Science.gov

Sample records for high-heat flux electronics

  1. Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, K.T.

    2005-10-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be

  2. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  3. High heat flux single phase heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Izenson, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux, single-phase heat exchanger for spacecraft thermal management. The intended application is a net generation interface heat exchanger to couple the crew module water thermal bus to the two-phase ammonia main thermal bus in the Space Station Freedom. The large size of the interface heat exchanger is dictated by the relatively poor water-side heat transfer characteristics. The objective of this program is to develop a single-phase heat transfer approach which can achieve heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients comparable to those of the evaporation ammonia side. A new heat exchanger concept has been developed to meet these objecties. The main feature of this heat exchanger is that it can achieve very high heat fluxes with a pressure drop one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of previous microchannel or jet impingement high heat flux heat exchangers. This paper describes proof-of-concept experiments performed in air and water and presents analytical model of the heat exchanger.

  4. High heat flux loop heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, Mark T.; Sarraf, David B.; Rosenfeld, John H.; Maidanik, Yuri F.; Vershinin, Sergey

    1997-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) can transport very large thermal power loads over long distances, through flexible, small diameter tubes against gravitational heads. In order to overcome the evaporator limit of LHPs, which is of about 0.07 MW/sq m, work was carried out to improve the efficiency by threefold to tenfold. The vapor passage geometry for the high heat flux conditions is shown. A bidisperse wick material within the circumferential vapor passages was used. Along with heat flux enhancement, several underlying issues were demonstrated, including the fabrication of bidisperse powder with controlled properties and the fabrication of a device geometry capable of replacing vapor passages with bidisperse powder.

  5. Applicability of copper alloys for DEMO high heat flux components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, Steven J.

    2016-02-01

    The current state of knowledge of the mechanical and thermal properties of high-strength, high conductivity Cu alloys relevant for fusion energy high heat flux applications is reviewed, including effects of thermomechanical and joining processes and neutron irradiation on precipitation- or dispersion-strengthened CuCrZr, Cu-Al2O3, CuNiBe, CuNiSiCr and CuCrNb (GRCop-84). The prospects for designing improved versions of wrought copper alloys and for utilizing advanced fabrication processes such as additive manufacturing based on electron beam and laser consolidation methods are discussed. The importance of developing improved structural materials design criteria is also noted.

  6. High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, C.P.

    1993-07-01

    Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

  7. High heat flux measurements and experimental calibrations/characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Carl T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in techniques employed in the measurement of very high heat-transfer rates in reentry-type facilities at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is described. These advances include thermal analyses applied to transducer concepts used to make these measurements; improved heat-flux sensor fabrication methods, equipment, and procedures for determining the experimental time response of individual sensors; performance of absolute heat-flux calibrations at levels above 2,000 Btu/cu ft-sec (2.27 kW/cu cm); and innovative methods of performing in-situ run-to-run characterizations of heat-flux probes installed in the test facility. Graphical illustrations of the results of extensive thermal analyses of the null-point calorimeter and coaxial surface thermocouple concepts with application to measurements in aerothermal test environments are presented. Results of time response experiments and absolute calibrations of null-point calorimeters and coaxial thermocouples performed in the laboratory at intermediate to high heat-flux levels are shown. Typical AEDC high-enthalpy arc heater heat-flux data recently obtained with a Calspan-fabricated null-point probe model are included.

  8. A high heat flux experiment for verification of thermostructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1988-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state of the art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of handling the high heat fluxes during flight. The leading edges of such systems must not only tolerate the maximum heating rates, but must also minimize distortions to the flow field due to excessive blunting and/or thermal warping of the compression surface to achieve the high inlet performance required. A combined analytical and experimental effort to study the aerothermodynamic loads on actively cooled structures for hypersonic applications was established. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine was modified to establish a high enthalpy high heat flux environment. The facility provides heat flux levels from about 200 up to 10000 Btu/sq ft/sec. Cross flow and parallel flow regeneratively cooled model can be tested and analyzed by using cooling fluids of water and hydrogen. Results are presented of the experiment and the characteristics of the Hot Gas Test Facility. The predicted temperature results of the cross flow model are compared with the experimental data on the first monolithic specimens and are found to be in good agreement. Thermal stress analysis results are also presented.

  9. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8%Y2O3 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with failing. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 2 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12%Y2O3 or ZrO2-20%Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  10. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with falling. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 1 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12 percent Y2O3 or ZrO2-2O percent Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  11. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y203 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with failing. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 2 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12 percent Y2O3 or ZrO2-20 percent Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  12. High heat flux mirror design for an undulator beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnessen, Thomas W.; Fisher, Steven E.; Anthony, Frank M.; Lunt, David L.; Khounsary, Ali M.; Randall, Kevin J.; Gluskin, Efim S.; Yun, Wenbing

    1993-11-01

    A-high-heat-load, horizontally deflecting/focusing mirror is designed for installation on an APS undulator beamline. The main design objective has been to keep the total tangential RMS slope error, including the thermally induced component, to less than 2 (mu) rad with an absorbed beam power on the mirror of 2 kW and a peak flux of 3.2 W/mm2. Extensive examination of various design parameters and detailed thermal/structural analyses has resulted in a mirror design that meets the tight slope-error requirement. Design features include a silicon substrate, a tailored pin-post cooling scheme, a moderate coolant flow rate, primary and secondary cooling areas, a multi-strip coating on the reflecting surface, and inlet/outlet cooling manifolds through an attached Ni-Fe mounting structure.

  13. Robust Cooling of High Heat Fluxes Using Hybrid Loop Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Jon; Park, Chanwoo; Sarraf, David; Paris, Anthony

    2005-02-01

    This paper discusses the development of an advanced hybrid loop technology that incorporates elements from both passive and active loop technologies. The result is a simple yet high performance cooling technology that can be used to remove high heat fluxes from large heat input areas. Operating principles and test results of prototype hybrid loops are discussed. Prototype hybrid loops have been demonstrated to remove heat fluxes in excess of 350W/cm2 from heat input areas over 4cm2 with evaporator thermal resistances between 0.008 and 0.065°C/W/cm2. Also importantly, this performance was achieved without the need to actively adjust or control the flows in the loops, even when the heat inputs varied between 0 and 350W/cm2. These performance characteristics represent substantial improvements over state of the art heat pipes, loop heat pipes and spray cooling devices. The hybrid loop technology was demonstrated to operate effectively at all orientations.

  14. CVD diamond for optics applications in high heat flux environments

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Diamond has a cubic lattice structure and a very wide bandgap, which suggests that this material should exhibit excellent optical properties at wavelengths ranging from the far infrared to the near ultraviolet. Since diamond also exhibits unusually favorable properties in terms of mechanical strength, chemical stability, and thermal conductivity, there is considerable interest in using diamond for optics applications that involve adverse environmental conditions. The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated assessment of some of the issues that arise in connection with the use of chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond for applications such as missile system windows or domes, and for designing components that must function in the high photon flux of high-power lasers. Specifically, since the flight velocities of future air-intercept missiles are projected to far exceed those of contemporary systems, this raises the issue of how to assess the capability of window/dome material candidates in an aero-thermal shock environment. In this context, it can be demonstrated that, compared to other candidate materials, diamond windows promise to deliver superior performances and should be able to meet any foreseeable requirement. Operation at high speeds, however, imposes limits on the tolerable window emittance to prevent blinding the seeker, and this issue leads to the conclusion that diamond is intrinsically unsuitable for operation in the 3- to 5-{micro}m spectral band. Concerning high-energy lasers, note that operational systems always include an optical train consisting of mirrors and windows, which must be capable of transporting and directing the beam without seriously degrading the nominal performance of the laser. In this regard, mirror-faceplate material candidates can be ranked on the basis of appropriate figures of merit, which demonstrate that diamond is of particular promise for high-heat-load applications that require efficient cooling.

  15. Fundamental experiments of steady-state high heat fluxes using spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Ortiz, Lester

    1996-11-01

    Spray cooling has been considered as one of the most efficient alternatives for the removal of high heat fluxes and is currently used in several modern industrial and technological applications to dissipate high amounts of heat from their components such as in electronics, lasers, metallurgical, and nuclear. In many of these applications steady-state high heat fluxes (SSHHF) removal is required. In this research, experiments were conducted to determine parameters that affect the steady-state behavior of high heat fluxes when using spray cooling. The parameters taken in consideration included the mass flow rate, the heated surface roughness, the liquid subcooling temperature, and the spray angle. Water was used as the working fluid in the experiments. An experimental apparatus was built to carry- out the experiments, consisting of a copper heater with a disc shaped surface, an atomizer system that used commercial nozzles, and a data acquisition systems to accurately measure temperatures, heat fluxes, flow rates, and room conditions. The commercial nozzles generated mean droplet diameters ranging from 85 to 100 micrometers and flow rates between 1.48 and 1.9L/hr. Two surface conditions were sued; one polished with 0.25 micrometers liquid solution and the other polished with 600 grit silicon carbide grinding paper. The SSHHF was determined by observing the transient response of the surface temperature and the surface heat flux. Steady- state heat fluxes in the order of 100W/cm2 were obtained in most cases. Results indicated that higher SSHHF can be obtained with increasing mass flow rates and it was easier to achieve them with smooth surfaces. Results also showed that subcooling may not be significant when high mass flow rates. Curves indicating maximum SSHHF were generated as function of the parameters investigated.

  16. Testing of actively cooled high heat flux mock-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rödig, M.; Duwe, R.; Kühnlein, W.; Linke, J.; Scheerer, M.; Smid, I.; Wiechers, B.

    1998-10-01

    Several un-irradiated CFC monoblock mock-ups have been loaded in thermal fatigue tests up to 1000 cycles at power densities <25 MW/m 2. No indication of failure was observed for these loading conditions. Two of the mock-ups were inspected by ultra-sonic methods before thermal cycling. It could be proved that the voids found in the post-mortem metallography existed before and had no effect on the integrity of the mock-up. For the first time, neutron-irradiated CFC monoblock mock-ups have been tested in the electron beam facility JUDITH. These mock-ups had been irradiated before in the High Flux Reactor at Petten up to 0.3 dpa at 320°C and 770°C. All samples showed a significant increase of surface temperature, due to the irradiation induced decrease in thermal conductivity of the CFC materials.

  17. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    -section components has become critical, but at the same time the service conditions have put our best alloy systems to their limits. As a result, implementation of cooling holes and thermal barrier coatings are new advances in hot-section technologies now looked at for modifications to reach higher temperature applications. Current thermal barrier coatings used in today's turbine applications is known as 8%yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and there are no coatings for current thrust chambers. Current research is looking at the applicability of 8%yttria-stabilized hafnia (YSH) for turbine applications and the implementation of 8%YSZ onto thrust chambers. This study intends to determine if the use of thermal barrier coatings are applicable for high heat flux thrust chambers using industrial YSZ will be advantageous for improvements in efficiency, thrust and longer service life by allowing the thrust chambers to be used more than once.

  18. Light-intensity modulator withstands high heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, H. G.; Strass, H. K.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanism modulates and controls the intensity of luminous radiation in light beams associated with high-intensity heat flux. This modulator incorporates two fluid-cooled, externally grooved, contracting metal cylinders which when rotated about their longitudinal axes present a circular aperture of varying size depending on the degree of rotation.

  19. Critical heat flux of subcooled flow boiling with water for high heat flux application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    1993-11-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in water is thought to be advantageous in removing high heat load of more than 10 MW/m2. Characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF), which determines the upper limit of heat removal, are very important for the design of cooling systems. In this paper, studies on subcooled flow boiling CHF, which have been conducted by the authors, are reported. Experiments were conducted using direct current heating of stainless steel tube. For uniform heating conditions, CHF increment in small diameter tubes (1 - 3 mm inside diameter) and the CHF characteristics in tubes with internal twisted tapes were investigated, and also the existing CHF correlations for ordinary tubes (more than 3 mm inside diameter) were evaluated. For peripherally non-uniform heating conditions using the tube, whose wall thickness was partly reduced, the CHF for swirl flow was higher than the CHF under uniform heating conditions with an increase of the non-uniformity factor.

  20. CVD diamond for optics applications in high heat flux environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Claude A.

    1996-11-01

    Diamond has a cubic lattice structure and a very wide bandgap, which suggests that this material should exhibit excellent optical properties at wavelengths ranging from the far infrared to the near ultraviolet. Since diamond also exhibits unusually favorable properties in terms of mechanical strength, chemical stability, and thermal conductivity, there is considerable interest in using diamond for optics applications that involve adverse environmental conditions. The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated assessment of some of the issues that arise in connection with the use of chemically vapor- deposited diamond for applications such as missile system windows or domes, and for designing components that must function in the high photon flux of high-power lasers. Specifically, since the flight velocities of future air- intercept missiles are projected to far exceed those of contemporary systems, this raises the issue of how to access the capability of window/dome material candidates in an aero-thermal shock environment.In this context, it can be demonstrated that, compared to other candidate materials, diamond windows promise to deliver superior performances and should be able to meet any foreseeable requirement. Operation at high speeds, however, imposes limits on the tolerable window emittance to prevent 'blinding' the seeker, and this issue leads to the conclusion that diamond is intrinsically unsuitable for operation in the 3- to 5-micrometers spectral band. Concerning high-energy lasers, note that operational systems always include an optical train consisting of mirrors and windows, which must be capable of transporting and directing the beam without seriously degrading the nominal performance of the laser. In this regard, mirror-faceplate material candidates can be ranked on the basis of appropriate applications that require efficient cooling. Finally, we emphasize that the power- handling capability of diamond laser windows must be examined in the

  1. High-heat-flux testing of helium-cooled heat exchangers for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, D.L.; Izenson, M.G.; Baxi, C.B.; Rosenfeld, J.H.

    1996-07-01

    High-heat-flux experiments on three types of helium-cooled divertor mock-ups were performed on the 30-kW electron beam test system and its associated helium flow loop at Sandia National Laboratories. A dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (DSCu) was used in the manufacture of all the mock-ups. The first heat exchanger provides for enhanced heat transfer at relatively low flow rates and much reduced pumping requirements. The Creare sample was tested to a maximum absorbed heat flux of 5.8 MW/m{sup 2}. The second used low pressure drops and high mass flow rates to achieve good heat removal. The GA specimen was tested to a maximum absorbed heat flux of 9 MW/m{sup 2} while maintaining a surface temperature below 400{degree}C. A second experiment resulted in a maximum absorbed heat flux of 34 MW/m{sup 2} and surface temperatures near 533{degree}C. The third specimen was a DSCu, axial flow, helium-cooled divertor mock-up filled with a porous metal wick which effectively increases the available heat transfer area. Low mass flow and high pressure drop operation at 4.0 MPa were characteristic of this divertor module. It survived a maximum absorbed heat flux of 16 MW/m{sup 2} and reached a surface temperature of 740{degree}C. Thermacore also manufactured a follow-on, dual channel porous metal-type heat exchanger, which survived a maximum absorbed heat flux of 14 MW/m{sup 2} and reached a maximum surface temperature of 690{degree}C. 11refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Evaporation on/in Capillary Structures of High Heat Flux Two-Phase Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, Amir; Khrustalev, Dmitry

    1996-01-01

    Two-phase devices (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, loop heat pipes, and evaporators) have become recognized as key elements in thermal control systems of space platforms. Capillary and porous structures are necessary and widely used in these devices, especially in high heat flux and zero-g applications, to provide fluid transport and enhanced heat transfer during vaporization and condensation. However, some unexpected critical phenomena, such as dryout in long heat pipe evaporators and high thermal resistance of loop heat pipe evaporators with high heat fluxes, are possible and have been encountered in the use of two-phase devices in the low gravity environment. Therefore, a detailed fundamental investigation is proposed to better understand the fluid behavior in capillary-porous structures during vaporization at high heat fluxes. The present paper addresses some theoretical aspects of this investigation.

  3. High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, D.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Wold, L.S.

    1994-12-31

    High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of Energy, has been in operation for over 17 years and has provided much of the high heat flux data used in the design and evaluation of plasma facing components for many of the world`s magnetic fusion, tokamak experiments. In addition to domestic tokamaks such as Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, components for international experiments like TEXTOR, Tore-Supra, and JET also have been tested at the PMTF. High heat flux testing spans a wide spectrum including thermal shock tests on passively cooled materials, thermal response and thermal fatigue tests on actively cooled components, critical heat flux-burnout tests, braze reliability tests and safety related tests. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the high heat flux testing capabilities at the PMTF and describe a few of the experiments performed over the last year.

  4. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coating During Interrupted High-Heat Flux Laser Testing Using Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence imaging of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been shown to successfully monitor TBC delamination progression during interrupted furnace cycling. However, furnace cycling does not adequately model engine conditions where TBC-coated components are subjected to significant heat fluxes that produce through-thickness temperature gradients that may alter both the rate and path of delamination progression. Therefore, new measurements are presented based on luminescence imaging of TBC-coated specimens subjected to interrupted high-heat-flux laser cycling exposures that much better simulate the thermal gradients present in engine conditions. The TBCs tested were deposited by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and were composed of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with an integrated delamination sensing layer composed of 7YSZ co-doped with erbium and ytterbium (7YSZ:Er,Yb). The high-heat-flux exposures that produce the desired through-thickness thermal gradients were performed using a high power CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Upconversion luminescence images revealed the debond progression produced by the cyclic high-heat-flux exposures and these results were compared to that observed for furnace cycling.

  5. High heat flux testing of CFC composites for the tokamak physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, P. G.; Nygren, R. E.; Burns, R. W.; Rocket, P. D.; Colleraine, A. P.; Lederich, R. J.; Bradley, J. T.

    1996-10-01

    High heat flux (HHF) testing of carbon fiber reinforced carbon composites (CFC's) was conducted under the General Atomics program to develop plasma-facing components (PFC's) for Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's tokamak physics experiment (TPX). As part of the process of selecting TPX CFC materials, a series of HHF tests were conducted with the 30 kW electron beam test system (EBTS) facility at Sandia National Laboratories, and with the plasma disruption simulator I (PLADIS-I) facility at the University of New Mexico. The purpose of the tests was to make assessments of the thermal performance and erosion behavior of CFC materials. Tests were conducted with 42 different CFC materials. In general, the CFC materials withstood the rapid thermal pulse environments without fracturing, delaminating, or degrading in a non-uniform manner; significant differences in thermal performance, erosion behavior, vapor evolution, etc. were observed and preliminary findings are presented below. The CFC's exposed to the hydrogen plasma pulses in PLADIS-I exhibited greater erosion rates than the CFC materials exposed to the electron-beam pulses in EBTS. The results obtained support the continued consideration of a variety of CFC composites for TPX PFC components.

  6. Modeling of a heat sink and high heat flux vapor chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadnjal, Aleksander

    An increasing demand for a higher heat flux removal capability within a smaller volume for high power electronics led us to focus on a novel cold plate design. A high heat flux evaporator and micro channel heat sink are the main components of a cold plate which is capable of removing couple of 100 W/cm2. In order to describe performance of such porous media device a proper modeling has to be addressed. A universal approach based on the volume average theory (VAT) to transport phenomena in porous media is shown. An approach on how to treat the closure for momentum and energy equations is addressed and a proper definition for friction factors and heat transfer coefficients are discussed. A numerical scheme using a solution to Navier-Stokes equations over a representative elementary volume (REV) and the use of VAT is developed to show how to compute friction factors and heat transfer coefficients. The calculation show good agreement with the experimental data. For the heat transfer coefficient closure, a proper average for both fluid and solid is investigated. Different types of heating are also investigated in order to determine how it influences the heat transfer coefficient. A higher heat fluxes in small area condensers led us to the micro channels in contrast to the classical heat fin design. A micro channel can have various shapes to enhance heat transfer, but the shape that will lead to a higher heat flux removal with a moderate pumping power needs to be determined. The standard micro-channel terminology is usually used for channels with a simple cross section, e.g. square, round, triangle, etc., but here the micro channel cross section is going to be expanded to describe more complicated and interconnected micro scale channel cross sections. The micro channel geometries explored are pin fins (in-line and staggered) and sintered porous micro channels. The problem solved here is a conjugate problem involving two heat transfer mechanisms; (1) porous media

  7. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  8. GRCop-84: A High Temperature Copper-based Alloy For High Heat Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    While designed for rocket engine main combustion chamber liners, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) offers potential for high heat flux applications in industrial applications requiring a temperature capability up to approximately 700 C (1292 F). GRCop-84 is a copper-based alloy with excellent elevated temperature strength, good creep resistance, long LCF lives and enhanced oxidation resistance. It also has a lower thermal expansion than copper and many other low alloy copper-based alloys. GRCop-84 can be manufactured into a variety of shapes such as tubing, bar, plate and sheet using standard production techniques and requires no special production techniques. GRCop-84 forms well, so conventional fabrication methods including stamping and bending can be used. GRCop-84 has demonstrated an ability to be friction stir welded, brazed, inertia welded, diffusion bonded and electron beam welded for joining to itself and other materials. Potential applications include plastic injection molds, resistance welding electrodes and holders, permanent metal casting molds, vacuum plasma spray nozzles and high temperature heat exchanger applications.

  9. High heat flux erosion of carbon fibre composite materials in the TEXTOR tokamak.

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.

    1998-03-10

    During plasma disruptions, ELMs, or vertical displacement events (VDEs) high transient heat loads to the plasma facing materials an cause damage such as thermal erosion, cracking, or melting. Self shielding processes, which take place when a material surface is exposed to a high heat flux from an incident plasma, can lead to a reduction of the deposited energy. Experiments using the fast pneumatic probe of the TEXTOR tokamak were carried out to investigate these effects. The materials tested were carbon fibre reinforced materials with and without Si-addition. The probe with the material specimens was introduced into the edge plasma up to a depth of 9 cm in front of the ALT41 main limiter with a residence time of 80 ms. After the repeated exposure to the TEXTOR-plasma, the material specimens were examined by profilometry and electron microscopy to determine the damage and erosion. It was found that only a very limited zone of the probe tip of about 2.5 mm extension in radial direction showed erosion. The maximum erosion was observed at the very tip of the probe with approx. 30 {micro}m per exposure. The results of the erosion quantification are compared with the results from numerical simulations and from plasma diagnostic measurements during the exposure of the specimens.

  10. High-Heat-Flux Cyclic Durability of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. For the supersonic vehicles currently envisioned in the NASA fundamental aeronautics program, advanced gas turbine engines will be used to provide high power density thrust during the extended supersonic flight of the aircraft, while meeting stringent low emission requirements. Advanced ceramic coating systems are critical to the performance, life and durability of the hot-section components of the engine systems. In this work, the laser and burner rig based high-heat-flux testing approaches were developed to investigate the coating cyclic response and failure mechanisms under simulated supersonic long-duration cruise mission. The accelerated coating cracking and delamination mechanism under the engine high-heat-flux, and extended supersonic cruise time conditions will be addressed. A coating life prediction framework may be realized by examining the crack initiation and propagation in conjunction with environmental degradation under high-heat-flux test conditions.

  11. Nonlinear aspects of high heat flux nucleate boiling heat transfer. Part 1, Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

    1994-04-01

    This paper outlines the essential details of the formulation and numerical implementation of a model used to study nonlinear aspects of the macrolayer-controlled heat transfer process associated with high heat flux nucleate boiling and the critical heat flux. The model addresses the three-dimensional transient conduction heat transfer process within the problem domain comprised of the macrolayer and heater. Heat dissipation from the heater is modeled as the sum of transient transport into the macrolayer, and the heat loss resulting from evaporation of menisci associated with vapor stems.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Characterization of High Heat Fluxes During Transient Blackbody Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.; Horn, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    High heat fluxes are encountered in numerous applications, such as hypersonic vehicles in flight, fires, and engines, Calibration of heat flux gages may be performed in a dual cavity cylindrical blackbody resulting in a transient calibration environment. To characterize the transient heat fluxes. experiments were performed on a dual cavity cylindrical blackbody at nominal temperatures varying from 800 C to 1900 C in increments of 100 C. Based on experiments, the optimum heat flux sensor insertion location as measured from the center partition was determined. The pre-insertion steady state axial temperature profile is compared experimentally, numerically, and analytically. The effect of convection in the blackbody cavity during the insertion is calculated and found to be less than 2 per cent. Also, an empirical correlation for predicting the emissivity of the blackbody is included. Detailed transient thermal models have been developed to simulate the heat flux calibration process at two extreme fluxes. The high (1MW/sq m) and relatively low (70 kw/sq m) fluxes are reported in this article. The transient models show the effect of inserting a heat flux gage at room temperature on the thermal equilibrium of the blackbody at 1800 C and 800 C nominal temperatures, respectively. Also, heat flux sensor outputs are derived from computed sensor temperature distributions and compared to experimental results.

  13. High heat flux testing of 12-14Cr ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintsuk, G.; Oksiuta, Z.; Linke, J.; Baluc, N.

    2010-01-01

    The thermal performance of Fe-(12-14)Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ODS reduced activation ferritic steels, which are considered as candidate first wall materials for the future fusion power reactors and were manufactured by mechanical alloying in hydrogen and hot isostatic pressing, was assessed by high heat flux (HHF) testing with the electron beam JUDITH facility at the Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ), Germany. An analysis of the microhardness and microstructure of the specimens was done before and after HHF tests. In general, both materials present a ferritic (α-Fe, bcc) microstructure with a wide range of grain sizes from 100 to 500 nm up to a few micrometers. The coarse grains are almost dislocation-free, while the smaller ones are surrounded by tangles of dislocations. Oxide and carbide impurities (about a few hundreds nm in size) and a high density of Y-Ti-O nano-clusters, with a mean size of about 5 nm, are also present. The microhardness, density and tensile strength of the 14Cr material are slightly larger than those of the 12Cr material. HHF tests revealed that there is no difference in thermal performance, level of degradation and erosion behaviour of 12Cr and 14Cr ODS steels. The onset of melting of the materials occurs for an energy density between 1 and 1.5 MJ/m 2. Below this value only some kind of thermal etching takes place. This is a significant improvement compared to stainless steel, for which severe plastic deformation at the material surface was observed.

  14. Failure analysis of beryllium tile assembles following high heat flux testing for the ITER program

    SciTech Connect

    B. C. Odegard, Jr.; C. H. Cadden; N. Y. C. Yang

    2000-05-01

    The following document describes the processing, testing and post-test analysis of two Be-Cu assemblies that have successfully met the heat load requirements for the first wall and dome sections for the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) fusion reactor. Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology investigation aimed at diffusion bonding or brazing a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Judicious selection of materials and coatings for these assemblies was essential to eliminate or minimize interactions with the highly reactive beryllium armor material. A thin titanium layer was used as a diffusion barrier to isolate the copper heat sink from the beryllium armor. To reduce residual stresses produced by differences in the expansion coefficients between the beryllium and copper, a compliant layer of aluminum or aluminum-beryllium (AlBeMet-150) was used. Aluminum was chosen because it does not chemically react with, and exhibits limited volubility in, beryllium. Two bonding processes were used to produce the assemblies. The primary process was a diffusion bonding technique. In this case, undesirable metallurgical reactions were minimized by keeping the materials in a solid state throughout the fabrication cycle. The other process employed an aluminum-silicon layer as a brazing filler material. In both cases, a hot isostatic press (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with vacuum-canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and provide sufficient pressure on the assemblies for full metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. The two final assemblies were subjected to a suite of tests including: tensile tests and electron and optical metallography. Finally, high heat flux testing was conducted at the electron beam testing system (EBTS) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. Here, test mockups were fabricated and subjected to normal heat loads to

  15. Experimental study of thermal crisis in connection with Tokamak reactor high heat flux components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, D.; Giardina, M.; Castiglia, F.; Celata, G. P.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G.; Cumo, M.

    2000-04-01

    The results of an experimental research on high heat flux thermal crisis in forced convective subcooled water flow, under operative conditions of interest to the thermal-hydraulic design of TOKAMAK fusion reactors, are here reported. These experiments, carried out in the framework of a collaboration between the Nuclear Engineering Department of Palermo University and the National Institute of Thermal - Fluid Dynamics of the ENEA - Casaccia (Rome), were performed on the STAF (Scambio Termico Alti Flussi) water loop and consisted, essentially, in a high speed photographic study which enabled focusing several information on bubble characteristics and flow patterns taking place during the burnout phenomenology.

  16. High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.; Yang, L.; Xu, Z.

    2004-08-01

    High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on carbon substrates have been studied by annealing and cyclic heat loading. The recrystallization temperature and an activation energy QR=126 kJ/mol for grain growth of tungsten coating by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) were estimated, and the microstructural changes of multi-layer tungsten and rhenium interface pre-deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) with anneal temperature were investigated. Cyclic load tests indicated that pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating could withstand 1000 cycles at 33-35 MW/m 2 heat flux and 3 s pulse duration, and inert gas plasma spray (IPS)-tungsten coating showed local cracks by 300 cycles but did not induce failure by further cycles. However, the failure of pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating by fatigue cracking was observed under higher heat load (55-60 MW/m 2) for 420 and 230 cycles, respectively.

  17. Manufacturing and High Heat Flux Testing of Brazed Flat-Type W/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Feng, Fan; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zhengkui; Wang, Jin; Chen, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Water-cooled flat-type W/CuCrZr plasma facing components with an interlayer of oxygen-free copper (OFC) have been developed by using vacuum brazing route. The OFC layer for the accommodation of thermal stresses was cast onto the surface of W at a temperature range of 1150 °C-1200 °C in a vacuum furnace. The W/OFC cast tiles were vacuum brazed to a CuCrZr heat sink at 940 °C using the silver-free filler material CuMnSiCr. The microstructure, bonding strength, and high heat flux properties of the brazed W/CuCrZr joint samples were investigated. The W/Cu joint exhibits an average tensile strength of 134 MPa, which is about the same strength as pure annealed copper. High heat flux tests were performed in the electron beam facility EMS-60. Experimental results indicated that the brazed W/CuCrZr mock-up experienced screening tests of up to 15 MW/m2 and cyclic tests of 9 MW/m2 for 1000 cycles without visible damage. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205049) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2011GB110004)

  18. Diamond Microchannel Heat Sink Designs For High Heat Flux Thermal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael V.; DeBenedictis, Matthew M.; James, David B.; LeBlanc, Stephen P.; Paradis, Leo R.

    2002-08-01

    Directed energy weapons, wide band gap semiconductor based radars, and other powerful systems present significant thermal control challenges to component designers. heat Flux levels approaching 2000 W/cm(2) are encountered at the base of laser diodes, and levels as high as 500 WI /cm(2) are expected in laser slabs and power amplifier tube collectors. These impressive heat flux levels frequently combine with strict operating temperature requirements to further compound the thermal control problem. Many investigators have suggested the use of diamond heat spreaders to reduce flux levels at or near to its source, and some have suggested that diamond microchannel heat sinks ultimately may play a significant role in the solution of these problems. Design engineers at Raytheon Company have investigated the application of all-diamond microchannel heat sinks to representative high heat flux problems and have found the approach promising. Diamond microchannel fabrication feasibility has been demonstrated; integration into packaging systems and the accompanying material compatibility issues have been addressed; and thermal and hydrodynamic performance predictions have been made for selected, possible applications. An example of a practical, all diamond microchannel heat sink has been fabricated, and another is in process and will be performance tested. The heat sink assembly is made entirely of optical quality, CVD diamond and is of sufficient strength to withstand the thermal and pressure-induced mechanical loads associated with manufacture and use in tactical weapons environment. The work presented describes the development program's accomplishments to date, and highlights many of the areas for future study.

  19. Hypersonic engine component experiments in high heat flux, supersonic flow environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1993-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Even though progress has been made in the computational understanding of fluid dynamics and the physics/chemistry of high speed flight, there is also a need for experimental facilities capable of providing a high heat flux environment for testing component concepts and verifying/calibrating these analyses. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to fulfill this need. This 'Hot Gas Facility' is capable of providing heat fluxes up to 450 w/sq cm on flat surfaces and up to 5,000 w/sq cm at the leading edge stagnation point of a strut in a supersonic flow stream. Gas temperatures up to 3050 K can also be attained. Two recent experimental programs conducted in this facility are discussed. The objective of the first experiment is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Macrophotographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight. The objective of the second experiment is to assess the capability of cooling a porous surface exposed to a high temperature, high velocity flow environment and to provide a heat transfer data base for a design procedure. Experimental results from transpiration cooled surfaces in a supersonic flow environment are presented.

  20. Erosion and Modifications of Tungsten-Coated Carbon and Copper Under High Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; S, Tamura; K, Tokunaga; N, Yoshida; Zhang, Fu; Xu, Zeng-yu; Ge, Chang-chun; N, Noda

    2003-08-01

    Tungsten-coated carbon and copper was prepared by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) and inert gas plasma spraying (IPS), respectively. W/CFC (Tungsten/Carbon Fiber-Enhanced material) coating has a diffusion barrier that consists of W and Re multi-layers pre-deposited by physical vapor deposition on carbon fiber-enhanced materials, while W/Cu coating has a graded transition interface. Different grain growth processes of tungsten coatings under stable and transient heat loads were observed, their experimental results indicated that the recrystallizing temperature of VPS-W coating was about 1400 °C and a recrystallized columnar layer of about 30 μm thickness was formed by cyclic heat loads of 4 ms pulse duration. Erosion and modifications of W/CFC and W/Cu coatings under high heat load, such as microstructure changes of interface, surface plastic deformations and cracks, were investigated, and the erosion mechanism (erosion products) of these two kinds of tungsten coatings under high heat flux was also studied.

  1. Development of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings Using a High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, high temperature capability thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity, which initially rises under the steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and later drops under the cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on damage accumulation and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The external radiation resistance of the coating is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser- heated intense radiation-flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature may be derived.

  2. Approaching the limits of two-phase boiling heat transfer: High heat flux and low superheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palko, J. W.; Zhang, C.; Wilbur, J. D.; Dusseault, T. J.; Asheghi, M.; Goodson, K. E.; Santiago, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate capillary fed porous copper structures capable of dissipating over 1200 W cm-2 in boiling with water as the working fluid. Demonstrated superheats for this structure are dramatically lower than those previously reported at these high heat fluxes and are extremely insensitive to heat input. We show superheats of less than 10 K at maximum dissipation and varying less than 5 K over input heat flux ranges of 1000 W cm-2. Fabrication of the porous copper layers using electrodeposition around a sacrificial template allows fine control of both microstructure and bulk geometry, producing structures less than 40 μm thick with active region lateral dimensions of 2 mm × 0.3 mm. The active region is volumetrically Joule heated by passing an electric current through the porous copper bulk material. We analyze the heat transfer performance of the structures and suggest a strong influence of pore size on superheat. We compare performance of the current structure to existing wick structures.

  3. Oxidation and Volatilization from Tungsten Brush High Heat Flux Armor During High Temperature Steam Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Petti, David Andrew

    2000-05-01

    Tungsten brush accommodates thermal stresses and high heat flux in fusion reactor components such as plasma facing surfaces or armor. However, inherently higher surface areas are introduced with the brush design. We have tested a specific design of tungsten brush in steam between 500 and 1100°C. Hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization rates were determined to address fusion safety issues. The brush prepared from 3.2-mm diameter welding rods had a packing density of 85 percent. We found that both hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush, fixtured to represent a unit within a larger component, were less than projections based upon the total integrated surface area (TSA). Steam access and the escape of hydrogen and volatile oxide from void spaces within the brush are restricted compared to specimens with more direct diffusion pathways to the test environment. Hydrogen generation rates from restrained specimens based on normal surface area (NSA) remain about five times higher than rates based on total surface areas from specimens with direct steam access. Volatilization rates from restrained specimens based upon normal surface area (NSA) were only 50 percent higher than our historic cumulative maximum flux plot (CMFP) for tungsten. This study has shown that hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush do not scale according to predictions with previously determined rates, but in fact, with higher packing density could approach those from flat surfaces.

  4. Scrape-off layer modeling of radiative divertor and high heat flux experiments on D3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, R. B.; Petrie, T. W.; Hill, D. N.

    1992-03-01

    We use a new multispecies 1-D fluid code, NEWT-1D, to model DIII-D scrape-off layer (SOL) behavior during radiative divertor and high heat flux experiments. The separatrix location and the width of the SOL are uncertain, and affect the comparison of the data in important ways. The model agrees with many of the experimental measurements for a particular prescription for the separatrix location. The model cannot explain the recent data on the separatrix T(sub i) with a conventional picture of ion and electron power flows across the separatrix. Radial transport of particles and heat in some form is required to explain the peak heat flux data before and after gas puffing. For argon puffing in the private flux region, entrainment is poor in the steady state. The calculations suggest that strike point argon puffing in a slot divertor geometry results in substantially better entrainment. Self-consistent, steady-state solutions with radiated powers up to 80 percent of the SOL power input are obtained in 1-D. We discuss significant radial effects which warrant the development of a code which can treat strongly radiating impurities in 2-D geometries.

  5. Scrape-off layer modeling of radiative divertor and high heat flux experiments on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, R. B.; Petrie, T. W.; Hill, D. N.

    1992-12-01

    We use a new multispecies 1D fluid code, NEWT-ID, to model DIII-D scrape-off layer (SOL) behavior during radiative divertor and high heat flux experiments. The separatrix location and the width of the SOL are uncertain, and affect the comparison of the data in important ways. The model agrees with many of the experimental measurements for a particular prescription for the separatrix location. The model cannot explain the recent data on the separatrix Ti with a conventional picture of ion and electron power flows across the separatrix. Radial transport of particles and heat in some form is required to explain the peak heat flux data before and after gas puffing. For argon puffing in the private flux region, entrainment is poor in the steady state. The calculations suggest that strike point argon puffing in a slot divertor geometry results in substantially better entrainment. Self-consistent, steady-state solutions with radiated powers up to 80% of the SOL power input are obtained in 1D. We discuss significant radial effects which warrant the development of a code which can treat strongly radiating impurities in 2D geometries.

  6. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  7. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  8. Microsample Characterization of Coatings for Grcop-84 for High Heat Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemker, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    A multidisciplinary Johns Hopkins University-NASA Glenn team is undertaking a collaborative research program to elucidate and model the thermal stability and mechanical integrity of candidate coatings for GRCop-84. GRCop-84 is a high conductivity, high strength copper alloy that was recently developed at NASA Glenn for use in high temperature, high heat flux applications. With potential applications in rocket motor combustion chamber liners, nozzle ramps and other actively cooled structures, this new material offers great potential for decreasing weight and increasing reliability of third generation reusable launch vehicles. Current emphasis has turned toward the development of environmentally resistant and thermal barrier coatings for this alloy. Metallic coatings such as NiCrAlY and Cu-8-30%Cr have shown promise in: prohibiting blanching, reducing dog-house failures, increasing operating temperatures and decreasing cooling requirements. The focus of this research program is to develop a fundamental understanding of the substrate-coating interactions that occur during thermal cycling (inter-diffusion, viscoplasticity, morphological evolution, crack formation, etc.) and to derive a science-based protocol for future coating selection, optimization and reliability assurance. The microsample tensile testing approach adopted for this study allows us to characterize small-scale and highly scale-specific coatings and properties in a way not possible by conventional means. In addition to providing much needed design data, the integration of microsample testing with detailed microstructural observations provides a mechanistic foundation for coating optimization and life prediction modeling.

  9. High Heat Flux Interactions and Tritium Removal from Plasma Facing Components by a Scanning Laser

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein

    2002-01-28

    A new technique for studying high heat flux interactions with plasma facing components is presented. The beam from a continuous wave 300 W neodymium laser was focused to 80 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the surface of carbon tiles. These tiles were previously used in the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] inner limiter and have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was codeposited during plasma operations. Laser scanning released up to 84% of the codeposited tritium. The temperature rise of the codeposit on the tiles was significantly higher than that of the manufactured material. In one experiment, the codeposit surface temperature rose to 1,770 C while for the same conditions, the manufactured surface increased to only 1,080 C. The peak temperature did not follow the usual square-root dependence on heat pulse duration. Durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, while a duration of approximately 10 ms showed minimal change. A digital microscope imaged the codeposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed hot spots on a 100-micron scale. These results will be compared to analytic modeling and are relevant to the response of plasma facing components to disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) in next-step magnetic fusion devices.

  10. Manufacturing and thermomechanical testing of actively cooled all beryllium high heat flux test pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, N.N.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Shatalov, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    One of the problems affiliated to ITER high heat flux elements development is a problem of interface of beryllium protection with heat sink routinely made of copper alloys. To get rid of this problem all beryllium elements could be used as heat receivers in places of enhanced thermal loads. In accordance with this objectives four beryllium test pieces of two types have been manufactured in {open_quotes}Institute of Beryllium{close_quotes} for succeeding thermomechanical testing. Two of them were manufactured in accordance with JET team design; they are round {open_quotes}hypervapotron type{close_quotes} test pieces. Another two ones are rectangular test sections with a twisted tape installed inside of the circular channel. Preliminary stress-strain analysis have been performed for both type of the test pieces. Hypervapotrons have been shipped to JET where they were tested on JET test bed. Thermomechanical testing of pieces of the type of {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} have been performed on Kurchatov Institute test bed. Chosen beryllium grade properties, some details of manufacturing, results of preliminary stress-strain analysis and thermomechanical testing of the test pieces {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} type are given in this report.

  11. Thermal conductivity and elastic modulus evolution of thermal barrier coatings under high heat flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-06-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may be encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser-simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8% Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m K to 1.15, 1.19, and 1.5 W/m K after 30 h of testing at surface temperatures of 990, 1100, and 1320 °C, respectively, Hardness and elastic modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and microindentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 h of testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced microporosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various TBC applications.

  12. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  13. Thermal Cyclic Behavior of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings Investigated Under High-Heat-Flux Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBC's) have been developed to protect silicon-carbide- (SiC) based ceramic components in gas turbine engines from high-temperature environmental attack. With continuously increasing demands for significantly higher engine operating temperature, future EBC systems must be designed for both thermal and environmental protection of the engine components in combustion gases. In particular, the thermal barrier functions of EBC's become a necessity for reducing the engine-component thermal loads and chemical reaction rates, thus maintaining the required mechanical properties and durability of these components. Advances in the development of thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TBC's and EBC's, respectively) will directly impact the successful use of ceramic components in advanced engines. To develop high-performance coating systems, researchers must establish advanced test approaches. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux technique was employed to investigate the thermal cyclic behavior of TBC's and EBC's on SiC-reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composite substrates (SiC/SiC) under high thermal gradient and thermal cycling conditions. Because the laser heat flux test approach can monitor the coating's real-time thermal conductivity variations at high temperature, the coating thermal insulation performance, sintering, and delamination can all be obtained during thermal cycling tests. Plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3) thermal barrier and barium strontium aluminosilicate-based environmental barrier coatings (BSAS/BSAS+mullite/Si) on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites were investigated in this study. These coatings were laser tested in air under thermal gradients (the surface and interface temperatures were approximately 1482 and 1300 C, respectively). Some coating specimens were also subject to alternating furnace cycling (in a 90-percent water vapor environment at 1300 C) and laser thermal gradient cycling tests

  14. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, R.T.; Yamashina, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  15. Development of a high-heat-flux target for multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beams at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Bush, C.E.; Foster, C.A.; Haselton, H.H.; Hayes, P.H.; Menon, M.M.; Moeller, J.A.; Sluss, F.; Tsai, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A high-heat-flux target has been developed for intercepting multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beam power at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Water-cooled copper swirl tubes are used for the heat transfer medium; these tubes exhibit an enhancement in burnout heat flux over conventional axial-flow tubes. The target consists of 126 swirl tubes (each 0.95 cm in outside diameter with 0.16-cm-thick walls and approx. =1 m long) arranged in a V-shape. Two arrays of parallel tubes inclined at an angle ..cap alpha.. to the beam axis form the V-shape, and this geometry reduces the surface heat flux by a factor of 1/sin ..cap alpha.. (for the present design, ..cap alpha.. =13/sup 0/ and 21/sup 0/). In tests with the ORNL long-pulse ion source (13- by 43-cm grid), the target has handled up to 3-MW, 30-s beam pulses with no deleterious effects. The peak power density was estimated at approx. =15 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (5.4 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces). The water flow rate through the target was 41.6 L/s (660 gpm) or 0.33 L/s (5.2 gpm) per tube (axial flow velocity = 11.6 m/s). The corresponding pressure drop across the target was 1.14 MPa (165 psi) with an inlet pressure of 1.45 MPa (210 psia). Data are also presented from backup experiments in which individual tubes were heated by a small ion source (10-cm-diam grid) to characterize tube performance. These results suggest that the target should handle peak power densities in the range 25 to 30 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (approx. =10 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces) with the present flow parameters. This translates to beam power levels of 5 to 6 MW for equivalent beam optics.

  16. Helium-cooled divertor for DEMO: Manufacture and high heat flux tests of tungsten-based mock-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norajitra, P.; Gervash, A.; Giniyatulin, R.; Hirai, T.; Janeschitz, G.; Krauss, W.; Kuznetsov, V.; Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Ovchinnikov, I.; Reiser, J.; Widak, V.

    2009-04-01

    A helium-cooled divertor concept for DEMO has been investigated extensively at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe under the EU power plant conceptual study, the goal being to demonstrate performance under heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 at least. Work covers different areas ranging from conceptual design to analysis, materials and fabrication issues to experiments. Meanwhile, the He-cooled modular divertor concept with jet cooling (HEMJ) has been proposed as reference design. In cooperation with the Efremov Institute, manufacture and high heat flux testing of divertor elements was performed for design verification and proof-of-principle. This paper focuses on the technological study of the fabrication of mock-ups from W/W alloy and Eurofer steel supporting structure material. The high heat flux test results of 2006 and 2007 are summarised and discussed.

  17. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coatings During Interrupted High-Heat-Flux Laser Testing using Luminescence Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation showed progress made in extending luminescence-base delamination monitoring to TBCs exposed to high heat fluxes, which is an environment that much better simulates actual turbine engine conditions. This was done by performing upconversion luminescence imaging during interruptions in laser testing, where a high-power CO2 laser was employed to create the desired heat flux. Upconverison luminescence refers to luminescence where the emission is at a higher energy (shorter wavelength) than the excitation. Since there will be negligible background emission at higher energies than the excitation, this methods produces superb contrast. Delamination contrast is produced because both the excitation and emission wavelengths are reflected at delamination cracks so that substantially higher luminescence intensity is observed in regions containing delamination cracks. Erbium was selected as the dopant for luminescence specifically because it exhibits upconversion luminescence. The high power CO2 10.6 micron wavelength laser facility at NASA GRC was used to produce the heat flux in combination with forced air backside cooling. Testing was performed at a lower (95 W/sq cm) and higher (125 W/sq cm) heat flux as well as furnace cycling at 1163C for comparison. The lower heat flux showed the same general behavior as furnace cycling, a gradual, "spotty" increase in luminescence associated with debond progression; however, a significant difference was a pronounced incubation period followed by acceleration delamination progression. These results indicate that extrapolating behavior from furnace cycling measurements will grossly overestimate remaining life under high heat flux conditions. The higher heat flux results were not only accelerated, but much different in character. Extreme bond coat rumpling occurred, and delamination propagation extended over much larger areas before precipitating macroscopic TBC failure. This indicates that under the higher heat flux (and

  18. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  19. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume III. Strategy for international collaborations in the areas of plasma materials interactions and high heat flux materials and components development

    SciTech Connect

    Gauster, W.B.; Bauer, W.; Roberto, J.B.; Post, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this summary is to assess opportunities for such collaborations in the specific areas of Plasma Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Development, and to aid in developing a strategy to take advantage of them. After some general discussion of international collaborations, we summarize key technical issues and the US programs to address them. Then follows a summary of present collaborations and potential opportunities in foreign laboratories.

  20. Particulate generation during disruption simulation on the SIRENS high heat flux facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, John Phillip

    2000-12-01

    Successful implementation of advanced electrical power generation technology into the global marketplace requires at least two fundamental ideals: cost effectiveness and the guarantee of public safety. One general area of concern for fusion devices is the production of particulate, often referred to as dust or aerosol, from material exposed to high energy density fusion plasma. This dust may be radiologically activated and/or chemically toxic, and, if released to the environment, could become a hazard to the public. The goal of this investigation was to provide insight into the production and transport of particulate generated during the event of extreme heat loads to surfaces directly exposed to high energy density plasma. A step towards achieving this goal was an experiment campaign carried out with the S&barbelow;urface I&barbelow;nteṞaction E&barbelow;xperiment at Ṉorth Carolina S&barbelow;tate (SIRENS), a facility used for high heat flux experiments. These experiments involved exposing various materials, including copper, stainless steel 316, tungsten, aluminum, graphite (carbon), and mixtures of carbon and metals, to the high energy density plasma of the SIRENS source section. Comparison of simulation results with experiment observations provides an understanding of the physical mechanisms forming the particulate and indicates if mechanisms other than those in the model were present in the experiment. Key results from this comparison were: the predicted amount of mass mobilized from the source section was generally much lower than that measured, the calculated and measured particle count median diameters were similar at various locations in the expansion chamber, and the measured standard deviations were larger than those predicted by the model. These results implicate that other mechanisms (e.g., mobilization of melted material) in addition to ablation were responsible for mass removal in the source section, a large number of the measured particles were

  1. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  2. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1993-01-28

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond monochromator system. In this paper, we consider various aspects, advantages and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative performance of a diamond monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of a diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means.

  3. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1992-12-01

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond mollochromator system. In this Paper, we consider various aspects, advantage and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative an monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means.

  4. Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C; Snead, Lance Lewis; Schaich, Charles Ross

    2014-01-01

    A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

  5. Facility for high-heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C.; Snead, Lance L.; Schaich, Charles R.

    2014-04-01

    A new high-heat flux testing (HHFT) facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon plasma arc lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can accommodate irradiated plasma facing component materials and sub-size mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW m-2, which are prototypic of fusion steady state heat flux conditions, over a heated area of 9 × 12 and 1 × 10 cm2, respectively. The use of PAL permits the heat source to be environmentally separated from the components of the test chamber, simplifying the design to accommodate safe testing of low-level irradiated articles and materials under high-heat flux. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing of tungsten samples are presented and discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this photon-based HHFT facility are compared to existing e-beam and particle beam facilities used for similar purposes.

  6. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.L.

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  7. High-heat-flux testing of irradiated tungsten-based materials for fusion applications using infrared plasma arc lamps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Schaich, Charles R.; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak S.

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design andmore » implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36×36×18 cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.« less

  8. High-heat-flux testing of irradiated tungsten-based materials for fusion applications using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Schaich, Charles R.; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak S.

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design and implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36×36×18 cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.

  9. Thermal Control Utilizing an Thermal Control Utilizing an Two-Phase Loop with High Heat Flux Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Seong-Il; Didion, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    The electric field applied in dielectric fluids causes an imbalance in the dissociation-recombination reaction generated free space charges. The generated charges are redistributed by the applied electric field resulting in the heterocharge layers in the Vicinity of the electrodes. Proper design of the electrodes generates net axial flow motion pumping the fluid. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) conduction pump is a new device that pumps dielectric fluids utilizing heterocharge layers formed by imposition of electrostatic fields. This paper evaluates the experimental performance of a two-phase breadboard thermal control loop consisting of an EHD conduction pump, condenser, pre-heater, high heat flux evaporator (HE), transport lines, and reservoir (accumulator). The generated pressure head and the maximum applicable heat flux are experimentally determined at various applied voltages and sink temperatures. Recovery from dryout condition by increasing the applied voltage to the pump is also demonstrated.

  10. Pool boiling with high heat flux enabled by a porous artery structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lizhan; Zhang, Lianpei; Lin, Guiping; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-06-01

    A porous artery structure utilizing the concept of "phase separation and modulation" is proposed to enhance the critical heat flux of pool boiling. A series of experiments were conducted on a range of test articles in which multiple rectangular arteries were machined directly into the top surface of a 10.0 mm diameter copper rod. The arteries were then covered by a 2.0 mm thickness microporous copper plate through silver brazing. The pool wall was fabricated from transparent Pyrex glass to allow a visualization study, and water was used as the working fluid. Experimental results confirmed that the porous artery structure provided individual flow paths for the liquid supply and vapor venting, and avoided the detrimental effects of the liquid/vapor counter flow. As a result, a maximum heat flux of 610 W/cm2 over a heating area of 0.78 cm2 was achieved with no indication of dryout, prior to reaching the heater design temperature limit. Following the experimental tests, the mechanisms responsible for the boiling critical heat flux and performance enhancement of the porous artery structure were analyzed.

  11. Investigation of Instabilities and Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Fuels at High Heat Flux and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.; Meyer, Michael L.; Braun, Donald C.; Keller, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    A series of heated tube experiments was performed to investigate fluid instabilities that occur during heating of supercritical fluids. In these tests, JP-7 flowed vertically through small diameter tubes at supercritical pressures. Test section heated length, diameter, mass flow rate, inlet temperature, and heat flux were varied in an effort to determine the range of conditions that trigger the instabilities. Heat flux was varied up to 4 BTU/sq in./s, and test section wall temperatures reached as high as 1950 F. A statistical model was generated to explain the trends and effects of the control variables. The model included no direct linear effect of heat flux on the occurrence of the instabilities. All terms involving inlet temperature were negative, and all terms involving mass flow rate were positive. Multiple tests at conditions that produced instabilities provided inconsistent results. These inconsistencies limit the use of the model as a predictive tool. Physical variables that had been previously postulated to control the onset of the instabilities, such as film temperature, velocity, buoyancy, and wall-to-bulk temperature ratio, were evaluated here. Film temperatures at or near critical occurred during both stable and unstable tests. All tests at the highest velocity were stable, but there was no functional relationship found between the instabilities and velocity, or a combination of velocity and temperature ratio. Finally, all of the unstable tests had significant buoyancy at the inlet of the test section, but many stable tests also had significant buoyancy forces.

  12. High heat flux x-ray monochromators: What are the limits?

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.

    1997-06-01

    First optical elements at third-generation, hard x-ray synchrotrons, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), are subjected to immense heat fluxes. The optical elements include crystal monochromators, multilayers and mirrors. This paper presents a mathematical model of the thermal strain of a three-layer (faceplate, heat exchanger, and baseplate), cylindrical optic subjected to narrow beam of uniform heat flux. This model is used to calculate the strain gradient of a liquid-gallium-cooled x-ray monochromator previously tested on an undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). The resulting thermally broadened rocking curves are calculated and compared to experimental data. The calculated rocking curve widths agree to within a few percent of the measured values over the entire current range tested (0 to 60 mA). The thermal strain gradient under the beam footprint varies linearly with the heat flux and the ratio of the thermal expansion coefficient to the thermal conductivity. The strain gradient is insensitive to the heat exchanger properties and the optic geometry. This formulation provides direct insight into the governing parameters, greatly reduces the analysis time, and provides a measure of the ultimate performance of a given monochromator.

  13. First operation of a high-heat flux, flush mounted ``rail'' Langmuir probe array on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Adam Q.; Brunner, Dan; Labombard, Brian; Leccacorvi, Rick; Vieira, Rui

    2015-11-01

    Divertor Langmuir probes are typically built proud of the divertor surface for an accurate measurement of the plasma flux. However, under the high heat flux conditions seen in Alcator C-Mod, proud tungsten probes that present a 10 degree attack angle to the incident heat flux can experience melt damage with less then 1 second plasma exposure time. A similar situation is anticipated for ITER. It is therefore desirable to develop a flush probe system that can both survive reactor-level fluxes and take accurate measurements. A poloidal array of 21 flush-mounted ``rail'' probes have been installed in the C-Mod outer divertor plate, which are toroidally-extended and field-aligned to minimize sheath expansion effects. Initial results indicate that the ``rail'' probes have a well-defined ion saturation current, reporting similar density and temperature measurements as proud probes. However, uncertainty in the projected area becomes significant when the incident magnetic field angle becomes less than ~0.5 degrees. Additionally, because the flush probes are conformal to the divertor surface, they are ideally suited to measure the poloidal distribution of halo currents during disruptions. Supported by USDoE C-Mod award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  14. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume II. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in high heat flux materials and component development

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Easor, J.R.; Gauster, W.B.; Gordon, J.D.; Mattas, R.F.; Morgan, G.D.; Ulrickson, M.A,; Watson, R.D.; Wolfer, W.G,

    1984-06-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas for high heat flux materials and components (HHFMC) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be of critical importance for the successful operation of near-term fusion experiments and for the feasibility and attractiveness of long-term fusion reactors. A number of subgroups were formed to assess the critical HHFMC issues along the following major lines: (1) source conditions, (2) systems integration, (3) materials and processes, (4) thermal hydraulics, (5) thermomechanical response, (6) electromagnetic response, (7) instrumentation and control, and (8) test facilities. The details of the technical assessment are presented in eight chapters. The primary technical issues and needs for each area are highlighted.

  15. Flash boiling from carbon foams for high-heat-flux transient cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engerer, J. D.; Fisher, T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Flash boiling of a liquid pool results in an event characterized by rapid phase change and, as a result, high rates of expansion and cooling. Because of the potential advantages of such characteristics for convective heat transfer, flash boiling is considered here for the purpose of cooling transient heat loads. The event has the positive characteristics mentioned as well as rapid response (˜10 ms) and high initial rates of phase change, and then quickly decays to a steady-state regime analogous to pool boiling. The performance of the cooling mechanism is evaluated using an objective function derived from the effect of temperature on the efficiency of optical transmission in a diode-pumped solid-state laser. Statistical surrogate models based on the experimental results are used to predict optimal run conditions. Experiments using these predicted parameters show that flash boiling can maintain device temperature to within ±6.1 °C through a pulsed 5 s heat flux of 68 W cm-2 and to within ±1.4 °C for a heat flux of 39 W cm-2.

  16. High heat flux Langmuir probe array for the DIII-D divertor platesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. G.; Taussig, D.; Boivin, R. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Nygren, R. E.

    2008-10-01

    Two modular arrays of Langmuir probes designed to handle a heat flux of up to 25 MW/m2 for 10 s exposures have been installed in the lower divertor target plates of the DIII-D tokamak. The 20 pyrolytic graphite probe tips have more than three times higher thermal conductivity and 16 times larger mass than the original DIII-D isotropic graphite probes. The probe tips have a fixed 12.5° surface angle to distribute the heat flux more uniformly than the previous 6 mm diameter domed collectors and a symmetric "rooftop" design to allow operation with reversed toroidal magnetic field. A large spring-loaded contact area improves heat conduction from each probe tip through a ceramic insulator into a cooled graphite divertor floor tile. The probe tips, brazed to molybdenum foil to ensure good electrical contact, are mounted in a ceramic tray for electrical isolation and reliable cable connections. The new probes are located 1.5 cm radially apart in a staggered arrangement near the entrance to the lower divertor pumping baffle and are linearly spaced 3 cm apart on the shelf above the in-vessel cryopump. Typical target plate profiles of Jsat, Te, and Vf with 4 mm spatial resolution are shown.

  17. Development of micro-engineered textured tungsten surfaces for high heat flux applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafat, Shahram; Aoyama, Aaron; Williams, Brian; Ghoniem, Nasr

    2013-11-01

    Surface micro-engineering can enhance the thermo-mechanical performance of plasma facing components (PFCs). For example, castellation of a surface can reduce thermal stress due to high heat loads and thus provide higher thermo-mechanical resilience. Recently, fabrication of a variety of micro-sized refractory dendrites with reproducible geometric characteristics (e.g., density, length, height, and aspect ratio) has been demonstrated. In contrast to flat surfaces exposed to high heat loads, dendrites deform independently to minimize near-surface thermal stress, which results in improved thermo-mechanical performance. Thus, the use of dendrites offers a unique micro-engineering approach to enhance the performance of PFC structures. A brief overview of W, Re, and Mo dendritic structures is given along with micrographs that show dendrite-coated surfaces. The thermal responses of representative dendrite structures are analyzed as a function of aspect ratios and dendrite geometry. The heat-management capability of needle-like dendrites exposed to a surface energy of up to 1 MJ/m2 is analyzed and compared to a flat surface. It is concluded that dendrite structures can significantly reduce thermal stress in the substrate when compared to flat surfaces. Implications of dendritic surfaces on sputter erosion rates are also discussed briefly. Higher heat load capability, due to increased surface area and quasi-volumetric heat deposition instead of purely surface loading. Reduced potential for crack initiation, due to the presence of the dendrites, which absorb most of the heat and then conduct it to the substrate. In effect, the dendritic surface is the ultimate in "castellated" (tiled) surfaces, which reduce thermal stresses and thus cracking. Reduced subsurface implantation depth of high-energy helium. A high aspect ratio (height/diameter) dendrite has very shallow ion impingement angles along the sides, which results in a significant reduction in the depth of penetration of

  18. Hybrid Heat Pipes for Lunar and Martian Surface and High Heat Flux Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ababneh, Mohammed T.; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Alvarez-Hernandez, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel hybrid wick heat pipes are developed to operate against gravity on planetary surfaces, operate in space carrying power over long distances and act as thermosyphons on the planetary surface for Lunar and Martian landers and rovers. These hybrid heat pipes will be capable of operating at the higher heat flux requirements expected in NASA's future spacecraft and on the next generation of polar rovers and equatorial landers. In addition, the sintered evaporator wicks mitigate the start-up problems in vertical gravity aided heat pipes because of large number of nucleation sites in wicks which will allow easy boiling initiation. ACT, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Johnson Space Center, are working together on the Advanced Passive Thermal experiment (APTx) to test and validate the operation of a hybrid wick VCHP with warm reservoir and HiK"TM" plates in microgravity environment on the ISS.

  19. High heat flux test of a HIP-bonded first wall panel of reduced activation ferritic steel F-82H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, T.; Suzuki, S.; Yokoyama, K.; Kuroda, T.; Enoeda, M.

    2000-12-01

    Reduced activation ferritic steel F-82H is a primary candidate structural material of DEMO fusion reactors. In fabrication technology, development of the DEMO blanket in JAERI, a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding method, especially for the first wall structure with built-in cooling tubes has been proposed. A HIP-bonded F-82H first wall panel was successfully fabricated with selected manufacturing parameters. A high heat flux test of the HIP-bonded F-82H first wall panel has been performed to examine the thermo-mechanical performance of the panel including the integrity of the HIP-bonded interfaces and the fatigue behavior. A maximum heat flux of 2.7 MW/m2 was applied to accelerate the fatigue test up to 5000 cycles in test blanket inserted ITER. The maximum temperature of the panel was ∼450°C under this heat flux. Through this test campaign, no damage such as cracks was observed on the surface of the panel, and no degradation in heat removal performance was observed either from the temperature responses. The thermal fatigue lifetime of the panel was found to be longer than the fatigue data obtained by mechanical testing.

  20. Coupled interactions between tungsten surfaces and transient high-heat-flux deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, S.; Uesugi, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental studies on the interactions between transient deuterium-plasma heat pulses and tungsten surfaces were carried out in terms of electrical, mechanical and thermal response in a compact plasma device AIT-PID (Aichi Institute of Technology-Plasma Irradiation Device). Firstly, electron-emission-induced surface-temperature increase is discussed in the surface-temperature range near tungsten's melting point, which is accomplished by controlling the sheath voltage and power transmission factor. Secondly, anomalous penetration of tungsten atomic efflux into the surrounding plasma was observed in addition to a normal layered population; it is discussed in terms of the effect of substantial tungsten influx into the deuterium plasma, which causes dissipation of plasma electron energy. Thirdly, a momentum input from pulsed plasma onto a tungsten target was observed visually. The force is estimated numerically by the accelerated ion flow to the target as well as the reaction of tungsten-vapour efflux. Finally, a discussion follows on the effects of the plasma heat pulses on the morphology of tungsten surface (originally a helium-induced ‘fuzzy’ nanostructure). A kind of bifurcated effect is obtained: melting and annealing. Open questions remain for all the phenomena observed, although sheath-voltage-dependent plasma-heat input may be a key parameter. Discussions on all these phenomena are provided by considering their implications to tokamak fusion devices.

  1. GRCop-84: A High-Temperature Copper Alloy for High-Heat-Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) is a new high-temperature copper-based alloy. It possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance and low-cycle fatigue up to 700 C (1292 F) along with low thermal expansion and good conductivity. GRCop-84 can be processed and joined by a variety of methods such as extrusion, rolling, bending, stamping, brazing, friction stir welding, and electron beam welding. Considerable mechanical property data has been generated for as-produced material and following simulated braze cycles. The data shows that the alloy is extremely stable during thermal exposures. This paper reviews the major GRCop-84 mechanical and thermophysical properties and compares them to literature values for a variety of other high-temperature copper-based alloys.

  2. Development of Low Conductivity and Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Coatings Using A High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 17OOOC) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, ultra-high temperature ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity: the initial conductivity rise under a steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and the later coating conductivity reduction under a subsequent cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on the damage accumulations and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The coating external radiation resistance is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser heated intense radiation flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature is derived.

  3. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatible with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-ε turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.

  4. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatiblemore » with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-ε turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.« less

  5. Cu-Cr-Nb-Zr Alloy for Rocket Engines and Other High-Heat- Flux Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Rocket-engine main combustion chamber liners are used to contain the burning of fuel and oxidizer and provide a stream of high-velocity gas for propulsion. The liners in engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine are regeneratively cooled by flowing fuel, e.g., cryogenic hydrogen, through cooling channels in the back side of the liner. The heat gained by the liner from the flame and compression of the gas in the throat section is transferred to the fuel by the liner. As a result, the liner must either have a very high thermal conductivity or a very high operating temperature. In addition to the large heat flux (>10 MW/sq m), the liners experience a very large thermal gradient, typically more than 500 C over 1 mm. The gradient produces thermally induced stresses and strains that cause low cycle fatigue (LCF). Typically, a liner will experience a strain differential in excess of 1% between the cooling channel and the hot wall. Each time the engine is fired, the liner undergoes an LCF cycle. The number of cycles can be as few as one for an expendable booster engine, to as many as several thousand for a reusable launch vehicle or reaction control system. Finally, the liners undergo creep and a form of mechanical degradation called thermal ratcheting that results in the bowing out of the cooling channel into the combustion chamber, and eventual failure of the liner. GRCop-84, a Cu-Cr-Nb alloy, is generally recognized as the best liner material available at the time of this reporting. The alloy consists of 14% Cr2Nb precipitates in a pure copper matrix. Through experimental work, it has been established that the Zr will not participate in the formation of Laves phase precipitates with Cr and Nb, but will instead react with Cu to form the desired Cu-Zr compounds. It is believed that significant improvements in the mechanical properties of GRCop-84 will be realized by adding Zr. The innovation is a Cu-Cr-Nb-Zr alloy covering the composition range of 0.8 to 8.1 weight

  6. Numerical Study of High Heat Flux Performances of Flat-Tile Divertor Mock-ups with Hypervapotron Cooling Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Xiang; Lian, Youyun; Cai, Laizhong

    2015-09-01

    The hypervapotron (HV), as an enhanced heat transfer technique, will be used for ITER divertor components in the dome region as well as the enhanced heat flux first wall panels. W-Cu brazing technology has been developed at SWIP (Southwestern Institute of Physics), and one W/CuCrZr/316LN component of 450 mm×52 mm×166 mm with HV cooling channels will be fabricated for high heat flux (HHF) tests. Before that a relevant analysis was carried out to optimize the structure of divertor component elements. ANSYS-CFX was used in CFD analysis and ABAQUS was adopted for thermal-mechanical calculations. Commercial code FE-SAFE was adopted to compute the fatigue life of the component. The tile size, thickness of tungsten tiles and the slit width among tungsten tiles were optimized and its HHF performances under International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) loading conditions were simulated. One brand new tokamak HL-2M with advanced divertor configuration is under construction in SWIP, where ITER-like flat-tile divertor components are adopted. This optimized design is expected to supply valuable data for HL-2M tokamak. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2011GB110001 and 2011GB110004)

  7. Characterization of the thermal performance of high heat flux systems at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, Michael L.; Bagford, John O.; North, Mark T.; Hull, Robert J.

    1996-11-01

    When developing a high-heat-flux system, it is important to be able to test the system under relevant thermal conditions and environmental surroundings. Thermal characterization testing is best performed in parallel with analysis and design. This permits test results to impact materials selection and systems design decisions. This paper describes the thermal testing and characterization capabilities of the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The facility features high-power carbon dioxide (CO2$ and neodymium:glass laser systems that can be teamed with vacuum chambers, wind tunnels, mechanical loading machines and/or ambient test sites to create application-specific thermal and environmental conditions local to the material sample or system. Representative results from recently conducted test series are summarized. The test series described demonstrate the successful use of a high power CO2 laser paired with environment simulation capability to : 1) simulate the expected in-service heat load on a newly developed heat transfer device to ensure its efficient operation prior to design completion, 2) simulate the heat load expected for a laser diode array cooler, 3) produce thermal conditions needed to test a radiator concept designed for space-based operation, and 4) produce thermal conditions experienced by materials use din solid rocket motor nozzles. Test diagnostics systems used to collect thermal and mechanical response data from the test samples are also described.

  8. High heat flux experiment on B4C-converted carbon based materials for plasma facing materials of JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, Toshiro; Satoh, Kazuyoshi; Yokoyama, Kenji; Suzuki, Satoshi; Dairakum, Masayuki; Araki, Masanori; Akiba, Masato

    1994-03-01

    High heat flux experiments have been previously carried out on three kinds, namely low pressure plasma spray (LPPS), chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and conversion (CVR) methods, of B4C-overlaid CFC's using the JAERI electron beam irradiation system (JEBIS). As a result, it turned out that CVR method has the best adhesion property between B4C layer and bulk carbon. However, thicker B4C layer is necessary to use in long period as the divertor tiles of JT-60U. The purpose of this experiment is to investigate the thermal property of B4C-converted carbon based materials which have thicker B4C layer than the previous experiments. Irradiations were performed under two different heating conditions, namely in the normal condition (5-20 MW/m(exp 2), 5 s) and in the disruption conditions (1100-1600 MW/m(exp 2), 2-3 ms). The dimensions of the samples were 25 mm x 25 mm x 25 mm, and B4C-converted layers were made on the three kinds of CFC's and fifth kinds of isotropic graphites. The thickness of B4C layer was 150-1300 (mu)m. Measurements were made with respect to the weight loss, changes of the surface morphology and the surface temperature. In the normal condition, the damages such as surface melting and exfoliation were not observed on the samples which have B4C layer below 600 (mu)m in thickness. In the disruption condition, melting and exfoliation were observed on the surfaces of the samples whose substrates were PD-330S, PD-600S and HCB-5S, and melting was observed on the surfaces of the samples whose substrates were PCC-2S, MFC-1, MCI-felt, ETP-10 and STP-60. It is considered that the porous layer in the B4C layer caused the severe exfoliation from the measurement of the surface composition.

  9. Experimental results and a self-consistent model of evaporation and high heat flux extraction by evaporating flow in a micro-grooved blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monazami, Reza; Saadat, Mehdi; Zhu, Jianzhong; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2015-11-01

    The problem of evaporation from a vertical micro-grooved blade heated from above is investigated. The required superheat to handle the incoming flux is calculated using the results of the study by Monazami and Haj-Hariri (2012). The relation between the applied heat flux, dry-out length and the maximum equilibrium temperature for several geometries and working fluids are studied. Furthermore, a computational study of the evaporating meniscus is conducted to evaluate the evaporation rates and dissipated heat flux at the liquid-vapor interface. The computational study accounts for the flow and heat transfer in both liquid and vapor phases. The results of this study indicate that the micro-grooved structure can dissipate heat fluxes as high as 10MW/m2 for superheats as low as 5 degrees Kelvin. Experiments are conducted to verify the computational and analytical results. The findings of this work are applicable to the design of thermal management systems for high heat flux applications. Partially supported by the MAXNET Energy Partnership (Max Planck Institute and UVA).

  10. Computation of full-coverage film-cooled airfoil temperatures by two methods and comparison with high heat flux data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Yeh, F. C.; Austin, P. J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Two methods were used to calculate the heat flux to full-coverage film cooled airfoils and, subsequently, the airfoil wall temperatures. The calculated wall temperatures were compared to measured temperatures obtained in the Hot Section Facility operating at real engine conditions. Gas temperatures and pressures up to 1900 K and 18 atm with a Reynolds number up to 1.9 million were investigated. Heat flux was calculated by the convective heat transfer coefficient adiabatic wall method and by the superposition method which incorporates the film injection effects in the heat transfer coefficient. The results of the comparison indicate the first method can predict the experimental data reasonably well. However, superposition overpredicted the heat flux to the airfoil without a significant modification of the turbulent Prandtl number. The results suggest that additional research is required to model the physics of full-coverage film cooling where there is significant temperature/density differences between the gas and the coolant.

  11. An augmented Young-Laplace model of an evaporating meniscus in a micro-channel with high heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayner, P. C., Jr.; Plawsky, J.; Schonberg, J. A.; Dasgupta, S.

    1993-01-01

    High flux evaporations from a steady meniscus formed in a 2 micron channel is modeled using the augmented Young-Laplace equation. The heat flux is found to be a function of the long range van der Waals dispersion force which represents interfacial conditions between heptane and various substrates. Heat fluxes of (1.3-1.6) x 10(exp 6) W/m(exp 2) based on the width of the channel are obtained for heptane completely wetting the substrate at 100 C. Small channels are used to obtain these large fluxes. Even though the real contact angle is 0 deg, the apparent contact angle is found to vary between 24.8 deg and 25.6 deg. The apparent contact angle, which represents viscous losses near the contact line, has a large effect on the heat flow rate because of its effect on capillary suction and the area of the meniscus. The interfacial heat flux is modeled using kinetic theory for the evaporation rate. The superheated state depends on the temperature and the pressure of the liquid phase. The liquid pressure differs from the pressure of the vapor phase due to capillarity and long range van der Waals dispersion forces which are relevant in the ultra think film formed at the leading edge of the meniscus. Important pressure gradients in the thin film cause a substantial apparent contact angle for a complete wetting system. The temperature of the liquid is related to the evaporation rate and to the substrate temperature through the steady heat conduction equation. Conduction in the liquid phase is calculated using finite element analysis except in the vicinity of the thin film. A lubrication theory solution for the thin film is combined with the finite element analysis by the method of matched asymptotic expansions.

  12. Large cooling differentials and high heat flux capability with p-type Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 and n-type Bi2Te3/Bi2SexTe3-x Superlattice Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulman, Gary; Siivola, Ed; Wiitala, Ryan; Grant, Brian; Pierce, Jonathan; Venkatasubramanian, Rama

    2007-03-01

    Thin film superlattice (SL) based thermoelectric (TE) devices offer the potential for improved efficiency and high heat flux cooling over conventional bulk materials. Recently, we have demonstrated external cooling of 55K and heat pumping capacity of 128 W/cm^2. These high heat fluxes in thin film devices, while attractive for cooling hot-spots in electronics, also make the device performance sensitive to various thermal resistances in the device structure. We will discuss advances in the cooling performance of Bi2Te3-based SL TE devices and describe a method to extract device material parameters, including thermal resistance, from measurements of their δT-I-V characteristics. These parameters will be compared to values obtained through Hall and Seebeck coefficient measurement on epitaxial materials. Results will be presented for both single couple and multi-couple modules, as well as multi-stage cascaded devices made with these materials. Single stage cooling couples with δTmax of 57.8K (Tc˜242K) and multi-stage modules with δTmax˜92.2K (Tc˜209K) have been measured. G.E. Bulman, E. Siivola, B. Shen and R. Venkatasubramanian, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 122117 (2006).

  13. Mechanical properties and microstructure of copper alloys and copper alloy-stainless steel laminates for fusion reactor high heat flux applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leedy, Kevin Daniel

    A select group of copper alloys and bonded copper alloy-stainless steel panels are under consideration for heat sink applications in first wall and divertor structures of a planned thermonuclear fusion reactor. Because these materials must retain high strengths and withstand high heat fluxes, their material properties and microstructures must be well understood. Candidate copper alloys include precipitate strengthened CuNiBe and CuCrZr and dispersion strengthened Cu-Alsb2Osb3 (CuAl25). In this study, uniaxial mechanical fatigue tests were conducted on bulk copper alloy materials at temperatures up to 500sp°C in air and vacuum environments. Based on standardized mechanical properties measurement techniques, a series of tests were also implemented to characterize copper alloy-316L stainless steel joints produced by hot isostatic pressing or by explosive bonding. The correlation between mechanical properties and the microstructure of fatigued copper alloys and the interface of copper alloy-stainless steel laminates was examined. Commercial grades of these alloys were used to maintain a degree of standardization in the materials testing. The commercial alloys used were OMG Americas Glidcop CuAl25 and CuAl15; Brush Wellman Hycon 3HP and Trefimetaux CuNiBe; and Kabelmetal Elbrodur and Trefimetaux CuCrZr. CuAl25 and CuNiBe alloys possessed the best combination of fatigue resistance and microstructural stability. The CuAl25 alloy showed only minimal microstructural changes following fatigue while the CuNiBe alloy consistently exhibited the highest fatigue strength. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that small matrix grain sizes and high densities of submicron strengthening phases promoted homogeneous slip deformation in the copper alloys. Thus, highly organized fatigue dislocation structure formation, as commonly found in oxygen-free high conductivity Cu, was inhibited. A solid plate of CuAl25 alloy hot isostatically pressed to a 316L stainless steel

  14. Dynamic vacuum analysis for APS high heat flux beamline front ends using optical ray-tracing simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Nielsen, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The high-power and high-flux x-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can cause significantly high gas desorption rates on beamline front-end components if beam missteering occurs. The effect of this gas desorption needs to be understood for dynamic vacuum analysis. To simulate beam missteering conditions, optical ray-tracing methods have been employed. The results of the ray-tracing analysis have been entered into a system-oriented vacuum program to provide dynamic vacuum calculations for determination of pumping requirements for the beamline front-ends. The APS will provide several types of synchrotron radiation sources, for example, undulators, wigglers, and bending magnets. For the purpose of this study, the wiggler source was chosen as a worst case'' scenario due to its high photon flux, high beam power, and relatively large beam cross section.

  15. Dynamic vacuum analysis for APS high heat flux beamline front ends using optical ray-tracing simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Nielsen, R.W.

    1992-09-01

    The high-power and high-flux x-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can cause significantly high gas desorption rates on beamline front-end components if beam missteering occurs. The effect of this gas desorption needs to be understood for dynamic vacuum analysis. To simulate beam missteering conditions, optical ray-tracing methods have been employed. The results of the ray-tracing analysis have been entered into a system-oriented vacuum program to provide dynamic vacuum calculations for determination of pumping requirements for the beamline front-ends. The APS will provide several types of synchrotron radiation sources, for example, undulators, wigglers, and bending magnets. For the purpose of this study, the wiggler source was chosen as a ``worst case`` scenario due to its high photon flux, high beam power, and relatively large beam cross section.

  16. Electron Flux of Radiation Belts Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows meridional (from north-south) plane projections of the REPT-A and REPT-B electron flux values. The animation first shows the expected two-belt Van Allen zone structure; from Se...

  17. High heat-flux self-rotating plasma-facing component: Concept and loading test in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, A.; Sergienko, G.; Hubeny, M.; Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Philipps, V.

    2015-08-01

    This contribution reports on the concept of a circular self-rotating and temperature self-stabilising plasma-facing component (PFC), and test of a related prototype in TEXTOR tokamak. This PFC uses the Lorentz force induced by plasma current and magnet field (J × B) to create a torque applied on metallic discs which produce a rotational movement. Additional thermionic current, present at high operation temperatures, brings additional temperature stabilisation ability. This self-rotating disk limiter was exposed to plasma in the TEXTOR tokamak under different radial positions to vary the heat flux. This disk structure shows the interesting ability to stabilise its maximum temperature through the fact that the self-induced rotation is modulated by the thermal emission current. It was observed that the rotation speed increased following both the current collected by the limiter, and the temperature of the tungsten disks.

  18. Micro- and nano-scale damage on the surface of W divertor component during exposure to high heat flux loads with He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Greuner, H.; Zhao, S. X.; Böswirth, B.; Luo, G. N.; Zhou, X.; Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, X.; Liu, W.

    2015-11-01

    Micro- and nano-scale surface damage on a W divertor component sample exposed to high heat flux loads generated with He atoms has been investigated through SEM, EBSD, AFM and FIB-SEM. The component sample was supplied by the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP) and AT&M company, China, and the loading experiment was performed in the GLADIS facility at IPP Garching, Germany. Two typical damage structures were observed on the surface: the first one is characterized by obvious blisters and some grooves formed from ruptured blisters, and the other one is a kind of porous structure accompanying with at least ∼25 nm surface material loss. As the grain orientation is further away from <111>, the damage morphology gradually changes from the former structure to the latter. The possible damage mechanism is discussed.

  19. Manufacturing and high heat flux loading of tungsten coatings on fine grain graphite for the ASDEX-upgrade divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschka, S.; García-Rosales, C.; Hohenauer, W.; Duwe, R.; Gauthier, E.; Linke, J.; Lochter, M.; Malléner, W.; Plöchl, L.; Rödhammer, P.; Salito, A.

    1996-10-01

    Fine grain graphite tiles coated with tungsten layers by plasma spray (PS, thickness 100-550 μm) and physical vapour deposition (PVD, 30-200 μm), respectively, were subjected to thermal loads up to 17 MW/m 2 and 2 s pulse duration. The damage limit was evaluated by increasing the heat flux and the pulse length stepwise. The results proved that PS coatings are capable of withstanding heat loads up to 15 MW/m 2 at 2 s pulse length without any structural changes, and cyclic loading with 1000 cycles at 10 MW/m 2. The highly dense PVD coatings suffered damage by crack formation at slightly lower heat loads, and thin PVD layers failed under cyclic loading with 1000 cycles at 10 MW/m 2 due to thermal fatigue and melting. The good performance of PS coatings is related to their porosity, which provides a crack arresting mechanism, and to their mechanical strength, depending on the density of the PS layer.

  20. A comparison of the heat transfer capabilities of two manufacturing methods for high heat flux water-cooled devices

    SciTech Connect

    McKoon, R.H.

    1986-10-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to compare the heat transfer characteristics of water-cooled copper devices manufactured via conventional drilled passage construction and via a technique whereby molten copper is cast over a network of preformed cooling tubes. Two similar test blocks were constructed; one using the drilled passage technique, the other via casting copper over Monel pipe. Each test block was mounted in a vacuum system and heated uniformly on the top surface using a swept electron beam. From the measured absorbed powers and resultant temperatures, an overall heat transfer coefficient was calculated. The maximum heat transfer coefficient calculated for the case of the drilled passage test block was 2534 Btu/hr/ft/sup 2///sup 0/F. This corresponded to an absorbed power density of 320 w/cm/sup 2/ and resulted in a maximum recorded copper temperature of 346/sup 0/C. Corresponding figures for the cast test block were 363 Btu/hr/ft/sup 2///sup 0/F, 91 w/cm/sup 2/, and 453/sup 0/C.

  1. High heat flux test with HIP-bonded Ferritic Martensitic Steel mock-up for the first wall of the KO HCML TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won Lee, Dong; Dug Bae, Young; Kwon Kim, Suk; Yun Shin, Hee; Guen Hong, Bong; Cheol Bang, In

    2011-10-01

    In order for a Korean Helium Cooled Molten Lithium (HCML) Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be tested in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), fabrication method for the TBM FW such as Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP, 1050 °C, 100 MPa, 2 h) has been developed including post HIP heat treatment (PHHT, normalizing at 950 °C for 2 h and tempering at 750 °C for 2 h) with Ferritic Martensitic Steel (FMS). Several mock-ups were fabricated using the developed methods and one of them, three-channel mock-up, was used for performing a High Heat Flux (HHF) test to verify the joint integrity. Test conditions were determined using the commercial code, ANSYS-11, and the test was performed in the Korea Heat Load Test (KoHLT) facility, which was used a radiation heating with a graphite heater. The mock-up survived up to 1000 cycles under 1.0 MW/m 2 heat flux and there is no delamination or failure during the test.

  2. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  3. Correlation of Electrical Resistance to CMC Stress-Strain and Fracture Behavior Under High Heat-Flux Thermal and Stress Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory; Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Because SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are under consideration for use as turbine engine hot-section components in extreme environments, it becomes necessary to investigate their performance and damage morphologies under complex loading and environmental conditions. Monitoring of electrical resistance (ER) has been shown as an effective tool for detecting damage accumulation of woven melt-infiltrated SiCSiC CMCs. However, ER change under complicated thermo-mechanical loading is not well understood. In this study a systematic approach is taken to determine the capabilities of ER as a relevant non-destructive evaluation technique for high heat-flux testing, including thermal gradients and localized stress concentrations. Room temperature and high temperature, laser-based tensile tests were conducted in which stress-dependent damage locations were determined using modal acoustic emission (AE) monitoring and compared to full-field strain mapping using digital image correlation (DIC). This information is then compared with the results of in-situ ER monitoring, post-test ER inspection and fractography in order to correlate ER response to convoluted loading conditions and damage evolution.

  4. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  5. Electron transport fluxes in potato plateau regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Electron transport fluxes in the potato plateau regime are calculated from the solutions of the drift kinetic equation and fluid equations. It is found that the bootstrap current density remains finite in the region close to the magnetic axis, although it decreases with increasing collision frequency. This finite amount of the bootstrap current in the relatively collisional regime is important in modeling tokamak startup with 100{percent} bootstrap current. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. High heat load synchrotron optics

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, D.M.

    1992-08-01

    Third generation synchrotron radiation sources currently being constructed worldwide will produce x-ray beams of unparalleled power and power density these high heat fluxes coupled with the stringent dimensional requirements of the x-ray optical components pose a prodigious challenge to designers of x-ray optical elements, specifically x-ray mirrors and crystal monochromators. Although certain established techniques for the cooling of high heat flux components can be directly applied to this problem, the thermal management of high heat load x-ray optical components has several unusual aspects that may ultimately lead to unique solutions. This manuscript attempts to summarize the various approaches currently being applied to this undertaking and to point out the areas of research that require further development.

  7. Electron energy flux in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Sugiura, M.

    1971-01-01

    Description of studies of electrons between 10 eV and 9.9 keV in the solar wind. The transport of energy in the rest frame of the plasma is evaluated and shown to be parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The presence of electrons from solar events causes this energy-flux density to exceed the heat flow due to thermal electrons. In one such event, the observations are shown to be consistent with the solar-electron observations made at higher energies. When observations are made at a point connected to the earth's bow shock by an interplanetary-field line, a comparatively large energy flux along the field toward the sun is observed, but the heat flow remains outwardly directed during this time interval. In either situation the heat flow is found to be consistent with measurements made on Vela satellites by a different method. These values, less than .01 ergs/sq cm/sec, are sufficiently low to require modifications to the Spitzer-Harm conductivity formula for use in solar-wind theories.

  8. Data base on the high heat flux behaviour of metals and carbon materials for plasma facing components: Experiments at the 10 MW neutral beam injection test stand of the IPP Nagoya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolt, H.; Croessmann, C. D.; Miyahara, A.; Kuroda, T.; Oka, Y.

    1987-08-01

    Disruption events in tokamak devices are regarded as one of the main issues governing material and design considerations for in-vessel components. During disruptions heat loads in the order of 100 to 5000 MW/sq m for durations of about 100 microseconds to severl tens of microseconds can cause severe damage to plasma facing components and may possibly lead to their failure. To determine the response of materials to high heat fluxes, an experimental program was carried out on metals and carbon materials using the 10 MW Neutral Beam Injection Test Stand of the IPP Nagoya. Stainless steel, aluminum, copper, and molybdenum samples, 13 grades of fine grain graphites, and pyrolytic carbon samples were subjected to hydrogen beam exposure with power densities of 15 to 120 MW/sq m and pulse durations of 50 to 950 ms. Resulting damage and threshold values for the occurrence of damage were determined and documented. Main damage observed on samples includes melting, erosion, and crack formation. The high heat flux resistance of each material tested is compared comprehensively with that of the others. Processes leading to material damage are discussed. in the case of damage on graphite, models of erosion and cracking processes are given. The implication of the experimental results for material selection and design of first wall components under the high heat flux aspect is discussed.

  9. Bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Zwickl, R. D.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    ISEE 3 plasma and magnetic field data are used here to document the general characteristics of bidirectional electron heat flux events (BEHFEs). Significant field rotations often occur at the beginning and/or end of such events and, at times, the large-field rotations characteristic of 'magnetic clouds' are present. Approximately half of all BEHFEs are associated with and follow interplanetary shocks, while the other events have no obvious shock associations. When shock-associated, the delay from shock passage typically is about 13 hours, corresponding to a radial separation of about 0.16 AU. When independent of any shock association, BEHFEs typically are about 0.13 AU thick in the radial direction. It is suggested that BEHFEs are one of the more prominent signatures of coronal mass ejection events in the solar wind at 1 AU.

  10. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stork, D.; Agostini, P.; Boutard, J. L.; Buckthorpe, D.; Diegele, E.; Dudarev, S. L.; English, C.; Federici, G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Gonzalez, S.; Ibarra, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Li Puma, A.; Marbach, G.; Morris, P. F.; Packer, L. W.; Raj, B.; Rieth, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Ward, D. J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a 'Starter Blanket' and 'Starter Divertor' is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m-2 fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m-2 first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290-320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R&D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200-350 °C) that could be realised, as a baseline-concept, using tungsten on a copper

  11. Electron Heat Flux Instabilities: Ulysses and LEIA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Robert; Balkey, Matthew; Boivin, Robert; Kline, John; Scime, Earl

    1999-11-01

    Electron heat flux, the non-vanishing third moment of an electron velocity distribution, represent of source of free energy that can drive electromagnetic instabilities. Linear Vlasov theory calculations indicate that at high electron beta, beta 1, the whistler heat flux instability is the most unstable electromagnetic mode. Assuming that the growth of the instability leads to electron velocity space diffusion that reduces the electron heat flux, it is possible to calculate the maximum allowable electron heat flux in a high beta plasma. Observations by the Ulysses spacecraft over 1 to 5 AU are generally supportive of a model of electron heat flux regulation based on excitation of the whistler heat flux instability. To perform controlled experiments on similar high beta plasmas, an electron gun has been installed in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies (LEIA) space simulation chamber. The electron gun is rapidly scanned in energy to simulate an energetic electron tail, an electron heat flux. Comparisons of Ulysses and LEIA electron distribution functions and plasma parameters will be presented. The electron distributions in LEIA are measured with a retarding potential analyzer and a curved plate electrostatic analyzer probe. Measurements of electromagnetic fluctuations in LEIA will be presented if available.

  12. Electron heat flux constraints in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S.P.; Skoug, R.M.; Daughton, W.

    1999-06-01

    Enhanced fluctuations from electromagnetic heat flux instabilities may, through wave-particle scattering, constrain the electron heat flux which flows parallel to the background magnetic field in the solar wind. A corollary of this hypothesis is that instability thresholds should correspond to observable bounds on the heat flux. Here plasma and magnetic field data from February and March 1995 of the Ulysses mission is analyzed in terms of the core/halo electron model to yield scaling relations of dimensionless electron parameters and empirical upper bounds on the dimensionless heat flux as functions of the core {beta}. Use of these scaling relations in linear Vlasov theory for the whistler and Alfv{acute e}n heat flux instabilities in homogeneous plasmas yields threshold conditions on the dimensionless heat flux which are also functions of the electron core {beta}. The empirical bounds and the theoretical thresholds are similar and are therefore consistent with the hypothesis. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Electronic Flux Density beyond the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Axel; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2016-05-19

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic wave function is typically real-valued and hence the electronic flux density (current density) seems to vanish. This is unfortunate for chemistry, because it precludes the possibility to monitor the electronic motion associated with the nuclear motion during chemical rearrangements from a Born-Oppenheimer simulation of the process. We study an electronic flux density obtained from a correction to the electronic wave function. This correction is derived via nuclear velocity perturbation theory applied in the framework of the exact factorization of electrons and nuclei. To compute the correction, only the ground state potential energy surface and the electronic wave function are needed. For a model system, we demonstrate that this electronic flux density approximates the true one very well, for coherent tunneling dynamics as well as for over-the-barrier scattering, and already for mass ratios between electrons and nuclei that are much larger than the true mass ratios. PMID:26878256

  14. Observations of intense trapped electron fluxes at synchronous altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, G. T.; Filbert, P. C.; Nightingale, R. W.; Imhof, W. L.; Reagan, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of flux limiting in the outer radiation belt proposed by Kennel and Petschek (1966) has been tested in a dynamic situation by using data acquired with instruments aboard the SCATHA satellite. A case-by-case analysis of 12 events for evidence of flux limiting under various magnetospheric conditions is made. The reuslts indicate qualitative agreement with the flux limiting theory for all the events studied. Even the quiescent events and hard-spectrum events are consistent with flux limiting. The limiting flux level at any instant appears to depend strongly on the recent history of the trapped electrons and plasma in the outer magnetosphere.

  15. POES MEPED differential flux retrievals and electron channel contamination correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, E. D.; Randall, C. E.; Green, J. C.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Rodger, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    A correction method to remove proton contamination from the electron channels of the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites Medium Energy Proton/Electron Detector (MEPED) is described. Proton contamination estimates are based on measurements in five of the MEPED proton spectral channels. A constrained inversion of the MEPED proton channel response function matrix is used to calculate proton differential flux spectra. In this inversion, the proton energy distribution is described by a weighted combination of exponential, power law, and Maxwellian distributions. Proton contamination in the MEPED electron spectral channels is derived by applying the electron channel proton sensitivities to the proton fluxes from the best fit proton spectra. Once the electron channel measurements are corrected for proton contamination, an inversion of the electron channel response function matrix is used to calculate electron differential flux spectra. A side benefit of the method is that it yields an estimate for the integrated electron flux in the energy range from 300 keV to 2.5 MeV with a center energy at ~800 keV. The final product is a differential spectrum of electron flux covering the energy range from about 10 keV to 2.5 MeV that is devoid of proton contamination except during large solar proton events. Comparisons of corrected MEPED differential fluxes to the Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions Instrument for Detecting Particles show that MEPED fluxes are greater than what is expected from altitude-induced particle population changes; this is attributed at least partially to measurement differences in pitch angle range.

  16. Electron flux at the surface of titanium tritide films

    SciTech Connect

    Kherani, N.P.; Shmayda, W.T. . Research Center)

    1992-03-01

    Certain metal tritides have been investigated as reliable and quasi-constant sources of electrons for a number of practical purposes with particular attention to the dependence of the electron emission rate as a function of temperature. The objective of this paper is to carry out simple calculations that illustrate the relative ranking of a numbed of binary metal tritides with respect to the maximum achievable electron flux; examine semi-empirically the energy spectrum of the electrons emanating from the surface of a titanium tritide film; and present experimental measurements of the electron emission rate from the surface of titanium tritide films. THe results suggest that beryllium tritide would yield the greatest electron emission rate of all the metal tritides; the emitted flux has a significant component of secondary electrons; and, the total electron emission rate is quite sensitive to the condition of the emitting surface.

  17. Field-aligned electron flux oscillations that produce flickering aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Boehm, M. H.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of energetic electrons that produce flickering aurora were made by a pair of sounding rockets, launched during a slowly evolving auroral breakup. Both payloads passed through a broad inverted-V structure. A component of the electron distribution function was closely aligned with the magnetic field over a broad energy range that extended from low energies up to the inverted-V differential energy flux peak. Measurements of the field-aligned component showed the presence of order of magnitude coherent flux oscillations. Source altitudes between 4000 and 8000 km were derived from velocity dispersion of the flux oscillations.

  18. Energetic Electron Fluxes at Saturn from Cassini Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, R.; Summers, D.

    2010-12-01

    Energetic electron fluxes (28 keV-10 MeV) observed by the MIMI/LEMMS instrument on the Cassini mission during 2004 to 2008 are analyzed. We consider 40 events where an event comprises a selected portion of a Cassini orbit that lies within 0.5 Rs of the magnetic equatorial plane, where Rs is Saturn's radius. We determine the electron energy spectrum and integral flux at specified L-shells in the range 3.25 < L < 15. In addition, comparisons are made between the observed fluxes and the corresponding self-limiting values derived from Kennel-Petschek theory.

  19. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Nagatani, Yukinori

    2014-02-10

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

  20. Energetic electron fluxes at Saturn from Cassini observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongxin; Summers, Danny

    2012-06-01

    Energetic electron fluxes (18 keV-21 MeV) observed by the MIMI/LEMMS instrument on the Cassini mission during 2004 to 2008 are analyzed. We consider all 101 orbits and we select portions of the orbits that lie within 0.5 RS of the magnetic equatorial plane, where RS is Saturn's radius. We determine the average electron differential flux and integral flux at specified L-shells in the range 4.5 < L < 11. Further, comparisons are made between the observed fluxes and the corresponding relativistic self-limiting values developed from Kennel-Petschek theory. We find that at lower L-shells, L < 5, measured fluxes are much less than limiting values; at intermediate L-shells, 5 < L < 7, measured fluxes are close to the Kennel-Petschek limit; and at larger L-shells, 7 < L < 10, measured fluxes well exceed the limit. This suggests that (1) at lower L-shells particle injection is relatively weak, (2) at intermediate L-shells, sufficiently strong particle injections generate whistler mode waves to self-limit trapped fluxes, and (3) at larger L-shells, intense particle injections result in trapped particle fluxes well in excess of the Kennel-Petschek limit.

  1. Melt-layer ejection and material changes of three different tungsten materials under high heat-flux conditions in the tokamak edge plasma of TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, J. W.; Philipps, V.; Brezinsek, S.; Pintsuk, G.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Wirtz, M.; Kreter, A.; Sugiyama, K.; Kurishita, H.; Torikai, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Samm, U.; TEXTOR-Team

    2011-11-01

    The behaviour of tungsten (W) plasma-facing components (PFCs) has been investigated in the plasma edge of the TEXTOR tokamak to study melt-layer ejection, macroscopic tungsten erosion from the melt layer as well as the changes of material properties such as grain-size and abundance of voids or bubbles. The parallel heat flux at the radial position of the exposed tungsten tile in the plasma ranges around q|| ~ 45 MW m-2 causing samples to be exposed at an impact angle of 35° to 20-30 MW m-2. Locally the temperature reached up to 6000 K, high levels of evaporation and boiling are causing significant erosion in the form of continuous fine spray or droplet ejection. The amount of fine-spray tungsten emission depends strongly on the material properties: in the case of the tungsten-tantalum alloy the effect of spraying and droplet emission is significantly higher at even low temperatures when compared with regular tungsten or even ultra-high purity tungsten which shows almost no spraying at all. Differences in the material composition, grain structure and size may be related to the different evolution of macroscopic erosion. In addition the re-solidified material is studied and strong differences in terms of re-crystallized grain size and evolution of the grain structure and grain orientation are observed. The build up of large voids has been observed.

  2. Online NARMAX model for electron fluxes at GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, R. J.; Balikhin, M. A.; Billings, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-input single-output (MISO) nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs (NARMAX) models have been derived to forecast the > 0.8 MeV and > 2 MeV electron fluxes at geostationary Earth orbit (GEO). The NARMAX algorithm is able to identify mathematical model for a wide class of nonlinear systems from input-output data. The models employ solar wind parameters as inputs to provide an estimate of the average electron flux for the following day, i.e. the 1-day forecast. The identified models are shown to provide a reliable forecast for both > 0.8 and > 2 MeV electron fluxes and are capable of providing real-time warnings of when the electron fluxes will be dangerously high for satellite systems. These models, named SNB3GEO > 0.8 and > 2 MeV electron flux models, have been implemented online at http://www.ssg.group.shef.ac.uk/USSW/UOSSW.html.

  3. Time series analysis of electron flux at geostationary orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Szita, S.; Rodgers, D.J.; Johnstone, A.D.

    1996-07-01

    Time series of energetic (42.9{endash}300 keV) electron flux data from the geostationary satellite Meteosat-3 shows variability over various timescales. Of particular interest are the strong local time dependence of the flux data and the large flux peaks associated with particle injection events which occur over a timescale of a few hours. Fourier analysis has shown that for this energy range, the average electron flux diurnal variation can be approximated by a combination of two sine waves with periods of 12 and 24 hours. The data have been further examined using wavelet analysis, which shows how the diurnal variation changes and where it appears most significant. The injection events have a characteristic appearance but do not occur in phase with one another and therefore do not show up in a Fourier spectrum. Wavelet analysis has been used to look for characteristic time scales for these events. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. The perpendicular electron energy flux driven by magnetic fluctuations in the edge of TEXT-U

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Bengtson, R.D.; Wootton, A.J.

    1995-06-12

    A fast bolometer was used for direct measurements of parallel electron energy flux in the edge of TEXT-U. The fluctuating component of the parallel electron energy flux, combined with a measurement of magnetic fluctuations, provides an upper limit to the perpendicular electron flux. This magnetically driven energy flux cannot account for the observed energy flux.

  5. Frozen flux violation, electron demagnetization and magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Daughton, W.

    2015-10-15

    We argue that the analogue in collisionless plasma of the collisional diffusion region of magnetic reconnection is properly defined in terms of the demagnetization of the plasma electrons that enable “frozen flux” slippage to occur. This condition differs from the violation of the “frozen-in” condition, which only implies that two fluid effects are involved, rather than the necessary slippage of magnetic flux as viewed in the electron frame. Using 2D Particle In Cell (PIC) simulations, this approach properly finds the saddle point region of the flux function. Our demagnetization conditions are the dimensionless guiding center approximation expansion parameters for electrons which we show are observable and determined locally by the ratio of non-ideal electric to magnetic field strengths. Proxies for frozen flux slippage are developed that (a) are measurable on a single spacecraft, (b) are dimensionless with theoretically justified threshold values of significance, and (c) are shown in 2D simulations to recover distinctions theoretically possible with the (unmeasurable) flux function. A new potentially observable dimensionless frozen flux rate, Λ{sub Φ}, differentiates significant from anecdotal frozen flux slippage. A single spacecraft observable, ϒ, is shown with PIC simulations to be essentially proportional to the unobservable local Maxwell frozen flux rate. This relationship theoretically establishes electron demagnetization in 3D as the general cause of frozen flux slippage. In simple 2D cases with an isolated central diffusion region surrounded by separatrices, these diagnostics uniquely identify the traditional diffusion region (without confusing it with the two fluid “ion-diffusion” region) and clarify the role of the separatrices where frozen flux violations do occur but are not substantial. In the more complicated guide and asymmetric 2D cases, substantial flux slippage regions extend out along, but inside of, the preferred separatrices

  6. Solar axion flux from the axion-electron coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2013-12-01

    In non-hadronic axion models, where axions couple to electrons at tree level, the solar axion flux is completely dominated by the ABC reactions (Atomic recombination and deexcitation, Bremsstrahlung and Compton). In this paper the ABC flux is computed from available libraries of monochromatic photon radiative opacities (OP, LEDCOP and OPAS) by exploiting the relations between axion and photon emission cross sections. These results turn to be ∼ 30% larger than previous estimates due to atomic recombination (free-bound electron transitions) and deexcitation (bound-bound), which where not previously taken into account.

  7. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; et al

    2016-06-10

    In muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux frommore » 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.« less

  8. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  9. Observation of relativistic electron precipitation during a rapid decrease of trapped relativistic electron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, R. M.; Lin, R. P.; Smith, D. M.; McCarthy, M. P.

    2007-05-01

    We present the first quantitative comparison of precipitating and geomagnetically trapped electron flux during a relativistic electron depletion event. Intense bremsstrahlung X-ray emission from relativistic electron precipitation was observed on January 19-20, 2000 (21:20-00:45 UT) by the germanium spectrometer on the MAXIS balloon payload (-7.2 to -9.3 E, 74 S corresponding to IGRF L = 4.7, 1920-2240 MLT). A rapid decrease in the geosynchronous >2 MeV electron flux was simultaneously observed at GOES-8 and GOES-10, and between 0.34-3.6 MeV by GPS ns33 at L = 4.7. The observations show that electrons were lost to the atmosphere early in the flux depletion event, during a period of magnetic field stretching in the tail. The observed X-ray spectrum is well modeled by an exponential distribution of precipitating electrons with an e-folding energy of 290 keV and a lower-energy cut-off of 400 keV. The duration of the event implies precipitation extended over at least 3 hours of MLT, assuming a source fixed in local time. Comparison of the precipitation rate with the flux decrease measured at GPS implies that the loss cone flux was only ~1% of the equatorial flux. However, precipitation is sufficient to account for the rate of flux decrease if it extended over 2-3 hours of local time.

  10. Microscale technology electronics cooling overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golliher, Eric L.

    2002-01-01

    NASA requirements and subsequent technology solutions for high heat flux electronics are generally different that those for the terrestrial applications. Unlike terrestrial operations. NASA spacecraft have limited opportunities for air cooling, for example, and must rely on less efficient thermal radiation to reject heat to space. The terrestrial commercial electronics industry, as well as other Government agencies, is investing in advanced technologies for electronics cooling at the microscale. This paper gives a brief summary of metrics used in high heat flux electronics cooling, the difference between solutions developed for terrestrial requirements and those for space, and a short description of challenges as well as possible solutions for space-based high heat flux electronics cooling. The argument is made that high heat flux electronics cooling is indeed a core technology required by NASA, since the thermal and other environmental requirements are unique to NASA space missions and are not addressed by current terrestrial electronics cooling technology development projects. .

  11. Electron Heat Flux in Pressure Balance Structures at Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. Rom previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere. We investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. At 2001 AGU Spring meeting, we reported that PBSs have structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that they are associated with network activity at the base of polar plumes. In this paper, we have analyzed high-energy electron data at Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and confirm the conclusions more precisely. As a result, although most events show a typical flux directed away from the Sun, we have obtained evidence that some PBSs show bi-directional electron flux and others show an isotropic distribution of electron pitch angles. The evidence shows that plasmoids are flowing away from the Sun, changing their flow direction dynamically in a way not caused by Alfven waves. From this, we have concluded that PBSs are generated due to network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures axe current sheets or plasmoids.

  12. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27237470

  13. Polar cap auroral electron fluxes observed with Isis 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winningham, J. D.; Heikkila, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Three types of auroral particle precipitation have been observed over the polar caps, well inside the auroral oval, by means of the soft particle spectrometer on the Isis 1 satellite. The first type is a uniform, very soft (about 100 eV) electron 'polar rain' over the entire polar cap; this may well be present with very weak intensity at all times, but it is markedly enhanced during worldwide geomagnetic storms. A second type of precipitation is a structured flux of electrons with energies near 1 keV, suggestive of localized 'polar showers'; it seems likely that these are the cause of the sun-aligned auroral arcs that have been observed during moderately quiet conditions. During periods of intense magnetic disturbance this precipitation can become very intense and exhibit a characteristic pattern that we have come to call a 'polar squall'.

  14. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+). PMID:22103768

  15. Observation of relativistic electron precipitation during a rapid decrease of trapped electron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, R. M.; Lin, R. P.; Smith, D. M.; McCarthy, M. P.; Sample, J. G.; Shprits, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Rapid depletions of the trapped electron flux are often observed, and illustrate the important role played by losses in controlling electron variability in the radiation belts. The observed decrease may be partly due to adiabatic effects, but some of the electrons are lost either through magnetopause shadowing or through precipitation into Earth's atmosphere. On January 19, 2000, duskside precipitation was observed near the start of a rapid flux depletion event, during a period of magnetic field stretching in the tail. The observations were made with the germanium spectrometer on the MAXIS balloon payload and show that real losses were occurring during the initial decrease which has previously been attributed to purely adiabatic effects. A quantitative comparison of the precipitation rate with the change in electron flux measured at GPS implies that only ~1% of the loss cone was filled, however, precipitation alone is sufficient to account for the flux decrease if it extended over 2-3 hours of local time. We present these results and compare the observed loss rate with the theoretical loss rate expected for pitch-angle scattering by EMIC waves.

  16. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  17. Beta electron fluxes inside a magnetic plasma cavern: Calculation and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupitskii, E. L.; Smirnov, E. V.; Kulikova, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    We study the possibility of electrostatic blanking of beta electrons in the expanding spherical blob of a radioactive plasma in a rarefied ionosphere. From numerical studies on the dynamics of beta electrons departing a cavern, we obtain the form of a function that determines the portion of departing electrons and calculate the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern in relation to the Starfish Prime nuclear blast. We show that the flux density of electrons in geomagnetic flux tubes and inside the cavern depend on a correct allowance for the quantity of beta electrons returning to the cavern. On the basis of a physical analysis, we determine the approximate criterion for the return of electrons from a geomagnetic flux tube to the cavern. We compare calculation results in terms of the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern with the recently published experimental results from operation Starfish Prime.

  18. A selection rule for the directions of electronic fluxes during unimolecular pericyclic reactions in the electronic ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manz, Jörn; Yamamoto, Kentaro

    2012-05-01

    Unimolecular pericyclic reactions in a non-degenerate electronic ground state proceed under the constraint of zero electronic angular momentum. This restriction engenders a selection rule on the directions of electronic fluxes. Accordingly, clockwise or counter-clockwise fluxes are 'forbidden', whereas pincer-like fluxes (which consist of concerted clockwise and counter-clockwise fluxes) are 'allowed'. The selection rule is illustrated for three reactions: the degenerate Cope rearrangement of hexadiene, hydrogen transfer in malonaldehyde, and double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer.

  19. A survey of superthermal electron flux depressions, or "electron holes," within the illuminated Martian induced magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. E. S.; Lester, M.; Nichols, J. D.; Sánchez-Cano, B.; Andrews, D. J.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Fränz, M.

    2016-05-01

    Since Mars lacks a global intrinsic magnetic field, the solar wind interacts directly with the Martian upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The presence of localized intense remnant crustal magnetic fields adds to this interaction, making the Martian plasma system a unique environment within the solar system. Rapid reductions in the electron flux, referred to as "electron holes," occur within the Martian induced magnetosphere (IM). We present a statistical analysis of this phenomenon identified from proxy measurements of the electron flux derived from measurements by the Analyser of Space Plasmas and Energetic Neutral Atoms Electron Spectrometer experiment on board the Mars Express (MEX) spacecraft. The study is completed for the period of 9 February 2004 to 9 May 2014. Electron holes are observed within the IM in more than 56% of MEX orbits during this study period, occurring predominantly at altitudes less than 1300 km, with the majority in the negative X Mars-Centric Solar Orbital direction. The spatial distribution above the surface of Mars is observed to bear close resemblance to that of the crustal magnetic fields as predicted by the Cain et al. magnetic field model, suggesting that they play an important role in the formation of these phenomena.

  20. Comparison between triangulated auroral altitude and precipitating electron energy flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangalli, L.; Partamies, N. J.; Gustavsson, B.

    2012-12-01

    The MIRACLE network monitors auroral activity in the Fennoscandian sector of Europe. Network stations cover the range of 55° to 57° magnetic latitude North and span two hours in magnetic local time. Some of the MIRACLE network stations include digital all-sky cameras (ASC) with overlapping field-of-views at the latitude aurora occurs. The ASCs in this network operate at three different wavelengths: 427.8 nm (blue line), 557.7 nm (green line) and 630.0 nm (red line). These wavelengths are selected using narrow band filters. Red and blue lines images are recorded once per minute and green line images every 20 s. On January 31, 2001 multiple discrete arcs were observed at the zenith of the ASC located in Muonio (67.9° N, 23.6° E) and were visible in other stations. The peak auroral emission is estimated using triangulation between pairs of stations and compared with precipitating electron energy fluxes inverted from ASC images and measured in situ on the DMSP satellite.

  1. Comparison between triangulated auroral altitude and precipitating electron energy flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangalli, L.; Partamies, N. J.; Gustavsson, B.

    2013-12-01

    The MIRACLE network monitors auroral activity in the Fennoscandian sector of Europe. Network stations cover the range of 55° to 57° magnetic latitude North and span two hours in magnetic local time. Some of the MIRACLE network stations include digital all-sky cameras (ASC) with overlapping field-of-views at the latitude aurora occurs. The ASCs in this network operate at three different wavelengths: 427.8 nm (blue line), 557.7 nm (green line) and 630.0 nm (red line). These wavelengths are selected using narrow band filters. Red and blue lines images are recorded once per minute and green line images every 20 s. On January 31, 2001 multiple discrete arcs were observed at the zenith of the ASC located in Muonio (67.9° N, 23.6° E) and were visible in other stations. The peak auroral emission is estimated using triangulation between pairs of stations and compared with precipitating electron energy fluxes inverted from ASC images and measured in situ on the DMSP satellite.

  2. Electron Flux Models at GEO: 30 keV - 600 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, R.; Balikhin, M. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walker, S. N.; Ganushkina, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Forecast models are developed for the electron fluxes measured by the Magnetospheric Electron Detector (MagED) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 13. The models employ solar wind and geomagnetic indices as inputs to produce a forecast of the electron flux at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) for five energy ranges from 30 keV - 600 keV. All of these models will be implemented in real time to forecast the electron fluxes on the PROGRESS project website (https://ssg.group.shef.ac.uk/progress2/html/index.phtml).

  3. Nightside electron flux measurements at Mars by the Phobos-2 HARP instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shutte, N.; Gringauz, K.; Kiraly, P.; Kotova, G.; Nagy, A. F.; Rosenbauer, H.; Szego, K.; Verigin, M.

    1995-01-01

    All the available nightside electron data obtained during circular orbits at Mars from the Phobos-2 Hyperbolic Retarded Potential Analyzer (HARP) instrument have been examined in detail and are summarized in this paper. An electron flux component with energies exceeding that of the unperturbed solar wind was observed inside the magnetosheath, indicating the presence of acceleration mechanism(s). The character of the electron fluxes measured in the magnetotail cannot be classified in any simple manner, however, there is a correlation between the electron fluxes measured well inside this region and the unperturbed solar wind ram pressure.

  4. Sawtooth oscillations in the flux of runaway electrons to the PLT limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D.

    1982-03-01

    Increased fluxes of runaway electrons at the PLT limiter are observed in the few milliseconds following internal disruptions. These fluxes have an inverted (outside) sawtooth character. The time for the flux to reach a maximum after the disruption has been studied as a function of the plasma parameters for thousands of PLT discharges. One interpretation is that this delay represents the time for a perturbation to the runaway electron population to travel from the q = 1 region to the plasma boundary. These times are approx. 10/sup -1/ of the electron thermal confinement times and increase with the plasma electron density.

  5. Responses of relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Pu, Zuyin; Fu, Suiyan; Chen, Lunjin; Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen; Li, Jinxing; Guo, Ruilong; Parks, G. K.

    2015-11-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies, while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3-2.5 MeV electron fluxes show an increase, whereas 2.5-14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such "energy-dependent" responses of electrons preferably occur during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and these events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examined one of the cases where observed EMIC waves can resonate effectively with >2.5 MeV electrons and scatter them into the atmosphere. The correlation study further illustrates that electron flux dropouts during storm main phases do not correlate well with the flux buildup during storm recovery phases. We suggest that a combination of efficient EMIC-induced scattering and weaker chorus-driven acceleration provides a viable candidate for the energy-dependent responses of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to geomagnetic storms. These results are of great interest to both understanding of the radiation belt dynamics and applications in space weather.

  6. Energy Dependent Responses of Relativistic Electron Fluxes in the Outer Radiation Belt to Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase 4 or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. A statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies. In about 87% of the storms, 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons fluxes show increase, whereas 2.5-14 MeV electron fluxes increase in only 35% of the storms. Superposed epoch analyses suggest that such 'energy dependent' behavior of electrons preferably occurs during conditions of high solar wind density which is favorable to generate magnetospheric electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and these 'energy dependent' events are associated with relatively weaker chorus activities. We have examined one of the cases where observed EMIC waves can resonate effectively with >2.5 MeV electrons and scatter them into the atmosphere. The correlation study further illustrates that electron flux drop-outs during storm main phases do not correlate well with the flux build-up during storm recovery phases. We suggest that a combination of efficient EMIC-induced scattering and weaker chorus-driven acceleration provide a viable candidate for the energy dependent responses of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons to geomagnetic storms. These results are of great interest to both understanding of the radiation belt dynamics and applications in space weather.

  7. Investigations of natural and artificially injected energetic electron fluxes on board Spacelab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, K.

    The functions of the energetic electron spectrometer, its interaction with other instruments on board Spacelab I, and the relevance of the anticipated observations to auroral physics is presented. The theory of electron detection using electrostatic deflection devices for energy discrimination and continuous channel electron multipliers (CEM) for electron detection is analytically examined, noting a possible maximum efficiency of 0.6 for a CEM. Experiments include observations of the natural electron flux at high latitudes, with special attention paid to field-aligned fluxes and a peaked energy spectrum (as observed by sounding rockets). Also included are experiments to determine the importance of energetic electron fluxes as a carrier of magnetospheric currents (when used with a magnetometer), and studies of the interaction of artificially injected electron beams with the ionospheric plasma. Additional studies are envisioned of using energetic electrons to probe magnetospheric electric fields aligned along the magnetic field direction.

  8. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. To provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraft were used as the predictors. Model explanatory parameters were selected from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L ≧ 4.8 and L ≧ 5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≦ L ≦ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. A test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.

  9. The perpendicular electron energy flux driven by magnetic fluctuations in the edge of the Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Bengtson, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Wootton, A.J. |

    1995-12-01

    A fast bolometer was used for direct measurements of parallel electron energy flux in the edge of the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT-U) [K. W. Gentle, Nucl. Technol. Fusion {bold 1}, 479 (1981)]. The fluctuating component of the parallel electron energy flux, combined with a measurement of magnetic fluctuations, provides an upper limit to the perpendicular electron flux. This magnetically driven energy flux cannot account for the observed energy flux. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Mitigating Electronic Current in Molten Flux for the Magnesium SOM Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, Eric S.; Guan, Xiaofei; Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2014-08-01

    The solid oxide membrane (SOM) process has been used at 1423 K to 1473 K (1150 °C to 1200 °C) to produce magnesium metal by the direct electrolysis of magnesium oxide. MgO is dissolved in a molten MgF2-CaF2 ionic flux. An oxygen-ion-conducting membrane, made from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), separates the cathode and the flux from the anode. During electrolysis, magnesium ions are reduced at the cathode, and Mg(g) is bubbled out of the flux into a separate condenser. The flux has a small solubility for magnesium metal which imparts electronic conductivity to the flux. The electronic conductivity decreases the process current efficiency and also degrades the YSZ membrane. Operating the electrolysis cell at low total pressures is shown to be an effective method of reducing the electronic conductivity of the flux. A two steel electrode method for measuring the electronic transference number in the flux was used to quantify the fraction of electronic current in the flux before and after SOM process operation. Potentiodynamic scans, potentiostatic electrolyses, and AC impedance spectroscopy were also used to characterize the SOM process under different operating conditions.

  11. Regulation of the solar wind electron heat flux from 1 to 5 AU: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, E.E.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gary, S.P.; Phillips, J.L.; Balogh, A.

    1994-12-01

    In this study the authors use observations from the three-dimensional electron spectrometer and magnetometer aboard the Ulysses spacecraft to examine the solar wind electron heat flux from 1.2 to 5.4 AU in the ecliptic plane. Throughout Ulysses` transit to 5.4 AU, the electron heat flux decreases more rapidly ({approximately}R{sup {minus}3.0}) than simple collisionless expansion along the local magnetic field and is smaller than expected for a thermal gradient heat flux, q{sub {parallel}}e(r)={minus}k{sub {parallel}}{del}{sub {parallel}}T{sub e}(r). The radial gradients and magnitudes expected for a number of electron heat flux regulatory mechanisms are examined and compared to the observations. The best agreement is found for heat flux regulation by the whistler heat flux instability. The upper bound and radial scaling for the electron heat flux predicted for the whistler heat flux instability are consistent with observations.

  12. Searching for Dark Matter Signatures in the GLAST LAT Electron Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Profumo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    We explored several viable scenarios of how LAT might observe DM, when the spectral feature is predicted to be observed in the HE electron flux It has been demonstrated elsewhere that LAT will be capable to detect HE electrons flux in energy range from 20 GeV to - 1 TeV with 520% energy resolution and good statistics If there is a DM-caused feature in the HE electron flux (in the range 20 GeV - 1 TeV), LAT will be the best current instrument to observe it!

  13. Energy dependence of relativistic electron flux variations in the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Li, Jinxing; Fu, Suiyan; Pu, Zuyin; Chen, Lunjin; Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms can either increase or decrease relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt, depending on the delicate competition between electron energization and loss processes. Despite the well-known "energy independent" prototype in which electron fluxes enhance after geomagnetic storms at all energies, we present observations of "energy dependent" events, i.e., post-storm electron fluxes at lower energies (0.3-2.5 MeV, measured by MEPED/POES) recover or even exceed the pre-storm level, while electron fluxes at higher energies (2.5-14 MeV, measured by PET/SAMPEX) do not restore. The statistical survey of 84 isolated storms demonstrates that geomagnetic storms preferentially decrease relativistic electron fluxes at higher energies while flux enhancements are more common at lower energies: ~ 82% (3%) storm events produce increased (decreased) flux for 0.3-2.5 MeV electrons, while ~ 37% (45%) storms lead to enhancements (reductions) of 2.5-14 MeV electron flux. Superposed epoch analysis suggests that "energy dependent" events preferentially occur during periods of high solar wind density along with high dynamic pressure. Previous statistical studies have shown that this kind of solar wind conditions account for significant enhancements of EMIC waves, which cause efficient precipitation of > 2 MeV electrons into atmosphere via pitch angle scattering. Two cases of "energy dependent" events are investigated in detail with evident observations of EMIC waves that can resonate effectively with >2 MeV electrons. Besides, we do not capture much differences in the chorus wave activity between those "energy dependent" and "energy independent" events. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that EMIC waves play a crucial role in the occurrences of those "energy dependent" events in the outer zone during geomagnetic storms.

  14. Empirical predictive models of daily relativistic electron flux at geostationary orbit: Multiple regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Laura E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Pilipenko, Viacheslav; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Clilverd, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The daily maximum relativistic electron flux at geostationary orbit can be predicted well with a set of daily averaged predictor variables including previous day's flux, seed electron flux, solar wind velocity and number density, AE index, IMF Bz, Dst, and ULF and VLF wave power. As predictor variables are intercorrelated, we used multiple regression analyses to determine which are the most predictive of flux when other variables are controlled. Empirical models produced from regressions of flux on measured predictors from 1 day previous were reasonably effective at predicting novel observations. Adding previous flux to the parameter set improves the prediction of the peak of the increases but delays its anticipation of an event. Previous day's solar wind number density and velocity, AE index, and ULF wave activity are the most significant explanatory variables; however, the AE index, measuring substorm processes, shows a negative correlation with flux when other parameters are controlled. This may be due to the triggering of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves by substorms that cause electron precipitation. VLF waves show lower, but significant, influence. The combined effect of ULF and VLF waves shows a synergistic interaction, where each increases the influence of the other on flux enhancement. Correlations between observations and predictions for this 1 day lag model ranged from 0.71 to 0.89 (average: 0.78). A path analysis of correlations between predictors suggests that solar wind and IMF parameters affect flux through intermediate processes such as ring current (Dst), AE, and wave activity.

  15. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes

    PubMed Central

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed. PMID:26167432

  16. Comparison of simulated and observed trapped and precipitating electron fluxes during a magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Lemon, Colby L.; Orlova, Ksenia; Shprits, Yuri; Hecht, James; Walterscheid, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to accurately model precipitating electron distributions is crucial for understanding magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling processes. We use the magnetically and electrically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) of the inner magnetosphere to assess how well different electron loss models can account for observed electron fluxes during the large 10 August 2000 magnetic storm. The strong pitch angle scattering rate produces excessive loss on the morning and dayside at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) compared to what is observed by a Los Alamos National Laboratory satellite. RCM-E simulations with parameterized scattering due to whistler chorus outside the plasmasphere and hiss inside the plasmasphere are able to account simultaneously for trapped electron fluxes at 1.2 keV to ~100 keV observed at GEO and for precipitating electron fluxes and electron characteristic energies in the ionosphere at 833 km measured by the NOAA 15 satellite.

  17. Energetic electron precipitation into the middle atmosphere -- Constructing the loss cone fluxes from MEPED POES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesse Tyssøy, H.; Sandanger, M. I.; Ødegaard, L.-K. G.; Stadsnes, J.; Aasnes, A.; Zawedde, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the chemistry of the middle atmosphere (50-90 km) is still an outstanding question as accurate quantification of EEP is lacking due to instrumental challenges and insufficient pitch angle coverage of current particle detectors. The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors (MEPED) instrument on board the NOAA/Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) and MetOp spacecraft has two sets of electron and proton telescopes pointing close to zenith (0°) and in the horizontal plane (90°). Using measurements from either the 0° or 90° telescope will underestimate or overestimate the bounce loss cone flux, respectively, as the energetic electron fluxes are often strongly anisotropic with decreasing fluxes toward the center of the loss cone. By combining the measurements from both telescopes with electron pitch angle distributions from theory of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, a complete bounce loss cone flux is constructed for each of the electron energy channels >50 keV, >100 keV, and >300 keV. We apply a correction method to remove proton contamination in the electron counts. We also account for the relativistic (>1000 keV) electrons contaminating the proton detector at subauroral latitudes. This gives us full range coverage of electron energies that will be deposited in the middle atmosphere. Finally, we demonstrate the method's applicability on strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions during a weak geomagnetic storm in February 2008. We compare the electron fluxes and subsequent energy deposition estimates to OH observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite substantiating that the estimated fluxes are representative for the true precipitating fluxes impacting the atmosphere.

  18. Ground-based estimates of outer radiation belt energetic electron precipitation fluxes into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Gamble, Rory J.; Ulich, Thomas; Raita, Tero; SeppäLä, Annika; Green, Janet C.; Thomson, Neil R.; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Parrot, Michel

    2010-12-01

    AARDDVARK data from a radio wave receiver in Sodankylä, Finland have been used to monitor transmissions across the auroral oval and just into the polar cap from the very low frequency communications transmitter, call sign NAA (24.0 kHz, 44°N, 67°W, L = 2.9), in Maine, USA, since 2004. The transmissions are influenced by outer radiation belt (L = 3-7) energetic electron precipitation. In this study, we have been able to show that the observed transmission amplitude variations can be used to determine routinely the flux of energetic electrons entering the upper atmosphere along the total path and between 30 and 90 km. Our analysis of the NAA observations shows that electron precipitation fluxes can vary by 3 orders of magnitude during geomagnetic storms. Typically when averaging over L = 3-7 we find that the >100 keV POES "trapped" fluxes peak at about 106 el. cm-2 s-1 sr-1 during geomagnetic storms, with the DEMETER >100 keV drift loss cone showing peak fluxes of 105 el. cm-2 s-1 sr-1, and both the POES >100 keV "loss" fluxes and the NAA ground-based >100 keV precipitation fluxes showing peaks of ˜104 el. cm-2 s-1 sr-1. During a geomagnetic storm in July 2005, there were systematic MLT variations in the fluxes observed: electron precipitation flux in the midnight sector (22-06 MLT) exceeded the fluxes from the morning side (0330-1130 MLT) and also from the afternoon sector (1130-1930 MLT). The analysis of NAA amplitude variability has the potential of providing a detailed, near real-time, picture of energetic electron precipitation fluxes from the outer radiation belts.

  19. Electron heat flux dropouts in the solar wind - Evidence for interplanetary magnetic field reconnection?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.; Bame, S. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    An examination of ISEE-3 data from 1978 reveal 25 electron heat flux dropout events ranging in duration from 20 min to over 11 hours. The heat flux dropouts are found to occur in association with high plasma densities, low plasma velocities, low ion and electron temperatures, and low magnetic field magnitudes. It is suggested that the heat flux dropout intervals may indicate that the spacecraft is sampling plasma regimes which are magnetically disconnected from the sun and instead are connected to the outer heliosphere at both ends.

  20. Evaluation of the Antiproton Flux from the Antineutrino Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Belotsky, K. M.; Bogomolov, Yu V.; Budaev, R. I.; Dunaeva, O. A.; Kirillov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Laletin, M. N.; Lukyanov, A. D.; Malakhov, V. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Mayorova, M. A.; Mosichkin, A. F.; Okrugin, A. A.; Rodenko, S. A.; Shitova, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Recent experiments in high enegry cosmic ray physics, PAMELA and AMS-02, excite a new interest to the mechanisms of generation of galactic antiparticles. In spite of the fact that global picture coincides with the predictions of the standard model, there are some black spots stimulating scientists to involve into research a particularly new physics like dark matter. In the present work, we make an attempt to estimate the impact of standard neutrino processes into the total flux of secondary antiprotons detected by contemporary experiments.

  1. Simultaneous plasma wave and electron flux observations upstream of the Martian bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalsky, A.; Grard, R.; Kiraly, P.; Klimov, S.; Kopanyi, V.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Trotignon, J. G.

    1993-03-01

    Flux enhancements of electrons with energies between 100 and 530 eV are observed simultaneously with electron plasma waves in the upstream region of the Martian bow shock. The electron flux appears to reach its maximum when the pitch angle is close to 0 deg, which corresponds to particles reflected from the shock region and backstreaming in the solar wind along the magnetic field. The correlation between high-frequency waves and enhanced electron fluxes is reminiscent of several studies on the electron foreshock of the Earth. Such a similarity indicates that, in spite of major differences between the global shock structures, the microscopic processes operating in the foreshocks of Earth and Mars are probably identical.

  2. Artificial neural network prediction model for geosynchronous electron fluxes: Dependence on satellite position and particle energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dae-Kyu; Lee, Dae-Young; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Hwang, Junga; Kim, Jaehun

    2016-04-01

    Geosynchronous satellites are often exposed to energetic electrons, the flux of which varies often to a large extent. Since the electrons can cause irreparable damage to the satellites, efforts to develop electron flux prediction models have long been made until recently. In this study, we adopt a neural network scheme to construct a prediction model for the geosynchronous electron flux in a wide energy range (40 keV to >2 MeV) and at a high time resolution (as based on 5 min resolution data). As the model inputs, we take the solar wind variables, geomagnetic indices, and geosynchronous electron fluxes themselves. We also take into account the magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of the geosynchronous electron fluxes. We use the electron data from two geosynchronous satellites, GOES 13 and 15, and apply the same neural network scheme separately to each of the GOES satellite data. We focus on the dependence of prediction capability on satellite's magnetic latitude and MLT as well as particle energy. Our model prediction works less efficiently for magnetic latitudes more away from the equator (thus for GOES 13 than for GOES 15) and for MLTs nearer to midnight than noon. The magnetic latitude dependence is most significant for an intermediate energy range (a few hundreds of keV), and the MLT dependence is largest for the lowest energy (40 keV). We interpret this based on degree of variance in the electron fluxes, which depends on magnetic latitude and MLT at geosynchronous orbit as well as particle energy. We demonstrate how substorms affect the flux variance.

  3. A statistical approach to determining energetic outer radiation belt electron precipitation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon Wedlund, Mea; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Cresswell-Moorcock, Kathy; Cobbett, Neil; Breen, Paul; Danskin, Donald; Spanswick, Emma; Rodriguez, Juan V.

    2014-05-01

    Subionospheric radio wave data from an Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-Belt (Dynamic) Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia (AARDDVARK) receiver located in Churchill, Canada, is analyzed to determine the characteristics of electron precipitation into the atmosphere over the range 3 < L < 7. The study advances previous work by combining signals from two U.S. transmitters from 20 July to 20 August 2010, allowing error estimates of derived electron precipitation fluxes to be calculated, including the application of time-varying electron energy spectral gradients. Electron precipitation observations from the NOAA POES satellites and a ground-based riometer provide intercomparison and context for the AARDDVARK measurements. AARDDVARK radiowave propagation data showed responses suggesting energetic electron precipitation from the outer radiation belt starting 27 July 2010 and lasting ~20 days. The uncertainty in >30 keV precipitation flux determined by the AARDDVARK technique was found to be ±10%. Peak >30 keV precipitation fluxes of AARDDVARK-derived precipitation flux during the main and recovery phase of the largest geomagnetic storm, which started on 4 August 2010, were >105 el cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The largest fluxes observed by AARDDVARK occurred on the dayside and were delayed by several days from the start of the geomagnetic disturbance. During the main phase of the disturbances, nightside fluxes were dominant. Significant differences in flux estimates between POES, AARDDVARK, and the riometer were found after the main phase of the largest disturbance, with evidence provided to suggest that >700 keV electron precipitation was occurring. Currently the presence of such relativistic electron precipitation introduces some uncertainty in the analysis of AARDDVARK data, given the assumption of a power law electron precipitation spectrum.

  4. APS high heat load monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.K.; Mills, D.

    1993-02-01

    This document contains the design specifications of the APS high heat load (HHL) monochromator and associated accessories as of February 1993. It should be noted that work is continuing on many parts of the monochromator including the mechanical design, crystal cooling designs, etc. Where appropriate, we have tried to add supporting documentation, references to published papers, and calculations from which we based our decisions. The underlying philosophy behind performance specifications of this monochromator was to fabricate a device that would be useful to as many APS users as possible, that is, the design should be as generic as possible. In other words, we believe that this design will be capable of operating on both bending magnet and ID beamlines (with the appropriate changes to the cooling and crystals) with both flat and inclined crystal geometries and with a variety of coolants. It was strongly felt that this monochromator should have good energy scanning capabilities over the classical energy range of about 4 to 20 keywith Si (111) crystals. For this reason, a design incorporating one rotation stage to drive both the first and second crystals was considered most promising. Separate rotary stages for the first and second crystals can sometimes provide more flexibility in their capacities to carry heavy loads (for heavily cooled first crystals or sagittal benders of second crystals), but their tuning capabilities were considered inferior to the single axis approach.

  5. Solar flux variation of the electron temperature morning overshoot in the equatorial F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, C.; Liu, H.; Truhlík, V.; Lühr, H.; Richards, P. G.

    2011-04-01

    Using 8 years of CHAMP satellite observations of the equatorial electron temperature, Te, we investigate its behavior during the morning overshoot and at ionospheric altitudes below 450 km including its variation with solar activity. The morning Te has a maximum at the dip equator and decreases gradually with increasing latitude, which is due to the increasing importance of heat conduction as the dip angle becomes larger. The amplitude of the equatorial morning overshoot Te decreases with increasing solar flux by about -10°K/solar flux unit depending on season and longitude. Trends of similar magnitude are predicted by the FLIP model. The model calculations confirm that the electron cooling due to enhanced electron-ion collisions increases faster than the heating of thermal electrons through collision with photoelectrons for increasing solar EUV. Both data and model showed that elevated electron temperatures persist to later local times during low solar activity. Obviously, the decreased background plasma density, together with the slower rise of electron density after sunrise under such conditions are responsible for the longer persistence. First investigations of longitudinal aspects revealed that the strength of the anticorrelation between morning Te and solar flux and the seasonal difference of the Te amplitude varies with longitude. The positive correlation between the morning overshoot and solar flux at 600 km as was shown earlier in Hinotori data is consistent with FLIP predictions and radar observations. The solar flux variation of the morning Te reverses sign between 400 and 600 km.

  6. Estimating the energy deposition in the mesosphere from anisotropic electron fluxes during REP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadsnes, Johan; Sandanger, Marit; Nesse Tyssoy, Hilde; Odegaard, Linn-Kristine; Asnes, Arne

    Data from the MEPED particle spectrometers on the Polar Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) are often used for estimating the energy deposition in the upper atmosphere from electrons in the energy range 30 keV - 2.5 MeV. MEPED includes two collimated electron detectors, which are pointing approximately towards zenith (0 degree detector) and in the horizontal plane (90 degree detector). At medium and high geomagnetic latitudes the 0 degree detector measures particles within a limited part of the bounce loss cone and the 90 degree detector measures particles outside or near the edge of the loss cone. The electron fluxes often show strong pitch angle anisotropy which causes large uncertainty in the estimate of energy deposition based on these measurements. An upper estimate is derived from the 90 degree detector and a lower estimate from the 0 degree detector. The electron anisotropy is to a large extent determined by wave-particle interactions causing pitch angle diffusion driving electrons into the bounce loss cone. The pitch angle anisotropy is dependent on the strength of the diffusion. We are developing a method for calculating the flux versus pitch angle in the loss cone based on the measured electron fluxes and modeled flux profiles from pitch angle scattering by whistler mode waves. We will present results from calculation of the energy deposition using the derived anisotropic flux distribution during a REP event in 2008.

  7. The seasonal dependence of relativistic electron fluxes in the Earth's outer van Allen Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; McPherron, R.

    2007-12-01

    It is well known that geomagnetic activity shows a marked seasonal dependence. This effect has been attributed to the seasonal variation of the Earth's dipole tilt angle exposing the magnetosphere to an increased southward component of the interplanetary field (the Russell-McPherron effect) or an increased solar wind velocity (the axial/equinoctial effect). We examine the seasonal dependence of relativistic electron fluxes in the Earth's outer Van Allen belt. An earlier investigation by Baker et. al., (1999) found that the relativistic electron fluxes do show a strong seasonal dependence with the equinoctial electron fluxes being almost three times higher than the solstitial fluxes. We extend this previous investigation using data obtained by sensors onboard SAMPEX. This study of the seasonal dependence is based on data with a higher time resolution as compared to the earlier study. The results of our analysis show that the peak electron fluxes are shifted in time from the nominal equinoctial times. We discuss some possible implications of our observations in the context of electron energization in the Earth's magnetosphere. Baker, D.N., S.G. Kanekal, T.I. Pulkkinen, and J.B. Blake, Equinoctial and solstitial averages of magnetospheric relativistic electrons: A strong semiannual modulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, No. 20, 3193-3196, 1999.

  8. Characteristics of precipitating energetic electron fluxes relative to the plasmapause during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.

    2014-11-01

    In this study we investigate the link between precipitating electrons from the Van Allen radiation belts and the dynamical plasmapause. We consider electron precipitation observations from the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) constellation during geomagnetic storms. Superposed epoch analysis is performed on precipitating electron observations for the 13 year period of 1999 to 2012 in two magnetic local time (MLT) sectors, morning and afternoon. We assume that the precipitation is due to wave-particle interactions and our two MLT sectors focus on chorus (outside the plasmapause) and plasmaspheric hiss (inside the plasmapause) waves. We generate simple expressions based on the geomagnetic index, Dst, which reproduce the chorus-driven observations for the >30 keV precipitating electron flux magnitudes. Additionally, we find expressions for the fitted spectral index to describe the flux variation with energy, allowing a full energy reproduction as a function of distance from the plasmapause. The hiss-driven precipitating flux occurs inside the plasmapause but is independent of distance from the plasmapause. In the POES observations the hiss-induced electron precipitation is only detectable above the instrument noise in the >300 keV and P6 (>800 keV) channels of the flux detection instrument. We have derived expressions for the storm time variation in flux inside the plasmapause using Dst as a proxy. The observations show that there is little evidence for >800 keV electron precipitation occurring outside of the plasmapause, in the MLT sectors studied.

  9. Relativistic electrons spin states and spin light in dense neutrino fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balantsev, Ilya; Studenikin, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Relativistic electrons can produce electromagnetic radiation in moving background composed of neutrinos, that is the “spin light of electron in neutrino flux” (SLev ) [1, 2]. In this paper we further specify the electron quantum states in moving neutrino background by introdusing the electron spin operator that enables one to define the electron wave function in an exact and close form. This justifies our previous studies of SLev in dense neutrino fluxes and derivations of the electron energy spectrum, the radiation rate and power, and also the emitted photon energy. We argue that the SLev can have important consequences in different astrophysical settings.

  10. Design of a high-flux instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippetto, D.; Qian, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and optimization of a new instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging. The proposed instrument merges the high peak current and relativistic electron energies of radio-frequency guns, with the high average electron flux of static electron microscopes, extending the beam parameter space achievable with relativistic electrons by many orders of magnitude. An immediate consequence of this work is a broader range of accessible science by using electron probes, enabling techniques as femtosecond nano-diffraction and coherent diffraction imaging, and paving the way to direct observation of ultrafast dynamics in complex and isolated samples, from nanocrystals, to nano/micro droplets and organic molecules.

  11. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  12. Field-aligned fluxes of energetic electrons related to the onset of magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremser, G.; Korth, A.; Ullaland, S. L.; Roux, A.; Perraut, S.; Pedersen, A.; Schmidt, R.; Tanskanen, P.

    1987-08-01

    Observations of bidirectional field-aligned fluxes of energetic electrons (16 to 80 keV) at magnetic substorm onset are discussed. The electron fluxes appear 4 min after the onset of the expansion phase, last 1.5 min, and are associated with strong spatial gradients of the ion intensity. The observations are interpreted in terms of a model in which a surface wave develops at the transition from dipolelike to taillike geomagnetic fieldlines. The surface wave couples into kinetic Alfven waves that propagate along the fieldlines, are reflected at the ionosphere, and interact with mirrored electrons on their way back towards the equatorial plane.

  13. Analysis of Voyager Observed High-Energy Electron Fluxes in the Heliosheath Using MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washimi, Haruichi; Webber, W. R.; Zank, Gary P.; Hu, Qiang; Florinski, Vladimir; Adams, James; Kubo, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft (V1 and V2) observed electrons of 6-14 MeV in the heliosheath which showed several incidences of flux variation relative to a background of gradually increasing flux with distance from the Sun. The increasing flux of background electrons is thought to result from inward radial diffusion. We compare the temporal electron flux variation with dynamical phenomena in the heliosheath that are obtained from our MHD simulations. Because our simulation is based on V2 observed plasma data before V2 crossed the termination shock, this analysis is effective up to late 2008, i.e., about a year after the V2-crossing, during which disturbances, driven prior to the crossing time, survived in the heliosheath. Several electron flux variations correspond to times directly associated with interplanetary shock events. One noteworthy example corresponds to various times associated with the March 2006 interplanetary shock, these being the collision with the termination shock, the passage past the V1 spacecraft, and the collision with the region near the heliopause, as identified by W.R. Webber et al. for proton/helium of 7-200 MeV. Our simulations indicate that all other electron flux variations, except one, correspond well to the times when a shock-driven magneto-sonic pulse and its reflection in the heliosheath either passed across V1/V2, or collided with the termination shock or with the plasma sheet near the heliopause. This result suggests that variation in the electron flux should be due to either direct or indirect effects of magnetosonic pulses in the heliosheath driven by interplanetary shocks

  14. The Electronic Flux in Chemical Reactions. Insights on the Mechanism of the Maillard Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Patricio; Gutiérrez-Oliva, Soledad; Herrera, Bárbara; Silva, Eduardo; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2007-11-01

    The electronic transfer that occurs during a chemical process is analysed in term of a new concept, the electronic flux, that allows characterizing the regions along the reaction coordinate where electron transfer is actually taking place. The electron flux is quantified through the variation of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate and is used, together with the reaction force, to shed light on reaction mechanism of the Schiff base formation in the Maillard reaction. By partitioning the reaction coordinate in regions in which different process might be taking place, electronic reordering associated to polarization and transfer has been identified and found to be localized at specific transition state regions where most bond forming and breaking occur.

  15. Correlation of Alfvén wave Poynting flux in the plasma sheet at 4-7 RE with ionospheric electron energy flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiling, A.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C.; Peria, W.; Parks, G.; Temerin, M.; Mozer, F. S.; Russell, C. T.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2002-07-01

    A comparison of Poynting flux in the plasma sheet at geocentric distances of 4-7 RE to the energy flux of magnetically conjugate precipitating electrons at 100-km altitude is presented. We have investigated 40 plasma sheet crossings by the Polar satellite, including both cases with large in situ values of Poynting flux (~1 ergs cm-2 s-1) and cases with low values (<=0.1 ergs cm-2 s-1). The values correspond to ~125 and ~12 ergs cm-2 s-1, respectively, when mapped along converging magnetic field lines to 100 km. The north-south component of the electric field and the east-west component of the magnetic field were the primary source of the Poynting flux. On the basis of the phase relationship and ratio of E and B, the majority of Poynting flux events were identified as Alfvén waves. The Poynting flux measured at high altitudes by Polar was correlated with the intensity of the conjugate auroral emission in the ultraviolet frequency range, which can be used to estimate energy deposition due to precipitating electron beams. The electron energy flux during times of intense Poynting flux in the plasma sheet exceeded 20 ergs cm-2 s-1. In the absence of strong Poynting flux in the plasma sheet, electron precipitation was small (<=5 ergs cm-2 s-1). The mapped Poynting flux was in almost all events larger by a factor of 1-10 than the ionospheric electron energy flux. These results show that Alfvénic Poynting flux in the midtail region is associated with and capable of powering localized regions of magnetically conjugate auroral emissions. Furthermore, the large Poynting flux events observed at the outer edge of the plasma sheet were conjugate to the poleward border of the active auroral regions, giving further evidence that at least some of the discrete aurora connects to the plasma sheet boundary layer.

  16. Multidirectional Angular Electronic Flux during Adiabatic Attosecond Charge Migration in Excited Benzene.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gunter; Liu, ChunMei; Manz, Jörn; Paulus, Beate; Pérez-Torres, Jhon Fredy; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-07-14

    Recently, adiabatic attosecond charge migration (AACM) has been monitored and simulated for the first time, with application to the oriented iodoacetylene cation where AACM starts from the initial superposition of the ground state (φ0) and an electronic excited state (φ1). Here, we develop the theory for electronic fluxes during AACM in ring-shaped molecules, with application to oriented benzene prepared in the superposition of the ground and first excited singlet states. The initial state and its time evolution are analogous to coherent tunneling where φ0 and φ1 have different meanings; however, they denote the wave functions of the lowest tunneling doublet. This analogy suggests to transfer the theory of electronic fluxes during coherent tunneling to AACM, with suitable modifications which account for (i) the different time scales and (ii) the different electronic states, and which make use of (iii) the preparation of the initial state for AACM by a linearly polarized laser pulse. Application to benzene yields the multidirectional angular electronic flux with a pincer-motion type pattern during AACM: this unequivocal result confirms a previous working hypothesis. Moreover, the theory of AACM allows quantification of the electronic flux; that is, the maximum number of electrons (out of 42) which flow concertedly during AACM in benzene is 6 × 0.08 = 0.48. PMID:27046151

  17. Production of flickering aurora and field-aligned electron flux by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temerin, M.; Mcfadden, J.; Boehm, M.; Carlson, C. W.; Lotko, W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent observations have suggested that flickering aurora is produced by a modulation of the field-aligned component of the electron flux within an auroral arc. It is proposed that a portion of the field-aligned electrons are of ionospheric origin and that these electrons are accelerated and their flux modulated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves that occur below the main acceleration region on auroral arc field lines. A model of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave shows that the parallel phase velocity of the wave increase as the wave propagates toward the ionosphere. A test particle calculation shows that ionospheric electrons trapped or reflected by the wave are accelerated to energies of several keV and that their flux is modulated at the wave frequency. The relative amplitudes of the model wave electric fields are consistent with the observations of small-scale low-frequency ionospheric and magnetospheric electric fields near auroral arcs of approximately 10 mV/m and 100 mV/m, respectively. The large-amplitude ion cyclotron waves also produce a ponderomotive force and a self-consistent ambipolar electric field. Energy considerations show that the downward energy flux in the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave can be several percent of the total downward auroral electron energy flux.

  18. On calculating ionospheric conductances from the flux and energy of precipitating electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. M.; Vondrak, R. R.; Miller, K.; Dabbs, T.; Hardy, D.

    1987-01-01

    Auroral zone conductances can be estimated from the energy flux and average energy of precipitating electrons. Revised expressions are presented that relate height-integrated Hall and Pedersen conductance to the flux and average energy of a Maxwellian. It is shown that the accuracy of this method depends on the minimum and maximum energy within which the distribution is integrated to get the energy flux and average energy. It is also confirmed that the conductances produced by some of the more common auroral spectral distributions are similar to those produced by a Maxwellian with the same average energy and energy flux. The application of these results is demonstrated using precipitating electron measurements made by the Hilat satellite during a pass over Greenland.

  19. A case study of electron precipitation fluxes due to plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardman, Rachael; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Brundell, James B.; Duthie, Roger; Holzworth, Robert H.; Mann, Ian R.; Milling, David K.; Macusova, Eva

    2015-08-01

    We find that during a large geomagnetic storm in October 2011 the trapped fluxes of >30, >100, and >300 keV outer radiation belt electrons were enhanced at L = 3-4 during the storm main phase. A gradual decay of the trapped fluxes was observed over the following 5-7 days, even though no significant precipitation fluxes could be observed in the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) electron precipitation detectors. We use the Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-belt (Dynamic) Deposition-VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortium receiver network to investigate the characteristics of the electron precipitation throughout the storm period. Weak electron precipitation was observed on the dayside for 5-7 days, consistent with being driven by plasmaspheric hiss. Using a previously published plasmaspheric hiss-induced electron energy e-folding spectrum of E0 = 365 keV, the observed radio wave perturbation levels at L = 3-4 were found to be caused by >30 keV electron precipitation with flux ~100 el cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The low levels of precipitation explain the lack of response of the POES telescopes to the flux, because of the effect of the POES lower sensitivity limit and ability to measure weak diffusion-driven precipitation. The detection of dayside, inner plasmasphere electron precipitation during the recovery phase of the storm is consistent with plasmaspheric hiss wave-particle interactions and shows that the waves can be a significant influence on the evolution of the outer radiation belt trapped flux that resides inside the plasmapause.

  20. The effect of different solar wind parameters upon significant relativistic electron flux dropouts in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinliang; Li, Wen; Bortnik, Jacob; Thorne, Richard M.; Lu, Quanming; Ma, Qianli; Tao, Xin; Wang, Shui

    2015-06-01

    Superposed epoch analyses were performed on 193 significant relativistic electron flux dropout events, in order to study the roles of different solar wind parameters in driving the depletion of relativistic electrons, using ~16 years of data from the POES and GOES missions, and the OMNIWEB solar wind database. We find that the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz play key roles in causing the relativistic electron flux dropouts, but also that either large solar wind dynamic pressure or strong southward IMF Bz by itself is capable of producing the significant depletion of relativistic electrons. The relativistic electron flux dropouts occur not only when the magnetopause is compressed closer to the Earth but also when the magnetopause is located very far (> ~10 RE). Importantly, our results show that in addition to the large solar wind dynamic pressure, which pushes the magnetopause inward strongly and causes the electrons to escape from the magnetosphere, relativistic electrons can also be scattered into the loss cone and precipitate into the Earth's atmosphere during periods of strong southward IMF Bz, which preferentially provides a source of free energy for electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave excitation. This is supported by the fact that the strongest electron precipitation into the atmosphere is found in the dusk sector, where EMIC waves are typically observed in the high-density plasmasphere or plume and cause efficient electron precipitation down to ~1 MeV.

  1. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ion flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.

  2. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite years of observations from the magnetospheric plasma analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bilinear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ion flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3 h Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II, also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicates a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user requirements.

  3. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ionmore » flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.« less

  4. Properties of electron flux spectra around the plasmapause in the chorus and hiss regions using POES.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian; Rodger, Craig; Clilverd, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The European FP7 PLASMON project aims to provide observations of plasmaspheric densities, and link the plasmaspheric variations to relativistic electron precipitation from the radiation belts. This is intended to assist in the estimation and prevent damage of space assets from space weather events as well as to improve forecasting (http://plasmon.elte.hu). As part of the PLASMON project, electron fluxes from the POES series of satellites are being used to determine the link between energetic electron precipitation energy spectra and magnitude to the position of the plasmapause. The MEPED instrument onboard POES measures electron flux from 90° (trapped particles) and 0° (losscone) telescopes, in 3 integral energy channels (>30, >100 and >300 keV). These fluxes have been compared to the DEMETER/IDP instrument to confirm that published geometric factor corrections (Yando et al. 2011) can be accurately applied to the POES data to produce as accurate as possible fluxes. These global fluxes have then been separated into regions in which Chorus (23:00-11:00 MLT) and Hiss (11:00-16:00 MLT) whistler mode waves are expected to occur, in 0.2 L-shell bins with a 20 minute temporal resolution. The plasmapause locations have been determined from the O'Brien and Moldwin (2003) models based on Kp, Ae and Dst peaks. We are currently comparing the POES spectral gradient and flux magnitude with plasmapause location and geomagnetic activity for the locations in which chorus and hiss are known to occur. This presentation will focus on the electron flux spectral gradient behaviour either side of the plasmapause, a value that is difficult to measure from ground based techniques.

  5. Ground-based estimates of outer radiation belt energetic electron precipitation fluxes into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, C. J.; Clilverd, M.; Gamble, R. J.; Ulich, T.; Raita, T.; Seppälä, A. M.; Green, J. C.; Thomson, N. R.; Sauvaud, J.; Parrot, M.

    2010-12-01

    The variations of subionospheric VLF amplitudes observed at ground-based receivers can be used to determine the flux of electrons precipitating into the ionosphere along the path between the transmitter and receiver. A network of VLF receivers has been established to observe the upper atmosphere (~40-85 km), and tools are being developed to extract electron precipitation fluxes from the observations of this network, which is termed AARDDVARK (Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-belt (Dynamic) Deposition - VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortium). AARDDVARK data from a radiowave receiver in Sodankylä, Finland have been used to monitor transmissions across the auroral oval and just into the polar cap from the very low frequency communications transmitter, call sign NAA, (24.0 kHz, 44°N, 67°W, L=2.9) in Maine, USA, since 2004. The propagating signals are influenced by outer radiation belt (L=3-7) energetic electron precipitation. In this study we show that the observed amplitude variations can be used to routinely determine the flux of energetic electrons entering the upper atmosphere along the entire path, and between 30-90 km in altitude. Our analysis of the NAA observations shows that electron precipitation fluxes can vary by three orders of magnitude during geomagnetic storms. Typically when averaging over L=3-7 we find that the >100 keV POES ‘trapped’ fluxes peak at about 106 el.cm-2s-1sr-1 during geomagnetic storms, with the DEMETER >100 keV drift loss cone showing peak fluxes of 105 el.cm-2s-1sr-1, and both the POES >100 keV ‘loss’ fluxes and the NAA ground-based >100 keV precipitation fluxes showing peaks of ~104 el.cm-2s-1sr-1. During a geomagnetic storm in July 2005 there were systematic MLT variations in the fluxes observed: electron precipitation flux in the midnight sector (22-06 MLT) exceeded the fluxes from the morning side (0330-1130 MLT) and also from the afternoon sector (1130-1930 MLT). The analysis of NAA amplitude variability has the potential of

  6. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. PMID:25279617

  7. Electron fluxes and pitch-angle distributions at dipolarization fronts: THEMIS multipoint observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Gabrielse, C.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Turner, D.; Plaschke, F.

    2013-02-01

    Taking advantage of multipoint observations from a Cluster-like Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probe configuration repeated in three events, we study pitch-angle distributions (PAD) of lower energy (0.2-keV) electrons and omnidirectional energy-time spectrograms of higher energy (30-500 keV) electrons observed at and near dipolarization fronts in the plasma sheet. Recent observations have shown that dipolarization fronts in the plasma sheet provide an impulsive electric field suggested to cause electron energization and dispersionless injections. Increase and decrease in energetic electron flux are equally probable at the fronts, however. Our case studies demonstrate increased energetic electron flux in the front's central region but decreased flux on its dusk side, where diverted plasma flow forms a vortex. An electric field associated with this vortex causes the electron flux decrease. We also find that shorter-term energetic flux decreases, often observed before injections, coincide with a dip in the northward magnetic field ahead of the front. We attribute these decreases to particle energy loss via the inverse betatron effect. Our case studies reveal that pancake-type (maximum at 90° pitch angle) and cigar-type (maxima at 0 and 180°) PADs coexist at the same front. Our data analysis suggests that energetic electron PADs are mainly pancake type near the neutral sheet (|Bx| < 5 nt) and mainly cigar type at |Bx| > 10 nt. These results, to be confirmed in statistical studies, provide important constraints for further modeling of electron energization and transport toward the inner magnetosphere.

  8. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M.; Matteini, L.; Santolík, O.

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ∼10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β {sub e∥} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β {sub e∥} ≥ 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  9. Whistler Mode Waves and the Electron Heat Flux in the Solar Wind: Cluster Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Matteini, L.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; de Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M.

    2014-11-01

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ~10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β e∥ is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β e∥ >= 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  10. Geodesic mode instability driven by electron and ion fluxes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Elfimov, A. G. Camilo de Souza, F.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2015-11-15

    The effect of the parallel electron current and plasma flux on Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) in a tokamak is analyzed by kinetic theory taking into the account the ion Landau damping and diamagnetic drifts. It is shown that the electron current and plasma flow, modeled by shifted Maxwell distributions of electrons and ions, may overcome the ion Landau damping generating the GAM instability when the parallel electron current velocity is larger than the effective parallel GAM phase velocity of sidebands, Rqω. The instability is driven by the electron current and the parallel ion flux cross term. Possible applications to tokamak experiments are discussed. The existence of the geodesic ion sound mode due to plasma flow is shown.

  11. Flux averaged current drive efficiency of electron Bernstein waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, D. E.; Cairns, R. A.; Lashmore Davies, C. N.; O'Brien, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Electron Bernstein waves are of interest for heating and current drive in spherical tokamaks where the central region of the plasma is not accessible to the ordinary and extraordinary modes. In this paper we adapt an analytical theory of current drive in toroidal geometry developed by Lin-Liu et al (2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 4064) to this system. This involves taking account of the fact that the ratio of the Larmor radius to the perpendicular wavelength is not, in general, small for the Bernstein waves and also including the effects of a non-circular plasma cross section. By comparing the results with those of a full Fokker-Planck code, we demonstrate that the analytical method can yield a good approximation to the current drive efficiency in most regimes of practical interest. Since it is much less computationally demanding than using a Fokker-Planck code we suggest that it could be a useful tool for analysing experiments on Bernstein mode current drive in spherical tokamaks.

  12. The Westinghouse high flux electron beam surface heating facility (Esurf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahemow, M. D.

    The ESURF facility located, at the Westinghouse Electric Corp., Research and Development Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is described. It was first used to test cathodes for a BNL designed negative ion source. The water cooled copper cathodes were operated at a loading of 2 KW/sq cm steady state loading. Divertor collector targets for the MIT divertor program were subject to transient conditions. These molybdenum tubes were subject to up to 500 2 kW/sq cm transients. The facility is currently being used in a first wall/blanket/shield engineering test program for the Argonne National Labs. The ESURF uses a 50 KW 150 KeV electron beam as a heat source. The scan logic permits a wide variety of transient and steady state thermal effects to be modeled. The system cooling loop has a maximum operating pressure of 1000 psi. The pumps have an operating range from 7 gpm at a 700 ft head to 30 gpm at a 500 ft head. 40 KW of preheat and 100 KW of subcooling are provided. Temperature, pressure, flow, strain, etc. are measured and controlled. The system has a TI microprocessor control system linked to a LSI/11 computer system for control, data acquisition, and data processing.

  13. Neutrino-Electron Scattering in MINERvA for Constraining the NuMI Neutrino Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaewon

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is used as a reference process to constrain the neutrino flux at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam observed by the MINERvA experiment. Prediction of the neutrino flux at accelerator experiments from other methods has a large uncertainty, and this uncertainty degrades measurements of neutrino oscillations and neutrino cross-sections. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is a rare process, but its cross-section is precisely known. With a sample corresponding to $3.5\\times10^{20}$ protons on target in the NuMI low-energy neutrino beam, a sample of $120$ $\

  14. Energetic electron fluxes stimulated with pulsed injection of plasma in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, V.A.; Babaev, A.P.; Gaidukov, V.Iu.; Loevskii, A.S.; Popov, G.A.; Romanovskii, Iu.A.

    1981-01-01

    Two plasma blob injection experiments, performed from the MR-12 rocket launched from Volgograd in 1977, are presented. The blobs were injected along and transverse to the magnetic field lines. An energetic electron flux increase was observed in both cases, the increase being 2-3 times greater than the background flux prior to injection in the longitudinal-injection experiment, and 10-40 times greater in the transverse-injection experiment. Plasma blob parameters presented include injection frequency, propulsive mass, and direction of the injection. Spectrum changes of the energetic electron pulsations were also observed.

  15. A new approach to predict and estimate enhancements of "killer" electron flux at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexander; Ryzhakova, Larisa; Tsegmed, Battuulai

    2016-09-01

    So-called "killer" electrons are electrons of relativistic energies (more than 1-2 MeV) forming the outer radiation belt. Their fluxes present a serious threat for on-board electronics of spacecraft orbiting in geosynchronous orbit. This provides actuality of the problem of electron flux forecast. The population of energetic electrons grows after immersion of the Earth's magnetosphere into a high-speed stream of the solar wind. One of the main mechanisms of acceleration of magnetospheric electrons to relativistic energies assumed to be their wave-particle interaction with the ultra-low-frequency or very-low-frequency waves. Accordingly, the previously proposed prognostic methods were based on the connection of the outer radiation belt population with the speed of the solar wind and the activity of the low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere. In this paper, we propose to build a forecast based on a new kind of the multiple regressions model with sliding window of predictors. A set of predictors used in the successful multiple regressions model include parameters that reflect processes of replenishment of the outer radiation belt due to the acceleration of seed electrons as well as processes of the devastation of the electron flux in the geosynchronous region due to outward adiabatic transport and outward radial diffusion. To characterize these processes, we use the following set of parameters measured on the ground and in situ: the solar wind speed, density and dynamic pressure of the interplanetary plasma, the intensity of ultra-low-frequency oscillations in front of the magnetosphere and on the ground, the flux of seed electrons (of hundreds eV energy) at geosynchronous orbit, the actual values of the magnetic field at L=6.6, and interplanetary electric field. Coefficients in the model equation are derived from experimental data using the least-squares method. Test calculations using the proposed model have shown promising results.

  16. Reaction electronic flux and its role in DNA intramolecular proton transfers.

    PubMed

    Durán, Rocío; Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Herrera, Bárbara

    2016-06-01

    Proton transfer reactions present a key step in many biological and chemical processes. Here, we focused on the electronic changes in the proton transfer reactions of the four DNA bases. In combination with the previous structural analysis the reaction electronic flux together with local descriptors as the Hirshfeld-I charges allow us to identify chemical events and rationalize the underlying reaction mechanism. Our results show that imine-enamine in adenine and citosyne, and keto-enol tautomerizations in thymine and guanine have different reaction mechanisms. The former involve net structural rearrangements driven by favoured electrostatic interactions between the proton and the acceptor atom whereas the keto-enol tautomerizations require electronic changes reflected in the reaction electronic flux and changes in the NBO bond orders which favour the proton transfer reaction. PMID:27256316

  17. A Statistical Analysis on the Precipitated and Trapped Electron Fluxes Using Long-term POES Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Ni, B.; Li, W.; Zhao, Z.; Gu, X.; Shi, R.; Hu, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We present a statistical analysis on the electron precipitation and trapped fluxes using NOAA POES data from 1998 to 2013, which covers more than an entire solar circle. The data of precipitation and trapped electron fluxes and the ratios between them are comprehensively investigated as a function of L-shell, magnetic local time (MLT), and geomagnetic conditions. Our results will help establish the major features of precipitated and trapped electron dynamics in the inner magnetosphere and their dependence on the level of geomagnetic activity, spatial location and phase of a solar cycle. We also investigate electron precipitation near the area of the South Atlantic Anomaly and compare the results with other regions where the ambient magnetic field configuration is normal. By doing so, we intend to explore the effect of precipitation caused by drift loss cone in contrast to that caused by bounce loss cone.

  18. High heat flux burnout in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celata, G. P.; Cumo, M.; Mariani, A.

    1995-09-01

    The paper reports the results of an experimental research carried out at the Heat Transfer Division of the Energy Department, C.R. Casaccia, on the thermal hydraulic characterization of subcooled flow boiling CHF under typical conditions of thermonuclear fusion reactors, i.e. high liquid velocity and subcooling. The experiment was carried out exploring the following parameters: channel diameter (from 2.5 to 8.0 mm), heated length (10 and 15 cm), liquid velocity (from 2 to 40 m/s), exit pressure (from atmospheric to 5.0 MPa), inlet temperature (from 30 to 80 °C), channel orientation (vertical and horizontal). A maximum CHF value of 60.6 MW/m2 has been obtained under the following conditions: T in=30°, p=2.5 MPa, u=40 m/s, D=2.5 mm (smooth channel) Turbulence promoters (helically coiled wires) have been employed to further enhance the CHF attainable with subcooled flow boiling. Helically coiled wires allow an increase of 50% of the maximum CHF obtained with smooth channels.

  19. Structural materials for high-heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1991-12-31

    The structural materials for the ITER, (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) divertor must perform reliably under complex and diverse operating requirements. Only a limited number of materials offer a potential for meeting these requirements for the wide temperature range of interest. The candidate materials considered in the ITER design activity include copper, molybdenum, niobium alloys. Molybdenum alloys being considered include dilute alloys of the TZM type and the Mo-Re system. Niobium alloys under consideration include Nb-V-Zr and Nb-Zr systems. Copper alloys being considered include precipitation strengthened alloys of the Glidcop and MAGT type, alloys of Cu-Mo system and dispersion hardened bronzes. The projected operating conditions for the ITER divertor and the criteria for evaluating the candidate materials are reviewed. This paper summarizes the data base and presents recent experimental results on these candidate divertor structural alloys.

  20. Structural materials for high-heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.V. ); Smith, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The structural materials for the ITER, (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) divertor must perform reliably under complex and diverse operating requirements. Only a limited number of materials offer a potential for meeting these requirements for the wide temperature range of interest. The candidate materials considered in the ITER design activity include copper, molybdenum, niobium alloys. Molybdenum alloys being considered include dilute alloys of the TZM type and the Mo-Re system. Niobium alloys under consideration include Nb-V-Zr and Nb-Zr systems. Copper alloys being considered include precipitation strengthened alloys of the Glidcop and MAGT type, alloys of Cu-Mo system and dispersion hardened bronzes. The projected operating conditions for the ITER divertor and the criteria for evaluating the candidate materials are reviewed. This paper summarizes the data base and presents recent experimental results on these candidate divertor structural alloys.

  1. Integral probability of auroral electron flux events from SSJ/4 DMSP F9 electron measurements. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D.A.; Bounar, K.H.

    1992-05-18

    A study has been completed to determine the probability of observing different levels of auroral electron precipitation both within fixed spatial elements in magnetic local time and corrected geomagnetic latitude, and within spatial elements when the magnetic local time is fixed but the latitude range can be varied. The auroral electron precipitation probability is defined for a series of thresholds in electron average energy and electron energy flux as a function of geomagnetic activity. The study provides the capability to determine the probability of observation of an auroral electron precipitation event for any specified threshold in average energy, energy flux, and level of geomagnetic activity for any location in the auroral region or for any line of sight through the auroral region. The input for the study is one year of data from the SSJ/4 electron and proton spectrometer flown on the F9 satellite of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) comprising approximately 10, 141 hemispheric passes through the auroral region. The binning technique used to determine these probabilities is presented and some results are discussed. The operation of the software package to display the probability results is described. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), Aurora, Precipitating electrons, Geomagnetic Kp index, Integral probability.

  2. Tungsten joining with copper alloy and its high heat load performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Lian, Youyun; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zengkui; Chen, Jiming; Duan, Xuru; Song, Jioupeng; Yu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    W-CuCrZr joining technology by using low activation Cu-Mn filler metal was developed at Southwestern Institute of Physics (SWIP) for the manufacturing of divertor components of fusion experiment devices. In addition, a fast W coating technology by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was also developed and CVD-W/CuCrZr and CVD-W/C mockups with a W coating thickness of 2 mm were prepared. In order to assess their high heat flux (HHF) performances, a 60 kW Electron-beam Material testing Scenario (EMS-60) equipped with a 150 keV electron beam welding gun was constructed at SWIP. Experimental results indicated that brazed W/CuCrZr mockups can withstand 8 MW/m2 heat flux for 1000 cycles without visible damages and CVD-W/CuCrZr mockups with W-Cu gradient interface can survive 1000 cycles under 11 MW/m2 heat flux. An ultrasonic inspection method for non-destructive tests (NDT) of brazed W/CuCrZr mockups was established and 2 mm defect can be detected. Infinite element analysis and heat load tests indicated that 5 mm defect had less noticeable influence on the heat transfer.

  3. RELEC Experiment on board Vernov Satellite: Relativistic Electron Flux Dynamics in Near-Earth Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svertilov, Sergiey

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of RELEC mission is study of magnetosphere relativistic electron precipitation with it possible acting on the upper atmosphere and ionosphere as well as the monitor observation of radiation and electromagnetic environment in the near-Earth Space. The RELEC set of instruments includes two identical detectors of X- and gamma-rays of high temporal resolution and sensitivity (DRGE-1 & DRGE-2), three axe directed detectors of energetic electrons and protons DRGE-3, UV TLE imager MTEL, UV detector DUV, low-frequency analyser LFA, radio-frequency analyser RFA, module of electronics intended for commands and data collection BE. The small satellite now named Vernov with RELEC instruments was successfully launched July, 8 2014. The mission orbit is solar-synchronous with apogee 830 km, perigee 640 km, inclination 98.4o and orbital period about 100 min. The total data output is about 1.2 Gbyte per day. The fluxes and spectra of electrons in the wide energy range from 0.2 to 15 MeV are measured with the use of three detectors with axe normally directed to each other: to the local zenith, opposite to the satellite velocity vector and along the direction added two previous to the Cartesian system. Due to such detector system it is possible to estimate the electron flux anisotropy. The wide dynamical range from ~1 up to 104 part/cm2s and fine time resolution (~10 mcs) allows observations of trapped, quasi-trapped and precipitated electron flux and spectral variations in different areas in the near-Earth space including low L-shells. Comparative analysis of electron fluxes measured by RELEC with experimental data on electron detection in the experiments on board the spacecraft Electro-L with geostationary orbit, and Meteor-M2 with 800 km altitude circular polar orbit similar to Vernov allows to reconstruct the energetic electron spatial distribution in the near-Earth space. A comparison will be held for periods of moderate geomagnetic disturbances of August 26

  4. Effect of electron flux on radiation damage in GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R. Y.; Kamath, G. S.; Knechtli, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of electron flux and temperature on radiation damage in GaAs solar cells. The defect levels and the power ratio of the GaAs solar cells under various irradiation conditions are compared. In a 200 C continuous annealing experiment, the GaAs solar cells which were irradiated at a flux of 2 x 10 to the 9th e/sq cm s suffered less power degradation than the cells which were irradiated at the same temperature at a higher flux of 4 x 10 to the 10th e/sq cm s. After the continuous annealing experiment, a single-step post annealing at 200 C was performed for 40 hr on these irradiated cells. An additional improvement in power recovery was observed only on those cells irradiated at the high flux of 4 x 10 to the 10th e/sq cm s. DLTS data indicate that the defect density decreases with lower electron flux. Both of these observations strongly suggest that the continuous annealing in GaAs cells can be effective at temperatures as low as 150 C, or even less in a space environment such as geosynchronous orbit.

  5. Secondary electron emission and the bifurcation of the heat flux to the targets in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonjae; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.

    2013-12-15

    The presence of secondary electron emission (SEE) from plasma facing components in fusion devices can result in a strong localization of the heat flux from plasma to the wall and subsequent wall erosion. Usually, the impact of the SEE is considered assuming the Maxwellian distribution of the electrons coming to the surface. As a result, the SEE coefficient only depends on the temperature of primary electrons. However, the tail of primary electron distribution function in the scrape off layer (SOL) of fusion devices can be far from Maxwellian due to preferential loss of fast electrons. Consequently, it is shown that the SEE coefficient will depend on the wall potential and multiple solutions can be possible corresponding to different regimes of plasma flow to the wall: with and without SEE effects. This effect can cause two-slope electron temperature profiles in the SOL, which are often seen in experiments.

  6. Quantitative analysis of bidirectional electron fluxes within coronal mass ejections at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. L.; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    The solar wind electron heat flux is carried primarily by suprathermal 'halo' electrons beamed antisunward along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), indicating magnetic connection to the Sun only in one direction. However, electron observations at 1 AU show that counterstreaming halo beams, suggesting closed magnetic structures, prevail within coronal mass ejections (CME's). These structures might be magnetic 'tongues', tied to the Sun at both ends, magnetically detached plasmoids, or complex flux rope structures. Here, we present first results of analysis of ISEE-3 observations within 39 CME's, including the asymmetry between the counterstreaming beams and its control by the IMF orientation, and the variation of the electron distributions as CME's convect past the spacecraft. We find that some CME's contain nearly symmetric electron beams, while others are strongly asymmetric, and that the antisunward beam is generally dominant. The more nearly radial the IMF, the greater the asymmetry between outward and inward beams. We present an example of a distinctive 'strahl-on-strahl' distribution, suggesting continued magnetic connection to the corona, in which a narrow antisunward beam is superimposed on a broader beam. Taken as a whole, our results appear to favor a tongue or flux rope scenario rather than a fully detached plasmoid.

  7. Formation of plasma and ion flux on a target, irradiated by an intense electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Engelko, Vladimir; Mueller, Georg

    2005-07-01

    Theoretical consideration shows that under the influence of an intense electron beam, first, an ion flux and then plasma are formed on the surface of a target. The target plasma is created when the density of the ion flux achieves a certain limiting value. The time necessary for the plasma formation depends on the beam current density and the efficiency of gas desorption and ionization. This time is few microseconds under typical vacuum conditions of about 5.0x10{sup -5} mbar, electron-beam current density in the range of 10 A/cm{sup 2}, and kinetic energy of electrons in the range of 100 keV. When the density of the ion flux reaches a limiting value the beam potential decreases to a level, which is half of the initial one. A transient layer is formed between the plasma boundary and the electron beam. For conditions mentioned above its length are few centimeters. The target plasma expands into the beam drift region, with a velocity increasing in time. The expansion of the target plasma is the main reason for neutralization of the electron-beam space charge.

  8. The role of electron heat flux in guide-field magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Masha; Birn, Joachim

    2004-12-01

    A combination of analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations are employed in order to investigate the electron dynamics near and at the site of guide field magnetic reconnection. A detailed analysis of the contributions to the reconnection electric field shows that both bulk inertia and pressure-based quasiviscous processes are important for the electrons. Analytic scaling demonstrates that conventional approximations for the electron pressure tensor behavior in the dissipation region fail, and that heat flux contributions need to be accounted for. Based on the evolution equation of the heat flux three tensor, which is derived in this paper, an approximate form of the relevant heat flux contributions to the pressure tensor is developed, which reproduces the numerical modeling result reasonably well. Based on this approximation, it is possible to develop a scaling of the electron current layer in the central dissipation region. It is shown that the pressure tensor contributions become important at the scale length defined by the electron Larmor radius in the guide magnetic field.

  9. Quantitative analysis of bidirectional electron fluxes within coronal mass ejections at 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.; Gosling, J. T.; Mccomas, D. J.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    The solar wind electron heat flux is carried primarily by suprathermal electrons beamed antisunward along the interplanetary magnetic field. However, analysis of electron observations at 1 AU has shown that counterstreaming electron beams, suggesting closed magnetic structures, prevail within coronal mass ejections (CMEs). These structures might be magnetic 'tongues', magnetically detached plasmoids, or complex flux ropes. Here we show results of analysis of ISEE-3 observations within 39 CMEs, including the asymmetry between the two beams, its control by magnetic field orientation, and the variation of the electron distributions as CMEs convect past the spacecraft. We find that some CMEs are strongly asymmetric, with the antisunward beam generally dominant, while others contain nearly symmetric beams. The beam asymmetries, and the magnetic field orientations, exhibit characteristic trends as CMEs pass over the spacecraft. We present an example of a distinctive 'strahl-on-strahl' distribution, suggesting continued magnetic connection to the corona, in which a narrow antisunward beam is superimposed on a broader beam. Our results favor continuing magnetic connection to the Sun in a tongue or flux rope geometry rather than a fully detached plasmoid.

  10. The Mars aurora: UV detections and in situ electron flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, J.-C.; Soret, L.; Lundin, R.; Libert, L.; Stiepen, A.; Radioti, A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed search through the database of the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express made it possible to identify 16 signatures of the CO Cameron and CO2+ doublet auroral emissions. These auroral UV signatures are all located in the southern hemisphere in the vicinity of the statistical boundary between open and closed field lines. The energy spectrum of the energetic electrons was simultaneously measured by ASPERA-3/ELS at higher altitude. The UV aurora is generally shifted from the region of enhanced downward electron energy flux by a few to several tens of degrees of latitude, suggesting that precipitation occurs in magnetic cusp like structures along inclined magnetic field lines. The ultraviolet brightness shows no proportionality with the electron flux measured at the spacecraft altitude. The Mars aurora appears as a sporadic short-lived feature. Results of Monte Carlo simulations will be compared with the observed brightness of the Cameron and CO2+ bands.

  11. Nonstorm time dropout of radiation belt electron fluxes on 24 September 2013

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Su, Zhenpeng; Gao, Zhonglei; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Zhu, Hui; Li, Wen; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2016-07-15

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts during the main phase of geomagnetic storms have received increasing attention in recent years. Here we focus on a rarely reported nonstorm time dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes on 24 September 2013. Within several hours, the radiation belt electron fluxes exhibited a significant (up to 2 orders of magnitude) depletion over a wide range of radial distances (L > 4.5), energies (~500 keV to several MeV) and equatorial pitch angles (0° ≤ αe ≤ 180°). STEERB simulations show that the relativistic electron loss in the region L = 4.5–6.0 was primarily caused bymore » the pitch angle scattering of observed plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. Furthermore, our results emphasize the complexity of radiation belt dynamics and the importance of wave-driven precipitation loss even during nonstorm times.« less

  12. Determining the spectra of radiation belt electron losses: Fitting DEMETER electron flux observations for typical and storm times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Gamble, Rory J.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Sauvaud, Jean-André

    2013-12-01

    The energy spectra of energetic electron precipitation from the radiation belts are studied in order to improve our understanding of the influence of radiation belt processes. The Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) microsatellite electron flux instrument is comparatively unusual in that it has very high energy resolution (128 channels with 17.9 keV widths in normal survey mode), which lends itself to this type of spectral analysis. Here electron spectra from DEMETER have been analyzed from all six years of its operation, and three fit types (power law, exponential, and kappa-type) have been applied to the precipitating flux observations. We show that the power law fit consistently provides the best representation of the flux and that the kappa-type is rarely valid. We also provide estimated uncertainties in the flux for this instrument as a function of energy. Average power law gradients for nontrapped particles have been determined for geomagnetically nondisturbed periods to get a typical global behavior of the spectra in the inner radiation belt, slot region, and outer radiation belt. Power law spectral gradients in the outer belt are typically -2.5 during quiet periods, changing to a softer spectrum of ˜-3.5 during geomagnetic storms. The inner belt does the opposite, hardening from -4 during quiet times to ˜-3 during storms. Typical outer belt e-folding values are ˜200 keV, dropping to ˜150 keV during geomagnetic storms, while the inner belt e-folding values change from ˜120 keV to >200 keV. Analysis of geomagnetic storm periods show that the precipitating flux enhancements evident from such storms take approximately 13 days to return to normal values for the outer belt and slot region and approximately 10 days for the inner belt.

  13. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  14. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  15. Observation of the magnetic flux and three-dimensional structure of skyrmion lattices by electron holography.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Soon; Yu, Xiuzhen; Aizawa, Shinji; Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Kanazawa, Naoya; Onose, Yoshinori; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    Skyrmions are nanoscale spin textures that are viewed as promising candidates as information carriers in future spintronic devices. Skyrmions have been observed using neutron scattering and microscopy techniques. Real-space imaging using electrons is a straightforward way to interpret spin configurations by detecting the phase shifts due to electromagnetic fields. Here, we report the first observation by electron holography of the magnetic flux and the three-dimensional spin configuration of a skyrmion lattice in Fe(0.5)Co(0.5)Si thin samples. The magnetic flux inside and outside a skyrmion was directly visualized and the handedness of the magnetic flux flow was found to be dependent on the direction of the applied magnetic field. The electron phase shifts φ in the helical and skyrmion phases were determined using samples with a stepped thickness t (from 55 nm to 510 nm), revealing a linear relationship (φ = 0.00173 t). The phase measurements were used to estimate the three-dimensional structures of both the helical and skyrmion phases, demonstrating that electron holography is a useful tool for studying complex magnetic structures and for three-dimensional, real-space mapping of magnetic fields. PMID:24727689

  16. Model of spatial distribution of relativistic electron fluxes in vicinity of Jupiter's moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzolko, Mikhail; Veselovsky, Igor; Getselev, Igor; Gubar, Yury

    This research was made as a part of a project of future space mission to the system of Jupiter, being developed by Russian Federal Space Agency. Currently several mission strategies are being considered, including placing the spacecraft into the low-altitude orbit around Jupiter’s moon Europa and possibly landing on its surface. In the region of Europa’s orbit the spacecraft will be affected by very strong radiation from the Jupiter’s radiation belts. The absorbed dose during 2 months under shielding compared to that for “Galileo” spacecraft will amount to almost 1 megarad. The major contribution to the dose will originate from relativistic electrons. However, near Europa part of the charged particle flux will be shaded by the moon. This reduction of the fluxes is nonuniform, depends on the particle energy and pitch-angle and differs for the surface and the low-altitude orbit. It is caused by a number of factors: complexity of particle trajectories relative to Europa, the flux anisotropy, variations of Europa’s position relative to Jupiter’s magnetic equator plane, magnetic and electric field disturbance in vicinity of Europa, the tenuous atmosphere of the moon. In the current study modeling of relativistic electron flux spatial distribution near Europa and on its surface and computation of the radiation doses have been made, taking into account several of mentioned above factors.

  17. Bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux and hemispherically symmetric polar rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    THe paper examines ISEE 3 solar wind electron data obtained concurrent with reported symmetric polar rain events and it is found that a bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux is present whenever such polar cap events occur. In contrast to the normal situation when only one of the earth's polar caps is magnetically connected to the sun, during hemispherically symmetric polar rain events either both of the earth's polar caps are magnetically connected to the sun, or else both are connected to a magnetic loop which is entirely disconnected from the sun. The relative timing between bidirectional solar wind heat flux and symmetrical polar rain events can be utilized to determine certain magnetospheric quantities such as the cross-tail convection speed.

  18. Fast electron flux driven by lower hybrid wave in the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Wang, L.; Gan, K. F.; Yang, J. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Liu, S. C.; Li, M. H.; Ding, S.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Shao, L. M.; Li, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, N.; and others

    2015-02-15

    The fast electron flux driven by Lower Hybrid Wave (LHW) in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in EAST is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The five bright belts flowing along the magnetic field lines in the SOL and hot spots at LHW guard limiters observed by charge coupled device and infrared cameras are attributed to the fast electron flux, which is directly measured by retarding field analyzers (RFA). The current carried by the fast electron flux, ranging from 400 to 6000 A/m{sup 2} and in the direction opposite to the plasma current, is scanned along the radial direction from the limiter surface to the position about 25 mm beyond the limiter. The measured fast electron flux is attributed to the high parallel wave refractive index n{sub ||} components of LHW. According to the antenna structure and the LHW power absorbed by plasma, a broad parallel electric field spectrum of incident wave from the antennas is estimated. The radial distribution of LHW-driven current density is analyzed in SOL based on Landau damping of the LHW. The analytical results support the RFA measurements, showing a certain level of consistency. In addition, the deposition profile of the LHW power density in SOL is also calculated utilizing this simple model. This study provides some fundamental insight into the heating and current drive effects induced by LHW in SOL, and should also help to interpret the observations and related numerical analyses of the behaviors of bright belts and hot spots induced by LHW.

  19. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energymore » channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).« less

  20. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B. A.

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energy channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).

  1. Periodic variations of magnetosheath energetic electron flux associated with global Pc5 pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafopoulos, D. V.; Takahashi, K.; McEntire, R. W.

    2001-07-01

    Measurements from the Wind spacecraft in the solar wind, the Geotail spacecraft in the magnetosheath, and multiple magnetometers on the ground are combined to study a unique electron flux modulation event in the magnetosheath that occurred during an interval of global Pc5 waves. The electron event is characterized by a Pc5-band oscillation occurring in the magnetic-field-aligned component of the electron flux (energy>38keV) while the local magnetic field and plasma density remained unperturbed. During this event the whole magnetosphere oscillated as inferred from magnetic field recorded at the CANOPUS, IMAGE, and 210° MM chains. At the ground stations that are mapped to the dayside and duskside magnetosphere, we find a one-to-one correspondence of the peaks in the horizontal component to those in the electron flux. At the stations mapped to the dawnside magnetosphere the observed frequency is twice that of the electron flux oscillation. The time-lagged solar wind density and velocity at Wind were constant, which leads us to exclude the possibility that the waves were driven by ram pressure variations upstream of the bow shock. The Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability on the magnetopause is the more probable source of the Pc5 waves because (1) the solar wind velocity was ~730 km s-1, well above the average value; (2) the ground-based observations show that the Pc5 amplitude decreases with distance from the magnetopause; and (3) the dawnside and duskside magnetospheric flanks show oppositely polarized waves. The electron flux oscillation in the magnetosheath can be explained by intermittent magnetic connection between the spacecraft and the dawnside pulsating magnetopause. The ~60 keV protons are continuously streaming throughout the whole interval, providing evidence for a continuously active source and permanent leakage through a tangential magnetopause discontinuity. It is worth noticing that at progressively higher energies the energetic particle angular

  2. Degradation of Silicone Oils Exposed to Geostationary Environment Components: Ultraviolet Radiations and Electron Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochem, H.; Rejsek-Riba, V.; Maerten, E.; Baceiredo, A.; Remaury, S.

    Degradation of polydimethylsiloxane and vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane oils exposed to UV radiation or 1.25 MeV electron flux was investigated using EPR, GC Headspace, NMR, GPC and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. To examine the influence of synthetic method, these two oils were prepared by ring opening polymerization using either an inorganic initiator KOH or an organic catalyst N-Heterocyclic carbene. Under UV radiation, any chemical change is observed for polydimethylsiloxane, whereas vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane presents a decrease of vinyl functions and an increase of chain length. Both polydimethylsiloxane and vinyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane demonstrated a degradation of thermo-optical properties, more significant for oils synthesized with organic catalyst. By improving oil purification, the degradation of thermo-optical properties can be reduced. Effects of electron flux are similar for each oil, thus independently of synthetic method and end functions. Electron flux generates important chemical damages initiated by homolytic chain scissions. Radical recombination produces gases (methane and ethane), new functions (Si-H) and bonds across silicone chains leading to a solid state material. Crosslinking of chains occurs by formation of R-Si-(O)3 and Si-CH2-Si groups. Silyl radicals are trapped in the polymer network and can be detected even 1 week after the end of irradiation.

  3. A satellite investigation of energy flux and inferred potential drop in auroral electron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between auroral electron energy flux and the inferred accelerating potential drop for accelerated Maxwellian distributions is investigated on the basis of Atmospheric Explorer D spectral measurements. An analytical approximation for the total downward energy flux carried by an isotropic Maxwellian electron population accelerated by a field-aligned electrostatic potential drop is derived which is valid for values of the electron energy/characteristic accelerated Maxwellian distribution energy which are less than the difference between the ratio of the magnetic field strengths at the altitude of observation and the altitude of potential drop, and unity. Data from the Low Energy Electron Experiment on board AE D obtained on both the dayside and the nightside during periods of significant inverted-V type electron precipitation shows that the 455 energy spectra considered, 160 of them, obtained between 60 and 85 deg invariant latitude, could be fit to accelerated Maxwellian distributions. The 160 Maxwellian spectra are then shown to be in agreement with the predictions of the accelerated Maxwellian model. Finally, analysis of individual spectra suggests that the altitude of the inferred potential drop is at a maximum near the center of the inverted-V structures.

  4. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers.

    PubMed

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules. PMID:27577323

  5. Interplanetary magnetic field connection to the sun during electron heat flux dropouts in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Kahler, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses observations of 2- to 8.5-keV electrons, made by measurements aboard the ISEE 3 spacecraft during the periods of heat flux decreases (HFDs) reported by McComas et al. (1989). In at least eight of the total of 25 HFDs observed, strong streaming of electrons that were equal to or greater than 2 keV outward from the sun was recorded. In one HFD, an impulsive solar electron event was observed with an associated type III radio burst, which could be tracked from the sun to about 1 AU. It is concluded that, in many HFDs, the interplanetary field is still connected to the sun and that some energy-dependent process may produce HFDs without significantly perturbing electrons of higher energies.

  6. Electron energy distribution control by fiat: breaking from the conventional flux ratio scaling rules in etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Alok; Wang, Mingmei; Sherpa, Sonam; Ventzek, Peter

    2015-03-01

    With shrinking critical dimensions, minimizing each of aspect ratio dependent etching (ARDE), bowing, undercut, selectivity, and within die uniformly across a wafer is met by trading off one requirement against another. The problem of trade-offs is especially critical. At the root of the problem is that roles radical flux, ion flux and ion energy play may be both good and bad. Increasing one parameter helps meeting one requirement but hinders meeting the other. Managing process by managing flux ratios and ion energy alone with conventional sources is not adequate because surface chemistry is uncontrollable. At the root of lack of control is that the electron energy distribution function (eedf) has not been controlled. Fortunately the high density surface wave sources control the eedf by fiat. High density surface wave sources are characterized by distinct plasma regions: an active plasma generation region with high electron temperature (Te) and an ionization free but chemistry rich diffusive region (low Te region). Pressure aids is segregating the regions by proving a means for momentum relaxation between the source and downstream region. "Spatial pulsing" allows access to plasma chemistry with reasonably high ion flux, from the active plasma generation region, just above the wafer. Low plasma potential enables precise passivation of surfaces which is critical for atomic layer etch (ALE) or high precision etch where the roles of plasma species can be limited to their purposed roles. High precision etch need not be at the cost of speed and manufacturability. Large ion flux at precisely controlled ion energy with RLSATM realizes fast desorption steps for ALE without compromising process throughput and precision.

  7. Thermal flux limited electron Kapitza conductance in copper-niobium multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheaito, Ramez; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Gaskins, John T.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Duda, John C.; Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Ihlefeld, Jon; Piekos, Edward S.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Misra, Amit; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-03-05

    The interplay between the contributions of electron thermal flux and interface scattering to the Kapitza conductance across metal-metal interfaces through measurements of thermal conductivity of copper-niobium multilayers was studied. Thermal conductivities of copper-niobium multilayer films of period thicknesses ranging from 5.4 to 96.2 nm and sample thicknesses ranging from 962 to 2677 nm are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance over a range of temperatures from 78 to 500 K. The Kapitza conductances between the Cu and Nb interfaces in multilayer films are determined from the thermal conductivities using a series resistor model and are in good agreement with the electron diffuse mismatch model. The results for the thermal boundary conductance between Cu and Nb are compared to literature values for the thermal boundary conductance across Al-Cu and Pd-Ir interfaces, and demonstrate that the interface conductance in metallic systems is dictated by the temperature derivative of the electron energy flux in the metallic layers, rather than electron mean free path or scattering processes at the interface.

  8. Thermal flux limited electron Kapitza conductance in copper-niobium multilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheaito, Ramez; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Gaskins, John T.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Duda, John C.; Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Ihlefeld, Jon; Piekos, Edward S.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Misra, Amit; et al

    2015-03-05

    The interplay between the contributions of electron thermal flux and interface scattering to the Kapitza conductance across metal-metal interfaces through measurements of thermal conductivity of copper-niobium multilayers was studied. Thermal conductivities of copper-niobium multilayer films of period thicknesses ranging from 5.4 to 96.2 nm and sample thicknesses ranging from 962 to 2677 nm are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance over a range of temperatures from 78 to 500 K. The Kapitza conductances between the Cu and Nb interfaces in multilayer films are determined from the thermal conductivities using a series resistor model and are in good agreement with the electron diffusemore » mismatch model. The results for the thermal boundary conductance between Cu and Nb are compared to literature values for the thermal boundary conductance across Al-Cu and Pd-Ir interfaces, and demonstrate that the interface conductance in metallic systems is dictated by the temperature derivative of the electron energy flux in the metallic layers, rather than electron mean free path or scattering processes at the interface.« less

  9. Thermal flux limited electron Kapitza conductance in copper-niobium multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gaskins, John T.; Duda, John C.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Hattar, Khalid; Beechem, Thomas E.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Piekos, Edward S.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Misra, Amit

    2015-03-02

    We study the interplay between the contributions of electron thermal flux and interface scattering to the Kapitza conductance across metal-metal interfaces through measurements of thermal conductivity of copper-niobium multilayers. Thermal conductivities of copper-niobium multilayer films of period thicknesses ranging from 5.4 to 96.2 nm and sample thicknesses ranging from 962 to 2677 nm are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance over a range of temperatures from 78 to 500 K. The Kapitza conductances between the Cu and Nb interfaces in multilayer films are determined from the thermal conductivities using a series resistor model and are in good agreement with the electron diffuse mismatch model. Our results for the thermal boundary conductance between Cu and Nb are compared to literature values for the thermal boundary conductance across Al-Cu and Pd-Ir interfaces, and demonstrate that the interface conductance in metallic systems is dictated by the temperature derivative of the electron energy flux in the metallic layers, rather than electron mean free path or scattering processes at the interface.

  10. Thermal ion upflow in the cusp ionosphere and its dependence on soft electron energy flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.; Knudsen, D. J.; Clemmons, J. H.; Oksavik, K.; Pfaff, R. F.; Steigies, C. T.; Yau, A. W.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the origin of low-energy (Ek < 10 eV) ion upflows in Earth's low-altitude dayside cusp region. The Cusp-2002 sounding rocket flew from Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, on 14 December 2002, carrying plasma and field instrumentation to an altitude of 768 km. The Suprathermal Ion Imager, a two-dimensional energy/arrival angle spectrograph, observed large (>500 m s-1) ion upflows within the cusp at altitudes between 640 km and 768 km. We report a significant correlation between ion upflow and precipitating magnetosheath electron energy flux in this altitude range. There is only very weak correlation between upflow and wave power in the VLF band. We find a small negative correlation between upflow and the magnitude of the DC electric field for fields less than about 70 mV m-1. The apparent relation between upflow and electron energy flux suggests a mechanism whereby ions are accelerated by parallel electric fields that are established by the soft electrons. Significant ion upflows are not observed for electron energy fluxes less than about 1010 eV cm-2 s-1. The lack of correspondence between ∣$\\vec{E∣ and upflow on the one hand, and wave power and upflow on the other, does not rule out these processes but implies that, if operating, they are not local to the measurement region. We also observe narrow regions of large ion downflow that imply either a rebalancing of the ionosphere toward a low-Te equilibrium during which gravity dominates over the pressure gradients or a convection of the upflowing ions away from the precipitation region, outside of which the ions must fall back into equilibrium at lower altitudes.

  11. Ion Outflow in the Dayside Cusp Ionosphere and its Dependence on Soft Electron Energy Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.; Knudsen, D. J.; Clemmons, J. H.; Oksavik, K.; Pfaff, R. F.; Steigies, C. T.; Yau, A. W.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the origin of low energy (Ek<10 eV) ion upflows in Earth's low-altitude dayside cusp region. The Cusp-2002 sounding rocket flew from Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, on 14 December 2002, carrying plasma and field instrumentation to an altitude of 768 km. The Suprathermal Ion Imager, a two-dimensional energy/arrival-angle spectrograph, observed large (>500 m/s) O+ upflows within the cusp at altitudes between 640 km and 768 km. We report a significant association between ion upflow and precipitating magnetosheath electron energy flux in this altitude range, but no causal links between upflow and either wave power or the magnitude of the dc electric field. The correspondence between upflow and logarithm of the electron energy flux suggests a mechanism whereby ions are accelerated locally by ambipolar electric fields that are driven by the soft electrons. Significant ion upflows are not observed for electron energy fluxes below ˜1010 eV cm-2s-1, which suggests that any ambipolar fields present above 640 km must be in equilibrium with gravity and pressure gradients under this condition. The lack of correspondence between │E│ and upflow on the one hand, and wave power and upflow on the other, does not rule out these processes, but implies that, if operating, they are not local to the measurement region. We observe narrow regions of large downflow that imply either a re-balancing of the ionosphere toward a low-Te equilibrium during which gravity dominates the pressure gradients, or convection of the upflowing ions away from the precipitation region, outside of which the ions must fall back into equilibrium at lower altitudes.

  12. Multispacecraft observations of energetic electron flux pulsations at 6. 6 R/sub E/

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.N.; Higbie, P.R.; Belian, R.D.

    1980-12-01

    This paper reports observations of highly periodic flux pulsations in >30-keV electrons measured by essentially identical Los Alamos National Scientific Laboratory charged particle anaylzers on board spacecraft 1976--059, 1977--077, and 1979--053 at geostantionary orbit. Oscillations with periods in the range from approx.1 min to approx.10 min (Pc 4 and Pc 5) have been studied. Statistical analyses were performed using approx.4.5 years of data obtained at magnetic latitudes of 4.8 /sup 0/, 9.4 /sup 0/, and 11.4 /sup 0/. The statistical occurrence probabilities have been evaluated for measurements made at each of the various magnetic latitudes and for all local times. Substantial magnetic latitude and seasonal dependence are found for the flux pulsation occurrence frequency versus local time. These results are discussed in terms of previous observations and present theories of magnetic pulsation generation.

  13. Flux enhancement mechanism of the outer radiation belt electrons associated with coronal hole streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Kataoka, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Earth's outer radiation belt electrons increase when the magnetosphere is surrounded by the high speed solar wind stream, while the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is also known as an important factor for the flux enhancement. In order to distinguish the two different kinds of solar wind parameter dependence statistically, we investigate the response of the outer belt to stream interaction regions (SIRs). We classify the SIR events from 1994 to 2005 into two groups according to so-called "gspring-toward fall-away"h (STFA) rule: (A) IMF sector polarity after the stream interface is toward in spring or away in fall, and (B) vice versa. According to the Russell-McPherron effect, the groups A and B have a significant negative and positive offset of the IMF Bz after the stream interface. Comparing the groups A and B, by superposing about the stream interface, only IMF Bz dependence can be obtained because the other solar wind parameters change in the same manner. As a result, the greatest flux enhancement is found in the high-speed streams with a southward offset of the IMF Bz, indicating that only the solar wind speed by itself is not a sufficient condition for the large flux enhancement. Based on the obtained dependence on the STFA rule and the solar wind speed, it is possible to operate a probabilistic space weather forecast of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit for secure satellite operations. The probability is defined by the number of events with daily maximum flux above the NOAA alert levels, and the stream interface is used as a precursor of coming coronal hole stream in the forecast algorithm. We report how it works and evaluate the skill score of our test operation of the probabilistic forecast.

  14. Flux enhancement of the outer radiation belt electrons after the arrival of stream interaction regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Kataoka, Ryuho

    2008-03-01

    The Earth's outer radiation belt electrons increase when the magnetosphere is surrounded by the high-speed solar wind stream, while the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is also known as an important factor for the flux enhancement. In order to distinguish the two different kinds of solar wind parameter dependence statistically, we investigate the response of the outer belt to stream interaction regions (SIRs). A total of 179 SIR events are identified for the time period from 1994 to 2005. We classify the SIR events into two groups according to the so-called "spring-toward fall-away" rule: IMF sector polarity after the stream interface is toward in spring or away in fall (group A) and vice versa (group B). According to the Russell-McPherron effect, groups A and B have a significant negative and positive offset of the IMF Bz after the stream interface, respectively. Comparing groups A and B by superposing about the stream interface, only IMF Bz dependence can be obtained because the other solar wind parameters change in the same manner. As a result, the greatest flux enhancement is found in the highest-speed streams with a southward offset of the IMF Bz, indicating that only the solar wind speed by itself is not a sufficient condition for the large flux enhancement. It is also found that the large flux enhancement tends to be associated with weak geomagnetic activities with minimum Dst of about -50 nT on average, implying that the existence of intense magnetic storms is not essential for the flux enhancement.

  15. Modification of the quantum mechanical flux formula for electron-hydrogen ionization through Bohm's velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randazzo, J. M.; Ancarani, L. U.

    2015-12-01

    For the single differential cross section (SDCS) for hydrogen ionization by electron impact (e -H problem), we propose a correction to the flux formula given by R. Peterkop [Theory of Ionization of Atoms by Electron Impact (Colorado Associated University Press, Boulder, 1977)]. The modification is based on an alternative way of defining the kinetic energy fraction, using Bohm's definition of velocities instead of the usual asymptotic kinematical, or geometrical, approximation. It turns out that the solution-dependent, modified energy fraction is equally related to the components of the probability flux. Compared to what is usually observed, the correction yields a finite and well-behaved SDCS value in the asymmetrical situation where one of the continuum electrons carries all the energy while the other has zero energy. We also discuss, within the S -wave model of the e -H ionization process, the continuity of the SDCS derivative at the equal energy sharing point, a property not so clearly observed in published benchmark results obtained with integral and S -matrix formulas with unequal final states.

  16. Relativistic electron flux comparisons at low and high altitudes with fast time resolution and broad spatial coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Gaines, E. E.; Mcglennon, J. P.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Belian, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Analyses are presented for the first high-time resolution multisatellite study of the spatial and temporal characteristics of a relativistic electron enhancement event with a rapid onset. Measurements of MeV electrons were made from two low-altitude polar orbiting satellites and three spacecraft at synchronous altitude. The electron fluxes observed by the low-altitude satellites include precipitating electrons in both the bounce and drift loss cones as well as electrons that are stably trapped, whereas the observations at geosynchronous altitude are dominated by the trapped population. The fluxes of greater than 1 MeV electrons at low-satellite altitude over a wide range of L shells tracked very well the fluxes greater than 0.93 MeV at synchronous altitude.

  17. Characteristics of fluxes of energetic electrons in the transition region during times of enhanced geophysical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev, Y.V.; Spir'kova, E.S.

    1986-05-01

    In January 1976, the Interplanetary Magnetospheric Study (IMS) began. During the period January-March 1976, geomagnetic disturbances coincided mainly with a recurring sequence of earth passages through sector structures in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In March, unusually large enhancements in energetic electron fluxes were recorded by Prognoz 4. The observations were made during intersections of the flanks of the transition region (TR) in conditions of enhanced geomagnetic activity, and the enhancements were of significant duration. Intense bursts of these particles were also observed in the outer magnetosphere at high latitudes. We discuss possible mechanisms for creating such formations.

  18. Oxygen flux and dielectric response study of Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conducting (MIEC) heterogeneous functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbi, Fazle

    Dense mixed ionic-electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes consisting of ionic conductive perovskite-type and/or fluorite-type oxides and high electronic conductive spinel type oxides, at elevated temperature can play a useful role in a number of energy conversion related systems including the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), oxygen separation and permeation membranes, partial oxidization membrane reactors for natural gas processing, high temperature electrolysis cells, and others. This study will investigate the impact of different heterogeneous characteristics of dual phase ionic and electronic conductive oxygen separation membranes on their transport mechanisms, in an attempt to develop a foundation for the rational design of such membranes. The dielectric behavior of a material can be an indicator for MIEC performance and can be incorporated into computational models of MIEC membranes in order to optimize the composition, microstructure, and ultimately predict long term membrane performance. The dielectric behavior of the MIECs can also be an indicator of the transport mechanisms and the parameters they are dependent upon. For this study we chose a dual phase MIEC oxygen separation membrane consisting of an ionic conducting phase: gadolinium doped ceria-Ce0.8 Gd0.2O2 (GDC) and an electronic conductive phase: cobalt ferrite-CoFe2O4 (CFO). The membranes were fabricated from mixtures of Nano-powder of each of the phases for different volume percentages, sintered with various temperatures and sintering time to form systematic micro-structural variations, and characterized by structural analysis (XRD), and micro-structural analysis (SEM-EDS). Performance of the membranes was tested for variable partial pressures of oxygen across the membrane at temperatures from 850°C-1060°C using a Gas Chromatography (GC) system. Permeated oxygen did not directly correlate with change in percent mixture. An intermediate mixture 60%GDC-40%CFO had the highest flux compared to the 50%GDC

  19. Energetic electron fluxes (E180 KeV) observed by the Giotto experiment EPA during encounter with Comet Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, E.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.; Thompson, A.; Osullivan, D.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1986-12-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector system EPA/EPONA onboard Giotto detects ions and electrons with energies greater than 20 keV in various energy channels. In this paper, electron fluxes are presented together with data from the Giotto Magnetometer Experiment. Electrons >180 keV were recorded from the transit of the foreshock, inbound, until the last observation outbound at approximately 03:00 UT on 15 March 1986. Energy spectra for the inbound pass are shown. One flux enhancement in the >300 keV channel and several in the >180 keV channel were recorded outbound. Possible acceleration mechanisms for the energetic electrons are considered.

  20. Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation for Coupled Electron-Photon Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Liscum-Powell, J.L.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Morel, J.E.; Prinja, A.K.

    1999-07-08

    Recently, Morel and McGhee described an alternate second-order form of the transport equation called the self adjoint angular flux (SAAF) equation that has the angular flux as its unknown. The SAAF formulation has all the advantages of the traditional even- and odd-parity self-adjoint equations, with the added advantages that it yields the full angular flux when it is numerically solved, it is significantly easier to implement reflective and reflective-like boundary conditions, and in the appropriate form it can be solved in void regions. The SAAF equation has the disadvantage that the angular domain is the full unit sphere and, like the even- and odd- parity form, S{sub n} source iteration cannot be implemented using the standard sweeping algorithm. Also, problems arise in pure scattering media. Morel and McGhee demonstrated the efficacy of the SAAF formulation for neutral particle transport. Here we apply the SAAF formulation to coupled electron-photon transport problems using multigroup cross-sections from the CEPXS code and S{sub n} discretization.

  1. An Upper Limit on the Electron-Neutrino Flux from the HiRes Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Amann, J. F.; Archbold, G.; Belov, K.; Belz, J. W.; Ben Zvi, S. Y.; Bergman, D. R.; Biesiadecka, A.; Blake, S. A.; Boyer, J. H.; Brusova, O. A.; Burt, G. W.; Cannon, C.; Cao, Z.; Deng, W.; Fedorova, Y.; Findlay, J.; Finley, C. B.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Hughes, G.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Ivanov, D.; Jones, B. F.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kim, K.; Kirn, M. A.; Knapp, B. C.; Loh, E. C.; Maestas, M. M.; Manago, N.; Mannel, E. J.; Marek, L. J.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J. N.; Moore, S. A.; O'Neill, A.; Painter, C. A.; Perera, L.; Reil, K.; Riehle, R.; Roberts, M. D.; Rodriguez, D.; Sasaki, M.; Schnetzer, S. R.; Scott, L. M.; Seman, M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, J. D.; Snow, R.; Sokolsky, P.; Song, C.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Thomas, J. R.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tupa, D.; Wiencke, L. R.; Zech, A.; Zhang, X.

    2008-09-01

    Air-fluorescence detectors such as the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) detector are very sensitive to upward-going, Earth-skimming ultra-high-energy electron-neutrino-induced showers. This is due to the relatively large interaction cross sections of these high-energy neutrinos and to the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect. The LPM effect causes a significant decrease in the cross sections for bremsstrahlung and pair production, allowing charged-current electron-neutrino-induced showers occurring deep in the Earth's crust to be detectable as they exit the Earth into the atmosphere. A search for upward-going neutrino-induced showers in the HiRes-II monocular data set has yielded a null result. From an LPM calculation of the energy spectrum of charged particles as a function of primary energy and depth for electron-induced showers in rock, we calculate the shape of the resulting profile of these showers in air. We describe a full detector Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detector response to upward-going electron-neutrino-induced cascades and present an upper limit on the flux of electron neutrinos.

  2. A relationship between synchronous altitude electron fluxes and the auroral electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, R. D.; Shelley, E. G.; Rostoker, G.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous observations during four substorms are reported from the Lockheed auroral particle spectrometer on ATS 5 and the University of Alberta meridian magnetometer chain. During the four events studied there was a good correlation between the magnitude of the trapped electron fluxes in the energy range from 1.8 to 53 keV and the magnitude of the electrojet current as measured by a station in the magnetometer chain at a latitude close to that expected for the ATS conjugate point. A model electrojet is constructed based on the work of Coroniti and Kennel (1972) which gives a good absolute agreement between the two measured quantities. The results are consistent with the convection electric field's remaining approximately constant during a substantial portion of each of the substorms studied. The temporal variations of the electrojet were apparently controlled by conductivity changes in the ionosphere as determined by the precipitating auroral electrons.

  3. Comparison between POES energetic electron precipitation observations and riometer absorptions: Implications for determining true precipitation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, Craig J.; Kavanagh, Andrew J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Marple, Steve R.

    2013-12-01

    electron precipitation (EEP) impacts the chemistry of the middle atmosphere with growing evidence of coupling to surface temperatures at high latitudes. To better understand this link, it is essential to have realistic observations to properly characterize precipitation and which can be incorporated into chemistry-climate models. The Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) detectors measure precipitating particles but only integral fluxes and only in a fraction of the bounce loss cone. Ground-based riometers respond to precipitation from the whole bounce loss cone; they measure the cosmic radio noise absorption (CNA), a qualitative proxy with scant direct information on the energy flux of EEP. POES observations should have a direct relationship with ΔCNA and comparing the two will clarify their utility in studies of atmospheric change. We determined ionospheric changes produced by the EEP measured by the POES spacecraft in ~250 overpasses of an imaging riometer in northern Finland. The ΔCNA modeled from the POES data is 10-15 times less than the observed ΔCNA when the >30 keV flux is reported as <106 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. Above this level, there is relatively good agreement between the space-based and ground-based measurements. The discrepancy occurs mostly during periods of low geomagnetic activity, and we contend that weak diffusion is dominating the pitch angle scattering into the bounce loss cone at these times. A correction to the calculation using measurements of the trapped flux considerably reduces the discrepancy and provides further support to our hypothesis that weak diffusion leads to underestimates of the EEP.

  4. Precipitating electron energy flux and auroral zone conductances - An empirical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, R. W.; Reiff, P. H.; Maher, L. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Data from the low energy electron (LEE) experiments on the Atmosphere Explorer C and D satellites have been used to determine the average global distribution of the energy flux of precipitating auroral electrons and their average energy for different levels of geomagnetic activity. Measurements from the Atmosphere Explorer unified abstract file (15-s resolution) have been binned according to invariant latitude (in the range 50-90 deg), magnetic local time, and geomagnetic activity as measured by the Kp and auroral electrojet (AE) indices, separately. Bin-averaged values of precipitating energy flux and average energy have been calculated, and a smoothing algorithm used to reduce stochastic variations in the raw data. The results indicate that, for the parameters studied, the AE inces does a superior job of ordering the data with regard to geomagnetic activity. The global distribution of the auroral enhancement porition of the Pedersen and Hall conductances were inferred from the data by means of an empirical fit to detailed energy deposition calculations.

  5. Relativistic electron flux dropouts in the outer radiation belt associated with corotating interaction regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C.-J.; Zong, Q.-G.; Wan, W.-X.; Zhang, H.; Du, A.-M.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how the relativistic electron fluxes drop out in the outer radiation belt under different conditions is of great importance. To investigate which mechanisms may affect the dropouts under different solar wind conditions, 1.5-6.0 MeV electron flux dropout events associated with 223 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) from 1994 to 2003 are studied using the observations of Solar, Anomalous, Magnetospheric Particle Explorer satellite. According to the superposed epoch analysis, it is found that high solar wind dynamic pressure with the peak median value of about 7 nPa is corresponding to the dropout of the median of the radiation belt content (RBC) index to 20% of the level before stream interface arrival, whereas low dynamic pressure with the peak median value of about 3 nPa is related to the dropout of the median of RBC index to 40% of the level before stream interface arrival. Furthermore, the influences of Russell-McPherron effect with respect to interplanetary magnetic field orientation on dropouts are considered. It is pointed out that under positive Russell-McPherron effect (+RM effect) condition, the median of RBC index can drop to 23% of the level before stream interface arrival, while for negative Russell-McPherron effect (-RM effect) events, the median of RBC index only drops to 37% of the level before stream interface arrival. From the evolution of phase space density profiles, the effect of +RM on dropouts can be through nonadiabatic loss.

  6. Ultrasharp-front laser pulses generated by energetic-electron flux triggering of laser propagation in overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Ya; Yu, Yong; Shen, Bai-Fei; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Zhu, Wen-Jun; Chen, Zi-Yu; Ye, Yan

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports that an initially opaque plasma foil, irradiated by a laser pulse with intensity below the self-induced transparency (SIT) threshold, will become transparent, if a flux of energetic electrons is present. Based on this phenomenon, named flux-induced transparency (FIT), an approach to obtaining ultrasharp-front laser pulses is proposed. With the presence of an energetic-electron flux generated by a p-polarized laser irradiating an overdense plasma foil from the rear side, the propagation of an s-polarized laser irradiating the front surface of the foil can be manipulated. The transmitted s-polarized laser pulse has an ultrasharp front which rises by three orders of magnitude within a few laser cycles. The profile of the transmitted pulse is tunable by controlling the time at which the energetic-electron flux arrives at the front surface.

  7. Determination of Flux-Gate Magnetometer Spin Axis Offsets with the Electron Drift Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, Ferdinand; Nakamura, Rumi; Giner, Lukas; Teubenbacher, Robert; Chutter, Mark; Leinweber, Hannes K.; Magnes, Werner

    2014-05-01

    Spin-stabilization of spacecraft enormously supports the in-flight calibration of onboard flux-gate magnetometers (FGMs): eight out of twelve calibration parameters can be determined by minimization of spin tone and harmonics in the calibrated magnetic field measurements. From the remaining four parameters, the spin axis offset is usually obtained by analyzing observations of Alfvénic fluctuations in the solar wind. If solar wind measurements are unavailable, other methods for spin axis offset determination need to be used. We present two alternative methods that are based on the comparison of FGM and electron drift instrument (EDI) data: (1) EDI measures the gyration periods of instrument-emitted electrons in the ambient magnetic field. They are inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength. Differences between FGM and EDI measured field strengths can be attributed to inaccuracies in spin axis offset, if the other calibration parameters are accurately known. (2) For EDI electrons to return to the spacecraft, they have to be sent out in perpendicular direction to the ambient magnetic field. Minimization of the variance of electron beam directions with respect to the FGM-determined magnetic field direction also yields an estimate of the spin axis offset. Prior to spin axis offset determination, systematic inaccuracies in EDI gyration period measurements and in the transformation of EDI beam directions into the FGM spin-aligned reference coordinate system have to be corrected. We show how this can be done by FGM/EDI data comparison, as well.

  8. Systematic electronic-structure investigation of substitutional impurity diffusion and flux coupling in bcc iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Luca; Nastar, Maylise; Sandberg, Nils; Olsson, Pär

    2016-05-01

    The diffusion properties of a wide range of impurities (transition metals and Al, Si, and P) in ferritic alloys are here investigated by means of a combined ab initio-atomic diffusion theory approach. The flux-coupling mechanisms and the solute-diffusion coefficients are inferred from electronic-structure calculations of solute-defect interactions and microscopic jump frequencies. All properties except the second-nearest-neighbor binding energy are found to have a characteristic bell shape as a function of the d -band filling for the 4 d and 5 d series, and an M shape for the 3 d row because of the out-of-trend behavior of Mn. The solute jump frequencies are governed by compressibility, which makes diffusion of large solutes faster, although this effect is partially compensated for by lower attempt frequencies and larger correlations with the vacancy. Diffusion coefficients are predicted in a wide temperature range, far below the experimentally accessible temperatures. In accordance with experiments, Co is found to be a slow diffuser in iron, and the same behavior is predicted for Re, Os, and Ir impurities. Finally, flux-coupling phenomena depend on the iron jump frequencies next to a solute atom, which are mainly controlled by similar electronic interactions to those determining the binding energies. Vacancy drag and solute enrichment at sinks systematically arise below a solute-dependent temperature threshold, directly correlated with the electronic-level interactions at the equilibrium and the saddle-point states. Early transition metals with repulsive second-nearest-neighbor interactions also diffuse via vacancy drag, although they show a lower temperature threshold than the late metals. This confirms that drag is the most common solute-vacancy coupling mechanism in iron at low temperatures, and this is likely to be confirmed as well for impurity diffusion in other transition metals.

  9. The effects and correction of the geometric factor for the POES/MEPED electron flux instrument using a multisatellite comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Sauvaud, Jean-André

    2014-08-01

    Measurements from the Polar-Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) instrument are widely used in studies into radiation belt dynamics and atmospheric coupling. However, this instrument has been shown to have a complex energy-dependent response to incident particle fluxes, with the additional possibility of low-energy protons contaminating the electron fluxes. We test the recent Monte Carlo theoretical simulation of the instrument by comparing the responses against observations from an independent experimental data set. Our study examines the reported geometric factors for the MEPED electron flux instrument against the high-energy resolution Instrument for Detecting Particles (IDPs) on the Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite when they are located at similar locations and times, thereby viewing the same quasi-trapped population of electrons. We find that the new Monte Carlo-produced geometric factors accurately describe the response of the POES MEPED instrument. We go on to develop a set of equations such that integral electron fluxes of a higher accuracy are obtained from the existing MEPED observations. These new MEPED integral fluxes correlated very well with those from the IDP instrument (>99.9% confidence level). As part of this study we have also tested a commonly used algorithm for removing proton contamination from MEPED instrument observations. We show that the algorithm is effective, providing confirmation that previous work using this correction method is valid.

  10. Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation Flux Changes and Total Electron Content Enhancement During Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, T. P.; Zhang, S.; Coster, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Solar flares induce sudden changes in X-ray irradiance and EUV flux. The possibility of a correlation between these changes and the daytime global value of total electron content (TEC) is investigated through the use of data from the GPS, SOHO, and GOES satellites. The Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) is used to investigate the altitude stratification of the flare induced TEC enhancement. A study is conducted for the months of October 2002 and September 2005 as they had 329 and 114 flares, respectively. The amount of TEC enhancement due to a solar flare is found to be dependent on solar activity, solar flare strength, and the background TEC. On average, October 2002 had solar flares of less strength and higher solar activity. Flare effects were more evident in September 2005 which had on average, a small background TEC (10-15 TECu) and prominent (~2 TECu) TEC enhancements. In addition, a high and positive correlation between X-ray irradiance and EUV flux was seen during solar flare events. Through the comparison of the different data sets, it is found that the majority of the TEC enhancement is in the E and F regions (100-150 km) which corresponds to the portion of the ionosphere ionized by EUV radiation.