p53 mutations, greater expression of ER and PR, and greater expression of PAX2 and IGF-1. Primary treatment of low-grade serous carcinoma includes surgery plus platinum-based chemotherapy (either adjuvant or neoadjuvant). Clinical behavior is characterized by young age at diagnosis, relative chemoresistance, and prolonged overall survival. Current options for treatment of relapsed disease include secondary cytoreduction in selected patients, salvage chemotherapy, or hormone therapy. A recently completed trial of a MEK inhibitor for women with recurrent disease demonstrated promising activity. Future directions will include further investigations of the molecular biology and biomarker-driven clinical trials with targeted agent monotherapy and combinations. PMID:23714500

  8. Pembrolizumab, Bevacizumab, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-02

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Salpingectomy as a Means to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Mary B.; Dresher, Charles W.; Yates, Melinda S.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Alberts, David S.; Lu, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) has become the standard of care for risk reduction in women at hereditary risk of ovarian cancer. While this procedure significantly decreases both the incidence of and mortality from ovarian cancer, it impacts quality of life, and the premature cessation of ovarian function may have long term health hazards. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathways of ovarian cancer point to the fallopian tube epithelium as the origin of most high grade serous cancers (HGSC). This evolving appreciation of the role of the fallopian tube in HGSC has led to the consideration of salpingectomy alone as an option for risk management, especially in premenopausal women. In addition, it is postulated that bilateral salpingectomy with ovarian retention (BSOR), may have a public health benefit for women undergoing benign gynecologic surgery. In this review we provide the rationale for salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer risk reduction strategy. PMID:25586903

  10. Elesclomol Sodium and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  12. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride or Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  13. Homologous recombination deficiency and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Drew, Yvette; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that PARP inhibitors block an essential pathway of DNA repair in cells harbouring a BRCA mutation has opened up a new therapeutic avenue for high-grade ovarian cancers. BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are essential for high-fidelity repair of double-strand breaks of DNA through the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Deficiency in HRR (HRD) is a target for PARP inhibitors. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, has now been licensed for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers. While mutated BRCA genes are individually most commonly associated with HRD other essential HRR proteins may be mutated or functionally deficient potentially widening the therapeutic opportunities for PARP inhibitors. HRD is the first phenotypically defined predictive marker for therapy with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer. Several different PARP inhibitors are being trialled in ovarian cancer and this class of drugs has been shown to be a new selective therapy for high-grade ovarian cancer. Around 20% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers harbour germline or somatic BRCA mutations and testing for BRCA mutations should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. The expanded use of PARP inhibitors in HRD deficient (non-BRCA mutant) tumours using a signature of HRD in clinical practice requires validation. PMID:27065456

  14. Intraperitoneal Bortezomib and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  15. Epigenetic repression of PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 promotes ovarian cancer via NOS2-derived nitric oxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wayne Bond; Lau, Bonnie; Luo, Zhongyue; Lin, Qiao; Yang, Huiliang; Xuan, Yu; Yi, Tao; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer constitutes one of the most lethal gynaecological malignancies worldwide and currently no satisfactory therapeutic approaches have been established. Therefore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms to develop targeted therapy of ovarian cancer is crucial. PDLIM2 is critical to promote ubiquitination of nuclear p65 and thus its role in inflammation has been highlighted recently. We demonstrate that PDLIM2 is decreased in both ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma and in various human ovarian cancer cell lines compared with normal ovary tissues and human ovarian surface epithelial cells (HOSE). Further functional analysis revealed that PDLIM2 is epigenetically repressed in ovarian cancer development and inhibition of PDLIM2 promoted ovarian cancer growth both in vivo and in vitro via NOS2-derived nitric oxide signaling, leading to recruitment of M2 type macrophages. These results suggest that PDLIM2 might be involved in ovarian cancer pathogenesis, which could serve as a promising therapeutic target for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:26593252

  16. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Bevacizumab After Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. STAT3 polymorphisms may predict an unfavorable response to first-line platinum-based therapy for women with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Fulp, William J.; Reid, Brett M.; Chen, Zhihua; Georgeades, Christina; Cheng, Jin Q.; Magliocco, Anthony; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Lancaster, Johnathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progression and therapeutic response. We hypothesized that germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CSC-related genes may predict an initial therapeutic response for women newly diagnosed with EOC. A nested case–control design was used to study 361 women with advanced-stage serous EOC treated with surgery followed by first-line platinum-based combination therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center or as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas Study. “Cases” included 102 incomplete responders (IRs) and “controls” included 259 complete clinical responders (CRs) to therapy. Using Illumina genotyping arrays and imputation, DNA samples were evaluated for 5,509 SNPs in 24 ovarian CSC-related genes. We also evaluated the overall significance of each CSC gene using the admixture maximum likelihood (AML) test, and correlated genotype with EOC tumor tissue expression. The strongest SNP-level associations with an IR to therapy were identified for correlated (r2 > 0.80) SNPs within signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) [odds ratio (OR), 2.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32–3.78; p = 0.0027], after adjustment for age, population stratification, grade and residual disease. At the gene level, STAT3 was significantly associated with an IR to therapy (pAML 5 0.006). rs1053004, a STAT3 SNP in a putative miRNA-binding site, was associated with STAT3 expression (p = 0.057). This is the first study to identify germline STAT3 variants as independent predictors of an unfavorable therapeutic response for EOC patients. Findings suggest that STAT3 genotype may identify high-risk women likely to respond more favorably to novel therapeutic combinations that include STAT3 inhibitors. PMID:26264211

  18. Nek6 and Hif-1α cooperate with the cytoskeletal gateway of drug resistance to drive outcome in serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Marta De; Fanelli, Mara; Mariani, Marisa; Raspaglio, Giuseppina; Pandya, Deep; He, Shiquan; Fiedler, Paul; Petrillo, Marco; Scambia, Giovanni; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia selects the most aggressive and drug-resistant clones in solid malignancies. One of the pivotal transcription factors induced by hypoxia is Hif-1α. However, in serous ovarian cancer (SEOC), Hif-1α expression is not a prognostic biomarker. This study aims to assess the hypothesis that the serine-threonine kinase Nek6 functions as a downstream effector cooperating with Hif-1α in driving ovarian cancer aggressiveness. Nek6 was overexpressed and Hif-1α was silenced in A2780 cells. Nek6 was also stably silenced in Hey cells. The dependence of Nek6 expression on Hif-1α was assayed as a function of hypoxic growth conditions. Nek6 interaction with the cytoskeletal gateway of drug resistance was investigated with far western blot. The co-expression of NEK6, HIF1A, TUBB3 and GBP1 transcripts was quantified with qPCR in two cohorts of SEOC patients (346 locally treated patients and 344 from the TCGA dataset). Nek6 expression is induced by hypoxia in a Hif-1α dependent fashion. Nek6 directly interacts with GBP-1, thus being a component of the cytoskeletal gateway of drug resistance. Nek6 overexpression increases and silencing decreases the anchorage-independent growth of cultured cells. In SEOC patients, NEK6 expression is significantly correlated with HIF1A. Co-expression of NEK6, HIF1A, TUBB3 and GBP1 transcripts identifies a subset of SEOC patients characterized by poor outcome and drug resistance. This study demonstrates the functional relevance of Nek6 in the context of the adaptive response to hypoxia in SEOC. This finding may help identify a sub-population of patients at high risk of relapse to standard first-line chemotherapy. PMID:26269749

  19. STAT3 polymorphisms may predict an unfavorable response to first-line platinum-based therapy for women with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Fulp, William J; Reid, Brett M; Chen, Zhihua; Georgeades, Christina; Cheng, Jin Q; Magliocco, Anthony; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progression and therapeutic response. We hypothesized that germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CSC-related genes may predict an initial therapeutic response for women newly diagnosed with EOC. A nested case-control design was used to study 361 women with advanced-stage serous EOC treated with surgery followed by first-line platinum-based combination therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center or as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas Study. "Cases" included 102 incomplete responders (IRs) and "controls" included 259 complete clinical responders (CRs) to therapy. Using Illumina genotyping arrays and imputation, DNA samples were evaluated for 5,509 SNPs in 24 ovarian CSC-related genes. We also evaluated the overall significance of each CSC gene using the admixture maximum likelihood (AML) test, and correlated genotype with EOC tumor tissue expression. The strongest SNP-level associations with an IR to therapy were identified for correlated (r(2) > 0.80) SNPs within signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) [odds ratio (OR), 2.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32-3.78; p = 0.0027], after adjustment for age, population stratification, grade and residual disease. At the gene level, STAT3 was significantly associated with an IR to therapy (pAML = 0.006). rs1053004, a STAT3 SNP in a putative miRNA-binding site, was associated with STAT3 expression (p = 0.057). This is the first study to identify germline STAT3 variants as independent predictors of an unfavorable therapeutic response for EOC patients. Findings suggest that STAT3 genotype may identify high-risk women likely to respond more favorably to novel therapeutic combinations that include STAT3 inhibitors. PMID:26264211

  20. Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer or Recurrent Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  1. The long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes the proliferation of serous ovarian cancer cells through the regulation of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jun-jun; Wang, Yan; Ding, Jing-xin; Jin, Hong-yan; Yang, Gong; Hua, Ke-qin

    2015-05-01

    HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) is a well-known long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) whose dysregulation correlates with poor prognosis and malignant progression in many forms of cancer. Here, we investigate the expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function of HOTAIR in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Clinically, we found that HOTAIR levels were overexpressed in SOC tissues compared with normal controls and that HOTAIR overexpression was correlated with an advanced FIGO stage and a high histological grade. Multivariate analysis revealed that HOTAIR is an independent prognostic factor for predicting overall survival in SOC patients. We demonstrated that HOTAIR silencing inhibited A2780 and OVCA429 SOC cell proliferation in vitro and that the anti-proliferative effects of HOTAIR silencing also occurred in vivo. Further investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the growth inhibitory effects by HOTAIR silencing revealed that its knockdown resulted in the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through certain cell cycle-related and apoptosis-related proteins. Together, these results highlight a critical role of HOTAIR in SOC cell proliferation and contribute to a better understanding of the importance of dysregulated lncRNAs in SOC progression. - Highlights: • HOTAIR overexpression correlates with an aggressive tumour phenotype and a poor prognosis in SOC. • HOTAIR promotes SOC cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. • The proliferative role of HOTAIR is associated with regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis.

  2. Gene Set-Based Functionome Analysis of Pathogenesis in Epithelial Ovarian Serous Carcinoma and the Molecular Features in Different FIGO Stages.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Ming-Jie; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Serous carcinoma (SC) is the most common subtype of epithelial ovarian carcinoma and is divided into four stages by the Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system. Currently, the molecular functions and biological processes of SC at different FIGO stages have not been quantified. Here, we conducted a whole-genome integrative analysis to investigate the functions of SC at different stages. The function, as defined by the GO term or canonical pathway gene set, was quantified by measuring the changes in the gene expressional order between cancerous and normal control states. The quantified function, i.e., the gene set regularity (GSR) index, was utilized to investigate the pathogenesis and functional regulation of SC at different FIGO stages. We showed that the informativeness of the GSR indices was sufficient for accurate pattern recognition and classification for machine learning. The function regularity presented by the GSR indices showed stepwise deterioration during SC progression from FIGO stage I to stage IV. The pathogenesis of SC was centered on cell cycle deregulation and accompanied with multiple functional aberrations as well as their interactions. PMID:27275818

  3. Gene Set-Based Functionome Analysis of Pathogenesis in Epithelial Ovarian Serous Carcinoma and the Molecular Features in Different FIGO Stages

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Ming-Jie; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Serous carcinoma (SC) is the most common subtype of epithelial ovarian carcinoma and is divided into four stages by the Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system. Currently, the molecular functions and biological processes of SC at different FIGO stages have not been quantified. Here, we conducted a whole-genome integrative analysis to investigate the functions of SC at different stages. The function, as defined by the GO term or canonical pathway gene set, was quantified by measuring the changes in the gene expressional order between cancerous and normal control states. The quantified function, i.e., the gene set regularity (GSR) index, was utilized to investigate the pathogenesis and functional regulation of SC at different FIGO stages. We showed that the informativeness of the GSR indices was sufficient for accurate pattern recognition and classification for machine learning. The function regularity presented by the GSR indices showed stepwise deterioration during SC progression from FIGO stage I to stage IV. The pathogenesis of SC was centered on cell cycle deregulation and accompanied with multiple functional aberrations as well as their interactions. PMID:27275818

  4. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Hydrochloride in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Fatigue; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Pain; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  5. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase P1 and M1 genes and overall survival of patients with ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma treated with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    CONG, LAN-XIANG; ZHAI, XIANG-HONG; WU, FENG-XIA; ZHU, DONG-YI; WANG, AN-CONG

    2016-01-01

    The effects of platinum-based drugs are controlled by genes that are involved in DNA detoxification, including glutathione S-transferase (GST)P1 and GSTM1, which have been associated with increased benefits in the chemotherapeutic treatment of patients with ovarian cancer. The present study assessed the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms in GST genes on the overall survival (OS) of patients with ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma that were treated with chemotherapy. A total of 95 patients received treatment with a carboplatin-based or alternative chemotherapy. Polymorphisms in the patients were genotyped using the following methods: Pyrosequencing, to identify GSTP1 Ile105Val; a relative quantification method, to identify the copy number variation in GSTM1; and polymerase chain reaction followed by gel electrophoresis, to identify the null vs. non-null genotypes of GSTM1. The association between genotypes and OS of patients was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. The OS of patients treated with paclitaxel + carboplatin-based chemotherapy was significantly increased, compared with patients treated with alternative forms of chemotherapy (P=0.035). The OS of patients did not differ significantly between different GSTP1 genotypes (log-rank test, P=0.17). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that, since the start of the treatment, there was not a significant association between the GSTP1 isoleucine allele and the OS for heterozygous carriers of the isoleucine allele [hazards ratio (HR), 1.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.77–4.12; P=0.18] and no homozygous carriers of the valine allele had been detected (HR, 0.00). There was no significant difference between GSTM1 genotypes, according to Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (log-rank test, P=0.83). Patients that possessed ≤1 copy of GSTM1 exhibited no decrease in OS (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.37–2.51; P=0.94), compared with patients that

  7. Statin Therapy Is Associated with Improved Survival in Patients with Non-Serous-Papillary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Habis, Mohammed; Wroblewski, Kristen; Bradaric, Michael; Ismail, Nadia; Yamada, S. Diane; Litchfield, Lacey; Lengyel, Ernst; Romero, Iris L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine whether statin use is associated with improved epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) survival. Methods This is a single-institution retrospective cohort review of patients treated for OvCa between 1992 and 2013. Inclusion criteria were International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I–IV OvCa. The primary exposures analyzed were hyperlipidemia and statin use. The primary outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results 442 patients met inclusion criteria. The cohort was divided into three groups: patients with hyperlipidemia who used statins (n = 68), patients with hyperlipidemia who did not use statins (n = 28), and patients without hyperlipidemia (n = 346). OvCa outcomes were evaluated. When we analyzed the entire cohort, we found no significant differences in PFS or DSS among the groups. The median PFS for hyperlipidemics using statins, hyperlipidemics not using statins, and non-hyperlipidemics was 21.7, 13.6, and 14.7 months, respectively (p = 0.69). Median DSS for hyperlipidemics using statins, hyperlipidemics not using statins, and non-hyperlipidemics was 44.2, 75.7, and 41.5 months, respectively (p = 0.43). These findings did not change after controlling for confounders. However, a secondary analysis revealed that, among patients with non-serous-papillary subtypes of OvCa, statin use was associated with a decrease in hazards of both disease recurrence (adjusted HR = 0.23, p = 0.02) and disease-specific death (adjusted HR = 0.23, p = 0.04). To augment the findings in the retrospective cohort, the histology-specific effects of statins were also evaluated in vitro using proliferation assays. Here, statin treatment of cell lines resulted in a variable level of cytotoxicity. Conclusion Statin use among patients with non-serous-papillary OvCa was associated with improvement in both PFS and DSS. PMID:25118694

  8. MV-NIS or Investigator's Choice Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. KRAS Genomic Status Predicts the Sensitivity of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Decitabine | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma, and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low-grade and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells.

  10. PARP Inhibitors for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma: Current Treatment Options and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J.; Braicu, E. I.; Chekerov, R.

    2016-01-01

    More than simply a promising management option, PARP inhibitors can be regarded as a milestone in the development of personalised treatment of recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Their mechanism of action, known as “synthetic lethality”, is dependent on functional differences of the DNA repair mechanisms of healthy cells and tumour cells; cells that repair DNA damage less efficiently are particularly sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Olaparib, licensed for use this year, is the best-studied PARP inhibitor used for treatment of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC). The efficacy of PARP inhibitors appears to be increased when used in combination with other treatments. PMID:26941449

  11. EGEN-001 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-11

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  12. Microarray analysis of differentially expressed genes in ovarian and fallopian tube epithelium from risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomies.

    PubMed

    Veskimäe, Kristina; Staff, Synnöve; Tabaro, Francesco; Nykter, Matti; Isola, Jorma; Mäenpää, Johanna

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer an increased lifetime risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer risk can be decreased by risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). Studies on RRSO material have altered the paradigm of serous ovarian cancer pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to identify candidate genes possibly involved in the pathogenesis of serous ovarian cancer by carrying out a microarray analysis of differentially expressed genes in BRCA1/2- mutation positive ovarian and fallopian tube epithelium derived from RRSO surgery. Freshly frozen ovarian and fallopian tube samples from nine BRCA1/2 mutation carriers scheduled for RRSO were prospectively collected together with five mutation-negative control patients undergoing salpingo-oophorectomy for benign indications. Microarray analysis of genome-wide gene expression was performed on ovarian and fallopian tube samples from the BRCA1/2 and control patients. The validation of microarray data was performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in selected cases of RRSO samples and also in high grade serous carcinoma samples collected from patients with a BRCA phenotype. From 22,733 genes, 454 transcripts were identified that were differentially expressed in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers when compared with controls, pooling all ovarian and fallopian tube samples together. Of these, 299 genes were statistically significantly downregulated and 155 genes upregulated. Differentially expressed genes in BRCA1/2 samples reported here might be involved in serous ovarian carcinogenesis and provide interesting targets for further studies. PMID:25706666

  13. The prognostic significance of specific HOX gene expression patterns in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Zoe; Moller-Levet, Carla; McGrath, Sophie; Butler-Manuel, Simon; Kavitha Madhuri, Thumuluru; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Pandha, Hardev; Morgan, Richard; Michael, Agnieszka

    2016-10-01

    HOX genes are vital for all aspects of mammalian growth and differentiation, and their dysregulated expression is related to ovarian carcinogenesis. The aim of the current study was to establish the prognostic value of HOX dysregulation as well as its role in platinum resistance. The potential to target HOX proteins through the HOX/PBX interaction was also explored in the context of platinum resistance. HOX gene expression was determined in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary EOCs by QPCR, and compared to expression in normal ovarian epithelium and fallopian tube tissue samples. Statistical analysis included one-way ANOVA and t-tests, using statistical software R and GraphPad. The analysis identified 36 of the 39 HOX genes as being overexpressed in high grade serous EOC compared to normal tissue. We detected a molecular HOX gene-signature that predicted poor outcome. Overexpression of HOXB4 and HOXB9 was identified in high grade serous cell lines after platinum resistance developed. Targeting the HOX/PBX dimer with the HXR9 peptide enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. In conclusion, this study has shown the HOX genes are highly dysregulated in ovarian cancer with high expression of HOXA13, B6, C13, D1 and D13 being predictive of poor clinical outcome. Targeting the HOX/PBX dimer in platinum-resistant cancer represents a potentially new therapeutic option that should be further developed and tested in clinical trials. PMID:27225067

  14. Talazoparib and HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Metastatic Advanced Solid Tumor or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  15. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  16. Rare case of coexistence of primary ovarian carcinoid in mature teratoma with primary serous carcinoma in second ovary--a case report.

    PubMed

    Mieczkowska, E; Marciniak, A; Szydłowska, I; Brodowska, A; Starczewski, A

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian malignant tumours are mostly ovarian cancers. The most frequent ovarian benign lesions are mature teratomas. A very rare ovarian neoplasm is carcinoid. It mostly occurs as a component of mature teratoma, what causes rare diagnosis before surgery. Study presents the case of patient with primary ovarian carcinoid in mature teratoma of one ovary, co-existing with primary epithelial carcinoma of another ovary. Surgical treatment of carcinoid involves adnexectomy or hysterectomy with adnexa and removal of great omenturn, followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In young women with early-stage tumours, treatment can be limited to adnexectomy followed by close monitoring. In the presented case, management associated with the diagnosis of ovarian carcinoid, resulted in the detection of early-stage ovarian epithelial cancer. This case seems to confirm the recommendations to take tissue samples from the other ovary for histopathological evaluation in cases of ovarian unilateral benign tumours. PMID:26189263

  17. Three-dimensional modeling of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erin, White; Hilary, Kenny; Ernst, Lengyel

    2015-01-01

    New models for epithelial ovarian cancer initiation and metastasis are required to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the disease and to develop new therapeutics. Modeling ovarian cancer however is challenging as a result of the genetic heterogeneity of the malignancy, the diverse pathology, the limited availability of human tissue for research, the atypical mechanisms of metastasis, and because the origin is unclear. Insights into the origin of high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas and mechanisms of metastasis have resulted in the generation of novel three-dimensional (3D) culture models that better approximate the behavior of the tumor cells in vivo than prior two-dimensional models. The 3D models aim to recapitulate the tumor microenvironment, which has a critical role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. Ultimately, findings using models that accurately reflect human ovarian cancer biology are likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. In this review we discuss the design of new 3D culture models of ovarian cancer primarily using human cells, key studies in which these models have been applied, current limitations, and future applications. PMID:25034878

  18. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N; Nyholt, Dale R; Morris, Andrew P; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Burghaus, Stefanie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Eilber, Ursula; Rudolph, Anja; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Antonenkova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Cannioto, Rikki; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Wu, Xifeng; Bisogna, Maria; Dao, Fanny; Levine, Douglas A; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Missmer, Stacey; Bjorge, Line; Salvesen, Helga B; Kopperud, Reidun K; Bischof, Katharina; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Olson, Sara H; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Sieh, Weiva; Whittemore, Alice S; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Gilks, C Blake; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Gawełko, Jan; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise; Trabert, Britton; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mclaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Eccles, Diana; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Timorek, Agnieszka; Szafron, Lukasz; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Bandera, Elisa V; Poole, Elizabeth M; Morgan, Terry K; Risch, Harvey A; Goode, Ellen L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Webb, Penelope M; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Montgomery, Grant W; Zondervan, Krina T; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; MacGregor, Stuart

    2015-10-15

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We found evidence for shared genetic risks between endometriosis and all histotypes of ovarian cancer, except for the intestinal mucinous type. Clear cell carcinoma showed the strongest genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.51, 95% CI = 0.18-0.84). Endometrioid and low-grade serous carcinomas had similar correlation coefficients (0.48, 95% CI = 0.07-0.89 and 0.40, 95% CI = 0.05-0.75, respectively). High-grade serous carcinoma, which often arises from the fallopian tubes, showed a weaker genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.25, 95% CI = 0.11-0.39), despite the absence of a known epidemiological association. These results suggest that the epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian adenocarcinoma may be attributable to shared genetic susceptibility loci. PMID:26231222

  19. Role of the stem cell niche in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Odai-Afotey, Ashley A; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in the United States. Recent extensive genomic analyses of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), particularly the most common and deadly form of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, have provided important insights into the repertoire of molecular aberrations that are characteristic for this malignancy. However, interpretation of the discovered aberrations is complicated because the origin and mechanisms of progression of EOC remain uncertain. Here, we summarize current views on the cell of origin of EOC and discuss recent findings of a cancer-prone stem cell niche for ovarian surface epithelium, one of the major likely sources of EOC. We also outline future directions and challenges in studying the role of stem cell niches in EOC pathogenesis. PMID:27308341

  20. Integrated Genomic Analyses of Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project has analyzed mRNA expression, miRNA expression, promoter methylation, and DNA copy number in 489 high-grade serous ovarian adenocarcinomas (HGS-OvCa) and the DNA sequences of exons from coding genes in 316 of these tumors. These results show that HGS-OvCa is characterized by TP53 mutations in almost all tumors (96%); low prevalence but statistically recurrent somatic mutations in 9 additional genes including NF1, BRCA1, BRCA2, RB1, and CDK12; 113 significant focal DNA copy number aberrations; and promoter methylation events involving 168 genes. Analyses delineated four ovarian cancer transcriptional subtypes, three miRNA subtypes, four promoter methylation subtypes, a transcriptional signature associated with survival duration and shed new light on the impact on survival of tumors with BRCA1/2 and CCNE1 aberrations. Pathway analyses suggested that homologous recombination is defective in about half of tumors, and that Notch and FOXM1 signaling are involved in serous ovarian cancer pathophysiology. PMID:21720365

  1. MAL2 and tumor protein D52 (TPD52) are frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but differentially associated with histological subtype and patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The four-transmembrane MAL2 protein is frequently overexpressed in breast carcinoma, and MAL2 overexpression is associated with gain of the corresponding locus at chromosome 8q24.12. Independent expression microarray studies predict MAL2 overexpression in ovarian carcinoma, but these had remained unconfirmed. MAL2 binds tumor protein D52 (TPD52), which is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but the clinical significance of MAL2 and TPD52 overexpression was unknown. Methods Immunohistochemical analyses of MAL2 and TPD52 expression were performed using tissue microarray sections including benign, borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumours. Inmmunohistochemical staining intensity and distribution was assessed both visually and digitally. Results MAL2 and TPD52 were significantly overexpressed in high-grade serous carcinomas compared with serous borderline tumours. MAL2 expression was highest in serous carcinomas relative to other histological subtypes, whereas TPD52 expression was highest in clear cell carcinomas. MAL2 expression was not related to patient survival, however high-level TPD52 staining was significantly associated with improved overall survival in patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma (log-rank test, p < 0.001; n = 124) and was an independent predictor of survival in the overall carcinoma cohort (hazard ratio (HR), 0.498; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-0.728; p < 0.001; n = 221), and in serous carcinomas (HR, 0.440; 95% CI, 0.294-0.658; p < 0.001; n = 182). Conclusions MAL2 is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, and TPD52 overexpression is a favourable independent prognostic marker of potential value in the management of ovarian carcinoma patients. PMID:20846453

  2. Assessing the genetic architecture of epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes.

    PubMed

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Lu, Yi; Dixon, Suzanne C; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Burghaus, Stefanie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Antonenkova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Cannioto, Rikki; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Wu, Xifeng; Bisogna, Maria; Dao, Fanny; Levine, Douglas A; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Stampfer, Meir; Missmer, Stacey; Bjorge, Line; Salvesen, Helga B; Kopperud, Reidun K; Bischof, Katharina; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Olson, Sara H; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Sieh, Weiva; Whittemore, Alice S; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Blake Gilks, C; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Kluz, Tomasz; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise; Trabert, Britton; Lissowska, Jolanta; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Timorek, Agnieszka; Szafron, Lukasz; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Bandera, Elisa V; Poole, Elizabeth M; Morgan, Terry K; Goode, Ellen L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Webb, Penelope M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Risch, Harvey A; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the deadliest common cancers. The five most common types of disease are high-grade and low-grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell carcinoma. Each of these subtypes present distinct molecular pathogeneses and sensitivities to treatments. Recent studies show that certain genetic variants confer susceptibility to all subtypes while other variants are subtype-specific. Here, we perform an extensive analysis of the genetic architecture of EOC subtypes. To this end, we used data of 10,014 invasive EOC patients and 21,233 controls from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium genotyped in the iCOGS array (211,155 SNPs). We estimate the array heritability (attributable to variants tagged on arrays) of each subtype and their genetic correlations. We also look for genetic overlaps with factors such as obesity, smoking behaviors, diabetes, age at menarche and height. We estimated the array heritabilities of high-grade serous disease ([Formula: see text] = 8.8 ± 1.1 %), endometrioid ([Formula: see text] = 3.2 ± 1.6 %), clear cell ([Formula: see text] = 6.7 ± 3.3 %) and all EOC ([Formula: see text] = 5.6 ± 0.6 %). Known associated loci contributed approximately 40 % of the total array heritability for each subtype. The contribution of each chromosome to the total heritability was not proportional to chromosome size. Through bivariate and cross-trait LD score regression, we found evidence of shared genetic backgrounds between the three high-grade subtypes: serous, endometrioid and undifferentiated. Finally, we found significant genetic correlations of all EOC with diabetes and obesity using a polygenic prediction approach. PMID:27075448

  3. BCAT1 expression associates with ovarian cancer progression: possible implications in altered disease metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Guillemette, Chantal; Gobeil, Stéphane; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have identified the branched chain amino-acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) gene as notably hypomethylated in low-malignant potential (LMP) and high-grade (HG) serous epithelial ovarian tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. Here we show that BCAT1 is strongly overexpressed in both LMP and HG serous epithelial ovarian tumors, which probably correlates with its hypomethylated status. Knockdown of the BCAT1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells led to sharp decrease of cell proliferation, migration and invasion and inhibited cell cycle progression. BCAT1 silencing was associated with the suppression of numerous genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, and the induction of some tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). Moreover, BCAT1 suppression resulted in downregulation of numerous genes implicated in lipid production and protein synthesis, suggesting its important role in controlling EOC metabolism. Further metabolomic analyses were indicative for significant depletion of most amino acids and different phospho- and sphingolipids following BCAT1 knockdown. Finally, BCAT1 suppression led to significantly prolonged survival time in xenograft model of advanced peritoneal EOC. Taken together, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of BCAT1 in ovarian carcinogenesis and identify this transaminase as a novel EOC biomarker and putative EOC therapeutic target. PMID:26372729

  4. An Immunohistochemical Algorithm for Ovarian Carcinoma Typing

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Kurosh; Rambau, Peter F.; Naugler, Christopher; Le Page, Cécile; Meunier, Liliane; de Ladurantaye, Manon; Lee, Sandra; Leung, Samuel; Goode, Ellen L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Li, Xiaodong; Ewanowich, Carol A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Provencher, Diane; Huntsman, David; Lee, Cheng-Han; Gilks, C. Blake; Mes Masson, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    There are 5 major histotypes of ovarian carcinomas. Diagnostic typing criteria have evolved over time, and past cohorts may be misclassified by current standards. Our objective was to reclassify the recently assembled Canadian Ovarian Experimental Unified Resource and the Alberta Ovarian Tumor Type cohorts using immunohistochemical (IHC) biomarkers and to develop an IHC algorithm for ovarian carcinoma histotyping. A total of 1626 ovarian carcinoma samples from the Canadian Ovarian Experimental Unified Resource and the Alberta Ovarian Tumor Type were subjected to a reclassification by comparing the original with the predicted histotype. Histotype prediction was derived from a nominal logistic regression modeling using a previously reclassified cohort (N=784) with the binary input of 8 IHC markers. Cases with discordant original or predicted histotypes were subjected to arbitration. After reclassification, 1762 cases from all cohorts were subjected to prediction models (χ2 Automatic Interaction Detection, recursive partitioning, and nominal logistic regression) with a variable IHC marker input. The histologic type was confirmed in 1521/1626 (93.5%) cases of the Canadian Ovarian Experimental Unified Resource and the Alberta Ovarian Tumor Type cohorts. The highest misclassification occurred in the endometrioid type, where most of the changes involved reclassification from endometrioid to high-grade serous carcinoma, which was additionally supported by mutational data and outcome. Using the reclassified histotype as the endpoint, a 4-marker prediction model correctly classified 88%, a 6-marker 91%, and an 8-marker 93% of the 1762 cases. This study provides statistically validated, inexpensive IHC algorithms, which have versatile applications in research, clinical practice, and clinical trials. PMID:26974996

  5. An Immunohistochemical Algorithm for Ovarian Carcinoma Typing.

    PubMed

    Köbel, Martin; Rahimi, Kurosh; Rambau, Peter F; Naugler, Christopher; Le Page, Cécile; Meunier, Liliane; de Ladurantaye, Manon; Lee, Sandra; Leung, Samuel; Goode, Ellen L; Ramus, Susan J; Carlson, Joseph W; Li, Xiaodong; Ewanowich, Carol A; Kelemen, Linda E; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Provencher, Diane; Huntsman, David; Lee, Cheng-Han; Gilks, C Blake; Mes Masson, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    There are 5 major histotypes of ovarian carcinomas. Diagnostic typing criteria have evolved over time, and past cohorts may be misclassified by current standards. Our objective was to reclassify the recently assembled Canadian Ovarian Experimental Unified Resource and the Alberta Ovarian Tumor Type cohorts using immunohistochemical (IHC) biomarkers and to develop an IHC algorithm for ovarian carcinoma histotyping. A total of 1626 ovarian carcinoma samples from the Canadian Ovarian Experimental Unified Resource and the Alberta Ovarian Tumor Type were subjected to a reclassification by comparing the original with the predicted histotype. Histotype prediction was derived from a nominal logistic regression modeling using a previously reclassified cohort (N=784) with the binary input of 8 IHC markers. Cases with discordant original or predicted histotypes were subjected to arbitration. After reclassification, 1762 cases from all cohorts were subjected to prediction models (χ Automatic Interaction Detection, recursive partitioning, and nominal logistic regression) with a variable IHC marker input. The histologic type was confirmed in 1521/1626 (93.5%) cases of the Canadian Ovarian Experimental Unified Resource and the Alberta Ovarian Tumor Type cohorts. The highest misclassification occurred in the endometrioid type, where most of the changes involved reclassification from endometrioid to high-grade serous carcinoma, which was additionally supported by mutational data and outcome. Using the reclassified histotype as the endpoint, a 4-marker prediction model correctly classified 88%, a 6-marker 91%, and an 8-marker 93% of the 1762 cases. This study provides statistically validated, inexpensive IHC algorithms, which have versatile applications in research, clinical practice, and clinical trials. PMID:26974996

  6. Type-Specific Cell Line Models for Type-Specific Ovarian Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Anglesio, Michael S.; Wiegand, Kimberly C.; Melnyk, Nataliya; Chow, Christine; Salamanca, Clara; Prentice, Leah M.; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; Spillman, Monique A.; Cochrane, Dawn R.; Shumansky, Karey; Shah, Sohrab P.; Kalloger, Steve E.; Huntsman, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian carcinomas consist of at least five distinct diseases: high-grade serous, low-grade serous, clear cell, endometrioid, and mucinous. Biomarker and molecular characterization may represent a more biologically relevant basis for grouping and treating this family of tumors, rather than site of origin. Molecular characteristics have become the new standard for clinical pathology, however development of tailored type-specific therapies is hampered by a failure of basic research to recognize that model systems used to study these diseases must also be stratified. Unrelated model systems do offer value for study of biochemical processes but specific cellular context needs to be applied to assess relevant therapeutic strategies. Methods We have focused on the identification of clear cell carcinoma cell line models. A panel of 32 “ovarian cancer” cell lines has been classified into histotypes using a combination of mutation profiles, IHC mutation-surrogates, and a validated immunohistochemical model. All cell lines were identity verified using STR analysis. Results Many described ovarian clear cell lines have characteristic mutations (including ARID1A and PIK3CA) and an overall molecular/immuno-profile typical of primary tumors. Mutations in TP53 were present in the majority of high-grade serous cell lines. Advanced genomic analysis of bona-fide clear cell carcinoma cell lines also support copy number changes in typical biomarkers such at MET and HNF1B and a lack of any recurrent expressed re-arrangements. Conclusions: As with primary ovarian tumors, mutation status of cancer genes like ARID1A and TP53 and a general immuno-profile serve well for establishing histotype of ovarian cancer cell We describe specific biomarkers and molecular features to re-classify generic “ovarian carcinoma” cell lines into type specific categories. Our data supports the use of prototype clear cell lines, such as TOV21G and JHOC-5, and questions the use of SKOV3 and A

  7. NOTCH2 expression is decreased in epithelial ovarian cancer and is related to the tumor histological subtype

    PubMed Central

    Galic, Vijaya; Shawber, Carrie J.; Reeves, Claire; Shah, Monjri; Murtomaki, Aino; Wright, Jason; Herzog, Thomas; Tong, Guo Xia; Kitajewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Notch family members function as both oncogenes and tumor suppressors. NOTCH2 is down-regulated in colon cancer, and reduced expression is associated with a less differentiated, more aggressive phenotype, and reduced overall survival. NOTCH2 has also been shown to have pro-apoptotic and growth suppressive effects in thyroid carcinoma, and carcinoid tumors. The expression pattern of NOTCH2 in ovarian cancer is unknown. Methods: An immunohistochemical analysis using a polyclonal antibody to the NOTCH2 intracellular domain was performed on a total of 119 ovarian carcinomas, and 7 serous borderline tumors, arranged onto tissue arrays. Normal ovarian and fallopian tube epithelium were used as controls. Specimens were scored as low or high NOTCH2 expression. The score distributions for the subtypes were analyzed with the chi square test. Results: Fifty two of 61 (85.2%) papillary serous, eight of 13 (61.5%) clear cell, and 23 of 30 (76.7%) endometrioid, demonstrated negative or lower NOTCH2 expression than normal fallopian tubal epithelium or ovarian surface epithelium. In contrast, 10 of 15 (66.7%) mucinous carcinomas had a high level of NOTCH2 expression and consistently demonstrated intense polarized staining (P<.001). The apical expression of NOTCH2 protein present in the normal fallopian tube epithelium and many borderline tumors was absent in the high grade carcinomas, most notably in papillary serous. Conclusion: Decreased NOTCH2 expression is associated with the poorly differentiated serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma histology. Further studies are needed to assess the functional role of NOTCH2 in ovarian cancer and its effect on prognosis. PMID:24707357

  8. The status of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in ovarian cancer, part 1: olaparib.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rowan E; Ledermann, Jonathan A

    2016-08-01

    Poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promising clinical activity in epithelial ovarian cancer. Following the observation in vitro that PARP inhibition is synthetically lethal in tumors with BRCA mutations, PARP inhibition has become the first genotype-directed therapy for BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated ovarian cancer. However, it is becoming clear that PARP inhibition also may have clinical utility in cancers associated with defects or aberrations in DNA repair that are unrelated to BRCA mutations. Deficient DNA repair mechanisms are present in approximately 30% to 50% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers, the most common histologic subtype. Olaparib is the best-studied PARP inhibitor to date, and a number of phase 3 trials with this agent are underway. This article reviews the development of olaparib for ovarian cancer and discusses the current evidence for its use, ongoing studies, future research directions, and the challenges ahead. PMID:27487106

  9. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  10. [The molecular biology of epithelial ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Leary, Alexandra; Pautier, Patricia; Tazi, Youssef; Morice, Philippe; Duvillard, Pierre; Gouy, Sébastien; Uzan, Catherine; Gauthier, Hélène; Balleyguier, Corinne; Lhommé, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer frequently presents at an advanced stage where the cornerstone of management remains surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Unfortunately, despite sometimes dramatic initial responses, advanced ovarian cancer almost invariably relapses. Little progress has been made in the identification of effective targeted-therapies for ovarian cancer. The majority of clinical trials investigating novel agents have been negative and the only approved targeted-therapy is bevacizumab, for which reliable predictive biomarkers still elude us. Ovarian cancer is treated as a uniform disease. Yet, biological studies have highlighted the heterogeneity of this malignancy with marked differences in histology, oncogenesis, prognosis, chemo-responsiveness, and molecular profile. Recent high throughput molecular analyses have identified a huge number of genomic/phenotypic alterations. Broadly speaking, high grade serous carcinomas (type II) display significant genomic instability and numerous amplifications and losses; low grade (type I) tumors are genomically stable but display frequent mutations. Importantly, many of these genomic alterations relate to known oncogenes for which targeted-therapies are available or in development. There is today a real potential for personalized medicine in ovarian cancer. We will review the current literature regarding the molecular characterization of epithelial ovarian cancer and discuss the biological rationale for a number of targeted strategies. In order to translate these biological advances into meaningful clinical improvements for our patients, it is imperative to incorporate translational research in ovarian cancer trials, a number of strategies will be proposed such as the acquisition of quality tumor samples, including sequential pre- and post-treatment biopsies, the potential of liquid biopsies, and novel trial designs more adapted to the molecular era of ovarian cancer research. PMID:23238064

  11. Tubal ligation and ovarian cancer risk in a large cohort: Substantial variation by histological type.

    PubMed

    Gaitskell, Kezia; Green, Jane; Pirie, Kirstin; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    Histopathological and molecular studies suggest that different histological subtypes (histotypes) of ovarian cancer have different aetiologies. Few studies have been large enough to explore reliably the effect of tubal ligation (sterilization), which has been associated with a reduced overall risk of ovarian cancer, on different tumour histotypes. In a prospective study of 1.1 million UK women without prior cancer or bilateral oophorectomy, 8,035 ovarian cancers occurred during mean follow-up of 13.8 years. Using a Cox proportional hazards model, we estimated adjusted relative risks of ovarian cancer associated with tubal ligation. Overall, there was substantial heterogeneity in tumour risk associated with tubal ligation for the four main histotypes, serous, endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell (heterogeneity: p < 0.0001). For serous tumours, the most common histotype (n = 3,515), risks differed significantly between high-grade (RR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.67-0.89) and low-grade tumours (RR: 1.13, 95% CI: 0.89-1.42); heterogeneity: p = 0.007. Relative risks were almost halved for endometrioid (n = 690, RR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.43-0.69) and clear cell tumours (n = 401, RR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39-0.77), but there was no association between tubal ligation and mucinous tumours (n = 836, RR: 0.99, 95% CI: 0.84-1.18). For the main tumour histotypes we found little variation of risk by timing of tubal ligation. The significant differences by tumour histotype are unlikely to be due to confounding and are consistent with hypotheses that high-grade and low-grade serous tumours have different origins, and that some endometrioid and clear cell tumours might arise from cells and/or carcinogens travelling through the fallopian tubes. PMID:26378908

  12. Cisplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage IIC, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Gastrointestinal Complication; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  13. Pathway modulations and epigenetic alterations in ovarian tumorbiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Sabita N.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular pathways are numerous and are highly integrated in function in the control of cellular systems. They collectively regulate cell division, proliferation, survival and apoptosis of cells and mutagenesis of key genes that control these pathways can initiate neoplastic transformations. Understanding these pathways is crucial to future therapeutic and preventive strategies of the disease. Ovarian cancers are of three major types; epithelial, germ-cell and stromal. However, ovarian cancers of epithelial origin, arising from the mesothelium, are the predominant form. Of the subtypes of ovarian cancer, the high-grade serous tumors are fatal, with low survival rate due to late detection and poor response to treatments. Close examination of preserved ovarian tissues and in vitro studies have provided insights into the mechanistic changes occurring in cells mediated by a few key genes. This review will focus on pathways and key genes of the pathways that are mutated or have aberrant functions in the pathology of ovarian cancer. Non-genetic mechanisms that are gaining prominence in the pathology of ovarian cancer, miRNAs and epigenetics, will also be discussed in the review. PMID:24105793

  14. The TGFβ pathway stimulates ovarian cancer cell proliferation by increasing IGF1R levels.

    PubMed

    Alsina-Sanchis, Elisenda; Figueras, Agnès; Lahiguera, Álvaro; Vidal, August; Casanovas, Oriol; Graupera, Mariona; Villanueva, Alberto; Viñals, Francesc

    2016-10-15

    In a search for new therapeutic targets for treating epithelial ovarian cancer, we analyzed the Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGFβ) signaling pathway in these tumors. Using a TMA with patient samples we found high Smad2 phosphorylation in ovarian cancer tumoral cells, independently of tumor subtype (high-grade serous or endometrioid). To evaluate the impact of TGFβ receptor inhibition on tumoral growth, we used different models of human ovarian cancer orthotopically grown in nude mice (OVAs). Treatment with a TGFβRI&II dual inhibitor, LY2109761, caused a significant reduction in tumor size in all these models, affecting cell proliferation rate. We identified Insulin Growth Factor (IGF)1 receptor as the signal positively regulated by TGFβ implicated in ovarian tumor cell proliferation. Inhibition of IGF1R activity by treatment with a blocker antibody (IMC-A12) or with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (linsitinib) inhibited ovarian tumoral growth in vivo. When IGF1R levels were decreased by shRNA treatment, LY2109761 lost its capacity to block tumoral ovarian cell proliferation. At the molecular level TGFβ induced mRNA IGF1R levels. Overall, our results suggest an important role for the TGFβ signaling pathway in ovarian tumor cell growth through the control of IGF1R signaling pathway. Moreover, it identifies anti-TGFβ inhibitors as being of potential use in new therapies for ovarian cancer patients as an alternative to IGF1R inhibition. PMID:27299695

  15. TNF-α expression, risk factors, and inflammatory exposures in ovarian cancer: evidence for an inflammatory pathway of ovarian carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mamta; Babic, Ana; Beck, Andrew H; Terry, Kathryn

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory cytokines, like tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), are elevated in ovarian cancer. Differences in cytokine expression by histologic subytpe or ovarian cancer risk factors can provide useful insight into ovarian cancer risk and etiology. We used ribonucleic acid in situ hybridization to assess TNF-α and IL-6 expression on tissue microarray slides from 78 epithelial ovarian carcinomas (51 serous, 12 endometrioid, 7 clear cell, 2 mucinous, 6 other) from a population-based case-control study. Cytokine expression was scored semiquantitatively, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using polytomous logistic regression. TNF-α was expressed in 46% of the tumors, whereas sparse IL-6 expression was seen in only 18% of the tumors. For both markers, expression was most common in high-grade serous carcinomas followed by endometrioid carcinomas. Parity was associated with a reduced risk of TNF-α-positive (OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7 for 3 or more children versus none) but not TNF-α-negative tumors (P heterogeneity=.02). In contrast, current smoking was associated with a nearly 3-fold increase in risk of TNF-α-negative (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.2-6.6) but not TNF-α-positive tumors (P heterogeneity = .06). Our data suggest that TNF-α expression in ovarian carcinoma varies by histologic subtype and provides some support for the role of inflammation in ovarian carcinogenesis. The novel associations detected in our study need to be validated in a larger cohort of patients in future studies. PMID:27068525

  16. New models of hematogenous ovarian cancer metastasis demonstrate preferential spread to the ovary and a requirement for the ovary for abdominal dissemination.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Lan G; Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; Wu, Rong; Cho, Kathleen; Bai, Shoumei; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence suggest that many high-grade serous "ovarian" cancers (HGSOC) start in the fallopian tube. Cancer cells are then recruited to the ovary and then spread diffusely through the abdomen. The mechanism of ovarian cancer spread was thought to be largely due to direct shedding of tumor cells into the peritoneal cavity with vascular spread being of limited importance. Recent work challenges this dogma, suggesting hematogenous spread of ovarian cancer may play a larger role in ovarian cancer cell metastasis than previously thought. One reason the role of vascular spread of ovarian cancer has not been fully elucidated is the lack of easily accessible models of vascular ovarian cancer metastasis. Here, we present 3 metastatic models of ovarian cancer which confirm the ability of ovarian cancer to hematogenously spread. Strikingly, we observe a high rate of metastasis to the ovary with the development of ascites in these models. Interestingly, oophorectomy resulted in a complete loss of peritoneal metastases and ascites. Taken together, our data indicate that hematogenously disseminated HGSOC cells have a unique tropism for the ovary and that hematogenous spread in ovarian cancer may be more common than appreciated. Furthermore, our studies support a critical role for the ovary in promoting HGSOC cell metastasis to the abdomen. The models developed here represent important new tools to evaluate both the mechanism of cancer cell recruitment to the ovary and understand and target key steps in ovarian cancer metastasis. PMID:27083386

  17. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer Following Surgery and Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Tumor; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  18. Human monocytes in the presence of interferons alpha2a and gamma are potent killers of serous ovarian cancer cell lines in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chase L; Green, Daniel S; Zoon, Kathryn C

    2015-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play an important role in immune surveillance of tumors; however, their efficacy in the treatment of malignancies has been limited. Monocytes are mononuclear phagocytes that are critical to the generation of an innate immune response to tumors. The authors and others have shown that treatment of tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo with human monocytes primed with type I and type II IFNs results in killing. We now expand on this work, in an extended panel of ovarian cancer cell lines. In this study, we hypothesized that there would be variable sensitivity amongst cell lines to the killing properties of monocytes and IFNs. To this end, we explored the interactions of IFN primed monocytes in conjunction with the standard of therapy for ovarian cancer, taxane, and platinum-based chemotherapeutics. Using 6 ovarian cancer cell lines, we demonstrated that there is variation from cell line to cell line in the ability of IFN-α2a and IFN-γ primed monocytes to synergistically kill target tumor cells, and further, there is an additive killing effect when target cells are treated with both IFN primed monocytes and chemotherapy. PMID:25068849

  19. Human Monocytes in the Presence of Interferons Alpha2a and Gamma Are Potent Killers of Serous Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines in Combination with Paclitaxel and Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Chase L.; Zoon, Kathryn C.

    2015-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play an important role in immune surveillance of tumors; however, their efficacy in the treatment of malignancies has been limited. Monocytes are mononuclear phagocytes that are critical to the generation of an innate immune response to tumors. The authors and others have shown that treatment of tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo with human monocytes primed with type I and type II IFNs results in killing. We now expand on this work, in an extended panel of ovarian cancer cell lines. In this study, we hypothesized that there would be variable sensitivity amongst cell lines to the killing properties of monocytes and IFNs. To this end, we explored the interactions of IFN primed monocytes in conjunction with the standard of therapy for ovarian cancer, taxane, and platinum-based chemotherapeutics. Using 6 ovarian cancer cell lines, we demonstrated that there is variation from cell line to cell line in the ability of IFN-α2a and IFN-γ primed monocytes to synergistically kill target tumor cells, and further, there is an additive killing effect when target cells are treated with both IFN primed monocytes and chemotherapy. PMID:25068849

  20. Clinical outcomes in patients with isolated serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC): A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Patrono, Maria Guadalupe; Iniesta, Maria D; Malpica, Anais; Lu, Karen H; Fernandez, Rodrigo Orozco; Salvo, Gloria; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2015-12-01

    OBJECTIVE. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) is currently considered the precursor lesion of pelvic (i.e., ovarian or peritoneal) high-grade serous carcinoma. The incidence of STIC has been reported to range from 0.6% to 7% in BRCA mutations carriers. However, the clinical outcome of patients with 'isolated' STIC remains elusive. The aim of this study is to review the published literature on isolated STIC to determine outcomes of these ients and present a summary of management strategies. METHODS. A systematic English-language literature search was conducted in PubMed, MEDLINE-Ovid, Scopus, EBSCO host, Cochrane Library of articles published from February 2006 to April 2015. Study inclusion criteria for review were the following: risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO), BRCA mutation carriers, non-BRCA mutation carriers, and benign surgical indication. Exclusion criteria were as follows: the presence of synchronous gynecological cancers, concurrent non-gynecological malignancies, the presence of ovarian intraepithelial lesions, and articles that did not include any clinical information and were restricted to pathology information only. RESULTS. A total of 78 patients with isolated STIC were included in our analysis. The median age for all patients was 53.7 years (range; 37-83). Surgical indication was RRSO in 67 patients with BRCA mutations or high-risk personal or family history. In the other 11 patients, an incidental STIC was detected after surgery for non-cancerous indications. Eleven (16.4%) patients received chemotherapy after the diagnosis of STIC. The follow-up time ranged from 2 to 150 months. Three (4.5%) patients with BRCA mutations were diagnosed with primary peritoneal carcinoma (PPC) during the follow-up at 43, 48 and 72 months after RRSO. CONCLUSIONS. The rate of primary peritoneal carcinoma in patients with BRCA mutations and isolated STIC is 4.5%. The role of adjuvant therapy remains elusive and routine surveillance with tumor markers

  1. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  2. Sargramostim and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Previous Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  3. Copy neutral loss of heterozygosity is more frequent in older ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Brent; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Spillman, Monique A.; De, Subhajyoti

    2013-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is a common type of genomic alterations in ovarian cancer. Analyzing 74,415 copy neutral LOH events in 513 serous ovarian adenocarcinomas samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas, we report that the frequency of LOH events increases with age. Similar trend is observed for chromosome 17, which is frequently implicated in ovarian cancer. The results are consistent when we analyze data from the Boston High-grade serous cancer (HGSC) cohort. We further show that germ line and somatic mutations in BRCA1 (in chromosome 17) and BRCA2 (in chromosome 13) loci are not necessary to establish the pattern. We also report significant age-related changes in expression patterns for several genes in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway such as BRCA1, RAD50, RAD52, XRCC2, XRCC3, and MRE11A in these patient samples. Furthermore, we develop a metric for pathway-level imbalance, and show that increased imbalance in the HR pathway i.e. increase in expression of some HR genes and decrease in expression of others - is common, and correlates significantly with the frequency of LOH events in the patient samples. Taken together, it is highly likely that aging and deregulation of HR pathway contribute to the increased incidence of copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:23716468

  4. OVARIAN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kathleen R.; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian carcinomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms traditionally sub-classified based on type and degree of differentiation. Although current clinical management of ovarian carcinoma largely fails to take this heterogeneity into account, it is becoming evident that each major histological type has characteristic genetic defects that deregulate specific signaling pathways in the tumor cells. Moreover, within the most common histological types, the molecular pathogenesis of low-grade versus high-grade tumors appears to be largely distinct. Mouse models of ovarian carcinoma have been developed that recapitulate many of the morphological features, biological behavior, and gene expression patterns of selected subtypes of ovarian cancer. Such models will likely prove useful for studying ovarian cancer biology and for pre-clinical testing of molecularly targeted therapeutics, which may ultimately lead to better clinical outcomes for women with ovarian cancer. PMID:18842102

  5. Prevalence of BRCA1 Mutations in Familial and Sporadic Greek Ovarian Cancer Cases

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Fostira, Florentia; Pertesi, Maroulio; Tsitlaidou, Marianthi; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E.; Triantafyllidou, Olga; Bamias, Aristotelis; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Timotheadou, Eleni; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Christodoulou, Christos; Klouvas, George; Papadimitriou, Christos; Makatsoris, Thomas; Pentheroudakis, George; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Karydakis, Vassilis; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes contribute to approximately 18% of hereditary ovarian cancers conferring an estimated lifetime risk from 15% to 50%. A variable incidence of mutations has been reported for these genes in ovarian cancer cases from different populations. In Greece, six mutations in BRCA1 account for 63% of all mutations detected in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of BRCA1 mutations in a Greek cohort of 106 familial ovarian cancer patients that had strong family history or metachronous breast cancer and 592 sporadic ovarian cancer cases. All 698 patients were screened for the six recurrent Greek mutations (including founder mutations c.5266dupC, p.G1738R and the three large deletions of exon 20, exons 23–24 and exon 24). In familial cases, the BRCA1 gene was consequently screened for exons 5, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24. A deleterious BRCA1 mutation was found in 43/106 (40.6%) of familial cancer cases and in 27/592 (4.6%) of sporadic cases. The variant of unknown clinical significance p.V1833M was identified in 9/698 patients (1.3%). The majority of BRCA1 carriers (71.2%) presented a high-grade serous phenotype. Identifying a mutation in the BRCA1 gene among breast and/or ovarian cancer families is important, as it enables carriers to take preventive measures. All ovarian cancer patients with a serous phenotype should be considered for genetic testing. Further studies are warranted to determine the prevalence of mutations in the rest of the BRCA1 gene, in the BRCA2 gene, and other novel predisposing genes for breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:23536787

  6. miR-200c Regulation of Metastases in Ovarian Cancer: Potential Role in Epithelial and Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Siti A.; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Jamal, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Among the gynecological malignancies, ovarian cancer is the most fatal due to its high mortality rate. Most of the identified cases are epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with five distinct subtypes: high-grade serous carcinoma, low-grade serous carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, endometrioid carcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Lack of an early diagnostic approach, high incidence of tumor relapse and the heterogenous characteristics between each EOC subtypes contribute to the difficulties in developing precise intervention and therapy for the patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNAs that have been shown to function as tumor suppressors or oncomiRs. The miR-200 family, especially miR-200c, has been shown to be implicated in the metastasis and invasion of ovarian carcinoma due to its functional regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This mini review is aimed to summarize the recent findings of the miR-200c functional role as well as its validated targets in the metastasis cascade of ovarian cancer, with a focus on EMT regulation. The potential of this miRNA in early diagnosis and its dual expression status are also discussed. PMID:27601996

  7. DNA Copy Number Profiles in Affinity-Purified Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Mao, Tsui-Lien; Chen, Xu; Feng, Yuanjian; Nakayama, Kentaro; Wang, Yue; Glas, Ruth; Ma, M. Joe; Kurman, Robert J.; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Advanced ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is one of the most malignant ovarian malignancies, in part because it tends to be resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy. At present, little is known about the molecular genetic alterations in CCCs except that there are frequent activating mutations in PIK3CA. The purpose of this study is to comprehensively define the genomic changes in CCC based on DNA copy number alterations. Experimental Design We performed 250K high-density SNP array analysis in 12 affinity-purified CCCs and 10 CCC cell lines. Discrete regions of amplification and deletion were also analyzed in additional 21 affinity-purified CCCs using quantitative real-time PCR. Results The level of chromosomal instability in CCC as defined by the extent of DNA copy number changes is similar to those previously reported in low-grade ovarian serous carcinoma but much less than those in high-grade serous carcinoma. The most remarkable region with DNA copy number gain is at chr20 which harbors a potential oncogene, ZNF217. This is observed in 36% of CCCs but rarely detected in serous carcinomas regardless of grade. In addition, homozygous deletions are detected at CDKN2A/2B and LZTS1 loci. Interestingly, the DNA copy number changes observed in fresh CCC tissues are rarely detected in the established CCC cell lines. Conclusions This study provides the first high resolution, genome-wide view of DNA copy number alterations in ovarian CCC. The findings provide a genomic landscape for future studies aimed at elucidating the pathogenesis and developing new target-based therapies for CCCs. PMID:20233889

  8. Dual HER/VEGF receptor targeting inhibits in vivo ovarian cancer tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Becker, Marc A; Farzan, Thahir; Harrington, Sean C; Krempski, James W; Weroha, S John; Hou, Xiaonan; Kalli, Kimberly R; Wong, Tai W; Haluska, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Ovarian cancer mortality ranks highest among all gynecologic cancers with growth factor pathways playing an integral role in tumorigenesis, metastatic dissemination, and therapeutic resistance. The HER and VEGF receptor (VEGFR) are both overexpressed and/or aberrantly activated in subsets of ovarian tumors. While agents targeting either the HER or VEGF pathways alone have been investigated, the impact of these agents have not led to overall survival benefit in ovarian cancer. We tested the hypothesis that cotargeting HER and VEGFR would maximize antitumor efficacy at tolerable doses. To this end, ovarian cancer xenografts grown intraperitoneally in athymic nude mice were tested in response to AC480 (pan-HER inhibitor, "HERi"), cediranib (pan-VEGFR inhibitor "VEGFRi"), or BMS-690514 (combined HER/VEGFR inhibitor "EVRi"). EVRi was superior to both HERi and VEGFRi in terms of tumor growth, final tumor weight, and progression-free survival. Correlative tumor studies employing phosphoproteomic antibody arrays revealed distinct agent-specific alterations, with EVRi inducing the greatest overall effect on growth factor signaling. These data suggest that simultaneous inhibition of HER and VEGFR may benefit select subsets of ovarian cancer tumors. To this end, we derived a novel HER/VEGF signature that correlated with poor overall survival in high-grade, late stage, serous ovarian cancer patient tumors. PMID:24130056

  9. Genomic/Epigenomic Alterations in Ovarian Carcinoma: Translational Insight into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Anliang; Lu, Yan; Lu, Bingjian

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecological malignancy worldwide. Recent advance in genomic/epigenomic researches will impact on our prevention, detection and intervention on ovarian carcinoma. Detection of germline mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2, mismatch repair genes, and other genes in the homologous recombination/DNA repair pathway propelled the genetic surveillance of most hereditary ovarian carcinomas. Germline or somatic mutations in SMARCA4 in familial and sporadic small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemia type, lead to our recognition on this rare aggressive tumor as a new entity of the atypical teratoma/rhaboid tumor family. Genome-wide association studies have identified many genetic variants that will contribute to the evaluation of ovarian carcinoma risk and prognostic prediction. Whole exome sequencing and whole genome sequencing discovered rare mutations in other drive mutations except p53, but demonstrated the presence of high genomic heterogeneity and adaptability in the genetic evolution of high grade ovarian serous carcinomas that occurs in cancer progression and chemotherapy. Gene mutations, copy number aberrations and DNA methylations provided promising biomarkers for the detection, diagnosis, prognosis, therapy response and targets of ovarian cancer. These findings underscore the necessity to translate these potential biomarkers into clinical practice. PMID:27471560

  10. Olaparib or Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib Compared With Standard Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Platinum-Sensitive Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Tumor; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor signalling via Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J; Fraser, F W; Riley, C; Ahmed, N; McCulloch, D R; Ward, A C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in women, with only limited understanding of disease aetiology at the molecular level. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a key regulator of both normal and emergency haematopoiesis, and is used clinically to aid haematopoietic recovery following ablative therapies for a variety of solid tumours including ovarian cancer. Methods: The expression of G-CSF and its receptor, G-CSFR, was examined in primary ovarian cancer samples and a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF treatment on proliferation, migration and survival were determined. Results: G-CSFR was predominantly expressed in high-grade serous ovarian epithelial tumour samples and a subset of ovarian cancer cell lines. Stimulation of G-CSFR-expressing ovarian epithelial cancer cells with G-CSF led to increased migration and survival, including against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. The effects of G-CSF were mediated by signalling via the downstream JAK2/STAT3 pathway. Conclusion: This study suggests that G-CSF has the potential to impact on ovarian cancer pathogenesis, and that G-CSFR expression status should be considered in determining appropriate therapy. PMID:24220695

  12. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Tumor; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  13. Whole-genome characterization of chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Patch, Ann-Marie; Christie, Elizabeth L; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Garsed, Dale W; George, Joshy; Fereday, Sian; Nones, Katia; Cowin, Prue; Alsop, Kathryn; Bailey, Peter J; Kassahn, Karin S; Newell, Felicity; Quinn, Michael C J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Quek, Kelly; Wilhelm-Benartzi, Charlotte; Curry, Ed; Leong, Huei San; Hamilton, Anne; Mileshkin, Linda; Au-Yeung, George; Kennedy, Catherine; Hung, Jillian; Chiew, Yoke-Eng; Harnett, Paul; Friedlander, Michael; Quinn, Michael; Pyman, Jan; Cordner, Stephen; O'Brien, Patricia; Leditschke, Jodie; Young, Greg; Strachan, Kate; Waring, Paul; Azar, Walid; Mitchell, Chris; Traficante, Nadia; Hendley, Joy; Thorne, Heather; Shackleton, Mark; Miller, David K; Arnau, Gisela Mir; Tothill, Richard W; Holloway, Timothy P; Semple, Timothy; Harliwong, Ivon; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Idrisoglu, Senel; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Poudel, Barsha; Holmes, Oliver; Anderson, Matthew; Leonard, Conrad; Lonie, Andrew; Hall, Nathan; Wood, Scott; Taylor, Darrin F; Xu, Qinying; Fink, J Lynn; Waddell, Nick; Drapkin, Ronny; Stronach, Euan; Gabra, Hani; Brown, Robert; Jewell, Andrea; Nagaraj, Shivashankar H; Markham, Emma; Wilson, Peter J; Ellul, Jason; McNally, Orla; Doyle, Maria A; Vedururu, Ravikiran; Stewart, Collin; Lengyel, Ernst; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; deFazio, Anna; Grimmond, Sean M; Bowtell, David D L

    2015-05-28

    Patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) have experienced little improvement in overall survival, and standard treatment has not advanced beyond platinum-based combination chemotherapy, during the past 30 years. To understand the drivers of clinical phenotypes better, here we use whole-genome sequencing of tumour and germline DNA samples from 92 patients with primary refractory, resistant, sensitive and matched acquired resistant disease. We show that gene breakage commonly inactivates the tumour suppressors RB1, NF1, RAD51B and PTEN in HGSC, and contributes to acquired chemotherapy resistance. CCNE1 amplification was common in primary resistant and refractory disease. We observed several molecular events associated with acquired resistance, including multiple independent reversions of germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in individual patients, loss of BRCA1 promoter methylation, an alteration in molecular subtype, and recurrent promoter fusion associated with overexpression of the drug efflux pump MDR1. PMID:26017449

  14. [Individualized treatment for ovarian cancer may become possible].

    PubMed

    Kjölhede, Preben; Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla; Tholander, Bengt; Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in developed countries. Several promising steps toward individualized therapy have been taken recently due to increased knowledge of molecular biology. Multidisciplinary conferences for treatment planning and the centralization to tertiary surgical centers improve quality of surgery and survival. The primary treatment of EOC is radical surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel. Bevacizumab added to the chemotherapy and used as maintenance treatment is standard in the primary treatment of patients with residual tumor or inoperable patients. The PARP inhibitor olaparib is recommended as maintenance treatment of women with platinum sensitive relapsed BRCA mutated high-grade serous EOC who have responded to platinum-based chemotherapy. BRCA testing should be offered to women with EOC. In platinum-resistant recurrence addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy should be considered. PMID:26646960

  15. The promise and challenge of ovarian cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Noor; Ohman, Anders W.; Dinulescu, Daniela M.

    2015-01-01

    The complexity and heterogeneity of ovarian cancer cases are difficult to reproduce in in vitro studies, which cannot adequately elucidate the molecular events involved in tumor initiation and disease metastasis. It has now become clear that, although the multiple histological subtypes of ovarian cancer are being treated with similar surgical and therapeutic approaches, they are in fact characterized by distinct phenotypes, cell of origin, and underlying key genetic and genomic alterations. Consequently, the development of more personalized treatment methodologies, which are aimed at improving patient care and prognosis, will greatly benefit from a better understanding of the key differences between various subtypes. To accomplish this, animal models of all histotypes need to be generated in order to provide accurate in vivo platforms for research and the testing of targeted treatments and immune therapies. Both genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) and xenograft models have the ability to further our understanding of key mechanisms facilitating tumorigenesis, and at the same time offer insight into enhanced imaging and treatment modalities. While genetic models may be better suited to examine oncogenic functions and interactions during tumorigenesis, patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are likely a superior model to assess drug efficacy, especially in concurrent clinical trials, due to their similarity to the tumors from which they are derived. Genetic and avatar models possess great clinical utility and have both benefits and limitations. Additionally, the laying hen model, which spontaneously develops ovarian tumors, has inherent advantages for the study of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and recent work champions this model especially when assessing chemoprevention strategies. While high-grade ovarian serous tumors are the most prevalent form of EOC, rarer ovarian cancer variants, such as small cell ovarian carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type and

  16. Diagnosis of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma based on morphologic and immunohistochemical features: a reproducibility study.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan, Kala; Vang, Russell; Shaw, Patricia; Gross, Amy; Soslow, Robert; Parkash, Vinita; Shih, Ie-Ming; Kurman, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    There is compelling evidence that serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) is a precursor of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Large-scale studies are now required to determine its biological significance and clinical implication. Before conducting these studies, a reproducible classification for STIC is needed, and that is the goal of this study. This study involved 6 gynecologic pathologists from 4 academic institutions and 3 independent rounds of review. In round 1, sixty-seven lesions ranging from normal, atypical, to STICs were classified by 5 pathologists on the basis of predetermined morphologic criteria. Interobserver agreement for the diagnosis of STIC versus not STIC was fair [κ = 0.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26, 0.52], and intraobserver reproducibility ranged from fair to moderate on the basis of percentage agreement and κ. Round 2 involved testing revised criteria that incorporated morphology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for p53 protein expression and Ki-67 labeling in 10 sets by 3 of the pathologists. The result was an improvement in interobserver agreement for the classification of STIC (κ = 0.62; 95% CI 0.18, 1.00). An algorithm was then created combining morphology and IHC for p53 and Ki-67, and reproducibility was assessed as part of round 3. In 37 lesions reviewed by 6 pathologists, substantial agreement for STIC versus no STIC was observed (κ = 0.73; 95% CI 0.58, 0.86). In conclusion, we have developed reproducible criteria for the diagnosis of STIC that incorporate morphologic and IHC markers for p53 and Ki-67. The algorithm we propose is expected to help standardize the classification of STIC for future studies. PMID:21989347

  17. High-Grading Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Sellar, Glenn; Nunez, Jorge; Mosie, Andrea; Schwarz, Carol; Parker, Terry; Winterhalter, Daniel; Farmer, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts on long-duration lunar missions will need the capability to high-grade their samples to select the highest value samples for transport to Earth and to leave others on the Moon. We are supporting studies to define the necessary and sufficient measurements and techniques for high-grading samples at a lunar outpost. A glovebox, dedicated to testing instruments and techniques for high-grading samples, is in operation at the JSC Lunar Experiment Laboratory. A reference suite of lunar rocks and soils, spanning the full compositional range found in the Apollo collection, is available for testing in this laboratory. Thin sections of these samples are available for direct comparison. The Lunar Sample Compendium, on-line at http://www-curator.jsc.nasa.gov/lunar/compendium.cfm, summarizes previous analyses of these samples. The laboratory, sample suite, and Compendium are available to the lunar research and exploration community. In the first test of possible instruments for lunar sample high-grading, we imaged 18 lunar rocks and four soils from the reference suite using the Multispectral Microscopic Imager (MMI) developed by Arizona State University and JPL (see Farmer et. al. abstract). The MMI is a fixed-focus digital imaging system with a resolution of 62.5 microns/pixel, a field size of 40 x 32 mm, and a depth-of-field of approximately 5 mm. Samples are illuminated sequentially by 21 light emitting diodes in discrete wavelengths spanning the visible to shortwave infrared. Measurements of reflectance standards and background allow calibration to absolute reflectance. ENVI-based software is used to produce spectra for specific minerals as well as multi-spectral images of rock textures.

  18. BRCA Mutation Frequency and Patterns of Treatment Response in BRCA Mutation–Positive Women With Ovarian Cancer: A Report From the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Kathryn; Fereday, Sian; Meldrum, Cliff; deFazio, Anna; Emmanuel, Catherine; George, Joshy; Dobrovic, Alexander; Birrer, Michael J.; Webb, Penelope M.; Stewart, Colin; Friedlander, Michael; Fox, Stephen; Bowtell, David; Mitchell, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations in women with ovarian cancer is unclear; reports vary from 3% to 27%. The impact of germ-line mutation on response requires further investigation to understand its impact on treatment planning and clinical trial design. Patients and Methods Women with nonmucinous ovarian carcinoma (n = 1,001) enrolled onto a population-based, case-control study were screened for point mutations and large deletions in both genes. Survival outcomes and responses to multiple lines of chemotherapy were assessed. Results Germ-line mutations were found in 14.1% of patients overall, including 16.6% of serous cancer patients (high-grade serous, 22.6%); 44% had no reported family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Patients carrying germ-line mutations had improved rates of progression-free and overall survival. In the relapse setting, patients carrying mutations more frequently responded to both platin- and nonplatin-based regimens than mutation-negative patients, even in patients with early relapse after primary treatment. Mutation-negative patients who responded to multiple cycles of platin-based treatment were more likely to carry somatic BRCA1/2 mutations. Conclusion BRCA mutation status has a major influence on survival in ovarian cancer patients and should be an additional stratification factor in clinical trials. Treatment outcomes in BRCA1/2 carriers challenge conventional definitions of platin resistance, and mutation status may be able to contribute to decision making and systemic therapy selection in the relapse setting. Our data, together with the advent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor trials, supports the recommendation that germ-line BRCA1/2 testing should be offered to all women diagnosed with nonmucinous, ovarian carcinoma, regardless of family history. PMID:22711857

  19. Short-form Ron is a novel determinant of ovarian cancer initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Katherine M; Wang, Luyao; Welm, Alana L; Bieniasz, Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    Short-form Ron (sfRon) is an understudied, alternative isoform of the full-length Ron receptor tyrosine kinase. In contrast to Ron, which has been shown to be an important player in many cancers, little is known about the role of sfRon in cancer pathogenesis. Here we report the striking discovery that sfRon expression is required for development of carcinogen-induced malignant ovarian tumors in mice. We also show that sfRon is expressed in several subtypes of human ovarian cancer including high-grade serous carcinomas, which is in contrast to no detectable expression in healthy ovaries. In addition, we report that introduction of sfRon into OVCAR3 cells resulted in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, activation of the PI3K and PDK1 pathway, and inhibition of the MAPK pathway. We demonstrated that sfRon confers an aggressive cancer phenotype in vitro characterized by increased proliferation and migration, and decreased adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. Moreover, the in vivo studies show that OVCAR3 tumors expressing sfRon exhibit significantly more robust growth and spreading to the abdominal cavity when compared with the parental sfRon negative OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that sfRon plays a significant role in ovarian cancer initiation and progression, and may represent a promising therapeutic target for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27551332

  20. KRAS genomic status predicts the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to decitabine

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, ML; Tamayo, P; Wilson, AJ; Wang, S; Chang, YM; Kim, JW; Khabele, D; Shamji, AF; Schreiber, SL

    2015-01-01

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells. Pre-treatment with decitabine decreased the cytotoxic activity of MEK inhibitors in KRAS-mutant ovarian cancer cells, with reciprocal downregulation of DNMT1 and MEK/ERK phosphorylation. In parallel with these responses, decitabine also upregulated the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BNIP3, which is known to be regulated by MEK and ERK, and heightened the activity of pro-apoptotic small molecule navitoclax, a BCL-2 family inhibitor. In a xenograft model of KRAS-mutant ovarian cancer, combining decitabine and navitoclax heighted antitumor activity beyond administration of either compound alone. Our results define the RAS/MEK/DNMT1 pathway as a determinant of sensitivity to DNA methyltransferase inhibition, specifically implicating KRAS status as a biomarker of drug response in ovarian cancer. PMID:25968887

  1. Short-form Ron is a novel determinant of ovarian cancer initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Katherine M.; Wang, Luyao; Welm, Alana L.; Bieniasz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Short-form Ron (sfRon) is an understudied, alternative isoform of the full-length Ron receptor tyrosine kinase. In contrast to Ron, which has been shown to be an important player in many cancers, little is known about the role of sfRon in cancer pathogenesis. Here we report the striking discovery that sfRon expression is required for development of carcinogen-induced malignant ovarian tumors in mice. We also show that sfRon is expressed in several subtypes of human ovarian cancer including high-grade serous carcinomas, which is in contrast to no detectable expression in healthy ovaries. In addition, we report that introduction of sfRon into OVCAR3 cells resulted in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, activation of the PI3K and PDK1 pathway, and inhibition of the MAPK pathway. We demonstrated that sfRon confers an aggressive cancer phenotype in vitro characterized by increased proliferation and migration, and decreased adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. Moreover, the in vivo studies show that OVCAR3 tumors expressing sfRon exhibit significantly more robust growth and spreading to the abdominal cavity when compared with the parental sfRon negative OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that sfRon plays a significant role in ovarian cancer initiation and progression, and may represent a promising therapeutic target for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27551332

  2. YKL-40 in Serum Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Neoplasm; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Transitional Cell Tumor; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. ABCA Transporter Gene Expression and Poor Outcome in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hedditch, Ellen L.; Gao, Bo; Russell, Amanda J.; Lu, Yi; Emmanuel, Catherine; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Harnett, Paul; George, Joshy; Williams, Rebekka T.; Flemming, Claudia; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Fasching, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Nakanishi, Toru; Yatabe, Yasushi; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susan K.; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Brown, Bob; Flanagan, James; Metcalf, Michelle D; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sellers, Thomas; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Schildkraut, Joellen; Iversen, Ed; Weber, Rachel P.; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen; Bowtell, David D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; deFazio, Anna; Norris, Murray D.; MacGregor, Stuart; Haber, Michelle; Henderson, Michelle J.

    2014-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play various roles in cancer biology and drug resistance, but their association with outcomes in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is unknown. Methods The relationship between clinical outcomes and ABC transporter gene expression in two independent cohorts of high-grade serous EOC tumors was assessed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, analysis of expression microarray data, and immunohistochemistry. Associations between clinical outcomes and ABCA transporter gene single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested in a genome-wide association study. Impact of short interfering RNA–mediated gene suppression was determined by colony forming and migration assays. Association with survival was assessed with Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Associations with outcome were observed with ABC transporters of the “A” subfamily, but not with multidrug transporters. High-level expression of ABCA1, ABCA6, ABCA8, and ABCA9 in primary tumors was statistically significantly associated with reduced survival in serous ovarian cancer patients. Low levels of ABCA5 and the C-allele of rs536009 were associated with shorter overall survival (hazard ratio for death = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.26 to 1.79; P = 6.5e−6). The combined expression pattern of ABCA1, ABCA5, and either ABCA8 or ABCA9 was associated with particularly poor outcome (mean overall survival in group with adverse ABCA1, ABCA5 and ABCA9 gene expression = 33.2 months, 95% CI = 26.4 to 40.1; vs 55.3 months in the group with favorable ABCA gene expression, 95% CI = 49.8 to 60.8; P = .001), independently of tumor stage or surgical debulking status. Suppression of cholesterol transporter ABCA1 inhibited ovarian cancer cell growth and migration in vitro, and statin treatment reduced ovarian cancer cell migration. Conclusions Expression of ABCA transporters was associated with poor

  4. Evaluating the Progenitor Cells of Ovarian Cancer: Analysis of Current Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    King, Shelby M.; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Serous ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal gynecological malignancies. Progress on effective diagnostics and therapeutics for this disease are hampered by ambiguity as to the cellular origins of this histotype of ovarian cancer, as well as limited suitable animal models to analyze early stages of disease. In this report, we will review current animal models with respect to the two proposed progenitor cells for serous ovarian cancer, the ovarian surface epithelium and the fallopian tube epithelium. PMID:21777513

  5. Characteristics of Long-Term Survivors of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cress, Rosemary D.; Chen, Yingjia S.; Morris, Cyllene R.; Petersen, Megan; Leiserowitz, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify characteristics associated with long-term survival forepithelial ovarian cancer patients using the California Cancer Registry. Methods A descriptive analysis of survival of all California residents diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 1994 and 2001 was conducted using patients identified through the cancer registry with follow up through 2011. Characteristics of the patients who survived more than 10 years (long-term survivors) were compared to three other cohorts: patients who survived less than 2 years, those who survived at least 2 but no more than 5 years, and those who survived at least 5 but no more than 10 years. Results A total of 3,582 out of 11,541 (31% CI=30.2%, 31.8%) of the patients survived more than 10 years. Younger age, early stage, low-grade, and non-serous histology were significant predictors of long-term survival, but long-term survivors also included women with high-risk cancer. Conclusion Long-term survival is not unusual in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer, even in those with high-risk disease. Many of the prognostic factors are well known, but it remains to be determined why some patients with advanced stage high-grade cancers survive longer than others with the same histology. These findings are important for patient counseling. PMID:26244529

  6. Uterine papillary serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kathleen N; Fader, Amanda Nickles

    2011-06-01

    Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a histologic variant of endometrial cancer that accounts for only 10% of new cases of uterine cancer but is responsible for 40% of deaths from the disease. UPSC is an aggressive tumor with a predilection for early spread beyond the uterus. Treatment for UPSC typically entails surgery and in most women is followed by multimodality adjuvant therapy. In this review, we describe the epidemiology, natural history, treatment, and outcome of UPSC. PMID:21508697

  7. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary or peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Gershenson, D M

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decade, the strategy for clinical trial design in making progress against epithelial cancers of the ovary/peritoneum/fallopian tube has changed dramatically. The NRG (GOG) Rare Tumor Committee has been a leader in this transformation. No longer does 'one size fit all'. Rather, separate clinical trials for rare subtypes have been developed and, in some cases, completed. An enhanced understanding of their pathologic diagnosis, molecular biology, and clinical behavior has galvanized this change. Low-grade serous carcinoma may occur de novo or following an initial diagnosis of serous tumor of low malignant potential. It is characterized by young age at diagnosis, relative chemoresistance, and prolonged survival compared with high-grade serous carcinoma. Historically, conventional chemotherapy has demonstrated very limited activity in this subtype. Hormonal therapy may provide benefit in this subtype. Preclinical studies have identified and elucidated genes and pathways-MAP kinase pathway, IGF1-R, the angiogenesis pathway, and possibly, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in low-grade serous carcinoma. To date, clinical evidence supports the activity of MEK and BRAF inhibitors and bevacizumab. Further pursuit of targeted therapy trials is clearly warranted. PMID:27141071

  9. Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis identifies protein kinase CK2 as a key signaling node in an inflammatory cytokine network in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kulbe, Hagen; Iorio, Francesco; Chakravarty, Probir; Milagre, Carla S.; Moore, Robert; Thompson, Richard G.; Everitt, Gemma; Canosa, Monica; Montoya, Alexander; Drygin, Denis; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed how key pathways in cancer-related inflammation and Notch signaling are part of an autocrine malignant cell network in ovarian cancer. This network, which we named the “TNF network”, has paracrine actions within the tumor microenvironment, influencing angiogenesis and the immune cell infiltrate. The aim of this study was to identify critical regulators in the signaling pathways of the TNF network in ovarian cancer cells that might be therapeutic targets. To achieve our aim, we used a systems biology approach, combining data from phospho-proteomic mass spectrometry and gene expression array analysis. Among the potential therapeutic kinase targets identified was the protein kinase Casein kinase II (CK2). Knockdown of CK2 expression in malignant cells by siRNA or treatment with the specific CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 significantly decreased Notch signaling and reduced constitutive cytokine release in ovarian cancer cell lines that expressed the TNF network as well as malignant cells isolated from high grade serous ovarian cancer ascites. The expression of the same cytokines was also inhibited after treatment with CX-4945 in a 3D organotypic model. CK2 inhibition was associated with concomitant inhibition of proliferative activity, reduced angiogenesis and experimental peritoneal ovarian tumor growth. In conclusion, we have identified kinases, particularly CK2, associated with the TNF network that may play a central role in sustaining the cytokine network and/or mediating its effects in ovarian cancer. PMID:26871292

  10. BubR1 as a prognostic marker for recurrence-free survival rates in epithelial ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y-K; Choi, E; Kim, M A; Park, P-G; Park, N-H; Lee, H

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies, and has a high recurrence rate. Thus, prognostic markers for recurrence are crucial for the care of ovarian cancer. As ovarian cancers frequently exhibit chromosome instability, we aimed at assessing the prognostic significance of two key mitotic kinases, BubR1 and Aurora A. Methods: We analysed paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 160 ovarian cancer patients whose clinical outcomes had been tracked after first-line treatment. Results: The median recurrence-free survival in patients with a positive and negative expression of BubR1 was 27 and 83 months, respectively (P<0.001). A positive BubR1 expression was also associated with advanced stage, serous histology and high grade. In contrast, Aurora A immunostaining did not correlate with any of the clinical parameters analysed. Conclusion: BubR1, but not Aurora A, is a prognostic marker for recurrence-free survival rates in epithelial ovarian cancers. PMID:19603021

  11. Insights from HuR biology point to potential improvement for second-line ovarian cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Peng, Weidan; Furuuchi, Narumi; DuHadaway, James B.; Jimbo, Masaya; Pirritano, Andrea; Dunton, Charles J.; Daum, Gary S.; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Brody, Jonathan R.; Sawicki, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to investigate the role that an RNA-binding protein, HuR, plays in the response of high-grade serous ovarian tumors to chemotherapeutics. We immunohistochemically stained sections of 31 surgically-debulked chemo-naïve ovarian tumors for HuR and scored the degree of HuR cytoplasmic staining. We found no correlation between HuR intracellular localization in tumor sections and progression free survival (PFS) of these patients, 29 of whom underwent second-line gemcitabine/platin combination therapy for recurrent disease. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation (RNP-IP) analysis of ovarian cancer cells in culture showed that cytoplasmic HuR increases deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a metabolic enzyme that activates gemcitabine. The effects of carboplatin treatment on HuR and WEE1 (a mitotic inhibitor) expression, and on cell cycle kinetics, were also examined. Treatment of ovarian cancer cells with carboplatin results in increased HuR cytoplasmic expression and elevated WEE1 expression, arresting cell cycle G2/M transition. This may explain why HuR cytoplasmic localization in chemo-naïve tumors is not predictive of therapeutic response and PFS following second-line gemcitabine/platin combination therapy. These results suggest treatment of recurrent ovarian tumors with a combination of gemcitabine, carboplatin, and a WEE1 inhibitor may be potentially advantageous as compared to current clinical practices. PMID:26943573

  12. Ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers: analysis of prognostic factors and survival

    PubMed Central

    Biglia, Nicoletta; Sgandurra, Paola; Bounous, Valentina Elisabetta; Maggiorotto, Furio; Piva, Eleonora; Pivetta, Emanuele; Ponzone, Riccardo; Pasini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare clinical–pathological characteristics and outcome between sporadic ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer in patents with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Methods Twenty-four patients with ovarian cancer treated between 2000 and 2009 who tested positive for BRCA1/2 mutation (BRCA+) and a control group of 64 age-matched patients with no family history of breast/ovarian cancer (controls) were enrolled. Clinical–pathological characteristics, surgical outcome, overall (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared between the two groups. Results The high-grade serous histotype was more represented in BRCA+ than in controls (70.8% versus 53.1%) (p > 0.05). BRCA+ cancers were more frequently diagnosed at stage II than controls (20.83% versus 4.69%) (p = 0.024). Radical primary surgery was performed in 70% of women in both groups, with no difference in debulking results. In patients undergoing surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, in all BRCA+ patients, optimal cytoreduction was achieved (versus 70% of the controls). PFS was significantly longer for BRCA+ patients compared to controls (60 months versus 22 months; p = 0.039). No significant difference was observed in OS between BRCA+ patients and controls. Conclusions At a median follow-up time of 46 months, BRCA+ patients have a better prognosis than controls in terms of PFS. Higher chemosensitivity of BRCA+ tumours was observed. PMID:27350785

  13. Layer-by-layer assembled fluorescent probes in the second near-infrared window for systemic delivery and detection of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiangnan; Gu, Li; Qi, Jifa; Correa, Santiago; Zhang, Geran; Belcher, Angela M; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-05-10

    Fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II, 1,000-1,700 nm) features deep tissue penetration, reduced tissue scattering, and diminishing tissue autofluorescence. Here, NIR-II fluorescent probes, including down-conversion nanoparticles, quantum dots, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and organic dyes, are constructed into biocompatible nanoparticles using the layer-by-layer (LbL) platform due to its modular and versatile nature. The LbL platform has previously been demonstrated to enable incorporation of diagnostic agents, drugs, and nucleic acids such as siRNA while providing enhanced blood plasma half-life and tumor targeting. This work carries out head-to-head comparisons of currently available NIR-II probes with identical LbL coatings with regard to their biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and toxicities. Overall, rare-earth-based down-conversion nanoparticles demonstrate optimal biological and optical performance and are evaluated as a diagnostic probe for high-grade serous ovarian cancer, typically diagnosed at late stage. Successful detection of orthotopic ovarian tumors is achieved by in vivo NIR-II imaging and confirmed by ex vivo microscopic imaging. Collectively, these results indicate that LbL-based NIR-II probes can serve as a promising theranostic platform to effectively and noninvasively monitor the progression and treatment of serous ovarian cancer. PMID:27114520

  14. Incidental Serous Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinoma and Non-Neoplastic Conditions of the Fallopian Tubes in Grossly Normal Adnexa: A Clinicopathologic Study of 388 Completely Embedded Cases.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Jeffrey D; Krishnan, Jayashree; Yemelyanova, Anna; Vang, Russell

    2016-09-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), the putative precursor of the majority of extrauterine high-grade serous carcinomas, has been reported in both high-risk women (those with a germline BRCA mutation, a personal history of breast carcinoma, and/or family history of breast or ovarian carcinoma) and average risk women from the general population. We reviewed grossly normal adnexal specimens from 388 consecutive, unselected women undergoing surgery, including those with germline BRCA mutation (37 patients), personal history of breast cancer or family history of breast/ovarian cancer (74 patients), endometrial cancer (175 patients), and a variety of other conditions (102 patients). Among 111 high-risk cases and 277 non-high-risk cases, 3 STICs were identified (0.8%), all in non-high-risk women (high risk vs. non-high risk: P=not significant). STIC was found in 2 women with nonserous endometrial carcinoma and 1 with complex atypical endometrial hyperplasia. Salpingoliths (mucosal calcifications), found in 9% of high-risk cases, and fimbrial adenofibromas in 9.9% of high-risk cases, were significantly more common in high-risk as compared with non-high-risk women (1.8% and 2.5%, respectively; P<0.007). Mucinous metaplasia was found in 3.1%, salpingitis isthmica nodosa in 3.4%, hemosiderin or pseudoxanthoma cells in 4.9%, and fibrous luminal nodules in 4.1%. None of these latter features differed significantly in the high-risk versus non-high-risk groups. These findings suggest a possible association between STIC and endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma, and clarify the frequency of non-neoplastic tubal findings in grossly normal fallopian tubes. PMID:26630221

  15. Integrative proteomic profiling of ovarian cancer cell lines reveals precursor cell associated proteins and functional status

    PubMed Central

    Coscia, F.; Watters, K. M.; Curtis, M.; Eckert, M. A.; Chiang, C. Y.; Tyanova, S.; Montag, A.; Lastra, R. R.; Lengyel, E.; Mann, M.

    2016-01-01

    A cell line representative of human high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) should not only resemble its tumour of origin at the molecular level, but also demonstrate functional utility in pre-clinical investigations. Here, we report the integrated proteomic analysis of 26 ovarian cancer cell lines, HGSOC tumours, immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells and fallopian tube epithelial cells via a single-run mass spectrometric workflow. The in-depth quantification of >10,000 proteins results in three distinct cell line categories: epithelial (group I), clear cell (group II) and mesenchymal (group III). We identify a 67-protein cell line signature, which separates our entire proteomic data set, as well as a confirmatory publicly available CPTAC/TCGA tumour proteome data set, into a predominantly epithelial and mesenchymal HGSOC tumour cluster. This proteomics-based epithelial/mesenchymal stratification of cell lines and human tumours indicates a possible origin of HGSOC either from the fallopian tube or from the ovarian surface epithelium. PMID:27561551

  16. Ovarian Cancer and BRCA1/2 Testing: Opportunities to Improve Clinical Care and Disease Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Karakasis, Katherine; Burnier, Julia V.; Bowering, Valerie; Oza, Amit M.; Lheureux, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Without prevention or screening options available, ovarian cancer is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive tract. High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most common histologic subtype, and the role of germline BRCA1/2 mutation in predisposition and prognosis is established. Given the targeted treatment opportunities with PARP inhibitors, a predictive role for BRCA1/2 mutation has emerged. Despite recommendations to provide BRCA1/2 testing to all women with histologically confirmed HGSOC, uniform implementation remains challenging. The opportunity to review and revise genetic screening and testing practices will identify opportunities, where universal adoption of BRCA1/2 mutation testing will impact and improve treatment of women with ovarian cancer. Improving education and awareness of genetic testing for women with cancer, as well as the broader general community, will help focus much-needed attention on opportunities to advance prevention and screening programs in ovarian cancer. This is imperative not only for women with cancer and those at risk of developing cancer but also for their first-degree relatives. In addition, BRCA1/2 testing may have direct implications for patients with other types of cancers, many of which are now being found to have BRCA1/2 involvement. PMID:27242959

  17. Divergent Roles of PAX2 in the Etiology and Progression of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Hujaily, Ensaf M; Tang, Yong; Yao, De-Sheng; Carmona, Euridice; Garson, Kenneth; Vanderhyden, Barbara C

    2015-12-01

    PAX2 is an essential transcription factor for development. Aberrant PAX2 expression in adult tissues is associated with carcinogenesis and experimental evidence shows that PAX2 generally exhibits oncogenic properties. Although PAX2 is not expressed in normal ovaries, it is highly expressed in low malignant potential and low-grade epithelial ovarian tumors, suggesting that PAX2 induction in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) may contribute to transformation. Herein, we provide evidence that expression of PAX2 in normal murine OSE cells (mOSE) enhances their proliferation and survival and, with loss of p53, induces tumorigenicity. PAX2 expression in murine ovarian cancer cells enhanced or inhibited tumorigenicity, depending on the model system. In RM cells (mOSE transformed by K-RAS and c-MYC), PAX2 expression inhibited p53 and induced pERK1/2 and COX2, resulting in enhanced angiogenesis and decreased apoptosis of tumors arising from these cells. However, in a murine model of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (STOSE), PAX2 expression improved animal survival by reducing proliferation and metastasis, which correlated with increased Htra1 and decreased COX2. Thus, PAX2 may not be a classical oncogene or tumor suppressor but instead can act in either role by differential regulation of COX2 and/or HTRA1. PMID:26373819

  18. In vivo multiplexed interrogation of amplified genes identifies GAB2 as an ovarian cancer oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Gavin P.; Cheung, Hiu Wing; Agarwalla, Pankaj K.; Thomas, Sapana; Zektser, Yulia; Karst, Alison M.; Boehm, Jesse S.; Weir, Barbara A.; Berlin, Aaron M.; Zou, Lihua; Getz, Gad; Liu, Joyce F.; Hirsch, Michelle; Vazquez, Francisca; Root, David E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Drapkin, Ronny; Hahn, William C.

    2014-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancers are characterized by widespread recurrent copy number alterations. Although some regions of copy number change harbor known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, the genes targeted by the majority of amplified or deleted regions in ovarian cancer remain undefined. Here we systematically tested amplified genes for their ability to promote tumor formation using an in vivo multiplexed transformation assay. We identified the GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) as a recurrently amplified gene that potently transforms immortalized ovarian and fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells. Cancer cell lines overexpressing GAB2 require GAB2 for survival and show evidence of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activation, which was required for GAB2-induced transformation. Cell lines overexpressing GAB2 were as sensitive to PI3K inhibition as cell lines harboring mutant PIK3CA. Together, these observations nominate GAB2 as an ovarian cancer oncogene, identify an alternative mechanism to activate PI3K signaling, and underscore the importance of PI3K signaling in this cancer. PMID:24385586

  19. Ovarian Cancer and BRCA1/2 Testing: Opportunities to Improve Clinical Care and Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Karakasis, Katherine; Burnier, Julia V; Bowering, Valerie; Oza, Amit M; Lheureux, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Without prevention or screening options available, ovarian cancer is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive tract. High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most common histologic subtype, and the role of germline BRCA1/2 mutation in predisposition and prognosis is established. Given the targeted treatment opportunities with PARP inhibitors, a predictive role for BRCA1/2 mutation has emerged. Despite recommendations to provide BRCA1/2 testing to all women with histologically confirmed HGSOC, uniform implementation remains challenging. The opportunity to review and revise genetic screening and testing practices will identify opportunities, where universal adoption of BRCA1/2 mutation testing will impact and improve treatment of women with ovarian cancer. Improving education and awareness of genetic testing for women with cancer, as well as the broader general community, will help focus much-needed attention on opportunities to advance prevention and screening programs in ovarian cancer. This is imperative not only for women with cancer and those at risk of developing cancer but also for their first-degree relatives. In addition, BRCA1/2 testing may have direct implications for patients with other types of cancers, many of which are now being found to have BRCA1/2 involvement. PMID:27242959

  20. Non-hormonal interruption of incessant ovulation as a potential approach for ovarian cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Fathalla, Mahmoud F

    2016-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a silent killer. There is a need to intensify research efforts on prevention strategies. The causative role of incessant ovulation has been supported by the protective effect of oral hormonal contraceptives. The released follicular fluid in the process of ovulation bathes not only the surface of the ovary but also the fimbrial end of the fallopian tube. Evidence has been accumulating about a fimbrial tubal origin for ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma, and for the potential of opportunistic or elective salpingectomy as an intervention strategy. Alternatively, periodic suppression of ovulation could be beneficial among women who have no need or are not using oral hormonal contraceptives. Rupture of the ovarian follicle releasing the ovum and follicular fluid is a prostaglandin-mediated inflammatory process. It can be stopped by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, leading to pharmacologic production of a luteinized unruptured follicle, simulating a normal non-conception cycle with unaltered steroid patterns/levels and cycle length. Non-hormonal periodic interruption of incessant ovulation could be recommended for women who are at high risk of ovarian cancer, but further research is needed to validate the potential of this approach. PMID:26876699

  1. Tubal origin of ovarian endometriosis and clear cell and endometrioid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiying; Mang, Maggie; Wang, Yue; Wang, Lijie; Klein, Robert; Kong, Beihua; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    Current research has strongly proposed that contrary to prior beliefs, many ovarian epithelial cancers (OECs) do not, as their name suggests, originate in the ovaries. Recent findings regarding both high-grade and low-grade serous carcinomas has implicated the fallopian tube as a cell source for these OECs, but until now, there has been little insight into the cellular source for clear cell and endometrioid carcinomas. In this commentary review article, we aimed to discuss the new findings that support the possible contribution from the fallopian tube in clear cell and endometrioid carcinomas. Specifically, we have provided results that showcased ovarian surface epithelia (OSE) and ovarian epithelial inclusions (OEIs) as having mesothelial and tubal origins and have strongly recognized the secondary müllerian system and the ability for tubal epithelia to implant upon the ovarian surface as contributing to fallopian tube-derived OEIs (F-OEIs). We have provided initial indications of these F-OEIs and their relationship to endometriosis and then clear cell and endometrioid carcinomas and subsequently offer our new proposal of a probable tubal origin. This new proposal is a paradigm that drastically changes the understanding behind the origin of these OECs and has significant clinical implications in the near future. PMID:26045974

  2. Epigenetic remodeling regulates transcriptional changes between ovarian cancer and benign precursors

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Kevin M.; Emori, Megan M.; Westerling, Thomas; Long, Henry; Budina-Kolomets, Anna; Li, Fugen; MacDuffie, Emily; Davis, Michelle R.; Holman, Alexander; Lawney, Brian; Freedman, Matthew L.; Quackenbush, John; Brown, Myles; Drapkin, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of lineage-restricted transcription factors has been shown to influence malignant transformation in several types of cancer. Whether similar mechanisms are involved in ovarian cancer pathogenesis is unknown. PAX8 is a nuclear transcription factor that controls the embryologic development of the Müllerian system, including the fallopian tubes. Recent studies have shown that fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs) give rise to the most common form of ovarian cancer, high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). We designed the present study in order to understand whether changes in gene expression between FTSECs and HGSOCs relate to alterations in PAX8 binding to chromatin. Using whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-Seq) after PAX8 knockdown and ChIP-Seq, we show that FTSECs and HGSOCs are distinguished by marked reprogramming of the PAX8 cistrome. Genes that are significantly altered between FTSECs and HGSOCs are enriched near PAX8 binding sites. These sites are also near TEAD binding sites, and these transcriptional changes may be related to PAX8 interactions with the TEAD/YAP1 signaling pathway. These data suggest that transcriptional changes after transformation in ovarian cancer are closely related to epigenetic remodeling in lineage-specific transcription factors.

  3. The Cancer Genome Atlas ovarian cancer analysis

    Cancer.gov

    An analysis of genomic changes in ovarian cancer has provided the most comprehensive and integrated view of cancer genes for any cancer type to date. Ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tumors from 500 patients were examined by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Re

  4. Role of the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 in ovarian cancer progression: possible implications in abnormal mucin O-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Morin, Chantale; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have identified the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GALNT3) gene as notably hypomethylated in low-malignant potential (LMP) and high-grade (HG) serous epithelial ovarian tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. Here we show that GALNT3 is strongly overexpressed in HG serous EOC tumors as compared to normal ovarian tissue. Moreover, the GALNT3 expression significantly correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) intervals in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients with advanced disease. Knockdown of the GALNT3 expression in EOC cells led to sharp decrease of cell proliferation and induced S-phase cell cycle arrest. Additionally, GALNT3 suppression significantly inhibited EOC cell migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses confirmed these findings, as numerous genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, including EOC tumor invasion and metastasis, were found to be downregulated upon GALNT3 suppression, while some tumor suppressor genes were induced. Moreover, GALNT3 downregulation was associated with reduced MUC1 protein expression in EOC cells, probably related to destabilization of the MUC1 protein due to lack of GALNT3 glycosylation activity. GALNT3 knockdown was also accompanied with increase of the cell adhesion molecules β-catenin and E-cadherin, which are normally suppressed by MUC1 in cancer, thus supporting the role of the GALNT3-MUC1 axis in EOC invasion. Taken together, our data are indicative for a strong oncogenic potential of the GALNT3 gene in advanced EOC and identify this transferase as a novel EOC biomarker and putative EOC therapeutic target. Our findings also suggest that GALNT3 overexpression might contribute to EOC progression through aberrant mucin O-glycosylation PMID:24504219

  5. Targeting TBP-Associated Factors in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jennifer R; Lovasco, Lindsay A; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Freiman, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    As ovarian tumors progress, they undergo a process of dedifferentiation, allowing adaptive changes in growth and morphology that promote metastasis and chemoresistance. Herein, we outline a hypothesis that TATA-box binding protein associated factors (TAFs), which compose the RNA Polymerase II initiation factor, TFIID, contribute to regulation of dedifferentiation states in ovarian cancer. Numerous studies demonstrate that TAFs regulate differentiation and proliferation states; their expression is typically high in pluripotent cells and reduced upon differentiation. Strikingly, TAF2 exhibits copy number increases or mRNA overexpression in 73% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSC). At the biochemical level, TAF2 directs TFIID to TATA-less promoters by contact with an Initiator element, which may lead to the deregulation of the transcriptional output of these tumor cells. TAF4, which is altered in 66% of HGSC, is crucial for the stability of the TFIID complex and helps drive dedifferentiation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells. Its ovary-enriched paralog, TAF4B, is altered in 26% of HGSC. Here, we show that TAF4B mRNA correlates with Cyclin D2 mRNA expression in human granulosa cell tumors. TAF4B may also contribute to regulation of tumor microenvironment due to its estrogen-responsiveness and ability to act as a cofactor for NFκB. Conversely, TAF9, a cofactor for p53 in regulating apoptosis, may act as a tumor suppressor in ovarian cancer, since it is downregulated or deleted in 98% of HGSC. We conclude that a greater understanding of mechanisms of transcriptional regulation that execute signals from oncogenic signaling cascades is needed in order to expand our understanding of the etiology and progression of ovarian cancer, and most importantly to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24653979

  6. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  7. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating chemokine expression

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, C; Zhang, L; Carroll, S L; Ethier, S P; Cheung, H W

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that the scaffold adapter GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) is amplified and overexpressed in a subset of primary high-grade serous ovarian cancers and cell lines. Ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2 are dependent on GAB2 for activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and are sensitive to PI3K inhibition. In this study, we show an important role of GAB2 overexpression in promoting tumor angiogenesis by upregulating expression of multiple chemokines. Specifically, we found that suppression of GAB2 by inducible small hairpin RNA in ovarian cancer cells inhibited tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and peritoneal tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Overexpression of GAB2 upregulated the secretion of several chemokines from ovarian cancer cells, including CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8. The secreted chemokines not only signal through endothelial CXCR2 receptor in a paracrine manner to promote endothelial tube formation, but also act as autocrine growth factors for GAB2-induced transformation of fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells and clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2. Pharmacological inhibition of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase subunit β (IKKβ), but not PI3K, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), could effectively suppress GAB2-induced chemokine expression. Inhibition of IKKβ augmented the efficacy of PI3K/mTOR inhibition in suppressing clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells with GAB2 overexpression. Taken together, these findings suggest that overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating expression of CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8 that is IKKβ-dependent. Co-targeting IKKβ and PI3K pathways downstream of GAB2 might be a promising therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer that overexpresses GAB2. PMID:26657155

  11. Overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating chemokine expression.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, C; Zhang, L; Carroll, S L; Ethier, S P; Cheung, H W

    2016-08-01

    We previously found that the scaffold adapter GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) is amplified and overexpressed in a subset of primary high-grade serous ovarian cancers and cell lines. Ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2 are dependent on GAB2 for activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and are sensitive to PI3K inhibition. In this study, we show an important role of GAB2 overexpression in promoting tumor angiogenesis by upregulating expression of multiple chemokines. Specifically, we found that suppression of GAB2 by inducible small hairpin RNA in ovarian cancer cells inhibited tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and peritoneal tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Overexpression of GAB2 upregulated the secretion of several chemokines from ovarian cancer cells, including CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8. The secreted chemokines not only signal through endothelial CXCR2 receptor in a paracrine manner to promote endothelial tube formation, but also act as autocrine growth factors for GAB2-induced transformation of fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells and clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2. Pharmacological inhibition of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase subunit β (IKKβ), but not PI3K, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), could effectively suppress GAB2-induced chemokine expression. Inhibition of IKKβ augmented the efficacy of PI3K/mTOR inhibition in suppressing clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells with GAB2 overexpression. Taken together, these findings suggest that overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating expression of CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8 that is IKKβ-dependent. Co-targeting IKKβ and PI3K pathways downstream of GAB2 might be a promising therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer that overexpresses GAB2. PMID:26657155

  12. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-21

    Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  13. microRNA-181a has a critical role in ovarian cancer progression through the regulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Aditya; Lee, Christine; Joseph, Peronne; Marchini, Sergio; Baccarini, Alessia; Kolev, Valentin; Romualdi, Chiara; Fruscio, Robert; Shah, Hardik; Wang, Feng; Mullokandov, Gavriel; Fishman, David; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Rahaman, Jamal; Kalir, Tamara; Redline, Raymond W.; Brown, Brian D.; Narla, Goutham; Difeo, Analisa

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Effective targets to treat advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and biomarkers to predict treatment response are still lacking because of the complexity of pathways involved in ovarian cancer progression. Here we show that miR-181a promotes TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition via repression of its functional target, Smad7. miR-181a and phosphorylated Smad2 are enriched in recurrent compared with matched-primary ovarian tumours and their expression is associated with shorter time to recurrence and poor outcome in patients with EOC. Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-181a results in increased cellular survival, migration, invasion, drug resistance and in vivo tumour burden and dissemination. In contrast, miR-181a inhibition via decoy vector suppression and Smad7 re-expression results in significant reversion of these phenotypes. Combined, our findings highlight an unappreciated role for miR-181a, Smad7, and the TGF-β signalling pathway in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

  14. The Chicken Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hawkridge, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    The chicken is a unique experimental model for studying the spontaneous onset and progression of ovarian cancer (OVC). The prevalence of OVC in chickens can range from 10–35% depending on age, genetic strain, reproductive history, and diet. Furthermore, the chicken presents epidemiological, morphological, and molecular traits that are similar to human OVC making it a relevant experimental model for translation research. Similarities to humans include associated increased risk of OVC with the number of ovulations, common histopathological sub-types including high-grade serous, and molecular-level markers or pathways such as CA-125 expression and p53 mutation frequency. Collectively, the similarities between chicken and human OVC combined with a tightly controlled genetic background and predictable onset window provides an outstanding experimental model for studying the early events and progression of spontaneous OVC tumors under controlled environmental conditions. This review will cover the existing literature on OVC in the chicken and highlight potential opportunities for further exploitation (e.g, biomarkers, prevention, treatment, and genomics). PMID:25130871

  15. Network-based survival-associated module biomarker and its crosstalk with cell death genes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nana; Wu, Hao; Miao, Zhengqiang; Huang, Yan; Hu, Yongfei; Bi, Xiaoman; Wu, Deng; Qian, Kun; Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Changliang; Wang, Hongwei; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains a dismal disease with diagnosing in the late, metastatic stages, therefore, there is a growing realization of the critical need to develop effective biomarkers for understanding underlying mechanisms. Although existing evidences demonstrate the important role of the single genetic abnormality in pathogenesis, the perturbations of interactors in the complex network are often ignored. Moreover, ovarian cancer diagnosis and treatment still exist a large gap that need to be bridged. In this work, we adopted a network-based survival-associated approach to capture a 12-gene network module based on differential co-expression PPI network in the advanced-stage, high-grade ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. Then, regulatory genes (protein-coding genes and non-coding genes) direct interacting with the module were found to be significantly overlapped with cell death genes. More importantly, these overlapping genes tightly clustered together pointing to the module, deciphering the crosstalk between network-based survival-associated module and cell death in ovarian cancer. PMID:26099452

  16. Inter-observer variability in the classification of ovarian cancer cell type using microscopy: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; Ronnett, Brigitte M.; Vang, Russell; Seidman, Jeffrey D.

    2015-03-01

    Studies have shown that different cell types of ovarian carcinoma have different molecular profiles, exhibit different behavior, and that patients could benefit from typespecific treatment. Different cell types display different histopathology features, and different criteria are used for each cell type classification. Inter-observer variability for the task of classifying ovarian cancer cell types is an under-examined area of research. This study served as a pilot study to quantify observer variability related to the classification of ovarian cancer cell types and to extract valuable data for designing a validation study of digital pathology (DP) for this task. Three observers with expertise in gynecologic pathology reviewed 114 cases of ovarian cancer with optical microscopy, with specific guidelines for classifications into distinct cell types. For 93 cases all 3 pathologists agreed on the same cell type, for 18 cases 2 out of 3 agreed, and for 3 cases there was no agreement. Across cell types with a minimum sample size of 10 cases, agreement between all three observers was {91.1%, 80.0%, 90.0%, 78.6%, 100.0%, 61.5%} for the high grade serous carcinoma, low grade serous carcinoma, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and carcinosarcoma cell types respectively. These results indicate that unanimous agreement varied over a fairly wide range. However, additional research is needed to determine the importance of these differences in comparison studies. These results will be used to aid in the design and sizing of such a study comparing optical and digital pathology. In addition, the results will help in understanding the potential role computer-aided diagnosis has in helping to improve the agreement of pathologists for this task.

  17. Endogenous androgens and risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer by tumor characteristics in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ose, Jennifer; Fortner, Renée T; Rinaldi, Sabina; Schock, Helena; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Dossus, Laure; Fournier, Agnes; Baglietto, Laura; Romieu, Isabelle; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Ramon Quiros, Jose; Obón-Santacana, Mireia; Larrañaga, Nerea; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Sánchez, María-José; Barricarte, Aurelio; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Lund, Eiliv; Kaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth C; Merritt, Melissa A; Gunther, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2015-01-15

    The role of endogenous androgens and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in ovarian carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous disease and there are no prospective data on endogenous androgens and EOC risk by tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage) or the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis (i.e. type I vs. type II, leading to less or more aggressive tumors). We conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort evaluating androgens and SHBG and invasive EOC risk by tumor characteristics. Female participants who provided a blood sample and were not using exogenous hormones at blood donation were eligible (n = 183,257). A total of 565 eligible women developed EOC; two controls (n = 1,097) were matched per case. We used multivariable conditional logistic regression models. We observed no association between androgens, SHBG and EOC overall. A doubling of androstenedione reduced risk of serous carcinomas by 21% (odds ratio (OR)log2 = 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.64-0.97]). Moreover, associations differed for low-grade and high-grade carcinomas, with positive associations for low-grade and inverse associations for high-grade carcinomas (e.g. androstenedione: low grade: ORlog2 = 1.99 [0.98-4.06]; high grade: ORlog2 = 0.75 [0.61-0.93], phet ≤ 0.01), similar associations were observed for type I/II tumors. This is the first prospective study to evaluate androgens, SHBG and EOC risk by tumor characteristics and type I/II status. Our findings support a possible role of androgens in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional studies exploring this association are needed. PMID:24890047

  18. An apoptosis-enhancing drug overcomes platinum resistance in a tumour-initiating subpopulation of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janzen, D. M.; Tiourin, E.; Salehi, J. A.; Paik, D. Y.; Lu, J.; Pellegrini, M.; Memarzadeh, S.

    2015-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSCs) are deadly malignancies that relapse despite carboplatin chemotherapy. Here we show that 16 independent primary HGSC samples contain a CA125-negative population enriched for carboplatin-resistant cancer initiating cells. Transcriptome analysis reveals upregulation of homologous recombination DNA repair and anti-apoptotic signals in this population. While treatment with carboplatin enriches for CA125-negative cells, co-treatment with carboplatin and birinapant eliminates these cells in HGSCs expressing high levels of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP in the CA125-negative population. Birinapant sensitizes CA125-negative cells to carboplatin by mediating degradation of cIAP causing cleavage of caspase 8 and restoration of apoptosis. This co-therapy significantly improves disease-free survival in vivo compared with either therapy alone in tumour-bearing mice. These findings suggest that therapeutic strategies that target CA125-negative cells may be useful in the treatment of HGSC. PMID:26234182

  19. Anti-angiogenic agents in ovarian cancer: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Monk, B J; Minion, L E; Coleman, R L

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis plays a pivotal role in normal ovarian physiology as well as in the progression of ovarian cancer through ascites formation and metastatic spread. Bevacizumab (Avastin(®), Genentech; South San Francisco, CA, USA), a humanized anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monoclonal antibody, is the most widely studied anti-angiogenesis agent both across tumor types and specifically in epithelial ovarian cancer. In 2005, single-agent bevacizumab at 15 mg/kg (IV) every 3 weeks was first reported to be active in a case of recurrent high-grade serous ovarian cancer after failing 11th line cytotoxic treatment. Since then, many case series, phase II and phase III trials have confirmed these results leading to regulatory approval in most countries including the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014. Guidelines now give clear recommendations as to when and how bevacizumab should be integrated into the ovarian cancer treatment paradigm. Other anti-VEGF agents such as the VEGF receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors have not shown increased activity or reduced toxicity relative to bevacizumab. However, anti-angiogenics other than anti-VEGF/VEGFR agents such as those targeting Angiopoietin-1 and -2 are in development as well as novel combinations with vascular disrupting agents (VDAs), PARP inhibitors and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Clearly, the benefits of anti-angiogenic agents such as bevacizumab must be carefully weighed against the cost and associated toxicities. Although almost all patients with ovarian cancer will receive an anti-angiogenic compound, cures are not increased. Predictive biomarkers are an urgent unmet need. PMID:27141068

  20. Irregular menses predicts ovarian cancer: Prospective evidence from the Child Health and Development Studies.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Piera M; Wang, Erica T; Cedars, Marcelle I; Chen, Lee-May; Cohn, Barbara A

    2016-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that irregular menstruation predicts lower risk for ovarian cancer, possibly due to less frequent ovulation. We conducted a 50-year prospective study of 15,528 mothers in the Child Health and Development Studies cohort recruited from the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan from 1959 to 1966. Irregular menstruation was classified via medical record and self-report at age 26. We identified 116 cases and 84 deaths due to ovarian cancer through 2011 via linkage to the California Cancer Registry and Vital Statistics. Contrary to expectation, women with irregular menstrual cycles had a higher risk of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality over the 50-year follow-up. Associations increased with age (p <0.05). We observed a 2-fold increased incidence and mortality by age 70 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 3.4) rising to a 3-fold increase by age 77 (95% CI = 1.5, 6.7 for incidence; 95% CI = 1.4, 5.9 for mortality). We also found a 3-fold higher risk of mortality for high-grade serous tumors (95% CI = 1.3, 7.6) that did not vary by age. This is the first prospective study to show an association between irregular menstruation and ovarian cancer-we unexpectedly found higher risk for women with irregular cycles. These women are easy to identify and many may have polycystic ovarian syndrome. Classifying high-risk phenotypes such as irregular menstruation creates opportunities to find novel early biomarkers, refine clinical screening protocols and potentially develop new risk reduction strategies. These efforts can lead to earlier detection and better survival for ovarian cancer. PMID:27082375

  1. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Simon G.; Shen, Howard C.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K.; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10−30), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10−23) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10−15) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. PMID:25804953

  2. Histones and Their Modifications in Ovarian Cancer – Drivers of Disease and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Deborah J.; Shah, Jaynish S.; Cole, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of the gynecological malignancies. High grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) is the most common subtype, with the majority of women presenting with advanced disease where 5-year survival is around 25%. Platinum-based chemotherapy in combination with paclitaxel remains the most effective treatment despite platinum therapies being introduced almost 40 years ago. Advances in molecular medicine are underpinning new strategies for the treatment of cancer. Major advances have been made by international initiatives to sequence cancer genomes. For SEOC, with the exception of TP53 that is mutated in virtually 100% of these tumors, there is no other gene mutated at high frequency. There is extensive copy number variation, as well as changes in methylation patterns that will influence gene expression. To date, the role of histones and their post-translational modifications in ovarian cancer is a relatively understudied field. Post-translational histone modifications play major roles in gene expression as they direct the configuration of chromatin and so access by transcription factors. Histone modifications include methylation, acetylation, and monoubiquitination, with involvement of enzymes including histone methyltransferases, histone acetyltransferases/deacetylases, and ubiquitin ligases/deubiquitinases, respectively. Complexes such as the Polycomb repressive complex also play roles in the control of histone modifications and more recently roles for long non-coding RNA and microRNAs are emerging. Epigenomic-based therapies targeting histone modifications are being developed and offer new approaches for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Here, we discuss histone modifications and their aberrant regulation in malignancy and specifically in ovarian cancer. We review current and upcoming histone-based therapies that have the potential to inform and improve treatment strategies for women with ovarian cancer. PMID

  3. Development of Olaparib for BRCA-Deficient Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Krishnansu S; Eskander, Ramez N; Monk, Bradley J

    2015-09-01

    The FDA approval of the PARP inhibitor olaparib for fourth-line therapy of germline BRCA1/2-mutated ovarian cancer represents the first registered indication for this class of drugs in any disease. PARP is a family of proteins involved in the repair of single-strand DNA breaks. High-grade serous ovarian carcinomas with BRCA deficiencies may be particularly vulnerable to both direct and indirect effects of PARP inhibition. This phenotype frequently arises as a consequence of defects in the repair of damaged DNA, rendering cancer cells susceptible to DNA-damaging platinum compounds and targeted therapies affecting homologous recombination repair (HRR). When cells already deficient in HRR are exposed to PARP inhibitors, apoptosis occurs by way of synthetic lethality. In this review, we trace the clinical development of olaparib for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma harboring germline BRCA mutations, a biomarker for HRR deficiency present in 15% to 20% of cases. Clinical trials highlighted include not only those pivotal studies that have led to regulatory approval in the United States and in Europe, but also those in which olaparib was studied in novel combinations, including chemotherapy and antiangiogenesis agents. PMID:26169965

  4. Premalignant SOX2 overexpression in the fallopian tubes of ovarian cancer patients: Discovery and validation studies.

    PubMed

    Hellner, Karin; Miranda, Fabrizio; Fotso Chedom, Donatien; Herrero-Gonzalez, Sandra; Hayden, Daniel M; Tearle, Rick; Artibani, Mara; KaramiNejadRanjbar, Mohammad; Williams, Ruth; Gaitskell, Kezia; Elorbany, Samar; Xu, Ruoyan; Laios, Alex; Buiga, Petronela; Ahmed, Karim; Dhar, Sunanda; Zhang, Rebecca Yu; Campo, Leticia; Myers, Kevin A; Lozano, María; Ruiz-Miró, María; Gatius, Sónia; Mota, Alba; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Benítez, Javier; Witty, Lorna; McVean, Gil; Leedham, Simon; Tomlinson, Ian; Drmanac, Radoje; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Klein, Robert; Dunne, Kevin; Bast, Robert C; Kennedy, Stephen H; Hassan, Bassim; Lise, Stefano; Garcia, María José; Peters, Brock A; Yau, Christopher; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour

    2016-08-01

    Current screening methods for ovarian cancer can only detect advanced disease. Earlier detection has proved difficult because the molecular precursors involved in the natural history of the disease are unknown. To identify early driver mutations in ovarian cancer cells, we used dense whole genome sequencing of micrometastases and microscopic residual disease collected at three time points over three years from a single patient during treatment for high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). The functional and clinical significance of the identified mutations was examined using a combination of population-based whole genome sequencing, targeted deep sequencing, multi-center analysis of protein expression, loss of function experiments in an in-vivo reporter assay and mammalian models, and gain of function experiments in primary cultured fallopian tube epithelial (FTE) cells. We identified frequent mutations involving a 40kb distal repressor region for the key stem cell differentiation gene SOX2. In the apparently normal FTE, the region was also mutated. This was associated with a profound increase in SOX2 expression (p<2(-16)), which was not found in patients without cancer (n=108). Importantly, we show that SOX2 overexpression in FTE is nearly ubiquitous in patients with HGSOCs (n=100), and common in BRCA1-BRCA2 mutation carriers (n=71) who underwent prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy. We propose that the finding of SOX2 overexpression in FTE could be exploited to develop biomarkers for detecting disease at a premalignant stage, which would reduce mortality from this devastating disease. PMID:27492892

  5. Multispectral fluorescence imaging of human ovarian and Fallopian tube tissue for early stage cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Tyler; Baggett, Brenda; Rice, Photini; Watson, Jennifer; Orsinger, Gabe; Nymeyer, Ariel C.; Welge, Weston A.; Keenan, Molly; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Hatch, Kenneth; Chambers, Setsuko; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    With early detection, five year survival rates for ovarian cancer are over 90%, yet no effective early screening method exists. Emerging consensus suggests that perhaps over 50% of the most lethal form of the disease, high grade serous ovarian cancer, originates in the Fallopian tube. Cancer changes molecular concentrations of various endogenous fluorophores. Using specific excitation wavelengths and emissions bands on a Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) system, spatial and spectral data over a wide field of view can be collected from endogenous fluorophores. Wavelength specific reflectance images provide additional information to normalize for tissue geometry and blood absorption. Ratiometric combination of the images may create high contrast between neighboring normal and abnormal tissue. Twenty-six women undergoing oophorectomy or debulking surgery consented the use of surgical discard tissue samples for MFI imaging. Forty-nine pieces of ovarian tissue and thirty-two pieces of Fallopian tube tissue were collected and imaged with excitation wavelengths between 280 nm and 550 nm. After imaging, each tissue sample was fixed, sectioned and HE stained for pathological evaluation. Comparison of mean intensity values between normal, benign, and cancerous tissue demonstrate a general trend of increased fluorescence of benign tissue and decreased fluorescence of cancerous tissue when compared to normal tissue. The predictive capabilities of the mean intensity measurements are tested using multinomial logistic regression and quadratic discriminant analysis. Adaption of the system for in vivo Fallopian tube and ovary endoscopic imaging is possible and is briefly described.

  6. RAD51 and BRCA2 enhance oncolytic adenovirus type 5 activity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tookman, Laura A.; Browne, Ashley K.; Connell, Claire M.; Bridge, Gemma; Ingemarsdotter, Carin K.; Dowson, Suzanne; Shibata, Atsushi; Lockley, Michelle; Martin, Sarah A.; McNeish, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Homologous Recombination (HR) function is critically important in High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer (HGSOC). HGSOC with intact HR has a worse prognosis and is less likely to respond to platinum chemotherapy and PARP inhibitors. Oncolytic adenovirus, a novel therapy for human malignancies, stimulates a potent DNA damage response that influences overall anti-tumor activity. Here, the importance of HR was investigated by determining the efficacy of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vectors in ovarian cancer. Using matched BRCA2 mutant and wild-type HGSOC cells, it was demonstrated that intact HR function promotes viral DNA replication and augments overall efficacy, without influencing viral DNA processing. These data were confirmed in a wider panel of HR competent and defective ovarian cancer lines. Mechanistically, both BRCA2 and RAD51 localize to viral replication centers within the infected cell nucleus and that RAD51 localization occurs independently of BRCA2. In addition, a direct interaction was identified between RAD51 and adenovirus E2 DNA binding protein. Finally, using functional assays of HR competence, despite inducing degradation of MRE11, Ad5 infection does not alter cellular ability to repair DNA double strand break damage via HR. These data reveal that Ad5 redistributes critical HR components to viral replication centers and enhances cytotoxicity. Implications Oncolytic adenoviral therapy may be most clinically relevant in tumors with intact HR function. PMID:26452665

  7. Ovarian Cancer: The Fallopian Tube as the Site of Origin and Opportunities for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    George, Sophia H. L.; Garcia, Ruslan; Slomovitz, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and aggressive histotype of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), and it is the predominant histotype associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are responsible for most of the known causes of HBOC, while mutations in mismatch repair genes and several genes of moderate penetrance are responsible for the remaining known hereditary risk. Women with a history of familial ovarian cancer or with known germline mutations in highly penetrant genes are offered the option of risk-reducing surgery that involves the removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes (salpingo-oophorectomy). Growing evidence now supports the fallopian tube epithelia as an etiological site for the development of HGSC and consequently, salpingectomy alone is emerging as a prophylactic option. This review discusses the site of origin of EOC, the rationale for risk-reducing salpingectomy in the high-risk population, and opportunities for salpingectomy in the low-risk population. PMID:27200296

  8. Molecular Requirements for Transformation of Fallopian Tube Epithelial Cells into Serous Carcinoma12

    PubMed Central

    Jazaeri, Amir A; Bryant, Jennifer L; Park, Hong; Li, Hui; Dahiya, Neetu; Stoler, Mark H; Ferriss, James Stuart; Dutta, Anindya

    2011-01-01

    Although controversial, recent studies suggest that serous ovarian carcinomas may arise from fallopian tube fimbria rather than ovarian surface epithelium. We developed an in vitro model for serous carcinogenesis in which primary human fallopian tube epithelial cells (FTECs) were exposed to potentially oncogenic molecular alterations delivered by retroviral vectors. To more closely mirror in vivo conditions, transformation of FTECs was driven by the positive selection of growth-promoting alterations rather antibiotic selection. Injection of the transformed FTEC lines in SCID mice resulted in xenografts with histologic and immunohistochemical features indistinguishable from poorly differentiated serous carcinomas. Transcriptional profiling revealed high similarity among the transformed and control FTEC lines and patient-derived serous ovarian carcinoma cells and was used to define a malignancy-related transcriptional signature. Oncogene-treated FTEC lines were serially analyzed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis to identify oncogenes whose expression was subject to positive selection. The combination of p53 and Rb inactivation (mediated by SV40 T antigen), hTERT expression, and oncogenic C-MYC and HRAS accumulation showed positive selection during transformation. Knockdown of each of these selected components resulted in significant growth inhibition of the transformed cell lines that correlated with p27 accumulation. The combination of SV40 T antigen and hTERT expression resulted in immortalized cells that were nontumorigenic in mice, whereas forced expression of a dominant-negative p53 isoform (p53DD) and hTERT resulted in senescence. Thus, our investigation supports the tubal origin of serous carcinoma and provides a dynamic model for studying early molecular alterations in serous carcinogenesis. PMID:22028616

  9. Risk of Ovarian Cancer and the NF-κB Pathway: Genetic association with IL1A and TNFSF10

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Bridget; Block, Matthew S.; Bamlet, William R.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Fogarty, Zachary; Rider, David N.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth; Risch, Harvey A.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Trabert, Britton; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Whittemore, Alice S.; Sieh, Weiva; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bandera, Elisa V.; Orlow, Irene; Terry, Kathryn; Goodman, Marc T.; Thompson, Pamela J; Cook, Linda S.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Narod, Steven A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Butzow, Ralf; Dörk, Thilo; Pejovic, Tanja; Campbell, Ian; Le, Nhu D.; Bunker, Clareann H.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Eccles, Diana; Paul, James; Wu, Anna H.; Gayther, Simon A.; Hogdall, Estrid; Heitz, Florian; Kaye, Stanley B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Culver, Hoda Anton; Gronwald, Jacek; Hogdall, Claus K.; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter A.; Menon, Usha; Schildkraut, Joellen; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Levine, Douglas A.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Cramer, Daniel; Flanagan, James M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Brown, Robert; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Song, Honglin; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Liang, Dong; Odunsi, Kunle; Berchuck, Andrew; Jensen, Allan; Lubiński, Jan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bean, Yukie T.; Lurie, Galina; Ziogas, Argyrios; Walsh, Christine; Despierre, Evelyn; Brinton, Louise; Hein, Alexander; Rudolph, Anja; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Olson, Sara H.; Harter, Philipp; Tyrer, Jonathan; Vitonis, Allison F.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aben, Katja K.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Ramus, Susan J.; Wik, Elisabeth; Cybulski, Cezary; Lin, Jie; Sucheston, Lara; Edwards, Robert; McGuire, Valerie; Lester, Jenny; du Bois, Andreas; Lundvall, Lene; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Szafron, Lukasz M; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Yang, Hannah; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Van Altena, Anne M.; van den Berg, David; Halle, Mari K; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Schwaab, Ira; Chandran, Urmila; Menkiszak, Janusz; Ekici, Arif B.; Wilkens, Lynne R; Leminen, Arto; Modugno, Francesmary; Friel, Grace; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Vergote, Ignace; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Sobiczewski, Piotr; Kelemen, Linda E.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Moysich, Kirsten; Knutson, Keith L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2014-01-01

    A missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the immune modulatory gene IL1A has been associated with ovarian cancer risk (rs17561). While the exact mechanism through which this SNP alters risk of ovarian cancer is not clearly understood, rs17561 has also been associated with risk of endometriosis, an epidemiologic risk factor for ovarian cancer. IL-1α is both regulated by and able to activate NF-κB, a transcription factor family that induces transcription of many pro-inflammatory genes and may be an important mediator in carcinogenesis. We therefore tagged SNPs in over 200 genes in the NF-κB pathway for a total of 2,282 SNPs (including rs17561) for genotype analysis of 15,604 cases of ovarian cancer in patients of European descent, including 6,179 of high grade serous (HGS), 2,100 endometrioid, 1,591 mucinous, 1,034 clear cell and 1,016 low grade serous (LGS), including 23,235 control cases spanning 40 studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). In this large population, we confirmed the association between rs17561 and clear cell ovarian cancer (OR=0.84, 95% CI: 0.76–0.93; p=0.00075), which remained intact even after excluding participants in the prior study (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.75–0.95; p=0.006). Considering a multiple-testing-corrected significance threshold of p< 2.5×10−5, only one other variant, the TNFSF10 SNP rs6785617, was associated significantly with a risk of ovarian cancer (low malignant potential (LMP) tumors OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.79–0.91; p=0.00002). Our results extend the evidence that borderline tumors may have a distinct genetic etiology. Further investigation of how these SNPs might modify ovarian cancer associations with other inflammation related risk factors is warranted. PMID:24272484

  10. Epigenetic reprogramming of fallopian tube fimbriae in BRCA mutation carriers defines early ovarian cancer evolution.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Thomas E; Chindera, Kantaraja; McDermott, Jacqueline; Breeze, Charles E; Cooke, William R; Jones, Allison; Reisel, Daniel; Karegodar, Smita T; Arora, Rupali; Beck, Stephan; Menon, Usha; Dubeau, Louis; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The exact timing and contribution of epigenetic reprogramming to carcinogenesis are unclear. Women harbouring BRCA1/2 mutations demonstrate a 30-40-fold increased risk of high-grade serous extra-uterine Müllerian cancers (HGSEMC), otherwise referred to as 'ovarian carcinomas', which frequently develop from fimbrial cells but not from the proximal portion of the fallopian tube. Here we compare the DNA methylome of the fimbrial and proximal ends of the fallopian tube in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers. We show that the number of CpGs displaying significant differences in methylation levels between fimbrial and proximal fallopian tube segments are threefold higher in BRCA mutation carriers than in controls, correlating with overexpression of activation-induced deaminase in their fimbrial epithelium. The differentially methylated CpGs accurately discriminate HGSEMCs from non-serous subtypes. Epigenetic reprogramming is an early pre-malignant event integral to BRCA1/2 mutation-driven carcinogenesis. Our findings may provide a basis for cancer-preventative strategies. PMID:27216078

  11. Epigenetic reprogramming of fallopian tube fimbriae in BRCA mutation carriers defines early ovarian cancer evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Thomas E.; Chindera, Kantaraja; McDermott, Jacqueline; Breeze, Charles E.; Cooke, William R.; Jones, Allison; Reisel, Daniel; Karegodar, Smita T.; Arora, Rupali; Beck, Stephan; Menon, Usha; Dubeau, Louis; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The exact timing and contribution of epigenetic reprogramming to carcinogenesis are unclear. Women harbouring BRCA1/2 mutations demonstrate a 30–40-fold increased risk of high-grade serous extra-uterine Müllerian cancers (HGSEMC), otherwise referred to as ‘ovarian carcinomas', which frequently develop from fimbrial cells but not from the proximal portion of the fallopian tube. Here we compare the DNA methylome of the fimbrial and proximal ends of the fallopian tube in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers. We show that the number of CpGs displaying significant differences in methylation levels between fimbrial and proximal fallopian tube segments are threefold higher in BRCA mutation carriers than in controls, correlating with overexpression of activation-induced deaminase in their fimbrial epithelium. The differentially methylated CpGs accurately discriminate HGSEMCs from non-serous subtypes. Epigenetic reprogramming is an early pre-malignant event integral to BRCA1/2 mutation-driven carcinogenesis. Our findings may provide a basis for cancer-preventative strategies. PMID:27216078

  12. Association between endometriosis and risk of histological subtypes of ovarian cancer: a pooled analysis of case–control studies

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Templeman, Claire; Rossing, Mary Anne; Lee, Alice; Near, Aimee M; Webb, Penelope M; Nagle, Christina M; Doherty, Jennifer A; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L; Wicklund, Kristine G; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R; Carney, Michael E; Goodman, Marc T; Moysich, Kirsten; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hogdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Larson, Melissa C; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Palmieri, Rachel T; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Vitonis, Allison F; Titus, Linda J; Ziogas, Argyrios; Brewster, Wendy; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Alexandra; Ramus, Susan J; Anderson, A Rebecca; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Fasching, Peter A; Gayther, Simon A; Huntsman, David G; Menon, Usha; Ness, Roberta B; Pike, Malcolm C; Risch, Harvey; Wu, Anna H; Berchuck, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Endometriosis is a risk factor for epithelial ovarian cancer; however, whether this risk extends to all invasive histological subtypes or borderline tumours is not clear. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess the association between endometriosis and histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. Methods Data from 13 ovarian cancer case–control studies, which were part of the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, were pooled and logistic regression analyses were undertaken to assess the association between self-reported endometriosis and risk of ovarian cancer. Analyses of invasive cases were done with respect to histological subtypes, grade, and stage, and analyses of borderline tumours by histological subtype. Age, ethnic origin, study site, parity, and duration of oral contraceptive use were included in all analytical models. Findings 13 226 controls and 7911 women with invasive ovarian cancer were included in this analysis. 818 and 738, respectively, reported a history of endometriosis. 1907 women with borderline ovarian cancer were also included in the analysis, and 168 of these reported a history of endometriosis. Self-reported endometriosis was associated with a significantly increased risk of clear-cell (136 [20·2%] of 674 cases vs 818 [6·2%] of 13 226 controls, odds ratio 3·05, 95% CI 2·43–3·84, p<0·0001), low-grade serous (31 [9·2%] of 336 cases, 2·11, 1·39–3·20, p<0·0001), and endometrioid invasive ovarian cancers (169 [13·9%] of 1220 cases, 2·04, 1·67–2·48, p<0·0001). No association was noted between endometriosis and risk of mucinous (31 [6·0%] of 516 cases, 1·02, 0·69–1·50, p=0·93) or high-grade serous invasive ovarian cancer (261 [7·1%] of 3659 cases, 1·13, 0·97–1·32, p=0·13), or borderline tumours of either subtype (serous 103 [9·0%] of 1140 cases, 1·20, 0·95–1·52, p=0·12, and mucinous 65 [8·5%] of 767 cases, 1·12, 0·84–1·48, p=0·45). Interpretation

  13. [Extraovarian peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma: an unusual surgical case].

    PubMed

    Meier, C; Seifert, M; Wehrli, H

    1999-01-01

    The extraovarian peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma (EPSPC) is a multicentric peritoneal tumor with minimal or absent involvement of the ovaries. The actual treatment regimen consists of a cytoreductive surgery followed by a combination chemotherapy. Few studies have compared outcome of EPSPC to papillary serous ovarian cancer (PSOC). Several authors have documented similar clinical behavior between EPSPC and PSOC, but this finding has not been universal. A 64-year-old female patient with symptomatic gall stone disease underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Unexpectedly we found some uncommon small nodular structures on the serosa of the right colon. The histological findings suggested a poorly differentiated peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma. Biopsies of both ovaries showed no signs of tumor infiltration and the diagnosis of EPSPC was established. After surgery, a combination chemotherapeutic regimen with carboplatin and cyclophosphamid was given. Laparoscopic reassessment 7 months after the first procedure showed no tumor. 3 identical cycles completed chemotherapy. Normal ovaries and no other tumor sites were found in a final laparoscopic look after 11 months. PMID:10073126

  14. [A serous cystadenoma of the ovary of borderline malignancy with a fifteen-year history. A case report].

    PubMed

    Nagata, O; Aramaki, S; Iino, H; Ishikawa, S; Yoshida, H; Azekami, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Iwasa, T; Matsukuma, K; Iwata, Y

    1990-04-01

    A case of a serous cystadenoma of a ovary of borderline malignancy is reported. Sixteen years earlier, the patient had undergone an exploratory laparotomy because of ovarian tumor, and the histologic diagnosis had been a serous cystadenocarcinoma. Postoperative chemotherapy was not effective and drainage of the tumor fluid had been performed for 15 years, with the estimated drainage volume estimated to have reached, 1,000 1. Gradual malnutrition and marked tumor growth then become apparent. A reevaluation of the initial histologic slides and her clinical course strongly suggested a serous cystadenoma of borderline malignancy. Thus a tumor resection, a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and a hysterectomy was performed. A histologic diagnosis of a resected specimen confirmed a serous cystadenoma of borderline malignancy and the histologic features were quite similar to those of the initial biopsy specimens. The patient is living well postoperatively for 8 months without postoperative chemotherapy. PMID:2325270

  15. Reproductive and hormone-related risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer by histologic pathways, invasiveness and histologic subtypes: Results from the EPIC cohort.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Renée T; Ose, Jennifer; Merritt, Melissa A; Schock, Helena; Tjønneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Baglietto, Laura; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Agnoli, Claudia; Mattiello, Amalia; Masala, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peeters, Petra H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Torhild Gram, Inger; Duell, Eric J; Larrañaga, Nerea; Ardanaz, Eva; Sánchez, María-José; Chirlaque, M-D; Brändstedt, Jenny; Idahl, Annika; Lundin, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Travis, Ruth C; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2015-09-01

    Whether risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) differ by subtype (i.e., dualistic pathway of carcinogenesis, histologic subtype) is not well understood; however, data to date suggest risk factor differences. We examined associations between reproductive and hormone-related risk factors for EOC by subtype in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Among 334,126 women with data on reproductive and hormone-related risk factors (follow-up: 1992-2010), 1,245 incident cases of EOC with known histology and invasiveness were identified. Data on tumor histology, grade, and invasiveness, were available from cancer registries and pathology record review. We observed significant heterogeneity by the dualistic model (i.e., type I [low grade serous or endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, malignant Brenner] vs. type II [high grade serous or endometrioid]) for full-term pregnancy (phet  = 0.02). Full-term pregnancy was more strongly inversely associated with type I than type II tumors (ever vs. never: type I: relative risk (RR) 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33-0.69]; type II, RR: 0.81 [0.61-1.06]). We observed no significant differences in risk in analyses by major histologic subtypes of invasive EOC (serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell). None of the investigated factors were associated with borderline tumors. Established protective factors, including duration of oral contraceptive use and full term pregnancy, were consistently inversely associated with risk across histologic subtypes (e.g., ever full-term pregnancy: serous, RR: 0.73 [0.58-0.92]; mucinous, RR: 0.53 [0.30-0.95]; endometrioid, RR: 0.65 [0.40-1.06]; clear cell, RR: 0.34 [0.18-0.64]; phet  = 0.16). These results suggest limited heterogeneity between reproductive and hormone-related risk factors and EOC subtypes. PMID:25656413

  16. HLA ligandomics identifies histone deacetylase 1 as target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Bösmüller, Hans-Christian; Schuster, Heiko; Gückel, Brigitte; Hörzer, Helen; Roehle, Kevin; Schäfer, Richard; Wagner, Philipp; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan; Fend, Falko; Staebler, Annette

    2016-01-01

    abstract The recent approval of clincially effective immune checkpoint inhibitors illustrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. A challenging task remains the identification of specific targets guiding immunotherapy. Facilitated by technical advances, the direct identification of physiologically relevant targets is enabled by analyzing the HLA ligandome of cancer cells. Since recent publications demonstrate the immunogenicity of ovarian cancer (OvCa), immunotherapies, including peptide-based cancer vaccines, represent a promising treatment approach. To identify vaccine peptides, we employed a combined strategy of HLA ligandomics in high-grade serous OvCa samples and immunogenicity analysis. Only few proteins were naturally presented as HLA ligands on all samples analyzed, including histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 and 2. In vitro priming of CD8+ T cells demonstrated that two HDAC1/2-derived HLA ligands can induce T-cell responses, capable of killing HLA-matched tumor cells. High HDAC1 expression shown by immunohistochemistry in 136 high-grade serous OvCa patients associated with significantly reduced overall survival (OS), whereas patients with high numbers of CD3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the tumor epithelium and CD8+ TILs in the tumor stroma showed improved OS. However, correlating HDAC1 expression with TILs, high levels of TILs abrogated the impact of HDAC1 on OS. This study strengthens the role of HDAC1/2 as an important tumor antigen in OvCa, demonstrating its impact on OS in a large cohort of OvCa patients. We further identified two immunogenic HDAC1-derived peptides, which frequently induce multi-functional T-cell responses in many donors, suitable for future multi-peptide vaccine trials in OvCa patients.

  17. Targeting the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Jennifer; Gore, Martin; Banerjee, Susana

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, there has been little change in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer with the majority of women receiving identical systemic therapy, regardless of histological subtype. The heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer is now well established, with distinct subtypes characterized by specific molecular alterations and patterns of clinical behavior. Low-grade serous carcinoma is a rare subtype associated with an indolent biological behavior and inherent resistance to chemotherapy. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of low-grade serous carcinoma, and provides an attractive target for novel therapeutic agents. Selumetinib, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, demonstrates promising efficacy in women with relapsed low-grade serous carcinoma, and further trials of MEK-inhibition are underway. Translational research will be essential to identify predictive biomarkers for this treatment approach. PMID:27469379

  18. Brain metastases from ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Piura, Ettie; Piura, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on knowledge related to brain metastases from ovarian carcinoma. So far, less than 600 cases were documented in the literature with an incidence among ovarian carcinoma patients ranging from 0.29% to 11.6%. The ovarian carcinoma was usually an advanced-stage epithelial serous carcinoma, and the median interval between diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma and brain metastases was 2 years. Most often, brain metastases, affected the cerebrum, were multiple and part of a disseminated disease. Treatment of brain metastasis has evolved over the years from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) only to multimodal therapy including surgical resection or stereotactic radiosurgery followed by WBRT and/or chemotherapy. The median survival after diagnosis of brain metastases was 6 months; nevertheless, a significantly better survival was achieved with multimodal therapy compared to WBRT only. It is suggested that brain imaging studies should be included in the followup of patients after treatment for ovarian carcinoma. PMID:22191058

  19. Sphingosine kinase 1 is required for TGF-β mediated fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Dong-Joo; Lawrenson, Kate; Agadjanian, Hasmik; Walsh, Christine S.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), the enzyme that produces sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P), is known to be highly expressed in many cancers. However, the role of SPHK1 in cells of the tumor stroma remains unclear. Here, we show that SPHK1 is highly expressed in the tumor stroma of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC), and is required for the differentiation and tumor promoting function of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Knockout or pharmacological inhibition of SPHK1 in ovarian fibroblasts attenuated TGF-β-induced expression of CAF markers, and reduced their ability to promote ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion in a coculture system. Mechanistically, we determined that SPHK1 mediates TGF-β signaling via the transactivation of S1P receptors (S1PR2 and S1PR3), leading to p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The importance of stromal SPHK1 in tumorigenesis was confirmed in vivo, by demonstrating a significant reduction of tumor growth and metastasis in SPHK1 knockout mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of SPHK1 inhibition as a novel stroma-targeted therapy in HGSC. PMID:26716409

  20. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor in the Ovarian Follicle Attracts the Stromal Cells of the Fallopian Tube Fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Hua; Hsu, Che-Fang; Huang, Rui-Len; Ding, Dah-Ching; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    During human ovulation, the fallopian tube fimbriae must move to the ovulation site to catch the oocyte. As the tissue-of-origin of the majority of ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC), the fallopian tube fimbriae carrying a precursor cancer lesion may also approach the ovulatory site for metastasis. We hypothesize that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in mature follicle fluid (FF) attracts the migration of PDGFR-expressing fimbriae toward the ovulating follicle. We observed that more PDGFR-β was expressed in the distal part than in the proximal parts of the fallopian tube, particularly in stromal cells in the lamina propria. The stromal cells, but not the epithelial cells, from normal fimbriae and fallopian tube HGSC were highly chemotactic to mature FF. The chemotactic activities were positively correlated with PDGF-BB and estradiol levels in FF and were abolished by a blocking antibody of PDGFR-β and by tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. When PDGF-BB/AB was depleted from the FF, more than 80% of chemotaxis activities were diminished. This study suggests an ovarian follicle-directed and PDGF-dependent attraction of fallopian tube fimbriae before ovulation. The same mechanism may also be crucial for the ovarian homing of HGSC, which largely originates in the fimbriae. PMID:27379403

  1. Gene Set−Based Integrative Analysis Revealing Two Distinct Functional Regulation Patterns in Four Common Subtypes of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jie; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell (CCC), endometrioid (EC), mucinous (MC) and high-grade serous carcinoma (SC) are the four most common subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). The widely accepted dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis divided EOCs into type I and II categories based on the molecular features. However, this hypothesis has not been experimentally demonstrated. We carried out a gene set-based analysis by integrating the microarray gene expression profiles downloaded from the publicly available databases. These quantified biological functions of EOCs were defined by 1454 Gene Ontology (GO) term and 674 Reactome pathway gene sets. The pathogenesis of the four EOC subtypes was investigated by hierarchical clustering and exploratory factor analysis. The patterns of functional regulation among the four subtypes containing 1316 cases could be accurately classified by machine learning. The results revealed that the ERBB and PI3K-related pathways played important roles in the carcinogenesis of CCC, EC and MC; while deregulation of cell cycle was more predominant in SC. The study revealed that two different functional regulation patterns exist among the four EOC subtypes, which were compatible with the type I and II classifications proposed by the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:27527159

  2. Morphologic and Molecular Characteristics of Mixed Epithelial Ovarian Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Robertson; Talhouk, Aline; Eshragh, Sima; Lau, Sherman; Cheung, Daphne; Chow, Christine; Le, Nhu; Cook, Linda S; Wilkinson, Nafisa; McDermott, Jacqueline; Singh, Naveena; Kommoss, Friedrich; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Huntsman, David G; Köbel, Martin; Kommoss, Stefan; Gilks, C Blake; Anglesio, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) consists of 5 major histotypes: high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC), endometrioid carcinoma (EC), clear cell carcinoma (CCC), mucinous carcinoma (MC), and low-grade serous carcinoma (LGSC). Each can have a broad spectrum of morphologic appearances, and 1 histotype can closely mimic histopathologic features more typical of another. Historically, there has been a relatively high frequency of mixed, defined by 2 or more distinct histotypes present on the basis of routine histopathologic assessment, histotype carcinoma diagnoses (3% to 11%); however, recent immunohistochemical (IHC) studies identifying histotype-specific markers and allowing more refined histotype diagnoses suggest a much lower incidence. We reviewed hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides from 871 cases of EOC and found the frequency of mixed carcinomas to be 1.7% when modern diagnostic criteria are applied. Through international collaboration, we established a cohort totaling 22 mixed EOCs, consisting of 9 EC/CCC, 4 EC/LGSC, 3 HGSC/CCC, 2 CCC/MC, and 4 other combinations. We interrogated the molecular differences between the different components of each case using IHC, gene expression, and hotspot sequencing analyses. IHC data alone suggested that 9 of the 22 cases were not mixed tumors, as they presented a uniform immuno-phenotype throughout, and these cases most probably represent morphologic mimicry and variation within tumors of a single histotype. Synthesis of molecular data further reduces the incidence of mixed carcinomas. On the basis of these results, true mixed carcinomas with both morphologic and molecular support for the presence of >1 histotype within a given tumor represent <1% of EOCs. PMID:26099008

  3. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  4. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  5. Immunophenotype and human papillomavirus status of serous adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Togami, Shinichi; Sasajima, Yuko; Kasamatsu, Takahiro; Oda-Otomo, Rie; Okada, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Mitsuya; Ikeda, Shun-ichi; Kato, Tomoyasu; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Serous adenocarcinoma of the cervix (SACC) is a very rare tumor. Our study aimed to characterize the immune profile and human papillomavirus (HPV) status of SACC, in comparison with other serous adenocarcinomas arising in the female genital tract. The pathological specimens obtained from 81 patients with serous carcinoma of the uterine cervix (n = 12), 29 endometrium, 20 ovary and 20 patients with mucinous carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reviewed. We assessed the expression of WT-1, p53, p16, HER2, CEA, and CA125 by immunohistochemistry and HPV DNA by PCR in 12 SACC samples. Their immune profile was compared with that of uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC), ovarian serous adenocarcinoma (OSA), and mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma (MEA). WT-1 and HER2 were expressed in very few SACC samples (0 and 0%, respectively), but p16, CA125, CEA and p53 were present in 100, 92, 58 and 50%, respectively. The difference in WT-1 expression between SACC and UPSC, MEA is not significant, but SACC differ significantly from OSA (p < 0.01). HPV DNA (type 16 or 18) was detected in 4 of the 12 SACC. The immunophenotype of SACC was similar to UPSC, whereas the frequency of expression of WT-1 was significantly lower in SACC than OSA. It appeared that p53 expression was associated with worse clinical outcome in patients with SACC, and that HPV infection was related to its occurrence. PMID:25370301

  6. Improvement in High-Grade Osteosarcoma Survival

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Giun-Yi; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Chen, Paul C-H; Wu, Hung-Ta H.; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare survival before and after 2004 and define the prognostic factors for high-grade osteosarcomas beyond those of typical young patients with localized extremity disease. Few studies have reported the long-term treatment outcomes of high-grade osteosarcoma in Taiwan. A total of 202 patients with primary high-grade osteosarcoma who received primary chemotherapy at Taipei Veterans General Hospital between January 1995 and December 2011 were retrospectively evaluated and compared by period (1995–2003 vs 2004–2011). Patients of all ages and tumor sites and those following or not following controlled protocols were included in analysis of demographic, tumor-related, and treatment-related variables and survival. Overall survival and progression-free survival at 5 years were, respectively, 67.7% and 48% for all patients (n = 202), 77.3% and 57.1% for patients without metastasis (n = 157), and 33.9% and 14.8% for patients with metastasis (n = 45). The survival rates of patients treated after 2004 were significantly higher (by 13%–16%) compared with those of patients treated before 2004, with an accompanying 30% increase in histological good response rate (P = .002). Factors significantly contributing to inferior survival in univariate and multivariate analyses were diagnosis before 2004, metastasis at diagnosis, and being a noncandidate for a controlled treatment protocol. By comparison with the regimens used at our institution before 2004, the current results support the effectiveness of the post-2004 regimens, which consisted of substantially reduced cycles of high-dose methotrexate and a higher dosage of ifosfamide per cycle, cisplatin, and doxorubicin, for treating high-grade osteosarcoma in Asian patients. PMID:27082623

  7. DNA Cytometry and Nuclear Morphometry in Ovarian Benign, Borderline and Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    el Din, Amina A. Gamal; Badawi, Manal A.; Aal, Shereen E. Abdel; Ibrahim, Nihad A.; Morsy, Fatma A.; Shaffie, Nermeen M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKDROUND: Ovarian carcinoma is a leading cause of death in gynecological malignancy. Ovarian surface epithelial serous and mucinous tumours are classified as benign, borderline, and malignant. The identification of borderline tumours most likely to act aggressively remains an important clinical issue. AIM: This work aimed to study DNA ploidy and nuclear area in ovarian serous and mucinous; benign, borderline and malignant tumours. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study included forty ovarian (23 serous and 17 mucinous) tumours. Paraffin blocks were sectioned; stained with haematoxylin and eosin for histopathologic and morphometric studies and with blue feulgen for DNA analysis. RESULTS: All four serous and six out of nine mucinous benign tumours were diploid. All eight serous and five mucinous malignant tumours were aneuploid. Nine of eleven (81.8%) serous and all three mucinous borderline tumours were aneuploid. There were highly significant differences in mean aneuploid cells percentage between serous benign (1.5%), borderline (45.6%) and malignant (74.5%) (p = 0.0001) and between mucinous benign (13.2%) and both borderline (63.7%) and malignant (68.4%) groups (p = 0.0001). There were significant differences in nuclear area between serous benign (26.191%), borderline (45.619%) and malignant (67.634 %) and a significant positive correlation between mean percentage aneuploid value and mean nuclear area in all serous and mucinous groups. CONCLUSION: We suggest that DNA ploidy and nuclear area combined, may be adjuncts to histopathology; in ovarian serous and mucinous benign, borderline and malignant neoplasms; identifying the aggressive borderline tumours. PMID:27275284

  8. Insights into endometrial serous carcinogenesis and progression.

    PubMed

    Fadare, Oluwole; Zheng, Wenxin

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial serous carcinomas (ESC) constitute only approximately 10% of endometrial cancers, but have a substantially higher case-fatality rate than their more common endometrioid counterparts. The precise composite of factors driving endometrial serous carcinogenesis and progression remain largely unknown, but we attempt to review the current state of knowledge in this report. ESC probably do not evolve through a single pathway, and their underlying molecular events probably occur early in their evolution. TP53 gene mutations occur in 22.7 to 96% of cases, and p53 protein overexpression is seen in approximately 76%. By gene expression profiling, p16 is upregulated in ESC significantly above both normal endometrial cells and endometrioid carcinomas, and 92-100% of cases display diffuse expression of the p16 protein by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Together, these findings suggest dysregulation of both the p16(INKA)/Cyclin D-CDK/pRb-E2F and the ARF-MDM2-p53 cell cycle pathways in ESC. By IHC, HER2/neu is overexpressed (2+ or 3+) in approximately 32.1% of ESC, and approximately 54.5% of cases scored as 2+ or 3+ by IHC display c-erbB2 gene amplification as assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Genetic instability, typically manifested as loss of heterozygosity in multiple chromosomes, is a common feature of ESC, and one study found loss of heterozygosity at 1p32-33 in 63% of cases. A subset of ESC display protein expression patterns that are characteristic of high grade endometrial carcinomas, including loss of the metastasis suppressor CD82 (KAI-1) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation, the latter manifested as E-cadherin downregulation, P-cadherin upregulation, and expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation-related molecules such as zinc-finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) and focal adhesion kinase. Preliminary data suggests differential patterns of expression in ESC of some isoforms of claudins, proteases, the tumor invasiveness and

  9. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T.; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue. PMID:26745875

  10. Morphologic 3D scanning of fallopian tubes to assist ovarian cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madore, Wendy-Julie; De Montigny, Etienne; Deschênes, Andréanne; Benboujja, Fouzi; Leduc, Mikael; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane M.; Rahimi, Kurosh; Boudoux, Caroline; Godbout, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Pathological evaluation of the fallopian tubes is an important diagnostic result but tumors can be missed using routine approaches. As the majority of high-grade serous ovarian cancers are now believed to originate in the fallopian tubes, pathological examination should include in a thorough examination of the excised ovaries and fallopian tubes. We present an dedicated imaging system for diagnostic exploration of human fallopian tubes. This system is based on optical coherence tomography (OCT), a laser imaging modality giving access to sub- epithelial tissue architecture. This system produces cross-sectional images up to 3 mm in depth, with a lateral resolution of ≍15μm and an axial resolution of ≍12μm. An endoscopic single fiber probe was developed to fit in a human fallopian tube. This 1.2 mm probe produces 3D volume data of the entire inner tube within a few minutes. To demonstrate the clinical potential of OCT for lesion identification, we studied 5 different ovarian lesions and healthy fallopian tubes. We imaged 52 paraffin-embedded human surgical specimens with a benchtop system and compared these images with histology slides. We also imaged and compared healthy oviducts from 3 animal models to find one resembling the human anatomy and to develop a functional ex vivo imaging procedure with the endoscopic probe. We also present an update on an ongoing clinical pilot study on women undergoing prophylactic or diagnostic surgery in which we image ex vivo fallopian tubes with the endoscopic probe.

  11. Mutant p53 regulates ovarian cancer transformed phenotypes through autocrine matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Iavarone, Claudia; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Muranen, Taru; Novak, Marián; Ince, Tan A.; Drapkin, Ronny; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGS-OvCa) harbors p53 mutations and can originate from the epithelial cell compartment of the fallopian tube fimbriae. From this site, neoplastic cells detach, survive in the peritoneal cavity, and form cellular clusters that intercalate into the mesothelium to form ovarian and peritoneal masses. To examine the contribution of mutant p53 to phenotypic alterations associated with HGS-OvCA, we developed live-cell microscopy assays that recapitulate these early events in cultured fallopian tube nonciliated epithelial (FNE) cells. Expression of stabilizing mutant variants of p53, but not depletion of endogenous wild-type p53, in FNE cells promoted survival and cell-cell aggregation under conditions of cell detachment, leading to the formation of cell clusters with mesothelium-intercalation capacity. Mutant p53R175H-induced phenotypes were dependent on fibronectin production, α5β1 fibronectin receptor engagement, and TWIST1 expression. These results indicate that FNE cells expressing stabilizing p53 mutants acquire anchorage independence and subsequent mesothelial intercalation capacity through a mechanism involving mesenchymal transition and matrix production. These findings provide important new insights into activities of mutant p53 in the cells of origin of HGS-OvCa. PMID:27482544

  12. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-12

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue. PMID:26745875

  13. Genetic determinants of FOXM1 overexpression in epithelial ovarian cancer and functional contribution to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Barger, Carter J; Zhang, Wa; Hillman, Joanna; Stablewski, Aimee B; Higgins, Michael J; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2015-09-29

    The FOXM1 transcription factor network is frequently activated in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), the most common and lethal subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We used primary human EOC tissues, HGSOC cell lines, mouse and human ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells, and a murine transgenic ovarian cancer model to investigate genetic determinants of FOXM1 overexpression in EOC, and to begin to define its functional contribution to disease pathology. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data indicated that the FOXM1 locus is amplified in ~12% of HGSOC, greater than any other tumor type examined, and that FOXM1 amplification correlates with increased expression and poor survival. In an independent set of primary EOC tissues, FOXM1 expression correlated with advanced stage and grade. Of the three known FOXM1 isoforms, FOXM1c showed highest expression in EOC. In murine OSE cells, combined knockout of Rb1 and Trp53 synergistically induced FOXM1. Consistently, human OSE cells immortalized with SV40 Large T antigen (IOSE-SV) had significantly higher FOXM1 expression than OSE immortalized with hTERT (IOSE-T). FOXM1 was overexpressed in murine ovarian tumors driven by combined Rb1/Trp53 disruption. FOXM1 induction in IOSE-SV cells was partially dependent on E2F1, and FOXM1 expression correlated with E2F1 expression in human EOC tissues. Finally, FOXM1 functionally contributed to cell cycle progression and relevant target gene expression in human OSE and HGSOC cell models. In summary, gene amplification, p53 and Rb disruption, and E2F1 activation drive FOXM1 expression in EOC, and FOXM1 promotes cell cycle progression in EOC cell models. PMID:26243836

  14. [Mucinous ovarian neoplasms. Prognostically mostly excellent, infrequently a wolf in sheep's clothing].

    PubMed

    Lax, S; Staebler, A

    2014-07-01

    Mucinous ovarian neoplasms represent the second largest group of epithelial ovarian tumors after serous neoplasms, of which benign cystadenomas constitute more than 80 %. Mucinous cystadenomas and carcinomas cannot be distinguished by the clinical features or the mean age of onset of the disease. They typically occur unilaterally, are confined to the adnexae (FIGO stage I) and clinically present with non-specific abdominal symptoms or are diagnosed by chance. The mean age of disease onset is around 50 years old. The prognosis is excellent. Implants, peritoneal metastases and bilateral occurrence of ovarian mucinous neoplasms should lead to the suspicion of metastasis particularly from a gastrointestinal tumor. Neither microinvasion defined as a maximum extent of invasion of 5 mm, nor intraepithelial carcinoma characterized by high grade atypia without invasion, affect the prognosis of mucinous borderline tumors. Mucinous carcinomas typically show confluent glandular, expansile growth that leads to a labyrinth-like pattern. A destructive infiltrative or nodular growth pattern, however, should lead to the consideration of metastasis. Mural nodules that may reveal a spindle cell sarcomatous or anaplastic carcinomatous pattern occur infrequently in mucinous and do not affect the prognosis. Pax8 positivity is indicative of a primary ovarian neoplasm. In this case, however, mucinous tumors associated with teratomas may show the colonic immunoreaction pattern (CK7-/CK20+/CDX2+). The rare mucinous tumors with endocervical differentiation are now designated as seromucinous tumors and consist of two or more distinct cell types, are frequently associated with endometriosis and seem to show a molecular genetic relationship to endometrioid neoplasms. PMID:24962632

  15. Regulatory T cells, inherited variation, and clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Keith L; Maurer, Matthew J; Preston, Claudia C; Moysich, Kirsten B; Goergen, Krista; Hawthorne, Kieran M; Cunningham, Julie M; Odunsi, Kunle; Hartmann, Lynn C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Oberg, Ann L; Goode, Ellen L

    2015-12-01

    The immune system constitutes one of the host factors modifying outcomes in ovarian cancer. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are believed to be a major factor in preventing the immune response from destroying ovarian cancers. Understanding mechanisms that regulate Tregs in the tumor microenvironment could lead to the identification of novel targets aimed at reducing their influence. In this study, we used immunofluorescence-based microscopy to enumerate Tregs, total CD4 T cells, and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells in fresh frozen tumors from over 400 patients with ovarian cancer (>80 % high-grade serous). We sought to determine whether Tregs were associated with survival and genetic variation in 79 genes known to influence Treg induction, trafficking, or function. We used Cox regression, accounting for known prognostic factors, to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with T cell counts and ratios. We found that the ratios of CD8 T cells and total CD4 T cells to Tregs were associated with improved overall survival (CD8/Treg HR 0.84, p = 0.0089; CD4/Treg HR 0.88, p = 0.046) and with genetic variation in IL-10 (p = 0.0073 and 0.01, respectively). In multivariate analyses, the associations between the ratios and overall survival remained similar (IL-10 and clinical covariate-adjusted CD8/Treg HR 0.85, p = 0.031; CD4/Treg HR 0.87, p = 0.093), suggesting that this association was not driven by variation in IL-10. Thus, integration of novel tumor phenotyping measures with extensive clinical and genetic information suggests that the ratio of T cells to Tregs may be prognostic of outcome in ovarian cancer, regardless of inherited genotype in genes related to Tregs. PMID:26298430

  16. Critical role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in driving epithelial ovarian cancer platinum resistance.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Anil Belur; Joseph, Peronne; Kovalenko, Olga; Singh, Sareena; Armstrong, Amy; Redline, Raymond; Resnick, Kimberly; Zanotti, Kristine; Waggoner, Steven; DiFeo, Analisa

    2015-09-15

    Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy is the major barrier to treating epithelial ovarian cancer. To improve patient outcomes, it is critical to identify the underlying mechanisms that promote platinum resistance. Emerging evidence supports the concept that platinum-based therapies are able to eliminate the bulk of differentiated cancer cells, but are unable to eliminate cancer initiating cells (CIC). To date, the relevant pathways that regulate ovarian CICs remain elusive. Several correlative studies have shown that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation is associated with poor outcomes in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). However, the functional relevance of these findings remain to be delineated. We have uncovered that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation is a critical driver of HGSOC chemotherapy resistance, and targeted inhibition of this pathway, which eliminates CICs, represents a novel and effective treatment for chemoresistant HGSOC. Here we show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated in ovarian CICs, and targeted inhibition of β-catenin potently sensitized cells to cisplatin and decreased CIC tumor sphere formation. Furthermore, the Wnt/β-catenin specific inhibitor iCG-001 potently sensitized cells to cisplatin and decreased stem-cell frequency in platinum resistant cells. Taken together, our data is the first report providing evidence that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway maintains stem-like properties and drug resistance of primary HGSOC PDX derived platinum resistant models, and therapeutic targeting of this pathway with iCG-001/PRI-724, which has been shown to be well tolerated in Phase I trials, may be an effective treatment option. PMID:26125441

  17. Critical role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in driving epithelial ovarian cancer platinum resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Anil Belur; Joseph, Peronne; Kovalenko, Olga; Singh, Sareena; Armstrong, Amy; Redline, Raymond; Resnick, Kimberly; Zanotti, Kristine; Waggoner, Steven; DiFeo, Analisa

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy is the major barrier to treating epithelial ovarian cancer. To improve patient outcomes, it is critical to identify the underlying mechanisms that promote platinum resistance. Emerging evidence supports the concept that platinum-based therapies are able to eliminate the bulk of differentiated cancer cells, but are unable to eliminate cancer initiating cells (CIC). To date, the relevant pathways that regulate ovarian CICs remain elusive. Several correlative studies have shown that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation is associated with poor outcomes in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). However, the functional relevance of these findings remain to be delineated. We have uncovered that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation is a critical driver of HGSOC chemotherapy resistance, and targeted inhibition of this pathway, which eliminates CICs, represents a novel and effective treatment for chemoresistant HGSOC. Here we show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated in ovarian CICs, and targeted inhibition of β-catenin potently sensitized cells to cisplatin and decreased CIC tumor sphere formation. Furthermore, the Wnt/β-catenin specific inhibitor iCG-001 potently sensitized cells to cisplatin and decreased stem-cell frequency in platinum resistant cells. Taken together, our data is the first report providing evidence that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway maintains stem-like properties and drug resistance of primary HGSOC PDX derived platinum resistant models, and therapeutic targeting of this pathway with iCG-001/PRI-724, which has been shown to be well tolerated in Phase I trials, may be an effective treatment option. PMID:26125441

  18. Differential Analysis of Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers Identifies a Methylator Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kolbe, Diana L.; DeLoia, Julie A.; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Strange, Mary; Petrykowska, Hanna M.; Guirguis, Alfred; Krivak, Thomas C.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Elnitski, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Despite improved outcomes in the past 30 years, less than half of all women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer live five years beyond their diagnosis. Although typically treated as a single disease, epithelial ovarian cancer includes several distinct histological subtypes, such as papillary serous and endometrioid carcinomas. To address whether the morphological differences seen in these carcinomas represent distinct characteristics at the molecular level we analyzed DNA methylation patterns in 11 papillary serous tumors, 9 endometrioid ovarian tumors, 4 normal fallopian tube samples and 6 normal endometrial tissues, plus 8 normal fallopian tube and 4 serous samples from TCGA. For comparison within the endometrioid subtype we added 6 primary uterine endometrioid tumors and 5 endometrioid metastases from uterus to ovary. Data was obtained from 27,578 CpG dinucleotides occurring in or near promoter regions of 14,495 genes. We identified 36 locations with significant increases or decreases in methylation in comparisons of serous tumors and normal fallopian tube samples. Moreover, unsupervised clustering techniques applied to all samples showed three major profiles comprising mostly normal samples, serous tumors, and endometrioid tumors including ovarian, uterine and metastatic origins. The clustering analysis identified 60 differentially methylated sites between the serous group and the normal group. An unrelated set of 25 serous tumors validated the reproducibility of the methylation patterns. In contrast, >1,000 genes were differentially methylated between endometrioid tumors and normal samples. This finding is consistent with a generalized regulatory disruption caused by a methylator phenotype. Through DNA methylation analyses we have identified genes with known roles in ovarian carcinoma etiology, whereas pathway analyses provided biological insight to the role of novel genes. Our finding of differences between serous and endometrioid ovarian tumors

  19. Epac1 knockdown inhibits the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells by inactivating AKT/Cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Ma, Yanyan; Bast, Robert C; Li, Yue; Wan, Lu; Liu, Yanping; Sun, Yingshuo; Fang, Zhenghui; Zhang, Lining; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wei, Zengtao

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynecological malignancies, and high grade serous ovarian carcinoma is the most common and most aggressive subtype. Recently, it was demonstrated that cAMP mediates protein kinase A-independent effects through Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) proteins. Epac proteins, including Epac1 and Epac2, are implicated in several diverse cellular responses, such as insulin secretion, exocytosis, cellular calcium handling and formation of cell-cell junctions. Several reports document that Epac1 could play vital roles in promoting proliferation, invasion and migration of some cancer cells. However, the expression levels and roles of Epac1 in ovarian cancer have not been investigated. In the present study, we detected the expression levels of Epac1 mRNA and protein in three kinds of ovarian cancer cells SKOV3, OVCAR3 and CAOV3. Furthermore, the effect of Epac1 knockdown on the proliferation and apoptosis of SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that there was higher expression of Epac1 mRNA and protein in SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells. Epac1 knockdown inhibited the proliferation of SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells in vitro and in vivo. Decreased proliferation may be due to downregulation of Epac1-induced G1 phase arrest by inactivating the AKT/Cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway, but not to alterations in the MAPK pathway or to apoptosis. Taken together, our data provide new insight into the essential role of Epac1 in regulating growth of ovarian cancer cells and suggest that Epac1 might represent an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27277757

  20. Gene therapy for high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of high-grade gliomas remains difficult despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. True advances may emerge from the increasing understanding in molecular biology and discovery of novel mechanisms for the delivery of tumoricidal agents. In an attempt to overcome this formidable neoplasm, molecular approaches using gene therapy have been investigated clinically since 1992. The clinical trials have mainly been classified into three approaches: suicide gene therapy, immune gene therapy and oncolytic viral therapy. In this article, we review these approaches, which have been studied in previous and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:19262115

  1. Studies on high grade cerebral gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M. )

    1990-04-01

    A brief review of attempts in the United Kingdom to improve the results of treatment of high grade (grade 3, 4) supra-tentorial astrocytomas is presented. The radiosensitizer misonidazole failed to improve the results of post-surgical radiotherapy, however, multivariate analysis of data from these patients has provided a prognostic index of use in defining good and poor prognosis patients. An overview study of adjuvant nitrosourea therapy trials has shown a small significant advantage for the chemotherapy. A study of chemosensitization by benznidazole of CCNU treatment of patients in relapse failed to demonstrate any effect. 13 references.

  2. Ovarian Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ075 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Ovarian Cysts • What is an ovarian cyst? • What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts? • How are ovarian cysts diagnosed? • How are ovarian ...

  3. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  4. Frequency of mutations and polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors of known cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Shipman, Kristy; Kitsou-Mylona, Isidora; de Castro, David G; Hird, Vicky; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James; Gabra, Hani; Mills, Gordon B; Agarwal, Roshan; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2013-04-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent an understudied subset of ovarian tumors. Most studies investigating aberrations in borderline tumors have focused on KRAS/BRAF mutations. In this study, we conducted an extensive analysis of mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in borderline ovarian tumors. Using the Sequenom MassArray platform, we investigated 160 mutations/polymorphisms in 33 genes involved in cell signaling, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation and cellular senescence. Of 52 tumors analyzed, 33 were serous, 18 mucinous and 1 endometrioid. KRAS c.35G>A p.Gly12Asp mutations were detected in eight tumors (six serous and two mucinous), BRAF V600E mutations in two serous tumors, and PIK3CA H1047Y and PIK3CA E542K mutations in a serous and an endometrioid BOT, respectively. CTNNB1 mutation was detected in a serous tumor. Potentially functional polymorphisms were found in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), ABCB1, FGFR2 and PHLPP2. VEGF polymorphisms were the most common and detected at four loci. PHLPP2 polymorphisms were more frequent in mucinous as compared with serous tumors (P=0.04), with allelic imbalance in one case. This study represents the largest and most comprehensive analysis of mutations and functional SNPs in borderline ovarian tumors to date. At least 25% of borderline ovarian tumors harbor somatic mutations associated with potential response to targeted therapeutics. PMID:23174937

  5. Frequency of mutations and polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors of known cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Shipman, Kristy; Kitsou-Mylona, Isidora; de Castro, David Gonzalez; Hird, Vicky; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James; Hani Gabra, H; Mills, Gordon B.; Agarwal, R; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent an understudied subset of ovarian tumors. Most studies investigating aberrations in borderline tumors have focused on KRAS/BRAF mutations. In this study we conducted an extensive analysis of mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform we investigated 160 mutations/polymorphisms in 33 genes involved in cell signalling, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and cellular senescence. Of 52 tumors analysed, 33 were serous, 18 mucinous and 1 endometrioid. KRAS c.35G>A p.Gly12Asp mutations were detected in 8 tumors (6 serous and 2 mucinous), BRAF V600E mutations in 2 serous tumors, and PIK3CA H1047Y and PIK3CA E542K mutations in a serous and an endometrioid BOT respectively. CTNNB1 mutation was detected in a serous tumor. Potentially functional polymorphisms were found in VEGF, ABCB1, FGFR2 and PHLPP2. VEGF polymorphisms were the most common and detected at 4 loci. PHLPP2 polymorphisms were more frequent in mucinous as compared to serous tumors (p=0.04), with allelic imbalance in one case. This study represents the largest and most comprehensive analysis of mutations and functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors to date. At least 25% of borderline ovarian tumors harbour somatic mutations associated with potential response to targeted therapeutics. PMID:23174937

  6. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  7. Expression signature distinguishing two tumour transcriptome classes associated with progression-free survival among rare histological types of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Winterhoff, Boris J; Kalli, Kimberly R; Block, Matthew S; Armasu, Sebastian M; Larson, Melissa C; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Keeney, Gary L; Hartmann, Lynn C; Shridhar, Viji; Konecny, Gottfried E; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L

    2016-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms of recurrence have been under-studied in rare histologies of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) (endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous, and low-grade serous). We hypothesised the existence of an expression signature predictive of outcome in the rarer histologies. Methods: In split discovery and validation analysis of 131 Mayo Clinic EOC cases, we used clustering to determine clinically relevant transcriptome classes using microarray gene expression measurements. The signature was validated in 967 EOC tumours (91 rare histological subtypes) with recurrence information. Results: We found two validated transcriptome classes associated with progression-free survival (PFS) in the Mayo Clinic EOC cases (P=8.24 × 10−3). This signature was further validated in the public expression data sets involving the rare EOC histologies, where these two classes were also predictive of PFS (P=1.43 × 10−3). In contrast, the signatures were not predictive of PFS in the high-grade serous EOC cases. Moreover, genes upregulated in Class-1 (with better outcome) were showed enrichment in steroid hormone biosynthesis (false discovery rate, FDR=0.005%) and WNT signalling pathway (FDR=1.46%); genes upregulated in Class-2 were enriched in cell cycle (FDR=0.86%) and toll-like receptor pathways (FDR=2.37%). Conclusions: These findings provide important biological insights into the rarer EOC histologies that may aid in the development of targeted treatment options for the rarer histologies. PMID:27253175

  8. PAX8 Expression in Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Emily; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Gayther, Simon A; Lawrenson, Kate

    2015-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) is usually diagnosed at a late stage and is associated with poor prognosis. Understanding early stage disease biology is essential in developing clinical biomarkers to detect HGSOC earlier. While recent studies indicate that HGSOCs arise from fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs), a considerable body of evidence also suggests that HGSOC can also arise from ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSECs). PAX8 is overexpressed in HGSOCs and expressed in FTSECs, but there are conflicting reports about PAX8 expression in OSECs. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively characterize PAX8 expression in a large series of OSECs, and to investigate the role of PAX8 in early HGSOC development. PAX8 protein expression was analyzed in the OSECs of 27 normal ovaries and 7 primary OSEC cultures using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescent cytochemistry. PAX8 mRNA expression was quantified in 66 primary OSEC cultures. Cellular transformation was evaluated in OSECs expressing a PAX8 construct. PAX8 was expressed by 44-71% of OSECs. Calretinin and E-cadherin were frequently co-expressed with PAX8. Expression of PAX8 in OSECs decreased cellular migration (P=0.028), but had no other effects on cellular transformation. In addition, PAX8 expression was significantly increased (P=0.003) in an in vitro stepwise model of neoplastic transformation. In conclusion, PAX8 is frequently expressed by OSECs and endogenous levels of PAX8 expression are non-transforming. These data indicate that in OSECs PAX8 expression may represent a normal state and that OSECs may represent an origin of HGSOCs. PMID:26079312

  9. Comparison of Expression Profiles in Ovarian Epithelium In Vivo and Ovarian Cancer Identifies Novel Candidate Genes Involved in Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Catherine; Gava, Natalie; Kennedy, Catherine; Balleine, Rosemary L.; Sharma, Raghwa; Wain, Gerard; Brand, Alison; Hogg, Russell; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; George, Joshy; Birrer, Michael J.; Clarke, Christine L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bowtell, David D. L.; Harnett, Paul R.; deFazio, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Molecular events leading to epithelial ovarian cancer are poorly understood but ovulatory hormones and a high number of life-time ovulations with concomitant proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, increases risk. We identified genes that are regulated during the estrous cycle in murine ovarian surface epithelium and analysed these profiles to identify genes dysregulated in human ovarian cancer, using publically available datasets. We identified 338 genes that are regulated in murine ovarian surface epithelium during the estrous cycle and dysregulated in ovarian cancer. Six of seven candidates selected for immunohistochemical validation were expressed in serous ovarian cancer, inclusion cysts, ovarian surface epithelium and in fallopian tube epithelium. Most were overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared with ovarian surface epithelium and/or inclusion cysts (EpCAM, EZH2, BIRC5) although BIRC5 and EZH2 were expressed as highly in fallopian tube epithelium as in ovarian cancer. We prioritised the 338 genes for those likely to be important for ovarian cancer development by in silico analyses of copy number aberration and mutation using publically available datasets and identified genes with established roles in ovarian cancer as well as novel genes for which we have evidence for involvement in ovarian cancer. Chromosome segregation emerged as an important process in which genes from our list of 338 were over-represented including two (BUB1, NCAPD2) for which there is evidence of amplification and mutation. NUAK2, upregulated in ovarian surface epithelium in proestrus and predicted to have a driver mutation in ovarian cancer, was examined in a larger cohort of serous ovarian cancer where patients with lower NUAK2 expression had shorter overall survival. In conclusion, defining genes that are activated in normal epithelium in the course of ovulation that are also dysregulated in cancer has identified a number of pathways and novel candidate genes that may contribute

  10. Variation in NF-κB Signaling Pathways and Survival in Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Block, Matthew S.; Charbonneau, Bridget; Vierkant, Robert A.; Fogarty, Zachary; Bamlet, William R.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Rossing, Mary Anne; Cramer, Daniel; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Schildkraut, Joellen; Menon, Usha; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Levine, Douglas A.; Gronwald, Jacek; Culver, Hoda Anton; Whittemore, Alice S.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bandera, Elisa V.; Hogdall, Estrid; Heitz, Florian; Kaye, Stanley B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Campbell, Ian; Goodman, Marc T.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T.; Hays, Laura E.; Lurie, Galina; Eccles, Diana; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James M.; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Claus K.; Lundvall, Lene; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Paddock, Lisa E.; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Ziolkowska-Seta, Izabela; Brinton, Louise A.; Yang, Hannah; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Lester, Jenny; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Menkiszak, Janusz; Jensen, Allan; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Berchuck, Andrew; Wu, Anna H.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Terry, Kathryn L.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Ramirez, Starr M.; Rider, David N.; Knutson, Keith L.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Johnatty, Sharon E.; deFazio, Anna; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2014-01-01

    Survival in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is influenced by the host immune response, yet the key genetic determinants of inflammation and immunity that impact prognosis are not known. The nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor family plays an important role in many immune and inflammatory responses, including the response to cancer. We studied common inherited variation in 210 genes in the NF-κB family in 10,084 patients with invasive EOC (5,248 high grade serous, 1,452 endometrioid, 795 clear cell, and 661 mucinous) from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Associations between genotype and overall survival were assessed using Cox regression for all patients and by major histology, adjusting for known prognostic factors and correcting for multiple testing (threshold for statistical significance—p < 2.5×10−5). Results were statistically significant when assessed for patients of a single histology. Key associations were with CARD11 (caspase recruitment domain family, member 11) rs41324349 in patients with mucinous EOC (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.41–2.35, p=4.13×10−6) and TNFRSF13B (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 13B) rs7501462 in patients with endometrioid EOC (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.56–0.82, p=2.33×10−5). Other associations of note included TRAF2 (TNF receptor-associated factor 2) rs17250239 in patients with high-grade serous EOC (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77–0.92, p=6.49×10−5) and PLCG1 (phospholipase C, gamma 1) rs11696662 in patients with clear cell EOC (HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.26–0.73, p=4.56×10−4). These associations highlight the potential importance of genes associated with host inflammation and immunity in modulating clinical outcomes in distinct EOC histologies. PMID:24740199

  11. Expression of Mitochondrial Regulators PGC1α and TFAM as Putative Markers of Subtype and Chemoresistance in Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielson, Marike; Björklund, My; Carlson, Joseph; Shoshan, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC), the major cause of gynaecological cancer death, is a heterogeneous disease classified into five subtypes. Each subtype has distinct clinical characteristics and is associated with different genetic risk factors and molecular events, but all are treated with surgery and platinum/taxane regimes. Tumour progression and chemoresistance is generally associated with major metabolic alterations, notably altered mitochondrial function(s). Here, we report for the first time that the expression of the mitochondrial regulators PGC1α and TFAM varies between EOC subtypes; furthermore, we have identified a profile in clear-cell carcinoma consisting of undetectability of PGC1α/TFAM, and low ERα/Ki-67. By contrast, high-grade serous carcinomas were characterised by a converse state of PGC1α/TFAM, ERα positivity and a high Ki-67 index. Interestingly, loss of PGC1α/TFAM and ERα was found also in a non-clear cell EOC cell line made highly resistant to platinum in vitro. Similar to clear-cell carcinomas, these resistant cells also showed accumulation of glycogen. Altogether, our data provide mechanistic insights into the chemoresistant nature of ovarian clear-cell carcinomas. Furthermore, these findings corroborate the need to take into account the diversity of EOC and to develop subtype specific treatment strategies. PMID:25243473

  12. Conservative laparoscopic treatment of a benign giant ovarian cyst in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Rosario; Leanza, Vito; Genovese, Fortunato; Accardi, Manuela; Gelardi, Valentina; Intagliata, Eva

    2009-10-01

    Giant ovarian cysts are very rare. Recently, laparoscopic treatment, with extirpation of the giant cyst and associated oophorectomy, has been reported. In this article, we describe the first case of complete laparoscopic enucleating of a giant serous cystoadenomyoma with preservation of residual ovarian parenchyma in an 18-year-old girl. PMID:19489679

  13. Specific TP53 Mutants Overrepresented in Ovarian Cancer Impact CNV, TP53 Activity, Responses to Nutlin-3a, and Cell Survival1

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Lisa K.; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Marciano, David C.; Katsonis, Panagiotis; King-Crane, Erin R.; Ren, Yi Athena; Lichtarge, Olivier; Richards, JoAnne S.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary Action analyses of The Cancer Gene Atlas data sets show that many specific p53 missense and gain-of-function mutations are selectively overrepresented and functional in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). As homozygous alleles, p53 mutants are differentially associated with specific loss of heterozygosity (R273; chromosome 17); copy number variation (R175H; chromosome 9); and up-stream, cancer-related regulatory pathways. The expression of immune-related cytokines was selectively related to p53 status, showing for the first time that specific p53 mutants impact, and are related to, the immune subtype of ovarian cancer. Although the majority (31%) of HGSCs exhibit loss of heterozygosity, a significant number (24%) maintain a wild-type (WT) allele and represent another HGSC subtype that is not well defined. Using human and mouse cell lines, we show that specific p53 mutants differentially alter endogenous WT p53 activity; target gene expression; and responses to nutlin-3a, a small molecular that activates WT p53 leading to apoptosis, providing “proof of principle” that ovarian cancer cells expressing WT and mutant alleles represent a distinct ovarian cancer subtype. We also show that siRNA knock down of endogenous p53 in cells expressing homozygous mutant alleles causes apoptosis, whereas cells expressing WT p53 (or are heterozygous for WT and mutant p53 alleles) are highly resistant. Therefore, despite different gene regulatory pathways associated with specific p53 mutants, silencing mutant p53 might be a suitable, powerful, global strategy for blocking ovarian cancer growth in those tumors that rely on mutant p53 functions for survival. Knowing p53 mutational status in HGSC should permit new strategies tailored to control this disease. PMID:26585234

  14. MicroRNA Gene Expression Signature Driven by miR-9 Overexpression in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yanaihara, Nozomu; Noguchi, Yukiko; Saito, Misato; Takenaka, Masataka; Takakura, Satoshi; Yamada, Kyosuke; Okamoto, Aikou

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified microRNA (miRNA) involvement in human cancers. This study aimed to elucidate potential clinical and biological associations of ovarian cancer-related miRNA gene expression profiles in high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) and ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC). Accordingly, we investigated 27 patients with ovarian cancer (12 HGSC and 15 OCCC cases) using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the cancer-related miRNA expressions. Gene Cluster 3.0 was used for hierarchical clustering analysis, and differentially expressed miRNAs between HGSC and OCCC were identified by the class comparison analysis using BRB-ArrayTools. An unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis identified two distinct miRNA expression clusters, with histological subtype-related significant differences in the associations between clusters and clinicopathological features. A comparison of miRNA expression in HGSCs and OCCCs identified five miRNAs (miR-132, miR-9, miR-126, miR-34a, and miR-21), with OCCCs demonstrating a statistically higher expression. Further investigation of the biological significance of miR-9 overexpression in OCCC revealed that miR-9 inhibition reduced the cell invasion ability and upregulated E-cadherin expression. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we further demonstrated the direct binding of miR-9 to E-cadherin. Global cancer-related miRNA expression analysis identified statistically unique profiles that could discriminate ovarian cancer histotypes. In OCCC, miR-9 overexpression may affect pathogenesis by targeting E-cadherin, thereby inducing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Therefore, miR-9 may be a promising therapeutic target strategy for OCCC. PMID:27612152

  15. The contribution of deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and the mismatch repair genes to ovarian cancer in the population

    PubMed Central

    Song, Honglin; Cicek, Mine S.; Dicks, Ed; Harrington, Patricia; Ramus, Susan J.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Alsop, Jennifer; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Gayther, Simon A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of deleterious mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 to invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in the population. The coding sequence and splice site boundaries of all six genes were amplified in germline DNA from 2240 invasive EOC cases and 1535 controls. Barcoded fragment libraries were sequenced using the Illumina GAII or HiSeq and sequence data for each subject de-multiplexed prior to interpretation. GATK and Annovar were used for variant detection and annotation. After quality control 2222 cases (99.2%) and 1528 controls (99.5%) were included in the final analysis. We identified 193 EOC cases (8.7%) carrying a deleterious mutation in at least one gene compared with 10 controls (0.65%). Mutations were most frequent in BRCA1 and BRCA2, with 84 EOC cases (3.8%) carrying a BRCA1 mutation and 94 EOC cases (4.2%) carrying a BRCA2 mutation. The combined BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence was 11% in high-grade serous disease. Seventeen EOC cases carried a mutation in a mismatch repair gene, including 10 MSH6 mutation carriers (0.45%) and 4 MSH2 mutation carriers (0.18%). At least 1 in 10 women with high-grade serous EOC has a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The development of next generation sequencing technologies enables rapid mutation screening for multiple susceptibility genes at once, suggesting that routine clinical testing of all incidence cases should be considered. PMID:24728189

  16. Evolutionary etiology of high-grade astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yurong; Zhang, Qian; Kutlu, Burak; Difilippantonio, Simone; Bash, Ryan; Gilbert, Debra; Yin, Chaoying; O’Sullivan, T. Norene; Yang, Chunyu; Kozlov, Serguei; Bullitt, Elizabeth; McCarthy, Ken D.; Kafri, Tal; Louis, David N.; Miller, C. Ryan; Hood, Leroy; Van Dyke, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most common brain malignancy, remains fatal with no effective treatment. Analyses of common aberrations in GBM suggest major regulatory pathways associated with disease etiology. However, 90% of GBMs are diagnosed at an advanced stage (primary GBMs), providing no access to early disease stages for assessing disease progression events. As such, both understanding of disease mechanisms and the development of biomarkers and therapeutics for effective disease management are limited. Here, we describe an adult-inducible astrocyte-specific system in genetically engineered mice that queries causation in disease evolution of regulatory networks perturbed in human GBM. Events yielding disease, both engineered and spontaneous, indicate ordered grade-specific perturbations that yield high-grade astrocytomas (anaplastic astrocytomas and GBMs). Impaired retinoblastoma protein RB tumor suppression yields grade II histopathology. Additional activation of v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) network drives progression to grade III disease, and further inactivation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) yields GBM. Spontaneous missense mutation of tumor suppressor Trp53 arises subsequent to KRAS activation, but before grade III progression. The stochastic appearance of mutations identical to those observed in humans, particularly the same spectrum of p53 amino acid changes, supports the validity of engineered lesions and the ensuing interpretations of etiology. Absence of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation, asymptomatic low grade disease, and rapid emergence of GBM combined with a mesenchymal transcriptome signature reflect characteristics of primary GBM and provide insight into causal relationships. PMID:24114272

  17. HDAC4-regulated STAT1 activation mediates platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Stronach, Euan A; Alfraidi, Albandri; Rama, Nona; Datler, Christoph; Studd, James B; Agarwal, Roshan; Guney, Tankut G; Gourley, Charlie; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Mai, Antonello; Brown, Robert; Dina, Roberto; Gabra, Hani

    2011-07-01

    Ovarian cancer frequently acquires resistance to platinum chemotherapy, representing a major challenge for improving patient survival. Recent work suggests that resistant clones exist within a larger drug-sensitive cell population prior to chemotherapy, implying that resistance is selected for rather than generated by treatment. We sought to compare clinically derived, intrapatient paired models of initial platinum response and subsequent resistant relapse to define molecular determinants of evolved resistance. Transcriptional analysis of a matched cell line series from three patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer before and after development of clinical platinum resistance (PEO1/PEO4/PEO6, PEA1/PEA2, PEO14/PEO23) identified 91 up- and 126 downregulated genes common to acquired resistance. Significantly enhanced apoptotic response to platinum treatment in resistant cells was observed following knockdown of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4, FOLR2, PIK3R1, or STAT1 (P < 0.05). Interestingly, HDAC4 and STAT1 were found to physically interact. Acetyl-STAT1 was detected in platinum-sensitive cells but not in HDAC4 overexpressing platinum-resistant cells from the same patient. In resistant cells, STAT1 phosphorylation/nuclear translocation was seen following platinum exposure, whereas silencing of HDAC4 increased acetyl-STAT1 levels, prevented platinum-induced STAT1 activation, and restored cisplatin sensitivity. Conversely, matched sensitive cells were refractory to STAT1 phosphorylation on platinum treatment. Analysis of 16 paired tumor biopsies taken before and after development of clinical platinum resistance showed significantly increased HDAC4 expression in resistant tumors [n = 7 of 16 (44%); P = 0.04]. Therefore, clinical selection of HDAC4-overexpressing tumor cells upon exposure to chemotherapy promotes STAT1 deacetylation and cancer cell survival. Together, our findings identify HDAC4 as a novel, therapeutically tractable target to counter platinum

  18. HDAC4-regulated STAT1 activation mediates platinum resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stronach, Euan A; Alfraidi, Albandri; Rama, Nona; Datler, Christoph; Studd, Jamie; Agarwal, Roshan; Guney, Tankut G; Gourley, Charlie; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Mai, Antonello; Brown, Robert; Dina, Roberto; Gabra, Hani

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer frequently acquires resistance to platinum chemotherapy, representing a major challenge for improving patient survival. Recent work suggests resistant clones exist within a larger drug sensitive cell-population prior to chemotherapy, implying that resistance is selected for rather than generated by treatment. We sought to compare clinically-derived, intra-patient paired models of initial platinum response and subsequent resistant relapse to define molecular determinants of evolved resistance. Transcriptional analysis of a matched cell-line series from three patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer before and after development of clinical platinum resistance (PEO1/PEO4/PEO6, PEA1/PEA2, PEO14/PEO23) identified 91 up- and 126 down-regulated genes common to acquired resistance. Significantly enhanced apoptotic response to platinum treatment in resistant cells was observed following knockdown of HDAC4, FOLR2, PIK3R1 or STAT1 (p<0.05). Interestingly, HDAC4 and STAT1 were found to physically interact. Acetyl-STAT1 was detected in platinum sensitive but not HDAC4 over-expressing platinum resistant cells from the same patient. In resistant cells, STAT1 phosphorylation/nuclear translocation was seen following platinum exposure, whereas silencing of HDAC4 increased acetyl-STAT1 levels, prevented platinum induced STAT1 activation and restored cisplatin sensitivity. Conversely, matched sensitive cells were refractory to STAT1 phosphorylation on platinum treatment. Analysis of 16 paired tumor biopsies taken before and after development of clinical platinum resistance showed significantly increased HDAC4 expression in resistant tumors (n=7/16[44%]; p=0.04). Therefore, clinical selection of HDAC4 overexpressing tumor cells upon exposure to chemotherapy promotes STAT1 deacetylation and cancer cell survival. Together, our findings identify HDAC4 as a novel, therapeutically tractable target to counter platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. PMID:21571862

  19. SMARCA4 (BRG1) loss of expression is a useful marker for the diagnosis of ovarian small cell carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (ovarian rhabdoid tumor): a comprehensive analysis of 116 rare gynecologic tumors, 9 soft tissue tumors, and 9 melanomas.

    PubMed

    Karanian-Philippe, Marie; Velasco, Valérie; Longy, Michel; Floquet, Anne; Arnould, Laurent; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Le Naoures-Méar, Cécile; Averous, Gerlinde; Guyon, Frédéric; MacGrogan, Gaëtan; Croce, Sabrina

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian small cell carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT)/ovarian rhabdoid tumor is a rare and highly malignant tumor that typically occurs in young women. Up until now the diagnosis has been made on the basis of morphology without any specific immunohistochemical (IHC) markers. However, several authors have shown recently that SCCOHTs are characterized by inactivation of the SMARCA4 gene (encoding the BRG1 protein) resulting in a loss of BRG1 protein expression in IHC. We evaluated BRG1 and INI1 expression in 12 SCCOHTs and in a series of 122 tumors that could mimic SCCOHT morphologically: 9 juvenile granulosa cell tumors, 47 adult granulosa cell tumors, 33 high-grade ovarian serous carcinomas, 9 desmoplastic round cell tumors, 13 Ewing sarcomas (5 from the pelvis and 8 from soft tissues), 1 round cell sarcoma associated with CIC-DUX4 translocation from soft tissue (thigh), 1 case of high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma of the ovary, and 9 melanomas. Forty-four adult granulosa cell tumors were interpretable by IHC. All 12 SCCOHTs were devoid of BRG1 expression and expressed INI1. All other interpretable 119 tumors showed BRG1 nuclear positivity, with variable staining proportions, ranging from 10% to 100% of positive cells (mean: 77%, median: 80%), variable intensities (weak: 5%, moderate: 37%, strong: 58%), and distributions: diffuse in 82 cases (70%) and heterogenous in 36 cases (30%). BRG1 positivity was heterogenous in desmoplastic round cell tumors and adult granulosa cell tumors. Overall, BRG1 is a useful diagnostic marker in SCCOHT, showing the absence of expression in SCCOHT. Nevertheless, the possible heterogeneity and the variable intensity of this staining warrant caution in the interpretation of BRG1 staining in biopsy specimens. PMID:26135561

  20. The status of epidermal growth factor receptor in borderline ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Showeil, Rania; Romano, Claudia; Valganon, Mikel; Lambros, Maryou; Trivedi, Pritesh; Van Noorden, Susan; Sriraksa, Ruethairat; El-Kaffash, Dalal; El-Etreby, Nour; Natrajan, Rachael; Foroni, Letizia; Osborne, Richard; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2016-01-01

    The majority of borderline ovarian tumours (BOTs) behave in a benign fashion, but some may show aggressive behavior. The reason behind this has not been elucidated. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to contribute to cell survival signals as well as metastatic potential of some tumours. EGFR expression and gene status have not been thoroughly investigated in BOTs as it has in ovarian carcinomas. In this study we explore protein expression as well as gene mutations and amplifications of EGFR in BOTs in comparison to a subset of other epithelial ovarian tumours. We studied 85 tumours, including 61 BOTs, 10 low grade serous carcinomas (LGSCs), 9 high grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) and 5 benign epithelial tumours. EGFR protein expression was studied using immunohistochemistry. Mutations were investigated by Sanger sequencing exons 18-21 of the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR. Cases with comparatively higher protein expression were examined for gene amplification by chromogenic in situ hybridization. We also studied the tumours for KRAS and BRAF mutations. Immunohistochemistry results revealed both cytoplasmic and nuclear EGFR expression with variable degrees between tumours. The level of nuclear localization was relatively higher in BOTs and LGSCs as compared to HGSCs or benign tumours. The degree of nuclear expression of BOTs showed no significant difference from that in LGSCs (mean ranks 36.48, 33.05, respectively, p=0.625), but was significantly higher than in HGSCs (mean ranks: 38.88, 12.61 respectively, p< 0.001) and benign tumours (mean ranks: 35.18, 13.00 respectively, p= 0.010). Cytoplasmic expression level was higher in LGSCs. No EGFR gene mutations or amplification were identified, yet different polymorphisms were detected. Five different types of point mutations in the KRAS gene and the V600E BRAF mutation were detected exclusively in BOTs and LGSCs. Our study reports for the first time nuclear localization of EGFR in BOTs. The nuclear

  1. A unique subset of epithelial ovarian cancers with platinum sensitivity and PARP inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Raphael; O'Connor, Kevin W; Mouw, Kent W; Li, Adam Y; Matulonis, Ursula A; D'Andrea, Alan D; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A

    2015-02-15

    Platinum and PARP inhibitor (PARPi) sensitivity commonly coexist in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) due to the high prevalence of alterations in the homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathway that confer sensitivity to both drugs. In this report, we describe a unique subset of EOC with alterations in another DNA repair pathway, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which may exhibit a discordance in sensitivities to these drugs. Specifically, 8% of high-grade serous EOC from The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset exhibited NER alterations, including nonsynonymous or splice site mutations and homozygous deletions of NER genes. Tumors with NER alterations were associated with improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), compared with patients without NER alterations or BRCA1/2 mutations. Furthermore, patients with tumors with NER alterations had similar OS and PFS as BRCA1/2-mutated patients, suggesting that NER pathway inactivation in EOC conferred enhanced platinum sensitivity, similar to BRCA1/2-mutated tumors. Moreover, two NER mutations (ERCC6-Q524* and ERCC4-A583T), identified in the two most platinum-sensitive tumors, were functionally associated with platinum sensitivity in vitro. Importantly, neither NER alteration affected HR or conferred sensitivity to PARPi or other double-strand break-inducing agents. Overall, our findings reveal a new mechanism of platinum sensitivity in EOC that, unlike defective HR, may lead to a discordance in sensitivity to platinum and PARPi, with potential implications for previously reported and ongoing PARPi trials in this disease. PMID:25634215

  2. Therapeutic evaluation of microRNA-15a and microRNA-16 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dhar Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar; Mustafi, Soumyajit Banerjee; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Jiang, Dahai; Pradeep, Sunila; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Ling, Hui; Ivan, Cristina; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Calin, George A.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.; Bhattacharya, Resham

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of chemo-resistant ovarian cancer (OvCa) remains clinically challenging and there is a pressing need to identify novel therapeutic strategies. Here we report that multiple mechanisms that promote OvCa progression and chemo-resistance could be inhibited by ectopic expression of miR-15a and miR-16. Significant correlations between low expression of miR-16, high expression of BMI1 and shortened overall survival (OS) were noted in high grade serous (HGS) OvCa patients upon analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Targeting BMI1, in vitro with either microRNA reduced clonal growth of OvCa cells. Additionally, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) as well as expression of the cisplatin transporter ATP7B were inhibited by miR-15a and miR-16 resulting in decreased degradation of the extra-cellular matrix and enhanced sensitization of OvCa cells to cisplatin. Nanoliposomal delivery of the miR-15a and miR-16 combination, in a pre-clinical chemo-resistant orthotopic mouse model of OvCa, demonstrated striking reduction in tumor burden compared to cisplatin alone. Thus, with the advent of miR replacement therapy some of which are in Phase 2 clinical trials, miR-15a and miR-16 represent novel ammunition in the anti-OvCa arsenal. PMID:26918603

  3. Features of ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KANAKO; BANNO, KOUJI; YANOKURA, MEGUMI; IIDA, MIHO; ADACHI, MASATAKA; MASUDA, KENTA; UEKI, ARISA; KOBAYASHI, YUSUKE; NOMURA, HIROYUKI; HIRASAWA, AKIRA; TOMINAGA, EIICHIRO; AOKI, DAISUKE

    2014-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary ovarian cancer with a prevalence of 0.9–2.7%. Lynch syndrome accounts for 10–15% of hereditary ovarian cancers, while hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome accounts for 65–75% of these cancers. The lifetime risk for ovarian cancer in families with Lynch syndrome is ~8%, which is lower than colorectal and endometrial cancers, and ovarian cancer is not listed in the Amsterdam Criteria II. More than half of sporadic ovarian cancers are diagnosed in stage III or IV, but ≥80% of ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome are diagnosed in stage I or II. Ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome mostly have non-serous histology and different properties from those of sporadic ovarian cancers. A screening method for ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome has yet to be established and clinical studies of prophylactic administration of oral contraceptives are not available. However, molecular profiles at the genetic level indicate that ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome has a more favorable prognosis than sporadic ovarian cancer. Inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway and anti-epidermal growth factor antibodies may have efficacy for the disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome. PMID:25279173

  4. SPIRONOLACTONE FOR NONRESOLVING CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Elodie; Beydoun, Talal; Rothschild, Pierre-Raphaël; Bergin, Ciara; Zhao, Min; Batista, Rui; Brandely, Marie-Laure; Couraud, Benedicte; Farman, Nicolette; Gaudric, Alain; Chast, François

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, for nonresolving central serous chorioretinopathy. Methods: This is a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study. Sixteen eyes of 16 patients with central serous chorioretinopathy and persistent subretinal fluid (SRF) for at least 3 months were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either spironolactone 50 mg or placebo once a day for 30 days, followed by a washout period of 1 week and then crossed over to either placebo or spironolactone for another 30 days. The primary outcome measure was the changes from baseline in SRF thickness at the apex of the serous retinal detachment. Secondary outcomes included subfoveal choroidal thickness and the ETDRS best-corrected visual acuity. Results: The mean duration of central serous chorioretinopathy before enrollment in study eyes was 10 ± 16.9 months. Crossover data analysis showed a statistically significant reduction in SRF in spironolactone treated eyes as compared with the same eyes under placebo (P = 0.04). Secondary analysis on the first period (Day 0–Day 30) showed a significant reduction in subfoveal choroidal thickness in treated eyes as compared with placebo (P = 0.02). No significant changes were observed in the best-corrected visual acuity. There were no complications related to treatment observed. Conclusion: In eyes with persistent SRF due to central serous chorioretinopathy, spironolactone significantly reduced both the SRF and the subfoveal choroidal thickness as compared with placebo. PMID:26017871

  5. Small cell ovarian carcinoma: genomic stability and responsiveness to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The biology of small cell ovarian carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT), which is a rare and aggressive form of ovarian cancer, is poorly understood. Tumourigenicity, in vitro growth characteristics, genetic and genomic anomalies, and sensitivity to standard and novel chemotherapeutic treatments were investigated in the unique SCCOHT cell line, BIN-67, to provide further insight in the biology of this rare type of ovarian cancer. Method The tumourigenic potential of BIN-67 cells was determined and the tumours formed in a xenograft model was compared to human SCCOHT. DNA sequencing, spectral karyotyping and high density SNP array analysis was performed. The sensitivity of the BIN-67 cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents and to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the JX-594 vaccinia virus was tested. Results BIN-67 cells were capable of forming spheroids in hanging drop cultures. When xenografted into immunodeficient mice, BIN-67 cells developed into tumours that reflected the hypercalcemia and histology of human SCCOHT, notably intense expression of WT-1 and vimentin, and lack of expression of inhibin. Somatic mutations in TP53 and the most common activating mutations in KRAS and BRAF were not found in BIN-67 cells by DNA sequencing. Spectral karyotyping revealed a largely normal diploid karyotype (in greater than 95% of cells) with a visibly shorter chromosome 20 contig. High density SNP array analysis also revealed few genomic anomalies in BIN-67 cells, which included loss of heterozygosity of an estimated 16.7 Mb interval on chromosome 20. SNP array analyses of four SCCOHT samples also indicated a low frequency of genomic anomalies in the majority of cases. Although resistant to platinum chemotherapeutic drugs, BIN-67 cell viability in vitro was reduced by >75% after infection with oncolytic viruses. Conclusions These results show that SCCOHT differs from high-grade serous carcinomas by exhibiting few chromosomal anomalies and lacking TP53

  6. Ovarian masses revisited: radiologic and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Sutton, C L; McKinney, C D; Jones, J E; Gay, S B

    1992-09-01

    Diagnosis of ovarian masses can be difficult because many pathologic conditions can affect the ovary and have similar clinical and radiologic manifestations. Knowledge of pathologic, age-specific characteristics can help refine the differential diagnosis. Ovarian masses are nonneoplastic (ovarian functional cysts, polycystic ovary disease, and ovarian torsion) or neoplastic (surface epithelial, sex cord-stromal, germ cell, and metastatic tumors). Functional cysts, if complicated by hemorrhage, can have a confusing ultrasonographic (US) appearance. Polycystic disease and torsion are easily diagnosed with US. Benign and malignant forms of serous and mucinous surface epithelial tumors can usually be differentiated with US. Imaging features of surface epithelial tumors of low malignant potential are nonspecific, resembling those of benign serous and mucinous tumors. Mature (benign) teratomas are usually cystic, with components of fat, soft tissue, and calcium, and are sonographically distinct from immature (malignant) teratomas, which are mostly solid. Sex cord-stromal tumors occur more often in menopausal or postmenopausal women and are typically solid. Metastatic disease is less common than other ovarian tumors; however, its radiologic appearance may resemble those of other masses. PMID:1529129

  7. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) promotes the proliferation and invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Cai, Qi; Godwin, Andrew K.; Zhang, Rugang

    2010-01-01

    EZH2 is the catalytic subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) that includes non-catalytic subunits SUZ12 and EED. When present in PRC2, EZH2 catalyzes trimethylation on lysine 27 residue of histone H3 (H3K27Me3), resulting in epigenetic silencing of gene expression. Here, we investigated the expression and function of EZH2 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). When compared to primary human ovarian surface epithelial (pHOSE) cells, EZH2, SUZ12 and EED were expressed at higher levels in all eight human EOC cell lines tested. Consistently, H3K27Me3 was also overexpressed in human EOC cell lines compared to pHOSE cells. EZH2 was significantly overexpressed in primary human EOCs (n=134) when compared to normal ovarian surface epithelium (n=46) (p<0.001). EZH2 expression positively correlated with expression of Ki67 (p<0.001) (a marker of cell proliferation) and tumor grade (p=0.034) but not tumor stage (p=0.908) in EOC. There was no correlation of EZH2 expression with overall (p=0.3) or disease-free survival (p=0.2) in high-grade serous histotype EOC patients (n=98). Knockdown of EZH2 expression reduced the level of H3K27Me3 and suppressed the growth of human EOC cells both in vitro and in vivo in xenograft models. EZH2 knockdown induced apoptosis of human EOC cells. Finally, we showed that EZH2 knockdown suppressed the invasion of human EOC cells. Together, these data demonstrate that EZH2 is frequently overexpressed in human EOC cells and its overexpression promotes the proliferation and invasion of human EOC cells, suggesting that EZH2 is a potential target for developing EOC therapeutics. PMID:21115743

  8. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  9. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Ovarian Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  10. Ovarian cysts

    MedlinePlus

    Physiologic ovarian cysts; Functional ovarian cysts; Corpus luteum cysts; Follicular cysts ... cyst often contains a small amount of blood. Ovarian cysts are more common in the childbearing years between ...

  11. Estrogen receptor-mediated miR-486-5p regulation of OLFM4 expression in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xubin; Shen, Hongwei; Xia, Meng; Liu, Xingyang; Zhang, Wenhui; Wang, Liantang; Chen, Shangwu; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen signaling influences the development and progression of ovarian tumors, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In a previous study we demonstrated that impairment of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-mediated olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) expression promotes the malignant progression of endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and we identified OLFM4 as a potential target of miR-486-5p. In this study we investigated the role of OLFM4 in ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. Ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tissues had reduced OLFM4 expression. Expression of OLFM4 was positively correlated with ERα expression, and estrogen (E2) treatment in ovarian cancer cells induced OLFM4 expression in an ERα-dependent manner. In contrast to ERα, miR-486-5p levels were inversely correlated with OLFM4 expression in ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. Ovarian cancer cells transfected with miR-486-5p mimics showed decreased OLFM4 mRNA expression, and ovarian cancer cells treated with E2 showed reduced cellular miR-486-5p levels. OLFM4 knockdown enhanced proliferation, migration, and invasion by ovarian cancer cells. Low expression of OLFM4 was also associated with high tumor FIGO stage and poor tumor differentiation. These results suggest OLFM4 is downregulated by miR-486-5p, which contributes to ovarian cancer tumorigenesis. Conversely, estrogen receptor signaling downregulates miR-486-5p and upregulates OLFM4 expression, slowing the development and progression of ovarian cancer. PMID:26871282

  12. 1. Mill exterior, high grade chute partially restored on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Mill exterior, high grade chute partially restored on the outside of mill building center of picture. Looking northeast from below bridge. - Kennecott Copper Corporation, Concentration Mill, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  13. 40 CFR 246.200 - High-grade paper recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false High-grade paper recovery. 246.200 Section 246.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES SOURCE... paper recovery....

  14. 40 CFR 246.200 - High-grade paper recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false High-grade paper recovery. 246.200 Section 246.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES SOURCE... paper recovery....

  15. 40 CFR 246.200 - High-grade paper recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true High-grade paper recovery. 246.200 Section 246.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES SOURCE... paper recovery....

  16. 40 CFR 246.200 - High-grade paper recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-grade paper recovery. 246.200 Section 246.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES SOURCE... paper recovery....

  17. 40 CFR 246.200 - High-grade paper recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false High-grade paper recovery. 246.200 Section 246.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES SOURCE... paper recovery....

  18. High-Grading Lunar Samples for Return to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Sellar, Glenn; Nunez, Jorge; Winterhalter, Daniel; Farmer, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts on long-duration lunar missions will need the capability to "high-grade" their samples to select the highest value samples for transport to Earth and to leave others on the Moon. We are supporting studies to defile the "necessary and sufficient" measurements and techniques for highgrading samples at a lunar outpost. A glovebox, dedicated to testing instruments and techniques for high-grading samples, is in operation at the JSC Lunar Experiment Laboratory.

  19. Recently identified drug resistance biomarkers in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ben

    2016-05-01

    Ovarian cancer, consisting mainly of ovarian carcinoma, is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Improvements in outcome for patients with advanced-stage disease are limited by intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance and by tumor heterogeneity at different anatomic sites and along disease progression. Molecules and cellular pathways mediating chemoresistance appear to be different for the different histological types of ovarian carcinoma, with most recent research focusing on serous and clear cell carcinoma. This review discusses recent data implicating various biomarkers in chemoresistance in this cancer, with focus on studies in which clinical specimens have been central. PMID:26895188

  20. Serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma: a case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pathiraja, P; Dhar, S; Haldar, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Minimal uterine serous cancer (MUSC) or serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (EIC) has been described by many different names since 1998. There have been very few cases reported in literature since EIC/MUSC was recognized as a separate entity. The World health Organization (WHO) Classification favors the term serous EIC. Although serous EIC is confined to the uterine endometrium at initial histology diagnosis, a significant number of patients could have distal metastasis at diagnosis, without symptoms. Serous EIC is considered as being the precursor of uterine serous cancer (USC), but pure serous EIC also has an aggressive behavior similar to USC. It is therefore prudent to have an accurate diagnosis and appropriate surgical staging. There are very few published articles in literature that discuss the pure form of serous EIC. The aim of this series is to share our experience and review evidence for optimum management of serous EIC. Patients and methods We report a series of five women treated in our institute in the last 3 years. We reviewed the relevant literature on serous EIC and various management strategies, to recommend best clinical practice. Conclusion Pure serous EIC is a difficult histopathological diagnosis, which requires ancillary immunohistochemical staining. It can have an aggressive clinical behavior with early recurrence and poor survival. Optimum surgical staging, with appropriate adjuvant treatment, should be discussed when treating these patients. PMID:23861597

  1. Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Fridley, Brooke L; Song, Honglin; Lawrenson, Kate; Cunningham, Julie M; Ramus, Susan J; Cicek, Mine S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Stram, Douglas; Larson, Melissa C; Köbel, Martin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Hannah P; Wu, Anna H; Wozniak, Eva L; Woo, Yin Ling; Winterhoff, Boris; Wik, Elisabeth; Whittemore, Alice S; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Vitonis, Allison F; Vincent, Daniel; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Van Den Berg, David; Van Altena, Anne M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Thompson, Pamela J; Tessier, Daniel C; Terry, Kathryn L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Templeman, Claire; Stram, Daniel O; Southey, Melissa C; Sieh, Weiva; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shridhar, Viji; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Severi, Gianluca; Schwaab, Ira; Salvesen, Helga B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Risch, Harvey A; Renner, Stefan P; Poole, Elizabeth M; Pike, Malcolm C; Phelan, Catherine M; Pelttari, Liisa M; Pejovic, Tanja; Paul, James; Orlow, Irene; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Olson, Sara H; Odunsi, Kunle; Nickels, Stefan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ness, Roberta B; Narod, Steven A; Nakanishi, Toru; Moysich, Kirsten B; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Modugno, Francesmary; Menon, Usha; McLaughlin, John R; McGuire, Valerie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Adenan, Noor Azmi Mat; Massuger, Leon F A G; Lurie, Galina; Lundvall, Lene; Lubiński, Jan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Levine, Douglas A; Leminen, Arto; Lee, Alice W; Le, Nhu D; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Lambrechts, Diether; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Krakstad, Camilla; Konecny, Gottfried E; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kelemen, Linda E; Keeney, Gary L; Karlan, Beth Y; Karevan, Rod; Kalli, Kimberly R; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jensen, Allan; Jakubowska, Anna; Iversen, Edwin; Hosono, Satoyo; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Hoatlin, Maureen; Hillemanns, Peter; Heitz, Florian; Hein, Rebecca; Harter, Philipp; Halle, Mari K; Hall, Per; Gronwald, Jacek; Gore, Martin; Goodman, Marc T; Giles, Graham G; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Flanagan, James M; Fasching, Peter A; Ekici, Arif B; Edwards, Robert; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas F; Dürst, Matthias; du Bois, Andreas; Dörk, Thilo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Despierre, Evelyn; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Cramer, Daniel W; Cook, Linda S; Chen, Xiaoqing; Charbonneau, Bridget; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Campbell, Ian; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Brown, Robert; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brinton, Louise A; Bogdanova, Natalia; Block, Matthew S; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Beesley, Jonathan; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bandera, Elisa V; Baglietto, Laura; Bacot, François; Armasu, Sebastian M; Antonenkova, Natalia; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Aben, Katja K; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Sellers, Thomas A; Huntsman, David; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Laird, Peter W; Goode, Ellen L; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2013-01-01

    HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR)=1.13, P=3.1 × 10(-10)) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR=0.77, P=1.6 × 10(-8)) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes. PMID:23535649

  2. Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Fridley, Brooke L.; Song, Honglin; Lawrenson, Kate; Cunningham, Julie M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Cicek, Mine S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Stram, Douglas; Larson, Melissa C.; Köbel, Martin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Hannah P.; Wu, Anna H.; Wozniak, Eva L.; Woo, Yin Ling; Winterhoff, Boris; Wik, Elisabeth; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Vitonis, Allison F.; Vincent, Daniel; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vergote, Ignace; Van Den Berg, David; Van Altena, Anne M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Templeman, Claire; Stram, Daniel O.; Southey, Melissa C.; Sieh, Weiva; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shridhar, Viji; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Severi, Gianluca; Schwaab, Ira; Salvesen, Helga B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Risch, Harvey A.; Renner, Stefan P.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pejovic, Tanja; Paul, James; Orlow, Irene; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Olson, Sara H.; Odunsi, Kunle; Nickels, Stefan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ness, Roberta B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nakanishi, Toru; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Modugno, Francesmary; Menon, Usha; McLaughlin, John R.; McGuire, Valerie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Adenan, Noor Azmi Mat; Massuger, Leon F.A. G.; Lurie, Galina; Lundvall, Lene; Lubiński, Jan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Levine, Douglas A.; Leminen, Arto; Lee, Alice W.; Le, Nhu D.; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Lambrechts, Diether; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Krakstad, Camilla; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Keeney, Gary L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Karevan, Rod; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jensen, Allan; Jakubowska, Anna; Iversen, Edwin; Hosono, Satoyo; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Hoatlin, Maureen; Hillemanns, Peter; Heitz, Florian; Hein, Rebecca; Harter, Philipp; Halle, Mari K.; Hall, Per; Gronwald, Jacek; Gore, Martin; Goodman, Marc T.; Giles, Graham G.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Flanagan, James M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Ekici, Arif B.; Edwards, Robert; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas F.; Dürst, Matthias; du Bois, Andreas; Dörk, Thilo; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Despierre, Evelyn; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cook, Linda S.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Charbonneau, Bridget; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Campbell, Ian; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Brown, Robert; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brinton, Louise A.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Block, Matthew S.; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Beesley, Jonathan; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Baglietto, Laura; Bacot, François; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Antonenkova, Natalia; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Aben, Katja K.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Huntsman, David; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Laird, Peter W.; Goode, Ellen L.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2013-01-01

    HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR) = 1.13, P = 3.1 × 10−10) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR = 0.77, P = 1.6 × 10−8) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes. PMID:23535649

  3. Differential hRad17 expression by histologic subtype of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the search for unique ovarian cancer biomarkers, ovarian specific cDNA microarray analysis identified hRad17, a cell cycle checkpoint protein, as over-expressed in ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to validate this expression. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on 72 serous, 19 endometrioid, 10 clear cell, and 6 mucinous ovarian cancers, 9 benign ovarian tumors, and 6 normal ovarian tissue sections using an anti-hRad17 antibody. Western blot analysis and quantitative PCR were performed using cell lysates and total RNA prepared from 17 ovarian cancer cell lines and 6 normal ovarian epithelial cell cultures (HOSE). Results Antibody staining confirmed upregulation of hRad17 in 49.5% of ovarian cancer cases. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that only 42% of serous and 47% of endometrioid subtypes showed overexpression compared to 80% of clear cell and 100% of mucinous cancers. Western blot confirmed overexpression of hRad17 in cancer cell lines compared to HOSE. Quantitative PCR demonstrated an upregulation of hRad17 RNA by 1.5-7 fold. hRad17 RNA expression differed by subtype. Conclusions hRad17 is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. This over-expression varies by subtype suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of these types. Functional studies are needed to determine the potential role of this protein in ovarian cancer. PMID:21450056

  4. A tumor DNA complex aberration index is an independent predictor of survival in breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Rueda, Oscar M.; Chin, Suet-Feung; Curtis, Christina; Turashvili, Gulisa; Shah, Sohrab; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Yuan, Yinyin; Ng, Charlotte K.; Dunning, Mark J.; Dicks, Ed; Provenzano, Elena; Sammut, Stephen; McKinney, Steven; Ellis, Ian O.; Pinder, Sarah; Purushotham, Arnie; Murphy, Leigh C.; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Brenton, James D.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Aparicio, Samuel; Caldas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Complex focal chromosomal rearrangements in cancer genomes, also called “firestorms”, can be scored from DNA copy number data. The complex arm-wise aberration index (CAAI) is a score that captures DNA copy number alterations that appear as focal complex events in tumors, and has potential prognostic value in breast cancer. This study aimed to validate this DNA-based prognostic index in breast cancer and test for the first time its potential prognostic value in ovarian cancer. Copy number alteration (CNA) data from 1950 breast carcinomas (METABRIC cohort) and 508 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (TCGA dataset) were analyzed. Cases were classified as CAAI positive if at least one complex focal event was scored. Complex alterations were frequently localized on chromosome 8p (n = 159), 17q (n = 176) and 11q (n = 251). CAAI events on 11q were most frequent in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cases and on 17q in estrogen receptor negative (ER−) cases. We found only a modest correlation between CAAI and the overall rate of genomic instability (GII) and number of breakpoints (r = 0.27 and r = 0.42, p < 0.001). Breast cancer specific survival (BCSS), overall survival (OS) and ovarian cancer progression free survival (PFS) were used as clinical end points in Cox proportional hazard model survival analyses. CAAI positive breast cancers (43%) had higher mortality: hazard ratio (HR) of 1.94 (95%CI, 1.62–2.32) for BCSS, and of 1.49 (95%CI, 1.30–1.71) for OS. Representations of the 70-gene and the 21-gene predictors were compared with CAAI in multivariable models and CAAI was independently significant with a Cox adjusted HR of 1.56 (95%CI, 1.23–1.99) for ER+ and 1.55 (95%CI, 1.11–2.18) for ER− disease. None of the expression-based predictors were prognostic in the ER− subset. We found that a model including CAAI and the two expression-based prognostic signatures outperformed a model including the 21-gene and 70-gene signatures but excluding CAAI

  5. Association between invasive ovarian cancer susceptibility and 11 best candidate SNPs from breast cancer genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Honglin; Ramus, Susan J.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; DiCioccio, Richard A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Hogdall, Estrid; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Hogdall, Claus; Blaakaer, Jan; Wu, Anna H.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jacobs, Ian J.; Webb, Penny M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T.; Lurie, Galina; Thompson, Pamela J.; Carney, Michael E.; Ness, Roberta B.; Moysich, Kirsten; Goode, Ellen L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Anderson, Stephanie; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Brewster, Wendy R.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2009-01-01

    Because both ovarian and breast cancer are hormone-related and are known to have some predisposition genes in common, we evaluated 11 of the most significant hits (six with confirmed associations with breast cancer) from the breast cancer genome-wide association study for association with invasive ovarian cancer. Eleven SNPs were initially genotyped in 2927 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 4143 controls from six ovarian cancer case–control studies. Genotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared using a likelihood ratio test in a logistic regression model stratified by study. Initially, three SNPs (rs2107425 in MRPL23, rs7313833 in PTHLH, rs3803662 in TNRC9) were weakly associated with ovarian cancer risk and one SNP (rs4954956 in NXPH2) was associated with serous ovarian cancer in non-Hispanic white subjects (P-trend < 0.1). These four SNPs were then genotyped in an additional 4060 cases and 6308 controls from eight independent studies. Only rs4954956 was significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk both in the replication study and in combined analyses. This association was stronger for the serous histological subtype [per minor allele odds ratio (OR) 1.07 95% CI 1.01–1.13, P-trend = 0.02 for all types of ovarian cancer and OR 1.14 95% CI 1.07–1.22, P-trend = 0.00017 for serous ovarian cancer]. In conclusion, we found that rs4954956 was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk, particularly for serous ovarian cancer. However, none of the six confirmed breast cancer susceptibility variants we tested was associated with ovarian cancer risk. Further work will be needed to identify the causal variant associated with rs4954956 or elucidate its function. PMID:19304784

  6. Use of immunohistochemical staining panel for characterisation of ovarian neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Ashorn, P; Helle, M; Helin, H; Ashorn, R; Krohn, K

    1988-01-01

    Eighty five ovarian epithelial and non-epithelial tumours were studied by peroxidase histochemical staining for their reactivity with six monoclonal human milk fat globule (HMFG) antibodies, peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and a monoclonal cytokeratin antibody. HMFG IIIC12 and cytokeratin antibodies distinguished epithelial from non-epithelial tumours. The staining patterns of mucinous and serous tumours were essentially different from each other; poorly differentiated anaplastic carcinomas showed similar antigenic content to that of the serous cystadenocarcinomas. Furthermore, staining with PNA lectin and HMFG antibodies was useful in distinguishing clear cell carcinomas from other malignant epithelial tumours of the ovary. Images Fig 2 Fig 1 PMID:2449464

  7. Genetic imbalance on chromosome 17 in papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Bandera, C A; Muto, M G; Welch, W R; Berkowitz, R S; Mok, S C

    1998-07-01

    We extend the evaluation of allelic loss patterns on chromosome 17 to papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneum (PSCP) which is histologically identical to papillary serous ovarian carcinoma (PSOC). DNA was obtained from 11 archival cases of PSCP, with 1-11 tumor sites per case. Using ten loci spanning chromosome 17, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was identified in all 11 cases (100%). Furthermore, 75-100% of informative cases exhibited LOH at the loci p53, D17S1322 (intragenic to the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1), D17S1327 and MPO. PSCP cases exhibit a higher rate of LOH at most loci when compared with PSOC. Alternating allelic loss at different tumor sites was identified in three cases supporting a multifocal origin of PSCP. Microsatellite instability (MI) is an uncommon event which was identified in four cases. These data implicate chromosome 17 as a potential location of genetic events important in the pathogenesis of PSCP as well as ovarian cancer. PMID:9692553

  8. Surgical Outcomes of High-Grade Spinal Cord Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to obtain useful information for establishing the guidelines for treating high-grade spinal cord gliomas. Overview of Literature The optimal management of high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains controversial. We report the outcomes of the surgical management of 14 high-grade spinal glioma. Methods We analyzed the outcomes of 14 patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas who were surgically treated between 1989 and 2012. Survival was charted with the Kaplan-Meier plots and comparisons were made with the log-rank test. Results None of the patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas underwent total resection. Subtotal resection was performed in two patients, partial resection was performed in nine patients, and open biopsy was performed in three patients. All patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy and six patients further underwent radiation cordotomy. The median survival time for patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas was 15 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 22.2%. The median survival time for patients with World Health Organization grade III tumors was 25.5 months, whereas the median survival time for patients with glioblastoma multiforme was 12.5 months. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant effect only in the group that did not include cervical cord lesion as a factor associated with survival (p=0.04 and 0.03). Conclusions The surgical outcome of patients diagnosed with high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains poor. Notably, only the model which excluded cervical cord lesions as a factor significantly predicted survival. PMID:26713128

  9. Bullous variant of idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, D.; Namperumalsamy, P; Hilton, G.; de Sousa, N. F

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Spontaneous bullous serous retinal detachment (RD) with subretinal exudation complicating idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy (ICSC) is a rare and infrequently described clinical entity. Clinical observations are described on this variant form in 11 patients, the largest series reported to date.
METHODS—13 eyes of 11 Indian patients having this entity were followed up clinically and angiographically for 12-24 months (retrospective, longitudinal). None of the patients had any previous history of other diseases nor were they on any medications. Four eyes received laser treatment (group A); nine eyes were not treated (group B).
RESULTS—All 11 patients were male, aged 23-49 years (median 37 years). The clinical and photographic records revealed subretinal exudation and inferior bullous serous RD complicating ICSC with evidence of large, single or multiple, leaking retinal pigment epithelial detachments (PEDs) in all the cases. In group A, resolution of serous RD occurred in 12 weeks (median) with a visual recovery of ⩾20/30 in three out of four eyes while in group B resolution of serous retinal detachment was observed in 14 weeks (median) with eight out of nine eyes achieving a visual acuity of ⩾20/30. Subretinal fibrosis developed in two eyes in group A and none of the eyes in group B.
CONCLUSION—The disease is an exaggerated form of ICSC and can occur spontaneously without any history of corticosteroid therapy. Recognition of this atypical presentation is important to avoid inappropriate treatment. These observations suggest that with respect to the duration of the disease and the final visual outcome laser therapy offers no additional benefit over the natural course of this variant form of ICSC.

 PMID:10781512

  10. Cytogenetic studies in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Whang-Peng, J; Knutsen, T; Douglass, E C; Chu, E; Ozols, R F; Hogan, W M; Young, R C

    1984-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies of ovarian cancer have been conducted in the Medicine Branch, NCI, National Institutes of Health for 5 years. A total of 72 patients were studied by direct preparation and/or 1- to 3-day short-term culture of ascites (86 samples), pleural fluid (4 samples), and tumor (2 samples). Repeat examinations (1-24 months later) were performed in 7 of the 72 patients. Forty-four patients (62%) were successfully analyzed with banding techniques: 6 patients had adenocarcinoma, 7 had serous adenocarcinoma, 13 had serous papillary adenocarcinoma, 7 had serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, 2 had mucinous adenocarcinoma, 6 had undifferentiated or poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, 1 had clear cell adenocarcinoma, and 2 were not classified. Of these 44 patients, 29 had received prior chemotherapy, 14 were untreated, and in 1 patient the treatment status was unknown. Aneuploidy was observed in all patients and there was considerable variation in the chromosome numbers (even within single samples), often ranging from diploidy to triploidy to tetraploidy. All 44 patients had numerical abnormalities and 39 had structural abnormalities. The chromosomes most frequently involved in structural abnormalities (in decreasing order according to the number of patients involved) were #1, #3, #2, #4, #9, #10, #15, #19, #6, and #11; the least involved chromosomes were #21 and #5. Clone formation and the number of chromosomes involved in structural abnormalities increased with duration of disease and were more extensive in patients treated with chemotherapy than in patients treated with surgery alone. Our data did not show a deletion of chromosome #6 (6q-) to be specific for ovarian cancer. PMID:6690026

  11. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Paine, Martin R L; Kim, Jaeyeon; Bennett, Rachel V; Parry, R Mitchell; Gaul, David A; Wang, May D; Matzuk, Martin M; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO) mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy. PMID:27159635

  12. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Bennett, Rachel V.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Gaul, David A.; Wang, May D.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO) mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy. PMID:27159635

  13. Expression of LATS family proteins in ovarian tumors and its significance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Sun, Duoxiang; Wang, Zhihua; Weng, Haiyan; Wu, Dabao; Zhang, Xuefen; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Weiping

    2015-06-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is composed of a diverse group of tumors that can be derived from the fallopian tube, endometrium, or ovary. In this study, we explored the expression levels of LATS family members in ovarian tumors using normal ovaries, fallopian tubes, and endometrium as controls. Immunohistochemistry studies of LATS1, LATS2, Pax8, and calretinin were performed on normal ovary, fallopian tube, normal endometrium, and ovarian tumor sections. Statistical analyses were conducted using the χ(2) test, Fisher exact test, or Kruskal-Wallis H test. Patient survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. LATS1 was expressed in normal ovarian epithelia, endometrium, and fallopian tubes, whereas LATS2 expression was observed in the normal fallopian tubes and endometrium. High expressions of LATS1 and LATS2 in serous cystadenomas gradually decreased in borderline cystadenomas and carcinomas, respectively. However, an opposite expression pattern was observed in mucinous tumors. Low expressions of LATS1 and LATS2 were also detected in clear cell carcinoma. Both LATS1 and LATS2 expression levels significantly correlated with recurrence and stage; LATS1 levels were also related with tumor grades in serous carcinoma. However, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that high expression of LATS1 was associated with better prognosis in patients with serous carcinoma. Both LATS1 and LATS2 were not related with the clinical variables in mucinous and clear cell carcinoma. LATS1 expression levels might be a valuable survival indicator in ovarian serous carcinoma. PMID:25841306

  14. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Rishi R.; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  15. Photodynamic therapy of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) high grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Belotto, Renata; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-02-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the precursor of invasive cervical cancer and associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors. PDT is based on the accumulation of a photosensitizer in target cells that will generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species upon illumination, inducing the death of abnormal tissue and PDT with less damaging to normal tissues than surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy and seems to be a promising alternative procedure for CIN treatment. The CIN high grades (II and III) presents potential indications for PDT due the success of PDT for CIN low grade treatment. The patients with CIN high grade that were treated with new clinic protocol shows lesion regression to CIN low grade 60 days after the treatment. The new clinical protocol using for treatment of CIN high grade shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  16. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Lulla, Rishi R; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  17. Extraovarian peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma: a case-control retrospective comparison to papillary adenocarcinoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Bloss, J D; Liao, S Y; Buller, R E; Manetta, A; Berman, M L; McMeekin, S; Bloss, L P; DiSaia, P J

    1993-09-01

    Since the establishment of extraovarian peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma (EPSPC) as a clinical entity in 1959, less than 250 cases have been described and its clinicopathologic features remain obscure. The present series is a retrospective, case-controlled study comparing the response and survival to cytoreductive surgery followed by cisplatin-based multiagent chemotherapy of 33 women with confirmed EPSPC versus 33 cases with papillary serous ovarian cancer (PSOC). Each EPSPC case was matched to a PSOC control for extent and distribution of disease prior to and following cytoreductive surgery, tumor grade, patient age, and treatment. Additionally, the new Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the diagnosis for EPSPC are discussed. There were no significant differences in tumor response to therapy, disease-free interval, and actuarial survival between cases and controls. These data suggest that EPSPC is clinically similar to PSOC and support the need for a prospective clinical trial to compare these two entities further. PMID:8406199

  18. PRIMA-1MET induces apoptosis through accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species irrespective of p53 status and chemo-sensitivity in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIKAWA, NOBUHISA; KAJIYAMA, HIROAKI; NAKAMURA, KAE; UTSUMI, FUMI; NIIMI, KAORU; MITSUI, HIROKO; SEKIYA, RYUICHIRO; SUZUKI, SHIRO; SHIBATA, KIYOSUMI; CALLEN, DAVID; KIKKAWA, FUMITAKA

    2016-01-01

    There is an intensive need for the development of novel drugs for the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the most lethal gynecologic malignancy due to the high recurrence rate. TP53 mutation is a common event in EOC, particularly in high-grade serous ovarian cancer, where it occurs in more than 90% of cases. Recently, PRIMA-1 and PRIMA-1MET (p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis and its methylated form) were shown to have an antitumor effect on several types of cancer. Despite that PRIMA-1MET is the first compound evaluated in clinical trials, the antitumor effects of PRIMA-1MET on EOC remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of PRIMA-1MET for the treatment of EOC cells. PRIMA-1MET treatment of EOC cell lines (n=13) resulted in rapid apoptosis at various concentrations (24 h IC50 2.6–20.1 µM). The apoptotic response was independent of the p53 status and chemo-sensitivity. PRIMA-1MET treatment increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and PRIMA-1MET-induced apoptosis was rescued by an ROS scavenger. Furthermore, RNA expression analysis revealed that the mechanism of action of PRIMA-1MET may be due to inhibition of antioxidant enzymes, such as Prx3 and GPx-1. In conclusion, our results suggest that PRIMA-1MET represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ovarian cancer irrespective of p53 status and chemo-sensitivity. PMID:26986846

  19. Identification of two poorly prognosed ovarian carcinoma subtypes associated with CHEK2 germ-line mutation and non-CHEK2 somatic mutation gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Ow, Ghim Siong; Ivshina, Anna V; Fuentes, Gloria; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC), a major histologic type of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), is a poorly-characterized, heterogeneous and lethal disease where somatic mutations of TP53 are common and inherited loss-of-function mutations in BRCA1/2 predispose to cancer in 9.5-13% of EOC patients. However, the overall burden of disease due to either inherited or sporadic mutations is not known. We performed bioinformatics analyses of mutational and clinical data of 334 HG-SOC tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas to identify novel tumor-driving mutations, survival-significant patient subgroups and tumor subtypes potentially driven by either hereditary or sporadic factors. We identified a sub-cluster of high-frequency mutations in 22 patients and 58 genes associated with DNA damage repair, apoptosis and cell cycle. Mutations of CHEK2, observed with the highest intensity, were associated with poor therapy response and overall survival (OS) of these patients (P = 8.00e-05), possibly due to detrimental effect of mutations at the nuclear localization signal. A 21-gene mutational prognostic signature significantly stratifies patients into relatively low or high-risk subgroups with 5-y OS of 37% or 6%, respectively (P = 7.31e-08). Further analysis of these genes and high-risk subgroup revealed 2 distinct classes of tumors characterized by either germline mutations of genes such as CHEK2, RPS6KA2 and MLL4, or somatic mutations of other genes in the signature. Our results could provide improvement in prediction and clinical management of HG-SOC, facilitate our understanding of this complex disease, guide the design of targeted therapeutics and improve screening efforts to identify women at high-risk of hereditary ovarian cancers distinct from those associated with BRCA1/2 mutations. PMID:24879340

  20. Medical interventions for high grade vulval intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pepas, Litha; Kaushik, Sonali; Bryant, Andrew; Nordin, Andy; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background Vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is a pre-malignant condition of the vulval skin; its incidence is increasing in women under 50 years. VIN is graded histologically as low grade or high grade. High grade VIN is associated with infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and may progress to invasive disease. There is no consensus on the optimal management of high grade VIN. The high morbidity and high relapse rate associated with surgical interventions call for a formal appraisal of the evidence available for less invasive but effective interventions for high grade VIN. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of medical interventions for high grade VIN. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to September 2010). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed medical interventions, in adult women diagnosed with high grade VIN. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Where possible the data were synthesised in a meta-analysis. Main results Four trials met our inclusion criteria: three assessed the effectiveness of topical imiquimod versus placebo in women with high grade VIN; one examined low versus high dose indole-3-carbinol in similar women. Meta-analysis of three trials found that the proportion of women who responded to treatment at 5 to 6 months was much higher in the group who received topical imiquimod than in the group who received placebo (relative risk (RR) = 11.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.21 to 44.51). A single trial showed similar results at 12 months in (RR = 9.10, 95% CI 2.38 to 34.77). Only one trial reported

  1. Large-Scale Evaluation of Common Variation in Regulatory T Cell-Related Genes and Ovarian Cancer Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Bridget; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Oberg, Ann L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Fogarty, Zachary C.; Block, Matthew S.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Goergen, Krista M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Rider, David N.; Preston, Claudia; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Lawrenson, Kate; Wang, Chen; Tyrer, Jonathan; Song, Honglin; deFazio, Anna; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Ramirez, Starr M.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Van Den Berg, David; Pike, Malcolm C.; Wu, Anna H.; Berchuck, Andrew; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ramus, Susan J.; Diergaarde, Brenda; Shen, Howard; Jensen, Allan; Menkiszak, Janusz; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubiński, Jan; Ziogas, Argyrios; Rothstein, Joseph H.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Yang, Hannah; Brinton, Louise A.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Paddock, Lisa E.; Orlow, Irene; Lundvall, Lene; Olson, Sara H.; Hogdall, Claus K.; Schwaab, Ira; du Bois, Andreas; Harter, Philipp; Flanagan, James M.; Brown, Robert; Paul, James; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Eccles, Diana; Lurie, Galina; Hays, Laura E.; Bean, Yukie T.; Pejovic, Tanja; Goodman, Marc T.; Campbell, Ian; Fasching, Peter A.; Konecny, Gottfried; Kaye, Stanley B.; Heitz, Florian; Hogdall, Estrid; Bandera, Elisa V.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Lambrechts, Diether; Karlan, Beth Y.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Culver, Hoda Anton; Gronwald, Jacek; Levine, Douglas A.; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Menon, Usha; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Cramer, Daniel W.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Ness, Roberta B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara E.; Knutson, Keith L.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in solid tumors is known to play a role in patient survival in ovarian cancer and other malignancies. We assessed inherited genetic variations via 749 tag SNPs in 25 Treg-associated genes (CD28, CTLA4, FOXP3, IDO1, IL10, IL10RA, IL15, 1L17RA, IL23A, IL23R, IL2RA, IL6, IL6R, IL8, LGALS1, LGALS9, MAP3K8, STAT5A, STAT5B, TGFB1, TGFB2, TGFB3, TGFBR1, TGRBR2, and TGFBR3) in relation to ovarian cancer survival. We analyzed genotype and overall survival in 10,084 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, including 5,248 high-grade serous, 1,452 endometrioid, 795 clear cell, and 661 mucinous carcinoma cases of European descent across 28 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). The strongest associations were found for endometrioid carcinoma and IL2RA SNPs rs11256497 [HR=1.42, 95% CI: 1.22–1.64; p=5.7 × 10−6], rs791587 [HR=1.36, 95% CI:1.17–1.57; p=6.2 × 10−5], rs2476491 [HR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.191.64; p=5.6 × 10−5], and rs10795763 [HR=1.35, 95% CI: 1.17–1.57; p=7.9 × 10−5], and for clear cell carcinoma and CTLA4 SNP rs231775 [HR=0.67, 95% CI: 0.54–0.82; p=9.3 × 10−5] after adjustment for age, study site, population stratification, stage, grade, and oral contraceptive use. The rs231775 allele associated with improved survival in our study also results in an amino acid change in CTLA4 and previously has been reported to be associated with autoimmune conditions. Thus, we found evidence that SNPs in genes related to Tregs appear to play a role in ovarian cancer survival, particularly in patients with clear cell and endometrioid EOC. PMID:24764580

  2. [CLINICAL APPROACH TO PEDIATRIC SEROUS OTITIS MEDIA].

    PubMed

    Gruber, Maayan; Honigman, Tal; Cohen-Kerem, Raanan

    2015-06-01

    Serous otitis media (also known as otitis media with effusion) is one of the most prevalent pediatric diagnoses. However, the recommended clinical approach and significance of this entity are controversial. Pathogenesis is usually based upon a combination of factors as overviewed in the body of the article. The cognitive and behavioral effects amongst children suffering serous otitis media were extensively studied and data points to little if any effects during long term follow-ups in otherwise healthy children. The therapeutic approach can be divided into watchful waiting, systemic drugs, topical drugs, mechanical therapies and surgical therapy (i.e. ventilation tube insertion). The reviewed literature mainly supports the effectiveness of the surgical approach in carefully selected cohorts of patients. PMID:26281082

  3. Ultrasonography for early detection of ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andolf, E; Svalenius, E; Astedt, B

    1986-12-01

    Ultrasound scan for detection of ovarian enlargements was performed in a target group of out-patients attending the clinic for various reasons in the 40-70 years range. Overall 805 women were examined, in 99% of whom the ovaries and/or their vessels could be identified. Pathological findings were suspected in 83 patients at the first scan, and were confirmed in 50 after a repeat scan, 39 of whom subsequently underwent surgery. Various ovarian lesions were found in 35 women, including five mucinous and serous cystadenomas, one carcinoma, two borderline tumours, and a cancer of the caecum. None of the borderline or malignant ovarian lesions were found by manual pelvic examination. Ultrasound screening appears to be a useful diagnostic aid, though its usefulness might be further improved if other risk factors such as heredity and period of ovulatory activity are taken into consideration. PMID:3542015

  4. [A case of peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Sakata, Yoshio; Nishida, Yu; Nomura, Yusuke; Makino, Tetsuya; Maeda, Tetsuo; Tada, Hidetoshi; Kimoto, Takeo; Ueno, Sayaka; Fujiwara, Kiyoshi

    2011-08-01

    A 65-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with abdominal distension. Abdominal CT and MRI revealed massive ascites and an omental cake, but the ovaries were of normal size. After an omentum biopsy was performed during open abdominal surgery, she was diagnosed as peritoneal serous papillary adenocarcinoma. After 6 courses of chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin, the massive ascites totally disappeared, and a second look operation could be performed. She is still alive with no sign of recurrence. PMID:21829076

  5. Identical TP53 mutations in pelvic carcinosarcomas and associated serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas provide evidence of their clonal relationship.

    PubMed

    Ardighieri, Laura; Mori, Luigi; Conzadori, Sara; Bugatti, Mattia; Falchetti, Marcella; Donzelli, Carla Maria; Ravaggi, Antonella; Odicino, Franco E; Facchetti, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    Pelvic carcinosarcomas (PCSs) are rare aggressive biphasic tumors that localize in the ovary, fallopian tube, or peritoneum and present frequently as bilateral disease. We undertook a morphological, p53 immunohistochemical and TP53 gene mutational analysis study in a single institution cohort of 16 PCSs in order to investigate the nature of bilateral tumors and to shed light on their origin and pathogenesis. Of the 16 patients, 10 presented with bilateral disease, 6 with a carcinosarcoma in both adnexa, and the remaining cases with a carcinosarcoma in one adnexum and a carcinoma in the opposite. The carcinoma component showed high-grade serous features in 13/16 of cases (81 %). In 10 patients (63 %), a serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) was found, in one case bilateral, making a total of 11 STICs. STIC was found only in cases with a carcinoma component with high-grade serous features. All 10 bilateral tumors and all 11 PCS-associated STICs showed a similar p53 immunostaining pattern. At mutation analysis of the TP53 gene, all five bilateral PCS contained an identical mutation in both localizations. Furthermore, a TP53 mutation was found in 8 of 10 STICs, with an identical mutation in the associated PCS. The finding of similar p53 immunostaining in all bilateral cases and identical TP53 mutations in most PCS-associated STIC provides evidence for a clonal relation between these neoplastic lesions, supporting a metastatic nature of bilateral PCS and suggesting that they have an extraovarian origin in a STIC. PMID:27059324

  6. Ovarian Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... new cysts. A health problem that may involve ovarian cysts is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with ... male hormones, irregular or no periods and small ovarian cysts. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office ...

  7. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - ovaries ... Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women. It causes more deaths than any other type of female reproductive organ cancer. The cause of ovarian cancer is unknown. Risk ...

  8. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of ovarian cancer Already been diagnosed with ovarian cancer to determine how well treatment is working Other tests that may be done include: Complete blood count and blood chemistry Pregnancy test (serum HCG) CT or MRI of ...

  9. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-03-22

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26871602

  10. Germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and ten-year survival for women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J.; Song, Honglin; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Larson, Melissa C.; Alsop, Kathryn; Dicks, Ed; Harrington, Patricia; Ramus, Susan J.; de Fazio, Anna; Mitchell, Gillian; Fereday, Sian; Bolton, Kelly L.; Gourley, Charlie; Michie, Caroline; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Cass, Ilana; Olsson, Håkan; Gore, Martin; Benitez, Javier J.; Garcia, Maria J.; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Montagna, Marco; Alducci, Elisa; Sadetzki, Siegal; Chetrit, Angela; Kwong, Ava; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Estrid; Neuhausen, Susan; Nussbaum, Robert; Daly, Mary; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Moysich, Kirsten; Toland, Amanda E.; Lambrechts, Diether; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Brenton, James D.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A.; Bowtell, David; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyse the effect of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 on mortality in ovarian cancer patients up to ten years after diagnosis. Experimental Design We used unpublished survival time data for 2,242 patients from two case-control studies and extended survival-time data for 4,314 patients from previously reported studies. All participants had been screened for deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Survival time was analysed for the combined data using Cox proportional hazard models with BRCA1 and BRCA2 as time-varying covariates. Competing risks were analysed using Fine and Gray model. Results The combined 10-year overall survival was 30% (95% CI, 28%-31%) for non-carriers, 25% (95% CI, 22%-28%) for BRCA1 carriers, and 35% (95% CI, 30%-41%) for BRCA2 carriers. The hazard ratio for BRCA1 was 0.53 at time zero and increased over time becoming greater than one at ·4.8 years. For BRCA2, the hazard ratio was 0.42 at time zero and increased over time (predicted to become greater than one at 10.5 years). The results were similar when restricted to 3,202 patients with high-grade serous tumors, and to ovarian cancer specific mortality. Conclusions BRCA1/2 mutations are associated with better short-term survival, but this advantage decreases over time and, in BRCA1 carriers is eventually reversed. This may have important implications for therapy of both primary and relapsed disease and for analysis of long-term survival in clinical trials of new agents, particularly those that are effective in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:25398451

  11. HNF1β drives glutathione (GSH) synthesis underlying intrinsic carboplatin resistance of ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC).

    PubMed

    Lopes-Coelho, Filipa; Gouveia-Fernandes, Sofia; Gonçalves, Luís G; Nunes, Carolina; Faustino, Inês; Silva, Fernanda; Félix, Ana; Pereira, Sofia A; Serpa, Jacinta

    2016-04-01

    Chemoresistance to platinum-based antineoplastic agents is a consistent feature among ovarian carcinomas; however, whereas high-grade serous carcinoma (OSC) acquires resistance during chemotherapy, ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is intrinsically resistant. The main objective of this study was to explore, in vitro and in vivo, if hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) and glutaminolysis contribute for the resistance of OCCC to carboplatin through the intrinsically increased GSH bioavailability. To disclose the role of HNF1β, experiments were also performed in an OSC cell line, which does not express HNF1β. Metabolic profiles, GSH quantification, HNF1β, and γ-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) expression, cell cycle, and death were assessed in ES2 cell line (OCCC) and OVCAR3 cell line (OSC); HNF1β knockdown was performed in ES2 and murine model of subcutaneous and peritoneal OCCC tumors was established to test buthionine sulphoxamine (BSO), as a sensitizer to carboplatin. Glutaminolysis is activated in ES2 and OVCAR3, though ES2 exclusively synthesizes amino acids and GSH. ES2 cells are more resistant to carboplatin than OVCAR3 and the abrogation of GSH production by BSO sensitizes ES2 to carboplatin. HNF1β regulates the expression of GCLC, but not GCLM, and consequently GSH production in ES2. In vivo, BSO prior to carboplatin reduces dramatically subcutaneous tumor size and GSH levels, as well as peritoneal dissemination. Our study discloses HNF1β as the mediator of intrinsic OCCC chemoresistance and sheds a light to re-explore a cancer adjuvant therapeutic approach using BSO to overcome the lack of efficient therapy in OCCC. PMID:26520442

  12. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26871602

  13. Ultra-deep sequencing detects ovarian cancer cells in peritoneal fluid and reveals somatic TP53 mutations in noncancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Krimmel, Jeffrey D; Schmitt, Michael W; Harrell, Maria I; Agnew, Kathy J; Kennedy, Scott R; Emond, Mary J; Loeb, Lawrence A; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Risques, Rosa Ana

    2016-05-24

    Current sequencing methods are error-prone, which precludes the identification of low frequency mutations for early cancer detection. Duplex sequencing is a sequencing technology that decreases errors by scoring mutations present only in both strands of DNA. Our aim was to determine whether duplex sequencing could detect extremely rare cancer cells present in peritoneal fluid from women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). These aggressive cancers are typically diagnosed at a late stage and are characterized by TP53 mutations and peritoneal dissemination. We used duplex sequencing to analyze TP53 mutations in 17 peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC and 20 from women without cancer. The tumor TP53 mutation was detected in 94% (16/17) of peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC (frequency as low as 1 mutant per 24,736 normal genomes). Additionally, we detected extremely low frequency TP53 mutations (median mutant fraction 1/13,139) in peritoneal fluid from nearly all patients with and without cancer (35/37). These mutations were mostly deleterious, clustered in hotspots, increased with age, and were more abundant in women with cancer than in controls. The total burden of TP53 mutations in peritoneal fluid distinguished cancers from controls with 82% sensitivity (14/17) and 90% specificity (18/20). Age-associated, low frequency TP53 mutations were also found in 100% of peripheral blood samples from 15 women with and without ovarian cancer (none with hematologic disorder). Our results demonstrate the ability of duplex sequencing to detect rare cancer cells and provide evidence of widespread, low frequency, age-associated somatic TP53 mutation in noncancerous tissue. PMID:27152024

  14. Evidence for a time-dependent association between FOLR1 expression and survival from ovarian carcinoma: implications for clinical testing. An Ovarian Tumour Tissue Analysis consortium study

    PubMed Central

    Köbel, M; Madore, J; Ramus, S J; Clarke, B A; Pharoah, P D P; Deen, S; Bowtell, D D; Odunsi, K; Menon, U; Morrison, C; Lele, S; Bshara, W; Sucheston, L; Beckmann, M W; Hein, A; Thiel, F C; Hartmann, A; Wachter, D L; Anglesio, M S; Høgdall, E; Jensen, A; Høgdall, C; Kalli, K R; Fridley, B L; Keeney, G L; Fogarty, Z C; Vierkant, R A; Liu, S; Cho, S; Nelson, G; Ghatage, P; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Gayther, S A; Benjamin, E; Widschwendter, M; Intermaggio, M P; Rosen, B; Bernardini, M Q; Mackay, H; Oza, A; Shaw, P; Jimenez-Linan, M; Driver, K E; Alsop, J; Mack, M; Koziak, J M; Steed, H; Ewanowich, C; DeFazio, A; Chenevix-Trench, G; Fereday, S; Gao, B; Johnatty, S E; George, J; Galletta, L; Goode, E L; Kjær, S K; Huntsman, D G; Fasching, P A; Moysich, K B; Brenton, J D; Kelemen, L E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Folate receptor 1 (FOLR1) is expressed in the majority of ovarian carcinomas (OvCa), making it an attractive target for therapy. However, clinical trials testing anti-FOLR1 therapies in OvCa show mixed results and require better understanding of the prognostic relevance of FOLR1 expression. We conducted a large study evaluating FOLR1 expression with survival in different histological types of OvCa. Methods: Tissue microarrays composed of tumour samples from 2801 patients in the Ovarian Tumour Tissue Analysis (OTTA) consortium were assessed for FOLR1 expression by centralised immunohistochemistry. We estimated associations for overall (OS) and progression-free (PFS) survival using adjusted Cox regression models. High-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSC) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were evaluated independently for association between FOLR1 mRNA upregulation and survival. Results: FOLR1 expression ranged from 76% in HGSC to 11% in mucinous carcinomas in OTTA. For HGSC, the association between FOLR1 expression and OS changed significantly during the years following diagnosis in OTTA (Pinteraction=0.01, N=1422) and TCGA (Pinteraction=0.01, N=485). In OTTA, particularly for FIGO stage I/II tumours, patients with FOLR1-positive HGSC showed increased OS during the first 2 years only (hazard ratio=0.44, 95% confidence interval=0.20–0.96) and patients with FOLR1-positive clear cell carcinomas (CCC) showed decreased PFS independent of follow-up time (HR=1.89, 95% CI=1.10–3.25, N=259). In TCGA, FOLR1 mRNA upregulation in HGSC was also associated with increased OS during the first 2 years following diagnosis irrespective of tumour stage (HR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.25–0.94). Conclusions: FOLR1-positive HGSC tumours were associated with an increased OS in the first 2 years following diagnosis. Patients with FOLR1-negative, poor prognosis HGSC would be unlikely to benefit from anti-FOLR1 therapies. In contrast, a decreased PFS interval was observed for FOLR1

  15. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  16. Ovarian Cyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... accurate way to tell if a woman has ovarian cancer. For example, some women who do have ovarian cancer have a normal CA-125 level. Also, this ... for women who show signs or symptoms of ovarian cancer or who have genetic mutations that increase the ...

  17. PTN signaling: Components and mechanistic insights in human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Geetika; Kwon, Youngjoo; Burkhalter, Rebecca J; Pathak, Harsh B; Madan, Rashna; McHugh, Sarah; Atay, Safinur; Murthy, Smruthi; Tawfik, Ossama W; Godwin, Andrew K

    2015-12-01

    Molecular vulnerabilities represent promising candidates for the development of targeted therapies that hold the promise to overcome the challenges encountered with non-targeted chemotherapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Through a synthetic lethality screen, we previously identified pleiotrophin (PTN) as a molecular vulnerability in ovarian cancer and showed that siRNA-mediated PTN knockdown induced apoptotic cell death in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells. Although, it is well known that PTN elicits its pro-tumorigenic effects through its receptor, protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Z1 (PTPRZ1), little is known about the potential importance of this pathway in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. In this study, we show that PTN is expressed, produced, and secreted in a panel of EOC cell lines. PTN levels in serous ovarian tumor tissues are on average 3.5-fold higher relative to normal tissue and PTN is detectable in serum samples of patients with EOC. PTPRZ1 is also expressed and produced by EOC cells and is found to be up-regulated in serous ovarian tumor tissue relative to normal ovarian surface epithelial tissue (P < 0.05). Gene silencing of PTPRZ1 in EOC cell lines using siRNA-mediated knockdown shows that PTPRZ1 is essential for viability and results in significant apoptosis with no effect on the cell cycle phase distribution. In order to determine how PTN mediates survival, we silenced the gene using siRNA mediated knockdown and performed expression profiling of 36 survival-related genes. Through computational mapping of the differentially expressed genes, members of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) family were found to be likely effectors of PTN signaling in EOC cells. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that PTN and its signaling components may be of significance in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer and provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of MAPK inhibitors in PTN and/or PTPRZ1 expressing ovarian

  18. High-Grade Sarcomas Mimicking Traumatic Intramuscular Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo; Morcuende, Jose

    2004-01-01

    We reported on three patients with high-grade soft-tissue sarcomas mimicking traumatic intramuscular hematomas. Patients had an episode of trauma to the extremity, and after initial clinical and imaging evaluations they were considered to have muscular hematomas. The lesions increased in size over time, leading to further evaluations that demonstrated the actual diagnosis. We conducted a retrospective review of the clinical findings, magnetic resonance images, and computed tomography scans to assess characteristics that will help in the differential diagnosis. We conclude that intramuscular hematomas following trauma should be approached with a high degree of clinical suspicion. MRI analysis can be used as an important diagnostic tool, but the results must be seen in the context of the clinical history. MRI is not sensitive or specific enough to rule out malignancy. The diagnosis of a high-grade sarcoma must be considered in these patients and any doubt should be resolved with a biopsy. PMID:15296215

  19. Selective nonoperative management of high grade splenic trauma.

    PubMed

    Branco, Bernardino C; Tang, Andrew L; Rhee, Peter; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Rizoli, Sandro; O'Keeffe, Terence

    2013-01-01

    The "Evidence-based Telemedicine - Trauma & Acute Care Surgery" (EBT-TACS) Journal Club performed a critical review of the literature and selected three up-to-date articles on the management of splenic trauma. Our focus was on high-grade splenic injuries, defined as AAST injury grade III-V. The first paper was an update of the 2003 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) practice management guidelines for nonoperative management of injury to the spleen. The second paper was an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) 2012 plenary paper evaluating the predictive role of contrast blush on CT scan in AAST grade IV and V splenic injuries. Our last article was from Europe and investigates the effects of angioembolization of splenic artery on splenic function after high-grade splenic trauma (AAST grade III-V). The EBT-TACS Journal Club elaborated conclusions and recommendations for the management of high-grade splenic trauma. PMID:23912375

  20. Clinical management of uterine papillary serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roelofsen, Thijs; van Ham, Maaike A; de Hullu, Joanne A; Massuger, Leon F

    2011-01-01

    Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer. Owing to its rarity, most clinicians are unfamiliar with the clinical aspects and management of UPSC. Furthermore, little prospective evidence exists regarding how best to treat this subset of patients. In anticipation of prospective clinical trials, this article summarizes the latest results of various clinical management options in the different substages of UPSC, with a special focus on the effects of cytoreductive surgery, comprehensive surgical staging and different adjuvant treatment options in relation to recurrence rate and survival outcome. PMID:21166512

  1. Primary peritoneal serous carcinoma, an extremely rare malignancy: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    YUN, WOO-SUNG; BAE, JUNG-MIN

    2016-01-01

    Primary peritoneal serous carcinoma (PPSC) is an extremely rare malignancy that was first described in 1959. This type of cancer arises from the peritoneal epithelium and is similar to serous ovarian carcinoma. A diagnosis of PPSC is typically made based on the Gynecology Oncology Group criteria; however, a correct differential diagnosis of PPSC is difficult preoperatively. The current study describes the case of a 66 year-old female patient presenting with abdomen distension. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed abundant ascites in the abdominal cavity and omental infiltration. The results of positron emission tomography/CT showed hot uptake in the greater omentum. Furthermore, preoperative serum cancer antigen-125 levels were 1,032 U/ml. Upon surgical exploration, a whitish mass and nodule were found in the greater omentum. Therefore, omentectomy was performed. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed a diagnosis of PPSC. PPSC is extremely rare with few cases cited in the current literature. The present study describes a rare case of PPSC with a review of the literature. PMID:27313741

  2. Secretome Identifies Tenascin-X as a Potent Marker of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Marianne; Pierredon, Sandra; Ribaux, Pascale; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Cohen, Marie

    2015-01-01

    CA-125 has been a valuable marker for the follow-up of ovarian cancer patients but it is not sensitive enough to be used as diagnostic marker. We had already used secretomic methods to identify proteins differentially secreted by serous ovarian cancer cells compared to healthy ovarian cells. Here, we evaluated the secretion of these proteins by ovarian cancer cells during the follow-up of one patient. Proteins that correlated with CA-125 levels were screened using serum samples from ovarian cancer patients as well as benign and healthy controls. Tenascin-X secretion was shown to correlate with CA-125 value in the initial case study. The immunohistochemical detection of increased amount of tenascin-X in ovarian cancer tissues compared to healthy tissues confirms the potent interest in tenascin-X as marker. We then quantified the tenascin-X level in serum of patients and identified tenascin-X as potent marker for ovarian cancer, showing that secretomic analysis is suitable for the identification of protein biomarkers when combined with protein immunoassay. Using this method, we determined tenascin-X as a new potent marker for serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26090390

  3. Napsin A is a specific marker for ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoriko; Nagasaka, Tetsuro; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Sato, Shinya; Suzuki, Shugo; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ito, Masafumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma has a relatively poor prognosis among the ovarian cancer subtypes because of its high chemoresistance. Differential diagnosis of clear cell adenocarcinoma from other ovarian surface epithelial tumors is important for its treatment. Napsin A is a known diagnostic marker for lung adenocarcinoma, and expression of napsin A is reported in a certain portion of thyroid and renal carcinomas. However, napsin A expression in ovarian surface epithelial tumors has not previously been examined. In this study, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that in 71 of 86 ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma patients (83%) and all of the 13 patients with ovarian clear cell adenofibroma, positive napsin A staining was evident. No expression was observed in 30 serous adenocarcinomas, 11 serous adenomas or borderline tumors, 19 endometrioid adenocarcinomas, 22 mucinous adenomas or borderline tumors, 10 mucinous adenocarcinomas, or 3 yolk sac tumors of the ovary. Furthermore, expression of napsin A was not observed in the normal surface epithelium of the ovary, epithelia of the fallopian tubes, squamous epithelium, endocervical epithelium, or the endometrium of the uterus. Therefore, we propose that napsin A is another sensitive and specific marker for distinguishing ovarian clear cell tumors (especially adenocarcinomas) from other ovarian tumors. PMID:24721826

  4. Central Serous Chorioretinopathy Treatments: A Mini Review.

    PubMed

    Iacono, Pierluigi; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Falcomatà, Bruno; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is a retinal disorder that primarily affects young (20- to 50-year-old) white men, although it is seen occasionally in older patients and females. CSC is characterized by avascular focal leakage through the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), resulting in serous detachment of the neurosensory retina. The course is usually self-limiting and in most cases resolves spontaneously within a 3-month period, with visual acuity usually recovering to 20/30 or better. However, chronic CSC may develop as a consequence of recurrences or persistent neurosensory detachment, and can result in progressive RPE atrophy and permanent visual loss. A primary involvement of the RPE and choroidal vascularization play a significant role in the pathogenesis of CSC and the current treatment options attempt to restore the functions of the RPE and the normal choroidal vasculature. The aim of the current review is to provide an overview of the current therapeutical approaches to CSC, including observation, laser treatment, photodynamic therapy with verteporfin, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy and the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. PMID:26619293

  5. Changes in expression of differentiation markers between normal ovarian cells and derived tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Van Niekerk, C. C.; Ramaekers, F. C.; Hanselaar, A. G.; Aldeweireldt, J.; Poels, L. G.

    1993-01-01

    The marker profile of 18 samples of normal human ovarian tissues and 138 samples of their derived tumors was established using 51 monoclonal antibodies directed against intermediate filaments, ovarian carcinoma-specific antigens, general tumor-associated antigens and MHC-I/II antigens. Our data show that vimentin and keratins 7, 8, 18, and 19 were found in both epithelial and some nonepithelial ovarian tumors. Several tumor samples contained additional keratins 4, 10, 13, and 14, as well as desmin. BW 495/36 and to a lesser extent HMFG-2 were usually found in all ovarian tumors that contained simple epithelial keratins, except the absence of HMFG-2 in gonadal tumors as well as in dysgerminomas. In contrast to the keratin antibodies, these two panepithelial antibodies were negative in normal mesothelial cells and granulosa cells of the ovarian follicles. In general, the marker TAG-72 appeared useful for its discrimination between positively stained mucinous adenomas, the ovarian carcinomas as well as germ cell tumors, and the negatively stained gonadal tumors, serous adenomas, and cystomas. OV632 appeared useful in the distinction between negatively stained serous adenomas and positively stained serous carcinomas. In contrast, the monoclonal antibodies OC 125, OV-TL 3, OV-TL 16, and MOv 18 can be considered as pan-ovarian carcinoma markers, however without the discriminative capability as seen for OV632. These ovarian carcinoma-associated antigens were hardly found expressed in gonadal and germ cell tumors, except in the group of endodermal sinus tumors. HLA-I was found to be expressed in almost all nucleated cells, although loss of HLA-I expression was seen in areas of tumor cells. HLA-DR was negative in normal ovarian tissue, but heterogeneous expression was noticed in most of the epithelial tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7678716

  6. Predicting Ovarian Cancer Patients' Clinical Response to Platinum-Based Chemotherapy by Their Tumor Proteomic Signatures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Levine, Douglas A; Zhang, Hui; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Zhen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy in the United States with most patients diagnosed in the advanced stage of the disease. Platinum-based antineoplastic therapeutics is indispensable to treating advanced ovarian serous carcinoma. However, patients have heterogeneous responses to platinum drugs, and it is difficult to predict these interindividual differences before administering medication. In this study, we investigated the tumor proteomic profiles and clinical characteristics of 130 ovarian serous carcinoma patients analyzed by the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), predicted the platinum drug response using supervised machine learning methods, and evaluated our prediction models through leave-one-out cross-validation. Our data-driven feature selection approach indicated that tumor proteomics profiles contain information for predicting binarized platinum response (P < 0.0001). We further built a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO)-Cox proportional hazards model that stratified patients into early relapse and late relapse groups (P = 0.00013). The top proteomic features indicative of platinum response were involved in ATP synthesis pathways and Ran GTPase binding. Overall, we demonstrated that proteomic profiles of ovarian serous carcinoma patients predicted platinum drug responses as well as provided insights into the biological processes influencing the efficacy of platinum-based therapeutics. Our analytical approach is also extensible to predicting response to other antineoplastic agents or treatment modalities for both ovarian and other cancers. PMID:27312948

  7. Irradiation of Pediatric High-Grade Spinal Cord Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Wu Shengjie; Kun, Larry E.; Broniscer, Alberto; Sanford, Robert A.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To report the outcome using radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric patients with high-grade spinal cord tumors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was conducted that included 17 children with high-grade spinal cord tumors treated with RT at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital between 1981 and 2007. Three patients had gross total resection, 11 had subtotal resection, and 3 underwent biopsy. The tumor diagnosis was glioblastoma multiforme (n = 7), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 8), or anaplastic oligodendroglioma (n = 2). Seven patients received craniospinal irradiation (34.2-48.6 Gy). The median dose to the primary site was 52.2 Gy (range, 38-66 Gy). Results: The median progression-free and overall survivals were 10.8 and 13.8 months, respectively. Local tumor progression at 12 months (79% vs. 30%, p = 0.02) and median survival (13.1 vs. 27.2 months, p = 0.09) were worse for patients with glioblastoma multiforme compared with anaplastic astrocytoma or oligodendroglioma. The median overall survival was shorter for patients when failure included neuraxis dissemination (n = 8) compared with local failure alone (n = 5), 9.6 vs. 13.8 months, p = 0.08. Three long-term survivors with World Health Organization Grade III tumors were alive with follow-up, ranging from 88-239 months. Conclusions: High-grade spinal cord primary tumors in children have a poor prognosis. The propensity for neuraxis metastases as a component of progression after RT suggests the need for more aggressive therapy.

  8. Development of a Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth R.; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology. A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant) mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1–5% (it is not a null mutation). Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer. Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention. PMID:24616881

  9. Distinct prognostic values of four-Notch-receptor mRNA expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinling; Teng, Lingling; Wang, Min

    2016-05-01

    Notch signaling pathway includes ligands and Notch receptors, which are frequently deregulated in several human malignancies including ovarian cancer. Aberrant activation of Notch signaling has been linked to ovarian carcinogenesis and progression. In the current study, we used the "Kaplan-Meier plotter" (KM plotter) database, in which updated gene expression data and survival information from a total of 1306 ovarian cancer patients were used to access the prognostic value of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer patients. Hazard ratio (HR), 95 % confidence intervals, and log-rank P were calculated. Notch1 messenger RNA (mRNA) high expression was not found to be correlated to overall survival (OS) for all ovarian cancer, as well as in serous and endometrioid cancer patients followed for 20 years. However, Notch1 mRNA high expression is significantly associated with worsen OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, while it is significantly associated with better OS in TP53 mutation-type ovarian cancer patients. Notch2 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to worsen OS for all ovarian cancer patients, as well as in grade II ovarian cancer patients. Notch3 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to better OS for all ovarian cancer patients, but not in serous cancer patients and endometrioid cancer patients. Notch4 mRNA high expression was not found to be significantly correlated to OS for all ovarian cancer patients, serous cancer patients, and endometrioid cancer patients. These results indicate that there are distinct prognostic values of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer. This information will be useful for better understanding of the heterogeneity and complexity in the molecular biology of ovarian cancer and for developing tools to more accurately predict their prognosis. Based on our results, Notch1 could be a potential drug target of TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer and Notch2 could be a potential drug

  10. Biomechanics of high-grade spondylolisthesis with and without reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhai; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Cahill, Patrick; Baran, George; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Parent, Stefan; Labelle, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    The clinical advantages of reducing spondylolisthesis over fusion in situ have several intuitive reasons such as restore the spinal column into a more anatomic relationship and alignment. However, there is only little evidence in the literature supporting the theoretical advantages of reduction, and its effect on spinopelvic alignment remains poorly defined. In this study, a comprehensive finite element model was developed to analyze the biomechanics of the spine after spinal fusion at L5-S1 in both types of high-grade spondylolisthesis (balanced and unbalanced pelvis). The relevant clinical indices (i.e. spondylolisthesis grade and Dubousset lumbosacral angle), the displacement of L4-L5, pressure within the annulus and nucleus, and stress at L4-L5 were evaluated and compared. The model can well predict the changes of the important clinical indices during the surgery. For a balanced pelvis, the reduction has a minimal effect on the biomechanical conditions at the adjacent level during postsurgical activities. In the unbalanced case, reduction induced larger deformation in the lumbosacral region and a higher stress concentration at adjacent level. Whether such a stress concentration can lead to long-term disc degeneration is not known. The results provide additional information for the clinician considering reduction of high-grade spondylolisthesis. PMID:26233229

  11. Ovarian haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Gunes, H A; Egilmez, R; Dulger, M

    1990-12-01

    Although ovaries have a very rich vasculature, haemangiomas of the ovary are extremely rare. There are only another 39 cases of ovarian haemangioma recorded in the literature. We describe an 11-year-old girl with an ovarian haemangioma who presented clinically with an acute abdomen. The patient has been well without complications for a year. PMID:2102218

  12. Adrenal Metastasis from Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Singh, Navdeep; Tuli, Sandeep S.; Seligman, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: UPSC with adrenal metastasis Symptoms: Post menopausal bleeding Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Adrenalectomy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a highly malignant form of endometrial cancer with a high propensity for metastases and recurrences even when there is minimal or no myometrial invasion. It usually metastasizes to the pelvis, retroperitoneal lymph nodes, upper abdomen, and peritoneum. However, adrenal metastases from UPSC is extremely rare. Here, we present a case of UPSC with adrenal metastasis that occurred 6 years after the initial diagnosis. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman previously diagnosed with uterine papillary serous carcinoma at an outside facility presented in September of 2006 with postmenopausal bleeding. She underwent comprehensive surgical staging with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage 2. Post-operatively, the patient was treated with radiation and chemotherapy. The treatment was completed in April of 2007. The patient had no evidence of disease until July 2009 when she was found to have a mass highly suspicious for malignancy. Subsequently, she underwent right upper lobectomy. The morphology of the carcinoma was consistent with UPSC. She refused chemotherapy due to a previous history of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. The patient was followed up with regular computed tomography (CT) scans. In October 2012 a new right adrenal nodule was seen on CT, which showed intense metabolic uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy. Pathology of the surgical specimen was consistent with UPSC. Conclusions: UPSC is an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer associated with high recurrence rate and poor prognoses. Long-term follow-up is needed because there is a possibility of late metastases, as in this case. PMID:27117594

  13. Adrenal Metastasis from Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singh Lubana, Sandeep; Singh, Navdeep; Tuli, Sandeep S; Seligman, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a highly malignant form of endometrial cancer with a high propensity for metastases and recurrences even when there is minimal or no myometrial invasion. It usually metastasizes to the pelvis, retroperitoneal lymph nodes, upper abdomen, and peritoneum. However, adrenal metastases from UPSC is extremely rare. Here, we present a case of UPSC with adrenal metastasis that occurred 6 years after the initial diagnosis. CASE REPORT A 60-year-old woman previously diagnosed with uterine papillary serous carcinoma at an outside facility presented in September of 2006 with postmenopausal bleeding. She underwent comprehensive surgical staging with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage 2. Post-operatively, the patient was treated with radiation and chemotherapy. The treatment was completed in April of 2007. The patient had no evidence of disease until July 2009 when she was found to have a mass highly suspicious for malignancy. Subsequently, she underwent right upper lobectomy. The morphology of the carcinoma was consistent with UPSC. She refused chemotherapy due to a previous history of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. The patient was followed up with regular computed tomography (CT) scans. In October 2012 a new right adrenal nodule was seen on CT, which showed intense metabolic uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy. Pathology of the surgical specimen was consistent with UPSC. CONCLUSIONS UPSC is an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer associated with high recurrence rate and poor prognoses. Long-term follow-up is needed because there is a possibility of late metastases, as in this case. PMID:27117594

  14. Ovarian tumours of Wolffian or allied nature: their place in ovarian oncology.

    PubMed Central

    Hughesdon, P E

    1982-01-01

    Two unusual ovarian tumours thought to be of Wolffian identity, one of them malignant, are described. They showed packed combinations of adenopapillary, tubular, trabecular and diffuse patterns, a sharp and generalised periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive basement membrane and areas of elastic network. A review of published Wolffian tumours at various sites suggests that the prototypes of the two tumours occur chiefly in the cervix and broad ligament. The significance of Wolffian tumours and their differentiation from arrhenoblastoma and serous tumours is discussed. Images PMID:6282940

  15. NFATc1 regulates cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Duan, Zhaoning; Yu, Jihui; Dang, Hong-Xing

    2016-08-01

    NFATc1 (nuclear factor of activated T‑cells c1) is associated with malignancy in several cancer models. However, the expression and function of NFATc1 in ovarian cancer remain elusive. In the present study, we investigated the role of NFATc1 in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) using human ovarian adenocarcinoma SKOV3 cells and patient characteristics. NFATc1 expression was silenced by siRNA in the SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell line and in human ovarian cancer nude mouse xenografts. Real‑time PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemical staining, MTT, flow cytometry, transwell, erasion trace and mouse assays were used to detect NFATc1 expression, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell invasion and migration, tumor growth and angiogenesis. Survival analysis was performed to assess the correlation between NFATc1 expression and survival. NFATc1 was overexpressed in the SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell line and in human serous/mucinous ovarian cancer tissues. The silencing of NFATc1 expression by siRNA reduced cell proliferation and migration and promoted apoptosis in vitro and decreased the ovarian cancer cell tumorigenesis in vivo in nude mice. NFATc1 overexpression in high‑grade serous ovarian carcinomas was an independent prognostic factor of poor overall survival and of early relapse (P<0.01) in a univariate analysis. Our present data provide evidence that NFATc1 is overexpressed in human serous/mucinous ovarian cancer and is associated with a poor prognosis. NFATc1 silencing regulates the cell cycle, apoptosis, invasion and migration. NFATc1 thus has the potential to be a therapeutic target and to be used in EOC diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:27350254

  16. Expression and histopathological correlation of CCR9 and CCL25 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajesh; Stockard, Cecil R; Grizzle, William E; Lillard, James W; Singh, Shailesh

    2011-08-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecological malignancy among women and its poor prognosis is mainly due to metastasis. Chemokine receptor CCR9 is primarily expressed by a small subset of immune cells. The interactions between CCL25 and CCR9 have been implicated in leukocyte trafficking to the small bowel, a frequent metastatic site for ovarian cancer cells. We have previously shown that ovarian cancer cells express CCR9 and play an important role in cell migration, invasion and survival in the presence of its natural ligand in vitro. In this study, we have evaluated the expression of CCR9 and CCL25 in ovarian cancer cells and clinical samples. Ovarian cancer tissue microarrays from University of Alabama at Birmingham and AccuMax were stained for CCR9 and CCL25. Aperio ScanScope was used to acquire 80X digital images and expression analysis of CCR9 and CCL25. Flow cytometry and the Image stream system were used to conform the expression of CCR9 and CCL25 in ovarian cancer cells. Our results show significantly higher (p<0.001) expression of CCR9 and CCL25 in serous adenocarcinoma followed by serous papillary cystadenoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, cystadenoma, mucinous boderline adenocarcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, granulosa cell tumor, dysgerminoma, transitional cell carcinoma, Brenner tumor, yolk sac tumor, adenocarcinoma and fibroma cases, compared to non-neoplastic ovarian tissue. Similar to tissue expression, CCR9 was also sig