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Sample records for high-harmonic fast wave

  1. Turbulence Scattering of High Harmonic Fast Waves

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono; J. Hosea; B. LeBlanc; J. Menard; C.K. Phillips; R. Wilson; P. Ryan; D. Swain; J. Wilgen; S. Kubota; and T.K. Mau

    2001-05-31

    Effect of scattering of high-harmonic fast-magnetosonic waves (HHFW) by low-frequency plasma turbulence is investigated. Due to the similarity of the wavelength of HHFW to that of the expected low-frequency turbulence in the plasma edge region, the scattering of HHFW can become significant under some conditions. The scattering probability increases with the launched wave parallel-phase-velocity as the location of the wave cut-off layer shifts toward the lower density edge. The scattering probability can be reduced significantly with higher edge plasma temperature, steeper edge density gradient, and magnetic field. The theoretical model could explain some of the HHFW heating observations on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX).

  2. Numerical Modeling of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Hosea, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Leblanc, B. P.; Parker, J. B.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, P. M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Wilgen, J. B.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Dumont, R. J.

    2007-11-01

    High harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive processes, at frequencies up to 15 times the fundamental deuterium cyclotron frequency, are being studied on NSTX. Recent experiments indicate that the core heating efficiency depends strongly on the antenna phasing and plasma conditions [1]. The wave propagation and absorption characteristics for select NSTX discharges will be analyzed using a variety of rf modeling codes, including both ray tracing and full wave models. Both core power deposition profiles and rf power flow in the edge regions will be considered. The possibility of off-axis mode conversion of the HHFW to shorter wavelength modes and the subsequent impact on power deposition will be explored. [1] See invited talk by J. C. Hosea this meeting for details

  3. High Harmonic Fast Wave Propagation and Heating on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. B.; Phillips, C. K.; Hosea, J. C.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.

    2007-11-01

    Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) show that the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) core heating efficiency depends on the antenna phasing and plasma conditions. [1]. Power losses in the edge due to rf sheath formation or other parasitic absorption processes could occur if the waves propagate nearly parallel to the wall in the edge regions and intersect nearby vessel structures. To investigate this possibility, the 3D HHFW propagation in NSTX has been studied both analytically and numerically with the ray tracing code GENRAY. Initial calculations show that for certain values of the launched parallel wave number and magnetic field, the waves in NSTX are launched at a shallow angle to the vessel wall. In contrast, for ICRF heating in C-Mod or ITER, the initial ray trajectories tend to be more radially oriented. Comparisons of the GENRAY results with 2D TORIC full wave simulations for the power deposition will also be discussed. [1] See invited talk by J. C. Hosea this meeting.

  4. Recent Results from High Harmonic Fast Wave Experiments on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Yuh, H.

    2008-11-01

    30 MHz high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive experiments in NSTX at an axial toroidal field of 0.55 T show significantly improved core power deposition and heating efficiency at lower launched toroidal wavenumbers (k||) compared to operation at or below 0.45 T. In addition, lithium wall conditioning has been effectively used to reduce the edge density resulting in the first observation of HHFW core heating at k|| = 3 m-1 in a deuterium plasma. Record core electron temperatures of 5 keV were reached with 3.1 MW HHFW power, and for the first time core HHFW electron heating of NBI-driven deuterium H-mode plasmas was obtained. Motional Stark effect measurements of the current driven in 0.55 T L-mode helium plasmas are consistent with predictions from AORSA and TORIC full-wave simulations. These improved HHFW heating results are attributed to moving the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation in the plasma further from the wall [1]. [1] J.C. Hosea, et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056104 (2008)

  5. Results of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Hosea; R.E. Bell; M. Bitter; P. Bonoli; M. Carter; D. Gates; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Majeski; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; S. Paul; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; A. Rosenberg; P. Ryan; S.A. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D. Swain; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; and J.R. Wilson

    2001-08-09

    The study of high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) heating and current drive is being conducted on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) device to determine the physics of applying radio-frequency (rf) waves at high harmonics (approximately 10-20) of the ion cyclotron frequency in this high-beta plasma regime and to extend the performance of the NSTX plasma. The magnetic field of this low aspect ratio device is lower (less than or equal to 0.35 T for this work) than that for the typical moderate aspect ratio tokamak regime by about an order of magnitude and the plasma densities achieved are typically in the mid 10(superscript ''19'') m(superscript ''-3'') range. Thus, the dielectric constant of the plasma, epsilon always equals omega (subscript ''pe'')(superscript ''2'') divided by omega (subscript ''ce'')(superscript ''2''), is of order approximately 50-100 resulting in wave physics properties which favor electron heating by TTMP and Landau damping. Radio-frequency power is applied on NSTX at 3 0 MHz using an antenna array with 12 current straps aligned in the poloidal direction. The antenna can be phased to launch waves with toroidal wave numbers, k(subscript ''T'') between 2 m(superscript ''-1'') and 14 m(superscript ''-1'') and can be phased for current drive with peak toroidal directionality at 7 m(superscript ''-1''). To date most of the HHFW experiments have been carried out using k(subscript ''T'') = 14 m(superscript ''-1'') with 0-pi-0-pi-... phasing of the strap currents. The diagnostic complement on NSTX includes a 30-Hz, 10-spatial-channel Thomson scattering (MPTS) system for measuring profiles of electron temperature and density every 33 msec, and a charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system for measuring profiles of the impurity ion temperature and toroidal rotation during a neutral-beam blip. Strong electron and ion heating are observed in helium discharges, whereas the heating efficiency is noticeably reduced for deuterium

  6. High-Harmonic Fast-Wave heating in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, B. P.; Bell, R. E.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hosea, J. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Mau, T. K.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Phillips, C. K.; Pinsker, R.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D. W.; Takase, Y.; Wilgen, J. B.; Wilson, J. R.

    2001-10-01

    High-Harmonic Fast-Wave (HHFW), a radio-frequency technique scenario applicable to high-beta plasmas, has been selected as one of the main auxiliary heating systems on NSTX. The HHFW antenna assembly comprises 12 toroidally adjacent current elements, extending poloidally and centered on the equatorial plane. This paper reviews experimental results obtained with a symmetrical (vacuum) launching spectrum with k∥=14 m-1 at a frequency of 30 MHz. We describe results obtained when HHFW power is applied to helium and deuterium plasmas, during the plasma-current flattop period of the discharge. Application of 1.8-MW HHFW pulse to MHD quiescent plasmas resulted in strong electron heating, during which the central electron temperature, Teo more than doubled from ≈0.05 keV to 1.15 keV. In deuterium plasmas, HHFW heating was found less efficient, with a Teo increase of the order of 40% during a 1.8-MW HHFW pulse, from ≈400 eV to ≈550 eV. (At HHFW power of 2.4 MW, Teo increased by 60%, reaching 0.625 keV.) HHFW heating in presence of MHD activity is also discussed. A short neutral beam pulse was applied to permit charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) measurement of the impurity ion temperature Ti. Preliminary CHERS analysis show that Ti≈Te during HHFW heating. Of special interest are deuterium discharges, where the application of HHFW power was done during the current ramp-up. We observe the creation of large density gradients in the edge region. In the latter case, the density rose spontaneously to neo⩽8×1013 cm-3.

  7. High-harmonic Fast-wave Heating in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc; R.E. Bell; P.T. Bonoli; J.C. Hosea; D.W. Johnson; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; S. Paul; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; A. Rosenberg; P.M. Ryan , S.A. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; Y. Takase; J.B. Wilgen; J.R. Wilson

    2001-06-11

    High-Harmonic Fast-Wave (HHFW), a radio-frequency technique scenario applicable to high-beta plasmas, has been selected as one of the main auxiliary heating systems on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The HHFW antenna assembly comprises 12 toroidally adjacent current elements, extending poloidally and centered on the equatorial plane. This paper reviews experimental results obtained with a symmetrical (vacuum) launching spectrum with k|| = 14 m(superscript ''-1'') at a frequency of 30 MHz. We describe results obtained when HHFW power is applied to helium and deuterium plasmas, during the plasma-current flattop period of the discharge. Application of 1.8-MW HHFW pulse to MHD quiescent plasmas resulted in strong electron heating, during which the central electron temperature T(subscript ''eo'') more than doubled from approximately 0.5 keV to 1.15 keV. In deuterium plasmas, HHFW heating was found less efficient, with a central electron temperature increase of the order of 40% during a 1.8-MW HHFW pulse, from approximately 400 eV to approximately 550 eV. (At HHFW power of 2.4 MW, central electron temperature increased by 60%, reaching 0.625 keV.) HHFW heating in presence of MHD activity is also discussed. A short neutral-beam pulse was applied to permit charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) measurement of the impurity ion temperature T(subscript ''i''). Preliminary CHERS analysis show that ion temperature approximately equals electron temperature during HHFW heating. Of special interest are deuterium discharges, where the application of HHFW power was done during the current ramp-up. We observe the creation of large density gradients in the edge region. In the latter case, the density rose spontaneously to n (subscript ''eo'') less than or equal to 8 x 10 (superscript ''13'') cm (superscript ''-3'').

  8. High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J. R.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Bonoli, P.; Carter, Mark Dwain; Gates, D.; Hosea, Joel; LeBlanc, B; Majeski, R.; Mau, T. K.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Paul, S.; Phillips, Cynthia; Pinsker, R.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Sabbagh, S. A.; Stutman, D.; Swain, David W; Takase, Y.; Wilgen, John B

    2001-01-01

    A radio frequency (rf) system has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) with the aim of heating the plasma and driving plasma current. The system consists of six rf transmitters, a twelve element antenna and associated transmission line components to distribute and couple the power from the transmitters to the antenna elements in a fashion to allow control of the antenna toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date, power levels up to 3.85 MW have been applied to the NSTX plasmas. The frequency and spectrum of the rf waves has been selected to heat electrons via Landau damping and transit time magnetic pumping. The electron temperature has been observed to increase from 400 to 900 eV with little change in plasma density resulting in a plasma stored energy of 59 kJ , a toroidal beta, βT , =10% and a normalized beta, βn = 2.7.

  9. Reflectometer sensing of rf waves in front of the high harmonic fast wave antenna on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Wilgen, J. B.; Ryan, P. M.; Hanson, G. R.; Swain, D. W.; Bernabei, S. I.; Greenough, N.; DePasquale, S.; Phillips, C. K.; Hosea, J. C.; Wilson, J. R.

    2006-10-15

    The ability to measure rf driven waves in the edge of the plasma can help to elucidate the role that surface waves and parametric decay instabilities (PDIs) play in rf power losses on NSTX. A microwave reflectometer has recently been modified to monitor rf plasma waves in the scrape-off layer in front of the 30 MHz high harmonic fast wave antenna array on NSTX. In rf heated plasmas, the plasma-reflected microwave signal exhibits 30 MHz sidebands, due primarily to the modulation of the cutoff layer by the electrostatic component of the heating wave. Similarly, electrostatic parametric decay waves (when present) are detected at frequencies below the heating frequency, near 28, 26,... MHz, separated from the heating frequency by harmonics of the local ion cyclotron frequency of about 2 MHz. In addition, a corresponding frequency matched set of decay waves is also detected near the ion cyclotron harmonics at 2, 4,... MHz. The rf plasma-wave sensing capability is useful for determination of the PDI power threshold as a function of antenna array phasing (including toroidal wavelength), outer gap spacing, and various plasma parameters such as the magnetic field and the plasma current.

  10. Fast ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, A. L.; Menard, J. E.; Wilson, J. R.; Medley, S. S.; Andre, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Darrow, D. S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Redi, M. H.; Fisch, N. J.; NSTX Team, Harvey, R. W.; Mau, T. K.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Swain, D. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Egedal, J.

    2004-05-01

    Ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in a spherical torus [Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 26, 769 (1986)] is of critical importance to assessing the viability of the wave as a means of heating and driving current. Analysis of recent National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] shots has revealed that under some conditions when neutral beam and rf power are injected into the plasma simultaneously, a fast ion population with energy above the beam injection energy is sustained by the wave. In agreement with modeling, these experiments find the rf-induced fast ion tail strength and neutron rate at lower B-fields to be less enhanced, likely due to a larger β profile, which promotes greater off-axis absorption where the fast ion population is small. Ion loss codes find the increased loss fraction with decreased B insufficient to account for the changes in tail strength, providing further evidence that this is a rf interaction effect. Though greater ion absorption is predicted with lower k∥, surprisingly little variation in the tail was observed, along with a neutron rate enhancement with higher k∥. Data from the neutral particle analyzer, neutron detectors, x-ray crystal spectrometer, and Thomson scattering are presented, along with results from the TRANSP [R. J. Hawryluk, Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions 1, 19 (1981); J. P. H. E. Ongena et al., Fusion Technol. 33, 181 (1998)] transport analysis code, ray-tracing codes HPRT [J. Menard et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2002 (1999)], and CURRAY [T. K. Mau et al., RF Power in Plasmas: 13th Topical Conference (1999), p. 148], full-wave code AORSA [E. F. Jaeger et al., RF Power in Plasmas: 14th Topical Conference, 2001, p. 369], quasilinear code CQL3D [R. W. Harvey et al., in Proceedings of the IAEA TCM on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, 1992], and ion loss codes EIGOL [D. S. Darrow et al., in Proceedings of the 6th IAEA TCM on

  11. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y. Li, F. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.

    2015-10-15

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  12. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.; Li, F. Y.

    2015-10-01

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  13. Advances in High-harmonic Fast Wave Physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G; Hosea, J C; LeBlanc, B P; Phillips, C K; Podesta, M; Valeo, E J; Wilson, J R; Ahn, J -W; Chen, G; Green, D L; Jaeger, E F; Maingi, R; Ryan, P M; Wilgen, J B; Heidbrink, W W; Liu, D; Bonoli, P T; Brecht, T; Choi, M

    2009-12-01

    Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating at longer wavelengths and during start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall. Lithium conditioning allowed significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-mode plasmas to be observed for the first time. Large edge localized modes were observed immediately after the termination of rf power. Visible and infrared camera images show that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable rf energy on the outboard divertor. HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities were observed to heat ions in the plasma edge and may be the cause for a measured drag on edge toroidal rotation during HHFW heating. A significant enhancement in neutron rate and fast-ion profile were measured in NBI-fuelled plasmas when HHFW heating was applied. __________________________________________________

  14. Advances in high-harmonic fast wave physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Podesta, M.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J-W.; Chen, G.; Green, D. L.; Jaeger, E. F.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Bonoli, P. T.; Brecht, T.; Choi, M.

    2010-05-15

    Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating at longer wavelengths and during start-up and plasma current ramp-up has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall. Lithium conditioning allowed significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-mode plasmas to be observed for the first time. Large edge localized modes were observed immediately after the termination of rf power. Visible and infrared camera images show that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable rf energy on the outboard divertor. HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities were observed to heat ions in the plasma edge and may be the cause for a measured drag on edge toroidal rotation during HHFW heating. A significant enhancement in neutron rate and fast-ion profile was measured in NBI-fuelled plasmas when HHFW heating was applied.

  15. Exploration of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Wilson; R.E. Bell; S. Bernabei; M. Bitter; P. Bonoli; D. Gates; J. Hosea; B. LeBlanc; T.K. Mau; S. Medley; J. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; C.K. Phillips; R.I. Pinsker; R. Raman; A. Rosenberg; P. Ryan; S. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D. Swain; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; the NSTX Team

    2003-02-11

    High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating has been proposed as a particularly attractive means for plasma heating and current drive in the high-beta plasmas that are achievable in spherical torus (ST) devices. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono, M., Kaye, S.M., Neumeyer, S., et al., Proceedings, 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Albuquerque, 1999, (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ (1999), p. 53.)] is such a device. An radio-frequency (rf) heating system has been installed on NSTX to explore the physics of HHFW heating, current drive via rf waves and for use as a tool to demonstrate the attractiveness of the ST concept as a fusion device. To date, experiments have demonstrated many of the theoretical predictions for HHFW. In particular, strong wave absorption on electrons over a wide range of plasma parameters and wave parallel phase velocities, wave acceleration of energetic ions, and indications of current drive for directed wave spectra have been observed. In addition HHFW heating has been used to explore the energy transport properties of NSTX plasmas, to create H-mode (high-confinement mode) discharges with a large fraction of bootstrap current and to control the plasma current profile during the early stages of the discharge.

  16. Recent Developments in High-Harmonic Fast Wave Physics in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc, R.E. Bell, P. Bonoli, R. Harvey, W.W. Heidbrink, J.C. Hosea, S.M. Kaye, D. Liu, R. Maingi, S.S. Medley, M. Ono, M. Podestà, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, A.L. Roquemore, G. Taylor, J.R. Wilson and the NSTX Team

    2010-10-06

    Understanding the interaction between ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) fast waves and the fast-ions created by neutral beam injection (NBI) is critical for future devices such as ITER, which rely on a combination ICRF and NBI. Experiments in NSTX which use 30 MHz High-Harmonic Fast-Wave (HHFW) ICRF and NBI heating show a competition between electron heating via Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping, and radio-frequency wave acceleration of NBI generated fast ions. Understanding and mitigating some of the power loss mechanisms outside the last closed flux surface (LCFS) has resulted in improved HHFW heating inside the LCFS. Nevertheless a significant fraction of the HHFW power is diverted away from the enclosed plasma. Part of this power is observed locally on the divertor. Experimental observations point toward the radio-frequency (RF) excitation of surface waves, which disperse wave power outside the LCFS, as a leading loss mechanism. Lithium coatings lower the density at the antenna, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the antenna and surrounding material surfaces. Visible and infrared imaging reveal flows of RF power along open field lines into the divertor region. In L-mode -- low average NBI power -- conditions, the fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic measures a near doubling and broadening of the density profile of the upper energetic level of the fast ions concurrent with the presence of HHFW power launched with k// =-8m-1. We are able to heat NBI-induced H-mode plasmas with HHFW. The captured power is expected to be split between absorption by the electrons and absorption by the fast ions, based on TORIC calculation. In the case discussed here the Te increases over the whole profile when ~2MW of HHFW power with antenna k// =13m-1 is applied after the H-mode transition.. But somewhat unexpectedly fast-ion diagnostics do not observe a change between the HHFW heated NBI discharge and the

  17. Transition From High Harmonic Fast Wave to Whistler/Helicon Regime in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. P.; Pinsker, R. I.; Porkolab, M.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments are being prepared1 on DIII-D in which fast waves (FWs) at 0.5 GHz will be used to drive current noninductively in the mid-radius region. Previous DIII-D experiments used FWs at ~0.1 GHz to drive central current; in this work we examine the frequency dependence of wave propagation and damping in the 0.1-1.0 GHz range with the goal of identifying the optimum frequency range for a particular application. Strongly enhanced electron damping and reduced ion damping at higher frequencies must be weighed against increasing coupling difficulties at higher frequencies and more restrictive wave accessibility at low toroidal field. Wave propagation and accessibility is studied with ray tracing models in slab, cylindrical, and fully toroidal geometries. Analytic expressions for electron and ion damping will be derived with an emphasis on understanding the transition from the moderate-to-high ion cyclotron harmonic regime to the very high harmonic or ``whistler''/``helicon''/lower hybrid FW regime. Work supported in part by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  18. Advances in High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating of NSTX H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Bonoli, P.; Chen, Guangye; Green, David L; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, Cynthia; Podesta, M.; Taylor, G.; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    High-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive is being developed in NSTX to provide bulk electron heating and q(0) control during non-inductively sustained Hmode plasmas fuelled by deuterium neutral-beam injection (NBI). In addition, it is used to assist the plasma current ramp-up. A major modification to increase the RF power limit was made in 2009; the original end-grounded, single end-powered current straps of the 12- element array were replaced with center-grounded, double end-powered straps. Greater than 3 MW have been coupled into NBI-driven, ELMy H-mode plasmas with this upgraded antenna. Improved core HHFW heating, particularly at longer wavelengths and during low-density start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall [1]. Significant core electron heating of NBI-fuelled H-modes has been observed for the first time over a range of launched wavelengths and H-modes can be accessed by HHFW alone. Visible and IR camera images of the antenna and divertor indicate that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable RF energy on the outboard divertor plate, especially at longer wavelengths that begin to propagate closer to the vessel walls. Edge power loss can also arise from HHFWgenerated parametric decay instabilities; edge ion heating is observed that is wavelength dependent. During plasmas where HHFW is combined with NBI, there is a significant enhancement in neutron rate, and fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) emission measurements clearly show broadening of the fast-ion profile in the plasma core. Large edge localized modes (ELMs) have been observed immediately following the termination of RF power, whether the power turn off is programmed or due to antenna arcing. Causality has not been established but new experiments are planned and will be reported. Fast digitization of the reflected power signal

  19. Edge Ion Heating by Launched High Harmonic Fast Waves in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Biewer; R.E. Bell; S.J. Diem; C.K. Phillips; J.R. Wilson; P.M. Ryan

    2004-12-01

    A new spectroscopic diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) measures the velocity distribution of ions in the plasma edge simultaneously along both poloidal and toroidal views. An anisotropic ion temperature is measured during high-power high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) radio-frequency (rf) heating in helium plasmas, with the poloidal ion temperature roughly twice the toroidal ion temperature. Moreover, the measured spectral distribution suggests that two populations of ions are present and have temperatures of typically 500 eV and 50 eV with rotation velocities of -50 km/s and -10 km/s, respectively (predominantly perpendicular to the local magnetic field). This bi-modal distribution is observed in both the toroidal and poloidal views (for both He{sup +} and C{sup 2+} ions), and is well correlated with the period of rf power application to the plasma. The temperature of the hot component is observed to increase with the applied rf power, which was scanned between 0 and 4.3 MW . The 30 MHz HHFW launched by the NSTX antenna is expected and observed to heat core electrons, but plasma ions do not resonate with the launched wave, which is typically at >10th harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency in the region of observation. A likely ion heating mechanism is parametric decay of the launched HHFW into an Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW). The presence of the IBW in NSTX plasmas during HHFW application has been directly confirmed with probe measurements. IBW heating occurs in the perpendicular ion distribution, consistent with the toroidal and poloidal observations. Calculations of IBW propagation indicate that multiple waves could be created in the parametric decay process, and that most of the IBW power would be absorbed in the outer 10 to 20 cm of the plasma, predominantly on fully stripped ions. These predictions are in qualitative agreement with the observations, and must be accounted for when calculating the energy budget of the plasma.

  20. Characterization of Fast Ion Absorption of the High Harmonic Fast Wave in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Rosenberg; J.E. Menard; J.R. Wilson; S. Medle; C.K. Phillips; R. Andre; D.S. Darro; R.J. Dumont; B.P. LeBlanc; M.H. Redi; T.K. Mau; E. F. Jaeger; P.M. Ryan; D.W. Swain; R.W. Harvey; J. Egedal; the NSTX Team

    2003-08-19

    Ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in a spherical torus is of critical importance to assessing the viability of the wave as a means of heating and driving current. Analysis of recent National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) shots has revealed that under some conditions when neutral beam and radio-frequency (RF) power are injected into the plasma simultaneously, a fast ion population with energy above the beam injection energy is sustained by the wave. In agreement with modeling, these experiments find the RF-induced fast ion tail strength and neutron rate at lower B-fields to be less enhanced, likely due to a larger beta profile, which promotes greater off-axis absorption where the fast ion population is small. Ion loss codes find the increased loss fraction with decreased B insufficient to account for the changes in tail strength, providing further evidence that this is an RF interaction effect. Though greater ion absorption is predicted with lower k(sub)||, surprisingly little variation in the tail was observed, along with a small neutron rate enhancement with higher k(sub)||. Data from the neutral particle analyzer, neutron detectors, X-ray crystal spectrometer, and Thomson scattering is presented, along with results from the TRANSP transport analysis code, ray-tracing codes HPRT and CURRAY, full-wave code and AORSA, quasi-linear code CQL3D, and ion loss codes EIGOL and CONBEAM.

  1. High-Harmonic Fast-Wave Power Flow Along Magnetic Field Lines in the Scrape-Off Layer of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Hosea, J.; Kramer, G.; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; Green, David L; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B; McLean, Adam G; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Sabbagh, S. A.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    A significant fraction of high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) power applied to NSTX can be lost to the scrape-off layer (SOL) and deposited in bright and hot spirals on the divertor rather than in the core plasma. We show that the HHFW power flows to these spirals along magnetic field lines passing through the SOL in front of the antenna, implying that the HHFW power couples across the entire width of the SOL rather than mostly at the antenna face. This result will help guide future efforts to understand and minimize these edge losses in order to maximize fast-wave heating and current drive.

  2. High-harmonic fast-wave power flow along magnetic field lines in the scrape-off layer of NSTX.

    PubMed

    Perkins, R J; Hosea, J C; Kramer, G J; Ahn, J-W; Bell, R E; Diallo, A; Gerhardt, S; Gray, T K; Green, D L; Jaeger, E F; Jaworski, M A; LeBlanc, B P; McLean, A; Maingi, R; Phillips, C K; Roquemore, L; Ryan, P M; Sabbagh, S; Taylor, G; Wilson, J R

    2012-07-27

    A significant fraction of high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) power applied to NSTX can be lost to the scrape-off layer (SOL) and deposited in bright and hot spirals on the divertor rather than in the core plasma. We show that the HHFW power flows to these spirals along magnetic field lines passing through the SOL in front of the antenna, implying that the HHFW power couples across the entire width of the SOL rather than mostly at the antenna face. This result will help guide future efforts to understand and minimize these edge losses in order to maximize fast-wave heating and current drive. PMID:23006093

  3. HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE IN NSTX WITH ELECTRON BERNSTEIN WAVES AND HIGH HARMONIC FAST WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K

    2010-06-14

    A suitable theoretical and computational framework for studying heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment has been developed. This framework can also be used to study heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in spherical tori and other magnetic confinement devices. It is also useful in studying the propagation and damping of electron cyclotron waves in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  4. Full Wave Modeling of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bernabei, S.; Hosea, J.; Leblanc, B.; Wilson, J. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P.; Swain, D.

    2004-11-01

    Previous modeling of HHFW heating experiments predicted that the 2D nature of the magnetic equilibrium as well as the assumed antenna spectrum should strongly influence the wave propagation and power absorption in NSTX. Recently, a detailed series of HHFW heating experiments using modulated rf power waveforms have been performed on NSTX for a variety of antenna phasings and plasma conditions [1]. The power deposition profiles inferred from this experimental data will be compared to simulations obtained with the TORIC-HHFW [M. Brambilla, Pl. Phys. Controlled Fus. 44(2002)2423] and AORSA [E.F. Jaeger et al., Phys. Plasmas 8(2001)1573] full wave modeling codes. Though both the AORSA and TORIC-HHFW models make no assumptions about the relative size of the Larmor radius to the wavelength, AORSA solves the full integral wave equation, while TORIC-HHFW uses a generalized quasi-local approximation to effectively retain only the HHFW in the wave equation.1] See posters by. S. Bernabei et al and J. Hosea et al, this conference.

  5. High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Efficiency Enhancemen and Current Drive at Longer Wavelength on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hosea, R. E. Bell, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillips, G. Taylor, E. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, E.F. Jaeger, P.M. Ryan, J. Wilgen, H. Yuh, F. Levinton, S. Sabbagh, K. Tritz, J. Parker, P.T. Bonoli, R. Harvey, and the NSTX Team

    2008-01-14

    High harmonic fast wave heating and current drive (CD) are being developed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] for supporting startup and sustainment of the ST plasma. Considerable enhancement of the core heating efficiency (η) from 44% to 65% has been obtained for CD phasing of the antenna (strap-to-strap φ = -90o, kφ = -8 m-1) by increasing the magnetic field from 4.5 kG to 5.5 kG. This increase in efficiency is strongly correlated to moving the location of the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation (nonset ∝ ΒΦ× k|| 2/w) away from the antenna face and wall, and hence reducing the propagating surface wave fields. RF waves propagating close to the wall at lower BΦ and k|| can enhance power losses from both the parametric decay instability (PDI) and wave dissipation in sheaths and structures around the machine. The improved efficiency found here is attributed to a reduction in the latter, as PDI losses are little changed at the higher magnetic field. Under these conditions of higher coupling efficiency, initial measurements of localized CD effects have been made and compared with advanced RF code simulations

  6. High harmonic fast wave heating efficiency enhancement and current drive at longer wavelength on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J.; Yuh, H.; Levinton, F.; Sabbagh, S.; Tritz, K.; Parker, J.; Bonoli, P. T.; Harvey, R.

    2008-05-15

    High harmonic fast wave heating and current drive (CD) are being developed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] for supporting startup and sustainment of the spherical torus plasma. Considerable enhancement of the core heating efficiency ({eta}) from 44% to 65% has been obtained for CD phasing of the antenna (strap-to-strap {phi}=-90 deg., k{sub {phi}}=-8 m{sup -1}) by increasing the magnetic field from 4.5 to 5.5 kG. This increase in efficiency is strongly correlated to moving the location of the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation (n{sub onset}{proportional_to}Bxk{sub parallel}{sup 2}/{omega}) away from the antenna face and wall, and hence reducing the propagating surface wave fields. Radio frequency (RF) waves propagating close to the wall at lower B and k{sub parallel} can enhance power losses from both the parametric decay instability (PDI) and wave dissipation in sheaths and structures around the machine. The improved efficiency found here is attributed to a reduction in the latter, as PDI losses are little changed at the higher magnetic field. Under these conditions of higher coupling efficiency, initial measurements of localized CD effects have been made and compared with advanced RF code simulations.

  7. High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Efficiency Enhancement and Current Drive at Longer Wavelength on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B; Phillips, Cynthia; Taylor, G.; Valeo, Dr Ernest; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Ryan, Philip Michael; Wilgen, John B; Yuh, H.; Levinton, F.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Tritz, K.; Parker, J.; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    High harmonic fast wave heating and current drive CD are being developed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 2001 for supporting startup and sustainment of the spherical torus plasma. Considerable enhancement of the core heating efficiency from 44% to 65% has been obtained for CD phasing of the antenna strap-to-strap = 90 , k= 8 m 1 by increasing the magnetic field from 4.5 to 5.5 kG. This increase in efficiency is strongly correlated to moving the location of the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation nonsetBk 2 / away from the antenna face and wall, and hence reducing the propagating surface wave fields. Radio frequency RF waves propagating close to the wall at lower B and k can enhance power losses from both the parametric decay instability PDI and wave dissipation in sheaths and structures around the machine. The improved efficiency found here is attributed to a reduction in the latter, as PDI losses are little changed at the higher magnetic field. Under these conditions of higher coupling efficiency, initial measurements of localized CD effects have been made and compared with advanced RF code simulations.

  8. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N. Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, C.; Blazevski, D.; Green, D. L.; Berry, L.; Ryan, P. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Qin, C. M.; and others

    2015-12-10

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to “conventional” tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  9. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, C.; Blazevski, D.; Green, D. L.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Qin, C. M.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2015-12-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to "conventional" tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  10. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Nicola; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, Cornwall H; Blazevski, Dan; Green, David L; Berry, Lee Alan; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, Cynthia; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Qin, C M; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, Randy; Wright, J.; Zhang, X J

    2015-01-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to "conventional" tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  11. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2015-12-17

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.

  12. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2016-01-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for ‘conventional’ tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime. This article is dedicated to the memory of Cynthia K. Phillips

  13. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; et al

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSAmore » results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.« less

  14. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.

  15. Phase coherence of parametric-decay modes during high-harmonic fast-wave heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, J. A.; Wilson, J. R.; Hosea, J. C.; Greenough, N. L.; Perkins, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Third-order spectral analysis, in particular, the auto bicoherence, was applied to probe signals from high-harmonic fast-wave heating experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Strong evidence was found for parametric decay of the 30 MHz radio-frequency (RF) pump wave, with a low-frequency daughter wave at 2.7 MHz, the local majority-ion cyclotron frequency. The primary decay modes have auto bicoherence values around 0.85, very close to the theoretical value of one, which corresponds to total phase coherence with the pump wave. The threshold RF pump power for onset of parametric decay was found to be between 200 kW and 400 kW.

  16. High Non-inductive Fraction H-mode Discharges Generated by High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hosea, J.; Kessel, C. E.; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    A deuterium H-mode discharge with a plasma current of 300 kA, an axial toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T, and a calculated non-inductive plasma current fraction of 0.7 1 has been generated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment by 1.4MW of 30MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive. Seventy-five percent of the non-inductive current was generated inside an internal transport barrier that formed at a normalized minor radius 0.4. Three quarters of the non-inductive current was bootstrap current, and the remaining non-inductive current was generated directly by HHFW power inside a normalized minor radius 0.2. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Development of fully non-inductive plasmas heated by medium and high-harmonic fast waves in the national spherical torus experiment upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.; Poli, F.; Bertelli, N.; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Mueller, D.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Raman, R.

    2015-12-01

    A major challenge for spherical tokamak development is to start-up and ramp-up the plasma current (Ip) without using a central solenoid. Experiments in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) demonstrated that 1.4 MW of 30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power could generate an Ip = 300 kA H-mode discharge with a non-inductive Ip fraction, fNI ˜ 0.7. The discharge had an axial toroidal magnetic field (BT(0)) of 0.55 T, the maximum BT(0) available on NSTX. NSTX has undergone a major upgrade (NSTX-U), that will eventually allow the generation of BT(0) ≤ 1 T and Ip ≤ 2 MA plasmas. Full wave simulations of 30 MHz HHFW and medium harmonic fast wave (MHFW) heating in NSTX-U predict significantly reduced FW power loss in the plasma edge at the higher BT(0) achievable in NSTX-U. HHFW experiments will aim to generate stable, fNI ˜ 1, Ip = 300 kA H-mode plasmas and to ramp Ip from 250 to 400 kA with FW power. Time-dependent TRANSP simulations are used to develop non-inductive Ip ramp-up and sustainment using 30 MHz FW power. This paper presents results from these RF simulations and plans for developing non-inductive plasmas heated by FW power.

  18. High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive Results for Deuterium H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillisp, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2012-07-25

    A critical research goal for the spherical torus (ST) program is to initiate, ramp-up, and sustain a discharge without using the central solenoid. Simulations of non-solenoidal plasma scenarios in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [1] predict that high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) [2] can play an important roll in enabling fully non-inductive (fNI {approx} 1) ST operation. The NSTX fNI {approx} 1 strategy requires 5-6 MW of HHFW power (PRF) to be coupled into a non-inductively generated discharge [3] with a plasma current, Ip {approx} 250-350 kA, driving the plasma into an HHFW H-mode with Ip {approx} 500 kA, a level where 90 keV deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) can heat the plasma and provide additional CD. The initial approach on NSTX has been to heat Ip {approx} 300 kA, inductively heated, deuterium plasmas with CD phased HHFW power [2], in order to drive the plasma into an H-mode with fNI {approx} 1.

  19. High voltage test-stand research done on ICRF antenna elements of the high-harmonic fast-wave system of NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Ahn, J.-W.; Bortolon, A.; Brunkhorst, C.; Ellis, R.; Fredd, E.; Greenough, N.; Hosea, J. C.; Kung, C.; Miller, D.

    2015-12-01

    The twelve-strap high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) antenna on NSTX has exhibited a high-voltage standoff around 25 kV during previous experimental campaigns; this standoff needs to be improved for increased power coupling. During the recent NSTX-U upgrade period, a test-stand was set up with two antenna straps along with Faraday screens for testing purposes. Using a diagnostic suite consisting of a fast camera, a residual gas analyzer, a pressure gage, high-voltage probes, and an infrared camera, several interesting discoveries were made, leading to possible improvements of the antenna RF voltage operation level. First, arcing was observed outside the Faraday shields towards the low-voltage ("grounded") end of the straps (faraday shield box ends); this arcing was successfully eliminated by installing an additional grounding point between the Faraday shield box and the vessel wall. Second, considerable outgassing was observed during the RF pulse and the amount of outgassing was found to decrease with increasing RF power, possibly indicative of multipacting. Finally, infrared camera measurements of heating on the Faraday shield assembly suggest that the return currents on the Faraday shield box are highly localized at the box sides and possibly account for the pressure increase observed. Computations of these RF currents using Microwave Studio show qualitative agreement with the heated regions. New grounding points between the antenna box and the vessel have been implemented in NSTX-U, where future tests will be done to determine if the high-voltage standoff has improved. Further antenna improvements will be sought through future experiments on the test stand.

  20. High Voltage Test-Stand Research Done on ICRF Antenna Elements of the High-Harmonic Fast-Wave System of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Ahn, J.W.; Bortolon, A.; Brunkhorst, C.; Ellis, R.; Fredd, E.; Greenough, Nevell; Hosea, J.; Kung, C. C.; Miller, D.

    2015-01-01

    The twelve-strap high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) antenna on NSTX has exhibited a high-voltage standoff around 25 kV during previous experimental campaigns; this standoff needs to be improved for increased power coupling. During the recent NSTX-U upgrade period, a test-stand was set up with two antenna straps along with Faraday screens for testing purposes. Using a diagnostic suite consisting of a fast camera, a residual gas analyzer, a pressure gage, high-voltage probes, and an infrared camera, several interesting discoveries were made, leading to possible improvements of the antenna RF voltage operation level. First, arcing was observed outside the Faraday shields towards the low-voltage ("grounded") end of the straps (faraday shield box ends); this arcing was successfully eliminated by installing an additional grounding point between the Faraday shield box and the vessel wall. Second, considerable outgassing was observed during the RF pulse and the amount of outgassing was found to decrease with increasing RF power, possibly indicative of multipacting. Finally, infrared camera measurements of heating on the Faraday shield assembly suggest that the return currents on the Faraday shield box are highly localized at the box sides and possibly account for the pressure increase observed. Computations of these RF currents using Microwave Studio show qualitative agreement with the heated regions. New grounding points between the antenna box and the vessel have been implemented in NSTX-U, where future tests will be done to determine if the high-voltage standoff has improved. Further antenna improvements will be sought through future experiments on the test stand.

  1. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  2. Semiclassical-wave-function perspective on high-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauger, François; Abanador, Paul M.; Lopata, Kenneth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a semiclassical-wave-function (SCWF) model for strong-field physics and attosecond science. When applied to high-harmonic generation (HHG), this formalism allows one to show that the natural time-domain separation of the contribution of ionization, propagation, and recollisions to the HHG process leads to a frequency-domain factorization of the harmonic yield into these same contributions, for any choice of atomic or molecular potential. We first derive the factorization from the natural expression of the dipole signal in the temporal domain by using a reference system, as in the quantitative rescattering (QRS) formalism [J. Phys. B 43, 122001 (2010), 10.1088/0953-4075/43/12/122001]. Alternatively, we show how the trajectory component of the SCWF can be used to express the factorization, which also allows one to attribute individual contributions to the spectrum to the underlying trajectories.

  3. The contribution of radio-frequency rectification to field-aligned losses of high-harmonic fast wave power to the divertor in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J. Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Diallo, A.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A.; Sabbagh, S.

    2015-04-15

    The National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) can exhibit a major loss of high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power along scrape-off layer (SOL) field lines passing in front of the antenna, resulting in bright and hot spirals on both the upper and lower divertor regions. One possible mechanism for this loss is RF sheaths forming at the divertors. Here, we demonstrate that swept-voltage Langmuir probe characteristics for probes under the spiral are shifted relative to those not under the spiral in a manner consistent with RF rectification. We estimate both the magnitude of the RF voltage across the sheath and the sheath heat flux transmission coefficient in the presence of the RF field. Although precise comparison between the computed heat flux and infrared (IR) thermography cannot yet be made, the computed heat deposition compares favorably with the projections from IR camera measurements. The RF sheath losses are significant and contribute substantially to the total SOL losses of HHFW power to the divertor for the cases studied. This work will guide future experimentation on NSTX-U, where a wide-angle IR camera and a dedicated set of coaxial Langmuir probes for measuring the RF sheath voltage directly will quantify the contribution of RF sheath rectification to the heat deposition from the SOL to the divertor.

  4. Two-wave regime of operation of the high-harmonic gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, A. V.; Denisov, G. G.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Osharin, I. V.

    2015-04-15

    The use of the two-wave co-generation is proposed as a way to decrease the effective Q-factor of the operating near-cutoff wave of the gyrotron. In this two-wave regime, the operating wave represents a “hot” wave mode formed by two partial “cold” modes (near-cutoff and far-from-cutoff ones) coupled on the electron beam. It is shown that the use of this regime can provide a significant decrease of the Ohmic losses in low-relativistic high-harmonic gyrotrons operating in the THz frequency range.

  5. Operation of a large-orbit high-harmonic gyro-traveling-wave tube amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Furuno, D.S. ); McDermott, B.D.; Kou, C.S.; Luhmann, N.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Vitello, P. )

    1990-06-01

    The high-harmonic gyro-traveling wave tube (gyro-TWT) is a high-power ({>=} 1 kW) millimeter wave amplifier based on the synchronous interaction of a beam of large-orbit axis-encircling electrons with a high-order cylindrical waveguide mode. Since the interaction occurs at a high harmonic of the cyclotron frequency, the intense magnetic fields required for the conventional fundamental-mode gyro-TWT are not required. A proof-of-principle experiment designed to demonstrate the interaction of a 150-mA 350-keV electron beam with the TE{sub 81} ode of a cylindrical waveguide is described. Principal results include a small signal gain of 10 dB, an interaction bandwidth of 4.3 percent, and a saturated power transfer from electron beam to wave of 0.5 kW.

  6. Suppression of Weibel Instabilities by High Harmonic Electron Bernstein Modes in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V.

    2006-10-01

    A novel mechanism for the suppression of Weibel instabilities in the core of advanced fast ignition pellets is addressed. The propagation of generated suprathermal electron beam toward the core may lead to the appearance of colossal (˜10MG), small scale (L˜c/φpe, c---velocity of light, φpe---local electron plasma frequency) magnetic fields. The suppression synergy of high harmonic electron Bernstein, (EB), modes and Weibel modes, (WB), in the cone-attached laser fusion pellets is based on nonlinear mode-mode coupling. EB modes are excited by ignition, a cone guided, or implosion laser beams. High harmonic EB modes easily propagate to the core of the pellet whereby they nonlinearly interact with, and suppress, the WB. The suppression synergy is maximized at the simultaneous action of ignition and implosion lasers. E. S. Weibel, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2,83 (1959) in the core of advanced fast ignition pellets M. Tabak, J. Hammer, M.E. Glinsky, W.L. Kruer, S. C. Wilks, J. Woodworth, E. M. Campbell, and M.D. Perry, Phys. Plasmas 1 (5), 1626 (1994). V. Stefan, (a) Quasi-Stationary B-Fields due to Weibel Instability in FI Laser Fusion Pellets; (b) Pellet Core Heating Via High Harmonic EB Modes in FI Laser Fusion. 35th Annual A.A.C, 2005,

  7. Generation Of High Non-inductive Plasma Current Fraction H-mode Discharges By High-harmonic Last Wave Heating In The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G; Kessel, C E; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D; Phillips, D K; Valeo, E J; Wilson, J R; Ryan, P M; Bonoli, P T; Wright, J C

    2012-02-13

    1.4 MW of 30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating, with current drive antenna phasing, has generated a Ip = 300kA, BT (0) = 0.55T deuterium H-mode plasma in the National Spherical Torus Experiment that has a non-inductive plasma current fraction, fNI = 0.7-1. Seventy-five percent of the non-inductive current was generated inside an internal transport barrier that formed at a normalized minor radius, r/a {approx} 0.4 . Three quarters of the non-inductive current was bootstrap current and the remaining non-inductive current was generated directly by HHFW power inside r/a {approx} 0.2.

  8. High Resolution Full Wave Modeling of Fast Waves in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Berk, L.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B. P.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.

    2010-11-01

    High Harmonic Fast Waves (HHFW) are being used in NSTX for plasma heating and noninductive current profile control. Numerical solutions for the wave fields obtained with the full wave TORIC and AORSA codes with ultrafine spatial resolution reveal the presence of a short wavelength feature that is predominantly polarized in the direction parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field and which is predicted by the codes to damp on electrons. A similar short wavelength mode also appears in simulations of the rf fields in C-Mod in the ICRF regime. Preliminary analysis indicates that the mode may be related to a slow mode that can propagate above the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency. The predicted power deposition profiles will be compared to those inferred from experimental measurements to see if the mode has a significant effect on the wave propagation and absorption. Possibilities for detecting the mode in NSTX and C-Mod will be discussed.

  9. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-05-11

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  10. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  11. Progress on High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. M.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Wilgen, J. B.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Yuh, H.

    2008-11-01

    The recent improvement of the 30 MHz HHFW heating efficiency at lower toroidal wavenumbers in helium plasmas [1] has been extended to deuterium operation at BT(0) = 0.55 T on NSTX. The key to effective power penetration of the edge plasma is the reduction of the plasma density near the Faraday screen/first wall [2]. For deuterium plasmas, it was necessary to use lithium wall conditioning to control the density rise that often accompanies high power RF operation, particularly at the lower toroidal wavenumbers achievable with the 12-element phased-array launcher. The HHFW power deposition at k|| = -8 m-1 is comparable to that of k|| = -14 m-1, and core heating at k|| = -3 m-1 has now been observed, albeit at lower efficiency. Central electron temperatures of 5 keV have been achieved in both deuterium and helium plasmas with 3.1 MW at k|| = -14 m-1 (-150^o relative phase shift). Central heating of NBI-driven H-mode plasmas has been observed for both k|| = 14 and 8 m-1. [1] Hosea, J. et al, Physics of Plasmas 15, 056104 (2008) [2] Hosea, J. et al, poster at this conference

  12. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D. Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-10

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  13. Apparatus and fast method for cancer cell classification based on high harmonic coherent diffraction imaging in reflection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zürch, Michael; Foertsch, Stefan; Matzas, Mark; Pachmann, Katharina; Kuth, Rainer; Spielmann, Christian

    2014-03-01

    In cancer treatment it is highly desirable to identify and /or classify individual cancer cells in real time. Nowadays, the standard method is PCR which is costly and time-consuming. Here we present a different approach to rapidly classify cell types: we measure the pattern of coherently diffracted extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV radiation at 38nm wavelength), allowing to distinguish different single breast cancer cell types. The output of our laser driven XUV light source is focused onto a single unstained and unlabeled cancer cell, and the resulting diffraction pattern is measured in reflection geometry. As we will further show, the outer shape of the object can be retrieved from the diffraction pattern with sub-micron resolution. For classification it is often not necessary to retrieve the image, it is only necessary to compare the diffraction patterns which can be regarded as a spatial fingerprint of the specimen. For a proof-of-principle experiment MCF7 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells were pipetted on gold-coated silica slides. From illuminating each single cell and measuring a diffraction pattern we could distinguish between them. Owing to the short bursts of coherent soft x-ray light, one could also image temporal changes of the specimen, i.e. studying changes upon drug application once the desired specimen is found by the classification method. Using a more powerful laser, even classifying circulating tumor cells (CTC) at a high throughput seems possible. This lab-sized equipment will allow fast classification of any kind of cells, bacteria or even viruses in the near future.

  14. Recent Improvements in Fast Wave Heating in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, R.E. Bell, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.B. Wilgen, J.R. Wilson, and the NSTX Team

    2009-06-26

    Recent improvements in high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) core heating in NSTX are attributed to using lithium conditioning, and other wall conditioning techniques, to move the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation further from the antenna. This has resulted in the first observation of HHFW core electron heating in deuterium plasma at a launched toroidal wavenumber, kφ = -3 m-1, NSTX record core electron temperatures of 5 keV in helium and deuterium discharges and, for the first time, significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral-beam-fuelled H-mode plasmas. Also, kφ = -8 m-1 heating of the plasma startup and plasma current ramp-up has resulted in significant core electron heating, even at central electron densities as low as ~ 4x1018 m-3.

  15. Recent Improvements in Fast Wave Heating in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.

    2009-11-26

    Recent improvements in high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) core heating in NSTX are attributed to using lithium conditioning, and other wall conditioning techniques, to move the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation further from the antenna. This has resulted in the first observation of HHFW core electron heating in deuterium plasma at a launched toroidal wavenumber, k{phi} = -3 m{sup -1}, NSTX record core electron temperatures of 5 keV in helium and deuterium discharges and, for the first time, significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral-beam-fuelled H-mode plasmas. Also, k{phi} = -8 m{sup -1} heating of the plasma startup and plasma current ramp-up has resulted in significant core electron heating, even at central electron densities as low as {approx}4x10{sup 18} m-3.

  16. Spectral effects on fast wave core heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Cynthia; Bell, R. E.; Berry, Lee; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Ryan, Philip Michael; Wilgen, John B

    2009-01-01

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L-mode and H-mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit radio frequency (rf) power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of HHFW CD were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  17. Fast wave heating in the NSTX-Upgrade device

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Nicola; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, Lee Alan; Bonoli, P.; Budny, R. V.; Fu, GuoYong; Gerhardt, S.; Green, David L; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J.; Kramer, G.; LeBlanc, B; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J.

    2013-01-01

    NSTX-Upgrade will operate with toroidal magnetic fields (B T) up to 1 T, nearly twice the value used in the experiments on NSTX, and the available NBI power will be doubled. The doubling of B T while retaining the 30 MHz RF source frequency has moved the heating regime from the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime used in NSTX to the mid harmonic fast wave (MHFW) regime. By making use of the full wave code AORSA, this work shows that direct ion damping (mainly by thermal ions localized at the 5th harmonic resonance) might be significant in NSTX-Upgrade under TRANSP predicted full performance conditions and the electron and ion absorption is sensitive to the ratio of electron and ion temperature. Launching at high toroidal wave number appears to be one way to significantly reduce the ion damping. By using the extended AORSA code, which includes a detailed description of the scrape-off layer in the field solutions, we found a large electric field amplitude outside of the last closed flux surface as previously seen in NSTX from AORSA simulations (D. L. Green, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 145001 (2011)). Preliminary results by introducing a collision damping in the scrape-off layer in the AORSA code to represent a damping process are presented, showing for the first time absorbed power in the scrape-off layer.

  18. Fast wave heating in the NSTX-Upgrade device

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Budny, R.; Fu, G.-Y.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L.; Green, D. L.; Ryan, P.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    NSTX-Upgrade will operate with toroidal magnetic fields (B{sub T}) up to 1 T, nearly twice the value used in the experiments on NSTX, and the available NBI power will be doubled. The doubling of B{sub T} while retaining the 30 MHz RF source frequency has moved the heating regime from the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime used in NSTX to the mid harmonic fast wave (MHFW) regime. By making use of the full wave code AORSA, this work shows that direct ion damping (mainly by thermal ions localized at the 5th harmonic resonance) might be significant in NSTX-Upgrade under TRANSP predicted full performance conditions and the electron and ion absorption is sensitive to the ratio of electron and ion temperature. Launching at high toroidal wave number appears to be one way to significantly reduce the ion damping. By using the extended AORSA code, which includes a detailed description of the scrape-off layer in the field solutions, we found a large electric field amplitude outside of the last closed flux surface as previously seen in NSTX from AORSA simulations (D. L. Green, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 145001 (2011)). Preliminary results by introducing a collision damping in the scrape-off layer in the AORSA code to represent a damping process are presented, showing for the first time absorbed power in the scrape-off layer.

  19. Mode conversion and absorption of fast waves at high ion cyclotron harmonics in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Suwon; Kwak, Jong-Gu

    2014-04-15

    The propagation and absorption of high harmonic fast waves is of interest for non-inductive current drives in fusion experiments. The fast wave can be coupled with the ion Bernstein wave that propagates in the high magnetic field side of an ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layer. This coupling and the absorption are analyzed using the hot plasma dispersion relation and a wave equation that was converted from an approximate dispersion relation for the case where λ{sub i}=k{sub ⊥}{sup 2}ρ{sub i}{sup 2}/2≳1 (where k{sub ⊥} is the perpendicular wave number and ρ{sub i} is the ion Larmor radius). It is found that both reflection and conversion may occur near the harmonic resonance layer but that they decrease rapidly, giving rise to a sharp increase in the absorption as the parallel wave number increases.

  20. Fast magnetoacoustic wave trains in coronal holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kupriyanova, E. G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances recently discovered in the solar corona are interpreted in terms of guided fast magnetoacoustic waves. Fast magnetoacoustic waves experience geometric dispersion in waveguides, which causes localised, impulsive perturbations to develop into quasi-periodic wave trains. Aims: We consider the formation of fast wave trains in a super-radially expanding coronal hole modelled by a magnetic funnel with a field-aligned density profile that is rarefied in comparison to the surrounding plasma. This kind of structure is typical of coronal holes, and it forms a fast magnetoacoustic anti-waveguide as a local maximum in the Alfvén speed. Methods: We performed 2D MHD numerical simulations for impulsively generated perturbations to the system. Both sausage and kink perturbations are considered and the role of the density contrast ratio investigated. Results: The anti-waveguide funnel geometry refracts wave energy away from the structure. However, in this geometry the quasi-periodic fast wave trains are found to appear, too, and so can be associated with the observed rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances. The wave trains propagate along the external edge of the coronal hole. The fast wave trains generated in coronal holes exhibit less dispersive evolution than in the case of a dense waveguide. Conclusions: We conclude that an impulsive energy release localised in a coronal plasma inhomogeneity develops into a fast wave train for both kink and sausage disturbances and for both waveguide and anti-waveguide transverse plasma profiles.

  1. Fast wave power flow along SOL field lines in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Leblanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Sabbagh, S.

    2012-10-01

    On NSTX, a major loss of high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power can occur along open field lines passing in front of the antenna over the width of the scrape-off layer (SOL). Up to 60% of the RF power can be lost and at least partially deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling [1,2]. The flow of HHFW power from the antenna region to the divertor is mostly aligned along the SOL magnetic field [3], which explains the pattern of heat deposition as measured with infrared (IR) cameras. By tracing field lines from the divertor back to the midplane, the IR data can be used to estimate the profile of HHFW power coupled to SOL field lines. We hypothesize that surface waves are being excited in the SOL, and these results should benchmark advanced simulations of the RF power deposition in the SOL (e.g., [4]). Minimizing this loss is critical optimal high-power long-pulse ICRF heating on ITER while guarding against excessive divertor erosion.[4pt] [1] J.C. Hosea et al., AIP Conf Proceedings 1187 (2009) 105. [0pt] [2] G. Taylor et al., Phys. Plasmas 17 (2010) 056114. [0pt] [3] R.J. Perkins et al., to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett. [0pt] [4] D.L. Green et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 (2011) 145001.

  2. Modeling of Synergy Between 4th and 6th Harmonic Absorptions of Fast Waves on Injected Beams in DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Chan, V. S.; Muscatello, C. M.; Jaeger, E. F.

    2011-12-23

    In recent moderate to high harmonic fast wave heating and current drive experiments in DIII-D, a synergy effect was observed when the 6{sup th} harmonic 90 MHz fast wave power is applied to the plasma preheated by neutral beams and the 4{sup th} harmonic 60 MHz fast wave. In this paper, we investigate how the synergy can occur using ORBIT-RF coupled with AORSA. Preliminary simulations suggest that damping of 4{sup th} harmonic FW on beam ions accelerates them above the injection energy, which may allow significant damping of 6{sup th} harmonic FW on beam ion tails to produce synergy.

  3. Observation of Electronic Structure Minima in High-Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Woerner, Hans Jakob; Villeneuve, D. M.; Niikura, Hiromichi; Bertrand, Julien B.; Corkum, P. B.

    2009-03-13

    We report detailed measurements of the high-harmonic spectra generated from argon atoms. The spectra exhibit a deep minimum that is shown to be independent of the laser intensity, and is thus a clear measure of the electronic structure of the atom. We show that exact field-free continuum wave functions reproduce the minimum, but plane wave and Coulomb wave functions do not. This remarkable observation suggests that electronic structure can be accurately determined in high-harmonic experiments despite the presence of the strong laser field. Our results clarify the relation between high-harmonic generation and photoelectron spectroscopy. The use of exact continuum functions also resolves the ambiguity associated with the choice of the dispersion relation.

  4. Fast wave current drive in neutral beam heated plasmas on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Forest, C.B.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1997-04-01

    The physics of non-inductive current drive and current profile control using the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. In non-sawtoothing discharges formed by neutral beam injection (NBI), the radial profile of the fast wave current drive (FWCD) was determined by the response of the loop voltage profile to co, counter, and symmetric antenna phasings, and was found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. The application of counter FWCD increased the magnetic shear reversal of the plasma and delayed the onset of sawteeth, compared to co FWCD. The partial absorption of fast waves by energetic beam ions at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency was also evident from a build up of fast particle pressure near the magnetic axis and a correlated increase in the neutron rate. The anomalous fast particle pressure and neutron rate increased with increasing NBI power and peaked when a harmonic of the deuterium cyclotron frequency passed through the center of the plasma. The experimental FWCD efficiency was highest at 2 T where the interaction between the fast waves and the beam ions was weakest; as the magnetic field strength was lowered, the FWCD efficiency decreased to approximately half of the maximum theoretical value.

  5. High-harmonic gyrotron with sectioned cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Savilov, A. V.

    2010-07-15

    High-harmonic large-orbit gyrotrons require long-length operating cavities because of both a weak electron-wave coupling and relatively low electron currents. Since diffraction Q factors of such cavities are very high, a large fraction of the radiated power is dissipated in Ohmic losses. A sectioned klystronlike cavity can be a way to combine a long electron-wave interaction region with a relatively low diffraction Q factor. In this paper, a design of a third-harmonic terahertz gyrotron is studied in detail and discussed. As compared to a regular cavity, the use of a sectioned microwave system provides an enhancement of the output rf power by several times along with the halving of the Ohmic losses.

  6. Wave modes facilitating fast magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.

    2011-12-01

    Whistler and kinetic Alfven waves are often invoked to explain fast magnetic reconnection in collsionless plasmas. But how these wave modes facilitate the reconnection has remained unclear. An important unanswered question deals with the meaning of the wave frequency in the context of magnetic reconnection. New measurement on a fast explosive reconnection event in the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT provides an interesting example of the meaning of the wave mode and the associated frequency directly related to the time scale of the impulsive reconnection. We examine the measurements in VTF in view of the whistler wave mode, showing that the explosive growth in the reconnection is related to the thinning of the current sheet to a few electron skin depths. We further demonstrate that the fastest measured time scale (~ 3 microseconds) and the largest normalized reconnection rate (~0.35) agree with those predicted from the whistler mode dispersion relation.

  7. Fast Waves in Smooth Coronal Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of transverse density structuring in coronal slab-like waveguides on the properties of fast waves. We generalized previous results obtained for the exponential and Epstein profiles to the case of an arbitrary transverse density distribution. The criteria are given to determine the possible (trapped or leaky) wave regime, depending on the type of density profile function. In particular, there are plasma slabs with transverse density structuring that support pure trapped fast waves for all wavelengths. Their phase speed is nearly equal to the external Alfvén speed for the typical parameters of coronal loops. Our findings are obtained on the basis of Kneser’s oscillation theorem. To confirm the results, we analytically solved the wave equation evaluated at the cutoff point and the original wave equation for particular cases of transverse density distribution. We also used the WKB method and obtained approximate solutions of the wave equation at the cutoff point for an arbitrary transverse density profile. The analytic results were supplemented by numerical solutions of the obtained dispersion relations. The observed high-quality quasi-periodic pulsations of flaring loops are interpreted in terms of the trapped fundamental fast-sausage mode in a slab-like coronal waveguide.

  8. High-harmonic generation in aligned water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Devin, Julien; Hoffmann, Matthias; Cryan, James; Kaldun, Andreas; Bucksbaum, Philip

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the use of high harmonic generation (HHG) in aligned molecular vapors has become a powerful tool to study ultrafast dynamics of electronic and nuclear wave packets. In our new experimental setup, we are able to orient H2 O and D2 O molecules using a single cycle terahertz (THz) pulse. Aligning water is especially interesting as the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of water contains a node in the xz plane of the molecular frame, allowing us to perform HHG from second highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO-1) only, by setting the polarization of the fundamental laser along the z-axis of the aligned water molecules. We are particularly interested in the HOMO-1 state, as there is fast motion of the H-O-H angle leading to sub-wavelength dynamics. On this poster we present our all-optical alignment setup where HHG and single-cycle THz generation take place in high-vacuum, where measurements with arbitrary polarization angles between the two are possible. In addition, we discuss the effects of the molecular orientation on HHG, including symmetry breaking that could produce even harmonics and isotope effects between H2 O and D2 O due to different vibrational energies. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  9. Fast wave evanescence in filamentary boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Radio frequency waves for heating and current drive of plasmas in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices must first traverse the scrape-off-layer (SOL) before they can be put to their intended use. The SOL plasma is strongly turbulent and intermittent in space and time. These turbulent properties of the SOL, which are not routinely taken into account in wave propagation codes, can have an important effect on the coupling of waves through an evanescent SOL or edge plasma region. The effective scale length for fast wave (FW) evanescence in the presence of short-scale field-aligned filamentary plasma turbulence is addressed in this paper. It is shown that although the FW wavelength or evanescent scale length is long compared with the dimensions of the turbulence, the FW does not simply average over the turbulent density; rather, the average is over the exponentiation rate. Implications for practical situations are discussed.

  10. Global wave modeling of electron interactions with fast magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Batchelor, D. B.; Murakami, M.

    Electron interactions with fast magnetosonic waves are of interest for both direct electron heating and fast-wave current drive (FWCD) in tokamaks. Here the authors apply the full-wave ICRF code PICES to examples of both of these applications. To realistically account for the actual D-shaped magnetic geometry of present-day tokamaks, PICES is interfaced with the 3-D MHD equilibrium code VMEC. Likewise, to correctly model the real toroidal structure of both source and image currents in ICRF current drive antennas, PICES is interfaced with the 2-D recessed antenna impedance code RANT. Both current drive and electron heating by fast waves can be strongly altered through modification of the kappa(sub (parallel))-spectrum by the poloidal magnetic field. A poloidal mode expansion in PICES allows such variations in kappa(sub (parallel)) to be included correctly. In this paper, comparisons are made to observations of the direct electron heating profile on TFTR and to the FWCD efficiency on DIII-D. They also extrapolate to make predictions for future tokamaks such as TPX and ITER.

  11. Understanding ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave heating losses in the scrape off layer of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N; Jaeger, E F; Hosea, J C; Phillips, C K; Berry, L; Bonoli, P T; Gerhardt, S P; Green, D; LeBlanc, B; Perkins, R J; Ryan, P M; Taylor, G; Valeo, E J; Wilso, J R; Wright, J C

    2014-07-01

    Fast waves at harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency, which have been used successfully on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), will also play an important role in ITER and are a promising candidate for the Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) designs based on spherical torus (ST). Experimental studies of high harmonic fast waves (HHFW) heating on the NSTX have demonstrated that substantial HHFW power loss occurs along the open field lines in the scrape-off layer (SOL), but the mechanism behind the loss is not yet understood. The full wave RF code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain, is applied to specific NSTX discharges in order to predict the effects and possible causes of this power loss. In the studies discussed here, a collisional damping parameter has been implemented in AORSA as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. A prediction for the NSTX Upgrade (NSTX-U) experiment, that will begin operation next year, is also presented, indicating a favorable condition for the experiment due to a wider evanescent region in edge density.*Research supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 with Princeton University.

  12. THE EFFECTS OF WAVE ESCAPE ON FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu E-mail: devore@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-09-20

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )}. In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term. We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region. We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  13. The Effects of Wave Escape on Fast Magnetosonic Wave Turbulence in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves"). In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast-waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term.We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region.We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  14. Wavelength Scaling of High Harmonic Generation Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Shiner, A. D.; Trallero-Herrero, C.; Kajumba, N.; Corkum, P. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Bandulet, H.-C.; Comtois, D.; Legare, F.; Giguere, M.; Kieffer, J-C.

    2009-08-14

    Using longer wavelength laser drivers for high harmonic generation is desirable because the highest extreme ultraviolet frequency scales as the square of the wavelength. Recent numerical studies predict that high harmonic efficiency falls dramatically with increasing wavelength, with a very unfavorable lambda{sup -(5-6)} scaling. We performed an experimental study of the high harmonic yield over a wavelength range of 800-1850 nm. A thin gas jet was employed to minimize phase matching effects, and the laser intensity and focal spot size were kept constant as the wavelength was changed. Ion yield was simultaneously measured so that the total number of emitting atoms was known. We found that the scaling at constant laser intensity is lambda{sup -6.3+}-{sup 1.1} in Xe and lambda{sup -6.5+}-{sup 1.1} in Kr over the wavelength range of 800-1850 nm, somewhat worse than the theoretical predictions.

  15. High harmonic generation from impulsively aligned SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devin, Julien; Wang, Song; Kaldun, Andreas; Bucksbaum, Phil

    2016-05-01

    Previous work in high harmonics generation (HHG) in aligned molecular gases has mainly focused on rotational dynamics in order to determine the contributions of different orbitals to the ionization step. In our experiment, we focus on the shorter timescale of vibrational dynamics. We generate high harmonics from impulsively aligned SO2 molecules in a gas jet and record the emitted attosecond pulse trains in a home-built high resolution vacuum ultra violet (VUV) spectrometer. Using the high temporal resolution of our setup, we are able to map out the effects of vibrational wavepackets with a sub-femtosecond resolution. The target molecule, SO2 gas, is impulsively aligned by a near-infrared laser pulse and has accessible vibrations on the timescale of the short laser pulse used. We present first experimental results for the response to this excitation in high-harmonics. We observe both fast oscillations in the time domain as well as shifts of the VUV photon energy outside of the pulse overlaps. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division and by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

  16. Multi-Orbital contributions in High Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guehr, Markus

    2009-05-01

    The high harmonic spectrum generated from atoms or molecules in a strong laser field contains information about the electronic structure of the generation medium. In the high harmonic generation (HHG) process, a free electron wave packet tunnel-ionizes from the molecular orbital in a strong laser field. After being accelerated by the laser electric field, the free electron wave packet coherently recombines to the orbital from which is was initially ionized, thereby emitting the harmonic spectrum. Interferences between the free electron wave packet and the molecular orbital will shape the spectrum in a characteristic way. These interferences have been used to tomographically image the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of N2 [1]. Molecular electronic states energetically below the HOMO should contribute to laser-driven high harmonic generation (HHG), but this behavior has not been observed previously. We have observed evidence of HHG from multiple orbitals in aligned N2 [2]. The tunneling ionization (and therefore the harmonic generation) is most efficient if the orbital has a large extension in the direction of the harmonic generation polarization. The HOMO with its σg symmetry therefore dominates the harmonic spectrum if the molecular axis is parallel to the harmonic generation polarization, the lower bound πu HOMO-1 dominates in the perpendicular case. The HOMO contributions appear as a regular plateau with a cutoff in the HHG spectrum. In contrast, the HOMO-1 signal is strongly peaked in the cutoff region. We explain this by semi-classical simulations of the recombination process that show constructive interferences between the HOMO-1 and the recombining wave packet in the cutoff region. The ability to monitor several orbitals opens the route to imaging coherent superpositions of electronic orbitals. [1] J. Itatani et al., Nature 432, 867 (2004)[2] B. K. McFarland, J. P. Farrell, P. H. Bucksbaum and M. Gühr, Science 322, 1232 (2008)

  17. High efficiency off-axis current drive by high frequency fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Pinsker, R. I.; Moeller, C. P.; Porkolab, M.; Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-12

    Modeling work shows that current drive can be done off-axis with high efficiency, as required for FNSF and DEMO, by using very high harmonic fast waves (“helicons” or “whistlers”). The modeling indicates that plasmas with high electron beta are needed in order for the current drive to take place off-axis, making DIII-D a highly suitable test vehicle for this process. The calculations show that the driven current is not very sensitive to the launched value of n{sub ∥}, a result that can be understood from examination of the evolution of n{sub ∥} as the waves propagate in the plasma. Because of this insensitivity, relatively large values (∼3) of n{sub ∥} can be launched, thereby avoiding some of the problems with mode conversion in the boundary found in some previous experiments. Use of a traveling wave antenna provides a very narrow n{sub ∥} spectrum, which also helps avoid mode conversion.

  18. Fast wave current drive: Experimental status and reactor prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    The fast wave is one of the two possible wave polarizations which propagate according to the basic theory of cold plasmas. It is distinguished from the other (slow wave) branch by having an electric field vector which is mainly orthogonal to the confining magnetic field of the plasma. The plasma and fast wave qualitatively assume different behavior depending on the frequency range of the launched wave. The high frequency fast wave (HFFW), with a frequency (..omega..2..pi.. )approximately) GHz) much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency (..cap omega../sub i/), suffers electron Landau damping and drives current by supplying parallel momentum to superthermal electrons in a fashion similar to lower hybrid (slow wave) current drive. In the simple theory the HFFW should be superior to the slow wave and can propagate to very high density and temperature without impediment. Experiments, however, have not conclusively shown that HFFW current drive can be achieved at densities above the slow wave current drive limit, possibly due to conversion of the launched fast waves into slow waves by density fluctuations. Alternatively, the low frequency fast wave (LFFW), with frequencies ()approxreverse arrowlt) 100 MHz) only a few times the ion cyclotron frequency, is damped by electron Landau damping and, in a hot plasma ()approxreverse arrowgt) 10 keV), by electron transit time magnetic pumping; current drive is achieved by pushing superthermal electrons, and efficiency is prediocted to be slightly better than for lower hybrid current drive. Most significantly, the slow wave does not propagate in high density plasma when ..omega.. )approximately) ..cap omega../sub i/, so parasitic coupling to the slow wave can be avoided, and no density and temperture limitations are foreseen. Experiments with fast wve current drive invariably find current drive efficiency as good as obtained in lower hybrid experiments at comparable, low temperatures. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. High-harmonic generation in cavitated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Comier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-05-15

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using ultraintense lasers interacting with highly stripped ions in cavitated plasmas. This method relies on plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense drive beam (laser or electron beam) to produce an ion cavity. An ultrashort pulse laser propagating in the plasma-electron-free ion cavity generates laser harmonics. The longitudinal electron motion, which inhibits high-harmonic generation at high laser intensities, can be suppressed by the space-charge field in the ion cavity or by using a counterpropagating laser pulse. Periodic suppression of the longitudinal electron motion may also be used to quasi-phase-match. This method enables harmonic generation to be extended to the sub-A regime.

  20. High harmonic phase in molecular nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Brian K.

    2009-10-17

    Electronic structure in atoms and molecules modulates the amplitude and phase of high harmonic generation (HHG). We report measurements of the high harmonic spectral amplitude and phase in N{sub 2}. The phase is measured interferometrically by beating the N{sub 2} harmonics with those of an Ar reference oscillator in a gas mixture. A rapid phase shift of 0.2{pi} is observed in the vicinity of the HHG spectral minimum, where a shift of {pi} had been presumed [J. Itatani et al., Nature 432, 867 (2004)]. We compare the phase measurements to a simulation of the HHG recombination step in N{sub 2} that is based on a simple interference model. The results of the simulation suggest that modifications beyond the simple interference model are needed to explain HHG spectra in molecules.

  1. High Harmonic Generation at Long Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, B.; Martin, J. D. D.; DiMauro, L. F.; Agostini, P.; Schafer, K. J.; Gaarde, M. B.; Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, S-22100 Lund, ; Kulander, K. C.

    1999-12-20

    High harmonic radiation spectra up to 19th order in alkali metal vapors excited by an intense, picosecond mid-infrared (3-4 {mu} m ) laser are reported and compared to theory. The strong-field dynamics in the alkali metal atoms exhibit significant differences from all previously studied systems due to the strong coupling between their ground and first excited states. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  2. Wave-particle interactions on the FAST satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temerin, M. A.; Carlson, C. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Ergun, R. E.; Mcfadden, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Fast Auroral Snapshot, or 'FAST' satellite, scheduled for launch in 1993, will investigate the plasma physics of the low altitude auroral zone from a 3500-km apogee polar orbit. FAST will give attention to wave, double-layer, and soliton production processes due to electrons and ions, as well as to wave-wave interactions, and the acceleration of electrons and ions by waves and electric fields. FAST will employ an intelligent data-handling system capacle of data acquisition at rates of up to 1 Mb/sec, in addition to a 1-Gbit solid-state memory. The data need be gathered for only a few minutes during passes through the auroral zone, since the most interesting auroral phenomena occur in such narrow regions as auroral arcs, electrostatic shocks, and superthermal electron bursts.

  3. Recent Fast Wave Coupling and Heating Studies on NSTX, with Possible Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Hosea, R.E. Bell, E. Feibush, R.W. Harvey, E.F. Jaeger, B.P LeBlanc, R. Maingi, C.K. Phillips, L. Roquemore, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, K. Tritz, E.J. Valeo, J. Wilgen, J.R. Wilson, and the NSTX Team

    2009-07-21

    The goal of the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) research on NSTX is to maximize the coupling of RF power to the core of the plasma by minimizing the coupling of RF power to edge loss processes. HHFW core plasma heating efficiency in helium and deuterium L-mode discharges is found to improve markedly on NSTX when the density 2 cm in front of the antenna is reduced below that for the onset of perpendicular wave propagation (nonset ∝ B*k|| 2/ω). In NSTX, the observed RF power losses in the plasma edge are driven in the vicinity of the antenna as opposed to resulting from multi-pass edge damping. PDI surface losses through ion-electron collisions are estimated to be significant. Recent spectroscopic measurements suggest that additional PDI losses could be caused by the loss of energetic edge ions on direct loss orbits and perhaps result in the observed clamping of the edge rotation. Initial deuterium H-mode heating studies reveal that core heating is degraded at lower kφ (- 8 m-1 relative to 13 m-1) as for the Lmode case at elevated edge density. Fast visible camera images clearly indicate that a major edge loss process is occurring from the plasma scrape off layer (SOL) in the vicinity of the antenna and along the magnetic field lines to the lower outer divertor plate. Large type I ELMs, which are observed at both kφ values, appear after antenna arcs caused by precursor blobs, low level ELMs, or dust. For large ELMs without arcs, the source reflection coefficients rise on a 0.1 ms time scale, which indicates that the time derivative of the reflection coefficient can be used to discriminate between arcs and ELMs.

  4. Recent Fast Wave Coupling and Heating Studies on NSTX, with Possible Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Feibush, E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J.; Tritz, K.

    2009-11-26

    The goal of the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) research on NSTX is to maximize the coupling of RF power to the core of the plasma by minimizing the coupling of RF power to edge loss processes. HHFW core plasma heating efficiency in helium and deuterium L-mode discharges is found to improve markedly on NSTX when the density 2 cm in front of the antenna is reduced below that for the onset of perpendicular wave propagation (n{sub onset}{proportional_to}B*k{sub parallel}{sup 2}/{omega}). In NSTX, the observed RF power losses in the plasma edge are driven in the vicinity of the antenna as opposed to resulting from multi-pass edge damping. PDI surface losses through ion-electron collisions are estimated to be significant. Recent spectroscopic measurements suggest that additional PDI losses could be caused by the loss of energetic edge ions on direct loss orbits and perhaps result in the observed clamping of the edge rotation. Initial deuterium H-mode heating studies reveal that core heating is degraded at lower k{sub {phi}}(-8 m{sup -1} relative to 13 m{sup -1}) as for the L-mode case at elevated edge density. Fast visible camera images clearly indicate that a major edge loss process is occurring from the plasma scrape off layer (SOL) in the vicinity of the antenna and along the magnetic field lines to the lower outer divertor plate. Large type I ELMs, which are observed at both k{sub {phi}} values, appear after antenna arcs caused by precursor blobs, low level ELMs, or dust. For large ELMs without arcs, the source reflection coefficients rise on a 0.1 ms time scale, which indicates that the time derivative of the reflection coefficient can be used to discriminate between arcs and ELMs.

  5. Fast magnetosonic waves of the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, Irina

    Propagation of FMS waves in the cylindrical model of the magnetotail with plasma and current sheets are described. It is shown that the presence of the plasma sheet affects significantly the magnetotail transparency for FMS waves. Positions are calculated of reflecting cylindrical surfaces for the modes with different azimuthal numbers. It is also shown that the large azimuthal length FMS waves with sufficiently small longitudinal phase velocity penetrating into the magnetotail and propagating along the azimuthal coordinate concentrate in the lobes being very weak in the plasma sheet. Radial structures of FMS modes penetrating from the solar wind and those generating in the current sheet as well as the structures along PSBL of Alfven waves into which such FMS modes are mode converting and corresponding aurora are described.

  6. Fast-wave Power Flow Along SOL Field Lines In NSTX nd The Associated Power Deposition Profile Across The SOL In Front Of The Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Roy

    2013-06-21

    Fast-wave heating and current drive efficiencies can be reduced by a number of processes in the vicinity of the antenna and in the scrape off layer (SOL). On NSTX from around 25% to more than 60% of the high-harmonic fast-wave power can be lost to the SOL regions, and a large part of this lost power flows along SOL magnetic field lines and is deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling. We show that field-line mapping matches the location of heat deposition on the lower divertor, albeit with a portion of the heat outside of the predictions. The field-line mapping can then be used to partially reconstruct the profile of lost fast-wave power at the midplane in front of the antenna, and the losses peak close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS) as well as the antenna. This profile suggests a radial standing-wave pattern formed by fast-wave propagation in the SOL, and this hypothesis will be tested on NSTX-U. Advanced RF codes must reproduce these results so that such codes can be used to understand this edge loss and to minimize RF heat deposition and erosion in the divertor region on ITER.

  7. Parabolic approximation method for fast magnetosonic wave propagation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Perkins, F.W.; Hwang, D.Q.

    1985-07-01

    Fast magnetosonic wave propagation in a cylindrical tokamak model is studied using a parabolic approximation method in which poloidal variations of the wave field are considered weak in comparison to the radial variations. Diffraction effects, which are ignored by ray tracing mthods, are included self-consistently using the parabolic method since continuous representations for the wave electromagnetic fields are computed directly. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the cylindrical convergence of the launched waves into a diffraction-limited focal spot on the cyclotron absorption layer near the magnetic axis for a wide range of plasma confinement parameters.

  8. Secondary Fast Magnetoacoustic Waves Trapped in Randomly Structured Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ding; Li, Bo; Walsh, Robert W.

    2016-09-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves are an important tool for inferring parameters of the solar atmosphere. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas that mimic the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the speed of the fast wave, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period (\\bar{p}) on the initial pulse width (w 0) and studying the density contrast ({δ }ρ ) and correlation length (L c ) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, {δ }ρ does not alter \\bar{p} significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when {δ }ρ is small but have a smoothing effect when {δ }ρ is sufficiently large. We found that \\bar{p} scales linearly with L c and that the scaling factor is larger for a narrower pulse. However, in terms of the absolute values of \\bar{p}, broader pulses generate secondary waves with longer periods, and this effect is stronger in random plasmas with shorter correlation lengths. Secondary waves carry the signatures of both the leading wave pulse and the background plasma. Our study may find applications in magnetohydrodynamic seismology by exploiting the secondary waves detected in the dimming regions after coronal mass ejections or extreme ultraviolet waves.

  9. Fast Wave Current Drive in JET ITB-Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, T.; Laxaaback, M.; Bergkvist, T.; Johnson, T.; Brzozowski, J.; Rachlew, E.; Tennfors, E.; Mantsinen, M.; Matthews, G.; Tala, T.; Meo, F.; Nguyen, F.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Joffrin, E.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Petty, C.C.; Eester, D. van

    2005-09-26

    Fast wave current drive has been performed in JET plasmas with internal transport barriers, ITBs, and strongly reversed magnetic shear. Although the current drive efficiency of the power absorbed on the electrons is fairly high, only small effects are seen in the central current density. The main reasons are the parasitic absorption of RF power, the strongly inductive nature of the plasma and the interplay between the fast wave driven current and bootstrap current. The direct electron heating in the FWCD experiments is found to be strongly degraded compared to that with the dipole phasing.

  10. Linear coupling of planetary scale waves in ionospheric zonal shear winds: Generation of fast magnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanishvili, R.; Chagelishvili, G.; Uchava, E.; Kharshiladze, O.

    2016-04-01

    Our goal is to gain new insight into the physics of wave dynamics in ionospheric zonal shear flows. We study the shear flow non-normality induced linear coupling of planetary scale (slow) modified Rossby waves and westward propagating fast magnetized (Khantadze) waves using an approach different from the existing one to the linear wave dynamics. The performed analysis allows us to separate from each other different physical processes, grasp their interplay, and, by this way, construct the basic physics of the linear coupling of the slow and fast waves in an ionospheric zonal flow with linear shear of mean velocity, U0=(S y ,0 ) . It should be noted from the beginning that we consider incompressible flow and the classified "slow" and "fast" waves are not connected with the similarly labeled magnetosonic waves in compressible heliosphere. We show that: the modified Rossby waves generate fast magnetized waves due to the coupling for a quite wide range of ionospheric and shear flow parameters; the linear transient processes are highly anisotropic in wavenumber plane; the generation of the magnetized waves/oscillations is most efficient/optimal for S ≃0.1 (S is the shear rate normalized to the combination of the angular velocity and latitude, Ω0 cos θ0 ); the streamwise wave number of the optimally generated magnetized wave harmonics decreases (the length scale increases) with increasing the Hall parameter, α. At the end, we discuss nonlinear consequences of the described anisotropic linear dynamics—they should lead to an anisotropy of nonlinear cascade processes (in wavenumber plane). In turn, an interplay of the analyzed quite strong transient growth of the fast magnetic waves with anisotropic nonlinear processes should ensure self-sustenance of (stochastic or regular) magnetic perturbations.

  11. Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanli, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis Ali Ismet KANLI Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Geophysical Engineering, 34320, Avcilar Campus, Istanbul-Turkey, E-mail: kanli@istanbul.edu.tr Abstract: A two-step surface wave analysis method is proposed including both the MASW (Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves) and Micro-tremor based techniques. This is an integrated approach and the MASW survey data are gathered to obtain the shear wave velocity-depth information up to at least 30 meters by using a special type active seismic source called as SR-II or Kangaroo. In the second step, the microtremor data which are based on surface waves from seismic noise at each site are used to determine the shear-wave velocity-depth profiles. In the second step of the process, the multichannel analysis of surface waves data are given as constraints in the microtremor inversion process. This proposed algorithm allows us to calculate shear wave velocity-depth information with all geotechnical parameters from near surface to bedrock depths very fast and efficiently.

  12. Fast wave direct electron heating in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Jaeger, E.F.; Rimini, F.G.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Stevens, J.E.; Wilson, J.R.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Hammett, G.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.C.; Janos, A.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Taylor, G.; Zamstorff, M.C. )

    1994-10-15

    Direct electron heating experiments were carried out in two regimes: B[sub T]=4.6 T with D[sup +] supershots; and B[sub T]=2.3 T with [sup 3]He majority. The electron power deposition profiles measured with modulation of RF power are found to be strongly peaked in the core with the total volume-integrated power of up to 80% of the modulated power. The magnitude and profile shape agree well with those predicted by a full-wave code.

  13. Vacuum high-harmonic generation and electromagnetic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhl, P.; King, B.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-04-01

    > When one takes into account the presence of virtual charged states in the quantum vacuum, a nonlinear self-interaction can arise in the propagation of electromagnetic fields. This self-interaction is often referred to as `real photon-photon scattering'. When the centre-of-mass energy of colliding photons is much lower than the rest energy of an electron-positron pair, this quantum effect can be included in the classical field equations of motion as a vacuum current and charge density using the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian. Using analytical and numerical methods for subcritical fields, the intrinsic solution to Maxwell's equations has been found for counterpropagating probe and pump plane waves in the presence of vacuum four- and six-wave mixing. In the corresponding all-order solution for the scattered probe, a route to vacuum high-harmonic generation is identified in which a long phase length can compensate for the weakness of interacting fields. The resulting shocks in the probe carrier wave and envelope are studied for different parameter regimes and polarisation set-ups. In this special issue, we study two additional set-ups: that of a slowly varying single-cycle background to highlight the effect of an oscillating background on the probe harmonic spectrum, and that of a few-cycle probe to highlight the smoothing of the harmonic peaks produced by a wider spectrum of probe photons. We also correct sign errors in an earlier publication.

  14. Fast wave current drive in DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, E.; Van Eestera, D.; Messiaen, A.; Collaboration: EFDA-PPPT Contributors

    2014-02-12

    The ability to non-inductively drive a large fraction of the toroidal plasma current in magnetically confined plasmas is an essential requirement for steady state fusion reactors such as DEMO. Besides neutral beam injection (NBI), electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and lower hybrid wave heating (LH), ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is a promising candidate to drive current, in particular at the high temperatures expected in fusion plasmas. In this paper, the current drive (CD) efficiencies calculated with coupled ICRF wave / CD numerical codes for the DEMO-1 design case (R{sub 0}=9m, B{sub 0}=6.8T, a{sub p}=2.25m) [1] are presented. It will be shown that although promising CD efficiencies can be obtained in the usual ICRF frequency domain (20-100MHz) by shifting the dominant ion-cyclotron absorption layers to the high-field side, operation at higher frequencies (100-300MHz) has a stronger CD potential, provided the parasitic RF power absorption of the alpha particles can be minimized.

  15. High-harmonic spectroscopy of molecular isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M. C. H.; Brichta, J.-P.; Bhardwaj, V. R.; Spanner, M.; Patchkovskii, S.

    2011-11-15

    We demonstrate that high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy can be used to probe stereoisomers of randomly oriented 1,2-dichloroethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) and 2-butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}). The high-harmonic spectra of these isomers are distinguishable over a range of laser intensities and wavelengths. Time-dependent numerical calculations of angle-dependent ionization yields for 1,2-dichloroethylene suggest that the harmonic spectra of molecular isomers reflect differences in their strong-field ionization. The subcycle ionization yields for the cis isomer are an order of magnitude higher than those for the trans isomer. The sensitivity in discrimination of the harmonic spectra of cis- and trans- isomers is greater than 8 and 5 for 1,2-dichloroethylene and 2-butene, respectively. We show that HHG spectroscopy cannot differentiate the harmonic spectra of the two enantiomers of the chiral molecule propylene oxide (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O).

  16. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  17. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  18. Fast wave current drive in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Forest, C.B.; Freeman, R.L.; Gohil, P.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.-R.

    1995-02-01

    The non-inductive current drive from fast Alfven waves launched by a directional four-element antenna was measured in the DIII-D tokamak. The fast wave frequency (60 MHz) was eight times the deuterium cyclotron frequency at the plasma center. An array of rf pickup loops at several locations around the torus was used to verify the directivity of the four-element antenna. Complete non-inductive current drive was achieved using a combination of fast wave current drive (FWCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in discharges for which the total plasma current was inductively ramped down from 400 to 170 kA. For discharges with steady plasma current, up to 110 kA of FWCD was inferred from an analysis of the loop voltage, with a maximum non-inductive current (FWCD, ECCD, and bootstrap) of 195 out of 310 kA. The FWCD efficiency increased linearly with central electron temperature. For low current discharges, the FWCD efficiency was degraded due to incomplete fast wave damping. The experimental FWCD was found to agree with predictions from the CURRAY ray-tracing code only when a parasitic loss of 4% per pass was included in the modeling along with multiple pass damping.

  19. Real-time observation of interfering crystal electrons in high-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Hohenleutner, M; Langer, F; Schubert, O; Knorr, M; Huttner, U; Koch, S W; Kira, M; Huber, R

    2015-07-30

    Acceleration and collision of particles has been a key strategy for exploring the texture of matter. Strong light waves can control and recollide electronic wavepackets, generating high-harmonic radiation that encodes the structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules and lays the foundations of attosecond science. The recent discovery of high-harmonic generation in bulk solids combines the idea of ultrafast acceleration with complex condensed matter systems, and provides hope for compact solid-state attosecond sources and electronics at optical frequencies. Yet the underlying quantum motion has not so far been observable in real time. Here we study high-harmonic generation in a bulk solid directly in the time domain, and reveal a new kind of strong-field excitation in the crystal. Unlike established atomic sources, our solid emits high-harmonic radiation as a sequence of subcycle bursts that coincide temporally with the field crests of one polarity of the driving terahertz waveform. We show that these features are characteristic of a non-perturbative quantum interference process that involves electrons from multiple valence bands. These results identify key mechanisms for future solid-state attosecond sources and next-generation light-wave electronics. The new quantum interference process justifies the hope for all-optical band-structure reconstruction and lays the foundation for possible quantum logic operations at optical clock rates. PMID:26223624

  20. Real-time observation of interfering crystal electrons in high-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenleutner, M.; Langer, F.; Schubert, O.; Knorr, M.; Huttner, U.; Koch, S. W.; Kira, M.; Huber, R.

    2015-07-01

    Acceleration and collision of particles has been a key strategy for exploring the texture of matter. Strong light waves can control and recollide electronic wavepackets, generating high-harmonic radiation that encodes the structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules and lays the foundations of attosecond science. The recent discovery of high-harmonic generation in bulk solids combines the idea of ultrafast acceleration with complex condensed matter systems, and provides hope for compact solid-state attosecond sources and electronics at optical frequencies. Yet the underlying quantum motion has not so far been observable in real time. Here we study high-harmonic generation in a bulk solid directly in the time domain, and reveal a new kind of strong-field excitation in the crystal. Unlike established atomic sources, our solid emits high-harmonic radiation as a sequence of subcycle bursts that coincide temporally with the field crests of one polarity of the driving terahertz waveform. We show that these features are characteristic of a non-perturbative quantum interference process that involves electrons from multiple valence bands. These results identify key mechanisms for future solid-state attosecond sources and next-generation light-wave electronics. The new quantum interference process justifies the hope for all-optical band-structure reconstruction and lays the foundation for possible quantum logic operations at optical clock rates.

  1. Resonant interaction between a localized fast wave and a slow wave with constant asymptotic amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Zabolotskii, A. A.

    2009-11-15

    An integrable Yajima-Oikawa system is solved in the case of a finite density, which corresponds to a slowly varying (long-wavelength) wave with finite amplitude at infinity and a localized fast-oscillating (short-wavelength) wave. Application of the results to spinor Bose-Einstein condensates and other physical systems is discussed.

  2. Fast gravitational wave radiometry using data folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain, Anirban; Dalvi, Prathamesh; Mitra, Sanjit

    2015-07-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from the early universe and unresolved astrophysical sources are expected to create a stochastic GW background (SGWB). The GW radiometer algorithm is well suited to probe such a background using data from ground-based laser interferometric detectors. Radiometer analysis can be performed in different bases, e.g., isotropic, pixel or spherical harmonic. Each of these analyses possesses a common temporal symmetry which we exploit here to fold the whole data set for every detector pair, typically a few hundred to a thousand days of data, to only one sidereal day, without any compromise in precision. We develop the algebra and a software pipeline needed to fold data, accounting for the effect of overlapping windows and nonstationary noise. We implement this on LIGO's fifth science run data and validate it by performing a standard anisotropic SGWB search on both folded and unfolded data. Folded data not only leads to orders of magnitude reduction in computation cost, but it results in a conveniently small data volume of few gigabytes, making it possible to perform an actual analysis on a personal computer, as well as easy movement of data. A few important analyses, yet unaccomplished due to computational limitations, will now become feasible. Folded data, being independent of the radiometer basis, will also be useful in reducing processing redundancies in multiple searches and provide a common ground for mutual consistency checks. Most importantly, folded data will allow vast amount of experimentation with existing searches and provide substantial help in developing new strategies to find unknown sources.

  3. Effective ATI channels in high harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchiev, M. Yu; Ostrovsky, V. N.

    2001-02-01

    Harmonic generation by an atom in a laser field is described by the three-step mechanism as proceeding via above-threshold ionization (ATI) followed by electron propagation in the laser-dressed continuum and subsequent laser-assisted recombination (LAR). The amplitude of the harmonic production is given by the coherent sum of contributions from different intermediate ATI channels labelled by the number, m, of absorbed laser photons. The range of m-values that give a substantial contribution is explored and found to be rather broad for high harmonic generation. The coherence effects are of crucial importance as they are responsible for the characteristic pattern of harmonic intensities with a plateau domain followed by a cut-off region. Due to the multiphoton nature of the process, an efficient summation of m-contributions can be carried out within the framework of the saddle-point method. The saddle points correspond to some complex-valued labels m = mc associated with the intermediate effective ATI channels in the three-step harmonic generation process. The advantage of this approach stems from the fact that summation over a large number of conventional ATI m-channels is replaced by summation over a small number of effective mc-channels. The equation governing mc has a transparent physical meaning: the electron ejected from the atom on the first (ATI) stage should return to the core to make LAR possible. The effective channel labels m move along characteristic trajectories in the complex plane as the system parameters vary. In the cut-off region of the harmonic spectrum a single effective channel contributes. For lower harmonics, in the plateau domain, two effective ATI channels become essential. The interference of their contributions leads to an oscillatory pattern in the harmonic generation rates. The calculated rates are in good agreement with the results obtained by other approaches.

  4. High Harmonic Generation from Rotationally Excited Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, Robynne M.

    2011-12-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is understood through a three-step model. A strong laser field ionizes an atom or molecule. The free electron propagates in the laser field and may recombine with the atom or molecule leading to the generation of extreme ultraviolet or soft x-ray light at odd harmonics of the fundamental. Since the wavelength of the recombining electron is on the order of internuclear distances in molecules, HHG acts as a probe of molecular structure and dynamics. Conversely, control of the molecules leads to control of the properties (intensity, phase, and polarization) of the harmonic emission. Rotationally exciting molecules provides field-free molecular alignment at time intervals corresponding to fractions of the rotational period of the molecule. Alignment is necessary for understanding how the harmonic emission depends on molecular structure and alignment. Additionally, HHG acts as a probe of the rotational wavepackets. This thesis reports three experiments on HHG from rotationally excited molecules. Before we can use HHG as a probe of complex molecular dynamics or control harmonic properties through molecules, the harmonic emission from aligned, linear molecules must first be understood. To that end, the first experiment measures the intensity and phase of harmonics generated from N 2O and N2 near times of strong alignment revealing interferences during recombination. The second experiment demonstrates HHG as a sensitive probe of rotational wavepacket dynamics in CO2 and N2O, revealing new revival features not detected by any other probe. The final experiment focuses on understanding and controlling the polarization state of the harmonic emission. Generating elliptically polarized harmonics would be very useful for probing molecular and materials systems. We observe an elliptical dichroism in polarization-resolved measurements of the harmonic emission from aligned N2 and CO2 molecules, revealing evidence for electron-hole dynamics between the

  5. On Plasma Rotation Induced by Traveling Fast Alfvin Waves

    SciTech Connect

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; and V.S. Chan

    2001-08-09

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the minority fundamental ion-cyclotron resonance, coupled with finite banana width physics, generates torque distributions and ultimately rotational shear layers in the bulk plasma, even when the toroidal wavenumber k(subscript ''phi'') = n/R of the fast wave vanishes (n=0) and cyclotron absorption introduces no angular momentum nor canonical angular momentum [F.W. Perkins, R.B. White, P.T. Bonoli, and V.S. Chan, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2181]. The present work extends these results to travelling waves with non-zero n where heating directly introduces angular momentum. Since tokamak fast-wave antennas have approximately one wavelength per toroidal field coil, the toroidal mode number n lies in the range n = 10-20, independent of machine size. A zero-dimensional analysis shows that the rotation rate arising from direct torque is comparable to that of the rotational shear layer and has the same scaling. Nondimensional rotation profiles for n = (-10, 10) show modest changes from the n = 0 case in the expected direction. For a balanced antenna spectrum, the nondimensional rotational profile (averaged over n = -10, 10) lies quite close to the n = 0 profile.

  6. Vorticity equation for MHD fast waves in geospace environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The MHD vorticity equation is modified in order to apply it to nonlinear MHD fast waves or shocks when their extent along the magnetic field is limited. Field-aligned current (FAC) generation is also discussed on the basis of this modified vorticity equation. When the wave normal is not aligned to the finite velocity convection and the source region is spatially limited, a longitudinal polarization causes a pair of plus and minus charges inside the compressional plane waves or shocks, generating a pair of FACs. This polarization is not related to the separation between the electrons and ions caused by their difference in mass, a separation which is inherent to compressional waves. The resultant double field-aligned current structure exists both with and without the contributions from curvature drift, which is questionable in terms of its contribution to vorticity change from the viewpoint of single-particle motion.

  7. IBW and Fast Wave Launching and Damping on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = J.C. Hosea

    1997-01-01

    Antennas to provide direct IBW (ion-Bernstein wave) excitation and to improve the launched spectrum and power handling for mode-coverted (MC) IBW excitation have been installed on TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) to support studies of transport barrier formation inside the TFTR plasma. Initial IBW launching/heating experiments have been performed at f(subscript) rf (nonsubsript) = 76 MHz and 50.6 MHz for several antenna and plasma positions, several mangetic fields [D, T, H, (superscript) 3 (nonsuperscript) He resonances], and with and without neutral-beam injection. Although the measured surface density profiles in front of the antenna should theoretically support IBW launching to the plasma core via EPW (electron plasma wave) excitation, loading resistance parameter dependence and heating results suggest that the wave energy is being deposited mostly in the plasma periphery. The potential roles of surface fast-wave and near-field excitation/damping on the IBW performance are discussed. Also MC IBW damping of the fast wave has been significantly improved through the removal of lithium 7 from the plasma.

  8. Nonlinear fast sausage waves in homogeneous magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalyaev, Badma B.; Ruderman, Michael S.

    2015-12-01

    > We consider fast sausage waves in straight homogeneous magnetic tubes. The plasma motion is described by the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in the cold plasma approximation. We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger equation describing the nonlinear evolution of an envelope of a carrier wave. The coefficients of this equation are expressed in terms Bessel and modified Bessel functions. They are calculated numerically for various values of parameters. In particular, we show that the criterion for the onset of the modulational or Benjamin-Fair instability is satisfied. The implication of the obtained results for solar physics is discussed.

  9. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium.

  10. Time-resolving Attosecond Chiral Dynamics in Molecules with High Harmonic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.; Cireasa, R.; Boguslavskiy, A.; Pons, B.; Wong, M. C. H.; Descamps, D.; Petit, S.; Ruf, H.; Thire, N.; Ferre, A.; Suarez, J.; Schmidt, B. E.; Higuet, J.; Alharbi, A. F.; Legare, F.; Blanchet, V.; Fabre, B.; Patchkovskii, S.; Mairesse, Y.; Bhardwaj, R.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate extreme chiral sensitivity of high harmonic generation from randomly oriented ensemble of chiral molecules in elliptical mid-infrared fields, and explain the physical mechanism underlying this very strong chiro-optical response. We also use the high harmonic spectra to follow the electronic chiral response with 0.1 femtosecond resolution. We studied two chiral molecules, epoxypropane and fenchone in 1.8 μm, 50 fs, mid-1013 W/cm2 pulses. Very small ellipticity of the incident light, about 1% in the field, is sufficient to induce several percent difference between the high harmonic response of left and right enantiomers. The origin of this effect lies in chiral-sensitive dynamics of the hole created by strong field ionization. Small differences in this dynamics between ionization and recombination are recorded and amplified by several orders of magnitude in high harmonic spectra. Using time-energy mapping we reconstruct sub-femtosecond chiral dynamics and show that the standard measure of the chiral signal is directly proportional to the recombination amplitude to the chiral-sensitive component of the hole wave-packet.

  11. Strongly Dispersive Transient Bragg Grating for High Harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.; Spector, L.S.; Gaarde, M.B.; McFarland, B.K.; Bucksbaum, P.H.; Guhr, Markus; /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-04

    We create a transient Bragg grating in a high harmonic generation medium using two counterpropagating pulses. The Bragg grating disperses the harmonics in angle and can diffract a large bandwidth with temporal resolution limited only by the source size.

  12. Single-shot fluctuations in waveguided high-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Goh, S J; Tao, Y; van der Slot, P J M; Bastiaens, H J M; Herek, J; Biedron, S G; Danailov, M B; Milton, S V; Boller, K-J

    2015-09-21

    For exploring the application potential of coherent soft x-ray (SXR) and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) provided by high-harmonic generation, it is important to characterize the central output parameters. Of specific importance are pulse-to-pulse (shot-to-shot) fluctuations of the high-harmonic output energy, fluctuations of the direction of the emission (pointing instabilities), and fluctuations of the beam divergence and shape that reduce the spatial coherence. We present the first single-shot measurements of waveguided high-harmonic generation in a waveguided (capillary-based) geometry. Using a capillary waveguide filled with Argon gas as the nonlinear medium, we provide the first characterization of shot-to-shot fluctuations of the pulse energy, of the divergence and of the beam pointing. We record the strength of these fluctuations vs. two basic input parameters, which are the drive laser pulse energy and the gas pressure in the capillary waveguide. In correlation measurements between single-shot drive laser beam profiles and single-shot high-harmonic beam profiles we prove the absence of drive laser beam-pointing-induced fluctuations in the high-harmonic output. We attribute the main source of high-harmonic fluctuations to ionization-induced nonlinear mode mixing during propagation of the drive laser pulse inside the capillary waveguide. PMID:26406689

  13. Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.

    2009-11-12

    This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole

  14. Fast Waves at the Base of the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Rhode, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Georg von Békésy observed that the onset times of responses to brief-duration stimuli vary as a function of distance from the stapes, with basal regions starting to move earlier than apical ones. He noticed that the speed of signal propagation along the cochlea is slow when compared with the speed of sound in water. Fast traveling waves have been recorded in the cochlea, but their existence is interpreted as the result of an experiment artifact. Accounts of the timing of vibration onsets at the base of the cochlea generally agree with Békésy’s results. Some authors, however, have argued that the measured delays are too short for consistency with Békésy’s theory. To investigate the speed of the traveling wave at the base of the cochlea, we analyzed basilar membrane (BM) responses to clicks recorded at several locations in the base of the chinchilla cochlea. The initial component of the BM response matches remarkably well the initial component of the stapes response, after a 4-μs delay of the latter. A similar conclusion is reached by analyzing onset times of time-domain gain functions, which correspond to BM click responses normalized by middle-ear input. Our results suggest that BM responses to clicks arise from a combination of fast and slow traveling waves. PMID:26062000

  15. Frequency and damping rate of fast sausage waves

    SciTech Connect

    Farahani, S. Vasheghani; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Goossens, M.; Hornsey, C.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the frequency and damping rate of fast axisymmetric waves that are subject to wave leakage for a one-dimensional magnetic cylindrical structure in the solar corona. We consider the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dispersion relation for axisymmetric MHD waves superimposed on a straight magnetic cylinder in the zero β limit, similar to a jet or loop in the solar corona. An analytic study accompanied by numerical calculations has been carried out to model the frequency, damping rate, and phase speed of the sausage wave around the cut-off frequency and in the long wavelength limit. Analytic expressions have been obtained based on equations around the points of interest. They are linear approximations of the dependence of the sausage frequency on the wave number around the cut-off wavelength for both leaky and non-leaky regimes and in the long wavelength limit. Moreover, an expression for the damping rate of the leaky sausage wave has been obtained both around the cut-off frequency and in the long wavelength limit. These analytic results are compared with numerical computations. The expressions show that the complex frequencies are mainly dominated by the density ratio. In addition, it is shown that the damping eventually becomes independent of the wave number in the long wavelength limit. We conclude that the sausage mode damping directly depends on the density ratios of the internal and external media where the damping declines in higher density contrasts. Even in the long wavelength limit, the sausage mode is weakly damped for high-density contrasts. As such, sausage modes could be observed for a significant number of periods in high-density contrast loops or jets.

  16. Non-collinear generation of angularly isolated circularly polarized high harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickstein, Daniel D.; Dollar, Franklin J.; Grychtol, Patrik; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Shaw, Justin M.; Fan, Tingting; Dorney, Kevin M.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Durfee, Charles G.

    2015-11-01

    We generate angularly isolated beams of circularly polarized extreme ultraviolet light through the first implementation of non-collinear high harmonic generation with circularly polarized driving lasers. This non-collinear technique offers numerous advantages over previous methods, including the generation of higher photon energies, the separation of the harmonics from the pump beam, the production of both left and right circularly polarized harmonics at the same wavelength and the capability of separating the harmonics without using a spectrometer. To confirm the circular polarization of the beams and to demonstrate the practicality of this new light source, we measure the magnetic circular dichroism of a 20 nm iron film. Furthermore, we explain the mechanisms of non-collinear high harmonic generation using analytical descriptions in both the photon and wave models. Advanced numerical simulations indicate that this non-collinear mixing enables the generation of isolated attosecond pulses with circular polarization.

  17. Resonance absorption of propagating fast waves in a cold plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of propagating waves impinging on a surface in which the plasma and magnetic field may change is investigated by examining in depth the problem of a combination of cold plasma, uniform magnetic field and a surface density which varies linearly from zero at the left end to some finite value at the right end, beyond which the density is constant. Two cases are considered: one in which the plasma is a vacuum everywhere to the left of the surface (which may correspond to coronal conditions) and one in which the plasma density jumps to a very large value to the left of the surface (which may mimic the magnetosphere with the dense region at the left corresponding to the plasmasphere). A complete discussion of the resonance absorption of propagating fast waves for the case considered by Kiveloson and Southwood (1986) is presented, emphasizing approximate analytical results whenever possible; these results are then compared with exact numerical solutions.

  18. Review of tokamak experiments on direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1993-12-01

    Results from tokamak experiments on direct electron interaction with the compressional Alfven wave ({open_quote}fast wave{close_quote}) are reviewed. Experiments aimed at electron heating as well as those in which fast wave electron current drive was investigated are discussed. A distinction is drawn between experiments employing the lower hybrid range of frequencies, where both the lower hybrid wave ({open_quote}slow wave{close_quote}) and the fast wave can propagate in much of the plasma, and those experiments using the fast wave in the range of moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics, where only the fast wave can penetrate to the plasma core. Most of the early tokamak experiments were in the lower hybrid frequency regime, and the observed electron interaction appeared to be very similar to that obtained with the slow wave at the same frequency. In particular, electron interaction with the fast wave was observed only below a density limit nearly the same as the well known slow wave density limit. In the more recent lower frequency fast wave experiments, electron interaction (heating and current drive) is observed at the center of the discharge, where slow waves are not present.

  19. High Harmonic Spectroscopy of the Cooper Minimum in Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. C. H.; Le, A.-T.; Alharbi, A. F.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Lucchese, R. R.; Brichta, J.-P.; Lin, C. D.; Bhardwaj, V. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Cooper minimum (CM) has been studied using high harmonic generation solely in atoms. Here, we present detailed experimental and theoretical studies on the CM in molecules probed by high harmonic generation using a range of near-infrared light pulses from λ=1.3 to 1.8μm. We demonstrate the CM to occur in CS2 and CCl4 at ˜42 and ˜40eV, respectively, by comparing the high harmonic spectra with the known partial photoionization cross sections of different molecular orbitals, confirmed by theoretical calculations of harmonic spectra. We use CM to probe electron localization in Cl-containing molecules (CCl4, CH2Cl2, and trans-C2H2Cl2) and show that the position of the minimum is influenced by the molecular environment.

  20. Experimental observation of anomalous high harmonics at low intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentin, C.; Kazamias, S.; Douillet, D.; Grillon, G.; Lefrou, T.; Augé, F.; Sebban, S.; Balcou, P.

    A variety of complex phenomena occurs when an ultra-short laser pulse interacts with atoms in the 1013 W/cm2 range: non-sequential ionisation, electron recollision, and Freeman resonances. We show that high-harmonic spectra obtained experimentally in this parameter range also display anomalous features, which are difficult to understand in the framework of the three-step, semiclassical model. The results of a systematic study of these high harmonics generated in argon, xenon, and krypton are presented. From the experimental curves, complex high-order harmonic generation phenomena are discussed.

  1. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    PubMed Central

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T–TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states. PMID:27181483

  2. Gravitational wave asteroseismology with fast rotating neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate damping and growth times of the quadrupolar f mode for rapidly rotating stars and a variety of different polytropic equations of state in the Cowling approximation. This is the first study of the damping/growth time of these types of oscillations for fast-rotating neutron stars in a relativistic treatment where the spacetime degrees of freedom of the perturbations are neglected. We use these frequencies and damping/growth times to create robust empirical formulae which can be used for gravitational-wave asteroseismology. The estimation of the damping/growth time is based on the quadrupole formula and our results agree very well with Newtonian ones in the appropriate limit.

  3. Technology of fast-wave current drive antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Haste, G.R.; Ryan, P.M.; Taylor, D.J.; Swain, D.W.; Mayberry, M.J.; Yugo, J.J.; General Atomics, San Diego, CA; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    The design of fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antennas combines the usual antenna considerations (e.g., the plasma/antenna interface, disruptions, high currents and voltages, and thermal loads) with new requirements for spectral shaping and phase control. The internal configuration of the antenna array has a profound effect on the spectrum and the ability to control phasing. This paper elaborates on these considerations, as epitomized by a proof-of-principle (POP) experiment designed for the DIII-D tokamak. The extension of FWCD for machines such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) will require combining ideas implemented in the POP experiment with reactor-relevant antenna concepts, such as the folded waveguide. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  5. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states.

    PubMed

    Vaskivskyi, I; Mihailovic, I A; Brazovskii, S; Gospodaric, J; Mertelj, T; Svetin, D; Sutar, P; Mihailovic, D

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states. PMID:27181483

  6. Fast calcium wave inhibits excessive apoptosis during epithelial wound healing.

    PubMed

    Justet, Cristian; Hernández, Julio A; Torriglia, Alicia; Chifflet, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Successful wound closure is mainly the result of two cellular processes: migration and proliferation. Apoptosis has also been suggested to play a role in the mechanisms of wound healing. The fast calcium wave (FCW), triggered immediately after a wound is produced, has been proposed to be involved in determining healing responses in epithelia. We have explored the effects of the reversible inhibition of FCW on the apoptotic and proliferative responses of healing bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) cells in culture. The most important findings of this study are that caspase-dependent apoptosis occurs during the healing process, that the amount of apoptosis has a linear dependence on the migrated distance, and that FCW inhibition greatly increases the apoptotic index. We have further been able to establish that FCW plays a role in the control of cell proliferation during BCE wound healing. These results indicate that one of the main roles of the wave is to inhibit an excessive apoptotic response of the healing migrating cells. This property might represent a basic mechanism to allow sufficient migration and proliferation of the healing cells to assure proper restitution of the injured tissue. PMID:26987821

  7. High frequency fast wave current drive for DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.

    2011-12-23

    A steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) requires a high efficiency current drive system, from plug to driven mega-amps. RF systems working in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have high efficiency from plug to antenna but a limited current drive (CD) efficiency and centrally peaked CD profiles. The latter feature is not adequate for a SSTR where the current should be sufficiently broad to keep the central safety factor (possibly significantly) above 1. In addition, the fact that the fast wave (FW) is evanescent at the edge limits coupling, requiring high voltage operation, which makes the system dependent on plasma edge properties and prone to arcing, reducing its reliability. A possible way to overcome these weaknesses is to operate at higher frequency (10 times or more the cyclotron frequency). The advantages are: (1) The coupling can be much better (waves propagate in vacuum) if the parallel refractive index n{sub ||} is kept below one, (2) The FW group velocity tends to align to the magnetic field, so the power circumnavigates the magnetic axis and can drive off-axis current, (3) Due to the latter property, n{sub ||} can be upshifted along the wave propagation path, allowing low n{sub ||} launch (hence good coupling, large CD efficiency) with ultimately good electron absorption (which requires higher n{sub ||}. Note however that the n{sub ||} upshift is a self-organized feature, that electron absorption is in competition with {alpha}-particle absorption and that uncoupling of the FW from the lower hybrid resonance at the edge requires n{sub ||} slightly above one. The latter possibly counterproductive features might complicate the picture. The different aspects of this potentially attractive off-axis FWCD scheme are discussed.

  8. Fast T Wave Detection Calibrated by Clinical Knowledge with Annotation of P and T Waves

    PubMed Central

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Eskofier, Bjoern; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited studies on the automatic detection of T waves in arrhythmic electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. This is perhaps because there is no available arrhythmia dataset with annotated T waves. There is a growing need to develop numerically-efficient algorithms that can accommodate the new trend of battery-driven ECG devices. Moreover, there is also a need to analyze long-term recorded signals in a reliable and time-efficient manner, therefore improving the diagnostic ability of mobile devices and point-of-care technologies. Methods Here, the T wave annotation of the well-known MIT-BIH arrhythmia database is discussed and provided. Moreover, a simple fast method for detecting T waves is introduced. A typical T wave detection method has been reduced to a basic approach consisting of two moving averages and dynamic thresholds. The dynamic thresholds were calibrated using four clinically known types of sinus node response to atrial premature depolarization (compensation, reset, interpolation, and reentry). Results The determination of T wave peaks is performed and the proposed algorithm is evaluated on two well-known databases, the QT and MIT-BIH Arrhythmia databases. The detector obtained a sensitivity of 97.14% and a positive predictivity of 99.29% over the first lead of the validation databases (total of 221,186 beats). Conclusions We present a simple yet very reliable T wave detection algorithm that can be potentially implemented on mobile battery-driven devices. In contrast to complex methods, it can be easily implemented in a digital filter design. PMID:26197321

  9. Can a Fast-Mode EUV Wave Generate a Stationary Front?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.; Chandra, R.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of stationary "EIT waves" about 16 years ago posed a big challenge to the then favorite fast-mode wave model for coronal "EIT waves". It encouraged various non-wave models and played an important role in convergence of the opposing viewpoints toward the recent consensus that there are two types of EUV waves. However, it was recently discovered that a stationary wave front can also be generated when a fast-mode wave passes through a magnetic quasi-separatrix layer (QSL). In this article, we perform a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation of the interaction between a fast-mode wave and a magnetic QSL, and a stationary wave front is reproduced. The analysis of the numerical results indicates that near the plasma beta {˜} 1 layer in front of the magnetic QSL, part of the fast-mode wave is converted to a slow-mode MHD wave, which is then trapped inside the magnetic loops, forming a stationary wave front. Our results imply that we have to be cautious in identifying the nature of a wave, since there may be mode conversion during the propagation of the waves driven by solar eruptions.

  10. 60 MHz fast wave current drive experiment for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Chiu, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Chan, V.; Freeman, R.; Harvey, R.; Pinsker, R. )

    1989-07-01

    The DIII-D facility provides an opportunity to test fast wave current drive appoach. Efficient FWCD is achieved by direct electron absorption due to Landa damping and transit time magnetic pumping. To avoid competing damping mechamisms we seek to maximize the single-pass asorption of the fast waves by electrons. (AIP)

  11. STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA ASSOCIATED WITH EIT/EUV WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Ofman, Leon; Kramar, Maxim; Olmedo, Oscar; Davila, Joseph M.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-03-20

    We report white-light observations of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO/SECCHI/COR1 inner coronagraphs on 2011 August 4. The wave front is observed in the form of density compression passing through various coronal regions such as quiet/active corona, coronal holes, and streamers. Together with measured electron densities determined with STEREO COR1 and Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) data, we use our kinematic measurements of the wave front to calculate coronal magnetic fields and find that the measured speeds are consistent with characteristic fast magnetosonic speeds in the corona. In addition, the wave front turns out to be the upper coronal counterpart of the EIT wave observed by STEREO EUVI traveling against the solar coronal disk; moreover, stationary fronts of the EIT wave are found to be located at the footpoints of deflected streamers and boundaries of coronal holes, after the wave front in the upper solar corona passes through open magnetic field lines in the streamers. Our findings suggest that the observed EIT wave should be in fact a fast magnetosonic shock/wave traveling in the inhomogeneous solar corona, as part of the fast magnetosonic wave propagating in the extended solar corona.

  12. Vibrational Quantum Beats and High Harmonic Generation in SF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Zachary B.; Tonzani, Stefano; Greene, Chris H.

    2007-06-01

    Although HHG is commonly understood as an electronic process, vibrational degrees of freedom in molecules allow for phenomena which have no analogue in atomic systems. This was recently demonstrated in experiments performed with SF6 (Wagner et al, PNAS 103 13279, 2006). If a HHG laser pulse is preceded by a weaker pulse which stimulates Raman-active vibrations, the harmonic intensity oscillates with the interpulse delay time at the frequencies of the stimulated modes. We explain this modulation as quantum interference between adjacent vibrational states of the molecule, which are mixed during the high harmonic process. We present an improved version of the three-step model, which uses nonperturbative electron-ion scattering wavefunctions to find the recombination dipole, and which tracks the vibrational wavefunction of the molecule throughout the high harmonic process.

  13. Role of Many-Electron Dynamics in High Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Ariel; Kaertner, Franz X.; Rohringer, Nina; Santra, Robin

    2006-06-09

    High harmonic generation (HHG) in many-electron atoms is studied theoretically. The breakdown of the frozen-core single active electron approximation is demonstrated, as it predicts roughly the same radiation amplitude in all noble gases. This is in contradiction with experiments, where heavier noble gases are known to emit much stronger HHG radiation than lighter ones. This experimental behavior of the noble gases can be qualitatively reproduced when many-electron dynamics, within a simple approximation, is taken into account.

  14. Energy and energy flux in axisymmetric slow and fast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, M. G.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Goossens, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to calculate the kinetic, magnetic, thermal, and total energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes. The resulting equations should contain as few parameters as possible to facilitate applicability for different observations. Methods: The background equilibrium is a one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube model with a piecewise constant radial density profile. This enables us to use linearised magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy for axisymmetric sausage modes. Results: The equations used to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes depend on the radius of the flux tube, the equilibrium sound and Alfvén speeds, the density of the plasma, the period and phase speed of the wave, and the radial or longitudinal components of the Lagrangian displacement at the flux tube boundary. Approximate relations for limiting cases of propagating slow and fast sausage modes are also obtained. We also obtained the dispersive first-order correction term to the phase speed for both the fundamental slow body mode under coronal conditions and the slow surface mode under photospheric conditions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Heating a plasma by a broadband stream of fast electrons: Fast ignition, shock ignition, and Gbar shock wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Nicolai, Ph.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2015-09-15

    An exact analytic solution is found for the steady-state distribution function of fast electrons with an arbitrary initial spectrum irradiating a planar low-Z plasma with an arbitrary density distribution. The solution is applied to study the heating of a material by fast electrons of different spectra such as a monoenergetic spectrum, a step-like distribution in a given energy range, and a Maxwellian spectrum, which is inherent in laser-produced fast electrons. The heating of shock- and fast-ignited precompressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets as well as the heating of a target designed to generate a Gbar shock wave for equation of state (EOS) experiments by laser-produced fast electrons with a Maxwellian spectrum is investigated. A relation is established between the energies of two groups of Maxwellian fast electrons, which are responsible for generation of a shock wave and heating the upstream material (preheating). The minimum energy of the fast and shock igniting beams as well as of the beam for a Gbar shock wave generation increases with the spectral width of the electron distribution.

  16. The Ultraviolet Surprise. Efficient Soft X-Ray High Harmonic Generation in Multiply-Ionized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Popmintchev, Dimitar; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Mancuso, Christopher; Perez-Hernandez, Jose A.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Hankla, Amelia; Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Gaeta, Alexander L.; Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.; Gaffney, Jim A.; Foord, Mark; Libby, Stephen B.; Jaron-Becker, Agnieskzka; Becker, Andreas; Plaja, Luis; Muranane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2015-12-04

    High-harmonic generation is a universal response of matter to strong femtosecond laser fields, coherently upconverting light to much shorter wavelengths. Optimizing the conversion of laser light into soft x-rays typically demands a trade-off between two competing factors. Reduced quantum diffusion of the radiating electron wave function results in emission from each species which is highest when a short-wavelength ultraviolet driving laser is used. But, phase matching—the constructive addition of x-ray waves from a large number of atoms—favors longer-wavelength mid-infrared lasers. We identified a regime of high-harmonic generation driven by 40-cycle ultraviolet lasers in waveguides that can generate bright beams in the soft x-ray region of the spectrum, up to photon energies of 280 electron volts. Surprisingly, the high ultraviolet refractive indices of both neutral atoms and ions enabled effective phase matching, even in a multiply ionized plasma. We observed harmonics with very narrow linewidths, while calculations show that the x-rays emerge as nearly time-bandwidth–limited pulse trains of ~100 attoseconds.

  17. The Ultraviolet Surprise. Efficient Soft X-Ray High Harmonic Generation in Multiply-Ionized Plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Popmintchev, Dimitar; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Mancuso, Christopher; Perez-Hernandez, Jose A.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Hankla, Amelia; Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Gaeta, Alexander L.; et al

    2015-12-04

    High-harmonic generation is a universal response of matter to strong femtosecond laser fields, coherently upconverting light to much shorter wavelengths. Optimizing the conversion of laser light into soft x-rays typically demands a trade-off between two competing factors. Reduced quantum diffusion of the radiating electron wave function results in emission from each species which is highest when a short-wavelength ultraviolet driving laser is used. But, phase matching—the constructive addition of x-ray waves from a large number of atoms—favors longer-wavelength mid-infrared lasers. We identified a regime of high-harmonic generation driven by 40-cycle ultraviolet lasers in waveguides that can generate bright beams inmore » the soft x-ray region of the spectrum, up to photon energies of 280 electron volts. Surprisingly, the high ultraviolet refractive indices of both neutral atoms and ions enabled effective phase matching, even in a multiply ionized plasma. We observed harmonics with very narrow linewidths, while calculations show that the x-rays emerge as nearly time-bandwidth–limited pulse trains of ~100 attoseconds.« less

  18. Ultraviolet surprise: Efficient soft x-ray high-harmonic generation in multiply ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popmintchev, Dimitar; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Mancuso, Christopher; Pérez-Hernández, Jose A.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Hankla, Amelia; Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Gaeta, Alexander L.; Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.; Gaffney, Jim A.; Foord, Mark; Libby, Stephen B.; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Becker, Andreas; Plaja, Luis; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2015-12-01

    High-harmonic generation is a universal response of matter to strong femtosecond laser fields, coherently upconverting light to much shorter wavelengths. Optimizing the conversion of laser light into soft x-rays typically demands a trade-off between two competing factors. Because of reduced quantum diffusion of the radiating electron wave function, the emission from each species is highest when a short-wavelength ultraviolet driving laser is used. However, phase matching—the constructive addition of x-ray waves from a large number of atoms—favors longer-wavelength mid-infrared lasers. We identified a regime of high-harmonic generation driven by 40-cycle ultraviolet lasers in waveguides that can generate bright beams in the soft x-ray region of the spectrum, up to photon energies of 280 electron volts. Surprisingly, the high ultraviolet refractive indices of both neutral atoms and ions enabled effective phase matching, even in a multiply ionized plasma. We observed harmonics with very narrow linewidths, while calculations show that the x-rays emerge as nearly time-bandwidth-limited pulse trains of ~100 attoseconds.

  19. Investigate the effect of bounce resonance between fast magnetosonic waves and energetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, A.; Chen, L.

    2014-12-01

    Equatorial noises are fast magnetosonic wave emissions that are nearly perpendicular propagating and confined near the geomagnetic equator within several degrees. We investigate the effect of bounce resonance between a fast magnetosonic wave and equatorially mirroring electrons using test particle simulation. Bounce resonance occurs when wave frequency matches multiple of electron bounce frequency. We find that the bounce resonance can lead to nonlinear oscillation of equatorially trapped electrons when wave frequency is near first few harmonics of electron bounce frequency. When in bounce resonance, the oscillation amplitude increases for larger wave amplitude, smaller wave normal angle, or larger plasma density. This oscillation is important for dynamics of equatorially mirroring electrons above 100 keV, because it can produce finite vz, which could enable gyro-resonance interaction with other waves such as whistler mode waves.

  20. Using dynamic interferometric synthetic aperature radar (InSAR) to image fast-moving surface waves

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Paul

    2005-06-28

    A new differential technique and system for imaging dynamic (fast moving) surface waves using Dynamic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is introduced. This differential technique and system can sample the fast-moving surface displacement waves from a plurality of moving platform positions in either a repeat-pass single-antenna or a single-pass mode having a single-antenna dual-phase receiver or having dual physically separate antennas, and reconstruct a plurality of phase differentials from a plurality of platform positions to produce a series of desired interferometric images of the fast moving waves.

  1. Fast Magnetoacoustic Wave Trains of Sausage Symmetry in Cylindrical Waveguides of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestov, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kuzin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves guided along the magnetic field by plasma non-uniformities, in particular coronal loops, fibrils, and plumes, are known to be highly dispersive, which lead to the formation of quasi-periodic wave trains excited by a broadband impulsive driver, e.g., a solar flare. We investigated the effects of cylindrical geometry on the fast sausage wave train formation. We performed magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of fast magnetoacoustic perturbations of a sausage symmetry, propagating from a localized impulsive source along a field-aligned plasma cylinder with a smooth radial profile of the fast speed. The wave trains are found to have pronounced period modulation, with the longer instant period seen in the beginning of the wave train. The wave trains also have a pronounced amplitude modulation. Wavelet spectra of the wave trains have characteristic tadpole features, with the broadband large-amplitude heads preceding low-amplitude quasi-monochromatic tails. The mean period of the wave train is about the transverse fast magnetoacoustic transit time across the cylinder. The mean parallel wavelength is about the diameter of the wave-guiding plasma cylinder. Instant periods are longer than the sausage wave cutoff period. The wave train characteristics depend on the fast magnetoacoustic speed in both the internal and external media, the smoothness of the transverse profile of the equilibrium quantities, and also the spatial size of the initial perturbation. If the initial perturbation is localized at the axis of the cylinder, the wave trains contain higher radial harmonics that have shorter periods.

  2. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Groopman, Amber M.; Katz, Jonathan I.; Holland, Mark R.; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A.; Miller, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable. PMID:26328678

  3. High Harmonic Generation from Multiple Orbitals in N2

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, B.; Farrell, Joseph P.; Bucksbaum, Philip H.; Guehr, Markus; /SLAC, Pulse /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2009-03-05

    Molecular electronic states energetically below the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) should contribute to laser-driven high harmonic generation (HHG), but this behavior has not been observed previously. Our measurements of the HHG spectrum of N{sub 2} molecules aligned perpendicular to the laser polarization showed a maximum at the rotational half-revival. This feature indicates the influence of electrons occupying the orbital just below the N{sub 2} HOMO, referred to as the HOMO-1. Such observations of lower-lying orbitals are essential to understanding subfemtosecond/subangstrom electronic motion in laser-excited molecules.

  4. High harmonic terahertz confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wenjie; Guan, Xiaotong; Yan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The harmonic confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam is proposed in this paper in order to develop compact and high power terahertz radiation source. A 0.56 THz third harmonic confocal gyrotron with a dual arc section nonuniform electron beam has been designed and investigated. The studies show that confocal cavity has extremely low mode density, and has great advantage to operate at high harmonic. Nonuniform electron beam is an approach to improve output power and interaction efficiency of confocal gyrotron. A dual arc beam magnetron injection gun for designed confocal gyrotron has been developed and presented in this paper.

  5. Lateral shearing interferometry of high-harmonic wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Austin, Dane R; Witting, Tobias; Arrell, Christopher A; Frank, Felix; Wyatt, Adam S; Marangos, Jon P; Tisch, John W G; Walmsley, Ian A

    2011-05-15

    We present a technique for frequency-resolved wavefront characterization of high harmonics based on lateral shearing interferometry. Tilted replicas of the driving laser pulse are produced by a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, producing separate focii in the target. The interference of the resulting harmonics on a flat-field extreme ultraviolet spectrometer yields the spatial phase derivative. A comprehensive set of spatial profiles, resolved by harmonic order, validate the technique and reveal the interplay of single-atom and macroscopic effects. PMID:21593877

  6. Attosecond Probing of Vibrational Dynamics with High-Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lein, Manfred

    2005-02-01

    The numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for vibrating hydrogen molecules in few-cycle laser pulses shows that high-harmonic generation is sensitive to the laser-induced vibrational motion. More intense harmonics are generated in heavier isotopes, the difference increasing with the harmonic frequency. Analytical theory reveals a dependence of the harmonics on the vibrational autocorrelation function. With the help of a genetic algorithm, the nuclear motion can be reconstructed from the harmonic spectra with sub-fs time resolution.

  7. Quantitative Modeling of Single Atom High Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Ariel; Kaertner, Franz X.

    2005-11-25

    It is shown by comparison with numerical solutions of the Schroedinger equation that the three step model (TSM) of high harmonic generation (HHG) can be improved to give a quantitatively reliable description of the process. Excellent agreement is demonstrated for the H atom and the H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ion. It is shown that the standard TSM heavily distorts the HHG spectra, especially of H{sub 2}{sup +}, and an explanation is presented for this behavior. Key to the improvement is the use of the Ehrenfest theorem in the TSM.

  8. Control of Laser High-Harmonic Generation with Counterpropagating Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, S. L.; Kohl, I.; Madsen, J. B.; Simmons, J.; Terry, N.; Titensor, J.; Wang, Q.; Peatross, J.

    2001-09-01

    Relatively weak counterpropagating light is shown to disrupt the emission of laser high-harmonic generation. Harmonic orders ranging from the teens to the low thirties produced by a 30-femtosecond pulse in a narrow argon jet are ``shut down'' with a contrast as high as 2 orders of magnitude by a chirped 1-picosecond counterpropagating laser pulse (60 times less intense). Alternatively, under poor phase-matching conditions, the counterpropagating light boosts harmonic production by similar contrast through quasiphase matching where out-of-phase emission is suppressed.

  9. High harmonic generation by novel fiber amplifier based sources.

    PubMed

    Hädrich, S; Rothhardt, J; Krebs, M; Tavella, F; Willner, A; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2010-09-13

    Significant progress in high repetition rate ultrashort pulse sources based on fiber technology is presented. These systems enable operation at a high repetition rate of up to 500 kHz and high average power in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range via high harmonic generation in a gas jet. High average power few-cycle pulses of a fiber amplifier pumped optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier are used to produce µW level average power for the strongest harmonic at 42.9 nm at a repetition rate of 96 kHz. PMID:20940915

  10. Particle simulations of efficient fast electron generation near the cutoff layer of an electrostatic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Karttunen, S.J.; Paettikangas, T.J.; Tala, T.J.; Cairns, R.A.

    1997-09-01

    Fast electron generation near the cutoff of an electrostatic plasma wave is investigated by particle-in-cell simulations and test particle calculations. Intense electron plasma waves which are excited in an underdense plasma region propagate up the density gradient until they are reflected from the cutoff layer. The density gradient affects the fast electron generation by the wave considerably. At low densities, the phase velocity is fairly close to the thermal distribution, which leads to wave-particle interactions with a large electron population. The trapped electrons are accelerated by the electron plasma wave with increasing phase velocity resulting in a very large and energetic population behind the cutoff layer. Since the accelerating electrons receive energy, the wave must be damped. A simple model based on the conservation of the energy of the wave and the trapped electrons is developed to describe the damping mechanism. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. High harmonics from solids probe Angstrom scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yong Sing; Reis, David; Ghimire, Shambhu

    2016-05-01

    The basic microscopic mechanism for the high harmonics generation (HHG) in isolated atoms and molecules has been understood in the 90's. Since then the gas harmonics have been utilized widely in ultrafast x-ray science, from attosecond pulse generation to imaging molecular orbitals of the target molecule. In contrast, the solid-state harmonic generation mechanism is currently being investigated following the recent experimental discovery in zinc oxide crystal. In particular, because of the fundamental differences, attributed to the high density and periodicity of the crystal, it was not clear if the solid-state harmonics could be used to reveal bonding structures in crystals. Here we report our experimental results on generation of XUV harmonics in single crystal MgO subjected to the field strengths on the order of 1V/Å without damage. High harmonics in MgO show strong crystal orientation dependence as well as a strong laser ellipticity dependence. By exploiting these unique characteristics, we demonstrate that XUV harmonics from bulk crystals can probe Angstrom scale electronic structure of the crystal.

  12. High harmonic generation in underdense plasmas by intense laser pulses with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Vieira, J.

    2015-12-01

    We study high harmonic generation produced by twisted laser pulses, with orbital angular momentum in the relativistic regime, for pulse propagation in underdense plasma. We consider fast time scale processes associated with an ultra-short pulse, where the ion motion can be neglected. We use both analytical models and numerical simulations using a relativistic particle-in-cell code. The present description is valid for relativistic laser intensities, when the normalized field amplitude is much larger than one, a ≫ 1. We also discuss two distinct processes associated with linear and circular polarization. Using both analytical solutions and particle-in-cell simulations, we are able to show that, for laser pulses in a well defined Laguerre-Gauss mode, angular momentum conservation is observed during the process of harmonic generation. Intensity modulation of the harmonic spectrum is also verified, as imposed by the nonlinear time-scale for energy transfer between different harmonics.

  13. High harmonic generation in underdense plasmas by intense laser pulses with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonça, J. T.; Vieira, J.

    2015-12-15

    We study high harmonic generation produced by twisted laser pulses, with orbital angular momentum in the relativistic regime, for pulse propagation in underdense plasma. We consider fast time scale processes associated with an ultra-short pulse, where the ion motion can be neglected. We use both analytical models and numerical simulations using a relativistic particle-in-cell code. The present description is valid for relativistic laser intensities, when the normalized field amplitude is much larger than one, a ≫ 1. We also discuss two distinct processes associated with linear and circular polarization. Using both analytical solutions and particle-in-cell simulations, we are able to show that, for laser pulses in a well defined Laguerre-Gauss mode, angular momentum conservation is observed during the process of harmonic generation. Intensity modulation of the harmonic spectrum is also verified, as imposed by the nonlinear time-scale for energy transfer between different harmonics.

  14. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  15. 3D WKB solution for fast magnetoacoustic wave behaviour around an X-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; Botha, G. J. J.; Régnier, S.; Spoors, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    Context. We study the propagation of a fast magnetoacoustic wave in a 3D magnetic field created from two magnetic dipoles. The magnetic topology contains an X-line. Aims: We aim to contribute to the overall understanding of MHD wave propagation within inhomogeneous media, specifically around X-lines. Methods: We investigate the linearised, 3D MHD equations under the assumptions of ideal and cold plasma. We utilise the WKB approximation and Charpit's method during our investigation. Results: It is found that the behaviour of the fast magnetoacoustic wave is entirely dictated by the local, inhomogeneous, equilibrium Alfvén speed profile. All parts of the wave experience refraction during propagation, where the magnitude of the refraction effect depends on the location of an individual wave element within the inhomogeneous magnetic field. The X-line, along which the Alfvén speed is identically zero, acts as a focus for the refraction effect. There are two main types of wave behaviour: part of the wave is either trapped by the X-line or escapes the system, and there exists a critical starting region around the X-line that divides these two types of behaviour. For the set-up investigated, it is found that 15.5% of the fast wave energy is trapped by the X-line. Conclusions: We conclude that linear, β = 0 fast magnetoacoustic waves can accumulate along X-lines and thus these will be specific locations of fast wave energy deposition and thus preferential heating. The work here highlights the importance of understanding the magnetic topology of a system. We also demonstrate how the 3D WKB technique described in this paper can be applied to other magnetic configurations.

  16. High-harmonic generation in a quantum electron gas trapped in a nonparabolic and anisotropic well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Jérôme; Lévêque-Simon, Kévin; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine; Manfredi, Giovanni; Haas, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    An effective self-consistent model is derived and used to study the dynamics of an electron gas confined in a nonparabolic and anisotropic quantum well. This approach is based on the equations of quantum hydrodynamics, which incorporate quantum and nonlinear effects in an approximate fashion. The effective model consists of a set of six coupled differential equations (dynamical system) for the electric dipole and the size of the electron gas. Using this model we show that: (i) high harmonic generation is related to the appearance of chaos in the phase space, as attested to by related Poincaré sections; (ii) higher order harmonics can be excited efficiently and with relatively weak driving fields by making use of chirped electromagnetic waves.

  17. Attosecond control of electron-ion recollision in high harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gademann, G.; Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W. K.; Johnsson, P.; Gaarde, M. B.; Schafer, K. J.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-03-01

    We show that high harmonic generation driven by an intense near-infrared (IR) laser can be temporally controlled when an attosecond pulse train (APT) is used to ionize the generation medium, thereby replacing tunnel ionization as the first step in the well-known three-step model. New harmonics are formed when the ionization occurs at a well-defined time within the optical cycle of the IR field. The use of APT-created electron wave packets affords new avenues for the study and application of harmonic generation. In the present experiment, this makes it possible to study harmonic generation at IR intensities where tunnel ionization does not give a measurable signal.

  18. High harmonic generation in the undulators for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2015-10-01

    We present the analysis of the undulator radiation (UR) with account for major sources of the spectral line broadening. For relativistic electrons we obtain the analytical expressions for the UR spectrum, the intensity and the emission line shape with account for the finite size of the beam, the emittance and the energy spread. Partial compensation of the divergency by properly imposed weak constant magnetic component is demonstrated in the analytical form. Considering the examples of radiation from single and double frequency undulators, we study high harmonic generation with account for all major sources of homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening with account for the characteristics of the electrons beam. We apply our analysis to free electron laser (FEL) calculations and we compare the obtained results with the radiation of a FEL on the supposition of the ideal undulator.

  19. Ptychographic hyperspectral spectromicroscopy with an extreme ultraviolet high harmonic comb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bosheng; Gardner, Dennis F; Seaberg, Matthew H; Shanblatt, Elisabeth R; Porter, Christina L; Karl, Robert; Mancuso, Christopher A; Kapteyn, Henry C; Murnane, Margaret M; Adams, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    We report a proof-of-principle demonstration of a new scheme of spectromicroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range, where the spectral response of the sample at different wavelengths is imaged simultaneously. This scheme is enabled by combining ptychographic information multiplexing (PIM) with a tabletop EUV source based on high harmonic generation, where four spectrally narrow harmonics near 30 nm form a spectral comb structure. Extending PIM from previously demonstrated visible wavelengths to the EUV/X-ray wavelengths promises much higher spatial resolution and a more powerful spectral contrast mechanism, making PIM an attractive spectromicroscopy method in both microscopy and spectroscopy aspects. In addition to spectromicroscopy, this method images the multicolor EUV beam in situ, making this a powerful beam characterization technique. In contrast to other methods, the techniques described here use no hardware to separate wavelengths, leading to efficient use of the EUV radiation. PMID:27505837

  20. Polarization gating of high harmonic generation in the water window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Ren, Xiaoming; Yin, Yanchun; Cheng, Yan; Cunningham, Eric; Wu, Yi; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-06-01

    We implement the polarization gating (PG) technique with a two-cycle, 1.7 μm driving field to generate an attosecond supercontinuum extending to the water window spectral region. The ellipticity dependence of the high harmonic yield over a photon energy range much broader than previous work is measured and compared with a semi-classical model. When PG is applied, the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) is swept to study its influence on the continuum generation. PG with one-cycle (5.7 fs) and two-cycle (11.3 fs) delay are tested, and both give continuous spectra spanning from 50 to 450 eV under certain CEP values, strongly indicating the generation of isolated attosecond pulses in the water window region.

  1. Creating High-Harmonic Beams with Controlled Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.

    A beam of light with an angle-dependent phase Φ = lϕ , where ϕ is the azimuthal coordinate, about the beam axis carries an orbital angular momentum (OAM) of lℏ per photon. Such beams have been exploited to provide superresolution in visible-light microscopy. The ability to create extreme ultraviolet or soft-x-ray beams with controllable OAM would be a critical step towards extending superresolution methods to extremely small feature size. Here we show that OAM is conserved during the process of high-harmonic generation (HHG). Experimentally, we use a fundamental beam with l = 1 and interferometrically determine that the q-th harmonic has an OAM quantum number l equal to its harmonic order q. We also show theoretically how to couple an arbitrary low value of the OAM quantum number l to any harmonic order q in a controlled manner. Our results open a route to microscopy on the molecular, or even submolecular, scale.

  2. Direct electron heating by 60 MHz fast waves on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Mayberry, M.J.; Chiu, S.C.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T. . Plasma Fusion Center); de Haas, J.C.M.; James, R.A. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United St

    1991-10-01

    Efficient direct electron heating by fast waves has been observed on the DIII-D tokamak. A four strap antenna with (0,{pi},0,{pi}) phasing launched up to 1.6 MW of fast wave power with {vert bar}n{sub {parallel}}{vert bar} {approx} 11. This {vert bar}n{sub {parallel}}{vert bar} is suitable for strong electron interaction in ohmic target plasmas (T{sub e} {le} 2 keV). Ion cyclotron absorption was minimized by keeping the hydrogen fraction low ({lt}3%) in deuterium discharges and by operating at high ion cyclotron harmonics ({omega} = 4{Omega}{sub H} = 8{Omega}{sub D} at 1T). The fast wave electron heating was weak for central electron temperatures below 1 keV, but improved substantially with increasing T{sub e}. Although linear theory predicts a strong inverse magnetic field scaling of the first pass absorption, the measured fast-wave heating efficiency was independent of magnetic field. Multiple pass absorption of the fast waves appears to be occurring since at 2.1 T nearly 100% efficient plasma heating is observed while the calculated first pass absorption is 6% to 8%. The central electron temperature during fast wave heating also increased with magnetic field. The improved electron heating at higher magnetic fields may be due in part to a peaking of the ohmic plasma current and the ohmic electron temperature profiles. Centrally peaked deposition profiles were measured by modulating the fast wave power at 10 Hz and observing the local electron temperature response across the plasma. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet high-harmonic spectroscopy of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, T. T.; Garg, M.; Kruchinin, S. Yu.; Moulet, A.; Hassan, M. Th.; Goulielmakis, E.

    2015-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) high-harmonic radiation emerging from laser-driven atoms, molecules or plasmas underlies powerful attosecond spectroscopy techniques and provides insight into fundamental structural and dynamic properties of matter. The advancement of these spectroscopy techniques to study strong-field electron dynamics in condensed matter calls for the generation and manipulation of EUV radiation in bulk solids, but this capability has remained beyond the reach of optical sciences. Recent experiments and theoretical predictions paved the way to strong-field physics in solids by demonstrating the generation and optical control of deep ultraviolet radiation in bulk semiconductors, driven by femtosecond mid-infrared fields or the coherent up-conversion of terahertz fields to multi-octave spectra in the mid-infrared and optical frequencies. Here we demonstrate that thin films of SiO2 exposed to intense, few-cycle to sub-cycle pulses give rise to wideband coherent EUV radiation extending in energy to about 40 electronvolts. Our study indicates the association of the emitted EUV radiation with intraband currents of multi-petahertz frequency, induced in the lowest conduction band of SiO2. To demonstrate the applicability of high-harmonic spectroscopy to solids, we exploit the EUV spectra to gain access to fine details of the energy dispersion profile of the conduction band that are as yet inaccessible by photoemission spectroscopy in wide-bandgap dielectrics. In addition, we use the EUV spectra to trace the attosecond control of the intraband electron motion induced by synthesized optical transients. Our work advances lightwave electronics in condensed matter into the realm of multi-petahertz frequencies and their attosecond control, and marks the advent of solid-state EUV photonics.

  4. A fast algorithm for the simulation of arterial pulse waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tao; Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2016-06-01

    One-dimensional models have been widely used in studies of the propagation of blood pulse waves in large arterial trees. Under a periodic driving of the heartbeat, traditional numerical methods, such as the Lax-Wendroff method, are employed to obtain asymptotic periodic solutions at large times. However, these methods are severely constrained by the CFL condition due to large pulse wave speed. In this work, we develop a new numerical algorithm to overcome this constraint. First, we reformulate the model system of pulse wave propagation using a set of Riemann variables and derive a new form of boundary conditions at the inlet, the outlets, and the bifurcation points of the arterial tree. The new form of the boundary conditions enables us to design a convergent iterative method to enforce the boundary conditions. Then, after exchanging the spatial and temporal coordinates of the model system, we apply the Lax-Wendroff method in the exchanged coordinate system, which turns the large pulse wave speed from a liability to a benefit, to solve the wave equation in each artery of the model arterial system. Our numerical studies show that our new algorithm is stable and can perform ∼15 times faster than the traditional implementation of the Lax-Wendroff method under the requirement that the relative numerical error of blood pressure be smaller than one percent, which is much smaller than the modeling error.

  5. Electromagnetic ELF wave intensification associated with fast earthward flows in mid-tail plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Ni, B.; Cully, C. M.; Donovan, E. F.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-03-01

    In this study we perform a statistical survey of the extremely-low-frequency wave activities associated with fast earthward flows in the mid-tail central plasma sheet (CPS) based upon THEMIS measurements. We reveal clear trends of increasing wave intensity with flow enhancement over a broad frequency range, from below fLH (lower-hybrid resonant frequency) to above fce (electron gyrofrequency). We mainly investigate two electromagnetic wave modes, the lower-hybrid waves at frequencies below fLH, and the whistler-mode waves in the frequency range fLH < f < fce. The waves at f < fLH dramatically intensify during fast flow intervals, and tend to contain strong electromagnetic components in the high-plasma-beta CPS region, consistent with the theoretical expectation of the lower-hybrid drift instability in the center region of the tail current sheet. ULF waves with very large perpendicular wavenumber might be Doppler-shifted by the flows and also partly contribute to the observed waves in the lower-hybrid frequency range. The fast flow activity substantially increases the occurrence rate and peak magnitude of the electromagnetic waves in the frequency range fLH < f < fce, though they still tend to be short-lived and sporadic in occurrence. We also find that the electron pitch-angle distribution in the mid-tail CPS undergoes a variation from negative anisotropy (perpendicular temperature smaller than parallel temperature) during weak flow intervals, to more or less positive anisotropy (perpendicular temperature larger than parallel temperature) during fast flow intervals. The flow-related electromagnetic whistler-mode wave tends to occur in conjunction with positive electron anisotropy.

  6. Direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Freeman, R.L.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J.; James, R.A.; Kawashima, H.

    1992-09-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed to evaluate noninductive current drive with direct electron absorption of the fast Alfven wave (FW) in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. These experiments have employed a 2 MW 60 NM transmitter connected to a four-element toroidally phased array of loop antennas located at the outside midplane of the DIII-D vacuum vessel. Efficient direct electron heating was obtained with (0, {pi}, 0, {pi}) antenna phasing; H-mode confinement was obtained with direct electron absorption of the fast wave as the sole source of auxiliary heating. Current drive experiments were performed with (0,{pi}/2,{pi},3{pi}/2) antenna phasing at fast wave power levels up to 1.2 MW. Preheating with 60 GHz ECH was used to increase the single-pass absorption of the fast wave with a directive spectrum. When the fast wave is lunched in the direction that aids the inductively driven current (co-current drive), up to 40% of the 0.4 MA plasma current is sustained noninductively. Counter-current drive strongly affects the sawtoothing behavior, and results in highly peaked electron temperature profiles (T{sub e}(0) {approx_lt} 6 keV) but much smaller driven currents.

  7. Direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Freeman, R.L.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J. ); James, R.A. (Lawrence Livermor

    1992-09-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed to evaluate noninductive current drive with direct electron absorption of the fast Alfven wave (FW) in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. These experiments have employed a 2 MW 60 NM transmitter connected to a four-element toroidally phased array of loop antennas located at the outside midplane of the DIII-D vacuum vessel. Efficient direct electron heating was obtained with (0, [pi], 0, [pi]) antenna phasing; H-mode confinement was obtained with direct electron absorption of the fast wave as the sole source of auxiliary heating. Current drive experiments were performed with (0,[pi]/2,[pi],3[pi]/2) antenna phasing at fast wave power levels up to 1.2 MW. Preheating with 60 GHz ECH was used to increase the single-pass absorption of the fast wave with a directive spectrum. When the fast wave is lunched in the direction that aids the inductively driven current (co-current drive), up to 40% of the 0.4 MA plasma current is sustained noninductively. Counter-current drive strongly affects the sawtoothing behavior, and results in highly peaked electron temperature profiles (T[sub e](0) [approx lt] 6 keV) but much smaller driven currents.

  8. Resonant Alfven wave instabilities driven by streaming fast particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary, A.

    1987-05-08

    A plasma simulation code is used to study the resonant interactions between streaming ions and Alfven waves. The medium which supports the Alfven waves is treated as a single, one-dimensional, ideal MHD fluid, while the ions are treated as kinetic particles. The code is used to study three ion distributions: a cold beam; a monoenergetic shell; and a drifting distribution with a power-law dependence on momentum. These distributions represent: the field-aligned beams upstream of the earth's bow shock; the diffuse ions upstream of the bow shock; and the cosmic ray distribution function near a supernova remnant shock. 92 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Detonation models of fast combustion waves in nanoscale Al-MoO3 bulk powder media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Dikici, Birce

    2013-02-01

    The combustion of nanometric aluminum (Al) powder with an oxidiser such as molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) is studied analytically. This study focuses on detonation wave models and a Chapman-Jouget detonation model provides reasonable agreement with experimentally-observed wave speeds provided that multiphase equilibrium sound speeds are applied at the downstream edge of the detonation wave. The results indicate that equilibrium sound speeds of multiphase mixtures can play a critical role in determining speeds of fast combustion waves in nanoscale Al-MoO3 powder mixtures.

  10. Fast wave current drive experiment on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, J.D. ); James, R.A. ); Kawash

    1992-06-01

    One method of radio-frequency heating which shows theoretical promise for both heating and current drive in tokamak plasmas is the direct absorption by electrons of the fast Alfven wave (FW). Electrons can directly absorb fast waves via electron Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping when the resonance condition {omega} {minus} {kappa}{sub {parallel}e}{upsilon}{sup {parallel}e} = O is satisfied. Since the FW accelerates electrons traveling the same toroidal direction as the wave, plasma current can be generated non-inductively by launching FW which propagate in one toroidal direction. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) is considered an attractive means of sustaining the plasma current in reactor-grade tokamaks due to teh potentially high current drive efficiency achievable and excellent penetration of the wave power to the high temperature plasma core. Ongoing experiments on the DIII-D tokamak are aimed at a demonstration of FWCD in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). Using frequencies in the ICRF avoids the possibility of mode conversion between the fast and slow wave branches which characterized early tokamak FWCD experiments in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. Previously on DIII-D, efficient direct electron heating by FW was found using symmetric (non-current drive) antenna phasing. However, high FWCD efficiencies are not expected due to the relatively low electron temperatures (compared to a reactor) in DIII-D.

  11. Initial fast wave heating and current drive experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Mayberry, M.J.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.; James, R.A.; Kawashima, H.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.; Trukhin, V.

    1991-12-01

    Heating and current drive experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak using a 4-strap fast wave antenna at power up to 1.7 MW at 30--60 MHz. Minority heating experiments using D(H) showed effective wave absorption, confirming that the antenna was launching the fast wave. Experiments on the direct absorption of fast waves by electrons through Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping were performed at 60 MHz. These experiments showed effective heating of electrons, with a global heating efficiency comparable to that of neutral injection, even when the calculated single-pass dumping was as small as 5%. It is believed that effective multiple-pass damping is taking place. Fast wave current drive experiments were performed with a toroidally directional spectrum obtained by {pi}/2-phasing of the antenna straps. Although non-inductive currents of up to 160 kA were found, the magnitude of the non-inductive current did not decrease when the wave spectrum was reversed. These results are presently under investigation.

  12. Study of wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.

    2015-12-01

    There are many energetic electrons in the radiation belt of Earth. When the geomagnetic activity becomes stronger, the energy flux of energetic electrons will increase to more than ten times in the outer radiation belt, therefore it is very important to study how the energetic electrons generate and the lifetime of energetic electrons for space weather research. The acceleration of electrons in radiation belt is mainly depending on wave-particle interaction: the whistler mode chorus is the main driver for local acceleration mechanism, which could accelerate and loss energetic electrons; the geomagnetic pulsation ULF wave will cause energetic electron inward radial diffusion which will charge the electrons; recently observation results show us that the fast magnetosonic waves may also accelerate energetic electrons. For the reason that we try to study the wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation, in which the most important past is at the storm time the combination of highly warped Earth magnetic field and fast magnetosonic wave field will be applied for the electromagnetic environment of moving test particles. The energy, pitch angle and cross diffusion coefficients will be calculated respectively in this simulation to study how the electrons receive energy from fast magnetosonic wave. The diffusion coefficients within different dipole Earth magnetic field and non-dipole storm magnetic field are compared, while dynamics of electrons at selected initial energys are shown in our study.

  13. Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Solitary Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop a new model for the acceleration of the fast solar wind by nonlinear, time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations of waves in solar coronal holes. Preliminary computational studies indicate that solitary-like waves are generated in coronal holes nonlinearly by torsional Alfven waves. These waves in addition to thermal conduction may contribute considerably to the accelerate the solar wind. Specific goals of this proposal are to investigate the generation of nonlinear solitary-like waves and their effect on solar wind acceleration by numerical 2.5D MHD simulation of coronal holes with a broad range of plasma and wave parameters; to study the effect of random disturbances at the base of a solar coronal hole on the fast solar wind acceleration with a more advanced 2.5D MHD model and to compare the results with the available observations; to extend the study to a full 3D MHD simulation of fast solar wind acceleration with a more realistic model of a coronal hole and solar boundary conditions. The ultimate goal of the three year study is to model the fast solar wind in a coronal hole, based on realistic boundary conditions in a coronal hole near the Sun, and the coronal hole structure (i.e., density, temperature, and magnetic field geometry) that will become available from the recently launched SOHO spacecraft.

  14. Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Solitary Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop a new model for the acceleration of the fast solar wind by nonlinear. time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations of waves in solar coronal holes. Preliminary computational studies indicate that nonlinear waves are generated in coronal holes by torsional Alfv\\'{e}n waves. These waves in addition to thermal conduction may contribute considerably to the accelerate the solar wind. Specific goals of this proposal are to investigate the generation of nonlinear solitary-like waves and their effect on solar wind acceleration by numerical 2.5D MHD simulation of coronal holes with a broad range of plasma and wave parameters; to study the effect of random disturbances at the base of a solar coronal hole on the fast solar wind acceleration with a more advanced 2.5D MHD model and to compare the results with the available observations; to extend the study to a full 3D MHD simulation of fast solar wind acceleration with a more realistic model of a coronal hole and solar boundary conditions. The ultimate goal of the three year study is to model the, fast solar wind in a coronal hole, based on realistic boundary conditions in a coronal hole near the Sun, and the coronal hole structure (i.e., density, temperature. and magnetic field geometry,) that will become available from the recently launched SOHO spacecraft.

  15. Full Wave Modeling of Wave -- Plasma Interactions in NSTX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bernabei, S.; Fredrickson, E.; Gorelenkov, N.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.

    2006-10-01

    Wave plasma interactions play an important role in the dynamics of NSTX plasmas in a wide range of frequencies. High harmonic fast waves (HHFW), with frequencies significantly above the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency, are used to heat and drive noninductive currents in NSTX plasmas. Fast ions from neutral beam injection can excite compressional and / or global Alfven eigenmodes (CAE/GAE) with frequencies near the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency. Simulations of power deposition profiles obtained with the full wave code, TORIC, will be compared to the observations from recent HHFW experiments that show that the wave propagation and absorption depend strongly on the antenna phasing and plasma conditions [i]. The issue of mode conversion of the HHFWs to shorter wavelength modes will be revisited. Initial simulations of driven eigenmodes in the CAE / GAE frequency range will also be discussed. [i] See contributed Oral Talk by J. C. Hosea et al this conference

  16. Current drive with fast waves, electron cyclotron waves, and neutral injection in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikel, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C. ); James, R.A. ); Porkolab, M. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J. ); Kawash

    1992-09-01

    Current drive experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak using fast waves, electron cyclotron waves, and neutral injection. Fast wave experiments were performed using a 4-strap antenna with 1 MW of power at 60 MHz. These experiments showed effective heating of electrons, with a global heating efficiency equivalent to that of neutral injection even when the single pass damping was calculated to be as small as 5%. The damping was probably due to the effect of multiple passes of the wave through the plasma. Fast wave current drive experiments were performed with a toroidally directional phasing of the antenna straps. Currents driven by fast wave current drive (FWCD) in the direction of the main plasma current of up to 100 kA were found, not including a calculated 40 kA of bootstrap current. Experiments with FWCD in the counter current direction showed little current drive. In both cases, changes in the sawtooth behavior and the internal inductance qualitatively support the measurement of FWCD. Experiments on electron cyclotron current drive have shown that 100 kA of current can be driven by 1 MW of power at 60 GHz. Calculations with a Fokker-Planck code show that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) can be well predicted when the effects of electron trapping and of the residual electric field are included. Experiments on driving current with neutral injection showed that effective current drive could be obtained and discharges with full current drive were demonstrated. Interestingly, all of these methods of current drive had about the same efficiency, 0.015 {times} 10{sup 20} MA/MW/m{sup 2}.

  17. Analytical estimates of electron quasi-linear diffusion by fast magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourenas, D.; Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2013-06-01

    Quantifying the loss of relativistic electrons from the Earth's radiation belts requires to estimate the effects of many kinds of observed waves, ranging from ULF to VLF. Analytical estimates of electron quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for whistler-mode chorus and hiss waves of arbitrary obliquity have been recently derived, allowing useful analytical approximations for lifetimes. We examine here the influence of much lower frequency and highly oblique, fast magnetosonic waves (also called ELF equatorial noise) by means of both approximate analytical formulations of the corresponding diffusion coefficients and full numerical simulations. Further analytical developments allow us to identify the most critical wave and plasma parameters necessary for a strong impact of fast magnetosonic waves on electron lifetimes and acceleration in the simultaneous presence of chorus, hiss, or lightning-generated waves, both inside and outside the plasmasphere. In this respect, a relatively small frequency over ion gyrofrequency ratio appears more favorable, and other propitious circumstances are characterized. This study should be useful for a comprehensive appraisal of the potential effect of fast magnetosonic waves throughout the magnetosphere.

  18. Fast neural solution of a nonlinear wave equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    A neural algorithm for rapidly simulating a certain class of nonlinear wave phenomena using analog VLSI neural hardware is presented and applied to the Korteweg-de Vries partial differential equation. The corresponding neural architecture is obtained from a pseudospectral representation of the spatial dependence, along with a leap-frog scheme for the temporal evolution. Numerical simulations demonstrated the robustness of the proposed approach.

  19. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Quasi self-adjoint nonlinear wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, N. H.; Torrisi, M.; Tracinà, R.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we generalize the classification of self-adjoint second-order linear partial differential equation to a family of nonlinear wave equations with two independent variables. We find a class of quasi self-adjoint nonlinear equations which includes the self-adjoint linear equations as a particular case. The property of a differential equation to be quasi self-adjoint is important, e.g. for constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries of the differential equation.

  20. A new equation in two dimensional fast magnetoacoustic shock waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Jehan, Nusrat; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2010-03-15

    Nonlinear properties of the two dimensional fast magnetoacoustic waves are studied in a three-component plasma comprising of electrons, positrons, and ions. In this regard, Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burger (KPB) equation is derived using the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. Under the condition that the electron and positron inertia are ignored, Burger-Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (Burger-KP) for a fast magnetoacoustic wave is derived for the first time, to the best of author's knowledge. The solutions of both KPB and Burger-KP equations are obtained using the tangent hyperbolic method. The effects of positron concentration, kinematic viscosity, and plasma beta are explored both for the KPB and the Burger-KP shock waves and the differences between the two are highlighted. The present investigation may have relevance in the study of nonlinear electromagnetic shock waves both in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  1. Commensal searches for microhertz gravitational waves and fast radio bursts: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Hobbs, George; Ravi, Vikram

    2014-04-01

    In this pilot observing programme, we propose to observe at high cadence the transient gravitational-wave and radio-wave Universe. The goals of these observations are threefold: 1) To improve the timing precision of secondary pulsars in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) to accelerate the detection of gravitational waves; 2) To characterise the gravitational wave universe in the hitherto unexplored microhertz frequency band; and 3) To develop methods and search for fast radio bursts (FRBs) while conducting precision time experiments. To achieve these goals, we request 120 hours of observations with the Parkes multibeam system, divided into 10 epochs comprising 12-hour LST days. This pilot project acts as a feasibility study for modifications to both the PPTA project and the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA), the consortium coordinating timing array observations in Australia, Europe, and North America, and assess the feasibility of searching for fast radio bursts while conduction precision timing observations.

  2. Fast algorithm for calculation of the moving tsunami wave height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivorotko, Olga; Kabanikhin, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    One of the most urgent problems of mathematical tsunami modeling is estimation of a tsunami wave height while a wave approaches to the coastal zone. There are two methods for solving this problem, namely, Airy-Green formula in one-dimensional case ° --- S(x) = S(0) 4 H(0)/H (x), and numerical solution of an initial-boundary value problem for linear shallow water equations ( { ηtt = div (gH (x,y)gradη), (x,y,t) ∈ ΩT := Ω ×(0,T); ( η|t=0 = q(x,y), ηt|t=0 = 0, (x,y ) ∈ Ω := (0,Lx)× (0,Ly ); (1) η|δΩT = 0. Here η(x,y,t) is the free water surface vertical displacement, H(x,y) is the depth at point (x,y), q(x,y) is the initial amplitude of a tsunami wave, S(x) is a moving tsunami wave height at point x. The main difficulty problem of tsunami modeling is a very big size of the computational domain ΩT. The calculation of the function η(x,y,t) of three variables in ΩT requires large computing resources. We construct a new algorithm to solve numerically the problem of determining the moving tsunami wave height which is based on kinematic-type approach and analytical representation of fundamental solution (2). The wave is supposed to be generated by the seismic fault of the bottom η(x,y,0) = g(y) ·θ(x), where θ(x) is a Heaviside theta-function. Let τ(x,y) be a solution of the eikonal equation 1 τ2x +τ2y = --, gH (x,y) satisfying initial conditions τ(0,y) = 0 and τx(0,y) = (gH (0,y))-1/2. Introducing new variables and new functions: ° -- z = τ(x,y), u(z,y,t) = ηt(x,y,t), b(z,y) = gH(x,y). We obtain an initial-boundary value problem in new variables from (1) ( 2 2 (2 bz- ) { utt = uzz + b uyy + 2b τyuzy + b(τxx + τyy) + 2b + 2bbyτy uz+ ( +2b(bzτy + by)uy, z,y- >2 0,t > 0,2 -1/2 u|t 0,t > 0. Then after some mathematical transformation we get the structure of the function u(x,y,t) in the form u(z,y,t) = S(z,y)·θ(t - z) + ˜u(z,y,t). (2) Here Å©(z,y,t) is a smooth function, S(z,y) is the solution of the problem: { S + b2τ S + (1b2(τ +

  3. Calculation of coupling to slow and fast waves in the LHRF from phased waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Duvall, R.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Colestock, P.L.

    1986-04-01

    A previously reported algorithm for solving the problem of coupling electromagnetic energy in the LHRF from a phased array of identical rectangular waveguides to a plane-stratified, magnetized cold plasma is numerically implemented. The resulting computer codes are sufficiently general to allow for an arbitrary number of waveguides with finite dimensions in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and are thus capable of computing coupling to both slow and fast waves in the plasma. Some of the details of the implementation and the extension of the algorithm to allow study of the Fourier spectrum of slow and fast waves launched by the array are discussed. Good agreement is found with previously reported, less general work for the slow wave launching case. The effect of phasing multirow arrays in the poloidal direction is studied, and an asymmetry between phasing 'up' and 'down' is found that persists in the case where the plasma adjacent to the array is uniform. A 4 x 3 array designed to launch fast waves of high phase velocity is studied. By using the optimal poloidal phasing, low reflection coefficients (absolute value of R/sup 2/ less than or equal to 20%) are found under some not unrealistic edge plasma conditions, but most of the input power is trapped in the outermost layer of the plasma. Implications of our results for fast wave current drive experiments are discussed.

  4. High harmonic generation from Bloch electron in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Ghimire, Shambhu; Reis, David; Schafer, Kenneth; Gaarde, Mette

    2015-05-01

    We study the generation of high harmonic radiation by Bloch electrons in a model solid driven by a strong mid-infrared laser field. We solve the single-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) using a velocity-gauge method [New J. Phys. 15, 013006 (2013)]. The resulting harmonic spectrum exhibits a primary plateau due to the coupling of the valence band to the first conduction band, with a cutoff energy that scales linearly with field strength and laser wavelength. We also find a weaker second plateau due to coupling to higher-lying conduction bands, with a cutoff that is also approximately linear in the field strength. To facilitate the analysis of the time-frequency characteristics of the emitted harmonics, we also solve the TDSE in the Houston states [Phys. Rev. B 33, 5494 (1986)], which allows us to separate inter- and intra-band contributions to the current. We find that the inter- and intra-band contributions display very different time-frequency characteristics. We show that solutions in these two bases are equivalent under an unitary transformation but that, unlike the velocity gauge method, the Houston state treatment is numerically unstable when more than a few low lying energy bands are used.

  5. EUV off-axis focusing using a high harmonic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, B.; Rogers, E. T. F.; Grant-Jacob, J.; Stebbings, S. L.; Praeger, M.; de Paula, A. M.; Froud, C. A.; Chapman, R. T.; Butcher, T. J.; Brocklesby, W. S.; Frey, J. G.

    2009-05-01

    High Harmonic Generation is a well established technique for generating Extreme Ultraviolet radiation. It is a promising technique for both structure and spectroscopic imaging due to both the high flux and coherence of the source, and the existence of multiple absorption edges at the generated wavelengths. To increase the flux, a focussing device can be used. Here we present focussing results for a Mo/Si spherical mirror that has been used in an off-axis arrangement, and give extensive analysis of the resulting astigmatic focus and its consequence on diffractive imaging. The astigmatic beam exists as a vertical and horizontal focus, separated by a circle of least confusion. With the help of a theoretical model we show that the most intense part of the beam is always the second line foci and that the phase at the focus is strongly saddle-shaped. However, this phase distortion cannot explain the significant interference peak splitting that is experimentally observed in our diffraction patterns. Instead we propose that the beam quality is degraded upon reflection from the multilayer mirror and it is this asymmetric phase distortion that causes the diffraction peak splitting.

  6. High-harmonic generation from an atomically thin semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanzhe; Li, Yilei; Ghimire, Shambhu; Heinz, Tony; Reis, David

    The process of high-harmonic generation (HHG) from ultrashort laser pulses has recently been observed in bulk solids, complementing the well-established process in the gas phase. HHG is of interest both as a source of ultrashort pulses in the attosecond regime that has photon energies extending up to the soft x-ray region and as a method of probing material response outside the regime of perturbative nonlinear optics. In this paper, we present the observation of HHG from a single atomic layer of MoS2 driven by a strong infrared pulse of 100 fs duration and 0.3 eV photon energy. We observe distinct harmonics up to the 13th order of the infrared excitation. The non-perturbative nature of the HHG process is demonstrated by the weak power dependence of the harmonic intensities. To gain further insight into the process, we have investigated the variation of the HHG signal with sample orientation and the ellipticity of pump excitation. We compare and contrast the process with that from the bulk MoS2 crystal. We find significant differences in the response for the monolayer and bulk crystal, which can be understood in terms of the distinct crystallographic symmetries in the two cases.

  7. Avalanche of stimulated forward scattering in high harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Serrat, Carles; Roca, David; Budesca, Josep M; Seres, Jozsef; Seres, Enikoe; Aurand, Bastian; Hoffmann, Andreas; Namba, Shinichi; Kuehl, Thomas; Spielmann, Christian

    2016-04-18

    Optical amplifiers in all ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum exhibit an essential characteristic, namely the input signal during the propagation in the amplifier medium is multiplied by the avalanche effect of the stimulated emission to produce exponential growth. We perform a theoretical study motivated and supported by experimental data on a He gas amplifier driven by intense 30-fs-long laser pulses and seeded with attosecond pulse trains generated in a separated Ne gas jet. We demonstrate that the strong-field theory in the frame of high harmonic generation fully supports the appearance of the avalanche effect in the amplification of extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse trains. We theoretically separate and identify different physical processes taking part in the interaction and we demonstrate that X-ray parametric amplification dominates over others. In particular, we identify strong-field mediated intrapulse X-ray parametric processes as decisive for amplification at the single-atom level. We confirm that the amplification takes place at photon energies where the amplifier is seeded and when the seed pulses are perfectly synchronized with the driving strong field in the amplifier. Furthermore, propagation effects, phase matching and seed synchronization can be exploited to tune the amplified spectral range within the seed bandwidth. PMID:27137242

  8. The preplasma effect on the properties of the shock wave driven by a fast electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llor Aisa, E.; Ribeyre, X.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2016-08-01

    Strong shock wave generation by a mono-energetic fast electron beam in a plasma with an increasing density profile is studied theoretically. The proposed analytical model describes the shock wave characteristics for a homogeneous plasma preceded by a low density precursor. The shock pressure and the time of shock formation depend on the ratio of the electron stopping length to the preplasma areal density and on the initial energy of injected electrons. The conclusions of theoretical model are confirmed in numerical simulations.

  9. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Neria-Pérez, J. A.; Medina, L.; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot's model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot's waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  10. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Solis-Najera, S. E. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Neria-Pérez, J. A. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Medina, L. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-07

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot’s model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot’s waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  11. Inspection of Samples using a fast Millimetre Wave Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommes, A.; Nüssler, D.; Warok, P.; Krebs, C.; Heinen, S.; Essen, H.

    2011-08-01

    Millimeterwaves and terahertz sensors can cover a broad field of applications ranging from production control to security scanners. The outstanding features are the transparency of many materials like textiles, paper and plastics in this frequency region, the good contrast of any humid or dense dielectric material and the capability to employ miniaturized RF systems and small antenna apertures or dielectric probes. A stand-alone-millimetre-wave-imager, SAMMY, was developed and built, to demonstrate the outstanding features of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum for material inspection.

  12. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  13. Fast wave stabilization/destabilization of drift waves in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-03-15

    Four wave-nonlinear coupling of a large amplitude whistler with low frequency drift wave and whistler wave sidebands is examined. The pump and whistler sidebands exert a low frequency ponderomotive force on electrons introducing a frequency shift in the drift wave. For whistler pump propagating along the ambient magnetic field B{sub s}z-caret with wave number k(vector sign){sub 0}, drift waves of wave number k(vector sign)=k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack }+k{sub ||}z-caret see an upward frequency shift when k{sub Up-Tack }{sup 2}/k{sub 0}{sup 2}>4k{sub ||}/k{sub 0} and are stabilized once the whistler power exceeds a threshold value. The drift waves of low transverse wavelength tend to be destabilized by the nonlinear coupling. Oblique propagating whistler pump with transverse wave vector parallel to k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack} is also effective but with reduced effectiveness.

  14. Structured mass density slab as a waveguide of fast magnetoacoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, M.

    Coronal loops are waveguides for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. These loops are expected to be structured. Therefore, in the present paper, we numerically studied the propagation of the fast MHD waves in the structured density slab (composed from a broad density slab with one axisymmetric narrow sub-slab superposed), and analysed the wave signals. Then, this structured slab was divided into its components, i.e., to simple broad and narrow slabs and the same analysis was made. We compared results of both these cases. For the calculations we adopted a two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, in which we solved a full set of ideal time-dependent MHD equations using the FLASH code, applying the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. To initiate the fast sausage magnetoacoustic waves, we used axisymmetric Gaussian velocity perturbation. Wave signals were detected in different locations along the slab and as a diagnostic tool of these waves, the wavelet analysis method has been used. We found that for the structured density slab with sufficiently sharp boundaries, i.e., for good quality waveguides (without an energy leakage), the guided waves in the structured slab behave similarly as in its separated (simple slab) components.

  15. Partial Reflection and Trapping of a Fast-mode Wave in Solar Coronal Arcade Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the first direct observation of a fast-mode wave propagating along and perpendicular to cool (171 Å) arcade loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). The wave was associated with an impulsive/compact flare near the edge of a sunspot. The EUV wavefront expanded radially outward from the flare center and decelerated in the corona from 1060 to 760 km s-1 within ˜3-4 minutes. Part of the EUV wave propagated along a large-scale arcade of cool loops and was partially reflected back to the flare site. The phase speed of the wave was about 1450 km s-1, which is interpreted as a fast-mode wave. A second overlying loop arcade, orientated perpendicular to the cool arcade, is heated and becomes visible in the AIA hot channels. These hot loops sway in time with the EUV wave, as it propagated to and fro along the lower loop arcade. We suggest that an impulsive energy release at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops causes the onset of an EUV shock wave that propagates along and perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  16. High-harmonic generation from Bloch electrons in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Ghimire, Shambhu; Reis, David A.; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2015-04-01

    We study the generation of high-harmonic radiation by Bloch electrons in a model transparent solid driven by a strong midinfrared laser field. We solve the single-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) using a velocity-gauge method [M. Korbman et al., New J. Phys. 15, 013006 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/1/013006] that is numerically stable as the laser intensity and number of energy bands are increased. The resulting harmonic spectrum exhibits a primary plateau due to the coupling of the valence band to the first conduction band, with a cutoff energy that scales linearly with field strength and laser wavelength. We also find a weaker second plateau due to coupling to higher-lying conduction bands, with a cutoff that is also approximately linear in the field strength. To facilitate the analysis of the time-frequency characteristics of the emitted harmonics, we also solve the TDSE in a time-dependent basis set, the Houston states [J. B. Krieger and G. J. Iafrate, Phys. Rev. B 33, 5494 (1986), 10.1103/PhysRevB.33.5494], which allows us to separate interband and intraband contributions to the time-dependent current. We find that the interband and intraband contributions display very different time-frequency characteristics. We show that solutions in these two bases are equivalent under a unitary transformation but that, unlike the velocity-gauge method, the Houston state treatment is numerically unstable when more than a few low-lying energy bands are used.

  17. Fast and Ultra-fast Kelvin wave modulations of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift and spread F development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett Marques Brum, C.; Abdu, M. A.; Batista, P. P.; Gurubaran, S.; Pancheva, D.; Bageston, J. V.; Batista, I. S.; Takahashi, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the role of eastward and upward propagating Fast (FK) and Ultrafast Kelvin (UFK) waves in the day-to-day variability of equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift and post sunset generation of spread F/plasma bubbles irregularities. Meteor wind data from Cariri and Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil) and medium Frequency (MF) radar wind data from Tirunelveli (India) are analyzed together with TIMED/SABER temperature in the 40 km - 100 km region to characterize the zonal and vertical propagations of these waves. Also analyzed are the F region evening vertical drift and spread F (ESF) development features as diagnosed by Digisondes operated at Fortaleza and Sao Luis in Brazil. The SABER temperature data permitted determination of the upward propagation characteristics of the FK (E1) waves with propagation speed in the range of 4 km/day. The radar Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) winds in the widely separated longitude sectors have yielded the eastward phase velocity of the both the FK and UFK waves. The vertical propagation of these waves cause strong oscillation in the F region evening prereversal vertical drift, observed for the first time at both FK and UFK periodicities. A delay of a few (~10) days is observed in the F region vertical drift perturbation with respect to the corresponding FK/UFK zonal wind oscillations, or temperature oscillations in the MLT region, which has permitted a direct identification of the sunset electro dynamic coupling process as responsible for the generation of the FK/UFK induced vertical drift oscillation. The vertical drift oscillations are found to cause significant modulation in the spread F/ plasma bubble irregularity development. The overall results highlight the role of FK/UFK waves in the day-to-day variability of the ESF in its occurrence season.

  18. Fast and slow flexural waves in a deviated borehole in homogeneous and layered anisotropic formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao; Hu, Hengshan; Guan, Wei

    2010-04-01

    Dipole acoustic fields in an arbitrarily deviated well penetrating a homogeneous as well as a stratified transversely isotropic formation are simulated using a 3-D finite-difference time-domain algorithm in cylindrical coordinates. The modelling results show that a dipole source can excite a fast- and a slow-flexural mode due to the shear wave anisotropy when the borehole is inclined with respect to the symmetry axis of transverse isotropy. Both flexural slownesses change with the wellbore deviation angle. The splitting of flexural modes is prominent in full wave arrays when the shear anisotropy is strong enough. It is revealed that the dipole orientation influences the relative amplitudes of the fast- and slow-flexural waves but it has no effect on their slownesses or phases. In a vertical well parallel to the symmetry axis, the two flexural waves degenerate and propagate at the same speed. The degenerated flexural wave travels approximately at the shear speed along the borehole wall except in a few formations. Our study shows, for example, that it is about 10 per cent slower than the shear wave in Mesaverde clayshale 5501. Even in that kind of formations, however, extraction of the fast- and slow-shear velocities from the flexural modes is still possible if the borehole deviation is large enough. To examine the effect of layering, we modelled the full waves in a formation with a sandwich. When the well is perpendicular to the layer interfaces, reflection is obvious and can be recognized. It becomes weaker or even invisible as the deviation angle increases, so it is difficult to detect a thin layer embedded in a formation directly from reflected waves. The sandwich can, instead, be recognized from the irregularity in the spectra of the full waveforms displayed versus depth. [Correction added after online publication 25th February 2009; the original spelling of `homogenous' in the title has been corrected to `homogeneous'.[

  19. Nonlinear interaction of fast particles with Alfven waves in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Borba, D.; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Kerner, W.; Berk, H.L.

    1996-12-17

    A numerical algorithm to study the nonlinear, resonant interaction of fast particles with Alfven waves in tokamak geometry has been developed. The scope of the formalism is wide enough to describe the nonlinear evolution of fishbone modes, toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes and ellipticity-induced Alfven eigenmodes, driven by both passing and trapped fast ions. When the instability is sufficiently weak, it is known that the wave-particle trapping nonlinearity will lead to mode saturation before wave-wave nonlinearities are appreciable. The spectrum of linear modes can thus be calculated using a magnetohydrodynamic normal-mode code, then nonlinearly evolved in time in an efficient way according to a two-time-scale Lagrangian dynamical wave model. The fast particle kinetic equation, including the effect of orbit nonlinearity arising from the mode perturbation, is simultaneously solved of the deviation, {delta}f = f {minus} f{sub 0}, from an initial analytic distribution f{sub 0}. High statistical resolution allows linear growth rates, frequency shifts, resonance broadening effects, and nonlinear saturation to be calculated quickly and precisely. The results have been applied to an ITER instability scenario. Results show that weakly-damped core-localized modes alone cause negligible alpha transport in ITER-like plasmas--even with growth rates one order of magnitude higher than expected values. However, the possibility of significant transport in reactor-type plasmas due to weakly unstable global modes remains an open question.

  20. Fast and accurate analytical model to solve inverse problem in SHM using Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Lamb wave propagation is at the center of attention of researchers for structural health monitoring of thin walled structures. This is due to the fact that Lamb wave modes are natural modes of wave propagation in these structures with long travel distances and without much attenuation. This brings the prospect of monitoring large structure with few sensors/actuators. However the problem of damage detection and identification is an "inverse problem" where we do not have the luxury to know the exact mathematical model of the system. On top of that the problem is more challenging due to the confounding factors of statistical variation of the material and geometric properties. Typically this problem may also be ill posed. Due to all these complexities the direct solution of the problem of damage detection and identification in SHM is impossible. Therefore an indirect method using the solution of the "forward problem" is popular for solving the "inverse problem". This requires a fast forward problem solver. Due to the complexities involved with the forward problem of scattering of Lamb waves from damages researchers rely primarily on numerical techniques such as FEM, BEM, etc. But these methods are slow and practically impossible to be used in structural health monitoring. We have developed a fast and accurate analytical forward problem solver for this purpose. This solver, CMEP (complex modes expansion and vector projection), can simulate scattering of Lamb waves from all types of damages in thin walled structures fast and accurately to assist the inverse problem solver.

  1. Fast ion loss diagnostic plans for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Darrow; R. Bell; D. W. Johnson; H. Kugel; J. R. Wilson; F. E. Cecil; R. Maingi; A. Krasilnikov; A. Alekseyev

    2000-06-13

    The prompt loss of neutral beam ions from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is expected to be between 12% and 42% of the total 5 MW of beam power. There may, in addition, be losses of fast ions arising from high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating. Most of the lost ions will strike the HHFW antenna or the neutral beam dump. To measure these losses in the 2000 experimental campaign, thermocouples in the antenna, several infrared camera views, and a Faraday cup lost ion probe will be employed. The probe will measure loss of fast ions with E > 1 keV at three radial locations, giving the scrape-off length of the fast ions.

  2. Power transfer and current generation of fast ions with large-{ital k}{sub {theta}} waves in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Sipilae, S.K.

    1995-10-01

    The direction and magnitude of power and momentum exchange between fast ions and electrostatic waves in slab and toroidal systems are obtained from global Monte Carlo simulations that include the quasilinear wave-induced ion diffusion both in velocity space and through a radially localized (lower hybrid) wave structure with propagation in one preferential poloidal direction in tokamaks. The model considers a full linearized collision model, finite fast ion orbits, and losses in toroidal geometry, and can properly treat the boundary effects on the particle--wave interaction in the configuration space. For an isotropic steady ion source, reduction of wave Landau damping but no wave amplification by wave localization is found for a Gaussian wave intensity distribution in radius, irrespective of the steepness of the radial gradient of the fast ion source rate. Enhanced wave-driven fast ion current, with magnitude, direction, and profile determined by the boundary conditions, net power transfer, and fast ion radial transport, is found to follow from the asymmetry in the parallel wave number spectrum created by the finite poloidal magnetic field. In the presence of intense well-penetrated waves the current carried by fusion {alpha} particles can be controlled by the choice of the poloidal wave number spectrum and the total current can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the {alpha} particles in a reactor. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  3. Fast and slow magnetosonic waves in two-dimensional spin-1/2 quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2010-10-15

    Using the spin-1/2 resistive quantum magnetohydrodynamics model, linear and nonlinear relations for slow and fast magnetosonic modes are derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. The plasma resistivity is shown to play a role of dissipation in the system. With the aid of tanh method the traveling wave solution of Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers is obtained. The solution shows a general shock wave profile superposed by a perturbative solitary-wave contribution. The dynamics of fast and slow magnetosonic shock and soliton, respectively, in the presence and absence of dissipation is investigated with respect to electron spin magnetization, quantum diffraction, and plasma statistic. It is found that results obtained from the spin quantum plasmas differ significantly from the nonspin quantum plasmas. The relevance of the present work to dense astrophysical plasmas such as pulsar magnetosphere is pointed out.

  4. Tomographic errors from wave front healing: more than just a fast bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, Alison E.; Trampert, Jeannot

    2011-04-01

    Wave front healing, in which diffractions interfere with directly travelling waves causing a reduction in recorded traveltime delays, has been postulated to cause a bias towards faster estimated earth models. This paper reviews the theory from the mathematical physics community that explains the properties of diffractions and applies it to a suite of increasingly complicated numerical examples. We focus in particular on the elastic case and on the differences between P and S healing. We find that rather than introducing a systemic fast bias, wave front healing gives a more complicated bias in the results of traveltime tomography, with fast anomalies even manifesting themselves as slow anomalies in some situations. Of particular interest, we find that a negative correlation between the bulk and shear or compressional velocities may result to a large extend from healing.

  5. Fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for wave equations in bounded convex domains

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Gang; Lai, Jun; Qian, Jianliang

    2014-03-15

    Motivated by fast multiscale Gaussian wavepacket transforms and multiscale Gaussian beam methods which were originally designed for pure initial-value problems of wave equations, we develop fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for initial boundary value problems of wave equations in bounded convex domains in the high frequency regime. To compute the wave propagation in bounded convex domains, we have to take into account reflecting multiscale Gaussian beams, which are accomplished by enforcing reflecting boundary conditions during beam propagation and carrying out suitable reflecting beam summation. To propagate multiscale beams efficiently, we prove that the ratio of the squared magnitude of beam amplitude and the beam width is roughly conserved, and accordingly we propose an effective indicator to identify significant beams. We also prove that the resulting multiscale Gaussian beam methods converge asymptotically. Numerical examples demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  6. Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape-off layer of NSTX and NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Nicola; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, Lee Alan; Gerhardt, S.; Green, David L; LeBlanc, B; Perkins, R. J.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Full wave simulations of fusion plasmas show a direct correlation between the location of the fast-wave cut-off, radiofrequency (RF) field amplitude in the scrape-off layer (SOL) and the RF power losses in the SOL observed in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX). In particular, the RF power losses in the SOL increase significantly when the launched waves transition from evanescent to propagating in that region. Subsequently, a large amplitude electric field occurs in the SOL, driving RF power losses when a proxy collisional loss term is added. A 3D reconstruction of absorbed power in the SOL is presented showing agreement with the RF experiments in NSTX. Loss predictions for the future experiment NSTX-Upgrade (NSTX-U) are also obtained and discussed.

  7. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material.

    PubMed

    Tweten, Dennis J; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Garbow, Joel R; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-11-26

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. PMID:26476762

  8. Fast particles-wave interaction in the Alfven frequency range on the Joint European Torus tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoli, A.; Borba, D.; Association EURATOM Breizman, B.; Gormezano, C.; Heeter, R. F.; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 ; Juan, A.; Mantsinen, M.; Sharapov, S.; Testa, D.

    2000-05-01

    Wave-particle interaction phenomena in the Alfven Eigenmode (AE) frequency range are investigated at the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] using active and passive diagnostic methods. Fast particles are generated by neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonance heating, and fusion reactions. External antennas are used to excite stable AEs and measure fast particle drive and damping separately. Comparisons with numerical calculations lead to an identification of the different damping mechanisms. The use of the active AE diagnostic system to generate control signals based on the proximity to marginal stability limits for AE and low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes is explored. Signatures of the different nonlinear regimes of fast particle driven AE instabilities predicted by theory are found in the measured spectra. The diagnostic use of AE measurements to get information both on the plasma bulk and the fast particle distribution is assessed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Fast Wave Trains Associated with Solar Eruptions: Insights from 3D Thermodynamic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C.; Liu, W.; Torok, T.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.; Ofman, L.

    2015-12-01

    EUV imaging observations during the SDO/AIA era have provided new insights into a variety of wave phenomena occurring in the low solar corona. One example is the observation of quasi-periodic, fast-propagating wave trains that are associated with solar eruptions, including flares and CMEs. While there has been considerable progress in understanding such waves from both an observational and theoretical perspective, it remains a challenge to pin down their physical origin. In this work, we detail our results from a case-study 3D thermodynamic MHD simulation of a coronal mass ejection where quasi-periodic wave trains are generated during the simulated eruption. We find a direct correlation between the onset of non-steady reconnection in the flare current sheet and the generation of quasi-periodic wave train signatures when patchy, collimated downflows interact with the flare arcade. Via forward modeling of SDO/AIA observables, we explore how the appearance of the wave trains is affected by line-of-sight integration and the multi-thermal nature of the coronal medium. We also examine how the wave trains themselves are channeled by natural waveguides formed in 3D by the non-uniform background magnetic field. While the physical association of the reconnection dynamics to the generation of quasi-periodic wave trains appears to be a compelling result, unanswered questions posed from recent observations as well as future prospects will be discussed.

  10. The structure of fast sausage waves in current-carrying coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bembitov, D. B.; Mikhalyaev, B. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    We study fast sausage waves in a model coronal loop that consists of a cylindrical core with axial magnetic field and coaxial annulus with purely azimuthal magnetic field. The magnetic field is discontinuous at the tube and core boundaries, and there are surface currents with the opposite directions on these boundaries. The principal mode of fast sausage waves in which the magnetic pressure perturbation has no nodes in the radial direction can exist for arbitrary wavelength. The results for the fundamental radial mode of sausage waves are applied to the interpretation of observed periodic pulsations of microwave emission in flaring loops with periods of a few tens of seconds. Radial plasma motion has opposite directions at the tube and core boundaries. This leads to the periodic contraction and expansion of the annulus. We assume that the principal mode of fast sausage waves in the current-carrying coronal loops is able to produce a current sheet. However, the nonlinear analysis is needed to confirm this conjecture.

  11. Full-wave calculation of fast-wave current drive in tokamaks including k sub parallel variations

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F; Batchelor, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    When fast waves propagate inward from the edge of a tokamak toward the plasma center, the k{perpendicular} spectrum produced by the antenna is not maintained but is shifted and deformed due to the presence of the finite poloidal magnetic field. This k{perpendicular} shift causes a variation in the parallel phase speed of the wave and can therefore have a strong effect on electron damping and current drive efficiency. In this paper, we include this effect in a new full-wave calculation (PICES) which represents the wave fields as a superposition of poloidal modes, thereby reducing k{perpendicular} to an algebraic operator. The wave equation is solved in general flux coordinates, including a full (non-perturbative) solution for E{perpendicular} and a reduced-order dielectric formulation to eliminate short-wavelength ion Bernstein modes. A simplified current drive model which includes particle trapping is used to estimate the effect of the k{perpendicular} shift on current drive efficiency in ITER and D3-D. Results suggest that when single-pass absorption is weak, reflected power may drive current nearly as efficiently as that absorbed on the first pass. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Fast and slow wave detection in bovine cancellous bone in vitro using bandlimited deconvolution and Prony's method.

    PubMed

    Wear, Keith; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami

    2014-10-01

    Fast and slow waves were detected in a bovine cancellous bone sample for thicknesses ranging from 7 to 12 mm using bandlimited deconvolution and the modified least-squares Prony's method with curve fitting (MLSP + CF). Bandlimited deconvolution consistently isolated two waves with linear-with-frequency attenuation coefficients as evidenced by high correlation coefficients between attenuation coefficient and frequency: 0.997 ± 0.002 (fast wave) and 0.986 ± 0.013 (slow wave) (mean ± standard deviation). Average root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the two algorithms for phase velocities were 5 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 13 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Average RMS differences for signal loss were 1.6 dB (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 0.4 dB (slow wave, 750 kHz). Phase velocities for thickness = 10 mm were 1726 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 1455 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Results show support for the model of two waves with linear-with frequency attenuation, successful isolation of fast and slow waves, good agreement between bandlimited deconvolution and MLSP + CF as well as with a Bayesian algorithm, and potential variations of fast and/or slow wave properties with bone sample thickness. PMID:25324100

  13. Nonlinear fast growth of surface gravity waves under the action of wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Maura; Marchiando, Nadège; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    The generation of ocean waves by wind is a highly nonlinear problem where the physical processes at the air-water interface are difficult to measure and to model for the presence of turbulence in both fluids. Direct field measurements of the induced pressure by airflow on waves are rare and difficult to perform, thus the underlying mechanisms leading to wave amplification are still unclear. We consider here the Miles' mechanism, which is characterised by growth rates, ΓM/f, in the range from 10-3-10-2 for fast-moving waves and in the range 10-2-1 for slow-moving waves and waves in laboratory tank experiments. This prompted us to investigate the case with Miles' growth rates of first order in the wave steepness, ΓM/f = O(ɛ), instead of the usually considered one, ΓM/f = O(ɛ2), where ɛ is the wave steepness which both in ocean and tank experiments can be of the order of 0.1. We use the method of multiple scales for deriving the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with wave growth rate of first order in the wave steepness. We find that a simple coordinate transformation reduces the wind-forced NLS equation into the standard NLS equation with constant coefficients. Thus, we show how the Peregrine, Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma solutions are modified in the presence of this first-order wind. In particular, the lifetime of both the Peregrine and the Akhmediev solitons increases for large growth rates and the maximum amplitude of these solitons slightly increases for growth rates larger than a certain value. The enhancement of both lifetime and maximum amplitude of rogue waves under the action of wind has been observed in tank experiments and numerical simulations of dispersive focusing, thus confirming the relevance in this context of the case ΓM/f = O(ɛ) considered in the present study.

  14. Lloyd’s mirror interference lithography with EUV radiation from a high-harmonic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-su; Baksh, Peter; Odstrcil, Michal; Miszczak, Magdalena; Frey, Jeremy G.; Juschkin, Larissa; Brocklesby, William S.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate interference lithography using a high-harmonic source. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is produced by high-harmonic generation with 800 nm light from a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (40 fs pulses, 1 kHz, 2 W average power) in argon gas. Interference patterns created using Lloyd’s mirror setup and monochromatized radiation at the 27th harmonic (29 nm) are recorded using a ZEP-520A photoresist, producing features with <200 nm pitch. The effect of the use of femtosecond pulsed EUV radiation on the recorded pattern is investigated. The capability of the high-harmonic source for high-resolution patterning is discussed.

  15. Enhanced loss of fast ions during mode conversion ion Bernstein wave heating in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Majeski, R.; Fisch, N.J.; Heeter, R.F.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-12-01

    A strong interaction of fast ions with ion Bernstein waves has been observed in TFTR. It results in a large increase in the fast ion loss rate, and heats the lost particles to several MeV. The lost ions are observed at the passing/trapped boundary and appear to be either DD fusion produced tritons or accelerated D neutral beam ions. Under some conditions, enhanced loss of DT alpha particles is also seen. The losses provide experimental support for some of the elements required for alpha energy channeling.

  16. Effect of surface modes on coupling to fast waves in the LHRF

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Colestock, P.L.

    1990-09-16

    The effect of surface modes of propagation on coupling to fast waves in the LHRF is studied theoretically and experimentally. The previously reported up-down' poloidal phasing asymmetry for coupling to a uniform plasma is shown to be due to the properties of a mode which carries energy along the plasma-conducting wall interface. Comparison of the theory with coupling experiments performed on the PLT tokamak with a phased array of twelve dielectric-loaded waveguides at 800 MHz shows that the observed dependence of the net reflection coefficient on toroidal phase angle can be explained only if the surface wave is taken into account. 43 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Effect of antenna geometry and plasma surface impedance on the directivity of fast wave antenna radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Pavlov, I.P.

    1996-02-01

    The fairly large poloidal directivity of a radiated fast wave spectrum related to the wave polarization relative to the ion gyration can be further enhanced by the nonperpendicular angle between the antenna current strap and the magnetic field. The latter is shown to be responsible also for the asymmetry in the parallel wavenumber spectrum of an unphased antenna, and can lead to deviations of order {le}30{percent} in the corresponding spectrum of a phased antenna array. The consequences of the observed effects to the antenna performance in the current drive applications as well as in excitation of poloidally asymmetric spectra are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Solitary fast magnetosonic waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field in cold collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichigin, G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Solutions describing solitary fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves (FMS solitons) in cold magnetized plasma are obtained by numerically solving two-fluid hydrodynamic equations. The parameter domain within which steady-state solitary waves can propagate is determined. It is established that the Mach number for rarefaction FMS solitons is always less than unity. The restriction on the propagation velocity leads to the limitation on the amplitudes of the magnetic field components of rarefaction solitons. It is shown that, as the soliton propagates in plasma, the transverse component of its magnetic field rotates and makes a complete turn around the axis along which the soliton propagates.

  19. Modeling of fast wave current drive experiments on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Mayberry, M.J.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Prater, R.; Tsunoda, S.I.

    1991-09-01

    Modeling of fast wave current drive experiments for D3-D has been improved to include calculation of target temperature profiles consistent with the D3-D database and more accurate modeling of the launched spectrum. The calculations indicate that a measurable current will be driven by fast wave in the near-term (30--200 kA). Modeling of the long-range goal of 2 MA non-inductive at high {beta} indicates the proposed 18 MW of rf power will be adequate. The optimum frequency for the intermediate scenario is 120 MHz; this frequency selection is also adequate for the long-term goals. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. ITER equilibrium with bootstrap currents, lower hybrid current drive and fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A current drive system is proposed for the technology phase of ITER which relies on rf power and bootstrap currents. The rf/bootstrap system permits operation at high safety factor, and we consider the axial value to be q/sub a/ approx. = 1.9, which minimizes the need for seed current near the magnetic axis. Lower hybrid power (/approximately/30 MW) provides current density near the surface, ICRF (/approximately/65 MHz, /approximately/30 MW) fast waves generate current near the axis, and high frequency fast waves (/approximately/250 MHz, /approximately/74 MW) supply the remaining current density. The system is not yet optimized but appears to offer great flexibility (ion heating for ignition, current rampup, etc.) with relatively inexpensive and well developed technology. 29 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  1. First results on fast wave current drive in advanced tokamak discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Cary, W.P.; Baity, F.W.

    1995-07-01

    Initial experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak on coupling, direct electron heating, and current drive by fast waves in advanced tokamak discharges. These experiments showed efficient central heating and current drive in agreement with theory in magnitude and profile. Extrapolating these results to temperature characteristic of a power plant (25 keV) gives current drive efficiency of about 0.3 MA/m{sup 2}.

  2. Hybrid Metameterials Enable Fast Electrical Modulation Of Freely Propagating Terahertz Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; O' Hara, John F; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate fast electrical modulation of freely propagating THz waves at room temperature using hybrid metamaterial devices. the devices are planar metamaterials fabricated on doped semiconducor epitaxial layers, which form hybrid metamaterial - Schottky diode structures. With an applied ac voltage bias, we show modulation of THz radiation at inferred frequencies over 2 MHz. The modulation speed is limited by the device depletion capacitance which may be reduced for even faster operation.

  3. Fast P wave propagation in subducted Pacific lithosphere: Refraction from the plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gideon; Gubbins, David; Mao, Weijian

    1994-12-01

    P waves traveling from events in the Tonga-Kermadec seismic zone to stations in New Zealand are very fast with highly emergent, dispersed waveforms. Ray tracing has shown the waves to travel close to the subducted Pacific plate throughout their length, and synthetic seismogram calculations have shown the dispersion requires a very thin (8-12 km) fast layer. Previous work has been based on data from analog records and one digital, single-component short-period instrument; no polarization analysis was possible, and measurements of dispersion were limited by the bandwidth. From January 1991 to August 1992 we deployed nine broad band, three-component seismometers in good sites for observing these arrivals; the data are augmented by three-component, short-period digital records from new stations of the New Zealand National Network. In this study we analyze 1191 broad-band and 2076 short period seismograms from 71 events for polarization of the initial P wave. The polarization directions are found to be up to 30 deg off the great circle path and consistently steep (20 deg from vertical). They are too steep to be explained by standard ray paths or refraction from a fast horizontal layer. We invert the polarization directions for a tilted interface beneath the array and use arrival times to control the depth to the interface, which is found to lie close to the top of the subducted plate inferred from the seismicity. We conclude that these precursive, emergent P waves have traveled through a fast layer close to the top of the subducted plate and refract upward to the station. A second arrival, with lower dominant frequency near 1 Hz and normal travel time, is occasionally seen on both broad band and short-time stations. Its polarization direction is similarly steep but difficult to measure; the evidence suggests that it also travels within the plate with similar ray path to the precursor.

  4. Influence of High Harmonics of Magnetic Fields on Trapped Magnetic Fluxes in HTS Bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, K.; Miyagi, D.; Tsukamoto, O.

    Various kinds of HTS bulk motors are proposed and have been developed. Generally, those motors are driven by semiconductor inverters and currents fed to the armature windings contain high harmonics. Therefore, the bulks are exposed to high harmonics magnetic fields and AC losses are produced in the bulks. The AC losses deteriorate the efficiency of the motors and cause temperature rise of the bulks which decrease the trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulks. Usually, electro-magnetic shielding devices are inserted between the bulks and armature windings. However, the shielding devices degrade compactness of the motors. Therefore, it is important to have knowledge of the influence of the high harmonics magnetic fields on the AC losses and trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulk for optimum design of the shielding devices. In this work, the authors experimentally study the influence of high harmonics magnetic fields.

  5. Generation of circularly polarized high harmonic radiation using a transmission multilayer quarter waveplate.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jürgen; Guggenmos, Alexander; Hofstetter, Michael; Chew, Soo Hoon; Kleineberg, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    High harmonic radiation is meanwhile nearly extensively used for the spectroscopic investigation of electron dynamics with ultimate time resolution. The majority of high harmonic beamlines provide linearly polarized radiation created in a gas target. However, circular polarization greatly extends the spectroscopic possibilities for high harmonics, especially in the analysis of samples with chirality or prominent spin polarization. We produced a free-standing multilayer foil as a transmission EUV quarter waveplate and applied it for the first time to high harmonic radiation. We measured a broadband (4.6 eV FWHM) ellipticity of 75% at 66 eV photon energy with a transmission efficiency of 5%. The helicity is switchable and the ellipticity can be adjusted to lower values by angle tuning. As a single element it can be easily integrated in any existing harmonic beamline without major changes. PMID:26832020

  6. Variational full wave calculation of fast wave current drive in DIII-D using the ALCYON code

    SciTech Connect

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    Initial fast wave current drive simulations performed with the ALCYON code for the 60 MHz DIII-D experiment are presented. Two typical shots of the 1991 summer campaign were selected with magnetic field intensities of 1 and 2 teslas respectively. The results for the wave electromagnetic field in the plasma chamber are displayed. They exhibit a strong enrichment of the poloidal mode number m-spectrum which leads to the upshift of the parallel wavenumber, {kappa}{perpendicular}, and to the wave absorption. The m-spectrum is bounded when the local poloidal wavenumber reaches the Alfven wavenumber and the {kappa}{perpendicular} upshifts do not destroy the wave directionality. Linear estimations of the driven current are made. The current density profiles are found to be peaked and we find that about 88 kA can be driven in the 1 tesla/1.7 keV phase with 1.7 MW coupled to the electrons. In the 2 tesla/3.4 keV case, 47 kA are driven with a total power of 1.5 MW, 44% of which are absorbed on the hydrogen minority, through the second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance. The global efficiency is then 0.18 {times} 10{sup 19} A m{sup {minus}2}W{sup {minus}1} if one considers only the effective power going to the electrons.

  7. Realistic Modeling of SDO/AIA-discovered Coronal Fast MHD Wave Trains in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution EUV observations by space telescopes have provided plenty of evidence for coronal MHD waves in active regions. In particular, SDO/AIA discovered quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs), which can propagate at speeds of ~1000 km/s perpendicular to the magnetic field. Such waves can provide information on the energy release of their associated flares and the magnetized plasma structure of the active regions. Before we can use these waves as tools for coronal seismology, 3D MHD modeling is required for disentangling observational ambiguities and improving the diagnostic accuracy. We present new results of observationally contained models of QFPs using our recently upgraded radiative, thermally conductive, visco-resistive 3D MHD code. The waves are excited by time-depended boundary conditions constrained by the spatial (localized) and quasi-periodic temporal evolution of a C-class flare typically associated with QFPs. We investigate the excitation, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, magnetic field structure, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and then obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs. We discuss the implications of our model results for the seismological application of QFPs and for understanding the dynamics of their associated flares.

  8. Fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an awake cat using a chronic microelectrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Russell S.; Rousche, Patrick J.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2007-06-01

    We investigated fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an alert cat using a chronically implanted microelectrode array. A custom, real-time imaging template exhibited wave dynamics within the 33-microwire array (3 mm2) during ten recording sessions spanning 1 month post implant. Images were based on the spatial arrangement of peri-stimulus time histograms at each recording site in response to auditory stimuli consisting of tone pips between 1 and 10 kHz at 75 dB SPL. Functional images portray stimulus-locked spiking activity and exhibit waves of excitation and inhibition that evolve during the onset, sustained and offset period of the tones. In response to 5 kHz, for example, peak excitation occurred at 27 ms after onset and again at 15 ms following tone offset. Variability of the position of the centroid of excitation during ten recording sessions reached a minimum at 31 ms post onset (σ = 125 µm) and 18 ms post offset (σ = 145 µm), suggesting a fine place/time representation of the stimulus in the cortex. The dynamics of these fast waves also depended on stimulus frequency, likely reflecting the tonotopicity in auditory cortex projected from the cochlea. Peak wave velocities of 0.2 m s-1 were also consistent with those purported across horizontal layers of cat visual cortex. The fine resolution offered by microimaging may be critical for delivering optimal coding strategies used with an auditory prosthesis. Based on the initial results, future studies seek to determine the relevance of these waves to sensory perception and behavior. The work was performed at Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, ECG 334 MS-9709 Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-9709, USA.

  9. Fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an awake cat using a chronic microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Witte, Russell S; Rousche, Patrick J; Kipke, Daryl R

    2007-06-01

    We investigated fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an alert cat using a chronically implanted microelectrode array. A custom, real-time imaging template exhibited wave dynamics within the 33-microwire array (3 mm(2)) during ten recording sessions spanning 1 month post implant. Images were based on the spatial arrangement of peri-stimulus time histograms at each recording site in response to auditory stimuli consisting of tone pips between 1 and 10 kHz at 75 dB SPL. Functional images portray stimulus-locked spiking activity and exhibit waves of excitation and inhibition that evolve during the onset, sustained and offset period of the tones. In response to 5 kHz, for example, peak excitation occurred at 27 ms after onset and again at 15 ms following tone offset. Variability of the position of the centroid of excitation during ten recording sessions reached a minimum at 31 ms post onset (sigma = 125 microm) and 18 ms post offset (sigma = 145 microm), suggesting a fine place/time representation of the stimulus in the cortex. The dynamics of these fast waves also depended on stimulus frequency, likely reflecting the tonotopicity in auditory cortex projected from the cochlea. Peak wave velocities of 0.2 m s(-1) were also consistent with those purported across horizontal layers of cat visual cortex. The fine resolution offered by microimaging may be critical for delivering optimal coding strategies used with an auditory prosthesis. Based on the initial results, future studies seek to determine the relevance of these waves to sensory perception and behavior. PMID:17409481

  10. The cutoff frequency for fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic waves in an isothermal atmosphere with a uniform horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, B. A.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1993-01-01

    This study analytically examines conditions for reflection of MHD fast-mode waves propagating upward in an isothermal atmosphere. A new method of transforming the linearized wave equation into Klein-Gordon form is utilized to calculate a local cutoff (critical) frequency for these waves. This critical frequency determines the height in the atmosphere at which reflection dominates and above which wave propagation is effectively cut off. Comparison of our results to those previously obtained shows that earlier calculations of the critical frequency for MHD fast mode waves were done incorrectly. The results may be helpful in explaining the short-period end of the spectrum of the solar global p-mode oscillations. They may also be important in studies of wave propagation and wave trapping in highly magnetized stellar atmospheres.

  11. Heating and Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Alfvén Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical simulations of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence in a magnetic flux tube at the center of a polar coronal hole. The model for the background atmosphere is a solution of the momentum equation and includes the effects of wave pressure on the solar wind outflow. Alfvén waves are launched at the coronal base and reflect at various heights owing to variations in Alfvén speed and outflow velocity. The turbulence is driven by nonlinear interactions between the counterpropagating Alfvén waves. Results are presented for two models of the background atmosphere. In the first model the plasma density and Alfvén speed vary smoothly with height, resulting in minimal wave reflections and low-energy dissipation rates. We find that the dissipation rate is insufficient to maintain the temperature of the background atmosphere. The standard phenomenological formula for the dissipation rate significantly overestimates the rate derived from our RMHD simulations, and a revised formula is proposed. In the second model we introduce additional density variations along the flux tube with a correlation length of 0.04 R⊙ and with relative amplitude of 10%. These density variations simulate the effects of compressive MHD waves on the Alfvén waves. We find that such variations significantly enhance the wave reflection and thereby the turbulent dissipation rates, producing enough heat to maintain the background atmosphere. We conclude that interactions between Alfvén and compressive waves may play an important role in the turbulent heating of the fast solar wind.

  12. Fast electron flux driven by lower hybrid wave in the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Wang, L.; Gan, K. F.; Yang, J. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Liu, S. C.; Li, M. H.; Ding, S.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Shao, L. M.; Li, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, N.; and others

    2015-02-15

    The fast electron flux driven by Lower Hybrid Wave (LHW) in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in EAST is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The five bright belts flowing along the magnetic field lines in the SOL and hot spots at LHW guard limiters observed by charge coupled device and infrared cameras are attributed to the fast electron flux, which is directly measured by retarding field analyzers (RFA). The current carried by the fast electron flux, ranging from 400 to 6000 A/m{sup 2} and in the direction opposite to the plasma current, is scanned along the radial direction from the limiter surface to the position about 25 mm beyond the limiter. The measured fast electron flux is attributed to the high parallel wave refractive index n{sub ||} components of LHW. According to the antenna structure and the LHW power absorbed by plasma, a broad parallel electric field spectrum of incident wave from the antennas is estimated. The radial distribution of LHW-driven current density is analyzed in SOL based on Landau damping of the LHW. The analytical results support the RFA measurements, showing a certain level of consistency. In addition, the deposition profile of the LHW power density in SOL is also calculated utilizing this simple model. This study provides some fundamental insight into the heating and current drive effects induced by LHW in SOL, and should also help to interpret the observations and related numerical analyses of the behaviors of bright belts and hot spots induced by LHW.

  13. Fast and accurate inference on gravitational waves from precessing compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rory; Field, Scott E.; Blackburn, Kent; Haster, Carl-Johan; Pürrer, Michael; Raymond, Vivien; Schmidt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Inferring astrophysical information from gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries is one of the key science goals of gravitational-wave astronomy. In order to reach the full scientific potential of gravitational-wave experiments, we require techniques to mitigate the cost of Bayesian inference, especially as gravitational-wave signal models and analyses become increasingly sophisticated and detailed. Reduced-order models (ROMs) of gravitational waveforms can significantly reduce the computational cost of inference by removing redundant computations. In this paper, we construct the first reduced-order models of gravitational-wave signals that include the effects of spin precession, inspiral, merger, and ringdown in compact object binaries and that are valid for component masses describing binary neutron star, binary black hole, and mixed binary systems. This work utilizes the waveform model known as "IMRPhenomPv2." Our ROM enables the use of a fast reduced-order quadrature (ROQ) integration rule which allows us to approximate Bayesian probability density functions at a greatly reduced computational cost. We find that the ROQ rule can be used to speed-up inference by factors as high as 300 without introducing systematic bias. This corresponds to a reduction in computational time from around half a year to half a day for the longest duration and lowest mass signals. The ROM and ROQ rules are available with the main inference library of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, LALInference.

  14. Effect of antenna orientation and plasma anisotropy on the directivity of fast wave antenna radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, I.P.; Heikkinen, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    Asymmetry in the transverse wave number spectrum of the radiated power of a screenless fast wave antenna at an ion cyclotron range of frequencies is calculated with a model that takes into account the nonsymmetry of the plasma surface impedance matrix for an inhomogeneous tokamak plasma in front of the antenna. The directivity of the wave number spectrum transverse to the ambient magnetic field caused by the asymmetry in the surface impedance is found to be strongly asymmetric with respect to the parallel wave number by the effect of the nonperpendicular angle between the antenna current strap and the magnetic field. The latter is shown to be responsible also for the asymmetry in the parallel wave number spectrum of an undirected antenna, and can lead to deviations of order {le}30% in the corresponding spectrum of a phased antenna array with directivity. The consequences of the observed effects to the antenna performance in the current drive applications as well as in excitation of poloidally asymmetric spectra are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. Resonant Absorption of Solar Wind-Generated Fast Magnetosonic Waves in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Daniil

    Resonant transformation of fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves into Alfven and slow magnetosonic (SMS) oscillations during their propagation from the solar wind to the magnetosphere is inves-tigated. The one-dimensionally inhomogeneous medium model with non-isothermal plasma is used to describe the day-side magnetosphere. In order to determine integrated properties of the FMS wave absorption after their transformation into resonant Alfven and SMS oscillations, we use the Kolmogorov spectrum typical of waves in turbulent plasma of the solar wind. Spatial distribution of energy dissipation rate of FMS oscillations penetrating into the magnetosphere from the solar wind is studied. The FMS wave energy dissipation rate caused by magnetosonic resonance excitation is shown to be several orders of magnitude greater than that caused by the Alfven resonance excitation at the same surface. It is connected with the spectrum of incident FMS waves. Magnitude of the Fourier harmonics exciting resonant Alfven oscillations is much smaller than that of the harmonics driving lower-frequency magnetosonic resonance. Being a low-frequency extension of ion-sound branch, SMS oscillations strongly interact with background ions. We estimate efficiency of the magnetospheric plasma heating via absorption of resonant SMS oscillations. The additional temperature related to such a heating turns out to be four orders of magnitude smaller than the background temperature.

  16. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations Ax=b, where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O(NlogN) memory and executing an iteration in O(Nlog(2)N) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps. PMID:26986436

  17. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M.

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations A x =b , where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O (N logN ) memory and executing an iteration in O (N log2N ) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps.

  18. A wideband fast multipole boundary element method for half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chang-Jun; Chen, Hai-Bo; Chen, Lei-Lei

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel wideband fast multipole boundary element approach to 3D half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems. The half-space fundamental solution is employed in the boundary integral equations so that the tree structure required in the fast multipole algorithm is constructed for the boundary elements in the real domain only. Moreover, a set of symmetric relations between the multipole expansion coefficients of the real and image domains are derived, and the half-space fundamental solution is modified for the purpose of applying such relations to avoid calculating, translating and saving the multipole/local expansion coefficients of the image domain. The wideband adaptive multilevel fast multipole algorithm associated with the iterative solver GMRES is employed so that the present method is accurate and efficient for both lowand high-frequency acoustic wave problems. As for exterior acoustic problems, the Burton-Miller method is adopted to tackle the fictitious eigenfrequency problem involved in the conventional boundary integral equation method. Details on the implementation of the present method are described, and numerical examples are given to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.

  19. Fast-mode Coronal Wave Trains Detected by SDO/AIA: Recent Observational Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Downs, Cooper; Ofman, Leon

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-periodic Fast Propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon discovered by SDO/AIA in extreme ultraviolet (EUV). They are fast-mode magnetosonic waves, closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flare emission ranging from radio to X-ray wavelengths. The significance of QFPs lies in their diagnostic potential, because they can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. In this presentation, we report recent advances in observing QFPs. In particular, using differential emission measure (DEM) inversion, we found clear evidence of heating and cooling cycles that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic wave pulses. We also found that different local magnetic and plasma environments can lead to two distinct types of QFPs located in different spatial domains with respect to their accompanying coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Moreover, recent IRIS observations of QFP source regions revealed sawtooth-like flare ribbon motions, indicative of pulsed magnetic reconnection, that are correlated with QFP excitation. More interestingly, from a statistical survey of over 100 QFP events, we found a preferential association with eruptive flares rather than confined flares. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating, energy transport, and solar eruptions.

  20. Fast Magnetosonic Waves and Global Coronal Seismology in the Extended Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ryun Young; Zhang, J.; Kramar, M.; Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Davila, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    We present global coronal seismology, for the first time, that allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strengths in a wide range of the extended solar corona. We use observations of propagating disturbance associated with a coronal mass ejection observed on 2011 August 4 by the COR1 inner coronagraphs on board the STEREO spacecraft. We establish that the disturbance is in fact a fast magnetosonic wave as the upper coronal counterpart of the EIT wave observed by STEREO EUVI and travels across magnetic field lines with inhomogeneous speeds, passing through various coronal regions such as quiet/active corona, coronal holes, and streamers. We derive magnetic field strengths along the azimuthal trajectories of the fronts at heliocentric distances 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 Rs, using the varying speeds and electron densities. The derived magnetic field strengths are consistent with values determined with a potential field source surface model and reported in previous works. The ranges of the magnetic field strengths at these heliocentric distances are 0.44 ± 0.29, 0.23 ± 0.15, and 0.26 ± 0.14 G, respectively. The uncertainty in determining magnetic field strengths is about 40 %. This work demonstrates that observations of fast magnetosonic waves by white-light coronagraphs can provide us with a unique way to diagnose magnetic field strength of an inhomogeneous medium in a wide spatial range of the extended solar corona.

  1. Anticorrelated Emission of High Harmonics and Fast Electron Beams From Plasma Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocoum, Maïmouna; Thévenet, Maxence; Böhle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Vernier, Aline; Jullien, Aurélie; Faure, Jérôme; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    We report for the first time on the anticorrelated emission of high-order harmonics and energetic electron beams from a solid-density plasma with a sharp vacuum interface—plasma mirror—driven by an intense ultrashort laser pulse. We highlight the key role played by the nanoscale structure of the plasma surface during the interaction by measuring the spatial and spectral properties of harmonics and electron beams emitted by a plasma mirror. We show that the nanoscale behavior of the plasma mirror can be controlled by tuning the scale length of the electron density gradient, which is measured in situ using spatial-domain interferometry.

  2. Gaussian-Schell analysis of the transverse spatial properties of high-harmonic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David T.; O’Keeffe, Kevin; Anderson, Patrick N.; Hooker, Simon M.

    2016-07-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is an established means of producing coherent, short wavelength, ultrafast pulses from a compact set-up. Table-top high-harmonic sources are increasingly being used to image physical and biological systems using emerging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography. These novel imaging methods require coherent illumination, and it is therefore important to both characterize the spatial coherence of high-harmonic beams and understand the processes which limit this property. Here we investigate the near- and far-field spatial properties of high-harmonic radiation generated in a gas cell. The variation with harmonic order of the intensity profile, wavefront curvature, and complex coherence factor is measured in the far-field by the SCIMITAR technique. Using the Gaussian-Schell model, the properties of the harmonic beam in the plane of generation are deduced. Our results show that the order-dependence of the harmonic spatial coherence is consistent with partial coherence induced by both variation of the intensity-dependent dipole phase as well as finite spatial coherence of the driving radiation. These findings are used to suggest ways in which the coherence of harmonic beams could be increased further, which would have direct benefits to imaging with high-harmonic radiation.

  3. Gaussian-Schell analysis of the transverse spatial properties of high-harmonic beams

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, David T.; O’Keeffe, Kevin; Anderson, Patrick N.; Hooker, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is an established means of producing coherent, short wavelength, ultrafast pulses from a compact set-up. Table-top high-harmonic sources are increasingly being used to image physical and biological systems using emerging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography. These novel imaging methods require coherent illumination, and it is therefore important to both characterize the spatial coherence of high-harmonic beams and understand the processes which limit this property. Here we investigate the near- and far-field spatial properties of high-harmonic radiation generated in a gas cell. The variation with harmonic order of the intensity profile, wavefront curvature, and complex coherence factor is measured in the far-field by the SCIMITAR technique. Using the Gaussian-Schell model, the properties of the harmonic beam in the plane of generation are deduced. Our results show that the order-dependence of the harmonic spatial coherence is consistent with partial coherence induced by both variation of the intensity-dependent dipole phase as well as finite spatial coherence of the driving radiation. These findings are used to suggest ways in which the coherence of harmonic beams could be increased further, which would have direct benefits to imaging with high-harmonic radiation. PMID:27465654

  4. Gaussian-Schell analysis of the transverse spatial properties of high-harmonic beams.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David T; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Anderson, Patrick N; Hooker, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is an established means of producing coherent, short wavelength, ultrafast pulses from a compact set-up. Table-top high-harmonic sources are increasingly being used to image physical and biological systems using emerging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography. These novel imaging methods require coherent illumination, and it is therefore important to both characterize the spatial coherence of high-harmonic beams and understand the processes which limit this property. Here we investigate the near- and far-field spatial properties of high-harmonic radiation generated in a gas cell. The variation with harmonic order of the intensity profile, wavefront curvature, and complex coherence factor is measured in the far-field by the SCIMITAR technique. Using the Gaussian-Schell model, the properties of the harmonic beam in the plane of generation are deduced. Our results show that the order-dependence of the harmonic spatial coherence is consistent with partial coherence induced by both variation of the intensity-dependent dipole phase as well as finite spatial coherence of the driving radiation. These findings are used to suggest ways in which the coherence of harmonic beams could be increased further, which would have direct benefits to imaging with high-harmonic radiation. PMID:27465654

  5. Synergy in Two-Frequency Fast Wave Cyclotron Harmonic Absorption in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F. W.; Hosea, J. C.

    2009-11-26

    Fast waves (FWs) at 60 MHz and at 90 MHz are coupled to DIII-D discharges for central heating and current drive at net FW power up to 3.5 MW. The primary absorption mechanism is intended to be direct electron damping in the plasma core. In discharges at B = 2 T with fast deuteron populations from neutral beam injection, 4th and 6th deuterium cyclotron harmonic absorption on the fast ions competes with direct electron damping. Previous experiments have shown that the 6{omega}{sub D} absorption of the 90 MHz FWs is weaker than the 4{omega}{sub D} absorption of 60 MHz FWs, in agreement with a model that includes unspecified edge losses. Recent experiments have shown that if the fast deuterons are accelerated by absorption of 60 MHz (4{omega}{sub D}) FWs, adding 90 MHz power (6{omega}{sub D}) can increase the fusion neutron rate by a larger increment than is obtained with 90 MHz power alone. Details of this synergy between 4{omega}{sub D} and 6{omega}{sub D} absorption are presented.

  6. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    PubMed Central

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved. PMID:25029282

  7. Love-wave sensors combined with microfluidics for fast detection of biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved. PMID:25029282

  8. Gravitational-wave Constraints on the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, Thomas; Kanner, Jonah; Weinstein, Alan

    2016-07-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, FRBs are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. Such coalescence events are strong gravitational-wave emitters. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements constrain the binary black hole rate to approximately 5% of the FRB rate, and results from Advanced LIGO’s O1 and O2 observing runs may place similarly strong constraints on the fraction of FRBs due to binary neutron star and neutron star–black hole progenitors.

  9. Fast dynamics and relaxation of colloidal drops during the drying process using multispeckle diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yong; Hwang, Ji Won; Jung, Hyun Wook; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Seong Jae; Yoon, Kisun; Weitz, David A

    2013-01-22

    The fast dynamics generated by the Brownian motion of particles in colloidal drops, and the related relaxation during drying, which play key roles in suspension systems, were investigated incorporating multispeckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS). MSDWS equipment was implemented to analyze the relaxation properties of suspensions under a nonergodic and nonstationary drying process, which cannot be elucidated by conventional light scattering methods, such as dynamic light scattering and diffusing wave spectroscopy. Rapid particle movement can be identified by the characteristic relaxation time, which is closely related to the Brownian motion due to thermal fluctuations of the particles. In the compacting stage of the drying process, the characteristic relaxation time increased gradually with the drying time because the particles in the colloidal drop were constrained by themselves. Moreover, variations of the initial concentration and particle size considerably affected the complete drying time and characteristic relaxation time, producing a shorter relaxation time for a low concentrated suspension with small particles. PMID:23281633

  10. Towards a fast-running method for blast-wave mitigation by a prismatic blast wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Éveillard, Sébastien; Lardjane, Nicolas; Vinçont, Jean-Yves; Sochet, Isabelle

    A procedure aimed at developing a fast-running method for blast-wave effects characterization behind a protection barrier is presented. Small-scale experiments of a hemispherical gaseous charge (stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture) without and with a prismatic protective barrier are used to validate the use of an in-house CFD code for gaseous detonation. From numerical experiments, pressure loss of a blast wave at a corner is quantified. These fits, in conjunction with TM5-1300 reflection charts, are used to estimate the maximum overpressure around a protective barrier through geometrical and empirical laws. The results show good agreement with numerical and experimental data from the ANR-BARPPRO research project.