Science.gov

Sample records for high-intensity impact loads

  1. Influence of Load Carriage on High-Intensity Running Performance Estimation.

    PubMed

    Solomonson, Aaron A; Dicks, Nathan D; Kerr, Whitney J; Pettitt, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    Solomonson, AA, Dicks, ND, Kerr, WJ, and Pettitt, RW. Influence of load carriage on high-intensity running performance estimation. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1391-1396, 2016-Load carriage is a necessary burden for tactical athletes. A combination of training modes, including aerobic conditioning and progressive load carriage, may lead to improved performance. The critical speed (CS) concept enables the practitioner to prescribe high-intensity interval training (HIIT) time limits (TLIMs) from a single 3-minute all-out exercise test (3 MT). We sought to examine the effect of a standard load carriage (18.86 kg) on CS and the finite running capacity > CS (D'). A group of trained subjects (age: 26 ± 5 years, height: 181 ± 4 cm, body mass [BM]: 90 ± 14 kg) completed a loaded and unloaded (UL) 3 MT. The CS was reduced by 0.66 ± 0.24 m·s (p < 0.01) in the loaded condition. There was a small nonsignificant increase in D' (21.25 ± 39.53 m, p = 0.07). The higher the % load carriage relative to BM is, the greater decline in CS (r = 0.83, p < 0.01). A revised CS with load carriage from the UL 3 MT may be calculated using: adjusted CS = original CS + ([-0.0638 × %load]) + 0.6982. Our results indicate that revised CS and TLIMs for fixed distance, fixed time, or fixed speed HIIT prescriptions may be derived from a UL 3 MT. Such calculations would enable more expeditious training for tactical athletes. We recommend further research involving implementation of HIIT using this new method. PMID:26422613

  2. Relationship Between Accelerometer Load, Collisions, and Repeated High-Intensity Effort Activity in Rugby League Players.

    PubMed

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2015-12-01

    Triaxial accelerometers have been critical in providing information on the high-acceleration, low-velocity movements that occur in team sports. In addition, these sensors have proven to be useful in quantifying the activities that do not involve the vertical acceleration associated with locomotion (e.g., tackling, on-ground wrestling, and grappling). This study investigated the relationship between Player Load (PL), 2D Player Load (2DPL), and Player Load Slow (PL Slow), collisions, and repeated high-intensity effort (RHIE) activity in rugby league players. One hundred and eighty-two rugby league players (age, 24.3 ± 3.3 years) participated in this study. Movement was recorded using a global positioning system unit sampling at 10 Hz and triaxial accelerometer sampling at 100 Hz. Analysis was completed during 26 matches (totaling 386 appearances). Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were used to determine relationships between PL, 2DPL, and PL Slow and total collisions and RHIE activity. When all players were considered, weak relationships were found between PL and the number of collisions and RHIE bouts performed. However, PL was strongly associated (p ≤ 0.05) with total distance, low-speed activity, high-speed running distance, total collisions, and the number of RHIE bouts for forwards and hookers. Weak and typically insignificant relationships were found between PL, 2DPL, and PL Slow and the number of collisions and RHIE bouts performed by the adjustables and outside backs positional groups. The relationships between PL and the number of collisions and RHIE bouts are stronger in positions where contact and repeated-effort demands are high. From a practical perspective, these results suggest that PL, 2DPL, and PL Slow offer useful "real-time" measures of collision and RHIE activity, particularly in forwards and hookers, to inform interchange strategies and ensure players are training at an adequate intensity. PMID:26196661

  3. Can Trained Runners Effectively Attenuate Impact Acceleration During Repeated High-Intensity Running Bouts?

    PubMed

    Clansey, Adam C; Lake, Mark J; Wallace, Eric S; Feehally, Tom; Hanlon, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of prolonged high-intensity running on impact accelerations in trained runners. Thirteen male distance runners completed two 20-minute treadmill runs at speeds corresponding to 95% of onset of blood lactate accumulation. Leg and head accelerations were collected for 20 s every fourth minute. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scores were recorded during the third and last minute of each run. RPE responses increased (P < .001) from the start (11.8 ± 0.9, moderate intensity) of the first run to the end (17.7 ± 1.5, very hard) of the second run. Runners maintained their leg impact acceleration, impact attenuation, stride length, and stride frequency characteristics with prolonged run duration. However, a small (0.11-0.14g) but significant increase (P < .001) in head impact accelerations were observed at the end of both first and second runs. It was concluded that trained runners are able to control leg impact accelerations during sustained high-intensity running. Alongside the substantial increases in perceived exertion levels, running mechanics and frequency domain impact attenuation levels remained constant. This suggests that the present trained runners are able to cope from a mechanical perspective despite an increased physiological demand. PMID:26695109

  4. High intensity single bunch operation with heavy periodic transient beam loading in wide band rf cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Fumihiko; Hotchi, Hideaki; Schnase, Alexander; Yoshii, Masahito; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Ohmori, Chihiro; Nomura, Masahiro; Toda, Makoto; Shimada, Taihei; Hasegawa, Katsushi; Hara, Keigo

    2015-09-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) was originally designed to accelerate two high intensity bunches, while some of neutron experiments in the materials and life science experimental facility and a muon experiment using main ring beams require a single bunch operation mode, in which one of the two rf buckets is filled and the other is empty. The beam intensity in the single bunch operation has been limited by longitudinal beam losses due to the rf bucket distortions by the wake voltage of the odd harmonics (h =1 ,3 ,5 ) in the wide band magnetic alloy cavities. We installed an additional rf feedforward system to compensate the wake voltages of the odd harmonics (h =1 ,3 ,5 ). The additional system has a similar structure as the existing feedforward system for the even harmonics (h =2 ,4 ,6 ). We describe the function of the feedforward system for the odd harmonics, the commissioning methodology, and the commissioning results. The longitudinal beam losses during the single bunch acceleration disappeared with feedforward for the odd harmonics. We also confirmed that the beam quality in the single bunch acceleration are similar to that of the normal operation with two bunches. Thus, high intensity single bunch acceleration at the intensity of 2.3 ×1013 protons per bunch has been achieved in the J-PARC RCS. This article is a follow-up of our previous article, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 14, 051004 (2011). The feedforward system extension for single bunch operation was successful.

  5. Behavior and design of reinforced concrete column-type lapped splices subjected to high-intensity cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, B.; White, R. N.; Gergely, P.

    1982-10-01

    The behavior and design of lapped splices in reinforced concrete column type specimens under high intensity flexural cyclic loads was studied. Special attention is focused on the transverse steel requirements of specimens with more than two splices in a layer; the use of offsets in spliced bars; the effect of concrete strength on splice strength and behavior; and the strength of epoxy-repaired splices. Procedures are provided for the design of reinforced lapped splices to sustain at least twenty reversing load cycles beyond yield and a maximum rebar strain at the splice of at least 2.5 times the yield strain. The key aspect of the design is the provision of closely spaced uniformly distributed stirrup ties in the splice region. Equations are developed for the spacing of stirrups and the minimum splice length requirement.

  6. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Fibroids - Potential Impact on Fertility and Pregnancy Outcome.

    PubMed

    Bohlmann, M K; Hoellen, F; Hunold, P; David, M

    2014-02-01

    Laparoscopic myomectomy is regarded as the gold standard for women with symptomatic fibroids who wish to become pregnant. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU or MRgFUS) ablation of uterine fibroids is also being discussed as a non-surgical, minimally invasive, therapeutic option. This review examines the available data on the impact of HIFU/MRgFUS on fertility and pregnancy, focusing particularly on potential direct side-effects of this type of intervention on ovaries, fallopian tubes and uterus and potential late effects on pregnancy and birth, based on the current literature. All pregnancies after HIFU/MRgFUS published to date (around 100 cases) were evaluated. The published case series suggest that HIFU/MRgFUS ablation has no impact on the rate of miscarriages or other obstetrical outcome parameters. Because no prospective studies exist which permit firm conclusions to be drawn on the impact of HIFU/MRgFUS on fertility and pregnancy outcome in women with symptomatic fibroids, this approach is currently only recommended for women with suspected fertility problems due to uterine fibroids who either decline surgery or who have an unacceptably high surgical risk. PMID:24741124

  7. Impact of preconditioning pulse on lesion formation during high-intensity focused ultrasound histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A; Riesberg, Grant M

    2012-11-01

    Therapeutic applications with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fall into two classifications-one using thermal effect for coagulation or ablation while generally avoiding cavitation and the other using cavitation-mediated mechanical effects while suppressing heating. Representative of the latter, histotripsy uses HIFU at low duty factor to create energetic bubble clouds inside tissue to liquefy a region and has the advantages in real-time monitoring and lesion fidelity to treatment planning. We explored the impact of a preconditioning/heating pulse on histotripsy lesion formation in porcine muscle samples. During sonication, a targeted square region 9 mm wide (lateral to the focal plane) was scanned in a raster pattern with a step size of 0.75 mm. The 20-s exposure at each treatment location consisted of a 5-s duration preconditioning burst at spatial-peak intensities from 0-1386 W/cm² followed by 5000 tone bursts at high intensity (with spatial-peak pulse-average intensity of 47.34 kW/cm², spatial-peak temporal-average intensity of 284 W/cm², peak compressional pressure of 102 MPa and peak rarefactional pressure of 17 MPa). The temperature increase for all exposures was measured using a thermal imager immediately after each exposure. Lesion volume increased with increasing amplitude of the preconditioning pulse until coagulation was observed, but lesion width/area did not change significantly with the amplitude. In addition, the lesion dimensions became smaller when the global tissue temperature was raised before applying the histotripsy pulsing sequence. Therefore, the benefit of the preconditioning pulse was not caused by global heating. PMID:22929656

  8. Water impact loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, D. H.; Safronski, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program to generate time history of load factor and pressure on conical body of revolution during impact with water is discussed. Program calculates depth of penetration, velocity, force, load factor, maximum pressure at water line, and average pressure. Program is written in FORTRAN 4 Level H for IBM 360/85/195 Release 20.1 computer.

  9. High-intensity interval training, solutions to the programming puzzle. Part II: anaerobic energy, neuromuscular load and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Martin; Laursen, Paul B

    2013-10-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIT) is a well-known, time-efficient training method for improving cardiorespiratory and metabolic function and, in turn, physical performance in athletes. HIT involves repeated short (<45 s) to long (2-4 min) bouts of rather high-intensity exercise interspersed with recovery periods (refer to the previously published first part of this review). While athletes have used 'classical' HIT formats for nearly a century (e.g. repetitions of 30 s of exercise interspersed with 30 s of rest, or 2-4-min interval repetitions ran at high but still submaximal intensities), there is today a surge of research interest focused on examining the effects of short sprints and all-out efforts, both in the field and in the laboratory. Prescription of HIT consists of the manipulation of at least nine variables (e.g. work interval intensity and duration, relief interval intensity and duration, exercise modality, number of repetitions, number of series, between-series recovery duration and intensity); any of which has a likely effect on the acute physiological response. Manipulating HIT appropriately is important, not only with respect to the expected middle- to long-term physiological and performance adaptations, but also to maximize daily and/or weekly training periodization. Cardiopulmonary responses are typically the first variables to consider when programming HIT (refer to Part I). However, anaerobic glycolytic energy contribution and neuromuscular load should also be considered to maximize the training outcome. Contrasting HIT formats that elicit similar (and maximal) cardiorespiratory responses have been associated with distinctly different anaerobic energy contributions. The high locomotor speed/power requirements of HIT (i.e. ≥95 % of the minimal velocity/power that elicits maximal oxygen uptake [v/p(·)VO(2max)] to 100 % of maximal sprinting speed or power) and the accumulation of high-training volumes at high-exercise intensity (runners can

  10. Impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels on coronary atheroma regression following high-intensity statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rishi; Nissen, Steven E; Shao, Mingyuan; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2014-11-15

    Guidelines now recommend high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with proven atherosclerotic disease. Yet the impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels on measures of disease regression to this therapy are unknown. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that high-intensity statin therapy causes equivalent degrees of coronary atheroma regression irrespective of baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. In 8 prospective randomized trials using serial coronary intravascular ultrasound, 1,881 patients who maintained or switched to 18- to 24 months of high-intensity statin therapy (rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg) were stratified according to baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. Changes in coronary percentage atheroma volume (PAV) and total atheroma volume (TAV) were evaluated. High-intensity statin therapy produced significant reductions from baseline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 38.4%, non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 33.6%, triglycerides by 13.1%, and CRP by 33.3%, while increasing HDL cholesterol by 11.7% (p <0.001 for all). This was associated with regression of PAV by 0.7% and of TAV by 8.2 mm(3) (p <0.001 for both). No significant differences of changes in PAV and TAV were observed across baseline quintiles of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or CRP. Moreover, across all measured lipoproteins and CRP, most patients demonstrated plaque regression (defined as any change from baseline in PAV or TAV <0). In conclusion, high-intensity statin therapy attenuated the natural progression of coronary atherosclerosis in all strata of patients with coronary artery disease irrespective of baseline lipoprotein or CRP levels. These findings provide support for the latest United States guideline recommendations for the broad use of high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with atherosclerosis, regardless of baseline lipid status. PMID:25282317

  11. The impact of short duration, high intensity exercise on cardiac troponin release.

    PubMed

    George, Keith P; Grant, Marie Clare; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the appearance of cardiac troponins (cTnI and/or cTnT) after a short bout (30 s) of 'all-out' intense exercise and to determine the stability of any exercise-related cTnI release in response to repeated bouts of high intensity exercise separated by 7 days recovery. Eighteen apparently healthy, physically active, male university students completed two all-out 30 s cycle sprint, separated by 7 days. cTnI, blood lactate and catecholamine concentrations were measured before, immediately after and 24 h after each bout. Cycle performance, heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise were also recorded. Cycle performance was modestly elevated in the second trial [6·5% increase in peak power output (PPO)]; there was no difference in the cardiovascular, lactate or catecholamine response to the two cycle trials. cTnI was not significantly elevated from baseline through recovery (Trial 1: 0·06 ± 0·04 ng ml(-1) , 0·05 ± 0·04 ng ml(-1) , 0·03 ± 0·02 ng ml(-1) ; Trial 2: 0·02 ± 0·04 ng ml(-1) , 0·04 ± 0·03 ng ml(-1) , 0·05 ± 0·06 ng ml(-1) ) in either trial. Very small within subject changes were not significantly correlated between the two trials (r = 0·06; P>0·05). Subsequently, short duration, high intensity exercise does not elicit a clinically relevant response in cTnI and any small alterations likely reflect the underlying biological variability of cTnI measurement within the participants. PMID:25532821

  12. Benchmark of the IMPACT Code for High Intensity Beam DynamicsSimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.

    2006-11-16

    The IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code was first developed under Computational Grand Challenge project in the mid 1990s [1]. It started as a three-dimensional (3D) data parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) code written in High Performance Fortran. The code used a split-operator based method to solve the Hamiltonian equations of motion. It contained linear transfer maps for drifts, quadrupole magnets and rf cavities. The space-charge forces were calculated using an FFT-based method with 3D open boundary conditions and longitudinal periodic boundary conditions. This code was completely rewritten in the late 1990s based on a message passing parallel programming paradigm using Fortran 90 and MPI following an object-oriented software design. This improved the code's scalability on large parallel computer systems and also gave the code better software maintainability and extensibility [2]. In the following years, under the SciDAC-1 accelerator project, the code was extended to include more accelerating and focusing elements such as DTL, CCL, superconducting linac, solenoid, dipole, multipoles, and others. Besides the original split-operator based integrator, a direct integration of Lorentz equations of motion using a leap-frog algorithm was also added to the IMPACT code to handle arbitrary external nonlinear fields. This integrator can read in 3D electromagnetic fields in a Cartesian grid or in a cylindrical coordinate system. Using the Lorentz integrator, we also extended the original code to handle multiple charge-state beams. The space-charge solvers were also extended to include conducting wall effects for round and rectangular pipes with longitudinal open and periodic boundary conditions. Recently, it has also been extended to handle short-range wake fields (longitudinal monopole and transverse dipole) and longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation wake fields. Besides the parallel macroparticle tracking code, an rf linac lattice design code

  13. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Fibroids – Potential Impact on Fertility and Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bohlmann, M. K.; Hoellen, F.; Hunold, P.; David, M.

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic myomectomy is regarded as the gold standard for women with symptomatic fibroids who wish to become pregnant. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU or MRgFUS) ablation of uterine fibroids is also being discussed as a non-surgical, minimally invasive, therapeutic option. This review examines the available data on the impact of HIFU/MRgFUS on fertility and pregnancy, focusing particularly on potential direct side-effects of this type of intervention on ovaries, fallopian tubes and uterus and potential late effects on pregnancy and birth, based on the current literature. All pregnancies after HIFU/MRgFUS published to date (around 100 cases) were evaluated. The published case series suggest that HIFU/MRgFUS ablation has no impact on the rate of miscarriages or other obstetrical outcome parameters. Because no prospective studies exist which permit firm conclusions to be drawn on the impact of HIFU/MRgFUS on fertility and pregnancy outcome in women with symptomatic fibroids, this approach is currently only recommended for women with suspected fertility problems due to uterine fibroids who either decline surgery or who have an unacceptably high surgical risk. PMID:24741124

  14. Impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport from short pulse, high intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C. M.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E. W.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous experiments and modeling examining the impact of an underdense, pre-formed plasma in laser-plasma interactions have shown that the fast electrons are generated with energies higher than predicted by ponderomotive scaling [4, 3-14]. We report on experiments using the Texas Petawatt high intensity (150 fs, 1.5  ×  1020 W cm-2) laser pulse, which were conducted to examine the mechanism for accelerating these high energy electrons. These experiments gauge the impact a controlled low density pre-formed plasma has on electron generation with a shorter time scale than previous experiments, 150-180 fs. Electron temperatures measured via magnetic spectrometer on experiment were found to be independent of preformed plasma. Supplemental computational results using 1D PIC simulations predict that super-ponderomotive electrons are generated inside a potential well in the pre-plasma [1]. However, while the potential well is established around 150 fs, the electrons require at least an additional 50 fs to be trapped and heated inside it.

  15. Impact of Pre-Plasma on Fast Electron Generation and Transport from Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Link, A.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Minello, V.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results and analysis from recent short pulse laser matter experiments using the Texas Petawatt Laser to study the impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport. The experimental setup consisted of 3 separate beam elements: a main, high intensity, short pulse beam for the interaction, a secondary pulse of equal intensity interacting with a separate thin foil target to generate protons for side-on proton imaging and a third, low intensity, wider beam to generate a varied scale length pre-plasma. The main target consisted of a multilayer planar Al foil with a buried Cu fluor layer. The electron beam was characterized with multiple diagnostics, including several bremsstrahlung spectrometers, magnetic electron spectrometers and Cu-K α imaging. The protons from the secondary target were used to image the fields on the front of the target in the region of laser plasma interaction. Features seen in the interaction region by these protons will be presented along with characteristics of the generated electron beam. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under Contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA).

  16. Development of the experimental procedure to examine the response of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact.

    PubMed

    Hart, Robert J; Zhupanska, Olesya I

    2016-01-01

    A new fully automated experimental setup has been developed to study the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact. The experimental setup allows for real-time measurements of the pulsed electric current, voltage, impact load, and displacements on the CFRP composite specimens. The setup includes a new custom-built current pulse generator that utilizes a bank of capacitor modules capable of producing a 20 ms current pulse with an amplitude of up to 2500 A. The setup enabled application of the pulsed current and impact load and successfully achieved coordination between the peak of the current pulse and the peak of the impact load. A series of electrical, impact, and coordinated electrical-impact characterization tests were performed on 32-ply IM7/977-3 unidirectional CFRP composites to assess their ability to withstand application of a pulsed electric current and determine the effects of the pulsed current on the impact response. Experimental results revealed that the electrical resistance of CFRP composites decreased with an increase in the electric current magnitude. It was also found that the electrified CFRP specimens withstood higher average impact loads compared to the non-electrified specimens. PMID:26827355

  17. Development of the experimental procedure to examine the response of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Robert J.; Zhupanska, Olesya I.

    2016-01-01

    A new fully automated experimental setup has been developed to study the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact. The experimental setup allows for real-time measurements of the pulsed electric current, voltage, impact load, and displacements on the CFRP composite specimens. The setup includes a new custom-built current pulse generator that utilizes a bank of capacitor modules capable of producing a 20 ms current pulse with an amplitude of up to 2500 A. The setup enabled application of the pulsed current and impact load and successfully achieved coordination between the peak of the current pulse and the peak of the impact load. A series of electrical, impact, and coordinated electrical-impact characterization tests were performed on 32-ply IM7/977-3 unidirectional CFRP composites to assess their ability to withstand application of a pulsed electric current and determine the effects of the pulsed current on the impact response. Experimental results revealed that the electrical resistance of CFRP composites decreased with an increase in the electric current magnitude. It was also found that the electrified CFRP specimens withstood higher average impact loads compared to the non-electrified specimens.

  18. Exploratory Investigation of Impact Loads During the Forward Handspring Vault.

    PubMed

    Penitente, Gabriella; Sands, William A

    2015-06-27

    The purpose of this study was to examine kinematic and kinetic differences in low and high intensity hand support impact loads during a forward handspring vault. A high-speed video camera (500 Hz) and two portable force platforms (500 Hz) were installed on the surface of the vault table. Two-dimensional analyses were conducted on 24 forward handspring vaults performed by 12 senior level, junior Olympic program female gymnasts (16.9 ±1.4 yr; body height 1.60 ±0.1 m; body mass 56.7 ±7.8 kg). Load intensities at impact with the vault table were classified as low (peak force < 0.8 × body weight) and high (peak force > 0.8 × body weight). These vaults were compared via crucial kinetic and kinematic variables using independent t-tests and Pearson correlations. Statistically significant (p < 0.001) differences were observed in peak force (t(24) = 4.75, ES = 3.37) and time to peak force (t(24) = 2.07, ES = 1.56). Statistically significant relationships between the loading rate and time to peak force were observed for high intensity loads. Peak force, time to peak force, and a shoulder angle at impact were identified as primary variables potentially involved in the determination of large repetitive loading rates on the forward handspring vault. PMID:26240649

  19. Exploratory Investigation of Impact Loads During the Forward Handspring Vault

    PubMed Central

    Penitente, Gabriella; Sands, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine kinematic and kinetic differences in low and high intensity hand support impact loads during a forward handspring vault. A high-speed video camera (500 Hz) and two portable force platforms (500 Hz) were installed on the surface of the vault table. Two-dimensional analyses were conducted on 24 forward handspring vaults performed by 12 senior level, junior Olympic program female gymnasts (16.9 ±1.4 yr; body height 1.60 ±0.1 m; body mass 56.7 ±7.8 kg). Load intensities at impact with the vault table were classified as low (peak force < 0.8 × body weight) and high (peak force > 0.8 × body weight). These vaults were compared via crucial kinetic and kinematic variables using independent t-tests and Pearson correlations. Statistically significant (p < 0.001) differences were observed in peak force (t(24) = 4.75, ES = 3.37) and time to peak force (t(24) = 2.07, ES = 1.56). Statistically significant relationships between the loading rate and time to peak force were observed for high intensity loads. Peak force, time to peak force, and a shoulder angle at impact were identified as primary variables potentially involved in the determination of large repetitive loading rates on the forward handspring vault. PMID:26240649

  20. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Redwine, Robert P.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  1. Impact of High-intensity Intermittent and Moderate-intensity Continuous Exercise on Autonomic Modulation in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Santos, C; Giacon, T R; Campos, E Z; Gerosa-Neto, J; Rodrigues, B; Vanderlei, L C M; Lira, F S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare heart rate variability (HRV) recovery after two iso-volume (5 km) exercises performed at different intensities. 14 subjects volunteered (25.17±5.08 years; 74.7±6.28 kg; 175±0.05 cm; 59.56±5.15 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and after determination of peak oxygen uptake (VO2Peak) and the speed associated with VO2Peak (sVO2Peak), the subjects completed 2 random experimental trials: high-intensity exercise (HIE - 1:1 at 100% sVO2Peak), and moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MIE - 70% sVO2Peak). HRV and RR intervals were monitored before, during and after the exercise sessions together with, the HRV analysis in the frequency domains (high-frequency - HF: 0.15 to 0.4 Hz and low-frequency - LF: 0.04 to 0.15 Hz components) and the ratio between them (LF/HF). Statistical analysis comparisons between moments and between HIE and MIE were performed using a mixed model. Both exercise sessions modified LFlog, HFlog, and LF/HF (F=16.54, F=19.32 and F=5.17, p<0.05, respectively). A group effect was also found for LFlog (F=23.91, p<0.05), and HFlog (F=57.55, p< 0.05). LF/HF returned to resting value 15 min after MIE exercise and 20 min after HIE exercise. This means that the heavy domain (aerobic and anaerobic threshold) induces dissimilar autonomic modification in physically active subjects. Both HIE and MIE modify HRV, and generally HIE delays parasympathetic autonomic modulation recovery after iso-volume exercise. PMID:26951480

  2. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  3. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  4. Impact loads of falling rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, W.

    2009-04-01

    Depending on the chosen protection system the planning engineer has to proceed differently. If the impact energies stay below 3'000 - 5'000 kJ solutions using flexible protection systems are recommended in many cases being the most efficient solution. Since 2001, such systems are type tested in Switzerland. The results are published on the internet (www.umwelt-schweiz.ch/typenpruefung). Therefore, the engineers can concentrate on the design of the anchorage and do not need to consider the brake down process of the falling rock because its details including the acting forces within the barrier are given. This is different to the design of rockfall protection earth dams. Here, the evidence of the structural safety is the major task and questions like the following ones have to be answered: What magnitude are the forces that have to be carried for a certain kinetic energy? How are the forces influenced by mass or impact velocity? What is the influence of the soil properties such as strength, density and friction angle? How deep does the rock penetrate? Previous research on the impact loads on the cushion layer of protection galleries were performed by EPFL in the mid-nineties and led to a Swiss Guideline (ASTRA/SBB 1998) to calculate an equivalent static load for the structure underneath. This approach also delivers a function to predict the penetration depth. This contribution now checks whether above approach can also be used to design earth dams or how it can be modified. For that, the results of previous experiments performed by different institutions were analysed and, if possible, compared to the guideline. This could confirm above mentioned function to predict the penetration depth. In addition, an experimental series with different bodies (800 kg, 4000 kg) falling from different heights (2 - 15 m) on differently conditioned soils were performed. Measurements were taken through accelerometers attached to the blocks and measuring the vertical deceleration. The

  5. Effect of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound on Drug Release from Doxorubicin-Loaded PEGylated Liposomes and Therapeutic Effect in Colorectal Cancer Murine Models.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hwan-Seok; Hwang, Hyosook; Oh, Phil-Sun; Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Tai Kyoung; Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Hyeon Soo; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2016-04-01

    The goal of the study described here was to evaluate the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in drug release and its application in cancer therapy. HIFU was set to minimize hyperthermia, particularly non-specific hyperthermia, of exposed areas. An in vitro temperature-sensitive hydrogel phantom model determined the parameters of HIFU under mild condition settings (spatial average temporal average intensity [ISATA] = 83.35 W/cm(2)). PEGylated liposomal indocyanine green (LCLP-ICG) and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (LCLP-Dox) were prepared with the same mole ratio to allow direct comparison of drug release in vitro and in vivo. We induced drug release with HIFU treatment using LCLP-ICG coupled with optical imaging in vitro and in vivo. The size distribution changes in LCLP-ICG in vitro and fluorescence intensity changes in ICG after intra-tumoral injection of LCLP-ICG into CT26 solid tumors in vivo followed by HIFU confirmed the feasibility of the system. We validated the therapeutic effect of HIFU treatment of the CT26 mouse tumor model. The tumor growth rate was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) only in the group administered LCLP-Dox followed by cycles of HIFU treatment, and the chemotherapy of the CT26 solid tumors was found to be highly efficient. PMID:26795498

  6. Greater impact of acute high-intensity interval exercise on post-exercise executive function compared to moderate-intensity continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hayato; Suga, Tadashi; Takenaka, Saki; Tanaka, Daichi; Takeuchi, Tatsuya; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Isaka, Tadao; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MCE) can improve executive function (EF) acutely, potentially through the activation of both physiological and psychological factors. Recently, high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) has been reported to be more beneficial for physical adaptation than MCE. Factors for EF improvement can potentially be more enhanced by HIIE than by MCE; but the effects of HIIE on EF remain unknown. Therefore, we aimed to examine to what extent HIIE impacts post-exercise EF immediately after exercise and during post-exercise recovery, compared with traditional MCE. Twelve healthy male subjects performed cycle ergometer exercise based on either HIIE or MCE protocols in a randomized and counterbalanced order. The HIIE protocol consisted of four 4-min bouts at 90% of peak VO2 with 3-min active recovery at 60% of peak VO2. A volume-matched MCE protocol was applied at 60% of peak VO2. To evaluate EF, a color-words Stroop task was performed pre- and post-exercise. Improvement in EF immediately after exercise was the same for the HIIE and MCE protocols. However, the improvement of EF by HIIE was sustained during 30 min of post-exercise recovery, during which MCE returned to the pre-exercise level. The EF response in the post-exercise recovery was associated with changes in physiological and psychological responses. The present findings showed that HIIE and MCE were capable of improving EF. Moreover, HIIE could prolong improvement in EF during post-exercise recovery. For the first time, we suggest that HIIE may be more effective strategy than MCE for improving EF. PMID:26723268

  7. Wheelchair caster loading during frontal impact.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, Gina E; van Roosmalen, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Many wheelchair users are required or choose to use their wheelchairs as a motor vehicle seat during transport. It is therefore key that the wheelchair components be designed to tolerate crash-level loading conditions. Casters are particularly prone to failure under crash loading conditions. Our study evaluated wheelchair caster loading during 20g/48 kph frontal sled impact testing using an 85-kg surrogate wheelchair base (SWCB) with casters positioned on a load-measuring platform. A Hybrid III 50th percentile male test dummy was seated in the SWCB, which simulated a power wheelchair and was secured using four-point tiedowns. Various rear securement point heights and wheelchair seating systems were used to study their effect on caster loading. Caster normal loading was found to vary from 769 to 7,209 N depending on rear securement location and integrity of the seating system. Dynamic sled impact test results showed that normal loading of the front wheelchair casters was influenced by wheelchair seating system integrity and rear wheelchair securement height. Shear loading varied from 781 to 1,589 N and did not appear to be dependent on seat integrity or rear securement height. The load/time histories measured during dynamic impact testing can be used to guide the development of transit-safe caster design. PMID:15137727

  8. Differential Impact of Acute High-Intensity Exercise on Circulating Endothelial Microparticles and Insulin Resistance between Overweight/Obese Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    Durrer, Cody; Robinson, Emily; Wan, Zhongxiao; Martinez, Nic; Hummel, Michelle L.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Kilpatrick, Marcus W.; Little, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background An acute bout of exercise can improve endothelial function and insulin sensitivity when measured on the day following exercise. Our aim was to compare acute high-intensity continuous exercise (HICE) to high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) on circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) and insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese men and women. Methods Inactive males (BMI = 30 ± 3, 25 ± 6 yr, n = 6) and females (BMI = 28 ± 2, 21 ± 3 yr, n = 7) participated in three experimental trials in a randomized counterbalanced crossover design: 1) No exercise control (Control); 2) HICE (20 min cycling @ just above ventilatory threshold); 3) HIIE (10 X 1-min @ ∼90% peak aerobic power). Exercise conditions were matched for external work and diet was controlled post-exercise. Fasting blood samples were obtained ∼18 hr after each condition. CD62E+ and CD31+/CD42b- EMPs were assessed by flow cytometry and insulin resistance (IR) was estimated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Results There was a significant sex X exercise interaction for CD62E+ EMPs, CD31+/CD42b- EMPs, and HOMA-IR (all P<0.05). In males, both HICE and HIIE reduced EMPs compared to Control (P≤0.05). In females, HICE increased CD62E+ EMPs (P<0.05 vs. Control) whereas CD31+/CD42b- EMPs were unaltered by either exercise type. There was a significant increase in HOMA-IR in males but a decrease in females following HIIE compared to Control (P<0.05). Conclusions Overweight/obese males and females appear to respond differently to acute bouts of high-intensity exercise. A single session of HICE and HIIE reduced circulating EMPs measured on the morning following exercise in males but in females CD62E+ EMPs were increased following HICE. Next day HOMA-IR paradoxically increased in males but was reduced in females following HIIE. Future research is needed to investigate mechanisms responsible for potential differential responses between males and females. PMID:25710559

  9. Impact of high-intensity pulsed electric fields on carotenoids profile of tomato juice made of moderate-intensity pulsed electric field-treated tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Odriozola-Serrano, Isabel; Oms-Oliu, Gemma; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M; Elez-Martínez, Pedro; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2013-12-01

    The effect of pulsed electric fields (PEF) on the carotenoid content of tomato juices was studied. First, moderate-intensity PEF (MIPEF) was applied to raw tomatoes. Afterwards, MIPEF-treated and untreated tomatoes were immediately refrigerated at 4 °C for 24 h and then, they were separately ground to produce tomato juices. Juices were treated by heat treatments or by high-intensity PEF (HIPEF) and stored under refrigeration for 56 days. MIPEF treatment of tomatoes increased the content of carotenoid compounds in tomato juices. An enhancement of 63-65% in 15-cis-lycopene was observed in juices prepared with MIPEF-treated tomatoes. A slight increase in cis-lycopene isomers was observed over time, whereas other carotenoids slightly decreased. However, HIPEF treated tomato juices maintained higher carotenoid content (10-20%) through the storage time than thermally and untreated juices. The combination of MIPEF and HIPEF treatments could be used not only to produce tomato juices with high carotenoid content but also, to maintain higher the carotenoid content during storage time. PMID:23871069

  10. Age related vascular endothelial function following lifelong sedentariness: positive impact of cardiovascular conditioning without further improvement following low frequency high intensity interval training

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Fergal M.; Herbert, Peter; Ratcliffe, John W.; New, Karl J.; Baker, Julien S.; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aging is associated with diffuse impairments in vascular endothelial function and traditional aerobic exercise is known to ameliorate these changes. High intensity interval training (HIIT) is effective at improving vascular function in aging men with existing disease, but its effectiveness remains to be demonstrated in otherwise healthy sedentary aging. However, the frequency of commonly used HIIT protocols may be poorly tolerated in older cohorts. Therefore, the present study investigated the effectiveness of lower frequency HIIT (LfHIIT) on vascular function in a cohort of lifelong sedentary (SED; n =22, age 62.7 ± 5.2 years) men compared with a positive control group of lifelong exercisers (LEX; n = 17, age 61.1 ± 5.4 years). The study consisted of three assessment phases; enrolment to the study (Phase A), following 6 weeks of conditioning exercise in SED (Phase B) and following 6 weeks of low frequency HIIT in both SED and LEX (LfHIIT; Phase C). Conditioning exercise improved FMD in SED (3.4 ± 1.5% to 4.9 ± 1.1%; P <0.01) such that the difference between groups on enrolment (3.4 ± 1.5% vs. 5.3 ± 1.4%; P <0.01) was abrogated. This was maintained but not further improved following LfHIIT in SED whilst FMD remained unaffected by LfHIIT in LEX. In conclusion, LfHIIT is effective at maintaining improvements in vascular function achieved during conditioning exercise in SED. LfHIIT is a well‐tolerated and effective exercise mode for reducing cardiovascular risk and maintaining but does not improve vascular function beyond that achieved by conditioning exercise in aging men, irrespective of fitness level. PMID:25626864

  11. Impact of low-volume, high-intensity interval training on maximal aerobic capacity, health-related quality of life and motivation to exercise in ageing men.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Ann-Marie; Herbert, Peter; Easton, Chris; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Grace, Fergal M

    2015-01-01

    There is a demand for effective training methods that encourage exercise adherence during advancing age, particularly in sedentary populations. This study examined the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) exercise on health-related quality of life (HRQL), aerobic fitness and motivation to exercise in ageing men. Participants consisted of males who were either lifelong sedentary (SED; N = 25; age 63 ± 5 years) or lifelong exercisers (LEX; N = 19; aged 61 ± 5 years). [Formula: see text] and HRQL were measured at three phases: baseline (Phase A), week seven (Phase B) and week 13 (Phase C). Motivation to exercise was measured at baseline and week 13. [Formula: see text] was significantly higher in LEX (39.2 ± 5.6 ml kg min(-1)) compared to SED (27.2 ± 5.2 ml kg min(-1)) and increased in both groups from Phase A to C (SED 4.6 ± 3.2 ml kg min(-1), 95 % CI 3.1 - 6.0; LEX 4.9 ± 3.4 ml kg min(-1), 95 % CI 3.1-6.6) Physical functioning (97 ± 4 LEX; 93 ± 7 SED) and general health (70 ± 11 LEX; 78 ± 11 SED) were significantly higher in LEX but increased only in the SED group from Phase A to C (physical functioning 17 ± 18, 95 % CI 9-26, general health 14 ± 14, 95 % CI 8-21). Exercise motives related to social recognition (2.4 ± 1.2 LEX; 1.5 ± 1.0 SED), affiliation (2.7 ± 1.0 LEX; 1.6 ± 1.2 SED) and competition (3.3 ± 1.3 LEX; 2.2 ± 1.1) were significantly higher in LEX yet weight management motives were significantly higher in SED (2.9 ± 1.1 LEX; 4.3 ± 0.5 SED). The study provides preliminary evidence that low-volume HIIT increases perceptions of HRQL, exercise motives and aerobic capacity in older adults, to varying degrees, in both SED and LEX groups. PMID:25773069

  12. Delaminations in composite plates under impact loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; Springer, George S.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the locations, shapes, and sizes of delaminations which occur in a fiber reinforced composite plate subjected to non-penetrating (low velocity) impact of a solid object. The plate may be simply supported, clamped, or free along its edges. A failure model of the delamination formation was developed. This model was then coupled with a finite element analysis. The model and the finite element analysis were then implemented by a computer code (IMPACT-ST) which can be used to estimate the damage initiation load and the locations, shapes, and sizes of the delaminations. Tests were performed measuring the geometries of the delaminations in graphite-epoxy, graphite-toughened epoxy, and graphite-PEEK plates impacted by a projectile with a spherical tip having masses ranging from 0.355 lbm to 0.963 lbm and velocities from 50 in/sec to 225 in/sec. The data were compared to the results of the model, and good agreements were found between the measured and the calculated delamination lengths and widths.

  13. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  14. The effect of progressive high-intensity inspiratory muscle training and fixed high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-one stroke patients were assigned to one of three groups: progressive load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 8), fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 6), and controls (n = 7). [Methods] The progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training participants undertook an exercise program for 20 minutes, three times weekly, for 6 weeks. After each session, diaphragm thickness was measured using ultrasonography. The diaphragm asymmetry ratio and diaphragm thickening ratio were standardized using a formula. [Results] After intervention, the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly differed among the three groups, and the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly increased in the control group. A significant increase was identified in the diaphragm thickening ratio within the progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training groups. [Conclusion] Progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training decreased the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients; this effect, in turn, increased the diaphragm thickening ratio in stroke patients. The two interventions examined here should be selectively applied to individuals in the clinical field. PMID:26644689

  15. Dynamic buckling of stiffened plates subjected to explosion impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Guo, J.; Yao, X. L.; Zhang, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic buckling characteristics and criteria of a ship's structural stiffened plate subjected to underwater explosion impact loads are investigated in this study. Using the structural deformations observed in the experiments of underwater explosions against a plated grillage model, the mode shapes of the dynamic buckling were obtained. Through the construction of a computational model of stiffened plates subjected to an underwater explosion shock wave, the impact load was theoretically calculated and transformed into a rectangular pulse. According to the different response patterns of stiffened plates under different impact loads, a dynamic buckling criterion for the stiffened plates subjected to an explosion shock wave was proposed. Additionally, the static buckling phenomenon in the stiffened plates was analysed based on the minimum excess principle. In combination with the dynamic buckling criterion, the effects of various stiffening configurations on the dynamic and static buckling loads are discussed. The calculation results show that when the equivalent rectangular pulse is 2-3 times that of the static buckling load, the responses of the stiffened plates under the original shock load and the equivalent rectangular pulse are virtually identical. The impact load amplitude is the primary influencing factor in the dynamic buckling of stiffened plates subjected to underwater explosive impact loads. The stiffened plate aspect ratio has a substantial influence on the dynamic load factor. The analytical method and results are presented, which can be used to design stiffened optimum hull structures to enhance the dynamic load carrying capacity to withstand underwater shock damage.

  16. Load assumptions for the landing impact of seaplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taub, Josef

    1931-01-01

    The formula for the impact of floats must include the enlargement factor itself as well as the type of enlargement. The latter is preferably characterized by the change in surface loading. It is shown that the enlargement of a small seaplane generally results in a changed float (or boat) loading as well as wing loading. The conditions of starting stipulate the retention of the float loading when changing from single-float (boat) to twin-float arrangement. This contingency is followed by an increased impact factor in the twin-float type against the otherwise equivalent single-float type.

  17. Impact of dynamic loads on propulsion integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic loads produced by engine exhaust plumes are examined for a class of military fighter and bomber configurations in model and full scale. The configurations examined are associated with the USAF F-15 and B-1B aircraft, and the US F-18 HARV and ASTOVL programs. The experience gained as a result of these studies is used to formulate a level of understanding concerning this phenomena that could be useful at the preliminary stage of propulsion/airframe design.

  18. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  19. High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) project plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, Michael S.; Blair, Jerry T.; Hintze, M. Marx

    1991-09-01

    Addressed here is the Federal Aviation Administration's approach to High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) affecting the aviation community. Near- and far-term tasks are described. Deliverables, program management, scheduling, and cost issues are discussed.

  20. Precast concrete sandwich panels subjected to impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Matthew W.

    Precast concrete sandwich panels are a relatively new product in the construction industry. The design of these panels incorporates properties that allow for great resilience against temperature fluctuation as well as the very rapid and precise construction of facilities. The concrete sandwich panels investigated in this study represent the second generation of an ongoing research and development project. This second generation of panels have been engineered to construct midsized commercial buildings up to three stories in height as well as residential dwellings. The panels consist of a double-tee structural wythe, a foam core and a fascia wythe, joined by shear connectors. Structures constructed from these panels may be subjected to extreme loading including the effects of seismic and blast loading in addition to wind. The aim of this work was to investigate the behaviour of this particular sandwich panel when subjected to structural impact events. The experimental program consisted of fourteen concrete sandwich panels, five of which were considered full-sized specimens (2700 mm X 1200mm X 270 mm) and nine half-sized specimens (2700mm X 600mm X 270 mm) The panels were subjected to impact loads from a pendulum impact hammer where the total energy applied to the panels was varied by changing the mass of the hammer. The applied loads, displacements, accelerations, and strains at the mid-span of the panel as well as the reaction point forces were monitored during the impact. The behaviour of the panels was determined primarily from the experimental results. The applied loads at low energy levels that caused little to no residual deflection as well as the applied loads at high energy levels that represent catastrophic events and thus caused immediate failure were determined from an impact on the structural and the fascia wythes. Applied loads at intermediate energy levels representing extreme events were also used to determine whether or not the panels could withstand

  1. Impact of discharge data uncertainty on nutrient load uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, Ida; Gustavsson, Hanna; Sonesten, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty in the rating-curve model of the stage-discharge relationship leads to uncertainty in discharge time series. These uncertainties in turn affect many other analyses based on discharge data, such as nutrient load estimations. It is important to understand how large the impact of discharge data uncertainty is on such analyses, since they are often used as the basis to take important environmental management decisions. In the Baltic Sea basin, nutrient load estimates from river mouths are a central information basis for managing and reducing eutrophication in the Baltic Sea. In this study we investigated rating curve uncertainty and its propagation to discharge data uncertainty and thereafter to uncertainty in the load of phosphorous and nitrogen for twelve Swedish river mouths. We estimated rating curve uncertainty using the Voting Point method, which accounts for random and epistemic errors in the stage-discharge relation and allows drawing multiple rating-curve realisations consistent with the total uncertainty. We sampled 40,000 rating curves, and for each sampled curve we calculated a discharge time series from 15-minute water level data for the period 2005-2014. Each discharge time series was then aggregated to daily scale and used to calculate the load of phosphorous and nitrogen from linearly interpolated monthly water samples, following the currently used methodology for load estimation. Finally the yearly load estimates were calculated and we thus obtained distributions with 40,000 load realisations per year - one for each rating curve. We analysed how the rating curve uncertainty propagated to the discharge time series at different temporal resolutions, and its impact on the yearly load estimates. Two shorter periods of daily water quality sampling around the spring flood peak allowed a comparison of load uncertainty magnitudes resulting from discharge data with those resulting from the monthly water quality sampling.

  2. Rapidly pulsed, high intensity, incoherent light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rapid pulsing, high intensity, incoherent light is produced by selectively energizing a plurality of discharge lamps with a triggering circuit. Each lamp is connected to a capacitor, and a power supply is electrically connected to all but one of the capacitors. This last named capacitor is electrically connected to a discharge lamp which is connected to the triggering circuit.

  3. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2012-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5-MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  4. Deformation and damage of composite plates under impact loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Wooh, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    Transient deformation and damage were studied in impacted graphite/epoxy plates. The plates were 8-ply and 16-ply quasi-isotropic laminates clamped around a 12.7 cm diameter circumference. They were instrumented with surface and embedded strain gages and loaded by a 202 gr mass dropped from a height of 1.8 m. The load history and imparted energy were obtained by means of an accelerometer attached to the impactor. Transient strains at various locations through the thickness and at various distances from the loading point were obtained. The characteristic features of the strain records are associated with specific failure modes in the laminate. The deformation history was also correlated with the induced damage as detected by X-radiography and ultrasonics. Impact damage is more extensive in the thicker laminate. Damage takes the form of delaminated strips parallel to the fiber direction in each ply and increasing in length from top to bottom.

  5. Impact of thermal loading on waste package material performance

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, D.; McCoy, J.K.; McCright, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    This report focuses on the prediction of materials performance for the carbon steel corrosion-allowance container as a function of thermal loading for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. Low, intermediate and high thermal loads were evaluated as to their performance given assumptions regarding the temperature and humidity changes with time and the resultant depth of corrosion penetration. The reference case involved a kinetic relation for corrosion that was utilized in a sensitivity analysis to examine the impacts of time exponent, pitting, and mirobiologically-influenced corrosion. As a result of this study, the high thermal load appears to offer the best corrosion performance. However, other factors must be considered in making the final thermal loading decision.

  6. Migration impact on load balancing - an experience on Amoeba

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; Socko, P.

    1996-12-31

    Load balancing has been extensive study by simulation, positive results were received in most of the researches. With the increase of the availability oftlistributed systems, a few experiments have been carried out on different systems. These experimental studies either depend on task initiation or task initiation plus task migration. In this paper, we present the results of an 0 study of load balancing using a centralizedpolicy to manage the load on a set of processors, which was carried out on an Amoeba system which consists of a set of 386s and linked by 10 Mbps Ethernet. The results on one hand indicate the necessity of a load balancing facility for a distributed system. On the other hand, the results question the impact of using process migration to increase system performance under the configuration used in our experiments.

  7. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Homma, K.

    2012-10-01

    Over the last century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers. First we envision the laser-driven plasma accelerator may be able to extend the reach of the collider. For this approach to bear fruit, we need to develop the technology of high averaged power laser in addition to the high intensity. For this we mention that the latest research effort of ICAN is an encouraging sign. In addition to this, we now introduce the concept of the noncollider paradigm in exploring fundamental physics with high intensity (and large energy) lasers. One of the examples we mention is the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) far beyond TeV without large luminosity. If we relax or do not require the large luminosity necessary for colliders, but solely in ultrahigh energy frontier, we are still capable of exploring such a fundamental issue. Given such a high energetic particle source and high-intensity laser fields simultaneously, we expect to be able to access new aspects on the matter and the vacuum structure from fundamental physical point of views. LWFA naturally exploits the nonlinear optical effects in the plasma when it becomes of relativistic intensity. Normally nonlinear optical effects are discussed based upon polarization susceptibility of matter to external fields. We suggest application of this concept even to the vacuum structure as a new kind of order parameter to discuss vacuum-originating phenomena at semimacroscopic scales. This viewpoint unifies the following observables with the unprecedented experimental environment we envision; the dispersion relation of

  8. Ultra-high intensity laser plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, A. Bruce; Hinkel, D. E.; Lasinski, Barbara F.; Still, C. H.

    1997-11-01

    In current studies of plasma interactions relevant to the fast ignitor concept,footnote M. Tabak, et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994). an ultra-high intensity beam propagates through underdense, relativistically transparent, and then near solid density plasmas to create a channel. The ultra-high intensity beam propagates through this channel toward the compressed core where it creates hot electrons as it is absorbed. Three-dimensional fluid simulation(R. L. Berger et al), Phys. Fluids B, 2243 (1993). (with relativistic enhancements) studies of self-focusing in the underdense plasma will be reported and compared to PIC simulations in the same parameter regime. Beam structure near focus detracts from channel formation. Modeling in support of upcoming 100TW will be presented.

  9. The NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Reuben A.

    1997-01-01

    High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) are the result of a multitude of intentional and nonintentional electromagnetic sources that currently exists in the world. Many of today's digital systems are susceptible to electronic upset if subjected to certain electromagnetic environments (EME). Modern aerospace designers and manufacturers increasingly rely on sophisticated digital electronic systems to provide critical flight control in both military, commercial, and general aviation aircraft. In an effort to understand and emulate the undesired environment that high energy RF provides modern electronics, the Electromagnetics Research Branch (ERB) of the Flight Electronics and Technology Division (FETD) conducts research on RF and microwave measurement methods related to the understanding of HIRF. In the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory, the effects of high energy radiating electromagnetic fields on avionics and electronic systems are tested and studied.

  10. Dynamic response of scale models subjected to impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillsdon, Graham K.

    1997-05-01

    Presented with the problem of possible failure of large structures due to dynamic loading, and the cost of staging full scale tests. The Oxford University's Department of Engineering Science, supported by British Gas and Rolls Royce, has been scale modeling these events experimentally. The paper looks at two areas of research: (1) The structural integrity of a particular type of Liquified Natural Gas Storage Tank, and its vulnerability to blast loading. (2) The ability of Large Aero Engine Fan blades to withstand impacts associated with birds, stones, ice etc.

  11. Magnets for high intensity proton synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy, Vladimir Kashikhine and Alexander Makarov

    2002-09-19

    Recently, there has been considerable interest at Fermilab for the Proton Driver, a future high intensity proton machine. Various scenarios are under consideration, including a superconducting linac. Each scenario present some special challenges. We describe here the magnets proposed in a recent study, the Proton Driver Study II, which assumes a conventional warm synchrotron, roughly of the size of the existing FNAL booster, but capable of delivering 380 kW at 8 GeV.

  12. Positron microanalysis with high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more common applications for a high intensity slow positron facility will be microanalysis of solid materials. In the first section of this paper some examples are given of procedures that can be developed. Since most of the attendees of this workshop are experts in positron spectroscopy, comprehensive descriptions will be omitted. With the exception of positron emission microscopy, most of the procedures will be based on those already in common use with broad beams. The utility of the methods have all been demonstrated, but material scientists use very few of them because positron microbeams are not generally available. A high intensity positron facility will make microbeams easier to obtain and partially alleviate this situation. All microanalysis techniques listed below will have a common requirement, which is the ability to locate the microscopic detail or area of interest and to focus the positron beam exclusively on it. The last section of this paper is a suggestion of how a high intensity positron facility might be designed so as to have this capability built in. The method will involve locating the specimen by scanning it with the microbeam of positrons and inducing a secondary electron image that will immediately reveal whether or not the positron beam is striking the proper portion of the specimen. This scanning positron microscope' will be a somewhat prosaic analog of the conventional SEM. It will, however, be an indispensable utility that will enhance the practicality of positron microanalysis techniques. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Beam diagnostics for high intensity hadron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausset, Patrick; Gardès, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    High intensity hadron beam accelerators have been recently proposed and developed either for the production of high intensity secondary beams for Nuclear and Particle Physics research (EURISOL, SPIRAL2, FAIR), or Applied Physics in the field of Accelerator Driven System and waste transmutation (EUROTRANS). For these applications, high power Linear Accelerator (LINAC) are planned to produce and accelerate hadron beams up to 1 GeV. Both commissioning and operation of these accelerators require dedicated beam instrumentation able to monitor and characterize on line as completely as possible the produced beams having a power in the range of 1 MW. Beam current, transverse beam centroı¨d position and profiles and beam energy are the most important characteristics that have to be measured. Due to the high average power of the beam, nondestructive or at least minimally intercepting beam sensors are required. Beam instrumentation for IPHI (CEA/DSM and CNRS/IN2P3 collaboration) which is a high intensity proton (3 MeV, 100 mA, CW operation) injector initially designed to be a possible front end for this kind of LINAC is under realization. Beam diagnostics already under operation, developments in progress will be described and will introduce a more general description of high power beam instrumentation.

  14. Survey of proposed high intensity accelerators and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.

    1994-09-01

    Many interesting applications are being considered for high intensity accelerators. Implications of the technology developments that are enhancing these opportunities, or making them possible, will be covered in context of the applications. Applications include those for research (in areas such as material science, biological sciences, nuclear and high energy physics), accelerator-driven transmutation technologies, defense, and medicine. Specific examples will be used to demonstrate the impact that technology development can have and how transfer of this technology to industry can have an impact in the consumer and commercial arenas. Technology Development in rf power, controls, beam optics, rf structures, magnets, injectors, and beam halos will be considered.

  15. Attrition of limestone by impact loading in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrizio Scala; Fabio Montagnaro; Piero Salatino

    2007-09-15

    The present study addresses limestone attrition and fragmentation associated with impact loading, a process which may occur extensively in various regions of fluidized bed (FB) combustors/gasifiers, primarily the jetting region of the bottom bed, the exit region of the riser, and the cyclone. An experimental protocol for the characterization of the propensity of limestone to undergo attrition/fragmentation by impact loading is reported. The application of the protocol is demonstrated with reference to an Italian limestone whose primary fragmentation and attrition by surface wear have already been characterized in previous studies. The experimental procedure is based on the characterization of the amount and particle size distribution of the debris generated upon the impact of samples of sorbent particles against a target. Experiments were carried out at a range of particle impact velocities between 10 and 45 m/s, consistent with jet velocities corresponding to typical pressure drops across FB gas distributors. The protocol has been applied to either raw or preprocessed limestone samples. In particular, the effect of calcination, sulfation, and calcination/recarbonation cycles on the impact damage suffered by sorbent particles has been assessed. The measurement of particle voidage and pore size distribution by mercury intrusion was also accomplished to correlate fragmentation with the structural properties of the sorbent samples. Fragmentation by impact loading of the limestone is significant. Lime displays the largest propensity to undergo impact damage, followed by the sorbent sulfated to exhaustion, the recarbonated sorbent, and the raw limestone. Fragmentation of the raw limestone and of the sulfated lime follows a pattern typical of the failure of brittle materials. The fragmentation behavior of lime and recarbonated lime better conforms to a disintegration failure mode, with an extensive generation of very fine fragments. 27 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab.

  16. Damage assessment in CFRP laminates exposed to impact fatigue loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigkourakos, George; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.; Ashcroft, I. A.

    2011-07-01

    Demand for advanced engineering composites in the aerospace industry is increasing continuously. Lately, carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) became one of the most important structural materials in the industry due to a combination of characteristics such as: excellent stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratio, and ease of manufacture according to application. In service, aerospace composite components and structures are exposed to various transient loads, some of which can propagate in them as cyclic impacts. A typical example is an effect of the wind gusts during flight. This type of loading is known as impact fatigue (IF); it is a repetition of low-energy impacts. Such loads can cause various types of damage in composites: fibre breaking, transverse matrix cracking, de-bonding between fibres and matrix and delamination resulting in reduction of residual stiffness and loss of functionality. Furthermore, this damage is often sub-surface, which reinforces the need for more regular inspection. The effects of IF are of major importance due its detrimental effect on the structural integrity of components that can be generated after relatively few impacts at low force levels compared to those in a standard fatigue regime. This study utilises an innovative testing system with the capability of subjecting specimens to a series of repetitive impacts. The primary subject of this paper is to assess the damaging effect of IF on the behaviour of drilled CFRP specimens, exposed to such loading. A detailed damage analysis is implemented utilising an X-ray micro computed tomography system. The main findings suggested that at early stages of life damage is governed by o degree splits along the length of the specimens resulting in a 20% reduction of stiffness. The final failure damage scenario indicated that transverse crasks in the 90 degree plies are the main reason for complete delamination which can be translated to a 50% stiffness reduction.

  17. Human pendulum approach to simulate and quantify locomotor impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lafortune, M A; Lake, M J

    1995-09-01

    The understanding of impact mechanics during locomotion is important for research within the fields of injury prevention and footwear design. Instrumented missiles offer a worthy solution to the lack of control inherent in in vivo activities and to the isolated nature of tissue studies. However, missiles cannot mimic the magnitude and temporal characteristics of locomotion impacts. A human pendulum approach employed the subject's own body as the missile to impart controlled impacts to the lower extremity. The subject is swung toward a force platform instrumented wall while lying supine on a suspended lightweight bed. The ability of the pendulum to reproduce locomotor impact loading was assessed for heel-toe running. Axial reaction force and shank acceleration patterns recorded during pendulum tests in ten subjects were found to closely resemble running patterns and they were obtained without discomfort to the subjects. This new approach relies upon one's own body to impart impacts representative of locomotion. It should prove useful to study human impact loading in a controlled manner. PMID:7559680

  18. Load and wear experiments on the impact hammer of a vertical shaft impact crusher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. H.; Fang, H. Y.; Luo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Impact hammers are important components of impact crushers, and are often shortlived due to the high-impact nature of their use. Wear-resistant alloys are welded to the surface of impact hammers to prolong their service life. In this paper, a simulation model of the rotor and impact hammers in impact crushers was designed to utilize the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The wear-resistant alloy on each impact hammer was divided into twenty-two action regions. The load distribution on each alloy block is affected by the structural and manufacturing parameters of the impact crusher. The wear distribution of the impact hammer was measured by shape morphology according to relative impact crushers. The results demonstrated that the real measurements of wear distribution on the impact hammer were similar to simulated load distribution measurements on the same surface. The study of load distribution of impact hammers by DEM established a theoretical foundation on which to base the optimal design of impact crushers.

  19. The strength of laminated composite materials under repeated impact loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, Assa

    1988-01-01

    When low velocity and energy impact is exerted on a laminated composite material, in a perpendicular direction to the plane of the laminate, invisible damage may develop. It is shown analytically and experimentally that the invisible damage occurs during the first stage of contact between the impactor and the laminate and is a result of the contact stresses. However, the residual flexural strength changes only slightly, because it depends mainly on the outer layers, and these remain undamaged. Repeated impact intensifies the damage inside the laminate and causes larger bending under equivalent impact load. Finally, when the damage is most severe, even though it is still invisible, the laminate fails because of bending on the tension side. If the repeated impact is halted before final fracture occurs the residual strength and modulus would decrease by a certain amount.

  20. Impacts of Wildfire on Runoff and Sediment Loads at Little Granite Creek near Bondurant, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, S. E.; Dwire, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    There are a variety of mechanisms by which sediment is transferred from burned hillslopes to stream channels following wildfire. Post-fire erodability is related to a number of factors, including fire severity, topography, underlying geology, and nature of the soils, making the potential sedimentation impacts difficult to predict. Large scale disturbances, such as increased landsliding and debris flows, present dramatic responses that have long-lasting influences on channel form and process. However, not all burned areas undergo increased landsliding following wildfire. Perhaps a more common watershed response is the post-fire delivery of fine sediment that is carried in suspension during moderate to high flows. In this presentation we describe changes in suspended sediment loads observed in a burned watershed in NW Wyoming from the years 2001-03 and later in 2008. In August 2000, wildfire burned portions of the Little Granite Creek watershed near Bondurant, Wyoming where bedload and suspended sediment measurements had been collected during 13 previous runoff seasons. This presented an opportunity to quantify increases in sediment loads associated with wildfire. The first 3 years post-fire were warm and dry, with low snowpacks and few significant summer storms. Despite relatively low flows during the first runoff season, the estimated sediment load was about 4 times that predicted had there been no fire. This was attributed to increases in sediment loading during the rising limb and snowmelt peak (54%) and during the few summer storms (44%). In later years, loads decreased, indicating a return to baseline levels. The results from our sediment monitoring lacked some of the more dramatic responses that have been observed following fire. In other environments, high intensity rainstorms caused progressively bulking flows that triggered debris flows though channel erosion. In Little Granite Creek, there were a few substantial storms, but they did not trigger this type

  1. Impact of high biomass loading on ionic liquid pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment has shown great potential as a novel pretreatment technology with high sugar yields. To improve process economics of pretreatment, higher biomass loading is desirable. The goal of this work is to establish, the impact of high biomass loading of switchgrass on IL pretreatment in terms of viscosity, cellulose crystallinity, chemical composition, saccharification kinetics, and sugar yield. Results The pretreated switchgrass/IL slurries show frequency dependent shear thinning behavior. The switchgrass/IL slurries show a crossover from viscous behavior at 3 wt% to elastic behavior at 10 wt%. The relative glucan content of the recovered solid samples is observed to decrease with increasing levels of lignin and hemicelluloses with increased biomass loading. The IL pretreatment led to a transformation of cellulose crystalline structure from I to II for 3, 10, 20 and 30 wt% samples, while a mostly amorphous structure was found for 40 and 50 wt% samples. Conclusions IL pretreatment effectively reduced the biomass recalcitrance at loadings as high as 50 wt%. Increased shear viscosity and a transition from ‘fluid’ like to ‘solid’ like behavior was observed with increased biomass loading. At high biomass loadings shear stress produced shear thinning behavior and a reduction in viscosity by two orders of magnitude, thereby reducing the complex viscosity to values similar to lower loadings. The rheological properties and sugar yields indicate that 10 to 50 wt% may be a reasonable and desirable target for IL pretreatment under certain operating conditions. PMID:23578017

  2. Numerical and Experimental Studies on Impact Loaded Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Saarenheimo, Arja; Hakola, Ilkka; Karna, Tuomo; Hyvarinen, Juhani

    2006-07-01

    An experimental set-up has been constructed for medium scale impact tests. The main objective of this effort is to provide data for the calibration and verification of numerical models of a loading scenario where an aircraft impacts against a nuclear power plant. One goal is to develop and take in use numerical methods for predicting response of reinforced concrete structures to impacts of deformable projectiles that may contain combustible liquid ('fuel'). Loading, structural behaviour, like collapsing mechanism and the damage grade, will be predicted by simple analytical methods and using non-linear FE-method. In the so-called Riera method the behavior of the missile material is assumed to be rigid plastic or rigid visco-plastic. Using elastic plastic and elastic visco-plastic material models calculations are carried out by ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code, assuming axisymmetric deformation mode for the missile. With both methods, typically, the impact force time history, the velocity of the missile rear end and the missile shortening during the impact were recorded for comparisons. (authors)

  3. Advanced modeling of high intensity accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Wangler, T.P.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goals of this project were three-fold: (1) to develop a new capability, based on high performance (parallel) computers, to perform large scale simulations of high intensity accelerators; (2) to apply this capability to modeling high intensity accelerators under design at LANL; and (3) to use this new capability to improve the understanding of the physics of intense charge particle beams, especially in regard to the issue of beam halo formation. All of these goals were met. In particular, the authors introduced split-operator methods as a powerful and efficient means to simulate intense beams in the presence of rapidly varying accelerating and focusing fields. They then applied these methods to develop scaleable, parallel beam dynamics codes for modeling intense beams in linacs, and in the process they implemented a new three-dimensional space charge algorithm. They also used the codes to study a number of beam dynamics issues related to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, and in the process performed the largest simulations to date for any accelerator design project. Finally, they used the new modeling capability to provide direction and validation to beam physics studies, helping to identify beam mismatch as a major source of halo formation in high intensity accelerators. This LDRD project ultimately benefited not only LANL but also the US accelerator community since, by promoting expertise in high performance computing and advancing the state-of-the-art in accelerator simulation, its accomplishments helped lead to approval of a new DOE Grand Challenge in Computational Accelerator Physics.

  4. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  5. DEFORMATION CHARACTERISTICS OF CRUSHED-STONE LAYER UNDER CYCLIC IMPACT LOADING FROM MICRO-MECHANICAL VIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiko; Matsushima, Takashi

    'Hanging sleepers', which have gaps between sleepers and ballast layer are often found in the neighborhood of rail joints or rugged surface rails. This suggests that differential settlement of the ballast layer is due to impact loading generated by the contact between running wheel and rugged surface rail. Then cyclic loading tests were performed on crushed-stone layer with two loading patterns, the one is a cyclic impact loading and the other one is cyclic 'standard' loading controlled at 1/10 loading velocity of the impact loading. It was shown that the crashed-stone layer deforms with volumetric expansion during every off-loading processes under the cyclic impact loading. This phenomena prevents crushed stone layer from forming stable grain columns, then the residual settlement under the cyclic impact loading is larger than that under the cyclic 'standard' loading. A simple mass-spring model simulates that two masses move in the opposite direction with increased frequency of harmonic excitation.

  6. Triggered drug release from superhydrophobic meshes using high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yohe, Stefan T; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Porter, Tyrone M; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Application of high-intensity focused ultrasound to drug-loaded superhydrophobic meshes affords triggered drug release by displacing an entrapped air layer. The air layer within the superhydrophobic meshes is characterized using direct visualization and B-mode imaging. Drug-loaded superhydrophobic meshes are cytotoxic in an in vitro assay after ultrasound treatment. PMID:23592698

  7. Triggered Drug Release from Superhydrophobic Meshes using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yohe, Stefan T.; Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Porter, Tyrone M.; Colson, Yolonda L.

    2014-01-01

    Application of high-intensity focused ultrasound to drug-loaded superhydrophobic meshes affords triggered drug release by displacing an entrapped air layer. The air layer within the superhydrophobic meshes is characterized using direct visualization and B-mode imaging. Drug-loaded superhydrophobic meshes are cytotoxic in an in vitro assay after ultrasound treatment. PMID:23592698

  8. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

    1987-06-09

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

  9. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, Walter P.; Keeffe, William M.; Liebermann, Richard W.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO.sub.2, with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube.

  10. Wear behavior of bainite ductile cast iron under impact load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ting; Song, Ren-bo; Yang, Fu-qiang; Wu, Chun-jing

    2014-09-01

    The dry impact wear behavior of bainite ductile cast iron was evaluated under three different impact loads for 30000 cycles. The strain-hardening effects beneath the contact surfaces were analyzed according to the surfaces' micro-hardness profiles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to observe the worn surfaces. The results indicated that the material with the highest hardness was the one continuously cooled at 20°C, which exhibited the lowest wear rate under each set of test conditions. The hardness of the worn surface and the thickness of the hardened layer increased with the increases in impact load and in the number of test cycles. The better wear performance of the sample cooled at 20°C is attributed to its finer microstructure and superior mechanical properties. All the samples underwent the transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) phenomenon after impact wear, as revealed by the fact that small amounts of retained austenite were detected by XRD.

  11. Mechanical Model for Dynamic Behavior of Concrete Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuanxiang

    Concrete is a geo-material which is used substantively in the civil building and military safeguard. One coupled model of damage and plasticity to describe the complex behavior of concrete subjected to impact loading is proposed in this research work. The concrete is assumed as homogeneous continuum with pre-existing micro-cracks and micro-voids. Damage to concrete is caused due to micro-crack nucleation, growth and coalescence, and defined as the probability of fracture at a given crack density. It induces a decrease of strength and stiffness of concrete. Compaction of concrete is physically a collapse of the material voids. It produces the plastic strain in the concrete and, at the same time, an increase of the bulk modulus. In terms of crack growth model, micro-cracks are activated, and begin to propagate gradually. When crack density reaches a critical value, concrete takes place the smashing destroy. The model parameters for mortar are determined using plate impact experiment with uni-axial strain state. Comparison with the test results shows that the proposed model can give consistent prediction of the impact behavior of concrete. The proposed model may be used to design and analysis of concrete structures under impact and shock loading. This work is supported by State Key Laboratory of Explosion science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology (YBKT14-02).

  12. High intensity line source for x-ray spectrometer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Thoe, R.S.

    1986-06-01

    A high intensity electron-impact x-ray source using a one-dimensional Pierce lens has been built for the purpose of calibrating a bent crystal x-ray spectrometer. This source focuses up to 100 mA of 20-keV electrons to a line on a liquid-cooled anode. The line (which can serve as a virtual slit for the spectrometer) measures approximately 800 ..mu.. x 2 cm. The source is portable and therefore adaptable to numerous types of spectrometer applications. One particular application, the calibration of a high resolution (r = 10/sup 4/) time-resolved cyrstal spectrometer, will be discussed in detail.

  13. Impact of self-attraction and loading on Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katherine J.; Ponte, Rui M.; Tamisiea, Mark E.

    2015-06-01

    The impact of self-attraction and loading (SAL) on Earth rotation has not been previously considered except at annual timescales. We estimate Earth rotation excitations using models of atmospheric, oceanic, and land hydrology surface mass variations and investigate the importance of including SAL over monthly to interannual timescales. We assess SAL effects in comparison with simple mass balance effects where net mass exchanged with the atmosphere and land is distributed uniformly over the global ocean. For oceanic polar motion excitations, SAL impacts are important even though mass balance impact is minor except at the annual period. This is true of global (atmosphere + land + ocean) polar motion excitations as well, although the SAL impacts are smaller. When estimating length-of-day excitations, mass balance effects have a dominant impact, particularly for oceanic excitation. Although SAL can have a significant impact on estimated Earth rotation excitations, its consideration generally did not improve comparisons with geodetic observations. This result may change in the future as surface mass models and Earth rotation observations improve.

  14. Damage in woven CFRP laminates under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Harland, A. R.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large dynamic bending deformations caused by impact loading. Composite materials subjected to such loads demonstrate various damage modes such as matrix cracking, delamination and, ultimately, fabric fracture. Damage evolution affects both in-service properties and performance of CFRP that can deteriorate with time. These failure modes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation and numerical simulations. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in composite laminates due to dynamic bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of a woven CFRP material under large-deflection dynamic bending in impact tests carried out to obtain the force-time and absorbed energy profiles for CFRP laminates. Damage in the impacted laminates is analysed using optical microscopy. Numerical simulations are performed to study the deformation behaviour and damage in CFRP for cases of large-deflection bending based on three-dimensional finite-element models implemented in the commercial code Abaqus/Explicit. Multiple layers of bilinear cohesive-zone elements are employed to model the initiation and progression of inter-ply delamination observed in the microscopy studies. The obtained results of simulations show good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Testing and simulation of composite laminates under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xinglai

    Owing to their high stiffness-to-weight and high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composite laminates are excellent materials for high-performance structures. However, their properties in the thickness direction are very poor as they are weakly bonded by polymeric matrices through laminate interfaces. Accordingly, when a composite laminate is subjected to impact loading, high interlaminar stresses along with the low interlaminar strengths could easily result in interlaminar damage such as delamination. This thesis investigated the response of composite laminates under low-velocity impact and presented numerical techniques for impact simulation. To begin with, instrumented drop-weight impacts ranging from subperforation to perforation levels were introduced to composite laminates having various dimensions and thicknesses. Damaged composite laminates were then subjected to compression-after-impact tests for evaluations of residual properties. Experimental results revealed that perforation was an important damage milestone since impact parameters such as peak force, contact duration, maximum deflection and energy absorption, and residual properties such as compressive stiffness, strength and energy absorption all reached critical levels as perforation took place. It was also found that thickness played a more important role than in-plane dimensions in perforation process. In order to understand more about the relationship between laminate thickness and perforation resistance and to present an economical method to improve perforation resistance, thick laminated composite plates and their assembled counterparts were investigated and compared. An energy profile correlating the impact energy and absorbed energy at all energy levels for each type of composite plates investigated was established and found to be able to address the relationship between energy and damage. Experimental results concluded that increasing thickness was more efficient

  16. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. L.; Qin, J. G.; Chen, R.; Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m2/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  17. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected. PMID:25273746

  18. Delaminations in composite plates under transverse impact loads - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Ye-Fei; Springer, George S.

    1993-01-01

    Tests were performed measuring the locations and geometries of delaminations in Fiberite T300/976 graphite/epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, and ICI APC-2 graphite/PEEK plates subjected to transverse impact loads. The data provide specific information on the effects of impactor velocity, impactor mass, material, thickness of back ply group, difference in fiber orientation between adjacent ply groups, plate thickness, and impactor nose radius. The data were compared to the results of the Finn-Springer model. The model was found to describe the data with reasonable accuracy.

  19. High-intensity inspiratory muscle training in COPD.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Jenkins, S C; Philippe, D L; Cecins, N; Shepherd, K L; Green, D J; Hillman, D R; Eastwood, P R

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of an interval-based high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (H-IMT) programme on inspiratory muscle function, exercise capacity, dyspnoea and health-related quality of life (QoL) in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A double-blind randomised controlled trial was performed. Sixteen subjects (11 males, mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) 37.4+/-12.5%) underwent H-IMT performed at the highest tolerable inspiratory threshold load (increasing to 101% of baseline maximum inspiratory pressure). Seventeen subjects (11 males, mean FEV(1 )36.5+/-11.5%) underwent sham inspiratory muscle training (S-IMT) at 10% of maximum inspiratory pressure. Training took place three times a week for 8 weeks and was fully supervised. Pre- and post-training measurements of lung function, maximum inspiratory pressure, maximum threshold pressure, exercise capacity, dyspnoea and QoL (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire; CRDQ) were obtained. H-IMT increased maximum inspiratory pressure by 29%, maximum threshold pressure by 56%, 6-min walk distance by 27 m, and improved dyspnoea and fatigue (CRDQ) by 1.4 and 0.9 points per item, respectively. These changes were significantly greater than any seen following S-IMT. In conclusion, high-intensity inspiratory muscle training improves inspiratory muscle function in subjects with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, yielding meaningful reductions in dyspnoea and fatigue. PMID:16772388

  20. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  1. Impact of Hydroxychloroquine-Loaded Polyurethane Intravaginal Rings on Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Traore, Yannick Leandre; Chen, Yufei; Bernier, Anne-Marie; Ho, Emmanuel A

    2015-12-01

    The use of polymeric devices for controlled sustained delivery of drugs is a promising approach for the prevention of HIV-1 infection. Unfortunately, certain microbicides, when topically applied vaginally, may be cytotoxic to vaginal epithelial cells and the protective microflora present within the female genital tract. In this study, we evaluated the impact of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ)-loaded, reservoir-type, polyurethane intravaginal rings (IVRs) on the growth of Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii and on the viability of vaginal and ectocervical epithelial cells. The IVRs were fabricated using hot-melt injection molding and were capable of providing controlled release of HCQ for 24 days, with mean daily release rates of 17.01 ± 3.6 μg/ml in sodium acetate buffer (pH 4) and 29.45 ± 4.84 μg/ml in MRS broth (pH 6.2). Drug-free IVRs and the released HCQ had no significant effects on bacterial growth or the viability of vaginal or ectocervical epithelial cells. Furthermore, there was no significant impact on the integrity of vaginal epithelial cell monolayers, in comparison with controls, as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Overall, this is the first study to evaluate the effects of HCQ-loaded IVRs on the growth of vaginal flora and the integrity of vaginal epithelial cell monolayers. PMID:26416871

  2. Impact loading of the lumbar spine during football blocking.

    PubMed

    Gatt, C J; Hosea, T M; Palumbo, R C; Zawadsky, J P

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the impact force to the lumbar spine when football players hit a blocking sled. We quantified the loads at the L4-5 motion segment throughout the blocking sequence. Five Division I-A college football linemen were subjects for our study. Kinematic data were obtained while the subjects hit a blocking sled instrumented with a force plate. Three plane forces were then calculated from these data. The average impact force measured at the blocking sled was 3013 +/- 598 N. The average peak compression force at the L4-5 motion segment was 8679 +/- 1965 N. The average peak anteroposterior shear force was 3304 +/- 1116 N, and the average peak lateral shear force was 1709 +/- 411 N. The magnitude of the loads on the L4-5 motion segment during football blocking exceed those determined during fatigue studies to cause pathologic changes in both the lumbar disk and the pars interarticularis. These data suggest that the mechanics of repetitive blocking may be responsible for the increased incidence of lumbar spine injury incurred by football linemen. PMID:9167810

  3. Impact of Hydroxychloroquine-Loaded Polyurethane Intravaginal Rings on Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Traore, Yannick Leandre; Chen, Yufei; Bernier, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The use of polymeric devices for controlled sustained delivery of drugs is a promising approach for the prevention of HIV-1 infection. Unfortunately, certain microbicides, when topically applied vaginally, may be cytotoxic to vaginal epithelial cells and the protective microflora present within the female genital tract. In this study, we evaluated the impact of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ)-loaded, reservoir-type, polyurethane intravaginal rings (IVRs) on the growth of Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii and on the viability of vaginal and ectocervical epithelial cells. The IVRs were fabricated using hot-melt injection molding and were capable of providing controlled release of HCQ for 24 days, with mean daily release rates of 17.01 ± 3.6 μg/ml in sodium acetate buffer (pH 4) and 29.45 ± 4.84 μg/ml in MRS broth (pH 6.2). Drug-free IVRs and the released HCQ had no significant effects on bacterial growth or the viability of vaginal or ectocervical epithelial cells. Furthermore, there was no significant impact on the integrity of vaginal epithelial cell monolayers, in comparison with controls, as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Overall, this is the first study to evaluate the effects of HCQ-loaded IVRs on the growth of vaginal flora and the integrity of vaginal epithelial cell monolayers. PMID:26416871

  4. Diagnostics of High-Intensity-Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Helmar G.

    1996-05-01

    High intensity light sources have come a long way since the introduction of high pressure discharges in mercury and later in sodium. The introduction of other species (e.g. metal halides) into the discharge chemistry led to marked improvements in light intensity (lumens per watt or LPW) and the appearance of the light output (color rendering index or CRI). Many of these improvements have been achieved through qualitative understanding of the discharge and good engineering. The accurate predictions of discharge behavior and spectral power distribution through HID-models remains a difficult and challenging goal for lighting scientists. Modelling of a real lamp is complicated due to the high pressures in the discharge, the geometric influences of the discharge vessel, and the interactions between fills, wall materials and electrodes. The simultaneous use of solid-, liquid-, gaseous- and plasma-state descriptions, including for example effects of radiation transport, becomes necessary. Spectroscopic measurements have been and are still of highest value, not only to determine practical parameters like LPW and CRI, but also to determine species distributions and temperatures, eventually as a function of location in the discharge and time. These measurements are necessary not only for the quantitative understanding of the discharge mechanisms, but also to serve as a testbed for all simulation efforts. This paper will focus on diagnostic possibilities and opportunities using imaging data acquisition systems.

  5. High-Intensity Sweeteners and Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Martin, Ashley A.; Davidson, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to a link between a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) and the consumption of both calorically sweetened beverages and beverages sweetened with high-intensity, non-caloric sweeteners. Research on the possibility that non-nutritive sweeteners promote food intake, body weight gain, and metabolic disorders has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically-relevant model that describes the mechanistic basis for these outcomes. We have suggested that based on Pavlovian conditioning principles, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners could result in sweet tastes no longer serving as consistent predictors of nutritive postingestive consequences. This dissociation between the sweet taste cues and the caloric consequences could lead to a decrease in the ability of sweet tastes to evoke physiological responses that serve to regulate energy balance. Using a rodent model, we have found that intake of foods or fluids containing non-nutritive sweeteners was accompanied by increased food intake, body weight gain, accumulation of body fat, and weaker caloric compensation, compared to consumption of foods and fluids containing glucose. Our research also provided evidence consistent with the hypothesis that these effects of consuming saccharin may be associated with a decrement in the ability of sweet taste to evoke thermic responses, and perhaps other physiological, cephalic phase, reflexes that are thought to help maintain energy balance. PMID:20060008

  6. High-intensity sweeteners and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Martin, Ashley A; Davidson, Terry L

    2010-04-26

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to a link between a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) and the consumption of both calorically sweetened beverages and beverages sweetened with high-intensity, non-caloric sweeteners. Research on the possibility that non-nutritive sweeteners promote food intake, body weight gain, and metabolic disorders has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically-relevant model that describes the mechanistic basis for these outcomes. We have suggested that based on Pavlovian conditioning principles, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners could result in sweet tastes no longer serving as consistent predictors of nutritive postingestive consequences. This dissociation between the sweet taste cues and the caloric consequences could lead to a decrease in the ability of sweet tastes to evoke physiological responses that serve to regulate energy balance. Using a rodent model, we have found that intake of foods or fluids containing non-nutritive sweeteners was accompanied by increased food intake, body weight gain, accumulation of body fat, and weaker caloric compensation, compared to consumption of foods and fluids containing glucose. Our research also provided evidence consistent with the hypothesis that these effects of consuming saccharin may be associated with a decrement in the ability of sweet taste to evoke thermic responses, and perhaps other physiological, cephalic phase, reflexes that are thought to help maintain energy balance. PMID:20060008

  7. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  8. AGS RESONANT EXTRACTION WITH HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.; VANASSELT,W.

    1999-03-29

    The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), we continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams.[1] Learning to extract and transport these higher intensity beams has required a process of careful modeling and experimentation. We have had to learn how to correct for various instabilities and how to better match extraction and the transport lines to the higher emittance beams being accelerated in the AGS. Techniques employed include ''RF'' methods to smooth out momentum distributions and fine structure. We will present results of detailed multi-particle tracking modeling studies which enabled us to develop a clear understanding of beam loss mechanisms in the transport and extraction process. We will report on our status, experiences, and the present understanding of the intensity limitations imposed by resonant extraction and transport to fixed target stations.

  9. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densam, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L. J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J. S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-01

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ+ and μ- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular He6 and Ne18, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  10. Portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source provides increased experimental accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, W. C.; Stewart, D. C.; Wahlgren, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Small portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source combines twelve curium-americium beryllium sources. This high intensity of neutrons, with a flux which slowly decreases at a known rate, provides for increased experimental accuracy.

  11. Impacts to the chest of PMHSs - Influence of impact location and load distribution on chest response.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Svensson, Mats Y; Davidsson, Johan; Gutsche, Andreas; Tomasch, Ernst; Darok, Mario; Ravnik, Dean

    2016-02-01

    The chest response of the human body has been studied for several load conditions, but is not well known in the case of steering wheel rim-to-chest impact in heavy goods vehicle frontal collisions. The aim of this study was to determine the response of the human chest in a set of simulated steering wheel impacts. PMHS tests were carried out and analysed. The steering wheel load pattern was represented by a rigid pendulum with a straight bar-shaped front. A crash test dummy chest calibration pendulum was utilised for comparison. In this study, a set of rigid bar impacts were directed at various heights of the chest, spanning approximately 120mm around the fourth intercostal space. The impact energy was set below a level estimated to cause rib fracture. The analysed results consist of responses, evaluated with respect to differences in the impacting shape and impact heights on compression and viscous criteria chest injury responses. The results showed that the bar impacts consistently produced lesser scaled chest compressions than the hub; the Middle bar responses were around 90% of the hub responses. A superior bar impact provided lesser chest compression; the average response was 86% of the Middle bar response. For inferior bar impacts, the chest compression response was 116% of the chest compression in the middle. The damping properties of the chest caused the compression to decrease in the high speed bar impacts to 88% of that in low speed impacts. From the analysis it could be concluded that the bar impact shape provides lower chest criteria responses compared to the hub. Further, the bar responses are dependent on the impact location of the chest. Inertial and viscous effects of the upper body affect the responses. The results can be used to assess the responses of human substitutes such as anthropomorphic test devices and finite element human body models, which will benefit the development process of heavy goods vehicle safety systems. PMID:26687541

  12. On predicting and modeling material failure under impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.W.

    1998-09-01

    A method for predicting and modeling material failure in solids subjected to impact loading is outlined. The method uses classical void growth models of Gurson and Tvergaard in a material point method (MPM). Because of material softening, material stability is lost. At this point, the character of the governing partial differential equations changes, and localization occurs. This localization results in mesh dependence for many problems of interest. For many problems, predicting the occurrence of material failure and its extent is necessary. To enable this modeling, it is proposed that a discontinuity be introduced into the displacement field. By including a dissipation-based force-displacement relationship, the mesh dependence of energy dissipation can be avoided. Additionally, the material point method provides a means of allowing large deformations without mesh distortion or introduction of error through remapping.

  13. Characterization of pediatric wheelchair kinematics and wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint system loading during rear impact.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Susan I; Karg, Patricia; Bertocci, Gina

    2010-04-01

    This study characterizes pediatric wheelchair kinematic responses and wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint system (WTORS) loading during rear impact. It also examines the kinematic and loading effects of wheelchair headrest inclusion in rear impact. In two separate rear-impact test scenarios, identical WC19-compliant manual pediatric wheelchairs were tested using a seated Hybrid III 6-year-old anthropomorphic test device (ATD) to evaluate wheelchair kinematics and WTORS loading. Three wheelchairs included no headrests, and three were equipped with slightly modified wheelchair-mounted headrests. Surrogate WTORS properly secured the wheelchairs; three-point occupant restraints properly restrained the ATD. All tests used a 26km/h, 11g rear-impact test pulse. Headrest presence affected wheelchair kinematics and WTORS loading; headrest-equipped wheelchairs had greater mean seatback deflections, mean peak front and rear tiedown loads and decreased mean lap belt loads. Rear-impact tiedown loads differed from previously measured loads in frontal impact, with comparable tiedown load levels reversed in frontal and rear impacts. The front tiedowns in rear impact had the highest mean peak loads despite lower rear-impact severity. These outcomes have implications for wheelchair and tiedown design, highlighting the need for all four tiedowns to have an equally robust design, and have implications in the development of rear-impact wheelchair transportation safety standards. PMID:19398366

  14. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  15. High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise: Effect on Young People's Cardiometabolic Health and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Simon B; Dring, Karah J; Nevill, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    With only a quarter of young people currently meeting physical activity guidelines, two key areas of concern are the effects of exercise on cardiometabolic health and cognition. Despite the fact that physical activity in young people is typically high intensity and intermittent in nature, much of the literature examines traditional endurance-type exercise. This review provides an update on the effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise on young people's cardiometabolic health and cognition. High-intensity intermittent exercise has acute beneficial effects on endothelial function and postprandial lipemia and chronic positive effects on weight management. In addition, there is emerging evidence regarding chronic benefits on the blood lipid profile, blood pressure, and proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, emerging evidence suggests beneficial acute and chronic effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise on cognition. However, further research is required in both cardiometabolic health and cognition, particularly regarding the impact of school-based interventions in adolescents. PMID:27399821

  16. Characterization of Focal Muscle Compression Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Ben; Sory, David; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien; Curry, Richard; Clasper, Jon; Proud, William; Williams, Alun; Brown, Kate

    2015-06-01

    The pattern of battle injuries sustained in modern wars shows that over 70% of combat wounds are to the extremities. These injuries are characterized by disruption and contamination of the limb soft tissue envelope. The extent of this tissue trauma and contamination determine the outcome in extremity injury. In military injury, common post-traumatic complications at amputation sites include heterotopic ossification (formation of bone in soft tissue), and severe soft tissue and bone infections. We are currently developing a model of soft tissue injury that recreates pathologies observed in combat injuries. Here we present characterization of a controlled focal compression of the rabbit flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle group. The FCU was previously identified as a suitable site for studying impact injury because its muscle belly can easily be mobilized from the underlying bone without disturbing anatomical alignment in the limb. We show how macroscopic changes in tissue organization, as visualized using optical microscopy, can be correlated with data from temporally resolved traces of loading conditions. Funding provided by the Royal British Legion.

  17. Study on Impact Loading and Humerus Injury for Baseball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shinobu; Oda, Juhachi; Yonemura, Shigeru; Sakamoto, Jiro

    In the United States and Japan, baseball is a very popular sport played by many people. However, the ball used is hard and moves fast. A professional baseball pitcher in good form can throw a ball at speeds upwards of 41.7m/s (150km/hr). If a ball at this speed hits the batter, serious injury can occur. In this paper we will describe our investigations on the impact of a baseball with living tissues by finite element analysis. Baseballs were projected at a load cell plate using a specialized pitching machine. The dynamic properties of the baseball were determined by comparing the wall-ball collision experimentally measuring the time history of the force and the displacement using dynamic finite element analysis software (ANSYS/ LS-DYNA). The finite element model representing a human humerus and its surrounding tissue was simulated for balls pitched at variable speeds and pitch types (knuckle and fastball). In so doing, the stress distribution and stress wave in the bone and soft tissue were obtained. From the results, the peak stress of the bone nearly yielded to the stress caused by a high fast ball. If the collision position or direction is moved from the center of the upper arm, it is assumed that the stress exuded on the humerus will be reduced. Some methods to reduce the severity of the injury which can be applied in actual baseball games are also discussed.

  18. Flexible pressure sensors for smart protective clothing against impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Zhu, Bo; Shu, Lin; Tao, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    The development of smart protective clothing will facilitate the quick detection of injuries from contact sports, traffic collisions and other accidents. To obtain real-time information like spatial and temporal pressure distributions on the clothing, flexible pressure sensor arrays are required. Based on a resistive fabric strain sensor we demonstrate all flexible, resistive pressure sensors with a large workable pressure range (0-8 MPa), a high sensitivity (1 MPa-1) and an excellent repeatability (lowest non-repeatability ±2.4% from 0.8 to 8 MPa) that can be inexpensively fabricated using fabric strain sensors and biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The pressure sensitivity is tunable by using elastomers with different elasticities or by the pre-strain control of fabric strain sensors. Finite element simulation further confirms the sensor design. The simple structure, large workable pressure range, high sensitivity, high flexibility, facile fabrication and low cost of these pressure sensors make them promising candidates for smart protective clothing against impact loading.

  19. Effect of Impaction Sequence on Osteochondral Graft Damage: The Role of Repeated and Varying Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Richard W.; Friel, Nicole A.; Williams, James M.; Cole, Brian J.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteochondral autografts and allografts require mechanical force for proper graft placement into the defect site; however, impaction compromises the tissue. This study aimed to determine the effect of impaction force and number of hits to seat the graft on cartilage integrity. Hypothesis Under constant impulse conditions, higher impaction load magnitudes are more detrimental to cell viability, matrix integrity and collagen network organization and will result in proteoglycan loss and nitric oxide release. Study Design Controlled laboratory study Methods Osteochondral explants, harvested from fresh bovine trochleas, were exposed to a series of consistent impact loads delivered by a pneumatically driven device. Each plug received the same overall impulse of 7 Ns, reflecting the mean of 23 clinically inserted plugs. Impaction loads of 37.5N, 75N, 150N, and 300N were matched with 74, 37, 21, and 11 hits respectively. Following impaction, the plugs were harvested and cartilage was analyzed for cell viability, histology by safranin-o and picosirius red, and release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and nitric oxide. Data were compared with non-impacted control. Results Impacted plugs had significantly lower cell viability than non-impacted plugs. A dose response relationship in loss of cell viability with respect to load magnitude was seen immediately and after 4 days but lost after 8 days. Histologic analysis revealed intact cartilage surface in all samples (loaded or control), with loaded samples showing alterations in birefringence. While the sulfated GAG release was similar across varying impaction loads, release of nitric oxide increased with increasing impaction magnitudes and time. Conclusions Impaction loading parameters have a direct effect on the time course of the viability of the cartilage in the graft tissue. Clinical Relevance Optimal loading parameters for surgical impaction of osteochondral grafts are those with lower load magnitudes and a greater

  20. Evaluating the impact of Wyoming big sagebrush fuel loads on bunchgrass mortality following a fire event

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire temperatures can vary spatially due to fuel loading characteristics and burn conditions. The influence of fuel loads, particularly that of sagebrush, on bunchgrass mortality following a wildfire is largely unknown. In this study, we quantified pre-burn shrub fuel loads and its impact on blueb...

  1. Impact of sampling strategy on stream load estimates in till landscape of the Midwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vidon, P.; Hubbard, L.E.; Soyeux, E.

    2009-01-01

    Accurately estimating various solute loads in streams during storms is critical to accurately determine maximum daily loads for regulatory purposes. This study investigates the impact of sampling strategy on solute load estimates in streams in the US Midwest. Three different solute types (nitrate, magnesium, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC)) and three sampling strategies are assessed. Regardless of the method, the average error on nitrate loads is higher than for magnesium or DOC loads, and all three methods generally underestimate DOC loads and overestimate magnesium loads. Increasing sampling frequency only slightly improves the accuracy of solute load estimates but generally improves the precision of load calculations. This type of investigation is critical for water management and environmental assessment so error on solute load calculations can be taken into account by landscape managers, and sampling strategies optimized as a function of monitoring objectives. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  2. Anthropometric, Sprint, and High-Intensity Running Profiles of English Academy Rugby Union Players by Position.

    PubMed

    Darrall-Jones, Joshua D; Jones, Ben; Till, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running profiles of English academy rugby union players by playing positions, and to investigate the relationships between anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running characteristics. Data were collected from 67 academy players after the off-season period and consisted of anthropometric (height, body mass, sum of 8 skinfolds [∑SF]), 40-m linear sprint (5-, 10-, 20-, and 40-m splits), the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IRTL-1), and the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (30-15 IFT). Forwards displayed greater stature, body mass, and ∑SF; sprint times and sprint momentum, with lower high-intensity running ability and sprint velocities than backs. Comparisons between age categories demonstrated body mass and sprint momentum to have the largest differences at consecutive age categories for forwards and backs; whereas 20-40-m sprint velocity was discriminate for forwards between under 16s, 18s, and 21s. Relationships between anthropometric, sprint velocity, momentum, and high-intensity running ability demonstrated body mass to negatively impact on sprint velocity (10 m; r = -0.34 to -0.46) and positively affect sprint momentum (e.g., 5 m; r = 0.85-0.93), with large to very large negative relationships with the Yo-Yo IRTL-1 (r = -0.65 to -0.74) and 30-15 IFT (r = -0.59 to -0.79). These findings suggest that there are distinct anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running ability differences between and within positions in junior rugby union players. The development of sprint and high-intensity running ability may be impacted by continued increases in body mass as there seems to be a trade-off between momentum, velocity, and the ability to complete high-intensity running. PMID:26466132

  3. Androgynous, Reconfigurable Closed Loop Feedback Controlled Low Impact Docking System With Load Sensing Electromagnetic Capture Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor); Morales, Ray H. (Inventor); Le, Thang D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a fully androgynous, reconfigurable closed loop feedback controlled low impact docking system with load sensing electromagnetic capture ring. The docking system of the present invention preferably comprises two Docking- assemblies, each docking assembly comprising a load sensing ring having an outer face, one of more electromagnets, one or more load cells coupled to said load sensing ring. The docking assembly further comprises a plurality of actuator arms coupled to said load sensing ring and capable of dynamically adjusting the orientation of said load sensing ring and a reconfigurable closed loop control system capable of analyzing signals originating from said plurality of load cells and of outputting real time control for each of the actuators. The docking assembly of the present invention incorporates an active load sensing system to automatically dynamically adjust the load sensing ring during capture instead of requiring significant force to push and realign the ring.

  4. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of BaselineLoad Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote,Sila

    2008-01-01

    Both Federal and California state policymakers areincreasingly interested in developing more standardized and consistentapproaches to estimate and verify the load impacts of demand responseprograms and dynamic pricing tariffs. This study describes a statisticalanalysis of the performance of different models used to calculate thebaseline electric load for commercial buildings participating in ademand-response (DR) program, with emphasis onthe importance of weathereffects. During a DR event, a variety of adjustments may be made tobuilding operation, with the goal of reducing the building peak electricload. In order to determine the actual peak load reduction, an estimateof what the load would have been on the day of the event without any DRactions is needed. This baseline load profile (BLP) is key to accuratelyassessing the load impacts from event-based DR programs and may alsoimpact payment settlements for certain types of DR programs. We testedseven baseline models on a sample of 33 buildings located in California.These models can be loosely categorized into two groups: (1) averagingmethods, which use some linear combination of hourly load values fromprevious days to predict the load on the event, and (2) explicit weathermodels, which use a formula based on local hourly temperature to predictthe load. The models were tested both with and without morningadjustments, which use data from the day of the event to adjust theestimated BLP up or down.Key findings from this study are: - The accuracyof the BLP model currently used by California utilities to estimate loadreductions in several DR programs (i.e., hourly usage in highest 3 out of10 previous days) could be improved substantially if a morning adjustmentfactor were applied for weather-sensitive commercial and institutionalbuildings. - Applying a morning adjustment factor significantly reducesthe bias and improves the accuracy of all BLP models examined in oursample of buildings. - For buildings with low load

  5. Impact of Chloroquine on Viral Load in Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Katherine; Kuhn, Louise; Kasonde, Prisca; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Shutes, Erin; Vwalika, Cheswa; Ghosh, Mrinal; Aldrovandi, Grace; Thea, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The anti-malarial agent chloroquine has activity against HIV. We compared the effect of chloroquine (n = 18) to an anti-malarial agent without known anti-HIV-activity, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (n = 12), on breast milk HIV RNA levels among HIV-infected breastfeeding women in Zambia. After adjusting for CD4 count and plasma viral load, chloroquine was associated with a trend towards lower levels of HIV RNA in breast milk compared with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (P 0.05). Higher breastmilk viral load was also observed among women receiving presumptive treatment = for symptomatic malaria compared with asymptomatic controls and among controls reporting fever in the prior week. Further research is needed to determine the potential role of chloroquine in prevention of HIV transmission through breastfeeding. Impacte de la chloroquine sur la charge virale dans le lait maternelle La chloroquine, agent antimalarique, a une activité contre le VIH. Nous avons comparé l’effet de la chloroquine à celui d’un autre agent antimalarique, la sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, dont l’activité sur le VIH n’est pas connue, en mesurant les taux d’ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel de femmes allaitantes infectées par le VIH en Zambie. Après ajustement pour les taux de CD4 et la charge virale dans le plasma, la chloroquine comparée à la sulfadoxine pyrimethamine était associée à une tendance vers des teneurs plus bas en ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel (P = 0,05). Des charges virales plus élevées dans le lait maternel étaient aussi observées chez des femmes recevant un traitement présomptif pour des symptômes de malaria par rapport aux contrôles asymptomatiques et par rapport à des contrôles rapportant de la fièvre durant la première semaine. Des études supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour déterminer le rôle potentiel de la chloroquine dans la prévention de la transmission du VIH par l’allaitement maternel. mots clésVIH, malaria, allaitement maternel

  6. Charge Strippers of Heavy Ions for High Intensity Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, Jerry A.; Marti, Felix

    2014-02-01

    Charge strippers play a critical role in many high intensity heavy ion accelerators. Here we present some history of recent stripper technology development and indicate the capabilities and limitations of the various approaches. The properties of solid, gaseous, and liquid strippers are covered. In particular, the limitations of solid strippers for high intensity, high atomic number heavy ions and the unique features of helium gas and liquid lithium for high intensity applications are covered. The need for high quality simulation of stripper performance as important input for system optimization is explained and examples of the current simulation codes are given.

  7. High Intensity Accelerator and Neutron Source in China

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Xialing; Wei, J.; Loong Chun

    2011-06-28

    High intensity Accelerator is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. The R/D activities of the technology of High intensity accelerator are also developed in China for some year, and have some good facilities around China. This paper will reports the status of some high intensity accelerators and neutron source in China, which including ADS/RFQ; CARR; CSNS; PKUNIFTY and CPHS. This paper will emphatically report the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) led by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

  8. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  9. The impact of cognitive load on delayed recall.

    PubMed

    Camos, Valérie; Portrat, Sophie

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that long-term retention of items studied in a working memory span task depends on the refreshing of memory items-more specifically, on the number of refreshing opportunities. However, it was previously shown that refreshing depends on the cognitive load of the concurrent task introduced in the working memory span task. Thus, cognitive load should determine the long-term retention of items assessed in a delayed-recall test if such retention relies on refreshing. In two experiments, while the amount of refreshing opportunities remained constant, we varied the cognitive load of the concurrent task by either introducing tasks differing in their attentional demands or varying the pace of the concurrent task. To verify that this effect was related to refreshing and not to any maintenance mechanism, we also manipulated the availability of subvocal rehearsal. Replicating previous results, increasing cognitive load reduced immediate recall. This increase also had a detrimental effect on delayed recall. Conversely, the addition of concurrent articulation reduced immediate but not delayed recall. This study shows that both working and episodic memory traces depend on the cognitive load of the concurrent task, whereas the use of rehearsal affects only working memory performance. These findings add further evidence of the dissociation between subvocal rehearsal and attentional refreshing. PMID:25421406

  10. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  11. Space Station Live: High-Intensity Exercise in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with SPRINT Principal Investigator Lori Ploutz-Snyder to learn more about this high-intensity exercise research taking place aboard the International Sp...

  12. FLASH requirements for the high intensity radiated field electromagnetic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    The worldwide proliferation of high intensity emitting sources and the more electric aircraft increase the intensity of the Electromagnetic Environment (EME) in which aircraft must operate. A FLASH program HIRF (High Intensity Radiated Field) EME requirement is derived to cover both commercial and military fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This requirement is derived from the radiated susceptibility requirement documents of both the FAA and U.S. military. Specific test data and analysis will show that we can meet this requirement.

  13. System ID modern control algorithms for active aerodynamic load control and impact on gearbox loading.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan Charles; Halse, Chris; Crowther, Ashley; Barlas, Thanasis; Wilson, David Gerald; Berg, Dale E.; Resor, Brian Ray

    2010-06-01

    Prior work on active aerodynamic load control (AALC) of wind turbine blades has demonstrated that appropriate use of this technology has the potential to yield significant reductions in blade loads, leading to a decrease in wind cost of energy. While the general concept of AALC is usually discussed in the context of multiple sensors and active control devices (such as flaps) distributed over the length of the blade, most work to date has been limited to consideration of a single control device per blade with very basic Proportional Derivative controllers, due to limitations in the aeroservoelastic codes used to perform turbine simulations. This work utilizes a new aeroservoelastic code developed at Delft University of Technology to model the NREL/Upwind 5 MW wind turbine to investigate the relative advantage of utilizing multiple-device AALC. System identification techniques are used to identify the frequencies and shapes of turbine vibration modes, and these are used with modern control techniques to develop both Single-Input Single-Output (SISO) and Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) LQR flap controllers. Comparison of simulation results with these controllers shows that the MIMO controller does yield some improvement over the SISO controller in fatigue load reduction, but additional improvement is possible with further refinement. In addition, a preliminary investigation shows that AALC has the potential to reduce off-axis gearbox loads, leading to reduced gearbox bearing fatigue damage and improved lifetimes.

  14. The Impact of Cognitive Load Theory on Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Every student is different, which is the challenge of astronomy education research (AER) and teaching astronomy. This difference also provides the greatest goal for education researchers - our GUT - we need to be able to quantify these differences and provide explanatory and predictive theories to curriculum developers and teachers. One educational theory that holds promise is Cognitive Load Theory. Cognitive Load Theory begins with the well-established fact that everyone's working memory can hold 7 ± 2 unique items. This quirk of the human brain is why phone numbers are 7 digits long. This quirk is also why we forget peoples’ names after just meeting them, leave the iron on when we leave the house, and become overwhelmed as students of new material. Once the intricacies of Cognitive Load are understood, it becomes possible to design learning environments to marshal the resources students have and guide them to success. Lessons learned from Cognitive Load Theory can and should be applied to learning astronomy. Classroom-ready ideas will be presented.

  15. Impacts of transient salinity shock loads on Anammox process performance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun; Jin, Ren-Cun; Yang, Guang-Feng; Yu, Jin-Jin; Xing, Bao-Shan; Zhang, Qian-Qian

    2012-05-01

    The effect of salinity shock (5-60 g l(-1) NaCl) on anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process performance was investigated. The response to the shock loads can be divided into three stages: a sensitive period, an interim stable period and a recovery period which lasted 6-26 d. When exposed to NaCl shocks for 12h, the sludge retention time (SRT) of the reactor decreased with increasing NaCl shock loads, ranging between 2.9 and 22.5d, meanwhile the biomass decreased by 0.8-37.4%. When shock loads were higher than 10 g l(-1) NaCl, the reactor was at risk of losing too much biomass. The granular surface was rough due to rapid growth of filamentous bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also the EPS amount changed during all NaCl shock loads. In the latter of shocks, the microorganisms in the reactor showed a little adaption to the NaCl shock. PMID:22440577

  16. SRB attrition rate study of the aft skirt due to water impact cavity collapse loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, C. D.

    1976-01-01

    A methodology was presented so that realistic attrition prediction could aid in selecting an optimum design option for minimizing the effects of updated loads on the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) aft skirt. The updated loads resulted in water impact attrition rates greater than 10 percent for the aft skirt structure. Adding weight to reinforce the aft skirt was undesirable. The refined method treats the occurrences of the load distribution probabilistically, radially and longitudinally, with respect to the critical structural response.

  17. Installation of Impact Plates to Continuously Measure Bed Load: Elwha River, Washington, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2008 and 2009, a series of bed load impact plates was installed across a channel spanning weir on the Elwha River, Washington. This is the first permanent installation of its kind in North America and one of the largest anywhere. The purpose of this system is to measure coarse bed load during and...

  18. Climate Change Impacts on Residential and Commercial Loads in the Western U.S. Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Taylor, Zachary T.; Jiang, Wei; Xie, YuLong; Leung, Lai R.; Correia, James; Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Paget, Maria L.

    2008-09-30

    This report presents a multi-disciplinary modeling approach to quickly quantify climate change impacts on energy consumption, peak load, and load composition of residential and commercial buildings. This research focuses on addressing the impact of temperature changes on the building cooling load in 10 major cities across the Western United States and Canada. Our results have shown that by the mid-century, building yearly energy consumption and peak load will increase in the Southwest. Moreover, the peak load months will spread out to not only the summer months but also spring and autumn months. The Pacific Northwest will experience more hot days in the summer months. The penetration of the air conditioning (a/c) system in this area is likely to increase significantly over the years. As a result, some locations in the Pacific Northwest may be shifted from winter peaking to summer peaking. Overall, the Western U.S. grid may see more simultaneous peaks across the North and South in summer months. Increased cooling load will result in a significant increase in the motor load, which consumes more reactive power and requires stronger voltage support from the grid. This study suggests an increasing need for the industry to implement new technology to increase the efficiency of temperature-sensitive loads and apply proper protection and control to prevent possible adverse impacts of a/c motor loads.

  19. Repeated high-intensity exercise in professional rugby union.

    PubMed

    Austin, Damien; Gabbett, Tim; Jenkins, David

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency, duration, and nature of repeated high-intensity exercise in Super 14 rugby union. Time-motion analysis was used during seven competition matches over the 2008 and 2009 Super 14 seasons; five players from each of four positional groups (front row forwards, back row forwards, inside backs, and outside backs) were assessed (20 players in total). A repeated high-intensity exercise bout was considered to involve three or more sprints, and/or tackles and/or scrum/ruck/maul activities within 21 s during the same passage of play. The range of repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each group in a match was as follows: 11-18 for front row forwards, 11-21 for back row forwards, 13-18 for inside backs, and 2-11 for outside backs. The durations of the most intense repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each position ranged from 53 s to 165 s and the minimum recovery periods between repeated high-intensity exercise bouts ranged from 25 s for the back row forwards to 64 s for the front row forwards. The present results show that repeated high-intensity exercise bouts vary in duration and activities relative to position but all players in a game will average at least 10 changes in activity in the most demanding bouts and complete at least one tackle and two sprints. The most intense periods of activity are likely to last as long as 120 s and as little as 25 s recovery may separate consecutive repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. The present findings can be used by coaches to prepare their players for the most demanding passages of play likely to be experienced in elite rugby union. PMID:21756130

  20. Response of DP 600 products to dynamic impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Deidra Darcell

    The objective of this study was to compare the microstructural response of various DP 600 products subjected to low velocity, dynamic impact tests, typically encountered in a car crash. Since the response of steel is sensitive to its microstructure as controlled by the alloying elements, phase content, and processing; various DP 600 products may respond differently to crashes. The microstructure before and after dynamic impact deformation at 5 and 10 mph was characterized with regards to grain size, morphology, and phase content among vendors A, B, and C to evaluate efficiency in absorbing energy mechanisms during a crash simulated by dynamic impact testing in a drop tower.

  1. The Extravehicular Suit Impact Load Attenuation Study for Use in Astronaut Bone Fracture Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Gilkey, Kelly M.; Sulkowski, Christina M.; Samorezov, Sergey; Myers, Jerry G.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Integrated Medical Model (IMM) assesses the risk, including likelihood and impact of occurrence, of all credible in-flight medical conditions. Fracture of the proximal femur is a traumatic injury that would likely result in loss of mission if it were to happen during spaceflight. The low gravity exposure causes decreases in bone mineral density which heightens the concern. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have quantified bone fracture probability during spaceflight with a probabilistic model. It was assumed that a pressurized extravehicular activity (EVA) suit would attenuate load during a fall, but no supporting data was available. The suit impact load attenuation study was performed to collect analogous data. METHODS: A pressurized EVA suit analog test bed was used to study how the offset, defined as the gap between the suit and the astronaut s body, impact load magnitude and suit operating pressure affects the attenuation of impact load. The attenuation data was incorporated into the probabilistic model of bone fracture as a function of these factors, replacing a load attenuation value based on commercial hip protectors. RESULTS: Load attenuation was more dependent on offset than on pressurization or load magnitude, especially at small offsets. Load attenuation factors for offsets between 0.1 - 1.5 cm were 0.69 +/- 0.15, 0.49 +/- 0.22 and 0.35 +/- 0.18 for mean impact forces of 4827, 6400 and 8467 N, respectively. Load attenuation factors for offsets of 2.8 - 5.3 cm were 0.93 +/- 0.2, 0.94 +/- 0.1 and 0.84 +/- 0.5, for the same mean impact forces. Reductions were observed in the 95th percentile confidence interval of the bone fracture probability predictions. CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in uncertainty and improved confidence in bone fracture predictions increased the fidelity and credibility of the fracture risk model and its benefit to mission design and operational decisions.

  2. Assessment of dynamic effects on aircraft design loads: The landing impact case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstein, Michael; Feldman, Esther; Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses the potential benefits due to a fully dynamic approach to determine the design loads of a mid-size business jet. The study is conducted by considering the fuselage midsection of the DAEDALOS aircraft model with landing impact conditions. The comparison is presented in terms of stress levels between the novel dynamic approach and the standard design practice based on the use of equivalent static loads. The results illustrate that a slight reduction of the load levels can be achieved, but careful modeling of the damping level is needed. Guidelines for an improved load definition are discussed, and suggestions for future research activities are provided.

  3. Hydrodynamic Impact-Load Alleviation with a Penetrating Hydro-Ski

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, Philip M., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    A penetrating hydro-ski was mounted below a model tested previously in the study reported in NACA Technical Note 4401, and a series of impacts were made in the Langley impact basin to determine load alleviation with this type of hydro-ski. The hydro-ski was designed to penetrate through seaway irregularities with a minimum of drag and with small impact loads. The penetrating hydro-ski was small (beam-loading coefficient of 111) and of a streamline shape with the bottom designed for flush retraction into the main model. A series of impacts at fixed trim angles of 8, 16, and 30 deg were made in smooth water and at a fixed trim angle of 8 deg in rough water. The loads and motions of the model were recorded, and photographic observations of the flow and cavities generated in the water by the penetrating hydro-ski were made. The data are presented and the maximum impact loads and maximum drafts of the model with the penetrating hydro-ski are compared with those of the model obtained without the penetrating hydro-ski. Maximum load reductions of 30 to 70 percent in smooth water and of 50 to 80 percent in rough water are indicated. Cavity and flow generation by the penetrating hydro-ski are discussed, and it is indicated that the penetrating hydro-ski moved smoothly through the water and generated deep cavities which are shown by stereophotographs.

  4. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1993-11-01

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics. Issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. The author discusses in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of the discussion is inspired by the problems that were encountered and the useful things learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is the work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  5. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. )

    1994-10-10

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics, issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. I will discuss in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of our discussion is inspired by the problems we have encountered and the useful things we have learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is our work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  6. The impact of cognitive load on operatic singers' timing performance

    PubMed Central

    Çorlu, Muzaffer; Maes, Pieter-Jan; Muller, Chris; Kochman, Katty; Leman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report the results of an empirical study on the effects of cognitive load on operatic singing. The main aim of the study was to investigate to what extent a working memory task affected the timing of operatic singers' performance. Thereby, we focused on singers' tendency to speed up, or slow down their performance of musical phrases and pauses. Twelve professional operatic singers were asked to perform an operatic aria three times; once without an additional working memory task, once with a concurrent working memory task (counting shapes on a computer screen), and once with a relatively more difficult working memory task (more shapes to be counted appearing one after another). The results show that, in general, singers speeded up their performance under heightened cognitive load. Interestingly, this effect was more pronounced in pauses—more in particular longer pauses—compared to musical phrases. We discuss the role of sensorimotor control and feedback processes in musical timing to explain these findings. PMID:25954218

  7. The impact of cognitive load on operatic singers' timing performance.

    PubMed

    Çorlu, Muzaffer; Maes, Pieter-Jan; Muller, Chris; Kochman, Katty; Leman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report the results of an empirical study on the effects of cognitive load on operatic singing. The main aim of the study was to investigate to what extent a working memory task affected the timing of operatic singers' performance. Thereby, we focused on singers' tendency to speed up, or slow down their performance of musical phrases and pauses. Twelve professional operatic singers were asked to perform an operatic aria three times; once without an additional working memory task, once with a concurrent working memory task (counting shapes on a computer screen), and once with a relatively more difficult working memory task (more shapes to be counted appearing one after another). The results show that, in general, singers speeded up their performance under heightened cognitive load. Interestingly, this effect was more pronounced in pauses-more in particular longer pauses-compared to musical phrases. We discuss the role of sensorimotor control and feedback processes in musical timing to explain these findings. PMID:25954218

  8. Projectiles Impact Assessment of Aircraft Wing Structures with Real Dynamic Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lu; Han, Qing; Wang, Changlin

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis to achieve the impact damage of the wing structure under real dynamic load. MPCCI tools are utilized to convert wing aerodynamic load into structural Finite Element Method (FEM) node load. The ANSYS/LS-DYNA code is also used to simulate the dynamic loading effects of the wing structure hit by several projectiles, including both active damage mechanism and common damage mechanism. In addition, structural node force on the leading edge and the midline is compared to the aerodynamic load separately. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the penetrating size and the stress concentration around the damage holes indicates that under the same load situation, the structural damage efficiency of active damage mechanism is significantly higher than the one of common damage mechanism.

  9. High intensity, argon ion laser-jet photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. Marshall; Schnapp, Karlyn A.; Hannemann, Klaus; Ho, Douglas M.; Memarian, Hamid R.; Azadnia, Ardeshir; Pinhas, Allan R.; Figley, Timothy M.

    A new technique for the study of high intensity solution photochemistry has been developed. With this laser-jet technique, a high velocity microjet is irradiated with the focussed output of an argon ion laser. Under these extremely high intensity conditions, photochemically generated transient species with suitable absorption properties are excited further and produce relatively large amounts of photoproducts which are not observed under low intensity conditions. The application of this laser-jet technique in the study of the photochemistry of radicals, biradicals, photoenols and the higher excited states of carbonyl and polycyclic aromatic compounds is described.

  10. High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. C.; Xia, J. W.; Xiao, G. Q.; Xu, H. S.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhou, X. H.; Ma, X. W.; He, Y.; Ma, L. Z.; Gao, D. Q.; Meng, J.; Xu, Z.; Mao, R. S.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Y. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Yuan, P.; Zhan, W. L.; Shi, J.; Chai, W. P.; Yin, D. Y.; Li, P.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Zhang, J. Q.; Sheng, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    HIAF (High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility), a new facility planned in China for heavy ion related researches, consists of two ion sources, a high intensity Heavy Ion Superconducting Linac (HISCL), a 45 Tm Accumulation and Booster Ring (ABR-45) and a multifunction storage ring system. The key features of HIAF are unprecedented high pulse beam intensity and versatile operation mode. The HIAF project aims to expand nuclear and related researches into presently unreachable region and give scientists possibilities to conduct cutting-edge researches in these fields. The general description of the facility is given in this article with a focus on the accelerator design.

  11. Assessing the impact of long-term cultivation on runoff, pollutant load, and crop yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past century, agriculture had detrimental impacts on soil and water quality revealed by increased surface runoff and non-point source pollution. In this study, we estimated the impact of long-term agriculture on surface runoff, sediment yield, atrazine load, and crop yields. Soil samples we...

  12. Impact of electric vehicle loads on electric power distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchh, Tariq Aslam

    The voltages and currents on four distribution sites (FPLsb-1 to FPLsb-4) have been monitored. The load behavior with and without the EV load has been recorded. By performing laboratory tests on the GMC EV1 charger charging a fully discharged battery, the characteristics of the charger have been determined. The harmonic spectrum of the transformer current charging a fully discharged battery has been determined. The snap shots of the current and voltage waveforms have been recorded and studied. Based on the laboratory data a computer model of the charger and the distribution system has been developed. Comparing the simulation results to the laboratory results and the field data the simulation results have been validated. The simulated currents are roughly 4 to 10% away from the field recorded currents, in their magnitude and distortion. Based on the field data, laboratory results and the simulation results the derating of the distribution transformer has been calculated. The two methods suggested for the calculation of derating have been presented and compared. The maximum and minimum limits of derating have been suggested. Using the first method the maximum derating is 20% and the minimum value is 99%. Using the modified method the derating remains close to 99% throughout the charging cycle. (11 must be noted here, that a derating to 20% means that the transformer can safely handle only 20% of its full rated load. Likewise a derating to 99% means that the transformer can handle 99% of its full rated capacity. Thus, a transformer derated to 20% is highly derated and a transformer derated to 99% is slightly derated.) After establishing the reliability of the simulation, by comparing the simulation results with the field data and laboratory results, a charging scenario with shorter charging times (45 minutes and 1.2 hours) has been simulated. The distribution transformer derating corresponding to these short-charging times has been calculated and presented

  13. A Study of the Use of Contact Loading to Simulate Low Velocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Alton L.

    1997-01-01

    Although numerous studies on the impact response of laminated composites have been conducted, there is as yet no agreement within the composites community on what parameter or parameters are adequate for quantifying the severity of an impact event. One of the more interesting approaches that has been proposed uses the maximum contact force during impact to "quantify" the severity of the impact event, provided that the impact velocity is sufficiently low. A significant advantage of this approach, should it prove to be reliable, is that quasi-static contact loading could be used to simulate low velocity impact. In principle, a single specimen, loaded quasi-statically to successively increasing contact loads could be used to map the entire spectrum of damage as a function of maximum contact force. The present study had as its objective assessing whether or not the maximum contact force during impact is a suitable parameter for characterizing an impact. The response of [+/-60/0(sub 4)/+/-60/0(sub 2)](sub s) laminates fabricated from Fiberite T300/934 graphite epoxy and subjected to quasi-static contact loading and to low velocity impact was studied. Three quasi-static contact load levels - 525 lb., 600 lb., and 675 lb. - were selected. Three impact energy levels - 1.14 ft.-lb., 2.0 ft.-lb., and 2.60 ft.-lb. - were chosen in an effort to produce impact events in which the maximum contact forces during the impact events were 525 lb., 600 lb., and 625 lb., respectively. Damage development was documented using dye-penetrant enhanced x-ray radiography. A digital image processing technique was used to obtain quantitative information about the damage zone. Although it was intended that the impact load levels produce maximum contact forces equal to those used in the quasi-static contact experiments, larger contact forces were developed during impact loading. In spite of this, the damage zones developed in impacted specimens were smaller than the damage zones developed in

  14. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Textile Hybrid Composites Subjected to Low Velocity Impact Loadings

    PubMed Central

    Chandekar, Gautam S.; Kelkar, Ajit D.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study experimental and numerical investigations were carried out to predict the low velocity impact response of four symmetric configurations: 10 ply E Glass, 10 ply AS4 Carbon, and two Hybrid combinations with 1 and 2 outer plies of E Glass and 8 and 6 inner plies of Carbon. All numerical investigations were performed using commercial finite element software, LS-DYNA. The test coupons were manufactured using the low cost Heated Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (H-VARTM©) technique. Low velocity impact testing was carried out using an Instron Dynatup 8250 impact testing machine. Standard 6 × 6 Boeing fixture was used for all impact experiments. Impact experiments were performed over progressive damage, that is, from incipient damage till complete failure of the laminate in six successive impact energy levels for each configuration. The simulation results for the impact loading were compared with the experimental results. For both nonhybrid configurations, it was observed that the simulated results were in good agreement with the experimental results, whereas, for hybrid configurations, the simulated impact response was softer than the experimental response. Maximum impact load carrying capacity was also compared for all four configurations based on their areal density. It was observed that Hybrid262 configuration has superior impact load to areal density ratio. PMID:24719573

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations of textile hybrid composites subjected to low velocity impact loadings.

    PubMed

    Chandekar, Gautam S; Kelkar, Ajit D

    2014-01-01

    In the present study experimental and numerical investigations were carried out to predict the low velocity impact response of four symmetric configurations: 10 ply E Glass, 10 ply AS4 Carbon, and two Hybrid combinations with 1 and 2 outer plies of E Glass and 8 and 6 inner plies of Carbon. All numerical investigations were performed using commercial finite element software, LS-DYNA. The test coupons were manufactured using the low cost Heated Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (H-VARTM©) technique. Low velocity impact testing was carried out using an Instron Dynatup 8250 impact testing machine. Standard 6 × 6 Boeing fixture was used for all impact experiments. Impact experiments were performed over progressive damage, that is, from incipient damage till complete failure of the laminate in six successive impact energy levels for each configuration. The simulation results for the impact loading were compared with the experimental results. For both nonhybrid configurations, it was observed that the simulated results were in good agreement with the experimental results, whereas, for hybrid configurations, the simulated impact response was softer than the experimental response. Maximum impact load carrying capacity was also compared for all four configurations based on their areal density. It was observed that Hybrid262 configuration has superior impact load to areal density ratio. PMID:24719573

  16. SRB/FWC water impact: Flexible body loads test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The modeling of the cavity collapse pressure loading is discussed. There are excellent high speed color films of the quarter scale model during cavity collapse. In these films, it is possible to see a very clearly defined pressure wave front propagating circumferentially around the vehicle that seems to be associated at least on the lee side with an abrupt rise in pressure at each pressure transducer. By using a motion analyzer and stepping through the films, the location of this wave front is tracted at a number of time intervals for drops 17 through 21. The entry conditions and average wave front velocity are shown. Mathematical formulae aid in the reconstruction of the spatial distribution of the pressure.

  17. Rate modulation of human anconeus motor units during high-intensity dynamic elbow extensions.

    PubMed

    Cowling, Brianna L; Harwood, Brad; Copithorne, David B; Rice, Charles L

    2016-08-01

    Investigations of high-intensity isometric fatiguing protocols report decreases in motor unit firing rates (MUFRs), but little is known regarding changes in MUFRs following fatigue induced by high-intensity dynamic contractions. Our purpose was to evaluate MUFRs of the anconeus (an accessory elbow extensor) and elbow extension power production as a function of time to task failure (TTF) during high-velocity fatiguing concentric contractions against a moderately heavy resistance. Fine-wire intramuscular electrode pairs were inserted into the anconeus to record MUs in 12 male participants (25 ± 3 yr), over repeated sessions on separate days. MUs were tracked throughout a three-stage, varying load dynamic elbow extension protocol designed to extend the task duration for >1 min thereby inducing substantial fatigue. Mean MUFRs and peak power were calculated for three relative time ranges: 0-15% TTF (beginning), 45-60% TTF (middle) and 85-100% TTF (end). Mean duration of the overall fatigue protocol was ∼80 s. Following the protocol, isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), highest velocity at 35% MVC load, and peak power decreased 37, 60, and 64% compared with baseline, respectively. Data from 20 anconeus MUs tracked successfully throughout the protocol indicated a reduction in MUFRs in relation to power loss from 36 Hz/160 W (0-15% TTF) to 28 Hz/97 W (45-60% TTF) to 23 Hz/43 W (85-100% TTF). During these high-intensity maximal effort concentric contractions, anconeus MUFRs decreased substantially (>35%). Although the absolute MUFRs were higher in the present study than those reported previously for other muscles during sustained high-intensity isometric tasks, the relative decrease in MUFRs was similar between the two tasks. PMID:27283910

  18. Effects of Impact Velocity and Slenderness Ratio on Dynamic Buckling Load for Long Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, K.; Umeda, T.; Yu, M.; Uchida, Y.; Yaka, H.

    In this research, the buckling behavior of long columns under dynamic load was investigated both experimentally and numerically, and an effective buckling criterion for dynamic load was derived from the results in terms of the impact velocity and the slenderness ratio. In the experiments, a free fall drop-weight type impact testing machine was employed. The dynamic buckling loads were measured by the load sensing block, and the displacements were measured by a high speed magnetic-resistance device. In the numerical analyses, dynamic FEM code 'MSC-Dytran' was used to simulate the typical experimental results, and the validity and the accuracy of the simulations were checked. The dynamic buckling loads at various impact velocities were then systematically investigated. From both experimental and simulated results, it was found that the dynamic to static buckling load ratios can be successfully described as a square function of the slenderness ratio of the columns, while they can be also described by a power law of the applied impact velocity.

  19. Effect of boundary conditions, impact loading and hydraulic stiffening on femoral fracture strength.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ifaz T; Speirs, Andrew D; Frei, Hanspeter

    2013-09-01

    Patient specific quantitative CT (QCT) imaging data together with the finite element (FE) method may provide an accurate prediction of a patient's femoral strength and fracture risk. Although numerous FE models investigating femoral fracture strength have been published, there is little consent on the effect of boundary conditions, dynamic loading and hydraulic strengthening due to intra-medullary pressure on the predicted fracture strength. We developed a QCT-derived FE model of a proximal femur that included node-specific modulus assigned based on the local bone density. The effect of three commonly used boundary conditions published in literature were investigated by comparing the resulting strain field due to an applied fracture load. The models were also augmented with viscoelastic material properties and subject to a realistic impact load profile to determine the effect of dynamic loads on the strain field. Finally, the effect of hydraulic strengthening was investigated by including node specific permeability and performing a coupled pore diffusion and stress analysis of the FE model. Results showed that all boundary conditions yield the same strain field patterns, but peak strains were 22% lower and fracture load was 18% higher when loaded at the greater trochanter than when loaded at the femoral head. Comparison of the dynamic models showed that material viscoelasticity was important, but inertial effects (vibration and shock) were not. Finally, pore pressure changes did not cause significant hydraulic strengthening of bone under fall impact loading. PMID:23906770

  20. Impact location and load identification through inverse analysis with bounded uncertain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmari, Saeed; Yang, Mijia

    2013-08-01

    The growing demand for real-time damage assessment necessitates development of an efficient inverse analysis algorithm with consideration of practical issues such as uncertainty in measurement. A mathematical model-based inverse analysis scheme is proposed to identify impact locations and reconstruct impact load time history of a simply supported plate through multiple levels of analysis. The proximity of the impact location is first determined by the triangulation method and the impact location is then refined by minimization of an objective function through the particle swarm optimization method (PSO). Loss of data due to filtration is addressed in a further level by performing an interval analysis based on extreme measurement errors. The outcome of the analyses is a mean impact location, a load time history, and a range of likely deviations. The extreme deviation in impact location is shown by bounding lines, which form a rectangle. The deviation in load time history is also shown by upper and lower bounding sinusoidal curves. The results of the analyses indicate that the proposed method can effectively locate the impact point and reconstruct the load time history even with the existence of noise in the measured response.

  1. Mechanical Characterization of the Human Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Subjected to Impact Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David, IV

    Low back pain is a large and costly problem in the United States. Several working populations, such as miners, construction workers, forklift operators, and military personnel, have an increased risk and prevalence of low back pain compared to the general population. This is due to exposure to repeated, transient impact shocks, particularly while operating vehicles or other machinery. These shocks typically do not cause acute injury, but rather lead to pain and injury over time. The major focus in low back pain is often the intervertebral disc, due to its role as the major primary load-bearing component along the spinal column. The formation of a reliable standard for human lumbar disc exposure to repeated transient shock could potentially reduce injury risk for these working populations. The objective of this project, therefore, is to characterize the mechanical response of the lumbar intervertebral disc subjected to sub-traumatic impact loading conditions using both cadaveric and computational models, and to investigate the possible implications of this type of loading environment for low back pain. Axial, compressive impact loading events on Naval high speed boats were simulated in the laboratory and applied to human cadaveric specimen. Disc stiffness was higher and hysteresis was lower than quasi-static loading conditions. This indicates a shift in mechanical response when the disc is under impact loads and this behavior could be contributing to long-term back pain. Interstitial fluid loss and disc height changes were shown to affect disc impact mechanics in a creep study. Neutral zone increased, while energy dissipation and low-strain region stiffness decreased. This suggests that the disc has greater clinical instability during impact loading with progressive creep and fluid loss, indicating that time of day should be considered for working populations subjected to impact loads. A finite element model was developed and validated against cadaver specimen

  2. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, Donald J.; Schamaun, Roger G.; Clark, Donald C.; Potter, R. Christopher; Frank, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  3. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

    1980-03-11

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  4. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  5. Clinical applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    She, W H; Cheung, T T; Jenkins, C R; Irwin, M G

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound has been developed for therapeutic use in addition to its diagnostic ability. The use of focused ultrasound energy can offer a non-invasive method for tissue ablation, and can therefore be used to treat various solid tumours. High-intensity focused ultrasound is being increasingly used in the treatment of both primary and metastatic tumours as these can be precisely located for ablation. It has been shown to be particularly useful in the treatment of uterine fibroids, and various solid tumours including those of the pancreas and liver. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a valid treatment option for liver tumours in patients with significant medical co-morbidity who are at high risk for surgery or who have relatively poor liver function that may preclude hepatectomy. It has also been used as a form of bridging therapy while patients awaiting cadaveric donor liver transplantation. In this article, we outline the principles of high-intensity focused ultrasound and its clinical applications, including the management protocol development in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in Hong Kong by performing a search on MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE, and PubMed. The search of these databases ranged from the date of their establishment until December 2015. The search terms used were: high-intensity focused ultrasound, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, liver tumour, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreas, renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, breast cancer, fibroids, bone tumour, atrial fibrillation, glaucoma, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and neuropathic pain. PMID:27380753

  6. Nonlinear behavior in high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernd; Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The light flicker problem of high intensity discharge lamps is studied numerically and experimentally. It is shown that in some respects the systems behave very similar to the forced Duffing oscillator with a softening spring. In particular, the jump phenomenon and hysteresis are observed in the simulations and in the experiments.

  7. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  8. Critical design issues of high intensity proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-08-01

    Medium-energy proton linear accelerators are being studied as drivers for spallation applications requiring large amounts of beam powder. Important design factors for such high-intensity linacs are reviewed, and issues and concerns specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

  9. Acute plasma volume change with high-intensity sprint exercise.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Richard J; Farney, Tyler M

    2013-10-01

    When exercise is of long duration or of moderate to high intensity, a decrease in plasma volume can be observed. This has been noted for both aerobic and resistance exercise, but few data are available with regard to high-intensity sprint exercise. We measured plasma volume before and after 3 different bouts of acute exercise, of varying intensity, and/or duration. On different days, men (n = 12; 21-35 years) performed aerobic cycle exercise (60 minutes at 70% heart rate reserve) and 2 different bouts of cycle sprints (five 60-second sprints at 100% maximum wattage obtained during graded exercise testing (GXT) and ten 15-second sprints at 200% maximum wattage obtained during GXT). Blood was collected before and 0, 30, and 60 minutes postexercise and analyzed for hematocrit and hemoglobin and plasma volume was calculated. Plasma volume decreased significantly for all exercise bouts (p < 0.05), with the greatest decrease noted 0 minute postexercise for both sprint bouts (∼19%) compared with aerobic exercise bouts (∼11%). By 30 minutes postexercise, plasma volume approached pre-exercise values. We conclude that acute bouts of exercise, in particular high-intensity sprint exercise, significantly decrease plasma volume during the immediate postexercise period. It is unknown what, if any negative implications these transient changes may have on exercise performance. Strength and conditioning professionals may aim to rehydrate athletes appropriately after high-intensity exercise bouts. PMID:23302756

  10. Evaluation of a Compression-Loaded-Stitched-Multi-Bay Fuselage Panel With Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Li, Ji-An

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results from a stitched VaRTM carbon-epoxy composite panel tested under uni-axial compression loading are presented along with nonlinear finite element analysis prediction of the response. The curved panel is divided by frames and stringers into six bays with a column of three bays along the compressive loading direction. The frames are supported at the frame ends to resist out-of-plane translation. Back-to-back strain gages are used to record the strain and displacement transducers were used to record the out-of-plane displacements. In addition a full-field-displacement measurement technique that utilizes a camera-based-stereo-vision system was used to record the displacements. The panel was loaded to 1.5 times the predicted initial buckling load (1st bay buckling load, P(sub er) from the nonlinear finite element analysis and then was removed from the test machine for impact testing. After impacting with 20 ft-lbs of energy using a spherical impactor to produce barely visible damage the panel was loaded in compression until failure. The buckling load of the first bay to buckle was 97% of the buckling load before impact. The stitching constrained the impact damage from growing during the loading to failure. Impact damage had very little overall effect on panel stiffness. Panel stiffness measured by the full-field-displacement technique indicated a 13% loss in stiffness after impact. The panel failed at 1.64 times the first panel buckling load. The barely visible impact damage did not grow noticeably as the panel failed by global instability due to stringer-web terminations at the frame locations. The predictions from the nonlinear analysis of the finite element modeling of the entire specimen were very effective in the capture of the initial buckling and global behavior of the panel. In addition, the prediction highlighted the weakness of the panel under compression due to stringer web terminations. Both the test results and the nonlinear

  11. Impacts of groundwater metal loads from bedrock fractures on water quality of a mountain stream.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Brian S; Dawson, Helen E

    2009-06-01

    Acid mine drainage and metal loads from hardrock mines to surface waters is a significant problem in the western USA and many parts of the world. Mines often occur in mountain environments with fractured bedrock aquifers that serve as pathways for metals transport to streams. This study evaluates impacts from current and potential future groundwater metal (Cd, Cu, and Zn) loads from fractures underlying the Gilt Edge Mine, South Dakota, on concentrations in Strawberry Creek using existing flow and water quality data and simple mixing/dilution mass balance models. Results showed that metal loads from bedrock fractures to the creek currently contribute <1% of total loads. Even if background water quality is achieved upstream in Strawberry Creek, fracture metal loads would be <5%. Fracture loads could increase substantially and cause stream water quality standards exceedances once groundwater with elevated metals concentrations in the aquifer matrix migrates to the fractures and discharges to the stream. Potential future metal loads from an upstream fracture would contribute a small proportion of the total load relative to current loads in the stream. Cd has the highest stream concentrations relative to standards. Even if all stream water was treated to remove 90% of the Cd, the standard would still not be achieved. At a fracture farther downstream, the Cd standard can only be met if the upstream water is treated achieving a 90% reduction in Cd concentrations and the median stream flow is maintained. PMID:18604589

  12. Assessment of particulate cellulose epoxy composites manufactured by JMFIL under impact load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasababu, Nadendla

    2015-08-01

    Increase in environmental concern towards sustainable development invites the development of new materials which are eco-friendly to satisfy various engineering needs. The present work introduces a new manufacturing method i.e. "Just Mold Fill and Immediate Loading" to prepare epoxy composites reinforced at different contents of particulate cellulose. The fabricated composites specimens are post processed and machined, tested as per ASTM procedures under impact load.

  13. Energy dissipation characteristics of magnetosensitive elastomer under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, D.; Sun, L.; Sun, J.; Chen, W.; Ma, F.; Li, W.; Lin, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetosensitive (MS) elastomers are a class of material that ferro-magnetic particles dispersed in rubber or elastomer whose mechanical properties change with the external magnetic fields. To investigate energy dissipation properties of MS elastomers, experimental method is adopted. Firstly, this paper presents a new fabrication method of a magnetosensitive elastomers with particles in millimeter scale distributed in ideal isotropic or in chain. Then, a drop hammer testing setup is developed to measure the energy dissipation and study the impact behaviour of magnetosensitive elastomers (MSEs). For the same volume fraction and size of particle, the dissipated energy per unit length of MSEs increases with the magnetic field increasing, and chain-like structured MSEs dissipate more energy than homogenous MSEs under the same external magnetic field.

  14. Low-velocity perforation of punch-impact-loaded metal plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, H.M.; Jones, N.

    1996-05-01

    The deformation and failure of structures when loaded statically or dynamically is important for safety calculations of various structural systems in the nuclear engineering, vehicle crash-worthiness, offshore engineering, naval architecture, and defense industries. In particular, the deformation and perforation behavior of plates is important for the design of containment and protective structures against projectiles or dropped objects or impact by fragments generated during an industrial explosion. Here, an approximate quasi-static theoretical analysis is presented for the behavior of punch-impact-loaded metal plates. Based on the principle of virtual work, load-deflection relationships are first obtained and then used to predict the energy-absorbing capabilities of plates subjected to low-velocity impacts that cause perforation. It is demonstrated that the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations on fully clamped steel plates when material strain rate sensitivity is taken into consideration and provided that perforation does not occur by adiabatic shear plugging.

  15. Manipulation of cognitive load variables and impact on auscultation test performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruth; Grierson, Lawrence; Norman, Geoffrey

    2015-10-01

    Health profession educators have identified auscultation skill as a learning need for health professional students. This article explores the application of cognitive load theory (CLT) to designing cardiac and respiratory auscultation skill instruction for senior-level undergraduate nursing students. Three experiments assessed student auscultation performance following instructional manipulations of the three primary components of cognitive load: intrinsic, extraneous, and germane load. Study 1 evaluated the impact of intrinsic cognitive load by varying the number of diagnoses learned in one instruction session; Study 2 evaluated the impact of extraneous cognitive load by providing students with single or multiple examples of diagnoses during instruction; and Study 3 evaluated the impact of germane cognitive load by employing mixed or blocked sequences of diagnostic examples to students. Each of the three studies presents results that support CLT as explaining the influence of different types of cognitive processing on auscultation skill acquisition. We conclude with a discussion regarding CLT's usefulness as a framework for education and education research in the health professions. PMID:25430065

  16. A Methodology to Analyze the Impact of 30-Minute Wind Scheduling on Load-Following Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Ruisheng; Makarov, Yuri V.; Samaan, Nader A.; Kujala, Ben

    2014-12-24

    This paper proposes a new and systematic approach to investigating the impact of wind transfer between balancing authorities (BAs) with half-hour scheduling on load following requirements, which was traditionally scheduled on an hourly basis. The analysis is conducted for a few BAs in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. that are described as source BAs (sending renewables) and sink BAs (receiving renewables). The main hypothesis is that if the source BA could schedule interchange for wind on a half-hourly basis, it would make the schedule follow its net load more closely. The scheduling change in the source BA is matched by adding the corresponding component to the net load in the sink BA. The load-following requirements are calculated as: (a) by the difference between the net load and modified schedule in the source BA, and (b) the difference between modified net load and unchanged hourly schedule in the sink BA. Results are presented as hourly upward and downward load following requirements in the source and sink BA, and compared with the results obtained with all generators scheduled on an hourly basis. Thus, the proposed method can effectively help utilities better understand the impact of 30-minute scheduling and make better business decisions.

  17. Climate Change Impacts on Forest Soils Critical Acid Loads and Exceedances at a National Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, S. G.; Cohen, E.; Moore Myers, J.; Sun, G.; Caldwell, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Federal agencies of the United States (US) are currently developing guidelines for forest soil critical acid loads across the US. A critical acid load is defined as the amount of acid deposition (usually expressed on a annual basis) that an ecosystem can absorb. Traditionally, an ecosystem is considered to be at risk for health impairment when the critical acid load exceeds a level known to impair forest health. The excess over the critical acid load is termed the exceedance, and the larger the exceedance, the greater the risk of ecosystem damage. This definition of critical acid load applies to a single, long-term pollutant exposure. These guidelines are often used to establish regulations designed to maintain acidic deposition (e.g., nitrogen and sulfur) inputs below the level shown to exceed an ecosystem's critical acid load. The traditional definition for a critical acid load generally assume that the ecosystem is in a steady state condition (i.e. no major changes in the factors that regulate the ecosystems ability to absorb acids. Unfortunately, climate change is altering weather patterns and, thus, impacting the factors that regulate critical acid load limits. This paper explores which factors associated with establishing forest soil critical acid load limits will most likely be influenced by climate change, and how these changes might impact forest soil critical acid load limits across the US. Base cation weathering could increase with global warming, along with nitrogen uptake as a function of increased forest growth across New England. A moderate 20% increase in base cation weathering and nitrogen uptake would result in at least a 25% decrease in the amount of forest soil area that exceeded the critical acid load limit and at least a 50% decrease in the amount of high exceedance area across the US. While these results are encouraging, they do not account for other negative potential forest health risks associated with climate change such as elevated

  18. The effect of low fluoride concentrations on microdamage accumulation in mouse tibias under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qing; Chen, Nan; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Rong, Qi-Guo

    2015-12-01

    Microdamage accumulation in bone is one of the mechanisms for energy dissipation during the fracture process. Changes in the ultrastructure and composition of bone constituents due to aging or diseases could affect microdamage accumulation. Low concentration (1 mM) of sodium fluoride (NaF) has been used in this study to investigate the effect of ultrastructural changes on microdamage accumulation in mouse tibias following free-fall impact loadings. Twenty-two tibias were divided randomly into control and NaF-treated groups. Free-fall impact loading was conducted twice on each tibia to produce microdamage. The elastic modulus of NaF-treated tibias decreased significantly after the impact loadings, while there was no significant difference in the modulus of untreated samples between pre- and post-damage loadings. Microdamage morphology analysis showed that less and shorter microcracks existed in NaF-treated tibias compared with control bones. Meanwhile, more and longer microcracks were observed in tensile regions in untreated samples compared with that in compressive regions, whereas no significant difference was observed between tensile and compressive regions in NaF-treated bones. The results of this study indicate that more energy is required to generate microcracks in NaF-treated bone than in normal bone. A low concentration of fluoride treatment may increase the toughness of bone under impact loading.

  19. Impact load measurements with a PVDF pressure sensor in an erosive cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hujer, J.; Carrat, JB; Müller, M.; Riondet, M.

    2015-12-01

    A PVDF pressure sensor was used to measure the pressure peaks due to the collapse of cavitation bubbles in the high-speed tunnel of the LEGI laboratory. It was flush mounted on a stainless steel disk in the most erosive area of the test section. The recorded data were post- processed in order to get the impact load spectra for different velocities at constant cavitation number. The results are presented as cumulative histograms of peak rate and maximal impact load for different flow velocities of the high-speed tunnel.

  20. Salivary Cortisol Responses and Perceived Exertion during High Intensity and Low Intensity Bouts of Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Michael R.; Egan, Alison D.; Foster, Carl

    2004-01-01

    resistance exercise and that salivary cortisol responds promptly to the exercise load. Key Points The present study showed that salivary cortisol responses were significantly different immediately post exercise between the low intensity and high intensity exercise sessions Salivary measures of cortisol can be used to delineate between high and low intensity resistance exercise bouts. The session RPE method appears to be a reliable method of quantifying resistance exercise PMID:24497815

  1. Damage Tolerance of Pre-Stressed Composite Panels Under Impact Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alastair F.; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Schueler, Dominik

    2014-02-01

    An experimental test campaign studied the structural integrity of carbon fibre/epoxy panels preloaded in tension or compression then subjected to gas gun impact tests causing significant damage. The test programme used representative composite aircraft fuselage panels composed of aerospace carbon fibre toughened epoxy prepreg laminates. Preload levels in tension were representative of design limit loads for fuselage panels of this size, and maximum compression preloads were in the post-buckle region. Two main impact scenarios were considered: notch damage from a 12 mm steel cube projectile, at velocities in the range 93-136 m/s; blunt impact damage from 25 mm diameter glass balls, at velocities 64-86 m/s. The combined influence of preload and impact damage on panel residual strengths was measured and results analysed in the context of damage tolerance requirements for composite aircraft panels. The tests showed structural integrity well above design limit loads for composite panels preloaded in tension and compression with visible notch impact damage from hard body impact tests. However, blunt impact tests on buckled compression loaded panels caused large delamination damage regions which lowered plate bending stiffness and reduced significantly compression strengths in buckling.

  2. Impacts of wildfire on runoff and sediment loads at Little Granite Creek, western Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Sandra E.; Dwire, Kathleen A.; Dixon, Mark K.

    2011-06-01

    Baseline data on rates of sediment transport provide useful information on the inherent variability of stream processes and may be used to assess departure in channel form or process from disturbances. In August 2000, wildfire burned portions of the Little Granite Creek watershed near Bondurant, WY where bedload and suspended sediment measurements had been collected during 13 previous runoff seasons. This presented an opportunity to quantify increases in sediment loads associated with a large-scale natural disturbance. The first three years post-fire were warm and dry, with low snowpacks and few significant summer storms. Despite relatively low flows during the first runoff season, the estimated sediment load was about five times that predicted from regression of data from the pre-burn record. Increased sediment loading occurred during the rising limb and peak of snowmelt (54%) and during the few summer storms (44%). While high during the first post-fire year, total annual sediment yield decreased during the next two years, indicating an eventual return to baseline levels. The results from this sediment monitoring lacked some of the more dramatic responses that have been observed in other watersheds following fire. In other environments, moderate-to-high intensity rainstorms caused significant flooding, widespread debris flows and channel incision and aggradation. A few moderate intensity storms (< 2 year recurrence interval) occurred in the Little Granite Creek watershed, but they did not trigger this type of response. Instead, ash and charcoal rich discharges (herein described as "blackwater flows") and heavily sediment laden flows were observed without physical evidence of debris flows, as defined by channel incision into previously unchanneled areas. Speculatively, the sedimentation pattern and geomorphic response in Little Granite Creek may be fairly typical of stream responses to wildfire during times of continued drought and in the absence of widespread

  3. Failure characteristics of the isolated distal radius in response to dynamic impact loading.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2012-06-01

    We examined the mechanical response of the distal radius pre-fracture and at fracture under dynamic impact loads. The distal third of eight human cadaveric radii were potted and placed in a custom designed pneumatic impact system. The distal intra-articular surface of the radius rested against a model scaphoid and lunate, simulating 45° of wrist extension. The scaphoid and lunate were attached to a load cell that in turn was attached to an impact plate. Impulsive impacts were applied at increasing energy levels, in 10 J increments, until fracture occurred. Three 45° stacked strain gauge rosettes were affixed along the length of the radius quantifying the bone strains. The mean (SD) fracture energy was 45.5 (16) J. The mean (SD) resultant impact reaction force (IRFr) at failure was 2,142 (1,229) N, resulting in high compressive strains at the distal (2,718 (1,698) µε) and proximal radius (3,664 (1,890) µε). We successfully reproduced consistent fracture patterns in response to dynamic loads. The fracture energy and forces reported here are lower and the strains are higher than those previously reported and can likely be attributed to the controlled, incremental, dynamic nature of the applied loads. PMID:22083972

  4. A numerical analysis of empty and foam-filled aluminium conical tubes under oblique impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat, Fauziah; Ismail, Khairul Azwan; Yaacob, Sazali

    2015-05-01

    In real impact applications, an energy absorber rarely sustains dynamic loading either axial or oblique but a combination of both. Established studies have proved that thin-walled tube is an excellent energy absorber under dynamic loading. Furthermore, the introduction of foam filling successfully enhanced the energy absorption capacity of thin-walled tube. However, the understanding of its response under oblique loading has yet been fully explored. Moreover, emerging in automotive industry has lead to increase interests on lightweight materials such as aluminium alloy. As such, this paper presents the crushing behaviour of empty and foam-filled aluminium alloy (AA6061-T6) conical tubes under oblique impact loading using a validated nonlinear finite element (FE) code, LS-DYNA. The study aims to assess the effect of foam filling on the energy absorption of AA6061-T6 tubes for variations in filler density. In fact, to the best of our knowledge, this study is the first attempt to evaluate a response of empty and foam-filled aluminum conical tube by using an experimentally validated model under oblique dynamic loading conditions. Good correlations between the numerical and experimental results were observed. The study show that initial peak force and the energy absorption increase with increasing filler density under axial and oblique loading. On the other hand, the effect of foam filling (0.534 g/cm3 aluminium foam filler) is less pronounced for the initial peak force under axial impact loading. Furthermore, the initial peak force and dynamic force of empty and foam-filled AA6061-T6 conical tubes decrease as the load angle increases from 0 deg to 20 deg hence reduces the energy absorption capacity.

  5. BEAM HALO FORMATION IN HIGH-INTENSITY BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.

    2005-03-18

    Studies of beam halo became unavoidable feature of high-intensity machines where uncontrolled beam loss should be kept to extremely small level. For a well controlled stable beam such a loss is typically associated with the low density halo surrounding beam core. In order to minimize uncontrolled beam loss or improve performance of an accelerator, it is very important to understand what are the sources of halo formation in a specific machine of interest. The dominant mechanisms are, in fact, different in linear accelerators, circular machines or Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL). In this paper, we summarize basic mechanisms of halo formation in high-intensity beams and discuss their application to various types of accelerators of interest, such as linacs, rings and ERL.

  6. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy: an Overview for Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Min Joo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choi, Dongil

    2008-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy is a novel, emerging, therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves, propagated through tissue media, as carriers of energy. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation as well as hemostasis, thrombolysis and targeted drug/gene delivery. However, the application of this technology still has many drawbacks. It is expected that current obstacles to implementation will be resolved in the near future. In this review, we provide an overview of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy from the basic physics to recent clinical studies with an interventional radiologist's perspective for the purpose of improving the general understanding of this cutting-edge technology as well as speculating on future developments. PMID:18682666

  7. Short-pulse, high-intensity lasers at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Roberts, J.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Fulton, R.D.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    Advances in ultrafast lasers and optical amplifiers have spurred the development of terawatt-class laser systems capable of delivering focal spot intensities approaching 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. At these extremely high intensities, the optical field strength is more than twenty times larger than the Bohr electric field, permitting investigations of the optical properties of matter in a previously unexplored regime. The authors describe two laser systems for high intensity laser interaction experiments: The first is a terawatt system based on amplification of femtosecond pulses in XeCl which yields 250 mJ in 275 fs and routinely produces intensifies on target in excess of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The second system is based on chirped pulse amplification of 100-fs pulses in Ti:sapphire.

  8. Engineering Food Ingredients with High-Intensity Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jochen; Kristbergsson, Kristberg; Kjartansson, Gunnar Thor

    The use of ultrasound in the food industry has increased in the last decades. Ultrasound has been used both to analyze food structure and composition at low ultrasonic intensities and high frequencies and to modify ingredients at high ultrasonic intensities and low frequencies. Application of the latter is referred to as high-intensity (power) ultrasonication and is generally carried out at frequencies of =0.1 MHz and ultrasonic intensities of 10-100 W cm-2. In the food industry, power ultrasonication has proved to be a highly effective food processing and preservation technology, and use of high-intensity ultrasound with or without heat may be used, for example, to denature enzymes, aid in the extraction of valuable compounds from plants and seeds, tenderize meat, and homogenize or disperse two-phase systems such as emulsions or suspensions (Mason et al., 1996).

  9. High intensity muon beam source for neutrino beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham

    2015-09-01

    High intensity muon beams are essential for Muon accelerators like Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. In this study we report on a global optimization of the muon beam production and capture based on end-to-end simulations of the Muon Front End. The study includes the pion beam production target geometry, capture field profile, and forming muon beam into microbunches for further acceleration. The interplay between the transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics during the capture and transport of muon beam is evaluated and discussed. The goal of the optimization is to provide a set of design parameters that delivers high intensity muon beam that could be fit within the acceptance of a muon beam accelerator.

  10. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues. PMID:27580530

  11. An improved high intensity recycling helium-3 beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Hedgeland, H.; Kole, P. R.; Allison, W.; Ellis, J.; Jardine, A. P.

    2009-07-15

    We describe an improved high intensity, recycling, supersonic atomic beam source. Changes address several issues previously limiting performance and reliability of the apparatus, including the use of newly available vacuum pumps and modifications to the recycling system. We achieve a source intensity of 2.5x10{sup 19} atoms/s/sr, almost twice that previously achievable during recycling. Current limits on intensity are discussed.

  12. Enhancement of vasorelaxation in hypertension following high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-Lun; Lo, Chia-Wen; Lee, Jen-Ting; Su, Chia-Ting

    2011-04-30

    Exercise can ameliorate vascular dysfunction in hypertension, but its underlying mechanism has not been explored thoroughly. We aimed to investigate whether the high-intensity exercise could enhance vasorelaxation mediated by insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in hypertension. Sixteen-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats were randomly divided into non-exercise sedentary (SHR) and high-intensity exercise (SHR+Ex) groups conducted by treadmill running at a speed of 30 m/ min until exhaustion. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as the normotensive control group. Immediately after exercise, the agonist-induced vasorelaxation of aortas was evaluated in organ baths with or without endothelial denudation. Selective inhibitors were used to examine the roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) in the vasorelaxation. By adding superoxide dismutase (SOD), a superoxide scavenger, the role of superoxide production in the vasorelaxation was also clarified. We found that, the high-intensity exercise significantly (P < 0.05) induced higher vasorelaxant responses to insulin and IGF-1 in the SHR+Ex group than that in the SHR group; after endothelial denudation and pre-treatment of the PI3K inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, or SOD, vasorelaxant responses to insulin and IGF-1 became similar among three groups; the protein expression of insulin receptor, IGF-1 receptor, and endothelial NOS (eNOS) was significantly (P < 0.05) increased in the SHR+Ex group compared with the SHR group;] the relaxation to sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, was not different among three groups. Our findings suggested that the high-intensity exercise ameliorated the insulin- and IGF-1-mediated vasorelaxation through the endothelium-dependent pathway, which was associated with the reduced level of superoxide production. PMID:21789889

  13. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  14. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF HIGH INTENSITY HADRON SYNCHROTRONS.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO, A.; D'IMPERIO, N.; MALITSKY, N.

    2005-09-12

    Numerical algorithms for PIC simulation of beam dynamics in a high intensity synchrotron on a parallel computer are presented. We introduce numerical solvers of the Laplace-Poisson equation in the presence of walls, and algorithms to compute tunes and twiss functions in the presence of space charge forces. The working code for the simulation here presented is SIMBAD, that can be run as stand alone or as part of the UAL (Unified Accelerator Libraries) package.

  15. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance. PMID:23075550

  16. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  17. An improved high intensity recycling helium-3 beam source.

    PubMed

    Hedgeland, H; Kole, P R; Allison, W; Ellis, J; Jardine, A P

    2009-07-01

    We describe an improved high intensity, recycling, supersonic atomic beam source. Changes address several issues previously limiting performance and reliability of the apparatus, including the use of newly available vacuum pumps and modifications to the recycling system. We achieve a source intensity of 2.5 x 10(19) atoms/s/sr, almost twice that previously achievable during recycling. Current limits on intensity are discussed. PMID:19655995

  18. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  19. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  20. Radiation protection for an ultra-high intensity laser.

    PubMed

    Borne, F; Delacroix, D; Gelé, J M; Massé, D; Amiranoff, F

    2002-01-01

    Radiological characterisation of an experimental chamber and other areas of an ultra-high intensity laser facility (-terawatt) revealed significant levels of X ray, gamma and neutron radiation. Different techniques were used to detect and measure this radiation: TLD. photographic film, bubble detectors and germanium spectrometry. A test series of radiological measurements was made for 150 laser shots (300 femtoseconds) with energies in the 1 to 20 J range and a target illuminance of 10(19) W.cm2. Gamma dose equivalents in the vicinity of the chamber varied between 0.7 and 73 mSv. The dose equivalent due to the neutron component was evaluated to be 1% of the gamma dose equivalent. The amount of radiation generated depends on the laser energy and the nature of the target. No activation or contamination of the chamber or target holder were observed. Ultra-high intensity lasers are being extensively developed at the present time and the investigations performed demonstrate that it is necessary to take radiological risks into consideration in the design of ultra-high intensity laser facilities and to define personnel access conditions. PMID:12212903

  1. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  2. Modelling catchment management impact on in-stream phosphorus loads in northern Victoria.

    PubMed

    Vigiak, O; Rattray, D; McInnes, J; Newham, L T H; Roberts, A M

    2012-11-15

    Phosphorus pollution severely impairs the water quality of rivers in Australia and worldwide. Conceptual models have proved useful to assess management impact on phosphorus loads, particularly in data-sparse environments. This paper develops and evaluates the coupling of a point-scale model (HowLeaky2008) to a catchment scale model (CatchMODS) to enhance modelling of farm management impacts on in-stream phosphorus loads. The model was tested in two adjacent catchments in northern Victoria (Avon-Richardson and Avoca), Australia. After calibration of the in-stream attenuation parameter against measurements at gauging stations, the model simulated specific annual phosphorus loads across the catchments well (Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency of 0.52 in the Avon-Richardson and 0.83 for the Avoca catchment). Phosphorus loads at both catchment outlets under current conditions were estimated at 7 t y(-1) and were dominated by field exports. Changes to farm management practices, i.e. the use of perennial pastures in grazing systems and zero-tillage in cropping systems were estimated to reduce phosphorus load by 31% in the Avon-Richardson catchment and 19% in the Avoca catchment, relative to current practices (annual pasture and minimum tillage). The model afforded a major improvement in conceptual modelling by explicit simulation of the impacts of soil and climatic conditions on field-scale exports and by placing them in the context of landscape processes. PMID:22796756

  3. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  4. Reliability of accelerometry to assess impact loads of jumping and landing tasks.

    PubMed

    Simons, Chantal; Bradshaw, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Overuse injuries, resulting from repetitive subacute impact loading, are a problem in high-performance sports. Monitoring of impact loading may aid in the prevention of these injuries. The current study aimed to establish the intra-day and inter-day reliability of a tri-axial accelerometer to assess impact loading during jumping and landing tasks. Twelve participants wore an accelerometer on their upper and lower back. They performed a continuous hopping task as well as drop landings and rebound jumps from three drop heights (37.5, 57.5 and 77.5 cm), peak resultant acceleration (PRA) was calculated for all tasks. The tasks were performed twice, one week apart at the same time of day. The difference in the mean, intra-class correlation coefficient, coefficient of variation and Cohen's effect size were calculated as measures of reliability. PRA showed good intra-day reliability for the hopping task. Inter-day reliability of the PRA was moderate to good across all tasks. Reliability of PRA was slightly higher when accelerations were recorded on the lower back compared to the upper back. To assess impact loading, during continuous hopping, drop landings and rebound jumps, PRA recorded at both the upper and lower back appears to be a reliable measure. PMID:26836593

  5. Gross crack initiation and propagation in brittle thin solid and annular disks subjected to impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.; Bai, Y.L.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1984-04-01

    This paper derives from a study of grinding wheel break-up behavior due to impact. The impact fracture characteristics of circular disks of plaster of Paris with a concentric central hole were studied experimentally for three types of loading: (a) when the disks were suspended freely and loaded intensely at one point on their circumference by an explosive detonator; (b) when the disks were allowed to fall under gravity from a certain height on to a rigid base; and (c) when a disk, resting on a rigid base, was struck by a flat ended rigid body which was dropped on to it from a certain height. Quasi-static flattening tests on the disks were also carried out. The paper describes a theoretical investigation into the stress analysis of disks under impact, classifies the relevant damage sustained by them and attempts to unify the ''gross'' impact fracture patterns which arise in different modes of dynamic loading. The extent of local flattening of the quasi-statically loaded disks before fracture, is also reported. Good correlation between the theory and experimental results is obtained, especially for rings of diameter ratio (D /SUB i/ /D/sub 0/) of around 0.5.

  6. Impacts of Climate Change on Electric Transmission Capacity and Peak Electricity Load in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, M.; Bartos, M. D.; Eisenberg, D. A.; Gorman, B.; Johnson, N.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change may hinder future electricity reliability by reducing electric transmission capacity while simultaneously increasing electricity demand. This study estimates potential climate impacts to electric transmission capacity and peak electricity load in the United States. Electric power cables suffer decreased transmission capacity as they get hotter; similarly, during the summer peak period, electricity demand typically increases with hotter ambient air temperatures due to increased cooling loads. As atmospheric carbon concentrations increase, higher air temperatures may strain power infrastructure by reducing transmission capacity and increasing peak electricity loads. Taken together, these coincident impacts may have unpredictable consequences for electric power reliability. We estimate the effects of climate change on both the rated capacity of transmission infrastructure and expected electricity demand for 120 electrical utilities across the United States. We estimate climate-attributable capacity reductions to transmission lines by constructing thermal models of representative conductors, then forcing these models with downscaled CMIP5 temperature projections to determine the relative change in rated ampacity over the twenty-first century. Next, we assess the impact of climate change on electricity demand by using historical relationships between ambient temperature and utility-scale summertime peak load to estimate the extent to which climate change will incur additional peak load increases. We use downscaled temperature projections from 11 CMIP5 GCM models under 3 atmospheric carbon scenarios. We find that by mid-century (2040-2060), climate change may reduce average summertime transmission capacity by 4-6% relative to the 1990-2010 reference period. At the same time, peak summertime loads may rise by roughly 2-12% on average due to increases in daily maximum air temperature. In the absence of energy efficiency gains, demand-side management programs

  7. Virtual coaching for the high-intensity training of a powerlifter following coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard; Adams, Jenny; Qin, Huanying; Bilbrey, Tim; Schussler, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old powerlifter in Tennessee learned about the sport-specific, high-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training available in Dallas, Texas, and contacted the staff by phone. He was recovering from quadruple coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and had completed several weeks of traditional cardiac rehabilitation in his hometown, but the exercise program no longer met his needs. He wanted help in returning both to his normal training regimen and to powerlifting competition but was unable to attend the Dallas program in person. An exercise physiologist with the program devised a virtual coaching model in which the patient was sent a wrist blood pressure cuff for self-monitoring and was advised about exercises that would not harm his healing sternum, even as the weight loads were gradually increased. After 17 weeks of symptom-limited, high-intensity training that was complemented by phone and e-mail support, the patient was lifting heavier loads than he had before CABG. At a powerlifting competition 10 months after CABG, he placed first in his age group. This case report exemplifies the need for alternative approaches to the delivery of cardiac rehabilitation services. PMID:25552808

  8. Bond strength of pressure sensitive adhesives for CFRP aluminium-alloy hybrid beams under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, C.

    2003-09-01

    This paper discusses the impact absorbing capabilities of CFRP aluminium-alloy hybrid beams bonded with double-coated pressure sensitive adhesive tapes. Two sorts of double-coated adhesive tapes (VHB and SBT, 3M) were used in experiments. The strength and absorbed energy of the beams under impact loading were measured using an instrumented Charpy tester. Using the beams having the different adhesive tapes and the CFRP of different length, the variations of the strength and the absorbed energy were investigated. The beams bonded with VHB showed sufficient strength and absorbed energy. SBT showed also great capability of absorbing impact energy.

  9. Commissioning the new high power rf system for the AGS with high intensity beam

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Deng, D.P; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Otis, A.; Sanders, R.T.; Zaltsman, A.

    1994-08-01

    A new high power rf system has been installed in the AGS in order to raise the beam loading limit to beyond 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. The old system was limited to 2.2 {times} 10{sup l3} ppp by: available real power, multi-loop instability, and transient beam loading during batch filling from the Booster. The key components of the new system are: new power amplifiers in the tunnel using the Thomson-CSF TH573 300kW tetrode, rf feedback around the power stage, and reduction of the 10 cavities` R/Q by 1.8 by additional gap capacitors. Commissioning of the new rf system with high intensity beam is described. The intensity goal for the 1994 running period is 4 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp. To date, 3.7 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp has been achieved.

  10. Effects of filament geometry on the arc efficiency of a high-intensity He+ ion source.

    PubMed

    Kobuchi, T; Kisaki, M; Shinto, K; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Tsumori, K; Kaneko, O; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Hirano, Y; Wada, M

    2008-10-01

    A strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source equipped with three concave electrodes has been designed and constructed as the beam source for a high-energy He(0) neutral beam probe system to diagnose fusion-produced alpha particles in thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The reduction of heat load onto the concave extraction electrodes is particularly important for a long pulse operation, as the heat load deforms the electrodes and thus the beam focal length. The effects on the arc efficiency (beam current/arc power) of the ion source due to the discharge filament structure (straight-type and L-shape-type filaments), size (filament diameters of 2 and 1.5 mm), number, and the locations have been studied. Choice of the appropriate filament structure improved the arc efficiency by 17%. PMID:19044629

  11. Design procedure for pollutant loadings and impacts for highway stormwater runoff (IBM version) (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The interactive computer program was developed to make a user friendly procedure for the personal computer for calculations and guidance to make estimations of pollutant loadings and impacts from highway stormwater runoff which are presented in the Publication FHWA-RD-88-006, Pollutant Loadings and Impacts from Highway Stormwater Runoff, Volume I: Design Procedure. The computer program is for the evaluation of the water quality impact from highway stormwater runoff to a lake or a stream from a specific highway site considering the necessary rainfall data and geographic site situation. The evaluation considers whether or not the resulting water quality conditions can cause a problem as indicated by the violations of water quality criteria or objectives.

  12. Design procedure for pollutant loadings and impacts for highway stormwater runoff (Macintosh version) (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The interactive computer program was developed to make a user friendly procedure for the personal computer for calculations and guidance to make estimations of pollutant loadings and impacts from highway stormwater runoff which are presented in the Publication FHWA-RD-88-006, Pollutant Loadings and Impacts from Highway Stormwater Runoff, Volume I: Design Procedure. The computer program is for the evaluation of the water quality impact from highway stormwater runoff to a lake or a stream from a specific highway site considering the necessary rainfall data and geographic site situation. The evaluation considers whether or not the resulting water quality conditions can cause a problem as indicated by the violations of water quality criteria or objectives.

  13. Adaptations to high-intensity intermittent exercise in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bexfield, Nathan A; Parcell, Allen C; Nelson, W Bradley; Foote, Kristopher M; Mack, Gary W

    2009-09-01

    In humans, exercise-induced plasma volume (PV) expansion is typically associated with an increase in plasma albumin content, due in part to an increase in hepatic albumin synthesis. We tested the ability of a 12-day high-intensity intermittent exercise protocol to induce an increase in PV in rodents. Since albumin synthesis is transcriptionally regulated, we tested the hypothesis that exercise training would induce an increase in hepatic albumin gene expression. Fifty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 245 and 350 g were randomly assigned to one of five groups: cage control (CC), sham exercise (sham), continuous moderate-intensity exercise training (MI), high-intensity intermittent exercise training (HI), or a single day of HI training (1-HI). Twenty-four hours after the last training session, rats were anesthetized. PV was determined, and the liver was removed, flash frozen, and stored for later analysis. Citrate synthase (CS) activity of the red quadriceps muscle, a marker of aerobic adaptation, increased with training (MI and HI) and in response to 1-HI (P < 0.05). We did not see a significant exercise-induced PV expansion as PV averaged 23.6 +/- 2.7 ml/kg body wt in the CC group and 26.6 +/- 1.3 ml/kg body wt in the HI group (P > 0.05). However, hepatic albumin mRNA expression, as determined by real-time PCR, increased 2.9 +/- 0.4- and 4.1 +/- 0.4-fold after MI and HI, respectively, compared with CC. A single bout of HI (1-HI) did not alter hepatic albumin mRNA expression. These data demonstrate an increase in both CS activity and hepatic albumin gene expression with 12 days of aerobic exercise training in the rodent with a rapid (within 24 h) adaptation in the skeletal muscle to high-intensity intermittent exercise. PMID:19608925

  14. Statistics concerning the Apollo command module water landing, including the probability of occurrence of various impact conditions, sucessful impact, and body X-axis loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitnah, A. M.; Howes, D. B.

    1971-01-01

    Statistical information for the Apollo command module water landings is presented. This information includes the probability of occurrence of various impact conditions, a successful impact, and body X-axis loads of various magnitudes.

  15. Core-halo issues for a very high intensity beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, P. A. P.; Chauvin, N.; Uriot, D.

    2014-02-17

    The relevance of classical parameters like beam emittance and envelope used to describe a particle beam is questioned in case of a high intensity accelerator. In the presence of strong space charge effects that affect the beam differently following its density, the much less dense halo part behaves differently from the much denser core part. A method for precisely determining the core-halo limit is proposed, that allows characterizing the halo and the core independently. Results in 1D case are given and discussed. Expected developments extending the method to 2D, 4D, or 6D phase spaces are examined.

  16. A high intensity positron beam at the Brookhaven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.; Lynn, K.G.; Roellig, L.O.; Mills, A.P. Jr.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a high intensity, low energy positron beam utilizing high specific activity /sup 64/Cu sources (870 Ci/g) produced in a reactor with high thermal neutron flux. Fast-to-slow moderation can be performed in a self moderation mode or with a transmission moderator. Slow positron rates up to 1.6 x 10/sup 8/ e/sup +//s with a half life of 12.8 h are calculated. Up to 1.0 x 10/sup 8/ e/sup +//s have been observed. New developments including a Ne moderator and an on-line isotope separation process are discussed. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  18. ELECTRON COUD DYNAMICS IN HIGH-INTENSITY RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, L.; WEI, J.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cloud due to beam-induced multipacting is one of the main concerns for the high intensity. Electrons generated and accumulated inside the beam pipe form an ''electron cloud'' that interacts with the circulating charged particle beam. With sizeable amount of electrons, this interaction can cause beam instability, beam loss and emittance growth. At the same time, the vacuum pressure will rise due to electron desorption. This talk intends to provide an overview of the mechanism and dynamics of the typical electron multipacting in various magnetic fields and mitigation measures with different beams.

  19. HELIOS: A high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, T.E.; Broholm, C.; Fultz, B.

    1998-12-31

    A proposal to construct a high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE as part of the SPSS upgrade project is discussed. HELIOS will be optimized for science requiring high sensitivity neutron spectroscopy. This includes studies of phonon density of states in small polycrystalline samples, magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and highly correlated electron systems, as well as parametric studies (as a function of pressure, temperature, or magnetic field) of S(Q,{omega}). By employing a compact design together with the use of supermirror guide in the incident flight path the neutron flux at HELIOS will be significantly higher than any other comparable instrument now operating.

  20. The development of a high intensity dance performance fitness test.

    PubMed

    Redding, Emma; Weller, Peter; Ehrenberg, Shantel; Irvine, Sarah; Quin, Edel; Rafferty, Sonia; Wyon, Matthew; Cox, Carol

    2009-01-01

    While there is currently a validated dance-specific exercise method of measuring aerobic fitness, no such test has been developed to measure high intensity capabilities in dance. The purpose of this study was to initiate an intermittent high intensity dance-specific fitness test. The test was designed to be able to observe changes in heart rate (HR), thereby allowing for a measurement of physical fitness at high intensities. Sixteen professional dancers (4 males and 12 females) volunteered to take part in this study. The fitness test protocol consists of movements that are representative of contemporary dance, and contains exercise and rest periods that mimic the intermittent nature of dance. The participants performed four trials. The physiological variables measured were HR (b.min(-1)) for each one minute bout of the four minute test for all trials, oxygen uptake (VO(2)) throughout the test, and end blood lactate (BLa mmol.L) for each trial. In addition, five of the participants undertook a maximal oxygen uptake treadmill test, and the scores obtained were compared with those from the dance test. Results show HR consistency across each one minute bout of the test and across each of the four trials of testing for all participants, indicating that the test is reliable. There was good reliability between bouts of each trial (typical error as % of CV = 1.5), intraclass "r" = 0.8, and good reliability between the four trials (typical error as % of CV = 2.1), intraclass "r" = 0.82. There were no significant differences between the maximal VO(2) and BLa scores established in the treadmill and dance tests, demonstrating validity. Thus, the results of this study indicate that the high intensity dance-specific test is a reliable and valid means of assessing and monitoring the cardiovascular fitness of dancers. The test allows dancers to be assessed within an environment that they are accustomed to (the studio), using a mode of exercise that is relevant (dance), and it is

  1. Perforation of aluminium foam core sandwich panels under impact loading: A numerical and analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnasri, Ibrahim; Zhao, Han

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the numerical results of the inversed perforation test instrumented with Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar SHPB with an instrumented pressure bar on the AlSi7Mg0.5 aluminium foam core sandwich panels with 0.8 mm thick 2024 T3 aluminium top and bottom skin. The numerical models are developed in order to understand the origin of the enhancement of the top skin loads found under impact loading (paper published by [1]). Numerical predicted piercing force vs displacement curves are compared with experimental measurements (tests at impact velocities at 27 and 44 m/s). The simulation catches all process of the perforation of the sandwich panels (top skin, foam core, and bottom skin). Within experimental scatter, there is a good agreement between numerical predictions and experimental measurements. Virtual tests with different impact velocities up 200 m/s are presented and showed a significant enhancement of the piercing force under impact loading (top skin peak and foam core plateau loads). In order to understand the origin of these force enhancements, any difference of detailed local information between static and dynamic loading is studied and showed that a shock front effect is responsible for the enhancement piercing force. An analytical model using an improved RPPL shock model based a power law densification assumption is proposed to calculate the top skin piercing force. The improved RPPL shock model agrees with the FE results for small velocities and gives better prediction of the piercing force than the RPPL shock model for large velocities (>100 m/s).

  2. Strain rate and inertial effects on impact loaded single-edge notch bend specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, P.M.; Dodds, R.H. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Many problems in fracture mechanics of ductile metals involve surface breaking defects located in structures subjected to impact or blast. When the severity of impact loads is sufficient to produce large inelastic deformations, the assessment of crack-tip conditions must include the effects of plasticity, strain rate and inertia. This work examines the interaction of impact loading, inelastic material deformation and rate sensitivity with the goal of improving the interpretation of ductile fracture toughness values measured under dynamic loading. The authors focus on shallow and deeply notched bend test specimens, SE(B)s, employed routinely to measure the static fracture toughness of a material. A thorough understanding of the test specimen`s dynamic behavior is a prerequisite to the application of measured fracture properties in structural applications. Three-dimensional, nonlinear dynamic analyses are performed for SE(B) fracture specimens subjected to impact loading. Loading rates obtained in conventional drop tower tests are applied in the analyses. An explicit time integration procedure coupled with an efficient (one-point) element integration scheme is employed to compute the dynamic response of the specimen. Strain-rate sensitivity is introduced via a new, efficient implementation of the Bodner-Partom viscoplastic constitutive model. Material properties for A533B steel are used in the analyses. Static analyses of the SE(B) specimens provide baseline responses for assessment of inertial effects. Similarly, dynamic analyses using a strain-rate insensitive material provide reference responses for the assessment of strain rate effects. Strains at key locations on the specimens and the support reactions are extracted from the analyses to assess the accuracy of static formulas commonly used to estimate applied J values. Inertial effects on the applied J are quantified by examining the acceleration component of J evaluated through a domain integral procedure.

  3. The Impact of Boundary Conditions on Surface Curvature of Polypropylene Mesh in Response to Uniaxial Loading

    PubMed Central

    Barone, William R.; Amini, Rouzbeh; Maiti, Spandan; Moalli, Pamela A.; Abramowitch, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure following pelvic organ prolapse repair has been observationally associated with wrinkling of the implanted mesh. The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of variable boundary conditions on the out-of-plane deformations of mesh subjected to tensile loading. Using photogrammetry and surface curvature analyses, deformed geometries were accessed for two commercially available products. Relative to standard clamping methods, the amount of out-of-plane deformation significantly increased when point loads were introduced to simulate suture fixation in-vivo. These data support the hypothesis that regional increases in the concentration of mesh potentially enhance the host’s foreign body response, leading to exposure. PMID:25843260

  4. Oblique Loading in Post Mortem Human Surrogates from Vehicle Lateral Impact Tests using Chestbands.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Humm, John R; Pintar, Frank A; Arun, Mike W J; Rhule, Heather; Rudd, Rodney; Craig, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    While numerous studies have been conducted to determine side impact responses of Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS) using sled and other equipment, experiments using the biological surrogate in modern full-scale vehicles are not available. The present study investigated the presence of oblique loading in moving deformable barrier and pole tests. Threepoint belt restrained PMHS were positioned in the left front and left rear seats in the former and left front seat in the latter condition and tested according to consumer testing protocols. Three chestbands were used in each specimen (upper, middle and lower thorax). Accelerometers were secured to the skull, shoulder, upper, middle and lower thoracic vertebrae, sternum, and sacrum. Chestband signals were processed to determine magnitudes and angulations of peak deflections. The magnitude and timing of various signal peaks are given. Vehicle accelerations, door velocities, and seat belt loads are also given. Analysis of deformation contours, peak deflections, and angulations indicated that the left rear seated specimen were exposed to anterior oblique loading while left front specimens in both tests sustained essentially pure lateral loading to the torso. These data can be used to validate human body computational models. The occurrence of oblique loading in full-scale testing, hitherto unrecognized, may serve to stimulate the exploration of its role in injuries to the thorax and lower extremities in modern vehicles. It may be important to continue research in this area because injury metrics have a lower threshold for angled loading. PMID:26660738

  5. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-04-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

  6. High Intensity Particle Physics at PW-class laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Stepan; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Esirkepov, Timur; Kando, Masaki; Rosanov, Nikolay; Korn, Georg; Bulanov, Sergey V.; Leemans, Wim P.

    2015-11-01

    The processes typical for high intensity particle physics, i.e., the interactions of charged particles with strong electromagnetic fields, have attracted considerable interest recently. Some of these processes, previously believed to be of theoretical interest only, are now becoming experimentally accessible. High intensity electromagnetic (EM) fields significantly modify the interactions of particles and EM fields, giving rise to the phenomena that are not encountered either in classical or perturbative quantum theory of these interactions. One of such phenomena is the radiation reaction, which radically influences the electron motion in an electromagnetic standing wave formed by two super-intense counter-propagating laser pulses. Depending on the laser intensity and wavelength, either classical or quantum mode of radiation reaction prevail, or both are strong. When radiation reaction dominates, electron motion evolves to limit cycles and strange attractors. This creates a new framework for high energy physics experiments on an interaction of energetic charged particle beams and colliding super-intense laser pulses. Work supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  7. Analgesic effect of high intensity laser therapy in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Stiglić-Rogoznica, Nives; Stamenković, Doris; Frlan-Vrgoc, Ljubinka; Avancini-Dobrović, Viviana; Vrbanić, Tea Schnurrer-Luke

    2011-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA), the most common type of osteoarthritis (OA), is associated with pain and inflammation of the joint capsule, impaired muscular stabilization, reduced range of motion and functional disability. High-intensity laser therapy (HILT) involves higher-intensity laser radiation and causes minor and slow light absorption by chromophores. Light stimulation of the deep structures, due to high intensity laser therapy, activates cell metabolism through photochemical effect. The transmissions of pain stimulus are slowed down and result in a quick achievement of pain relief. The aim of our research was to investigate the prompt analgesic effect of HILT on patients with KOA. Knee radiographs were performed on all patients and consequently graded using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale (K/L). A group of 96 patients (75 female, 21 male, mean age 59.2) with K/L 2 and 3 were submitted to HILT therapy. Pain intensity was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after the treatment. HILT consisted in one daily application, over a period of ten days, using protocol wavelength, frequency and duration. The results showed statistically significant decrease in VAS after the treatment (p < 0.001). Considering these results, HILT enables prompt analgesic effects in KOA treatment. Therefore HILT is a reliable option in KOA physical therapy. PMID:22220431

  8. Transcranial Clot Lysis Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Zadicario, Eyal; Fisher, David J.; Bradley, William G.

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is the third common cause of death worldwide. The majority of strokes are caused by sudden vessel occlusion, due to a blood clot. Vessel recanalization is the primary goal of all acute stroke treatment strategies. Initial data using ultrasound in combination with a therapeutic agent for clot lysis in stroke are promising. However, sound absorption and defocusing of the ultrasound beam occur during transskull insonation, limiting the efficiency of this approach to high extent. Using a transskull High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) head system we were able to lyse blood clots within seconds and in absence of further lytic agents. We could show that any correction for the distortion might be negligible to focus the ultrasound beam after transskull insonation. The use of transskull HIFU for immediate clot lysis in the human brain without the need of further drugs and disregarding individual skull bone characteristics could become a successful strategy in early stroke treatment. Using magnetic resonance tomography for neuronavigation MRI Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has the potential to open new avenues for therapeutic applications in the brain including Stroke, Intracranial Hemorrhages, Braintumors, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Thalamic Pain, BBB opening, and local drug delivery. First results in transcranial clot lysis will be presented in this paper.

  9. Nanoplasma Formation by High Intensity Hard X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, T.; Jurek, Z.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Wada, S.; Johnsson, P.; Siano, M.; Mondal, S.; Ito, Y.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Hayashita, H.; Kajikawa, J.; Liu, X.-J.; Robert, E.; Miron, C.; Feifel, R.; Marangos, J. P.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Son, S.-K.; Ziaja, B.; Yao, M.; Santra, R.; Ueda, K.

    2015-01-01

    Using electron spectroscopy, we have investigated nanoplasma formation from noble gas clusters exposed to high-intensity hard-x-ray pulses at ~5 keV. Our experiment was carried out at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Dedicated theoretical simulations were performed with the molecular dynamics tool XMDYN. We found that in this unprecedented wavelength regime nanoplasma formation is a highly indirect process. In the argon clusters investigated, nanoplasma is mainly formed through secondary electron cascading initiated by slow Auger electrons. Energy is distributed within the sample entirely through Auger processes and secondary electron cascading following photoabsorption, as in the hard x-ray regime there is no direct energy transfer from the field to the plasma. This plasma formation mechanism is specific to the hard-x-ray regime and may, thus, also be important for XFEL-based molecular imaging studies. In xenon clusters, photo- and Auger electrons contribute more significantly to the nanoplasma formation. Good agreement between experiment and simulations validates our modelling approach. This has wide-ranging implications for our ability to quantitatively predict the behavior of complex molecular systems irradiated by high-intensity hard x-rays. PMID:26077863

  10. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Joseph P.; Mcdaniel, Oliver H.

    1990-01-01

    Observed spectral data from supersonic jet aircraft are known to contain much more high frequency energy than can be explained by linear acoustic propagation theory. It is believed that the high frequency energy is an effect of nonlinear distortion due to the extremely high acoustic levels generated by the jet engines. The objective, to measure acoustic waveform distortion for spherically diverging high intensity noise, was reached by using an electropneumatic acoustic source capable of generating sound pressure levels in the range of 140 to 160 decibels (re 20 micro Pa). The noise spectrum was shaped to represent the spectra generated by jet engines. Two microphones were used to capture the acoustic pressure waveform at different points along the propagation path in order to provide a direct measure of the waveform distortion as well as spectral distortion. A secondary objective was to determine that the observed distortion is an acoustic effect. To do this an existing computer prediction code that deals with nonlinear acoustic propagation was used on data representative of the measured data. The results clearly demonstrate that high intensity jet noise does shift the energy in the spectrum to the higher frequencies along the propagation path. In addition, the data from the computer model are in good agreement with the measurements, thus demonstrating that the waveform distortion can be accounted for with nonlinear acoustic theory.

  11. Reproductive costs for everyone: How female loads impact human mobility strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wall-Scheffler, Cara M.; Myers, Marcella J.

    2013-01-01

    While mobility strategies are considered important in understanding selection pressures on individuals, testing hypotheses of such strategies requires high resolution datasets, particularly at intersections between morphology, ecology and energetics. Here we present data on interactions between morphology and energetics in regards to the cost of walking for reproductive women and place these data into a specific ecological context of time and heat load. Frontal loads (up to 16% of body mass), as during pregnancy and child-carrying, significantly slow the optimal and preferred walking speed of women, significantly increase cost at the optimal speed, and make it significantly more costly for women to walk with other people. We further show for the first time significant changes in the curvature in the Cost of Transport curve for human walking, as driven by frontal loads. The impact of these frontal loads on females, and the populations to which they belong, would have been magnified by time constraints due to seasonal changes in day length at high latitudes and thermoregulatory limitations at low latitudes. However, wider pelves increase both stride length and speed flexibility, providing a morphological offset for load-related costs. Longer lower limbs also increase stride length. Observed differences between preferred and energetically optimal speeds with frontal loading suggest that speed choices of women carrying reproductive loads might be particularly sensitive to changes in heat load. Our findings show that female reproductive costs, particularly those related to locomotion, would have meaningfully shaped the mobility strategies of the hominin lineage, as well as modern foraging populations. PMID:23465336

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring of low velocity impact damage in graphite/epoxy laminates during tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.

    1992-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) system was set up in a linear location data acquisition mode to monitor the tensile loading of eight-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy specimens containing low velocity impact damage. The impact damage was induced using an instrumented drop weight tower. During impact, specimens were supported by either an aluminum plate or a membrane configuration. Cross-sectional examinations revealed that the aluminum plate configuration resulted in primarily matrix cracking and back surface fiber failure. The membrane support resulted in only matrix cracking and delamination damage. Penetrant enhanced radiography and immersion ultrasonics were used in order to assess the amount of impact damage in each tensile specimen. During tensile loading, AE reliably detected and located the damage sites which included fiber failure. All specimens with areas of fiber breakage ultimately failed at the impact site. AE did not reliably locate damage which consisted of only delaminations and matrix cracking. Specimens with this type of damage did not ultimately fail at the impact site. In summary, AE demonstrated the ability to increase the reliability of structural proof tests; however, the successful use of this technique requires extensive baseline testing.

  13. Start-to-end simulations for the proposed Fermilab high intensity proton source

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, Jean-Paul; Johnson, D.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A High Intensity Proton Source consisting in an 8 GeV superconducting H-minus linac and transfer line to the Main Injector has been proposed. The primary mission is to increase the intensity of the Fermilab Main Injector for the production of neutrino superbeams. Start-to-end simulations from the RFQ to the stripping foil using the simulation code TRACK (ANL) is presented in this paper. In particular, we will study the impact of jitter errors on the H-minus phase space at the stripping foil.

  14. The initial stage of surface modification of magnesium alloys by high intensity pulse ions beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.

    2016-06-01

    The initial stage of high intensity pulsed ion beam irradiated magnesium alloys was studied by MD simulation. Specimens containing Mg17Al12 precipitation were modeled to investigate the evolution of magnesium alloys during several picoseconds after a high-energy ion impacting. It was found that the Mg17Al12 precipitation has little effects on the kinetic energy evolution in the heat zone, but considerable effects on strength of kinetic energy peak moving to the deep matrix and on the surface morphology of the magnesium alloy at thermal equilibrium state. The thickness of the heat zone is independent on the temperature of surface region.

  15. High-intensity focused ultrasound plus concomitant radiotherapy: a new weapon in oncology?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The potential impact of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to general medicine and oncology seems very high. However, while in the research area, the development of this technique is very rapid and unchallenged. The direct application of HIFU to human tumour therapy is hampered by various technical difficulties, which may confine its role to a marginal device in the surgery armamentarium. To deploy the full potential of focused ultrasound in oncology, it seems necessary to review the basic relationship between HIFU and external beam radiotherapy. This is the aim of the present work. PMID:24761227

  16. Limitations of power conversion systems under transient loads and impact on the pulsed tokamak power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, G. T.; Wong, C. P. C.; Kapich, D. D.; McDonald, C. F.; Schleicher, R. W.

    1993-11-01

    The impact of cyclic loading of the power conversion system of a helium-cooled, pulsed tokamak power plant is assessed. Design limits of key components of heat transport systems employing Rankine and Brayton thermodynamic cycles are quantified based on experience in gas-cooled fission reactor design and operation. Cyclic loads due to pulsed tokamak operation are estimated. Expected performance of the steam generator is shown to be incompatible with pulsed tokamak operation without load leveling thermal energy storage. The close cycle gas turbine is evaluated qualitatively based on performance of existing industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines. Advances in key technologies which significantly improve prospects for operation with tokamak fusion plants are reviewed.

  17. Damage Simulation in Non-Crimp Fabric Composite Plates Subjected to Impact Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.; Aitharaju, Venkat; Aashat, Satvir; Kia, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Progressive failure analysis (PFA) of non-crimp fabric (NCF) composite laminates subjected to low velocity impact loads was performed using the COmplete STress Reduction (COSTR) damage model implemented through VUMAT and UMAT41 user subroutines in the frame works of the commercial finite element programs ABAQUS/Explicit and LS-DYNA, respectively. To validate the model, low velocity experiments were conducted and detailed correlations between the predictions and measurements for both intra-laminar and inter-laminar failures were made. The developed material and damage model predicts the peak impact load and duration very close with the experimental results. Also, the simulation results of delamination damage between the ply interfaces, in-plane matrix damages and fiber damages were all in good agreement with the measurements from the non-destructive evaluation data.

  18. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster initial water impact loads and dynamics - Analysis, tests, and flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kross, D. A.; Kiefling, L. A.; Murphy, N. C.; Rawls, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    A series of scale model tests, finite element dynamic response analyses and full scale segment tests have been performed for purposes of developing design criteria for the initial water impact loading conditions applied to the internal stiffener rings located in the aft skirt portion of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). In addition, flight experience has yielded information relative to structural reinforcement requirements. This paper discusses the test and analysis methods and summarizes significant results. It is noted that, although scale model test data are valuable for identifying trends, they have shortcomings concerning definition of full scale design loads criteria. Also, the frequently used static equivalent loads definition approach is not applicable for this type impact loading condition applied to an aft skirt type structure. Various types of ring structural fixes, including the addition of selected types of foam, are presented as well as associated full scale segment test results. Depending on the type and contour shape of the foam, reductions on applied pressures and peak measured strains over 50 percent are noted.

  19. Impact of Filtration Velocities and Particulate Matter Characteristics on Diesel Particulate Filter Wall Loading Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Michael J; Walker, Larry R; Yapaulo, Renato A; Orita, Tetsuo; Wirojsakunchai, Ekathai; Foster, David; Akard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The impact of different types of diesel particulate matter (PM) and different sampling conditions on the wall deposition and early soot cake build up within diesel particulate filters has been investigated. The measurements were made possible by a newly developed Diesel Exhaust Filtration Analysis (DEFA) system in which in-situ diesel exhaust filtration can be reproduced with in small cordierite wafer disks, which are essentially thin sections of a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) wall. The different types of PM were generated from selected engine operating conditions of a single-cylinder heavy-duty diesel engine. Two filtration velocities 4 and 8 cm/s were used to investigate PM deep-bed filtration processes. The loaded wafers were then analyzed in a thermal mass analyzer that measures the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) as well as soot and sulfate fractions of the PM. In addition, the soot residing in the wall of the wafer was examined under an optical microscope illuminated with Ultraviolet light and an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (E-SEM) to determine the bulk soot penetration depth for each loading condition. It was found that higher filtration velocity results in higher wall loading with approximately the same penetration depth into the wall. PM characteristics impacted both wall loading and soot cake layer characteristics. Results from imaging analysis indicate that soot the penetration depth into the wall was affected more by PM size (which changes with engine operating conditions) rather than filtration velocity.

  20. A Generalized Hydrodynamic-Impact Theory for the Loads and Motions of Deeply Immersed Prismatic Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markey, Melvin F.

    1959-01-01

    A theory is derived for determining the loads and motions of a deeply immersed prismatic body. The method makes use of a two-dimensional water-mass variation and an aspect-ratio correction for three-dimensional flow. The equations of motion are generalized by using a mean value of the aspect-ratio correction and by assuming a variation of the two-dimensional water mass for the deeply immersed body. These equations lead to impact coefficients that depend on an approach parameter which, in turn, depends upon the initial trim and flight-path angles. Comparison of experiment with theory is shown at maximum load and maximum penetration for the flat-bottom (0 deg dead-rise angle) model with bean-loading coefficients from 36.5 to 133.7 over a wide range of initial conditions. A dead-rise angle correction is applied and maximum-load data are compared with theory for the case of a model with 300 dead-rise angle and beam-loading coefficients from 208 to 530.

  1. Impact of pore characteristics of silica materials on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Numpilai, Thanapha; Muenmee, Suthaporn; Witoon, Thongthai

    2016-02-01

    Impact of pore characteristics of porous silica supports on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen was investigated. The porous silica materials and ibuprofen-loaded porous silica materials were thoroughly characterized by N2-sorption, thermal gravimetric and derivative weight analyses (TG-DTW), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the physical properties of materials, amount of ibuprofen adsorbed and position of ibuprofen. The detailed characterization reveals that the ibuprofen molecules adsorbed inside the mesopores. Increasing the mesopore size from 5nm to 10nm increased the ibuprofen loading from 0.74 to 0.85mmol/g, respectively. Incorporation of macropore into the structure of porous silica materials enhanced the ibuprofen loading capacity of 11.8-20.3%. The ibuprofen-loaded bimodal meso-macroporous silica materials exhibited the highest dissolution of 92wt.% within an hour. The ibuprofen particles deposited on the external surface of the porous silica materials showed a lower dissolution rate than the ibuprofen adsorbed inside the mesopores due to the formation of ibuprofen crystalline. PMID:26652347

  2. A longitudinal study of impact and early stance loads during gait following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Mills, Peter M; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Lloyd, David G; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-09-22

    People following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy (APM) are at increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. High impact loading and peak loading early in the stance phase of gait may play a role in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis. This was a secondary analysis of longitudinal data to investigate loading-related indices at baseline in an APM group (3 months post-surgery) and a healthy control group, and again 2 years later (follow-up). At baseline, 82 participants with medial APM and 38 healthy controls were assessed, with 66 and 23 re-assessed at follow-up, respectively. Outcome measures included: (i) heel strike transient (HST) presence and magnitude, (ii) maximum loading rate, (iii) peak vertical force (Fz) during early stance. At baseline, maximum loading rate was lower in the operated leg (APM) and non-operated leg (non-APM leg) compared to controls (p ≤ 0.03) and peak Fz was lower in the APM leg compared to non-APM leg (p ≤ 0.01). Over 2 years, peak Fz increased in the APM leg compared to the non-APM leg and controls (p ≤ 0.01). Following recent APM, people may adapt their gait to protect the operated knee from excessive loads, as evidenced by a lower maximum loading rate in the APM leg compared to controls, and a reduced peak Fz in the APM leg compared to the non-APM leg. No differences at follow-up may suggest an eventual return to more typical gait. However, the increase in peak Fz in the APM leg may be of concern for long-term joint health given the compromised function of the meniscus. PMID:25169661

  3. Uncertainty based analysis of the impact of watershed phosphorus load on reservoir phosphorus concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamouz, Mohammad; Taheriyoun, Masoud; Seyedabadi, Mohammadreza; Nazif, Sara

    2015-02-01

    In many regions of the world that depend on surface reservoirs as a source of water supply, eutrophication is a major water quality problem. Developing simulation models to evaluate the impact of watershed nutrient loads on the reservoir's water quality is an essential step in eutrophication management. In this regard, analysis of model uncertainty gives an opportunity to assess the reliability and the margin of safety of the model predictions for Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) from the watershed nutrient load. In this study, a computational procedure has been proposed for the analysis of the model uncertainties in simulation of watershed phosphorous load and reservoir phosphorous concentration. Data from the Aharchai watershed which is located upstream of the Satarkhan reservoir in the northwestern part of Iran, is used as the study area to test the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. The Soil and Water Assessment Tools (SWAT) is utilized for assessment of watershed phosphorus load as the main agent resulting in the reservoir eutrophication in the region. The most effective parameters in model performance are identified by a global sensitivity analysis technique named modified Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) which can incorporate parameter interdependencies. The Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) technique is also applied to set up behavioral ranges of the parameters that are relevant to the actual observations. Finally, the cumulative weighted-likelihood distribution functions (CWLDF) are derived for outputs of the SWAT. They are used jointly for estimation of results uncertainty limits using the Copula method. To assess the effectiveness of applying Best Management Practices (BMPs) in the watershed, two scenarios of with and without BMPs application are tested. The results showed the effectiveness of the proposed model in uncertainty estimation of watershed phosphorus load and reservoir phosphorus concentration as well as the

  4. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  5. A Plasma Lens for High Intensity Laser Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, F.; Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Lopes, N. C.; Ito, H.

    2006-11-27

    A plasma lens based on a short hydrogen-filled alumina capillary discharge is experimentally characterized. For a plasma length of about 5mm, the focal length, measured from the plasma entrance, was {approx} 11 to 8mm for on axis densities of {approx} 2.5 to 5 x 1018cm-3, respectively. The plasma temperature away from the walls of the 1/2mm diameter capillary was estimated to be {approx} 8eV indicating that the plasma is fully ionized. Such a lens should thus be suitable for focusing very high intensity pulses. Comparisons of the measured focusing strength to that predicted by a first-order fluid model [N. A. Bobrova, et al., Phys. Rev. E 65, 016407 (2002)] shows reasonable agreement given that some of the observed plasma parameters are not predicted by this model.

  6. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  7. S-76 rotorcraft high intensity radiated fields. Test plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry T.; Brooks, Steve M.; Barnes, Ken A.

    1991-07-01

    Concern over the effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) on civil and military aircraft has increased over the past 10 years. The increase is due to several factors which affect the safe flight of all fixed-wing and rotorcraft. Previous flight-critical mechanical controls are being replaced by electronic computer-driven controls; manufacturers are increasing the use of composite materials in the fabrication of new aircraft; and frequency ranges and output power levels of commercial and military transmitters have significantly increased. While much HIRF susceptibility information has been collected, the data are proprietary and have not been released. To address the HIRF concerns and begin development of a releasable HIRF data base, the FAA Technical Center, has implemented a HIRF research program. As part of that program, a HIRF test was performed on a Sikorsky S-76 Helicopter. The purpose, approach, and initial findings of the S-76 HIRF test are addressed.

  8. High intensity accelerator for a wide range of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conard, E. Milo

    1994-12-01

    When looking at commercial applications of accelerators from a market point of view, it appears that a common accelerator design could meet different users' needs. This would benefit both the manufacturer and the user by multiplying the number of machines sold, thus lowering their cost and improving their quality. These applications include: radioisotope production for medical imaging (positron emission tomography), industrial imaging and non-destructive testing (e.g. neutron radiography, explosive and drug detection in luggage or freight). This paper investigates the needs of the various applications and defines their common denominator to establish suitable specifications (type of particles, energy, intensity). Different accelerator types (cyclotrons, linear accelerators and electrostatic machines) are reviewed and compared on performance and estimated costs. A high intensity tandem accelerator design is studied in more detail as it seems the most appropriate candidate.

  9. Electrodeless HID lamp study. Final report. [High intensity discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.M.; Johnson, P.D.; Jones, C.E.; Rautenberg, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    High intensity discharge lamps excited by solenoidal electric fields (SEF/HID) were examined for their ability to give high brightness, high efficacy and good color. Frequency of operation was 13.56 MHz (ISM Band) and power to the lamp plasma ranged from about 400 to 1000 W. Radio frequency transformers with air cores and with air core complemented by ferrite material in the magnetic path were used to provide the voltage for excitation. Electrical properties of the matching network and the lamp plasma were measured or calculated and total light from the lamp was measured by an integrating sphere. Efficacies calculated from measurement were found to agree well with the positive column efficacies of conventional HID lamps containing only mercury, and with additives of sodium, thallium, and scandium iodide. Recommendations for future work are given.

  10. Comparison of Two High Intensity Acoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, A.; Tadao Sakita, M.; Kim, Youngkey K.

    2004-08-01

    In two different countries, at the same period of time, the institutes in charge of the development of space activities have decided to extend their satellite integration and test center, and to implement a reverberant acoustic chamber. In Brazil the INPE laboratory (LIT : Laboratorio de Integracao e Testes) and in South Korea the KARI laboratory (SITC : Satellite Integration and Test Center) started their projects in July 2000 for the RATF (Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility) and in May 2001 for the HIAC (High Intensity Acoustic Chamber) respectively, writing the technical specifications. The kick-off meetings took place in December 2000 and in February 2002 and the opening ceremonies in December 19, 2002 in Brazil and in August 22, 2003 in Korea. This paper compares the two projects in terms of design choices, manufacturing processes, equipment installed and technical final characteristics.

  11. Optimal conditions for tissue perforation using high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Kihara, Taizo; Ogawa, Kouji; Tanabe, Ryoko; Yosizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Kakimoto, Takashi; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2012-10-01

    To perforate tissue lying deep part in body, a large size transducer was assembled by combining four spherical-shaped transducers, and the optimal conditions for tissue perforation have studied using ventricle muscle of chicken as a target. The ex vivo experiments showed that ventricle muscle was successfully perforated both when it was exposed to High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) directly and when it was exposed to HIFU through atrial muscle layer. Moreover, it was shown that calculated acoustic power distributions are well similar to the perforation patterns, and that the acoustic energy distributes very complexly near the focus. Lastly, perforation on the living rabbit bladder wall was demonstrated as a preliminary in vivo experiment.

  12. [High-intensity interval training for young athletes].

    PubMed

    Engel, Florian Azad; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-06-01

    A computer-based literature research during July 2013 using the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science was performed to assess the effect of the high intensity interval training (HIIT) on sport performance in healthy children and adolescents. Studies examining the effect of HIIT on aerobic and anaerobic performance pre and post to HIIT-Interventions in children and adolescents (9-18 years) were included. The results indicate increased aerobic and anaerobic performance following two or three HIIT sessions per week for a period of five to ten weeks, additional to normal training. Results regarding long term effects following HIIT have not been documented so far. In addition, due to the physiological characteris-tics during HIIT protocols improved fatigue resistance has been demonstrated in children as compared to adults, which may be interpreted as a prerequisite for the applicability of HIIT in children. PMID:24733304

  13. High-intensity cyclotron for the IsoDAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, D.; IsoDAR Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The IsoDAR experiment is the MIT proposal to investigate about several neutrino properties, in order to explain some anomalies experimentally observed. It requires 10mA of proton beam at the energy of 60MeV to produce a high-intensity electron antineutrino flux from the production and the decay of 8Li: it is an ambitious goal for the accelerator design, due also to the fact that the machine has to be placed near a neutrino detector, like KAMLAND or WATCHMAN, located in underground sites. A compact cyclotron able to accelerate H2+ molecule beam up to energy of 60MeV/amu is under study. The critical issues of this machine concern the beam injection due to the effects of space charge, the efficiency of the beam extraction and the technical solutions needed to the machine assembly. Here, the innovative solutions and the preliminary results achieved by the IsoDAR team are discussed.

  14. Nitrate supplementation and high-intensity performance in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Hoon, Matthew W; Hopkins, William G; Jones, Andrew M; Martin, David T; Halson, Shona L; West, Nicholas P; Johnson, Nathan A; Burke, Louise M

    2014-09-01

    Consumption of inorganic nitrate (NO3(-)) is known to enhance endurance exercise performance in recreationally trained subjects. Here we report the effect on a high-intensity performance task in national-level cyclists. The performance test consisted of 2 cycle ergometer time trials of 4 min duration with 75 min between trials. In a randomized crossover design, 26 cyclists performed the test under the following 4 conditions (each separated by a 6-day washout): consumption of 70 mL of nitrate-rich beetroot juice at 150 min or 75 min before the first time trial, addition of a 35 mL "top-up dose" following the first time trial in the 150 min condition, and consumption of a placebo. A linear mixed model with adjustments for learning effects and athlete fitness (peak incremental power) was used to estimate effects on mean power, with probabilistic inferences based on a smallest important effect of 1.0%. Peak plasma nitrite (NO2(-)) concentration was greatest when nitrate was taken 75 min before the first time trial. Relative to placebo, the mean effect of all 3 nitrate treatments was unclear in the first time trial (1.3%, 90% confidence limits: ±1.7%), but possibly harmful in the second time trial (-0.3%, ±1.6%). Differences between nitrate treatments were unclear, as was the estimate of any consistent individual response to the treatments. Allowing for sampling uncertainty, the effect of nitrate on performance was less than previous studies. Under the conditions of our experiment, nitrate supplementation may be ineffective in facilitating high-intensity exercise in competitive athletes. PMID:24951296

  15. Recent developments for high-intensity proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Garnett, R.W.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.

    1996-04-01

    High-intensity proton linacs are being proposed for new projects around the world, especially for tritium production, and for pulsed spallation neutron sources. Typical requirements for these linacs include peak beam current of about 100 mA, and final energies of 1 GeV and higher, APT, a tritium production linac, requires cw operation to obtain sufficient average tritium production linac, requires cw operation to obtain sufficient average beam power, and H{sup +} ion sources appear capable of providing the required current and emittances. The pulsed spallation neutron source requires a linac as an injector to one or more accumulator rings, and favors the use of an H{sup minus} beam to allow charge-exchange injection into the rings. For both applications high availability is demanded; the fraction of scheduled beam time for actual production must be 75% or more. Such a high availability requires low beam-loss to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator, and to allow hands-on maintenance that will keep the mean repair and maintenance times short. To keep the accelerator activation sufficiently low, the beam loss should not exceed about 0.1 to 1.0 nA/m, except perhaps for a few localized places, where special design adaptations could be made. The requirement of such small beam losses at such a high intensity presents a new beam physics challenge. This challenge will require greater understanding of the beam distribution, including the low- density beam halo, which is believed to be responsible for most of the beam losses. Furthermore, it will be necessary to choose the apertures so the beam losses will be acceptably low, and because large aperture size is generally accompanied by an economic penalty resulting from reduced power efficiency, an optimized choice of the aperture will be desirable.

  16. Evaluating the Impact of Dwell Time on Solder Interconnect Durability Under Bending Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Sandeep; Osterman, Michael; Pecht, Michael

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing portability and miniaturization of modern-day electronics, the mechanical robustness of these systems has become more of a concern. Existing standards for conducting mechanical durability tests of electronic assemblies include bend, shock/drop, vibration, and torsion. Although these standards provide insights into both cyclic fatigue and overstress damage incurred in solder interconnects (widely regarded as the primary mode of failure in electronic assemblies), they fail to address the impact of time- dependent (creep) behavior due to sustained mechanical loads on solder interconnect durability. It has been seen in previous studies that solder durability under thermal cycling loads is inversely proportional to the dwell time or hold time at either temperature extreme of the imposed temperature cycle. Fatigue life models, which include dwell time, have been developed for solder interconnects subject to temperature cycling. However, the fatigue life models that have been developed in the literature for solder interconnects under mechanical loads fail to address the influence of the duration of loading. In this study, solder interconnect test vehicles were subjected to cyclic mechanical bending with various dwell times in order to understand the impact of the duration of mechanical loads on solder interconnect durability. The solder interconnects examined in this study were formed with 2512 resistor packages using various solder compositions [tin-lead (Sn-Pb) and 96.5Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu (SAC305)]. To evaluate the impact of dwell time, the boards were tested with 0 s, 60 s, and 300 s of dwell time at both extremes of the loading profile. It was observed that an increase in the dwell time of the loading profile resulted in a decrease in the characteristic life of the solder interconnects. The decrease in fatigue life was attributed to increased creep damage as identified using finite-element simulations. An energy partitioning approach was then used to

  17. Design features and performance of the LAMPF high-intensity beam area

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, L.; Grisham, D.; Macek, R.J.; Sommer, W.F.; Werbeck, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    LAMPF is a multi-purpose high-intensity meson factory capable of producing a 1 mA beam of 800-MeV protons. The three target cells and the beam stop facilities in the high intensity area have many special design features that are required for operation in the presence of high heat loads and intense radiation fields where accessibility is extremely limited. Reliable targets, beam windows, beam stops, beam transport and diagnostic components, vacuum enclosures, and auxiliary systems have been developed. Sophisticated remote-handling systems are employed for maintenance. Complex protection systems have been developed to guard against damage caused by errant beam. Beam availability approaching 90% has been achieved at currents of 600 to 700 ..mu..A. A new facility for direct proton and neutron radiation effects studies will be installed in 1985. The new facility will provide an integrated spallation neutron flux of up to 5 x 10/sup 17/ m/sup -2/s/sup -1/ and will anable proton irradiation studies in the primary beam.

  18. Prognostic impact of FLT3-ITD load in NPM1 mutated acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schnittger, S; Bacher, U; Kern, W; Alpermann, T; Haferlach, C; Haferlach, T

    2011-08-01

    High FLT3-ITD/wildtype (wt) load in FLT3-ITD-mutated AML has been associated with adverse impact on outcome in several studies. To clarify whether FLT3-ITD load as expressed as FLT3-ITD/wt ratio is also relevant in patients with NPM1 mutated AML, we assessed the FLT3-ITD mutation status and FLT3-ITD/wt ratio by fragment analysis in 638 NPM1mut AML (339 females; 299 males; 17.8-88.0 years), and analyzed its prognostic relevance in 355 patients. FLT3-ITD of various length and load were detected in 243/638 cases (38.1%). Median EFS (19.3 vs 9.7 months, P<0.001) and median 2-year survival rate (72.0 vs 52.7%, P=0.006) was better in FLT3wt (n=212 with available follow-up data) than FLT3-ITD (n=143). A higher FLT3-ITD/wt ratio as continuous variable was correlated with a shorter EFS (P=0.028). When patients were separated into subgroups according to the FLT3-ITD mutation load, only a FLT3-ITD/wt ratio 0.5 conferred an independent adverse impact on EFS and OS, and retained its prognostic significance also in multivariate analysis (P=0.009 for EFS, P=0.008 for OS). In conclusion, for risk estimation in NPM1 mutated AML not only the FLT3-ITD status, but also the FLT3-ITD load has to be taken into account. These data might contribute to clinical decision making in AML. PMID:21537333

  19. Cavitation erosion prediction based on analysis of flow dynamics and impact load spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mihatsch, Michael S. Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2015-10-15

    Cavitation erosion is the consequence of repeated collapse-induced high pressure-loads on a material surface. The present paper assesses the prediction of impact load spectra of cavitating flows, i.e., the rate and intensity distribution of collapse events based on a detailed analysis of flow dynamics. Data are obtained from a numerical simulation which employs a density-based finite volume method, taking into account the compressibility of both phases, and resolves collapse-induced pressure waves. To determine the spectrum of collapse events in the fluid domain, we detect and quantify the collapse of isolated vapor structures. As reference configuration we consider the expansion of a liquid into a radially divergent gap which exhibits unsteady sheet and cloud cavitation. Analysis of simulation data shows that global cavitation dynamics and dominant flow events are well resolved, even though the spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve individual vapor bubbles. The inviscid flow model recovers increasingly fine-scale vapor structures and collapses with increasing resolution. We demonstrate that frequency and intensity of these collapse events scale with grid resolution. Scaling laws based on two reference lengths are introduced for this purpose. We show that upon applying these laws impact load spectra recorded on experimental and numerical pressure sensors agree with each other. Furthermore, correlation between experimental pitting rates and collapse-event rates is found. Locations of high maximum wall pressures and high densities of collapse events near walls obtained numerically agree well with areas of erosion damage in the experiment. The investigation shows that impact load spectra of cavitating flows can be inferred from flow data that captures the main vapor structures and wave dynamics without the need for resolving all flow scales.

  20. Fate of alkylphenolic compounds during activated sludge treatment: impact of loading and organic composition.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Ewan J; Bagnall, John P; Soares, Ana; Koh, Yoong K K; Chiu, Tze Y; Scrimshaw, Mark D; Lester, John N; Cartmell, Elise

    2011-01-01

    The impact of loading and organic composition on the fate of alkylphenolic compounds in the activated sludge plant (ASP) has been studied. Three ASP designs comprising carbonaceous, carbonaceous/nitrification, and carbonaceous/nitrification/denitrification treatment were examined to demonstrate the impact of increasing levels of process complexity and to incorporate a spectrum of loading conditions. Based on mass balance, overall biodegradation efficiencies for nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs), short chain carboxylates (NP(1-3)EC) and nonylphenol (NP) were 37%, 59%, and 27% for the carbonaceous, carbonaceous/nitrification, and carbonaceous/nitrification/denitrification ASP, respectively. The presence of a rich community of ammonia oxidizing bacteria does not necessarily facilitate effective alkylphenolic compound degradation. However, a clear correlation between alkylphenolic compound loading and long chain ethoxylate compound biodegradation was determined at the three ASPs, indicating that at higher initial alkylphenolic compound concentrations (or load), greater ethoxylate biotransformation can occur. In addition, the impact of settled sewage organic composition on alkylphenolic compound removal was evaluated. A correlation between the ratio of chemical oxygen demand (COD) to alkylphenolic compound concentration and biomass activity was determined, demonstrating the inhibiting effect of bulk organic matter on alkylphenol polyethoxylate transformation activity. At all three ASPs the biodegradation pathway proposed involves the preferential biodegradation of the amphiphilic ethoxylated compounds, after which the preferential attack of the lipophilic akylphenol moiety occurs. The extent of ethoxylate biodegradation is driven by the initial alkylphenolic compound concentration and the proportion of COD constituted by the alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) and their metabolites relative to the bulk organic concentration of the sewage composed of proteins, acids, fats

  1. Pathways of nutrient loading and impacts on plant diversity in a New York peatland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, J.Z.; Bedford, B.L.

    2002-01-01

    Nutrient loading is a subtle, yet serious threat to the preservation of high diversity wetlands such as peatlands. Pathways of nutrient loading and impacts on plant diversity in a small peatland in New York State, USA were determined by collecting and analyzing a suite of hydrogeological, hydro-chemical, soil, and vegetation data. Piezometer clusters within an intensive network constituted hydro-chemical sampling points and focal points for randomly selected vegetation quadrats and soil-coring locations. Hydrogeological data and nutrient analyses showed that P and K loading occurred chiefly by means of overland flow from an adjacent farm field, whereas N loading occurred predominantly through ground-water flow from the farm field. Redundancy analysis and polynomial regression showed that nutrients, particularly total P in peat, total K in peat, extractable NH4-N, and NO3-N flux in ground water, were strongly negatively correlated with plant diversity measures at the site. No other environmental variables except vegetation measures associated with eutrophication demonstrated such a strong relationship with plant diversity. Nitrate loading over 4 mg m -2 day-1 was associated with low plant diversity, and Ca fluxes between 80 and 130 mg m-2 day-1 were associated with high plant diversity. Areas in the site with particularly low vascular plant and bryophyte species richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity (H') occurred adjacent to the farm field and near a hillside spring. High H' and species richness of vascular plants and bryophytes occurred in areas that were further removed from agriculture, contained no highly dominant vegetation, and were situated directly along the ground-water flow paths of springs. These areas were characterized by relatively constant water levels and consistent, yet moderate fluxes of base cations and nutrients. Overall, this study demonstrates that knowledge of site hydrogeology is crucial for determining potential pathways of nutrient loading

  2. Impact of Groundwater Flow and Energy Load on Multiple Borehole Heat Exchangers.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, S Emad; Schincariol, Robert A; Olofsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of array configuration, that is, number, layout, and spacing, on the performance of multiple borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is generally known under the assumption of fully conductive transport. The effect of groundwater flow on BHE performance is also well established, but most commonly for single BHEs. In multiple-BHE systems the effect of groundwater advection can be more complicated due to the induced thermal interference between the boreholes. To ascertain the influence of groundwater flow and borehole arrangement, this study investigates single- and multi-BHE systems of various configurations. Moreover, the influence of energy load balance is also examined. The results from corresponding cases with and without groundwater flow as well as balanced and unbalanced energy loads are cross-compared. The groundwater flux value, 10(-7) m/s, is chosen based on the findings of previous studies on groundwater flow interaction with BHEs and thermal response tests. It is observed that multi-BHE systems with balanced loads are less sensitive to array configuration attributes and groundwater flow, in the long-term. Conversely, multi-BHE systems with unbalanced loads are influenced by borehole array configuration as well as groundwater flow; these effects become more pronounced with time, unlike when the load is balanced. Groundwater flow has more influence on stabilizing loop temperatures, compared to array characteristics. Although borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems have a balanced energy load function, preliminary investigation on their efficiency shows a negative impact by groundwater which is due to their dependency on high temperature gradients between the boreholes and surroundings. PMID:25227154

  3. Investigation of impact loading rate effects on the ligamentous cervical spinal load-partitioning using finite element model of functional spinal unit C2-C3.

    PubMed

    Mustafy, Tanvir; El-Rich, Marwan; Mesfar, Wissal; Moglo, Kodjo

    2014-09-22

    The cervical spine functions as a complex mechanism that responds to sudden loading in a unique manner, due to intricate structural features and kinematics. The spinal load-sharing under pure compression and sagittal flexion/extension at two different impact rates were compared using a bio-fidelic finite element (FE) model of the ligamentous cervical functional spinal unit (FSU) C2-C3. This model was developed using a comprehensive and realistic geometry of spinal components and material laws that include strain rate dependency, bone fracture, and ligament failure. The range of motion, contact pressure in facet joints, failure forces in ligaments were compared to experimental findings. The model demonstrated that resistance of spinal components to impact load is dependent on loading rate and direction. For the loads applied, stress increased with loading rate in all spinal components, and was concentrated in the outer intervertebral disc (IVD), regions of ligaments to bone attachment, and in the cancellous bone of the facet joints. The highest stress in ligaments was found in capsular ligament (CL) in all cases. Intradiscal pressure (IDP) in the nucleus was affected by loading rate change. It increased under compression/flexion but decreased under extension. Contact pressure in the facet joints showed less variation under compression, but increased significantly under flexion/extension particularly under extension. Cancellous bone of the facet joints region was the only component fractured and fracture occurred under extension at both rates. The cervical ligaments were the primary load-bearing component followed by the IVD, endplates and cancellous bone; however, the latter was the most vulnerable to extension as it fractured at low energy impact. PMID:25129167

  4. Behavior of plywood and fiberglass steel composite tube structures subjected to impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaghani, Seyamend Bilind

    Paratransit buses are custom built as the major vehicle manufacturer produces the custom built passenger cage installed on the chassis for the Paratransit bus. In order for these Paratransit bus members to be sufficient, they have to be evaluated for crashworthiness and energy absorption. This has prompted Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) to fund research for the safety evaluation of Paratransit busses consisting of crash and safety analysis. There has been a large body of research done on steel subjected to static loads, but more research is needed for steel applied under dynamic loading and high speeds in order to improve crashworthiness in events such as rollovers and side impacts. Bare steel Hollow Structural Section (HSS) tubing are used a lot as structural members of Paratransit buses because of their lightness and progressive buckling under loading. The research will be conducted on quantifying the tubing's behavior under bending by conducting static three point bending and impact loading tests. In addition to the bare tubing, plywood and fiberglass composites are investigated because they are both strong and lightweight and their behavior under dynamic loading hasn't been quantified. As a result, the main purpose of this research is to quantify the differences between the dynamic and static behavior of plywood steel composite and fiberglass steel composite tubing and compare these findings with those of bare steel tubing. The differences will be quantified using detailed and thorough experiments that will examine the composites behavior under both static and dynamic loading. These tests will determine if there are any advantages of using the composite materials and thus allow for recommendations to be made to the FDOT with the goal of improving the safety of Paratransit busses. Tensile tests were conducted to determine the material properties of the tested specimens. Before the static and dynamic experiments are run to investigate the differences

  5. Evaluation of interlaminar shear strength of a unidirectional carbon/epoxy laminated composite under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Nakai, K.

    2006-08-01

    The interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of a unidirectional carbon/epoxy (T700/2521) laminated composite under impact loading is determined using the conventional split Hopkinson pressure bar. Double-notch shear (DNS) specimens with lateral constraint from a supporting jig are used in the static and impact interlaminar compressive shear tests. Short-beam shear specimens are also used under static 3-point bending. Numerical stress analyses are performed to determine the shear stress and normal stress distributions on the expected failure plane in the DNS specimen using the MSC/NASTRAN package. The effect of deformation rate on the ILSS and failure mode is investigated. It is observed that the ILSS is independent of the deformation rate up to nearly 1.5m/s (dotγ ≈ 780/s). The validity of the test results is confirmed by microscopic examinations of both static and impact failure surfaces for the DNS specimens.

  6. Protective Effectiveness of Porous Shields Under the Influence of High-Speed Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramshonkov, E. N.; Krainov, A. V.; Shorohov, P. V.

    2016-02-01

    The results of numerical simulations of a compact steel impactor with the aluminum porous shields under high-speed shock loading are presented. The porosity of barrier varies in wide range provided that its mass stays the same, but the impactor has always equal (identical) mass. Here presented the final assessment of the barrier perforation speed depending on its porosity and initial shock speed. The range of initial impact speed varies from 1 to 10 km/s. Physical phenomena such as: destruction, melting, vaporization of a interacting objects are taken into account. The analysis of a shield porosity estimation disclosed that the protection effectiveness of porous shield reveals at the initial impact speed grater then 1.5 km/s, and it increases when initial impact speed growth.

  7. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digital image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.

  8. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digitalmore » image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.« less

  9. Upper and Lower Neck Loads in Belted Human Surrogates in Frontal Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.; Moore, Jason; Rinaldi, James; Schlick, Michael; Maiman, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    The upper and lower neck loads in the restrained Hybrid III dummy and Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) were computed in simulated frontal impact sled tests at low, medium, and high velocities; repeatability performance of the two dummies were evaluated at all energy inputs; peak forces and moments were compared with computed loads at the occipital condyles and cervical-thoracic junctions from tests using post mortem human surrogates (PMHS). A custom sled buck was used to position the surrogates. Repeated tests were conducted at each velocity for each dummy and sufficient time was allowed to elapse between the two experiments. The upper and lower neck forces and moments were determined from load cell measures and its locations with respect to the ends of the neck. Both dummies showed good repeatability for axial and shear forces and bending moments at all changes in velocity inputs. Morphological characteristics in the neck loading responses were similar in all surrogates, although the peak magnitudes of the variables differed. In general, the THOR better mimicked the PMHS response than the Hybrid III dummy, and factors such as neck design and chest compliance were attributed to the observed variations. While both dummies were not designed for use at the two extremes of the tested velocities, results from the present study indicate that, currently the THOR may be the preferred anthropomorphic testing device in crashworthiness research studies and full-scale vehicle tests at all velocities. PMID:23169123

  10. Upper and lower neck loads in belted human surrogates in frontal impacts.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Moore, Jason; Rinaldi, James; Schlick, Michael; Maiman, Dennis J

    2012-01-01

    The upper and lower neck loads in the restrained Hybrid III dummy and Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) were computed in simulated frontal impact sled tests at low, medium, and high velocities; repeatability performance of the two dummies were evaluated at all energy inputs; peak forces and moments were compared with computed loads at the occipital condyles and cervical-thoracic junctions from tests using post mortem human surrogates (PMHS). A custom sled buck was used to position the surrogates. Repeated tests were conducted at each velocity for each dummy and sufficient time was allowed to elapse between the two experiments. The upper and lower neck forces and moments were determined from load cell measures and its locations with respect to the ends of the neck. Both dummies showed good repeatability for axial and shear forces and bending moments at all changes in velocity inputs. Morphological characteristics in the neck loading responses were similar in all surrogates, although the peak magnitudes of the variables differed. In general, the THOR better mimicked the PMHS response than the Hybrid III dummy, and factors such as neck design and chest compliance were attributed to the observed variations. While both dummies were not designed for use at the two extremes of the tested velocities, results from the present study indicate that, currently the THOR may be the preferred anthropomorphic testing device in crashworthiness research studies and full-scale vehicle tests at all velocities. PMID:23169123

  11. Effects of selected softball bat loading strategies on impact reaction impulse.

    PubMed

    Noble, L; Eck, J

    1986-02-01

    Interior loading strategies to modify the location and size of the effective hitting area of aluminum softball bats were identified. The effects of these strategies on theoretically derived and empirically determined relevant mechanical parameters were compared. Loading strategies consisted of adding 315 g to the interior of three similar (790 g) aluminum softball bats: at the center of mass of the original bat (bat C); at the ends of the bat and distributed so that the center of mass was unchanged, (bat A); and at the ends of the bat and distributed so that the moment of inertia about the swing axis (I1) was the same as that of bat C (bat B). The following parameters were derived theoretically by considering the bat as a physical pendulum and empirically by observing the impact reaction impulse on the axis of suspension: moment of inertia about the suspension axis (I0); moment of inertia about the swing axis; distance from the suspension axis to the center of percussion; and the slope of the impact reaction impulse (P1) relative to the impact impulse (P) as a function of impact location. These values for each bat were compared. Both empirical and theoretically derived data indicated that: the center of percussion of bat B was farther away from the axis than bats A and C; the moment of inertia about the swing axis of bat A was much greater than that of bats B and C; and the slope of the impact reaction regression line as a function of impact location for bat B was significantly less than that of the other bats. Thus, the effective hitting area of bat B was moved toward the barrel end of the bat and enlarged without a substantial increase in the moment of inertia about the swing axis. PMID:3959864

  12. Comparison of acceleration and impact stress as possible loading factors in phonation: a computer modeling study.

    PubMed

    Horácek, Jaromír; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria; Sidlof, Petr; Murphy, Peter; Svec, Jan G

    2009-01-01

    Impact stress (the impact force divided by the contact area of the vocal folds) has been suspected to be the main traumatizing mechanism in voice production, and the main cause of vocal fold nodules. However, there are also other factors, such as the repetitive acceleration and deceleration, which may traumatize the vocal fold tissues. Using an aeroelastic model of voice production, the present study quantifies the acceleration and impact stress values in relation to lung pressure, fundamental frequency (F0) and prephonatory glottal half-width. Both impact stress and acceleration were found to increase with lung pressure. Compared to impact stress, acceleration was less dependent on prephonatory glottal width and, thus, on voice production type. Maximum acceleration values were about 5-10 times greater for high F0 (approx. 400 Hz) compared to low F0 (approx. 100 Hz), whereas maximum impact stress remained nearly unchanged. This suggests that acceleration, i.e. the inertia forces, may present at high F0 a greater load for the vocal folds, and in addition to the collision forces may contribute to the fact that females develop vocal fold nodules and other vocal fold traumas more frequently than males. PMID:19571548

  13. Transient Dynamic Response and Failure of Sandwich Composite Structures under Impact Loading with Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Y. W.; Violette, M. A.; McCrillis, R. D.; Didoszak, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) effect on transient dynamic response and failure of sandwich composite structures under impact loading. The primary sandwich composite used in this study consisted of a 6.35 mm balsa core and a multi-ply symmetrical plain weave 6 oz E-glass skin. Both clamped sandwich composite plates and beams were studied using a uniquely designed vertical drop-weight testing machine. There were three impact conditions on which these experiments focused. The first of these conditions was completely dry (or air surrounded) testing. The second condition was completely water submerged. The final condition was also a water submerged test with air support at the backside of the plates. The tests were conducted sequentially, progressing from a low to high drop height to determine the onset and spread of damage to the sandwich composite when impacted with the test machine. The study showed the FSI effect on sandwich composite structures is very critical such that impact force, strain response, and damage size are generally much greater with FSI under the same impact condition. As a result, damage initiates at much lower impact energy conditions with the effect of FSI. Neglecting to account for FSI effects on sandwich composite structures results in very non-conservative analysis and design. Additionally, it was observed that the damage location changed for sandwich composite beams with the effect of FSI.

  14. A methodology for assessing high intensity RF effects in aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, R.A.; Avalle, C.A.; Kunz, K.S.; Molau, N.E.; Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.; Sharpe, R.M.

    1993-07-01

    Optical components have an inherent immunity to the electromagnetic interference (EMI) associated with High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF). The optical technology embodied in Fly-by-Light (FBL) might therefore minimize the effects of HIRF on digitally controlled systems while providing lifetime immunity to signal EMI. This is one of the primary motivations for developing FBL systems for aircraft. FBL has the potential to greatly simplify EMI certification by enabling technically acceptable laboratory tests of subsystems, as opposed to expensive full airplane tests. In this paper the authors describe a methodology for assessing EMI effects on FBL aircraft that reduces or potentially eliminates the need for full airplane tests. This methodology is based on comparing the applied EMI stress--the level of interference signal that arrives at a unit under test--versus the EMI strength of the unit--the interference level it can withstand without upset. This approach allows one to use computer models and/or low power coupling measurement and similarity (to other previously tested aircraft) to determine the stress applied to installed subsystems, and to use benchtop cable injection tests and/or mode stirred chamber radiated tests to determine the strength of the subsystem.

  15. Fast Acting Optical Forces From Far Detuned, High Intensity Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Hua, Xiang; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-05-01

    We are exploring fast acting, strong optical forces from standing wave light fields with high intensity and large detuning δ >> γ , where γ is the transition linewidth. We observe these fast acting forces on a time scale of a few times the excited state lifetime τ ≡ 1 / γ thus an atom may experience at most one or two spontaneous emission events. The dipole force is typically considered when the Rabi frequency Ω << δ , but we use Ω ~ δ so the usual approximations break down because a significant excited state population can occur, even for our short interaction times that limit spontaneous emission. Our experiment measures the transverse velocity distribution of a beam of 23S He after a chosen interaction time with a perpendicular standing wave detuned from the 23S -->33P transition near 389 nm. The distribution shows velocity resonance effects that persist over a large range of Ω. We also simulate the experiment numerically using the Optical Bloch Equations and the results are consistent with our measurements. Supported by ONR and Dept. of Education GAANN

  16. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  17. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of themore » beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.« less

  18. High intensity ultrasound modified ovalbumin: Structure, interface and gelation properties.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenfei; Wang, Yuntao; Zhang, Chunlan; Wan, Jiawei; Shah, Bakht Ramin; Pei, Yaqiong; Zhou, Bin; Li, Jin; Li, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Influence of high intensity ultrasound (HIUS) on the structure and properties of ovalbumin (OVA) were investigated. It was found that the subunits and secondary structure of OVA did not change significantly with HIUS treatment from the electrophoretic patterns and circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. The amount of free sulfhydryl groups increased and intrinsic fluorescence spectra analysis indicated changes in the tertiary structure and partial unfold of OVA after sonication increased. Compared with the untreated OVA, HIUS treatment increased the emulsifying activity and foaming ability, and decreased interface tension (oil-water and air-water interface), which due to the increased surface hydrophobicity and decreased the surface net charge in OVA, while the emulsifying and foaming stability had no remarkable differences. The increased particle size may be attributed to formation of protein aggregates. Moreover, the gelation temperatures of HIUS-treated samples were higher than the untreated OVA according to the temperature sweep model rheology, and this effect was consistent with the increased in surface hydrophobicity for ultrasound treated OVA. These changes in functional properties of OVA would promote its application in food industry. PMID:26964953

  19. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D P; Friedman, A; Vay, J L; Haber, I

    2004-12-09

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP{_}summary.html.

  20. Molecular Ionization at High Intensities: Characterizing OPA Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAcy, Collin; Karnemaat, Ryan; Marsh, Skyler; Foote, David; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2012-06-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses have long been the primary instruments of probing and analyzing intense-field molecular dynamics on femtosecond timescales. In particular, processes involving resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) have provided insight into ionization and dissociation dynamics. Typically the scope of REMPI is limited by the laser properties; namely, REMPI is limited by the transition energies accessible by an integer number of photons. However, the ability to tune the energies of these photons adds flexibility to the available resonances and, for longer wavelengths, makes tunneling the dominant ionization process. Optical parametric amplification (OPA) provides these changes, but the nonlinear processes required for OPA could have complicating effects on pulse duration and focusability, distorting beam quality and compromising experiments. We present the parametric amplification of 800-nm, 50-fs laser pulses in a TOPAS-C system: we use autocorrelation, power measurements, and knife-edging techniques to determine output pulse duration, intensity, and focal characteristics as a function of wavelength. We also report on the effects such changes will have on the practicality of various techniques requiring high-intensity processes.

  1. Operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Diem, S. J.; Martin, E. H.; Pesavento, P. V.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M. A.; Luo, G.-N.

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz rf power at levels up to 100 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~ 150 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). Ion cyclotron heating (~ 30 kW) will be via a magnetic beach approach. Plasma diagnostics include Thomson Scattering and a retarding field energy analyzer near the target, while a microwave interferometer and double-Langmuir probes are used to determine plasma parameters elsewhere in the system. Filterscopes are being used to measure D-alpha emission and He line ratios at multiple locations, and IR cameras image the target plates to determine heat deposition. High plasma densities in the helicon region have been produced in He (>3x1019/m3) and D (>1.5x1019/m3) , and operation with on-axis magnetic field strength >1 T has been demonstrated. Details of the experimental results and future plans for studying plasma surface/RF antenna interactions will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  2. S-76 high intensity radiated fields, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center sponsored a series of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) test on a Sikorsky S-76 rotorcraft. The project was conducted to evaluate the practicality of performing aircraft level HIRF tests, determine the effects of HIRF on a specific rotorcraft with the potential to obtain information on rotorcraft in general, and evaluate the effects of exposure to real world HIRF emitters. HIRF ground and flight tests were conducted to achieve the objective of the project. Site calibration (SCAL) measurements were made in the test area to determine the levels at which the S-76 would be irradiated when placed in the test area. Ground tests consisted of Low Level Swept Coupling (LLSC) and Low Level Swept Fields (LLSF) tests. The flight tests were flown directly into the main beam of a variety of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) transmitters including the Over the Horizon Back Scatter (OTHB), PAVE PAWS, ASR-9, FPS-65, and FPS-16 radars. Results of the S-76 tests added credibility to the existence of HIRF as a flight safety hazard. In the evaluation of the emitters, the flight tests showed repeatable instances where exposure resulted in instrumentation disruptions. It should be noted that all the observed disruptions were of a non-critical nature.

  3. S-76 high intensity radiated fields, volume 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center sponsored a series of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) tests on a Sikorsky S-76 rotorcraft. The project was conducted to evaluate the practically of performing aircraft level HIRF tests, determine the effects of HIRF on a specific rotorcraft with the potential to obtain information on rotorcraft in general, and evaluate the effects of exposure to 'real world' HIRF emitters. HIRF ground and flight tests were conducted to achieve the objective of the project. Site calibration (SCAL) measurements were made in the test area to determine the levels at which the S-76 would be irradiated when placed in the test area. Ground tests consisted of Low Level Swept Coupling (LLSC) and Low Level Swept Fields (LLSF) tests. The flight tests were flown directly into the main beam of a variety of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) transmitters including the Over the Horizon Back Scatter (OTHB), PAVE PAWS, ASR-9, FPS-65, and FPS-16 radars. Results of the S-76 tests added credibility to the existence of HIRF as a flight safety hazard. In the evaluation of the emitters, the flight tests showed repeatable instances where exposure resulted in instrumentation disruptions. It should however be noted that all the observed disruptions were of a non-critical nature.

  4. S-76 high intensity radiated fields, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jerry

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center sponsored a series of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) test on a Sikorsky S-76 rotorcraft. The project was conducted to evaluate the practically of performing aircraft level HIRF tests, determine the effects of HIRF on a specific rotorcraft with the potential to obtain information on rotorcraft in general, and evaluate the effects of exposure to real world HIRF emitters. HIRF ground and flight tests were conducted to achieve the objective of the project. Site calibration (SCAL) measurements were made in the test area to determine the levels at which the S-76 would be irradiated when placed in the test area. Ground tests consisted of Low Level Swept Coupling (LLSC) and Low Level Swept Fields (LLSF) tests. The flight tests were flown directly into the main beam of a variety of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) transmitters including the Over the Horizon Back Scatter (OTHB), PAVE PAWS, ASR-9, FPS-65, and FPS-16 radars. Results of the S-76 tests added credibility to the existence of HIRF as a flight safety hazard. In the evaluation of the emitters, the flight tests showed repeatable instances where exposure resulted in instrumentation disruptions. It should be noted that all the observed disruptions were of a non-critical nature.

  5. Proton shock acceleration using a high contrast high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; Kim, Jongjin; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art; Kerr, Shaun; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Ruby, John; William, Jackson; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration is a field of intense research due to the interesting characteristics of this novel particle source including high brightness, high maximum energy, high laminarity, and short duration. Although the ion beam characteristics are promising for many future applications, such as in the medical field or hybrid accelerators, the ion beam generated using TNSA, the acceleration mechanism commonly achieved, still need to be significantly improved. Several new alternative mechanisms have been proposed such as collisionless shock acceleration (CSA) in order to produce a mono-energetic ion beam favorable for those applications. We report the first results of an experiment performed with the TITAN laser system (JLF, LLNL) dedicated to the study of CSA using a high intensity (5x1019W/cm2) high contrast ps laser pulse focused on 55 μm thick CH and CD targets. We show that the proton spectrum generated during the interaction exhibits high-energy mono-energetic features along the laser axis, characteristic of a shock mechanism.

  6. High intensity focused ultrasound in clinical tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), which was developed in the 1940s as a viable thermal tissue ablation approach, have increased its popularity. In clinics, HIFU has been applied to treat a variety of solid malignant tumors in a well-defined volume, including the pancreas, liver, prostate, breast, uterine fibroids, and soft-tissue sarcomas. In comparison to conventional tumor/cancer treatment modalities, such as open surgery, radio- and chemo-therapy, HIFU has the advantages of non-invasion, non-ionization, and fewer complications after treatment. Over 100 000 cases have been treated throughout the world with great success. The fundamental principles of HIFU ablation are coagulative thermal necrosis due to the absorption of ultrasound energy during transmission in tissue and the induced cavitation damage. This paper reviews the clinical outcomes of HIFU ablation for applicable cancers, and then summarizes the recommendations for a satisfactory HIFU treatment according to clinical experience. In addition, the current challenges in HIFU for engineers and physicians are also included. More recent horizons have broadened the application of HIFU in tumor treatment, such as HIFU-mediated drug delivery, vessel occlusion, and soft tissue erosion (“histotripsy”). In summary, HIFU is likely to play a significant role in the future oncology practice. PMID:21603311

  7. HIGH INTENSITY EFFECTS IN THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2008-01-01

    Currently operating at 0.5 MW beam power on target, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is already the world's most powerful pulsed neutron source. However, we are only one third of the way to full power. As we ramp toward full power, the control of the beam and beam loss in the ring will be critical. In addition to practical considerations, such as choice of operating point, painting scheme, RF bunching, and beam scattering, it may be necessary to understand and mitigate collective effects due to space charge, impedances, and electron clouds. At each stage of the power ramp-up, we use all available resources to understand and to minimize beam losses. From the standpoint of beam dynamics, the losses observed so far under normal operating conditions have not involved collective phenomena. We are now entering the intensity regime in which this may change. In dedicated high intensity beam studies, we have already observed resistive wall, extraction kicker impedance-driven, and electron cloud activities. The analysis and simulation of this data are important ongoing activities at SNS. This paper discusses the status of this work, as well as other considerations necessary to the successful full power operation of SNS.

  8. Blood coagulation using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuc V.; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-03-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) technology provides a feasible method of achieving thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. One of the potential clinical benefits of HIFU can induce immediate hemostasis without suturing. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of a HIFU system for blood coagulation on severe vascular injury. ngHIFU treatment was implemented immediately after bleeding in artery. The ultrasound probe was made of piezoelectric material, generating a central frequency of 2.0 MHz as well as an ellipsoidal focal spot of 2 mm in lateral dimension and 10 mm in axial dimension. Acoustic coagulation was employed on a perfused chicken artery model in vitro. A surgical incision (1 to 2 mm long) was made with a scapel on the arterial wall, and heparinized autologous blood was made to leak out from the incision with a syringe pump. A total of 5 femoral artery incisions was treated with the HIFU beam. The intensity of 4500 W/cm2 at the focus was applied for all treatments. Complete hemostasis was achieved in all treatments, along with the treatment times of 25 to 50 seconds. The estimated intraoperative blood loss was from 2 to 5 mL. The proposed HIFU system may provide an effective method for immediate blood coagulation for arteries and veins in clinical applications.

  9. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1993-02-01

    The QUEGS facility at MURR has produced a number of new results and demonstrated the range of potential applications of high resolution, high intensity Moessbauer scattering. This work has been carried out by both MU and Purdue researchers and includes published results on Na, W, pentadecane, polydimethylsiloxane and other systems, manuscripts submitted on alkali halides (Phys. Rev. B) and accurate Moessbauer lineshape measurements (Phys. Rev. C), and manuscripts in preparation on glycerol, NiAl and Moessbauer spectra obtained by modulating a scattering crystal. Recently, new collaborations have been initiated which will substantially enhance our efforts. These are with W. Steiner (Vienna), G. Coddens (Saclay), and R. D. Taylor (Los Alamos). Steiner is experienced with Fe-57 Moessbauer scattering, while Coddens specializes in quasielastic neutron scattering; both of these areas naturally complement our work. R. D. Taylor has pioneered Moessbauer spectroscopy from the time of its discovery and has already made important contributions to our study of lattice dynamics and superconductivity for lead alloyed with small quantities of tin. At the same time, a significant instrument upgrade is underway, funded in part by the DOE-URIP program.

  10. Complete recovery time after exhaustion in high-intensity work.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Chieh; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Toly

    2005-05-15

    This study was aimed to investigate complete recovery time (CRT) after exhaustion in high-intensity work. Twenty-four subjects were divided into two groups based on the cardiorespiratory capability index, which was measured in a maximum capacity test. Each subject then performed two cycling tests (at 60% and 70% maximum working capacity). The subject continued cycling until exhaustion in each test and then sat recovering until he/she no longer felt fatigue or until the oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) returned to their baselines, whichever was longer. The results indicated that HR required the longest time to recover and, consequently, HR data were adopted to set the CRT. The CRT was significantly correlated with the cardiorespiratory capability index and the relative workload indices: RVO2 and RHR. The RVO2 was the average elevation in VO2 during work from the resting level as a percentage of maximum VO2 reserve. The RHR's definition was similar to that of RVO2. Based on the obtained CRT-prediction model, the CRT for a high-cardiorespiratory-capability person was 20.8, 22.1, 23.4, and 24.7 min at 50%, 60%, 70%, and 80% RHR levels, respectively. These suggested CRT values should be increased by 10 min for a low-cardiorespiratory-capability person. PMID:16087501

  11. Nanobiotechnology promotes noninvasive high-intensity focused ultrasound cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    The successful cancer eradication in a noninvasive manner is the ultimate objective in the fight against cancer. As a "bloodless scalpel," high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is regarded as one of the most promising and representative noninvasive therapeutic modalities for cancer surgery. However, large-scale clinical applications of HIFU are still in their infancy because of critical efficiency and safety issues which remain to be solved. Fortunately, recently developed nanobiotechnology provides an alternative efficient approach to improve such important issues in HIFU, especially for cancer therapy. This Research News presents the very recent exciting progresses on the elaborate design and fabrication of organic, inorganic, and organic/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles for enhancing the HIFU ablation efficiency against tumor tissues. It is highly expected that this Research News can arouse more extensive research enthusiasm on the development of functional nanomaterials for highly efficient HIFU-based synergistic therapy, which will give a promising noninvasive therapeutic modality for the successful cancer therapy with minimal damage to surrounding normal tissues, due to the noninvasive and site-specific therapeutic features of HIFU. PMID:24898413

  12. Treatment of Acne Scars With High Intensity Focused Radio Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimi, Omar A; Weiss, Robert A; Weiss, Margaret A; Halvorson, Christian R; Mayoral, Flor; Ross, E Victor; Cohen, Joel L

    2015-09-01

    In this multi-site case series, the efficacy of high intensity focused radiofrequency (RF) delivered to the dermis was evaluated for treating acne scars. A novel delivery system that uses insulated microneedles to deliver a desired thermal effect to multiple depths of the dermis while sparing the epidermis from RF injury was used. Four (4) healthy subjects from four different practices were evaluated and used in this case report. The subjects were treated between 3 or 4 times depending on the severity of the acne scars presented. The depth of thermal delivery was adjusted before each pass and all subjects received at a minimum, three passes to the treated area. Before and after photographs along with adverse effects were recorded. The theory behind the use of insulated needles with the active RF delivery at the distal tip is to allow for significant thermal injury to several layers of the dermis while avoiding thermal injury to the epidermis. This case report demonstrates significant improvement on acne scars and that all skin types should be safely treatable with minimum downtime realized. PMID:26355629

  13. Treatment of glaucoma with high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Aptel, Florent; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-05-01

    Glaucoma is a common disease mainly due to an increase in pressure inside the eye, leading to a progressive destruction of the optic nerve, potentially to blindness. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the result of a balance between production of liquid that fills the eye--aqueous humour--and its resorption. All treatments for glaucoma aim to reduce IOP and can therefore have two mechanisms of action: reducing aqueous humour production by the partial destruction or medical inhibition of the ciliary body--the anatomical structure responsible for production of aqueous humour--or facilitating the evacuation of aqueous humour from the eye. Several physical methods can be used to destroy the ciliary body, e.g. laser, cryotherapy, microwave. All these methods have two major drawbacks: they are non-selective for the organ to be treated and they have an unpredictable dose–effect relationship. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to coagulate the ciliary body and avoid these drawbacks. A commercially available device was marketed in the 1980s, but later abandoned, essentially for technical reasons. A smaller circular device using miniaturised transducers was recently developed and proposed for clinical practice. Experimental studies have shown selective coagulation necrosis of the treated ciliary body. The first three clinical trials in humans have shown that this device was well tolerated and allowed a significant, predictable and sustained reduction of IOP. The aim of this contribution is to present a summary of the work concerning the use of HIFU to treat glaucoma. PMID:25524084

  14. Nonlinear Mechanisms of Lesion Formation by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, V. A.; Bailey, M. R.; Reed, J.; Canney, M. S.; Kaczkowski, P. J.; Crum, L. A.

    2006-05-01

    Nonlinear mechanisms of lesion formation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) were investigated experimentally and numerically in a transparent polyacrylamide gel phantom. Numerical predictions were made with a finite-amplitude acoustic propagation model. A 2-MHz transducer of 42-mm diameter and 44.5-mm radius of curvature was operated above the cavitation threshold of the gel phantom at various peak acoustic powers and duty cycles. Acoustic waveforms were recorded in the gel by a fiber optic hydrophone. Bubble activity was detected actively by B-mode diagnostic imaging, passively by a remote focused hydrophone, and optically by CCD and high-speed cameras. Elevated static pressure was applied to suppress bubble activity and increase the boiling temperature, thus isolating the pure effect of acoustic nonlinearity. In overpressure experiment performed at 32 W acoustic power, both cavitation and nonlinear ultrasound propagation accelerated lesion inception and growth, but acoustic nonlinearity, which led to shock formation, played the dominant role. Rapid localized heating, particularly by increased absorption in the shocked wave, led to boiling and then to proximal growth and migration of the lesion even at low overpressure. At 90W acoustic power, boiling was observed and predicted in less than 50 ms.

  15. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise. [supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, O. H.; Roth, S. D.; Welz, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Research on high intensity (finite amplitude) acoustic waves shows that nonlinear distortion effects generally result in a shift of energy to higher frequencies. The higher intensities associated with supersonic jets would therefore indicate that high frequency enhancement of the spectrum should occur, resulting in the differences observed between subsonic and supersonic jets. A 10,000 acoustic watt source installed in an anechoic chamber generates sound levels such that acoustic shocks are readily observable. Dual frequency excitation of the source produces a strong parametric effect with a difference frequency comparable in level to the primary frequency. The test set up and recording equipment being used to determine the finite amplitude noise representative of an actual supersonic jet are described as well as the development of a computer program based on Burger's equation. The spectra of 1/2 octave band, 1 kHz sine wave, and dual frequency input and output are presented in graphs along with waveforms at Z = .025, 0.1, and 1.0.

  16. An Investigation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Cameron; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David

    2011-09-01

    Investigations into high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thrombolysis in vitro and in vivo in a rabbit femoral artery thrombus model were performed. A 1.51 MHz focused transducer was used to treat clots with pulse lengths of 1-10 ms, acoustic powers of 1-300 W and exposure durations of 5-20 s. Our measurements indicate the creation of acoustic radiation force induced clot displacements are insufficient to mechanically fractionate clots, despite reaching displacements >100 μm. Only under the presence of inertial cavitation was HIFU able to disrupt clots. Cavitation thresholds of 160 W in vitro and 215 W in vivo were observed. In vitro, clots insonified at powers above the cavitation threshold eroded regions up to 2.5× the transducer beam width. Successful recanalization in vivo occurred in 5/20 cases for 1ms pulses at powers >215 W. 10 ms pulses created high incidences of symptomatic bleeding while 1 ms pulses did not. These results demonstrate treatment feasibility in vivo, although further work is required to understand the influence of different acoustic parameters on treatment outcome.

  17. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapy System and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fucheng; He, Ye; Li, Rui

    2007-05-01

    At the end of last century, a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system was successfully developed and manufactured in China, which has been already applied to clinical therapy. This article aims to discuss the HIFU therapy system and its application. Detailed research includes the following: power amplifiers for high-power ultrasound, ultrasound transducers with large apertures, accurate 3-D mechanical drives, a software control system (both high-voltage control and low-voltage control), and the B-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment used for treatment monitoring. Research on the dosage of ultrasound required for tumour therapy in multiple human cases has made it possible to relate a dosage formula, presented in this paper, to other significant parameters such as the volume of thermal tumor solidification, the acoustic intensity (I), and the ultrasound emission time (tn). Moreover, the HIFU therapy system can be applied to the clinical treatment of both benign and malignant tumors in the pelvic and abdominal cavity, such as uterine fibroids, liver cancer and pancreatic carcinoma.

  18. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  19. Spectroscopic imaging of metal halide high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvallet, Geoffrey A.

    The body of this work consists of three main research projects. An optical- and near-ultraviolet-wavelength absorption study sought to determine absolute densities of ground and excited level Sc atoms, ground level Sc + ions, and ground level Na atoms in a commercial 250 W metal halide high intensity discharge lamp during operation. These measurements also allowed the determination of the arc temperature and absolute electron density as functions of radius. Through infrared emission spectroscopy, relative densities of sodium and scandium were determined as functions of radius. Using the absolute densities gained from the optical experiment, these relative densities were calibrated. In addition, direct observation of the infrared emission allowed us to characterize the infrared power losses of the lamp. When considered as a fraction of the overall power consumption, the near-infrared spectral power losses were not substantial enough to warrant thorough investigation of their reduction in these lamps. The third project was an attempt to develop a portable x-ray diagnostic experiment. Two-dimensional spatial maps of the lamps were analyzed to determine absolute elemental mercury densities and the arc temperature as a function of radius. Two methods were used to improve the calibration of the density measurements and to correct for the spread in x-ray energy: known solutions of mercury in nitric acid, and an arc lamp which was uniformly heated to evaporate the mercury content. Although many complexities arose in this experiment, its goal was successfully completed.

  20. High intensity ion beam injection into the 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Wutte, Daniela; Clark, Dave J.; Laune, Bernard; Leitner,Matthaeus A.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2000-05-31

    Low cross section experiments to produce super-heavyelements have increased the demand for high intensity heavy ion beams atenergies of about 5 MeV/nucleon at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory. Therefore, efforts are underway to increasethe overall ion beam transmission through the axial injection line andthe cyclotron. The ion beam emittance has been measured for various ionmasses and charge states. Beam transport simulations including spacecharge effects were performed for both of the injection line and the ionsource extraction. The relatively low nominal injection voltage of 10 kVwas found to be the main factor for ion beam losses, because of beam blowup due to space charge forces at higher intensities. Consequently,experiments and simulations have been performed at higherinjectionenergies, and it was demonstrated that the ion beams could still becentered in the cyclotron at these energies. Therefore, the new injectorion source VENUS and its ion beam transport system (currently underconstruction at the 88-Inch Cyclotron) are designed for extractionvoltages up to 30 kV.

  1. Effect of High Impact or Non-impact Loading Activity on Bone Bending Stiffness and Mineral Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Michael T. C.; Arnnud, Sara B.; Steele, Charles R.; Moreno, Alexjandro

    2003-01-01

    Material properties of conical bone, including mineral density (BMD) and its geometry is closely related to its load-carrying capacity. These two primary components determine the strength of conical bone. High impact loading involving acceleration and deceleration movements used in gymnastics induce higher BMD of the affected bone compared to the non-impact acceleration and deceleration movements used in swimming. Study of these two groups of athletes on bone bending stiffness has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in bone bending stiffness and BMD between competitive female synchronized swimmers and female gymnasts. Thirteen world class female synchronized swimmers (SYN) and 8 female gymnasts (GYM), mean age 21 +/- 2.9 yr. were recruited for this study. We used a mechanical response tissue analyzer (Gaitscan, NJ) to calculate EI, where E is Young's modulus of elasticity and I is the cross-sectional moment of inertia. EI was obtained from tissue response to a vibration probe placed directly on the skin of the mid-region of tibia and ulna. BMD of the heel and wrist were measured with a probe densitometer (PIXI, Lunor, WI). The SYN were taller than (p < 0.05) the GYM but weighed the same as the GYM. EI obtained from tibia and ulna of the SYN (291 +/- 159 and 41 +/- 19.4, respectively) were not significantly different from thc GYM (285 +/- 140 and 44 +/- 18.3, respectively). BMD of the heel and wrist in GYM were higher than in SYN (p < 0.001). High impact weight-bearing activities promote similar bone strength but greater BMD response than non-impact activities performed in a buoyant environment.

  2. Dynamic mechanical behavior and the constitutive model of concrete subjected to impact loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jianguo; Liu, Haifeng; Shang, Lin

    2008-11-01

    Based on the theory of consecutive damage mechanics, micro-mechanics, statistics and the visco-plastic constitutive equation of Perzyna, a coupled model of damage and plasticity is developed to describe the complex behavior of concrete subjected to impact loadings. In this model, some suppositions about deformation of the material and evolution of the damage are made. First, concrete is macroscopically assumed to be homogeneous and consecutive, while it is microscopically filled with large amounts of micro-crack and micro-void defects. Second, the damage evolution of the micro-cracks is caused by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of the micro-cracks due to the interior tensile stress in concrete, which leads to a degradation in the strength and stiffness of concrete. Third, compaction of concrete is physically a collapse of the material micro-void. It produces irreversible plastic strains in the material and, at the same time, an increase in the bulk modulus. Fourth, there is no interaction between the micro-crack and the micro-void. Last, when the damage reaches a critical value, the concrete may fail totally. The model parameters for concrete are determined by plate impact experiments. The model predictions fit the experimental results well. So the model can be used to simulate the dynamic mechanical behavior of concrete under impact loadings.

  3. Response of a circular steel plate with different weld geometries subject to impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Malek, S.; Meyer, L. W.; Herzig, N.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic response of clamped circular steel plates was experimentally investigated under impact loading. The experiments were performed using a high energy drop weight machine with a 5 ton drop weight, which falls from a height of 0.8 m and results in a total impact energy of 40 kJ. Target plates of 10 mm thickness and 580 mm diameter were welded in three different geometrical configurations of weld elements on the lower side. The impact process was carried out using a hemispherical punch. The force was registered by strain gages on the punch. A full dynamic strain field measurement was applied on the tension side using two high speed cameras. The evaluation of the strain field was carried out with the speckle photography technique. The effect of cracks and welding on the deformation and failure behavior was studied using pre-cracked disks and plates with welded webs, welded circular discs and also with a weld seam only. The failure of the plates was registered using the high speed cameras and from the force signal. The results are analyzed and discussed regarding the behavior of the material and component under high rate loading.

  4. The Impact of Learner Characteristics on Information Utilization Strategies, Cognitive Load Experienced, and Performance in Hypermedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Vollmann, Brigitte; Catrambone, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Against the background of an adaptation of Cognitive Load Theory to learner-controlled settings we investigated the impact of learner characteristics on information utilization strategies, cognitive load, and learning outcomes in a hypermedia environment. Based on the data of 79 students, five clusters of students were identified according to…

  5. Impact of Paint Color on Rest Period Climate Control Loads in Long-Haul Trucks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lustbader, J.; Kreutzer, C.; Jeffers, M.; Adelman, S.; Yeakel, S.; Brontz, P.; Olson, K.; Ohlinger, J.

    2014-02-01

    Cab climate conditioning is one of the primary reasons for operating the main engine in a long-haul truck during driver rest periods. In the United States, sleeper cab trucks use approximately 667 million gallons of fuel annually for rest period idling. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) CoolCab Project works closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that minimize engine idling and fuel use while maintaining occupant comfort. Heat transfer to the vehicle interior from opaque exterior surfaces is one of the major heat pathways that contribute to air conditioning loads during long-haul truck daytime rest period idling. To quantify the impact of paint color and the opportunity for advanced paints, NREL collaborated with Volvo Group North America, PPG Industries, and Dometic Environmental Corporation. Initial screening simulations using CoolCalc, NREL's rapid HVAC load estimation tool, showed promising air-conditioning load reductions due to paint color selection. Tests conducted at NREL's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility using long-haul truck cab sections, 'test bucks,' showed a 31.1% of maximum possible reduction in rise over ambient temperature and a 20.8% reduction in daily electric air conditioning energy use by switching from black to white paint. Additionally, changing from blue to an advanced color-matched solar reflective blue paint resulted in a 7.3% reduction in daily electric air conditioning energy use for weather conditions tested in Colorado. National-level modeling results using weather data from major U.S. cities indicated that the increase in heating loads due to lighter paint colors is much smaller than the reduction in cooling loads.

  6. Modeling the impacts of alternative fertilization methods on nitrogen loading in rice production in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zheng; Sha, Zhimin; Liu, Yibo; Wu, Shuhang; Zhang, Hanlin; Li, Changsheng; Zhao, Qi; Cao, Linkui

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) loss from paddy fields is an important source of agricultural non-point source pollution that leads to eutrophication of water bodies and degradation of water quality. The impacts of alternative N fertilizer management practices on N loading (N loss through runoff and leaching) from paddy fields in Shanghai were assessed using a process-based biogeochemical model, DNDC. The results indicated that the current fertilization rate in paddy fields of Shanghai (300kgN/ha) exceeds the actual rice demand and has led to substantial N loading of 1142±276kg. The combined application of urea at 150kgN/ha and organic manure at 100kgN/ha was identified as the best fertilization method for rice cultivation in Shanghai; this application maintained optimal rice yields and significantly reduced N loading to 714±151kg in comparison with the current fertilization rate. A sensitivity test was conducted with various input parameters, and the results indicated that fertilization, precipitation and soil properties were the most sensitive factors that regulate N loss from paddy fields. The variability of soil properties, especially SOC led to high uncertainties in the simulated results. Therefore, the local climate conditions and soil properties should be taken into account in the identification of the best management practice (BMP) for rice cultivation, given the high spatially heterogeneous N loading values across all towns used in the simulation. The DNDC model is an effective approach for simulating and predicting N loading in paddy fields under alternative agricultural management practices. PMID:27317135

  7. Pleiotropic impact of endosymbiont load and co-occurrence in the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Gislaine A; Vieira, Juliana L; Haro, Marcelo M; Corrêa, Alberto S; Ribon, Andrea Oliveira B; de Oliveira, Luiz Orlando; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2014-01-01

    Individual traits vary among and within populations, and the co-occurrence of different endosymbiont species within a host may take place under varying endosymbiont loads in each individual host. This makes the recognition of the potential impact of such endosymbiont associations in insect species difficult, particularly in insect pest species. The maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a key pest species of stored cereal grains, exhibits associations with two endosymbiotic bacteria: the obligatory endosymbiont SZPE ("Sitophilus zeamais Primary Endosymbiont") and the facultative endosymbiont Wolbachia. The impact of the lack of SZPE in maize weevil physiology is the impairment of nutrient acquisition and energy metabolism, while Wolbachia is an important factor in reproductive incompatibility. However, the role of endosymbiont load and co-occurrence in insect behavior, grain consumption, body mass and subsequent reproductive factors has not yet been explored. Here we report on the impacts of co-occurrence and varying endosymbiont loads achieved via thermal treatment and antibiotic provision via ingested water in the maize weevil. SZPE exhibited strong effects on respiration rate, grain consumption and weevil body mass, with observed effects on weevil behavior, particularly flight activity, and potential consequences for the management of this pest species. Wolbachia directly favored weevil fertility and exhibited only mild indirect effects, usually enhancing the SZPE effect. SZPE suppression delayed weevil emergence, which reduced the insect population growth rate, and the thermal inactivation of both symbionts prevented insect reproduction. Such findings are likely important for strain divergences reported in the maize weevil and their control, aspects still deserving future attention. PMID:25347417

  8. Shear fracture of jointed steel plates of bolted joints under impact load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daimaruya, M.; Fujiki, H.; Ambarita, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Shin, H.-S.

    2013-07-01

    The present study is concerned with the development of a fracture criterion for the impact fracture of jointed steel plates of bolted joints used in a car body, which contributes to crash simulations by CAE. We focus our attention on the shear fracture of the jointed steel plates of lap-bolted joints in the suspension of a car under impact load. Members of lap-bolted joints are modelled as a pair of steel plates connected by a bolt. One of the plates is a specimen subjected to plastic deformation and fracture and the other is a jig subjected to elastic deformation only. Three kinds of steel plate specimens are examined, i.e., a common steel plate with a tensile strength of 270 MPa and high tensile strength steel plates of 440 and 590 MPa used for cars. The impact shear test was performed using the split Hopkinson bar technique for tension impact, together with the static test using a universal testing machine INSTRON 5586. The behaviour of the shear stress and deformation up to rupture taking place in the joint was discussed. The obtained results suggest that a stress-based fracture criterion may be developed for the impact fracture of jointed steel plates of a lap-bolted joint.

  9. Assessment of PZT transducer bonding techniques under drop-weight impact loading in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Kyle R.; Ostiguy, Pierre-Claude; Masson, Patrice; Elkoun, Saïd; Quaegebeur, Nicolas

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the robustness of a structural health monitoring system (SHM) that utilizes lead-zirconatetitanate (PZT) transducers tested on carbon fibre composite coupons under drop-weight impact loading. Four PZT transducers are attached to the surface of 10.16 cm x 15.24 cm aerospace grade carbon fibre coupons using four types of adhesives: cyanoacrylate, epoxy, methyl methacrylate, and silicon. Each PZT transducer is tuned to excite preferentially an A0 mode guided wave burst into each composite coupon prior to and following an impact. The output from a PZT transducer, the amplitude of the propagating guided waves measured using a laser vibrometer on the coupon surface and the RMS velocity is plotted. The cycle is repeated for the three remaining transducers. The electrical admittance is also measured using an impedance analyzer prior to and following impact. This paper illustrates how a robustness metric expressed in terms of admittance can be used to infer the ability of the SHM system to generate guided waves and to detect damage following impact. The robustness metric is a measure of the adhesive strength and the mechanism to provide accurate damage detection results. It is shown that transducers attached using silicon provide accurate damage detection results based on pre-attached adhesive yielding difference of <0.5% obtained from electrical admittance measurements before and after impact.

  10. Plasmas and Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas

    1999-11-01

    Many of the applications of short-pulse, high-intensity laser systems, including coherent UV and X-ray generation, compact particle accelerators, and non-perturbative nonlinear optics as well as the study of laser-matter interaction physics, require large intensity-interaction length products. In recent years, plasma structures resulting from the hydrodynamic evolution of laser-produced plasma filaments have proven to be attractive media for guiding pulses with peak powers approaching the terawatt level over lengths many times the vacuum Rayleigh range. The hydrodynamics of plasma waveguides have been characterized using time- and space-resolved interferometry measurements of electron density profiles. The laser-driven ionization and heating phase of the plasma filament creation is followed by hot electron driven plasma expansion. Density profiles suitable for optical guiding develop within the first few hundred picoseconds after plasma creation, during which rapid cooling occurs. At longer times the plasma expansion closely follows that of a cylindrical blast wave, with further cooling due to expansion work. The observed guided intensity profiles of end-coupled and tunnel-coupled pulses compare favorably with calculations of the quasi-bound waveguide modes based on the measured electron density profiles. Time- and space-resolved electron density measurements of a laser-driven concentric implosion were also performed. The implosion is the result of the interaction of a second laser pulse with an existing plasma waveguide. The two-pulse absorption and ionization significantly exceed that due to a single pulse of the same total energy. The author would like to acknowledge the significant contributions of Prof. Howard M. Milchberg to the work being presented.

  11. High intensity ultrasound transducer used in gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Kyle P.; Keilman, George W.; Noble, Misty L.; Brayman, Andrew A.; Miao, Carol H.

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a novel therapeutic high intensity non-focused ultrasound (HIU) transducer designed with uniform pressure distribution to aid in accelerated gene transfer in large animal liver tissues in vivo. The underlying HIU transducer was used to initiate homogeneous cavitation throughout the tissue while delivering up to 2.7 MPa at 1.1 MHz across its radiating surface. The HIU transducer was built into a 6 cm diameter x 1.3 cm tall housing ergonomically designed to avoid collateral damage to the surrounding anatomy during dynamic motion. The ultrasound (US) radiation was applied in a 'paintbrush-like' manner to the surface of the liver. The layers and geometry of the transducer were carefully selected to maximize the active diameter (5.74 cm), maximize the electrical to acoustic conversion efficiency (85%) to achieve 2.7 MPa of peak negative pressure, maximize the frequency operating band at the fundamental resonance to within a power transfer delta of 1 dB, and reduce the pressure delta to within 2 dB across the radiating surface. For maximum peak voltage into the transducer, a high performance piezoceramic was chosen and a DC bias circuit was built integral to the system. An apodized two element annular pattern was made from a single piezoceramic element, resulting in significant pressure uniformity enhancement. In addition to using apodization for pressure uniformity, a proprietary multi-layered structure was used to improve efficiency while sustaining an operating band from 900 kHz to 1.3 MHz. The resultant operating band allowed for dithering techniques using frequency modulation. The underlying HIU transducer for use in large animals enhances gene expression up to 6300-fold.

  12. Method of making a high intensity solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sater, B. L.

    1985-05-14

    A method of manufacturing a high intensity edge illuminated solar cell is provided which comprises the following steps. A semiconductor substrate is formed having first, second and third essentially parallel layers having impurity doped semiconductor material and arranged in that order with the first and third layers terminating in opposing essentially parallel first and second major surfaces. The second layer is of a first type conductivity and the first layer is an opposite second type conductivity so as to define a PN junction between the first and second layers and which junction is essentially parallel to the first and second major surfaces. The third layer is of the first type conductivity but is of greater impurity concentration than that of the second layer for providing a built-in electrostatic drift field to enhance minority carrier movement toward the PN junction. The junction of the second and third layers is essentially parallel to the PN junction. First and second ohmic contact layers are applied on the first and second major surfaces respectively so as to provide electrical contacts thereon. The substrate is separated along separating planes into segments. These separating planes provide major working surfaces extending between the first and second major surfaces. The major working surfaces each contain a plurality of edge surfaces of the first, second and third impurity doped semiconductor material. The major working surfaces of each segment are prepared by passivating the edge surfaces of the first, second and third impurity doped material. At least one of the major working surfaces serves to receive incident radiation and thereby it serves as an operating surface. An accumulation layer is incorporated at the operating surface containing the first type conductivity semiconductor material to provide thereat a drift field to minimize minority carrier recombination at the operating surface.

  13. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James

    2009-04-01

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  14. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  15. Glass Strengthening via High-Intensity Plasma-Arc Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Harper, David C; Duty, Chad E; Patel, P

    2010-01-01

    The use of a high-intensity plasma-arc lamp was used to irradiate the surface of soda-lime silicate glass tiles to determine if an increase in strength could be achieved. The lamp had a power density of 3500 W/cm2, a processing area of 1 cm x 10 cm, irradiated near-infrared heating at a wavelength between 0.2 1.4 m, and was controlled to unidirectionally sweep across 50-mm-square tiles at a constant speed of 8 mm/s. Ring-on-ring (RoR) equibiaxial flexure and 4 pt uni-directional flexure testings of entire tiles were used to measure and compare failure stress distributions of treated and untreated glass. Even with non-optimized processing conditions, RoR failure stress increased by approximately 25% and the 4 pt bend failure stress increased by approximately 65%. Strengthening was due to a fire-polishing-like mechanism. The arc-lamp heat-treatment caused the location of the strength-limiting flaws in the 4-pt-bend tiles to change; namely, failure initiation occurred on the gage section surface for the treated glass whereas it occurred at a gage section edge for the untreated. Arc-lamp heat-treatment is attractive not only because it provides strengthening, but because it can (non-contact) process large amounts of glass quickly and inexpensively, and is a process that either a glass manufacturer or end-user can readily employ.

  16. Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  17. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1990-10-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  18. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James

    2009-04-14

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  19. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound induced Gene Activation in Solid Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2006-05-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to activate trans-gene expression in a mouse tumor model was investigated. 4T1 cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously in the hind limbs of Balb/C mice and adenovirus luciferase gene vectors under the control of heat shock protein 70B promoter (Adeno-hsp70B-Luc) were injected intratumoraly for gene transfection. One day following the virus injection, the transfected tumors were heated to a peak temperature of 55, 65, 75, and 85°C, respectively, in 10s at multiple sites around the center of the tumor using a HIFU transducer operated at either 1.1-MHz (fundamental) or 3.3-MHz (3rd harmonic) frequency. Inducible luciferase gene expression was found to vary from 15-fold to 120-fold of the control group following 1.1-MHz HIFU exposure. The maximum gene activation was produced at a peak temperature of 65˜75°C one day following HIFU exposure and decayed gradually to baseline level within 7 days. The inducible gene activation produced by 3.3-MHz HIFU exposure (75°C-10s) was found to be comparable to that produced by hyperthermia (42°C-30min). Altogether, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using HIFU as a simple and versatile physical means to regulate trans-gene expression in vivo. This unique feature may be explored in the future for a synergistic combination of HIFU-induced thermal ablation with heat-induced gene therapy for improved cancer therapy.

  20. Design Aspects of Focal Beams From High-Intensity Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Kruse, Dustin E.; Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    As the applications of ultrasonic thermal therapies expand, the design of the high-intensity array must address both the energy delivery of the main beam and the character and relevance of off-target beam energy. We simulate the acoustic field performance of a selected set of circular arrays organized by array format, including flat versus curved arrays, periodic versus random arrays, and center void diameter variations. Performance metrics are based on the −3-dB focal main lobe (FML) positioning range, axial grating lobe (AGL) temperatures, and side lobe levels. Using finite-element analysis, we evaluate the relative heating of the FML and the AGLs. All arrays have a maximum diameter of 100λ, with element count ranging from 64 to 1024 and continuous wave frequency of 1.5 MHz. First, we show that a 50% spherical annulus produces focus beam side lobes which decay as a function of lateral distance at nearly 87% of the exponential rate of a full aperture. Second, for the arrays studied, the efficiency of power delivery over the −3-dB focus positioning range for spherical arrays is at least 2-fold greater than for flat arrays; the 256-element case shows a 5-fold advantage for the spherical array. Third, AGL heating can be significant as the focal target is moved to its distal half-intensity depth from the natural focus. Increasing the element count of a randomized array to 256 elements decreases the AGL-to-FML heating ratio to 0.12 at the distal half-intensity depth. Further increases in element count yield modest improvements. A 49% improvement in the AGL-to-peak heating ratio is predicted by using the Sumanaweera spiral element pattern with randomization. PMID:21859578

  1. Tools and techniques for estimating high intensity RF effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, R.; Pennock, S.; Poggio, A.; Ray, S.

    1991-07-01

    With the ever-increasing dependence of modern aircraft on sophisticated avionics and electronic controls, the need to assure aircraft survivatality when exposed to high Intensity RF (HIRF) signals has become of great Interest. Advisory regulation is currently being proposed which would require testing and/or analysis to assure RF hardness of installed flight critical and flight essential equipment. While full-aircraft, full-threat testing may be the most thorough manner to assure survivability, it is not generally practical in loins of cost. Various combinations of limited full-aircraft testing, box-level testing, modeling, and analysis are also being considered as methods to achieve compliance. Modeling, analysis, and low power measurements may hold the key to making full-system survivability estimates at reasonable cost. In this paper we will describe some of the tools and techniques we use for estimating and measuring coupling and component disturbance. A finite difference time domain modeling code, TSAR, used to predict coupling will be described. This code has the capability to quickly generate a mesh model to represent the test object. Some recent applications as well as the advantages and limitations of using such a code will be described. We will also describe some of the facilities and techniques we have developed for making low power coupling measurements and for making direct injection test measurements of device disturbance. Some scaling laws for coupling and device effects will be presented. A method to extrapolate these low-power test results to high-power full-system effects will be presented.

  2. Production of high intensity Beta beams at the ISOLDE facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodák, Rastislav; Stora, Thierry; Mendonça, Tania M.

    2011-12-01

    We discuss a design study devoted to a construction of the Beta beams facility at CERN, a next generation European facility aiming for a production of pure and collimated ultra-relativistic beam of electron (anti)neutrinos with help of accelerated β-decaying radioactive ions circulating in a storage decay ring. This high intense source of (anti)neutrinos directed towards a remote underground neutrino detector will allow to measure neutrino oscillations with high accuracy offering a unique chance for establishing a value of the β13 mixing angle and CP violating phase. Recently, a significant progress have been achieved on the conceptual design of high power targets required for a production and an extraction of two baseline isotopes, 6He and 18Ne, at the unexampled rate of several 1013 ions/s. There is a possibility to produce these isotopes using the so-called Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) method at the ISOLDE facility (CERN). The 6He production is realized by taking advantage of the 9Be(n,α)6He reaction and with help of spallation neutrons and porous BeO target material. The production of 18Ne through the 19F(p,2n)18Ne reaction at required intensities is even more challenging. Currently, a molten salt (NaF) loop target is proposed for a production of high rate of 18Ne required for the Beta beams project. The progress on the design study associated with new data and plans for future is briefly presented.

  3. NASA's New High Intensity Solar Environment Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    Across the world, new spaceflight missions are being designed and executed that will place spacecraft and instruments into challenging environments throughout the solar system. To aid in the successful completion of these new missions, NASA has developed a new flexible space environment test platform. The High Intensity Solar Environment Test (HISET) capability located at NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center provides scientists and engineers with the means to test spacecraft materials and systems in a wide range of solar wind and solar photon environments. Featuring a solar simulator capable of delivering approximately 1 MW/m2 of broad spectrum radiation at maximum power, HISET provides a means to test systems or components that could explore the solar corona. The solar simulator consists of three high-power Xenon arc lamps that can be operated independently over a range of power to meet test requirements; i.e., the lamp power can be greatly reduced to simulate the solar intensity at several AU. Integral to the HISET capability are charged particle sources that can provide a solar wind (electron and proton) environment. Used individually or in combination, the charged particle sources can provide fluxes ranging from a few nA/cm2 to 100s of nA/cm2 over an energy range of 50 eV to 100 keV for electrons and 100 eV to 30 keV for protons. Anchored by a high vacuum facility equipped with a liquid nitrogen cold shroud for radiative cooling scenarios, HISET is able to accommodate samples as large as 1 meter in diameter. In this poster, details of the HISET capability will be presented, including the wide ]ranging configurability of the system.

  4. The dynamic performance of magnetic-sensitive elastomers under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Dingxin; Sun, Lingyu; Gordaninejad, Faramarz; Bayat, Alireza; Lin, Yi

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the impact response of magnetic-sensitive elastomer (MSE) under combined mechanical and magnetic loads. Two types of MSE specimens with iron particles (spheres) embedded uniformly or in chain-like arrangement in a rubber matrix are prepared by our group. Their dynamic behaviors are studied by a drop hammer-based experimental set-up with magnetic field generator. A numerical simulation method based on magneto-structural coupling is also provided. Both the experimental measurement and the numerical simulation demonstrate that the peak acceleration increases, and oscillation period and the total mitigation time decreases with increasing magnetic field intensity, for any type of MSE. Also, the chain-like structure enhances the trend above further. The failure mode for both types is matrix crushing, which occur at the positions between adjacent spheres within a chain where the impact and magnetic forces are superimposed.

  5. Identification of bearing supports' force coefficients from rotor responses due to imbalances and impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santiago Duran, Oscar Cesar

    Experimental identification of fluid film bearing parameters is vital to validate predictions from often restrictive computational fluid film bearing models and is also promising for condition monitoring and troubleshooting. This dissertation presents the analytical bases of two procedures for bearing supports parameter identification with potential for in-situ implementation. Bearing support coefficients are derived from measurements of rotor responses to impact loads and due to calibrated imbalances in characteristic planes. Subsequent implementation of the procedures to measurements performed in a rigid massive rotor traversing two critical speeds provides force coefficients for a novel bearing support comprising a tilting pad bearing (TPJB ) in series with an integral squeeze film damper (SFD). At a constant rotor speed, the first method requires impacts loads exerted along two lateral planes for identification of frequency-dependent force coefficients. Simulation numerical examples show the method is reliable with a reduced sensitivity to noise as the number of impacts increases (frequency averaging). In the experiments, an ad-hoc fixture delivers impacts to the rotor middle disk at speeds of 2,000 and 4,000 rpm. The experimentally identified force coefficients are in close agreement with predicted coefficients for the series support TPJB-SFD. In particular, damping coefficients are best identified around the system first natural frequency. Bearing stiffness are correctly identified in the low frequency range, but show a marked reduction at higher frequencies apparently due to inertial effects not accounted for in the model. Measurements of rotor response to calibrated imbalances allow identification of speed-dependent force coefficients. The procedure requires a minimum of two different imbalance distributions for identification of force coefficients from the two bearing supports. The rotor responses show minimal cross-coupling effects, as also predicted by

  6. Estimates of Minor Ocean Tide Loading Displacement and Its Impact on Continuous GPS Coordinate Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Jiang, Weiping; Ding, Wenwu; Deng, Liansheng; Peng, Lifeng

    2014-01-01

    The site displacement due to ocean tidal loading is regarded as one of the largest uncertainties in precise geodetic positioning measurements, among which the effect of minor ocean tides (MOT), except for the 11 main tidal constituents, are sometimes neglected in routine precise global positioning system (GPS) data processing. We find that MOT can cause large vertical loading displacements with peak-to-peak variations reaching more than 8 mm at coastal/island stations. The impact of MOT on the 24-hour GPS solution is slightly larger than the magnitude of MOT loading itself, with peak-to-peak displacement variation at about 10 mm for the horizontal and 30 mm for the vertical components. We also find that the vertical velocity of all the selected stations in the Southwest Pacific was reduced by more than 10% after considering the MOT effect, while stations with weighted root mean square reduced data account for 62%, 59%, and 36% for the up, east, and north components respectively, in particular for most coastal/island stations. Furthermore, MOT correction could significantly reduce the annual signal of the global stacked east component, the near fortnightly and the long-term periodic signals in the up component. The power of some anomalous harmonics of 1.04 cycle per year is also decreased to some extent. These results further proved the benefits of MOT correction in precise GPS data processing. PMID:24658620

  7. SRM attrition rate study of the aft motor case segments due to water impact cavity collapse loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, C. D.

    1976-01-01

    The attrition assessment of the aft segments of Solid Rocket Motor due to water impact requires the establishment of a correlation between loading occurrences and structural capability. Each discrete load case, as identified by the water impact velocities and angle, varies longitudinally and radially in magnitude and distribution of the external pressure. The distributions are further required to be shifted forward or aft one-fourth the vehicle diameter to assure minimization of the effect of test instrumentation location for the load determinations. The asymmetrical load distributions result in large geometric nonlinearities in structural response. The critical structural response is progressive buckling of the case. Discrete stiffeners have been added to these aft segments to aid in gaining maximum structural capability for minimum weight addition for resisting these loads. This report presents the development of the attrition assessment of the aft segments and includes the rationale for eliminating all assessable conservatisms from this assessment.

  8. The Aerodynamic and Dynamic Loading of a Slender Structure by an Impacting Tornado-Like Vortex: The Influence of Relative Vortex-to-Structure Size on Structural Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, Matthew N.

    Structural loading produced by an impacting vortex is a hazardous phenomenon that is encountered in numerous applications ranging from the destruction of residences by tornados to the chopping of tip vortices by rotors. Adequate design of structures to resist vortex-induced structural loading necessitates study of the phenomenon that control the structural loading produced by an impacting vortex. This body of work extends the current knowledge base of vortex-structure interaction by evaluating the influence of the relative vortex-to-structure size on the structural loading that the vortex produces. A computer model is utilized to directly simulate the two-dimensional impact of an impinging vortex with a slender, cylindrical structure. The vortex's tangential velocity profile (TVP) is defined by a normalization of the Vatistas analytical (TVP) which realistically replicates the documented spectrum of measured vortex TVPs. The impinging vortex's maximum tangential velocity is fixed, and the vortex's critical radius is incremented from one to one-hundred times the structure's diameter. When the impinging vortex is small, it interacts with vortices produced on the structure by the free stream, and maximum force coefficient amplitudes vary by more than 400% when the impinging vortex impacts the structure at different times. Maximum drag and lift force coefficient amplitudes reach asymptotic values as the impinging vortex's size increases that are respectively 94.77% and 10.66% less than maximum force coefficients produced by an equivalent maximum velocity free stream. The vortex produces maximum structural loading when its path is shifted above the structure's centerline, and maximum drag and lift force coefficients are respectively up to 4.80% and 34.07% greater than maximum force coefficients produced by an equivalent-velocity free stream. Finally, the dynamic load factor (DLF) concept is used to develop a generalized methodology to assess the dynamic amplification of

  9. Delamination growth analysis in quasi-isotropic laminates under loads simulating low-velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Elber, W.

    1984-01-01

    A geometrically nonlinear finite-element analysis was developed to calculate the strain energy released by delamination plates during impact loading. Only the first mode of deformation, which is equivalent to static deflection, was treated. Both the impact loading and delamination in the plate were assumed to be axisymmetric. The strain energy release rate in peeling, G sub I, and shear sliding, G sub II, modes were calculated using the fracture mechanics crack closure technique. Energy release rates for various delamination sizes and locations and for various plate configurations and materials were compared. The analysis indicated that shear sliding (G sub II) was the primary mode of delamination growth. The analysis also indicated that the midplane (maximum transverse shear stress plane) delamination was more critical and would grow before any other delamination of the same size near the midplane region. The delamination growth rate was higher (neutrally stable) for a low toughness (brittle) matrix and slower (stable) for high toughness matrix. The energy release rate in the peeling mode, G sub I, for a near-surface delamination can be as high as 0.5G sub II and can contribute significantly to the delamination growth.

  10. Cognitive Load Differentially Impacts Response Control in Girls and Boys with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Karen E; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Rosch, Keri S

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) consistently show impaired response control, including deficits in response inhibition and increased intrasubject variability (ISV) compared to typically-developing (TD) children. However, significantly less research has examined factors that may influence response control in individuals with ADHD, such as task or participant characteristics. The current study extends the literature by examining the impact of increasing cognitive demands on response control in a large sample of 81children with ADHD (40 girls) and 100 TD children (47 girls), ages 8-12 years. Participants completed a simple Go/No-Go (GNG) task with minimal cognitive demands, and a complex GNG task with increased cognitive load. Results showed that increasing cognitive load differentially impacted response control (commission error rate and tau, an ex-Gaussian measure of ISV) for girls, but not boys, with ADHD compared to same-sex TD children. Specifically, a sexually dimorphic pattern emerged such that boys with ADHD demonstrated higher commission error rate and tau on both the simple and complex GNG tasks as compared to TD boys, whereas girls with ADHD did not differ from TD girls on the simple GNG task, but showed higher commission error rate and tau on the complex GNG task. These findings suggest that task complexity influences response control in children with ADHD in a sexually dimorphic manner. The findings have substantive implications for the pathophysiology of ADHD in boys versus girls with ADHD. PMID:25624066

  11. Impacts of the climate change on runoff and diffuse phosphorus load to Lake Balaton (Hungary).

    PubMed

    Kovács, A; Clement, A

    2009-01-01

    The paper outlines a multi-component assessment of the impacts of the climate change on runoff and total phosphorus loads to the large shallow Lake Balaton in Hungary. Present hydrological cycle of the lake catchment has been examined using the rainfall-runoff model WetSpa. Particular phosphorus concentration in runoff was estimated on the basis of the simulated streamflow using an empirical power equation. Dissolved phosphorus concentrations were determined as a function of landuse and soil type of the corresponding sub-catchment. The model was calibrated and validated against daily observations manually at monitoring sites of sixteen inflowing streams around the lake. Runoff stemming from shoreline urban developments was calculated by the urban runoff simulation model SWMM. Phosphorus concentrations in urban runoff were calculated by an empirical relationship derived from field measurements. The model was henceforward run for climate change scenario analysis. Present weather data were modified by the climate change scenarios imported from the results of the CLIME project. The results indicate that the impact of the climate change on runoff and phosphorus load appears in the change of the distribution within a time period rather than in the total volume. However, due to the high uncertainties in climate models, the presented calculations are possible assumptions rather than established statements. PMID:19213995

  12. Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S

    1997-06-01

    Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated

  13. High-intensity physical training in adults with asthma. A 10-week rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Emtner, M; Herala, M; Stålenheim, G

    1996-02-01

    Twenty-six adults (23 to 58 years) with mild to moderate asthma underwent a 10-week supervised rehabilitation program, with emphasis on physical training. In the first 2 weeks, they exercised daily in an indoor swimming pool (33 degrees C) and received education about asthma, medication, and principles of physical training. In the following 8 weeks, they exercised in the pool twice a week. Every training session lasted 45 min. The training sessions were made as suitable as possible for the individual subjects, in order to minimize "drop outs" from the program. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the rehabilitation program and to determine if inactive asthmatic adults can exercise at high intensity. The rehabilitation program was preceded by a 6-min submaximal cycle ergometry test, a 12-min walking test, spirometry, and a methacholine provocation test. The subjects also responded to a five-item questionnaire related to anxiety about exercise, breathlessness, and asthma symptoms using a visual analogue scale. All subjects were able to perform physical training at a very high intensity, to 80 to 90% of their predicted maximal heart rate. No asthmatic attacks occurred in connection with the training sessions. Twenty-two of the 26 subjects completed the rehabilitation program, felt confident with physical training, and planned to continue regular physical training after the 10-week program. Improvements in cardiovascular conditioning, measured as a decreased heart rate at the same load on the cycle ergometer (average of 12 beats/min), and as a longer distance at the 12-min walking test (average of 111 m), were observed during the program. FEV1 increased significantly from 2.2 to 2.5 L. Forced expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity also increased slightly but significantly. Methacholine provocation dose causing a fall in FEV1 by 20% was unchanged. Seventeen subjects had a peak expiratory flow reduction of more than 15% after the preprogram ergometry

  14. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  15. Comparing simulated wildfire effects to jam distribution and habitat quality in an intermediate-sized stream 10 years after a high intensity fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, S. L.; Eaton, B. C.

    2013-12-01

    Large wood governs channel morphology and determines the quality and distribution of aquatic habitat in many forested river networks. This is particularly true in streams that contain both key pieces large enough to form morphologically effective jams, as well as smaller mobile wood. In these streams, jams create spawning habitat by retaining sediment, increase rearing and over-wintering habitat by forming pools, and force avulsions which create side channels. To explore the effects of wildfire-induced increases in wood loading on channel morphology and aquatic habitat we have applied the stochastic reach-scale channel simulator (RSCS) to a case study of Fishtrap Creek, an intermediate-sized stream in the interior of British Columbia which experienced a high intensity fire in 2003. As predicted by model simulations, high quality spawning, rearing, and over-wintering habitats, as well as multi-thread channels, are found exclusively in association with wood, while plane-bed morphologies dominate where wood is absent. However, valley confinement and glacial legacy exert an important control on the magnitude of the impacts of the fire-derived wood; where the stream is confined, wood is suspended and morphologically ineffective, while un-confined segments contain high effective wood loads, multi-thread channels, and abundant aquatic habitat. These findings suggest that the morphologic effects of wood are highly dependent on valley geometry, which is in turn dictated by glacial legacy throughout much of North America, and that the impacts of valley confinement on the effectiveness of introduced wood must be considered in future model iterations. Plane bed morphology typical of reaches without large wood present Complex forced pool-riffle morphology typical of reaches with high wood loading

  16. Endothelial function does not improve with high-intensity continuous exercise training in SHR: implications of eNOS uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Battault, Sylvain; Singh, François; Gayrard, Sandrine; Zoll, Joffrey; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Grégory

    2016-02-01

    Exercise training is a well-recognized way to improve vascular endothelial function by increasing nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, in hypertensive subjects, unlike low- and moderate-intensity exercise training, the beneficial effects of continuous high-intensity exercise on endothelial function are not clear, and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of high-intensity exercise on vascular function, especially on the NO pathway, in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR). These effects were studied on WKY, sedentary SHR and SHR that exercised at moderate (SHR-MOD) and high intensity (SHR-HI) on a treadmill (1 h per day; 5 days per week for 6 weeks at 55% and 80% of their maximal aerobic velocity, respectively). Endothelial function and specific NO contributions to acetylcholine-mediated relaxation were evaluated by measuring the aortic ring isometric forces. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and phosphorylation (ser1177) were evaluated by western blotting. The total aortic and eNOS-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed using electron paramagnetic resonance in aortic tissue. Although the aortas of SHR-HI had increased eNOS levels without alteration of eNOS phosphorylation, high-intensity exercise had no beneficial effect on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, unlike moderate exercise. This result was associated with increased eNOS-dependent ROS production in the aortas of SHR-HI. Notably, the use of the recoupling agent BH4 or a thiol-reducing agent blunted eNOS-dependent ROS production in the aortas of SHR-HI. In conclusion, the lack of a positive effect of high-intensity exercise on endothelial function in SHR was mainly explained by redox-dependent eNOS uncoupling, resulting in a switch from NO to O2(-) generation. PMID:26537830

  17. High Intensity Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis: Effects on Muscle Contractile Characteristics and Exercise Capacity, a Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, Frank; Grevendonk, Lotte; Verboven, Kenneth; Hansen, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-to-moderate intensity exercise improves muscle contractile properties and endurance capacity in multiple sclerosis (MS). The impact of high intensity exercise remains unknown. Methods Thirty-four MS patients were randomized into a sedentary control group (SED, n = 11) and 2 exercise groups that performed 12 weeks of a high intensity interval (HITR, n = 12) or high intensity continuous cardiovascular training (HCTR, n = 11), both in combination with resistance training. M.vastus lateralis fiber cross sectional area (CSA) and proportion, knee-flexor/extensor strength, body composition, maximal endurance capacity and self-reported physical activity levels were assessed before and after 12 weeks. Results Compared to SED, 12 weeks of high intensity exercise increased mean fiber CSA (HITR: +21±7%, HCTR: +23±5%). Furthermore, fiber type I CSA increased in HCTR (+29±6%), whereas type II (+23±7%) and IIa (+23±6%,) CSA increased in HITR. Muscle strength improved in HITR and HCTR (between +13±7% and +45±20%) and body fat percentage tended to decrease (HITR: -3.9±2.0% and HCTR: -2.5±1.2%). Furthermore, endurance capacity (Wmax +21±4%, time to exhaustion +24±5%, VO2max +17±5%) and lean tissue mass (+1.4±0.5%) only increased in HITR. Finally self-reported physical activity levels increased 73±19% and 86±27% in HCTR and HITR, respectively. Conclusion High intensity cardiovascular exercise combined with resistance training was safe, well tolerated and improved muscle contractile characteristics and endurance capacity in MS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01845896 PMID:26418222

  18. Observation and Simulation of Motion and Deformation for Impact-Loaded Metal Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, R. J.; Wise, J. L.; Smith, J. A.; Mersch, J. P.; Robino, C. V.; Arguello, J. G.

    2015-06-01

    Complementary gas-gun experiments and computational simulations have examined the time-resolved motion and post-mortem deformation of cylindrical metal samples subjected to impact loading. The effect of propagation distance on a compressive waveform generated in a sample by planar impact at one end was determined using a velocity interferometer to track the longitudinal motion of the opposing rear (i.e., free) surface. Samples (24 or 25.4-mm diameter) were fabricated from aluminum (types 6061 and 7075), copper, stainless steel (type 316), and cobalt alloy L-605 (AMS 5759). For each material, waveforms obtained for a short (2 mm) and a long (25.4 mm) cylinder corresponded, respectively, to one-dimensional (i.e., uniaxial) and two-dimensional strain at the measurement point. The wave-profile data have been analyzed to (i) establish key dynamic material modeling parameters, (ii) assess the functionality of the Sierra Solid Mechanics-Presto (SierraSM/Presto) code, and (iii) identify the need for additional testing, material modeling, and/or code development. The results of subsequent simulations have been compared to benchmark recovery experiments that showed the residual plastic deformation incurred by cylinders following end, side, and corner impacts. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Do accelerometers mounted on the back provide a good estimate of impact loads in jumping and landing tasks?

    PubMed

    Simons, Chantal; Bradshaw, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Artistic gymnasts are frequently exposed to both low- and high-magnitude loads through impacts with the apparatus. These impact loads are thought to be associated with the high injury rates observed in gymnastics. Due to the variable apparatus and surfaces in gymnastics, impact loads during training are difficult to quantify. This study aimed to use triaxial accelerometers mounted on the back to assess impact loading during jumping and landing tasks. Twelve participants were fitted with an accelerometer on their upper and lower back, before performing a continuous hopping task, as well as drop landings and rebound jumps from various heights (37.5, 57.5, and 77.5 cm) onto a force platform. Peak resultant acceleration (PRA) was low-pass filtered with four cut-off frequencies (8, 15, 20, and 50 Hz). Filtering of PRA with the 20 Hz cut-off frequency showed the highest correlations between ground reaction force (GRF) and PRA. PRA recorded at the upper back, filtered with a 20 Hz cut-off frequency, appears to provide a good estimate of impact loading for continuous hopping and rebound jumps, but less so for drop landings since correlations between GRF and PRA were only significant when landing from 57.5 cm. PMID:26873303

  20. Metabolic and cardiac autonomic effects of high-intensity resistance training protocol in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    de Deus, Ana Paula; de Oliveira, Claudio Ricardo; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Baldissera, Vilmar; da Silva, Carlos Alberto; Rossi, Bruno Rafael Orsini; de Sousa, Hugo Celso Dutra; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of metabolic and autonomic nervous control on high-intensity resistance training (HRT) as determined by pancreatic glucose sensitivity (GS), insulin sensitivity (IS), blood lactate ([La]), and heart rate variability (HRV) in rats. Thirty male, albino Wistar rats (292 ± 20 g) were divided into 3 groups: sedentary control (SC), low-resistance training (LRT), and HRT. The animals in the HRT group were submitted to a high-resistance protocol with a progressively increasing load relative to body weight until exhaustion, whereas the LRT group performed the same exercise regimen with no load progression. The program was conducted 3 times per week for 8 weeks. The [La], parameters related to the functionality of pancreatic tissue, and HRV were measured. There was a significant increase in peak [La] only in the HRT group, but there was a reduction in [La] when corrected to the maximal load in both trained groups (LRT and HRT, p < 0.05). Both trained groups exhibited an increase in IS; however, compared with SC and LRT, HRT demonstrated a significantly higher GS posttraining (p < 0.05). With respect to HRV, the low-frequency (LF) band, in milliseconds squared, reduced in both trained groups, but the high-frequency band, in milliseconds squared and nu, increased, and the LF in nu, decreased only in the HRT group (p < 0.05). The HRT protocol produced significant and beneficial metabolic and cardiac autonomic adaptations. These results provide evidence for the positive benefits of HRT in counteracting metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:22067239

  1. Biomechanics of Human Thoracolumbar Spinal Column Trauma from Vertical Impact Loading

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W. J.; Stemper, Brian D.; Pintar, Frank A.; Maiman, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that dorsal spine injuries occur in motor vehicle crashes to restrained occupants. Compression/compression-flexion injuries occur in frontal crashes due to seat pan and vertical loading. While injuries, mechanisms and tolerances for neck injuries have been determined, thoraco-lumbar spine data are very limited. The objective of the study was to determine the biomechanical characteristics associated with such spinal injuries due to vertical loading. Upper thoracic (T2–T6), lower thoracic (T7–T11) and lumbar (T12-L5) columns from post mortem human surrogates were procured, fixed at the ends and dropped from three heights: the first two impacts designed as non-failure tests and the final was the failure test. Intermittent evaluations consisted of palpations and x-rays. Injuries were assessed using posttest x-rays and computed tomography scans. The age, stature, total body mass and body mass index of three PMHS were: 50 years, 164 cm, 66.9 kg, and 24.7 kg/m2. The mean peak forces from 24 tests for the upper and lower thoracic and lumbar spines for varying drop heights ranged from 1.6 to 4.3, 1.3 to 5.1, and 1.3 to 6.7 kN, respectively. All peak forces increased with increasing drop heights. Injuries to the three spines included unstable vertebral body and posterior element (bipedicular and lamina) compression fractures and posterior complex disruptions. Logistic regression analysis indicated that peak forces of 3.4 and 3.7 kN are associated with 50% probability of fracture. These results indicate the initial tolerance limits of dorsal spines under vertical loading. PMID:24406955

  2. Reverberation Chamber Uniformity Validation and Radiated Susceptibility Test Procedures for the NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Mielnik, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory has developed a capability based on the RTCA/DO-160F Section 20 guidelines for radiated electromagnetic susceptibility testing in reverberation chambers. Phase 1 of the test procedure utilizes mode-tuned stirrer techniques and E-field probe measurements to validate chamber uniformity, determines chamber loading effects, and defines a radiated susceptibility test process. The test procedure is segmented into numbered operations that are largely software controlled. This document is intended as a laboratory test reference and includes diagrams of test setups, equipment lists, as well as test results and analysis. Phase 2 of development is discussed.

  3. Impacts of Providing Inertial Response on Dynamic Loads of Wind Turbine Drivetrains: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Girsang, I. P.; Dhupia, J.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Muljadi, E.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-09-01

    There has been growing demand from the power industry for wind power plants to support power system operations. One such requirement is for wind turbines to provide ancillary services in the form of inertial response. When the grid frequency drops, it is essential for wind turbine generators (WTGs) to inject kinetic energy stored in their inertia into the grid to help arrest the frequency decline. However, the impacts of inertial response on the structural loads of the wind turbine have not been given much attention. To bridge this gap, this paper utilizes a holistic model for both fixed-speed and variable-speed WTGs by integrating the aeroelastic wind turbine model in FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, with the electromechanical drivetrain model in SimDriveline and SimPowerSystems.

  4. Vibration measurement through high speed vision system in a civil structure under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Belén; García, Juan I.; Roig, Ana B.; Mas, David

    2014-05-01

    The method presented in this work is a simple, cheap and non-contact method. It is based on image processing using a circular target. It has subpixel accuracy and it only needs a low cost high-speed camera and a tripod. In the work presented in this paper, a Casio Exilim camera was used to measure the vibration of a pedestrian bridge. An impact load was applied on the bridge through one person jumping in the middle of the bridge. Tracking of the circle border give the center trajectory and therefore the displacement and frequency of the movement. Some accelerometers were used as a contrast device for the frequency. The displacement obtained by our procedure was previously checked in laboratory using a micrometric bench. The results show that this method is suitable for measuring successfully the vibration of civil structures.

  5. Shock loading in biofilters: impact on biodegradation activity distribution and resilience capacity.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, L; Malhautier, L; Poly, F; Lepeuple, A S; Fanlo, J L

    2009-01-01

    A synthetic contaminated gas was generated, representative of gaseous emissions from sludge composting. It was composed of six volatile organic compounds (aldehyde, ketones, esters, sulphur compound) in an ammoniacal matrix. The gaseous stream was purified by biofiltration, in pilot scale biofilters filled with pine bark woodchips as organic carrier for biomass colonization. After reaching a constant high efficiency, with complete removal, the system was disturbed by transient loading shocks. The impact of perturbations was assessed by both performance evaluation (i.e. contaminant removal) and microbial behaviour. The microbial community was analysed in terms of density. The resilience of functional component following a perturbation was evaluated. This work highlighted the longitudinal distribution of both biodegradation activities and biomass density. PMID:19380995

  6. The impact of heater-recess and load matching in phase change memory mushroom cells.

    PubMed

    Cywar, Adam; Li, Jing; Lam, Chung; Silva, Helena

    2012-06-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations with rotational symmetry are used to analyze the impact of the bottom electrode recess on the reset operation of phase change memory elements with mushroom cell geometry (Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) film over a patterned TiN pillar). Temperature dependent materials parameters are used for GST and TiN, and the latent heat of fusion in melting of GST is included to model melting. The results of this study indicate that a lower reset current and a more favorable thermal profile may be achieved by extending the active region of GST down into the pillar, due to the heat confinement. It is shown that the current through cells with an insufficient load condition for maximum power transfer can be maintained at a level lower than that which is sufficient for reset operation for extended periods of time due to the non-linear nature of temperature dependent electrical conductivity of GST. These results suggest that if the load condition is not matched, excessive voltage levels or pulse durations would be necessary to achieve successful reset operation across cell arrays. PMID:22571918

  7. The impact of heater-recess and load matching in phase change memory mushroom cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cywar, Adam; Li, Jing; Lam, Chung; Silva, Helena

    2012-06-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations with rotational symmetry are used to analyze the impact of the bottom electrode recess on the reset operation of phase change memory elements with mushroom cell geometry (Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) film over a patterned TiN pillar). Temperature dependent materials parameters are used for GST and TiN, and the latent heat of fusion in melting of GST is included to model melting. The results of this study indicate that a lower reset current and a more favorable thermal profile may be achieved by extending the active region of GST down into the pillar, due to the heat confinement. It is shown that the current through cells with an insufficient load condition for maximum power transfer can be maintained at a level lower than that which is sufficient for reset operation for extended periods of time due to the non-linear nature of temperature dependent electrical conductivity of GST. These results suggest that if the load condition is not matched, excessive voltage levels or pulse durations would be necessary to achieve successful reset operation across cell arrays.

  8. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and

  9. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion. PMID:24264647

  10. Impact induced failure of cartilage-on-bone following creep loading: a microstructural and fracture mechanics study.

    PubMed

    Thambyah, Ashvin; Zhang, Geran; Kim, Woong; Broom, Neil D

    2012-10-01

    Cartilage-on-bone samples obtained from healthy bovine patellae, with or without prior static compression (i.e. creep) at 2MPa for 3h, were delivered a single impact via an instrumented pendulum indenter at a velocity of 1.13m/s and an energy of 2.2J. Mechanical data was obtained and microstructural assessment of the region of failure was carried out using differential interference contrast (DIC) optical imaging. In addition, a fibrillar-level structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was conducted on a control batch of non-impacted samples that were subjected to either creep or non-creep loading protocols. Arising from the impact event the deepest levels of crack penetration into the articular cartilage occurred in those samples subjected to prior creep loading. Further the crack depth was inversely proportional to the rebound velocity of the indenter. By contrast, those impacted samples not subjected to prior creep loading had only short obliquely patterned microcracks confined to the upper one-third of the full cartilage depth. Ultrastructurally the creep-loaded cartilage matrix exhibited a substantial radial collapse or compaction of the fibrillar network in its primary radial zone. The increase in crack length in the prior creep-loaded cartilage is consistent with a reduction in its dissipative properties as indicated by a reduction in rebound velocity. An interpretation is offered in terms of classical fracture mechanics theory. PMID:22784816

  11. Probabilistic analysis of local ice pressures. [Calculation of ice load and impact effects on offshore platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Jordaan, I.J.; Brown, P.W. ); Maes, M.A.; Hermans, I.P. . Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics)

    1993-02-01

    Extensive work in recent years has been carried out on the calculation of global ice loads on a probabilistic basis. An analysis method is presented for local ice pressures, which yields values of pressure for specific values of exceedance probability. In developing this method, particular attention has been paid to problems of exposure (length, position and number of impacts), as well as the area of exposure (area within area versus nominal contact area). The solution has been formulated for a series of discrete impacts, e.g., rams by a vessel, or a series of periods of continuous interactions. Data for the MV CANMAR Kigoriak and USCGC Polar Sea were ranked and curves were fitted through the tail of probability plots for three panel sizes. This allowed determination of exceedance probabilities of the design coefficients for pressure as a junction of area. The method developed was then applied to an example for a ship based on the data and expected number of rams per year. Formulas useful in the design of structures in ice are presented.

  12. Water-cooled, high-intensity ultrasound surgical applicators with frequency tracking.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roy W; Vaezy, Shahram; Proctor, Andrew; Myntti, Terrence; Lee, Janelle B J; Crum, Lawrence A

    2003-10-01

    High-intensity, focused ultrasound (HIFU) applicators have been developed for arresting bleeding with the ultimate intent of use in surgery. The design uses a tapered titanium component for transmission coupling of the ultrasound energy from a spherically curved transducer to biological tissues. The nominal operating frequency is 5.5 MHz, in a highly resonant mode (quality factor of 327 with water load). Liquid cooling is used to remove energy loss important at net applied power greater than 18 W/cm2 at the surface of the piezoelectric element. A downward resonance frequency shift (>20 kHz) occurs, even with cooling, as the applicator warms with normal operation. A feedback technique is used for maintaining the excitation near optimum resonance. Standing wave ratios of the applied power of 1.6 or less are thus sustained. The system and applicators have been found to be highly robust, effective in achieving hemostasis in the hemorrhaging liver, spleen, lung, or blood vessels in rabbit and pig experiments. One unit has been operated for over 1.7 hours in treating organ hemorrhage in blunt trauma experiments with nine swine with electrical net power of up to 158 W (31 W/cm2 across the transducer) and intensity of 2560 W/cm2 at focus. PMID:14609070

  13. Aspects of operation of the Fermilab Booster RF System at very high intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.E.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this note is to examine the likelihood and problems associated with operation of the Fermilab Booster rf systems as it presently exists, or with only minor modifications, at beam intensity approaching 5x10{sup 13} protons per pulse. Beam loading of the rf system at such an intensity will be one order of magnitude larger than at the present operation level. It is assumed that the injection energy will be raised to 1 GeV with no major increase in the injected energy spread (longitudinal emittance). The beam will be bunched by adiabatic capture as is presently done although it may be necessary to remove one or two bunches prior to acceleration to allow clean extraction at 8 GeV. At very high intensity the charge in each bunch will interact with the vacuum chamber impedance (and with itself) in such a way as to reduce in some cases the bucket area generated by the rf voltage. Because this decrement must be made up by changes in the rf ring voltage if the required bucket area is to be maintained, these effects must be taken into consideration in any analysis of the capability of the rf system to accelerate very large intensity.

  14. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    SciTech Connect

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various /sup 192/Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from /sup 192/Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  15. Reversible permeabilization using high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses: applications to biopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Vikram; Acker, Jason P; Elezzabi, Abdulhakem Y

    2005-12-30

    Non-invasive manipulation of live cells is important for cell-based therapeutics. Herein we report on the uniqueness of using high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses for reversibly permeabilizing mammalian cells for biopreservation applications. When mammalian cells were suspended in a impermeable hyperosmotic cryoprotectant sucrose solution, femtosecond laser pulses were used to transiently permeabilize cells for cytoplasmic solute uptake. The kinetics of cells exposed to 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 M sucrose, following permeabilization, were measured using video microscopy, and post-permeabilization survival was determined by a dual fluorescence membrane integrity assay. Using appropriate laser parameters, we observed the highest cell survival for 0.2 M sucrose solution (>90%), with a progressive decline in cell survival towards higher concentrations. Using diffusion equations describing the transport of solutes, the intracellular osmolarity at the inner surface of the membrane (x = 10 nm) and to a diffusive length of x = 10 microm was estimated, and a high loading efficiency (>98% for x = 10 nm and >70% for x = 10 microm) was calculated for cells suspended in 0.2 M sucrose. This is the first report of using femtosecond laser pulses for permeabilizing cells in the presence of cryoprotectants for biopreservation applications. PMID:16189821

  16. Personalized Metabolomics for Predicting Glucose Tolerance Changes in Sedentary Women After High-Intensity Interval Training

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnbaum, Naomi L.; Gillen, Jenna B.; Gibala, Martin J.; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) offers a practical approach for enhancing cardiorespiratory fitness, however its role in improving glucose regulation among sedentary yet normoglycemic women remains unclear. Herein, multi-segment injection capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry is used as a high-throughput platform in metabolomics to assess dynamic responses of overweight/obese women (BMI > 25, n = 11) to standardized oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) performed before and after a 6-week HIIT intervention. Various statistical methods were used to classify plasma metabolic signatures associated with post-prandial glucose and/or training status when using a repeated measures/cross-over study design. Branched-chain/aromatic amino acids and other intermediates of urea cycle and carnitine metabolism decreased over time in plasma after oral glucose loading. Adaptive exercise-induced changes to plasma thiol redox and orthinine status were measured for trained subjects while at rest in a fasting state. A multi-linear regression model was developed to predict changes in glucose tolerance based on a panel of plasma metabolites measured for naïve subjects in their untrained state. Since treatment outcomes to physical activity are variable between-subjects, prognostic markers offer a novel approach to screen for potential negative responders while designing lifestyle modifications that maximize the salutary benefits of exercise for diabetes prevention on an individual level. PMID:25164777

  17. Numerical simulations of the occupant head response in an infantry vehicle under blunt impact and blast loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Sevagan, Gopinath; Zhu, Feng; Jiang, Binhui; Yang, King H

    2013-07-01

    This article presents the results of a finite element simulation on the occupant head response in an infantry vehicle under two separated loading conditions: (1) blunt impact and (2) blast loading conditions. A Hybrid-III dummy body integrated with a previously validated human head model was used as the surrogate. The biomechanical response of the head was studied in terms of head acceleration due to the impact by a projectile on the vehicle and intracranial pressure caused by blast wave. A series of parametric studies were conducted on the numerical model to analyze the effect of some key parameters, such as seat configuration, impact velocity, and boundary conditions. The simulation results indicate that a properly designed seat and internal surface of the infantry vehicle can play a vital role in reducing the risk of head injury in the current scenarios. Comparison of the kinematic responses under the blunt impact and blast loading conditions reveals that under the current loading conditions, the acceleration pulse in the blast scenario has much higher peak values and frequency than blunt impact case, which may reflect different head response characteristics. PMID:23636759

  18. Analysis of spinal motion and loads during frontal impacts. Comparison between PMHS and ATD.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J; Lau, Anthony; Lamp, John; Riley, Patrick; Lessley, David J; Damon, Andrew; Kindig, Matthew; Kent, Richard; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Seacrist, Thomas; Maltese, Matthew R; Arbogast, Kristy B; Higuchi, Kazuo; Tanji, Hiro

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the kinematics of the human spine during a frontal impact is a challenge due to the multi-degree-of-freedom structure of the vertebral column. This papers reports on a series of six frontal impacts sled tests performed on three Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS). Each subject was exposed first to a low-speed, non-injurious frontal impact (9 km/h) and then to a high-speed one (40 km/h). Five additional tests were performed using the Hybrid III 50(th) percentile male ATD for comparison with the PMHS. A 3D motion capture system was used to record the 6-degree-of-freedom motion of body segments (head, T1, T8, L2, L4 and pelvis). The 3D trajectories of individual bony structures in the PMHS were determined using bone-mounted marker arrays, thus avoiding skin-attached markers and their potential measurements artifacts. The PMHS spines showed different behavior between low and high speed. While at low speed the head and upper spinal segments lagged the lower portion of the spine and pelvis in reaching their maximum forward displacement (time for maximum forward head excursion was 254.3±31.9 ms and 140.3±9 ms for the pelvis), these differences were minimal at high speed (127±2.6 ms for the head vs. 116.7±3.5 ms for the pelvis). The ATD did not exhibit this speed-dependant behavior. Furthermore, the ATD's forward displacements were consistently less than those exhibited by the PMHS, regardless of the speed. Neck loads at the atlanto-occipital joint were estimated for the PMHS using inverse dynamics techniques and compared to those measured in the ATD. It was found that the axial and shear forces and the flexion moment at the upper neck of the PMHS were higher than those measured in the ATD. PMID:21050592

  19. Analysis of spinal motion and loads during frontal impacts. Comparison between PMHS and ATD

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J.; Lau, Anthony; Lamp, John; Riley, Patrick; Lessley, David J.; Damon, Andrew; Kindig, Matthew; Kent, Richard; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Seacrist, Thomas; Maltese, Matthew R.; Arbogast, Kristy B.; Higuchi, Kazuo; Tanji, Hiro

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the kinematics of the human spine during a frontal impact is a challenge due to the multi-degree-of-freedom structure of the vertebral column. This papers reports on a series of six frontal impacts sled tests performed on three Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS). Each subject was exposed first to a low-speed, non-injurious frontal impact (9 km/h) and then to a high-speed one (40 km/h). Five additional tests were performed using the Hybrid III 50th percentile male ATD for comparison with the PMHS. A 3D motion capture system was used to record the 6-degree-of-freedom motion of body segments (head, T1, T8, L2, L4 and pelvis). The 3D trajectories of individual bony structures in the PMHS were determined using bone-mounted marker arrays, thus avoiding skin-attached markers and their potential measurements artifacts. The PMHS spines showed different behavior between low and high speed. While at low speed the head and upper spinal segments lagged the lower portion of the spine and pelvis in reaching their maximum forward displacement (time for maximum forward head excursion was 254.3±31.9 ms and 140.3±9 ms for the pelvis), these differences were minimal at high speed (127±2.6 ms for the head vs. 116.7±3.5 ms for the pelvis). The ATD did not exhibit this speed-dependant behavior. Furthermore, the ATD’s forward displacements were consistently less than those exhibited by the PMHS, regardless of the speed. Neck loads at the atlanto-occipital joint were estimated for the PMHS using inverse dynamics techniques and compared to those measured in the ATD. It was found that the axial and shear forces and the flexion moment at the upper neck of the PMHS were higher than those measured in the ATD. PMID:21050592

  20. Aeshnid dragonfly larvae as bioindicators of methylmercury contamination in aquatic systems impacted by elevated sulfate loading.

    PubMed

    Jeremiason, J D; Reiser, T K; Weitz, R A; Berndt, M E; Aiken, G R

    2016-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) levels in dragonfly larvae and water were measured over two years in aquatic systems impacted to varying degrees by sulfate releases related to iron mining activity. This study examined the impact of elevated sulfate loads on MeHg concentrations and tested the use of MeHg in dragonfly larvae as an indicator of MeHg levels in a range of aquatic systems including 16 river/stream sites and two lakes. MeHg concentrations in aeshnid dragonfly larvae were positively correlated (R(2) = 0.46, p < 0.01) to peak MeHg concentrations in the dissolved phase for the combined years of 2012 and 2013. This relation was strong in 2012 (R(2) = 0.85, p < 0.01), but showed no correlation in 2013 (R(2) = 0.02, p > 0.05). MeHg in dragonfly larvae were not elevated at the highest sulfate sites, but rather the reverse was generally observed. Record rainfall events in 2012 and above average rainfall in 2013 likely delivered the majority of Hg and MeHg to these systems via interflow and activated groundwater flow through reduced sediments. As a result, the impacts of elevated sulfate releases due to mining activities were not apparent in these systems where little of the sulfate is reduced. Lower bioaccumulation factors for MeHg in aeshnid dragonfly larvae were observed with increasing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. This finding is consistent with previous studies showing that MeHg in high DOC systems is less bioavailable; an equilibrium model shows that more MeHg being associated with DOC rather than algae at the base of the food chain readily explains the lower bioaccumulation factors. PMID:26738880

  1. The Seasonal Hydrological Loading Impacts on Post-Earth Measurements for the 2015 Nepal Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Rong; Wang, Qi; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Poutanen, Markku

    2016-04-01

    In southern Tibet and Himalaya, ongoing vertical and horizontal motions due to the collision between India and Eurasia are monitored by large numbers of global positioning system (GPS) continuous and campaign sites installed in the past decade. Displacements measured by GPS usually include tectonic deformation as well as non-tectonic, time-dependent signals. To estimate the regional long-term tectonic deformation using GPS more precisely, seasonal elastic deformation signals associated with surface loading must be removed from the observations. Seasonal oscillations in GPS site time series also can bias estimates of postseismic deformation, especially in the critical first months after an earthquake. We investigate tectonic and hydrologic deformation at GPS sites in southern Tibet and Himalaya, focusing on removing seasonal signals in GPS time series for a robust determination of tectonic deformation. The 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake occurred in late April. In the first half -year since this thrusting earthquake, postseimic displacements for sites in southern Tibet and Himalaya have mainly to the south, in the same direction as the coseismic displacement. Because this is in the same direction as the largest horizontal seasonal oscillation, and because the impact of an annual period oscillation on the estimated rate is greatest when the data span is half a cycle, the seasonal displacements can have a significant impact on the early postseismic displacements. This study represents a considerable complement to the previous works that were based exclusively on analyzing the Nepal continuous GPS network because new sites in southern Tibet, China are considered, and numerous time series of campaign sites are analyzed. In particular, we analyze how removing seasonal hydrologic signals from GPS site time series impacts estimates of the postseismic transient following the 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake.

  2. The Impact of Higher Waste Loading on Glass Properties: The Effects of Uranium and Thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.K.

    2003-12-02

    In this study, glasses are designed or selected to assess the impacts of U3O8 and ThO2 on various glass properties of interest. More specifically, glasses were fabricated in which Th replaced U (on a molar basis) to assess the impact of ThO2 on the durability response (as measured by the Product Consistency Test ) and viscosity. Based on the measured normalized boron release values, the results indicated that the Th-enriched glasses were less durable than their Ubased counterparts. Although molar substitution of Th or U had a negative impact, all of the glasses were more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass - the highest release being 7.39 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L as reported for EA. With respect to model predictions, THERMOTM predicts that a molar substitution of thorium for uranium should increase glass durability. However, these data suggest that the signs and/or magnitudes of the Gi values associated with U3O8 and ThO2 are inconsistent with the theory on which the current model is based for the limited number of glasses tested. It should be noted that these glasses cover a narrow compositional region. With respect to the impact on viscosity, the data suggest that there may be a bias in the model. That is, the model currently does not contain a U3O8 or ThO2 term - but perhaps it should to account for their contributions to the measured (or actual) viscosity results. In addition, a series of glasses were produced to assess the impact of higher waste loadings on select glass properties. The PCT results suggest that durable glasses can be made at relatively high WLs (exceeding 40 wt percent). Comparisons between the measured PCTs and their predictions indicate that the current model is applicable, with all of the quenched glasses falling within the 95 percent confidence bands. The viscosity data for the higher WL glasses suggest that the current model may be extremely accurate for some systems but for different regions the model may be biased high

  3. IMPACT OF SIPHONING ACTIVITY AND NATURALLY SUSPENDED PARTICLE LOAD ON MUSSEL KILL by PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Molloy

    2003-08-04

    Under this USDOE-NETL contract, the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens is being developed as a biocontrol agent for zebra mussels. The specific purpose of the contract is to identify biotic and abiotic factors that affect mussel kill. Ingestion of these bacteria by zebra mussels is required to achieve kill, and tests evaluating factors that relate to mussel feeding are contained in this report. Specifically the impact of the following two factors were investigated: (1) Mussel siphoning behavior--In nature, zebra mussels typically have their two shells spread apart and their inhalant siphon tube extended from between their shells for taking food particles into their mantle cavities (Fig. 1). Our tests indicated that there is a direct correlation between mussel siphoning activity and mussel mortality achieved by a bacterial treatment. Therefore, to encourage mussel feeding on bacteria, future pipe treatments within power plants should be carried out using procedures which minimize disturbance to mussel siphoning. 2. Naturally suspended particle loads--Since bacterial cells are lethal only if ingested by mussels, waters containing very high levels of naturally suspended particles might reduce the mortality that can be achieved by a bacterial treatment. If true, this inhibition might occur as a result of particle exclusion, i.e., there could be reduced ingestion of bacterial cells since they represent a reduced percentage of all particles ingested. Our tests indicated that a range of particle concentrations that might naturally exist in a turbid river did not inhibit mussel kill by the bacterial cells, but that an artificially high load of natural particles was capable of causing a reduction in kill. To be conservative, therefore, future pipe treatments should be timed to occur when intake waters have relatively low quantities of naturally suspended particulate matter.

  4. High-intensity interval exercise and cerebrovascular health: curiosity, cause, and consequence

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Brassard, Patrice; Bailey, Damian M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a uniquely effective and pluripotent medicine against several noncommunicable diseases of westernised lifestyles, including protection against neurodegenerative disorders. High-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is emerging as an effective alternative to current health-related exercise guidelines. Compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous exercise training, HIT confers equivalent if not indeed superior metabolic, cardiac, and systemic vascular adaptation. Consequently, HIT is being promoted as a more time-efficient and practical approach to optimize health thereby reducing the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity. However, no studies to date have examined the impact of HIT on the cerebrovasculature and corresponding implications for cognitive function. This review critiques the implications of HIT for cerebrovascular function, with a focus on the mechanisms and translational impact for patient health and well-being. It also introduces similarly novel interventions currently under investigation as alternative means of accelerating exercise-induced cerebrovascular adaptation. We highlight a need for studies of the mechanisms and thereby also the optimal dose-response strategies to guide exercise prescription, and for studies to explore alternative approaches to optimize exercise outcomes in brain-related health and disease prevention. From a clinical perspective, interventions that selectively target the aging brain have the potential to prevent stroke and associated neurovascular diseases. PMID:25833341

  5. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (<8 min) deafening spectacle that generates short-lived, thick aerosol clouds. In this study, the impact of such events on air quality has been evaluated by means of particle number concentration measurements performed close to the venue during the June festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 μm was higher (maximum ˜2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ˜2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  6. 21 CFR 1040.30 - High-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false High-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps. 1040...-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section apply to any high-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamp that is designed, intended, or promoted for illumination purposes...

  7. 21 CFR 1040.30 - High-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false High-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps. 1040...-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section apply to any high-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamp that is designed, intended, or promoted for illumination purposes...

  8. 21 CFR 1040.30 - High-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false High-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps. 1040...-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section apply to any high-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamp that is designed, intended, or promoted for illumination purposes...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  11. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  20. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  4. Effect of Short-Term, High-Intensity Exercise on Anaerobic Threshold in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.

    This study investigated the effects of a six-week, high-intensity cycling program on anaerobic threshold (AT) in ten women. Subjects trained four days a week using high-intensity interval-type cycle exercises. Workouts included six 4-minute intervals cycling at 85 percent maximal oxygen uptake (VO sub 2 max), separated by 3-minute intervals of…

  5. The Influence of Sorbent Properties and Reaction Conditions on Attrition of Limestone by Impact Loading in Fluidized Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Fabrizio; Salatino, Piero

    The extent of attrition associated with impact loading was studied for five different limestones pre-processed in fluidized bed under different reaction conditions. The experimental procedure was based on the measurement of the amount and the particle size distribution of the debris generated upon impact of sorbent samples against a target at velocities between 10 and 45 m/s. The effect of calcination, sulfation and calcination/re-carbonation on impact damage was assessed. Fragmentation by impact loading of the limestones was significant and increased with the impact velocity. Lime samples displayed the largest propensity to undergo impact damage, followed by sulfated, re-carbonated and raw limestones. Fragmentation of the sulfated samples followed a partem typical of the failure of brittle materials. On the other hand, the behavior of lime samples better conformed to a disintegration failure mode, with extensive generation of very fine fragments. Raw limestone and re-carbonated lime samples followed either of the two patterns depending on the sorbent nature. The extent of particle fragmentation increased after multiple impacts, but the incremental amount of fragments generated upon one impact decreased with the number of successive impacts.

  6. Nitrogen critical loads and management alternatives for N-impacted ecosystems in California.

    PubMed

    Fenn, M E; Allen, E B; Weiss, S B; Jovan, S; Geiser, L H; Tonnesen, G S; Johnson, R F; Rao, L E; Gimeno, B S; Yuan, F; Meixner, T; Bytnerowicz, A

    2010-12-01

    Empirical critical loads for N deposition effects and maps showing areas projected to be in exceedance of the critical load (CL) are given for seven major vegetation types in California. Thirty-five percent of the land area for these vegetation types (99,639 km(2)) is estimated to be in excess of the N CL. Low CL values (3-8 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) were determined for mixed conifer forests, chaparral and oak woodlands due to highly N-sensitive biota (lichens) and N-poor or low biomass vegetation in the case of coastal sage scrub (CSS), annual grassland, and desert scrub vegetation. At these N deposition critical loads the latter three ecosystem types are at risk of major vegetation type change because N enrichment favors invasion by exotic annual grasses. Fifty-four and forty-four percent of the area for CSS and grasslands are in exceedance of the CL for invasive grasses, while 53 and 41% of the chaparral and oak woodland areas are in exceedance of the CL for impacts on epiphytic lichen communities. Approximately 30% of the desert (based on invasive grasses and increased fire risk) and mixed conifer forest (based on lichen community changes) areas are in exceedance of the CL. These ecosystems are generally located further from emissions sources than many grasslands or CSS areas. By comparison, only 3-15% of the forested and chaparral land areas are estimated to be in exceedance of the NO(3)(-) leaching CL. The CL for incipient N saturation in mixed conifer forest catchments was 17 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). In 10% of the CL exceedance areas for all seven vegetation types combined, the CL is exceeded by at least 10 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), and in 27% of the exceedance areas the CL is exceeded by at least 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Management strategies for mitigating the effects of excess N are based on reducing N emissions and reducing site N capital through approaches such as biomass removal and prescribed fire or control of invasive grasses by mowing, selective herbicides, weeding or

  7. The impact of benthic fauna on fluvial bed load transport: Challenges of upscaling laboratory experiments to river and landscape scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S. P.

    2012-04-01

    The impact on sediment transport processes and channel morphology of several relatively large, iconic animals including beaver and salmon is increasingly well understood. However, many other aquatic fauna are important zoogeomorphic agents and ecosystem engineers. These somewhat overlooked "Cinderella" species include benthic aquatic insect larvae, freshwater crustaceans and many species of fish. Despite relatively modest individual effects, the ubiquity, abundance and cumulative impact of these organisms makes them a potentially significant agency, with as yet undiscovered and unquantified impacts on channel morphology and sediment fluxes. Their actions (digging, foraging, moving, burrowing), constructions and secretions modify bed sediment characteristics (grain size distribution, interlock, imbrication, protrusion), alter bed topography (thence hydraulic roughness) and contribute to biogenic restraints on grain movement. In turn, they can affect the distribution of surface particle entrainment thresholds and bed shear stresses, with implications for bed load transport. Flume experiments have measured some of these impacts and provided direct observations of the mechanisms involved, but many of the most interesting research questions pertain to the impact of these animals at reach, catchment and even landscape scales: Not least, what is the impact of small aquatic animals on bed load flux and yield? This presentation will consider some of the challenges involved in answering this question; that is, of scaling up experimental understanding of how aquatic animals affect bed load transport processes to river scales. Pertinent themes include: (1) the potential impacts of experimental arrangements on the behaviours and activities that affect hydraulic or geomorphological processes; (2) field coincidence of the spatial and temporal distributions of (a) the animals and their behaviours with (b) the physical conditions (substrates, flows) under which those animals are

  8. Effects of partial interlaminar bonding on impact resistance and loaded-hole behavior of graphite/epoxy quasi-isotropic laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illg, W.

    1986-01-01

    A partial-bonding interlaminar toughening concept was evaluated for resistance to impact and for behavior of a loaded hole. Perforated Mylar sheets were interleaved between all 24 plies of a graphite/epoxy quasi-isotropic lay-up. Specimens were impacted by aluminum spheres while under tensile or compressive loads. Impact-failure thresholds and residual strengths were obtained. Loaded-hole specimens were tested in three configurations that were critical in bearing, shear, or tension. Partial bonding reduced the tensile and compressive strengths of undamaged specimens by about one-third. For impact, partial bonding did not change the threshold for impact failure under tensile preload. However, under compressive preload, partial bonding caused serious degradation of impact resistance. Partial bonding reduced the maximum load-carrying capacity of all three types of loaded-hole specimens. Overall, partial bonding degraded both impact resistance and bearing strength of holes.

  9. Caffeine withdrawal and high-intensity endurance cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Christopher; Desbrow, Ben; Ellis, Aleisha; O'Keeffe, Brooke; Grant, Gary; Leveritt, Michael

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of a controlled 4-day caffeine withdrawal period on the effect of an acute caffeine dose on endurance exercise performance. Twelve well-trained and familiarized male cyclists, who were caffeine consumers (from coffee and a range of other sources), were recruited for the study. A double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design was employed, involving four experimental trials. Participants abstained from dietary caffeine sources for 4 days before the trials and ingested capsules (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) containing either placebo or caffeine (1.5 mg · kg(-1) body weight · day(-1)). On day 5, capsules containing placebo or caffeine (3 mg · kg(-1) body weight) were ingested 90 min before completing a time trial, equivalent to one hour of cycling at 75% peak sustainable power output. Hence the study was designed to incorporate placebo-placebo, placebo-caffeine, caffeine-placebo, and caffeine-caffeine conditions. Performance time was significantly improved after acute caffeine ingestion by 1:49 ± 1:41 min (3.0%, P = 0.021) following a withdrawal period (placebo-placebo vs. placebo-caffeine), and by 2:07 ± 1:28 min (3.6%, P = 0.002) following the non-withdrawal period (caffeine-placebo vs. caffeine-caffeine). No significant difference was detected between the two acute caffeine trials (placebo-caffeine vs. caffeine-caffeine). Average heart rate throughout exercise was significantly higher following acute caffeine administration compared with placebo. No differences were observed in ratings of perceived exertion between trials. A 3 mg · kg(-1) dose of caffeine significantly improves exercise performance irrespective of whether a 4-day withdrawal period is imposed on habitual caffeine users. PMID:21279864

  10. Quadriceps and Respiratory Muscle Fatigue Following High-Intensity Cycling in COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bachasson, Damien; Wuyam, Bernard; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Tamisier, Renaud; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Exercise intolerance in COPD seems to combine abnormal ventilatory mechanics, impaired O2 transport and skeletal muscle dysfunction. However their relatie contribution and their influence on symptoms reported by patients remain to be clarified. In order to clarify the complex interaction between ventilatory and neuromuscular exercise limiting factors and symptoms, we evaluated respiratory muscles and quadriceps contractile fatigue, dynamic hyperinflation and symptoms induced by exhaustive high-intensity cycling in COPD patients. Fifteen gold II-III COPD patients (age = 67±6 yr; BMI = 26.6±4.2 kg.m-2) performed constant-load cycling test at 80% of their peak workload until exhaustion (9.3±2.4 min). Before exercise and at exhaustion, potentiated twitch quadriceps strength (Qtw), transdiaphragmatic (Pdi,tw) and gastric (Pga,tw) pressures were evoked by femoral nerve, cervical and thoracic magnetic stimulation, respectively. Changes in operational lung volumes during exercise were assessed via repetitive inspiratory capacity (IC) measurements. Dyspnoea and leg discomfort were measured on visual analog scale. At exhaustion, Qtw (-33±15%, >15% reduction observed in all patients but two) and Pdi,tw (-20±15%, >15% reduction in 6 patients) were significantly reduced (P<0.05) but not Pga,tw (-6±10%, >15% reduction in 3 patients). Percentage reduction in Qtw correlated with the percentage reduction in Pdi,tw (r=0.66; P<0.05). Percentage reductions in Pdi,tw and Pga,tw negatively correlated with the reduction in IC at exhaustion (r=-0.56 and r=-0.62, respectively; P<0.05). Neither dyspnea nor leg discomfort correlated with the amount of muscle fatigue. In conclusion, high-intensity exercise induces quadriceps, diaphragm and less frequently abdominal contractile fatigue in this group of COPD patients. In addition, the rise in end-expiratory lung volume and diaphragm flattening associated with dynamic hyperinflation in COPD might limit the development of abdominal and

  11. Quadriceps and respiratory muscle fatigue following high-intensity cycling in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Bachasson, Damien; Wuyam, Bernard; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Tamisier, Renaud; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Exercise intolerance in COPD seems to combine abnormal ventilatory mechanics, impaired O2 transport and skeletal muscle dysfunction. However their relative contribution and their influence on symptoms reported by patients remain to be clarified. In order to clarify the complex interaction between ventilatory and neuromuscular exercise limiting factors and symptoms, we evaluated respiratory muscles and quadriceps contractile fatigue, dynamic hyperinflation and symptoms induced by exhaustive high-intensity cycling in COPD patients. Fifteen gold II-III COPD patients (age = 67 ± 6 yr; BMI = 26.6 ± 4.2 kg.m(-2)) performed constant-load cycling test at 80% of their peak workload until exhaustion (9.3 ± 2.4 min). Before exercise and at exhaustion, potentiated twitch quadriceps strength (Q(tw)), transdiaphragmatic (P(di,tw)) and gastric (P(ga,tw)) pressures were evoked by femoral nerve, cervical and thoracic magnetic stimulation, respectively. Changes in operational lung volumes during exercise were assessed via repetitive inspiratory capacity (IC) measurements. Dyspnoea and leg discomfort were measured on visual analog scale. At exhaustion, Q(tw) (-33 ± 15%, >15% reduction observed in all patients but two) and Pdi,tw (-20 ± 15%, >15% reduction in 6 patients) were significantly reduced (P<0.05) but not Pga,tw (-6 ± 10%, >15% reduction in 3 patients). Percentage reduction in Q(tw) correlated with the percentage reduction in P(di,tw) (r = 0.66; P<0.05). Percentage reductions in P(di,tw) and P(ga,tw) negatively correlated with the reduction in IC at exhaustion (r = -0.56 and r = -0.62, respectively; P<0.05). Neither dyspnea nor leg discomfort correlated with the amount of muscle fatigue. In conclusion, high-intensity exercise induces quadriceps, diaphragm and less frequently abdominal contractile fatigue in this group of COPD patients. In addition, the rise in end-expiratory lung volume and diaphragm flattening associated with dynamic hyperinflation in COPD might limit

  12. The effect of a high-intensity interval training program on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in young men.

    PubMed

    Musa, Danladi I; Adeniran, Samuel A; Dikko, A U; Sayers, Stephen P

    2009-03-01

    This study examined the impact of an 8-week program of high-intensity interval training on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), and the atherogenic index (TC/HDL-C) in 36 untrained men ages 21-36 years. Participants were randomly assigned to an interval training group (n = 20) or a control group (n = 16). Participants in the experimental group performed 3.2 km of interval running (1:1 work:rest ratio) 3 times a week for 8 weeks at an intensity of 90% of maximal heart rate ( approximately 423 kcal per session). Results indicated significant pre- to posttraining changes in HDL-C (1.1 vs. 1.3 mmolxL, p < 0.0001) and TC/HDL-C (3.8 vs. 3.1, p < 0.0001) but no significant changes in TC (3.9 vs. 3.8 mmolxL, p > 0.05) with interval training. It was concluded that an 8-week program of high-intensity interval training is effective in eliciting favorable changes in HDL-C and TC/HDL-C but not TC in young adult men with normal TC levels. Our findings support the recommendations of high-intensity interval training as an alternative mode of exercise to improve blood lipid profiles for individuals with acceptable physical fitness levels. PMID:19209073

  13. Composite components under impact load and effects of defects on the loading capacity. [Alpha Jet tail assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoki, R.; Wurzel, D.

    1979-01-01

    Investigations were carried out on a horizontal tail assembly made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic for the Alpha Jet. The possibility of obtaining a leading edge nose design lighter but not more expensive than a metal version was studied. An important consideration was sufficient resistance of the leading edge against impact of stones and hailstones combined with high degree of stiffness. The improvement of energy reception characteristics of the materials through suitable laminate design was considered. Since certain defects occur in structural components, the effects of such defects on the characteristics of the parts were also studied.

  14. Impacts of Varying Penetration of Distributed Resources with & without Volt/Var Control: Case Study of Varying Load Types

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom; Li, Huijuan; Li, Fangxing; Xu, Yan; Adhikari, Sarina; Irminger, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a follow-up to an earlier one on impacts of distributed energy resources (DR) on distribution feeders. As DR penetration level on the feeder increases, there can be impacts to distribution system/feeder capacity, line losses, and voltage regulation. These can vary as the penetration level reaches the capacity of the distribution feeder/system or loading. The question is how high of a DR level can be accommodated without any major changes to system operation, system design and protection. Our objective for this work was to address the question of how the DR impacts vary in regards to both DR voltage regulation capability and load mix. A dynamic analysis was used to focus on the impacts of DR with and without volt/var control with different load composition on the distribution feeder. The study considered an example 10MVA distribution feeder in which two inverter-based DRs were used to provide voltage regulation. The results due to DR without voltage regulation capability are compared with DR capable of providing local (at its bus) voltage regulation. The analysis was repeated for four different feeder load compositions consisting of (1) constant power, (2) constant impedance, (3) constant current and (4) ZIP (equal combination of previous three).

  15. Constitutive modeling of rate-dependent stress-strain behavior of human liver in blunt impact loading.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Jessica L; Dupaix, Rebecca B

    2008-11-01

    An understanding of the mechanical deformation behavior of the liver under high strain rate loading conditions could aid in the development of vehicle safety measures to reduce the occurrence of blunt liver injury. The purpose of this study was to develop a constitutive model of the stress-strain behavior of the human liver in blunt impact loading. Experimental stress and strain data was obtained from impact tests of 12 unembalmed human livers using a drop tower technique. A constitutive model previously developed for finite strain behavior of amorphous polymers was adapted to model the observed liver behavior. The elements of the model include a nonlinear spring in parallel with a linear spring and nonlinear dashpot. The model captures three features of liver stress-strain behavior in impact loading: (1) relatively stiff initial modulus, (2) rate-dependent yield or rollover to viscous "flow" behavior, and (3) strain hardening at large strains. Six material properties were used to define the constitutive model. This study represents a novel application of polymer mechanics concepts to understand the rate-dependent large strain behavior of human liver tissue under high strain rate loading. Applications of this research include finite element simulations of injury-producing liver or abdominal impact events. PMID:18751900

  16. Calculation of reinforced-concrete frame strength under a simultaneous static cross section load and a column lateral impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Nikolay; Yugov, Nikolay; Kopanitsa, Dmitry; Kopanitsa, Georgy; Yugov, Alexey; Kaparulin, Sergey; Plyaskin, Andrey; Kalichkina, Anna; Ustinov, Artyom

    2016-01-01

    When designing buildings with reinforced concrete that are planned to resist dynamic loads it is necessary to calculate this structural behavior under operational static and emergency impact and blast loads. Calculations of the structures under shock-wave loads can be performed by solving dynamic equations that do not consider static loads. Due to this fact the calculation of reinforced concrete frame under a simultaneous static and dynamic load in full 3d settings becomes a very non trivial and resource consuming problem. This problem can be split into two tasks. The first one is a shock-wave problem that can be solved using software package RANET-3, which allows solving the problem using finite elements method adapted for dynamic task. This method calculates strain-stress state of the material and its dynamic destruction, which is considered as growth and consolidation of micro defects under loading. On the second step the results of the first step are taken as input parameters for quasi static calculation of simultaneous static and dynamic load using finite elements method in AMP Civil Engineering-11.

  17. The different effects of high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training for weightlessness countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Jie; Cheng, Tan; Zhi-Li, Li; Hui-juan, Wang; Wen-juan, Chen; Jianfeng, Zhang; Desheng, Wang; Dongbin, Niu; Qi, Zhao; Chengjia, Yang; Yanqing, Wang

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been demonstrated to improve performance in a relatively short training period. But the difference between high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training (MIIT) in simulated weightlessness still has not been well studied. This study sought to characterize the difference between 6 weeks high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training under reduced weight (RW) gait training device and zero-gravity locomotion system (ZLS). Twenty-three subjects (14M/4F, 32.5±4.5 years) volunteered to participate. They were divided into three groups, that were MITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 60% VO _{2} peak for 30min, five days per week) RW group (n=8), HITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 90% VO _{2} peak for 30min, three days per week) RW group (n=8) and HITT ZLS group (n=7). The Z-axis load used in RW group was 80% body weight (BW) and in ZLS was 100% BW. Cardiopulmonary function was measured before, after 4-week training and after 6-week training. Isokinetic knee extension-flexion test at 60(°) deg/s and 180(°) deg/s were performed before and after the 6-week training, and isometric knee extension-flexion test at 180(°) deg/s was also examined at the same time. It was found that the VO _{2} peaks, metabolic equivalent (MET), Speedmax and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were significantly increased after 4 and 6-week training in all three groups and no significant group difference were detected. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion were significantly increased after 6 week-training in all three groups, and only in HITT RW group the total power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion enhanced. The total power and average power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension decreased significantly after 6-week training in all three groups. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension in MIIT RW group was

  18. Mechanical Properties of Lead-Free Solder Joints Under High-Speed Shear Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Luong; Kim, Ho-Kyung

    2014-09-01

    In this study we expanded on recently reported research by using a modified miniature Charpy impact-testing system to investigate the shear deformation behavior of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu lead-free solder joints at high strain rates ranging from 1.1 × 103 s-1 to 5.5 × 103 s-1. The experimental results revealed that the maximum shear strength of the solder joint decreased with increasing load speed in the ranges tested in this study. For solder joints tested at a shear speed exceeding 1 m/s, corresponding to an approximate strain rate that exceeds 1950 s-1, the brittle fracture mode is the main failure mode, whereas lower strain rates result in a ductile-to-brittle transition in the fracture surfaces of solder joints. In addition, the mode II stress intensity factor (K II) used to evaluate the fracture toughness (K C) of an interfacial intermetallic compound layer between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder and the toughness of copper substrate was found to decrease from 1.63 MPa m0.5 to 0.97 MPa m0.5 in the speed range tested here.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Lead-Free Solder Joints Under High-Speed Shear Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Luong; Kim, Ho-Kyung

    2014-11-01

    In this study we expanded on recently reported research by using a modified miniature Charpy impact-testing system to investigate the shear deformation behavior of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu lead-free solder joints at high strain rates ranging from 1.1 × 103 s-1 to 5.5 × 103 s-1. The experimental results revealed that the maximum shear strength of the solder joint decreased with increasing load speed in the ranges tested in this study. For solder joints tested at a shear speed exceeding 1 m/s, corresponding to an approximate strain rate that exceeds 1950 s-1, the brittle fracture mode is the main failure mode, whereas lower strain rates result in a ductile-to-brittle transition in the fracture surfaces of solder joints. In addition, the mode II stress intensity factor ( K II) used to evaluate the fracture toughness ( K C) of an interfacial intermetallic compound layer between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder and the toughness of copper substrate was found to decrease from 1.63 MPa m0.5 to 0.97 MPa m0.5 in the speed range tested here.

  20. Finite Element Modeling of Laminated Composite Plates with Locally Delaminated Interface Subjected to Impact Loading

    PubMed Central

    Abo Sabah, Saddam Hussein; Kueh, Ahmad Beng Hong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of localized interface progressive delamination on the behavior of two-layer laminated composite plates when subjected to low velocity impact loading for various fiber orientations. By means of finite element approach, the laminae stiffnesses are constructed independently from their interface, where a well-defined virtually zero-thickness interface element is discreetly adopted for delamination simulation. The present model has the advantage of simulating a localized interfacial condition at arbitrary locations, for various degeneration areas and intensities, under the influence of numerous boundary conditions since the interfacial description is expressed discretely. In comparison, the model shows good agreement with existing results from the literature when modeled in a perfectly bonded state. It is found that as the local delamination area increases, so does the magnitude of the maximum displacement history. Also, as top and bottom fiber orientations deviation increases, both central deflection and energy absorption increase although the relative maximum displacement correspondingly decreases when in contrast to the laminates perfectly bonded state. PMID:24696668

  1. Wound Ballistics Modeling for Blast Loading Blunt Force Impact and Projectile Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul A.; Cooper, Candice Frances; Burnett, Damon J.

    2015-09-01

    Light body armor development for the warfighter is based on trial-and-error testing of prototype designs against ballistic projectiles. Torso armor testing against blast is virtually nonexistent but necessary to ensure adequate protection against injury to the heart and lungs. In this report, we discuss the development of a high-fidelity human torso model, it's merging with the existing Sandia Human Head-Neck Model, and development of the modeling & simulation (M&S) capabilities necessary to simulate wound injury scenarios. Using the new Sandia Human Torso Model, we demonstrate the advantage of virtual simulation in the investigation of wound injury as it relates to the warfighter experience. We present the results of virtual simulations of blast loading and ballistic projectile impact to the tors o with and without notional protective armor. In this manner, we demonstrate the ad vantages of applying a modeling and simulation approach to the investigation of wound injury and relative merit assessments of protective body armor without the need for trial-and-error testing.

  2. High-Intensity Training and Salivary Immunoglobulin A Responses in Professional Top-Level Soccer Players: Effect of Training Intensity.

    PubMed

    Owen, Adam L; Wong, Del P; Dunlop, Gordon; Groussard, Carole; Kebsi, Wiem; Dellal, Alexandre; Morgans, Ryland; Zouhal, Hassane

    2016-09-01

    Owen, AL, Wong, DP, Dunlop, G, Groussard, C, Kebsi, W, Dellal, A, Morgans, R, and Zouhal, H. High-intensity training and salivary immunoglobulin A responses in professional top-level soccer players: Effect of training intensity. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2460-2469, 2016-This study aimed (a) to test the hypothesis that salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) would vary with training intensity sessions (low-intensity [LI] vs. high-intensity sessions [HI]) during a traditional training program divided into 4 training periods and (b) to identify key variables (e.g., GPS data, rating of perceived exertion [RPE], and training duration), which could affect s-IgA. Saliva samples of 10 elite professional soccer players were collected (a) before the investigation started to establish the baseline level and (b) before and after each 4 training sessions (LI vs. HI). Training intensity was monitored as internal (through heart rate responses and RPE) and external (through GPS) loads. High-intensity sessions were associated with higher external load (GPS) and with higher RPE. Baseline and pretraining s-IgA did not differ between the 4 training sessions both for HI and LI. Post-training s-IgA were not different (in absolute value and in percentage of change) between HI and LI sessions at the first 3 periods. However, at the fourth period, s-IgA concentration for HI session was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) than the LI session. The percentage change between s-IgA post-training and s-IgA baseline concentrations differ significantly (p ≤ 0.05) between HI and LI training sessions. Significant correlations between s-IgA and training intensity were also noted. High-intensity soccer training sessions might cause a significant decrease in s-IgA values during the postexercise window as compared with LI sessions. This study encourages coaches to monitor s-IgA in routine, particularly during HI training periods, to take precautions to avoid upper respiratory tract infection in highly trained

  3. Finite element analysis of thermoviscoplastic deformations of an impact-loaded prenotched plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, Naim A.

    Four different thermoviscoplastic relations, namely, the Litonski-Batra, the Johnson-Cook, the Bodner-Partom and the power law are used to model the thermoviscoplastic response of a material. Each one of these relations accounts for strain hardening, strain-rate hardening and thermal softening of the material. The material parameters in these relations are found by solving an initial-boundary-value problem corresponding to simple shearing deformations so that the computed effective stress vs. the effective plastic strain curves match closely with the experimental data of Marchand and Duffy who tested thin-walled HY-100 steel tubes in torsion. These four viscoplastic relations are used to analyze dynamic thermomechanical deformations of a prenotched plate impacted on the notched side by a cylindrical projectile made of the same material as the plate. The impact loading on the contact surface is simulated by prescribing the time history of the normal component of velocity and null tangential tractions. A plane strain state of deformation is assumed to prevail in the plate and its deformations are studied for different values of the impact speed. The in-house developed finite element code employs constant strain triangular elements, one point integration rule, and a lumped mass matrix. The Lagrangian description of motion is used to describe deformations of the plate. The coupled nonlinear partial differential equations are first reduced to coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODES) by using the Galerkin approximation. The ODEs are integrated by using the stiff solver, LSODE, which adaptively adjusts the time step size and computes the solution within the prescribed accuracy. Results computed with the four constitutive relations are found to be qualitatively similar to each other and the general tends agree with the experimental observations in the sense that at low speed of impact, a brittle failure ensues at a point on the upper surface of the notch

  4. Customer Impact Evaluation for the 2009 Southern California Edison Participating Load Pilot

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, William; Bodmann, Shawn; Young, Paul; Eto, Joseph H.; Laundergan, Jeremy

    2010-05-28

    The 2009 Participating Load Pilot Customer Impact Evaluation provides evidence that short duration demand response events which cycle off air conditioners for less than thirty minutes in a hot, dry environment do not lead to a significant degradation in the comfort level of residents participating in the program. This was investigated using: (1) Analysis of interval temperature data collected from inside residences of select program participants; and (2) Direct and indirect customer feedback from surveys designed and implemented by Southern California Edison at the conclusion of the program season. There were 100 indoor temperature monitors that were acquired by LBNL for this study that transmitted temperature readings at least once per hour with corresponding timestamps during the program season, June-October, 2009. Recorded temperatures were transferred from the onsite telemetry devices to a mesh network, stored, and then delivered to KEMA for analysis. Following an extensive data quality review, temperature increases during each of the thirty demand response test events were calculated for each device. The results are as follows: (1) Even for tests taking place during outside temperatures in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, over 85 percent of the devices measured less than a 0.5 degree Fahrenheit temperature increase indoors during the duration of the event. (2) For the increases that were observed, none was more than 5 degrees and it was extremely rare for increases to be more than 2 degrees. At the end of the testing season SCE and KEMA designed and conducted a survey of the a facilities and public works managers and approximately 100 customers feedback survey to assess the extent the PLP events were noticed or disrupted the comfort level of participants. While only a small sampling of 3 managers and 16 customer surveys were completed, their responses indicate: (1) No customer reported even a moderate level of discomfort from the cycling-off of their air

  5. Preseason Training: The Effects of a 17-Day High-Intensity Shock Microcycle in Elite Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Sanz-Rivas, David; Sarabia, Jose Manuel; Moya, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    Preseasons in tennis are normally reduced to 5 to 7 weeks duration, and coaches should use an integrated approach to conditioning and skill-based work. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of adding a high-intensity training (HIT) shock microcycle to the normal training content in several physical performance indicators in the preseason training of high-level male tennis players. Over 17 days, 12 male tennis players performed 13 HIT sessions in addition to their usual training. Physical performance tests (30:15 intermittent fitness test [VIFT], 20 m sprint, countermovement jump [CMJ], repeated sprint ability [RSA]) were conducted before (pre-test) and 5 days after the intervention (post-test). After the shock microcycle, results showed a significant increase in the VIFT (p < 0.001; Large ES) and a significant decrease in the mean RSA time (RSAm) (p = 0.002; Small ES), while there were no significant changes in the other parameters analysed (e.g., 20 m, CMJ, best RSA time [RSAb]; percentage of decrement in the RSA [%Dec]). Moreover, the training load (TL) during tennis sessions was significantly higher (p < 0.01; Large ES) than the TL during the integrated sessions, except during the first training session. A 17-day shock microcycle (i.e., 13 HIT sessions) in addition to the regular tennis training significantly improved parameters that can impact physical performance in tennis. Moreover, additional sessions, including running exercises based on the 30:15ITF and on-court specific exercises, were characterised by significantly lower TL than tennis-training sessions. Key pointsHIT shock microcycle increases performance in professional tennis players in a short period of time.The inclusion of additional sessions, with running exercises based on the 30:15ITF and on-court specific exercises, was characterised by a significantly lower TL than tennis-training sessions alone.Coaches should be aware of TL (e.g., RPE) and fatigue-related parameters (e

  6. Preseason Training: The Effects of a 17-Day High-Intensity Shock Microcycle in Elite Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Sanz-Rivas, David; Sarabia, Jose Manuel; Moya, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Preseasons in tennis are normally reduced to 5 to 7 weeks duration, and coaches should use an integrated approach to conditioning and skill-based work. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of adding a high-intensity training (HIT) shock microcycle to the normal training content in several physical performance indicators in the preseason training of high-level male tennis players. Over 17 days, 12 male tennis players performed 13 HIT sessions in addition to their usual training. Physical performance tests (30:15 intermittent fitness test [VIFT], 20 m sprint, countermovement jump [CMJ], repeated sprint ability [RSA]) were conducted before (pre-test) and 5 days after the intervention (post-test). After the shock microcycle, results showed a significant increase in the VIFT (p < 0.001; Large ES) and a significant decrease in the mean RSA time (RSAm) (p = 0.002; Small ES), while there were no significant changes in the other parameters analysed (e.g., 20 m, CMJ, best RSA time [RSAb]; percentage of decrement in the RSA [%Dec]). Moreover, the training load (TL) during tennis sessions was significantly higher (p < 0.01; Large ES) than the TL during the integrated sessions, except during the first training session. A 17-day shock microcycle (i.e., 13 HIT sessions) in addition to the regular tennis training significantly improved parameters that can impact physical performance in tennis. Moreover, additional sessions, including running exercises based on the 30:15ITF and on-court specific exercises, were characterised by significantly lower TL than tennis-training sessions. Key points HIT shock microcycle increases performance in professional tennis players in a short period of time. The inclusion of additional sessions, with running exercises based on the 30:15ITF and on-court specific exercises, was characterised by a significantly lower TL than tennis-training sessions alone. Coaches should be aware of TL (e.g., RPE) and fatigue-related parameters

  7. High-intensity focused ultrasound: advances in technology and experimental trials support enhanced utility of focused ultrasound surgery in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Malietzis, G; Monzon, L; Hand, J; Wasan, H; Leen, E; Abel, M; Muhammad, A; Abel, P

    2013-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a rapidly maturing technology with diverse clinical applications. In the field of oncology, the use of HIFU to non-invasively cause tissue necrosis in a defined target, a technique known as focused ultrasound surgery (FUS), has considerable potential for tumour ablation. In this article, we outline the development and underlying principles of HIFU, overview the limitations and commercially available equipment for FUS, then summarise some of the recent technological advances and experimental clinical trials that we predict will have a positive impact on extending the role of FUS in cancer therapy. PMID:23403455

  8. Ionization and acceleration of heavy ions in high-Z solid target irradiated by high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, D.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In the interaction between high intensity laser and solid film, an ionization dynamics inside the solid is dominated by fast time scale convective propagation of the internal sheath field and the slow one by impact ionization due to heated high energy electrons coupled with nonlocal heat transport. Furthermore, ionization and acceleration due to the localized external sheath field which co- propagates with Al ions constituting the high energy front in the vacuum region. Through this process, the maximum charge state and then q/A increase in the rear side, so that ions near the front are further accelerated to high energy.

  9. The high intensity solar cell: Key to low cost photovoltaic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. L.; Goradia, C.

    1975-01-01

    The design considerations and performance characteristics of the 'high intensity' (HI) solar cell are presented. A high intensity solar system was analyzed to determine its cost effectiveness and to assess the benefits of further improving HI cell efficiency. It is shown that residential sized systems can be produced at less than $1000/kW peak electric power. Due to their superior high intensity performance characteristics compared to the conventional and VMJ cells, HI cells and light concentrators may be the key to low cost photovoltaic power.

  10. Characterizing Hot Electron Generation and Transport via Bremsstrahlung Emission on the High Intensity OMEGA EP Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, C. D.; Westover, B.; McLean, H. S.

    2014-10-01

    The investigation of high intensity laser generated fast electron beams is important for a number of High Energy Density Science applications, which include proton sources and fast ignition among others. A series of experimental campaigns performed using the kilojoule, 10-ps OMEGA EP laser closely examined the impact of a preformed plasma on laser plasma interaction and electron generation. Here we present the analysis of the measured bremsstrahlung x-ray radiation and the inferred results on fast electron characteristics. Simulations, performed with the Monte-Carlo code package ITS 3.0, generate the x-ray response of the target to an injected electron beam with a given temperature, energy and divergence angle. The simulated x-rays are then compared to those collected by the bremsstrahlung spectrometers, which allows us to characterize fast electrons created in the experiment. Preliminary results show a decrease in hot electron temperature with an increase in pre-pulse, which is further corroborated by magnetic electron and Cu-K α spectrometers. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA), DE-NA0002026 (NLUF) and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (FSC).

  11. Submaximal and Peak Cardiorespiratory Response After Moderate-High Intensity Exercise Training in Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mattlage, Anna E.; Ashenden, Abigail L.; Lentz, Angela A.; Rippee, Michael A.; Billinger, Sandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Reduced cardiovascular fitness post-stroke may negatively impact recovery. There is little information regarding exercise testing performance and cardiorespiratory response to an aerobic exercise intervention in subacute stroke. The purpose of this study was to examine cardiorespiratory response in subacute stroke after an 8-week aerobic exercise intervention using a total body recumbent stepper (TBRS). Methods Nine individuals with mean age 61.2 (SD 4.7) years and mean 66.7 (SD 41.5) days post-stroke completed the exercise intervention. Participants had a mean Fugl-Meyer score of 100.3 (SD 29.3). Outcome measures were obtained at baseline and postintervention. A peak exercise test using a TBRS assessed oxygen consumption, heart rate, and minute ventilation. Participants completed an 8-week exercise intervention on a recumbent stepper 3 times per week at a prescribed heart rate intensity. Results Submaximal VO2 was significantly lower from baseline to postintervention with a main effect of Study Visit (F1,8 = 8.5, p = 0.02). Heart rate was not significantly different pre- to postintervention. Minute ventilation exhibited no main effect of Study Visit or Test Minute. Conclusion Moderate-high intensity aerobic exercise in subacute stroke appears to be beneficial for improving cardiovascular outcomes during submaximal performance of an exercise test. PMID:23997687

  12. Protein denaturation of whey protein isolates (WPIs) induced by high intensity ultrasound during heat gelation.

    PubMed

    Frydenberg, Rikke P; Hammershøj, Marianne; Andersen, Ulf; Greve, Marie T; Wiking, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the impact of high intensity ultrasound (HIU) on proteins in whey protein isolates was examined. Effects on thermal behavior, secondary structure and nature of intra- and intermolecular bonds during heat-induced gelling were investigated. Ultrasonication (24 kHz, 300 W/cm(2), 2078 J/mL) significantly reduced denaturation enthalpies, whereas no change in secondary structure was detected by circular dichroism. The thiol-blocking agent N-ethylmaleimide was applied in order to inhibit formation of disulfide bonds during gel formation. Results showed that increased contents of α-lactalbumin (α-La) were associated with increased sensitivity to ultrasonication. The α-La:β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) ratio greatly affected the nature of the interactions formed during gelation, where higher amounts of α-La lead to a gel more dependent on disulfide bonds. These results contribute to clarifying the mechanisms mediating the effects of HIU on whey proteins on the molecular level, thus moving further toward implementing HIU in the processing chain in the food industry. PMID:26304368

  13. Intial characterization fo a commerical electron gun for profiling high intensity proton beams in Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Zhang, D.; Blokland, W.; /Oak Ridge

    2011-03-01

    Measuring the profile of a high-intensity proton beam is problematic in that traditional invasive techniques such as flying wires don't survive the encounter with the beam. One alternative is the use of an electron beam as a probe of the charge distribution in the proton beam as was done at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL. Here we present an initial characterization of the beam from a commercial electron gun from Kimball Physics, intended for use in the Fermilab Main Injector for Project X. Despite the fact that the horizontal spot size is abnormally large in the high current measurement, the spot size at the downstream cross X2 is reasonable in the context of measuring the deflection. A thin foil OTR would help with the beam heating and should be tried. The next phase of this experiment is to simulate the proton beam with a pair of current carrying wires and to design and construct a fast deflector. Some of the remaining issues to be considered include determining the minimum beam current needed to observe the deflected beam for a given sweep time and the impact of longitudinal variations in the charge density of the bunch.

  14. Atomistic Simulations of High-intensity XFEL Pulses on Diffractive Imaging of Nano-sized Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Phay; Knight, Christopher; Young, Linda; Tegze, Miklos; Faigel, Gyula

    We have developed a large-scale atomistic computational method based on a combined Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics (MC/MD) method to simulate XFEL-induced radiation damage dynamics of complex materials. The MD algorithm is used to propagate the trajectories of electrons, ions and atoms forward in time and the quantum nature of interactions with an XFEL pulse is accounted for by a MC method to calculate probabilities of electronic transitions. Our code has good scalability with MPI/OpenMP parallelization, and it has been run on Mira, a petascale system at the Argonne Leardership Computing Facility, with particle number >50 million. Using this code, we have examined the impact of high-intensity 8-keV XFEL pulses on the x-ray diffraction patterns of argon clusters. The obtained patterns show strong pulse parameter dependence, providing evidence of significant lattice rearrangement and diffuse scattering. Real-space electronic reconstruction was performed using phase retrieval methods. We found that the structure of the argon cluster can be recovered with atomic resolution even in the presence of considerable radiation damage. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. Modelling the impacts of strategic tree plantings on salt loads and flows in the Macquarie river catchment, NSW, Australia.

    PubMed

    Herron, Natasha; Davis, Richard; Dawes, Warrick; Evans, Ray

    2003-05-01

    In Australia, problems of dryland and stream salinity have recently become the focus of a National Action Plan. In many river catchments, preliminary stream salt load and salinity targets have been set to define maximum permissible export levels in 2015. Afforestation has been proposed as a strategy for meeting these targets, although several studies suggest that widespread commercial tree plantations are likely to deliver net dis-benefits. However, the impacts on stream salt loads of more localised tree plantings in high salt yielding areas have not been quantified. In this paper we use a simple empirical model to predict the effects of various strategic and non-strategic tree planting scenarios on flows and salt loads in the mid-Macquarie catchment, New South Wales. A simple salt routing model is then used to estimate the effect of these changes on salt loads at the end-of-valley monitoring site for the Macquarie catchment. Results suggest that widespread land management interventions will be required to meet the preliminary salt load targets for this catchment. On their own, small-scale, strategic tree planting in high salt export areas of the mid-Macquarie area will not have a significant impact on salt loads at the end-of-valley monitoring site. While widespread tree plantings may reduce salt loads in the longer term, they are likely to cause streamflow losses in the shorter term. Thus, stream salinities are expected to rise initially, due to the different response times of groundwater and surface water systems to land use change. PMID:12767861

  16. Online Reading: A Preliminary Study of the Impact of Integrated and Split-Attention Formats on L2 Students' Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shehri, Saleh; Gitsaki, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive load theory has been utilized by second language acquisition (SLA) researchers to account for differences in learner performance with regards to different learning tasks. Certain instructional designs were shown to have an impact on cognitive load and working memory, and this impact was found to be accentuated in a multimedia environment…

  17. High-Intensity Running and Plantar-Flexor Fatigability and Plantar-Pressure Distribution in Adolescent Runners

    PubMed Central

    Fourchet, François; Kelly, Luke; Horobeanu, Cosmin; Loepelt, Heiko; Taiar, Redha; Millet, Grégoire

    2015-01-01

    Context: Fatigue-induced alterations in foot mechanics may lead to structural overload and injury. Objectives: To investigate how a high-intensity running exercise to exhaustion modifies ankle plantar-flexor and dorsiflexor strength and fatigability, as well as plantar-pressure distribution in adolescent runners. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Academy research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eleven male adolescent distance runners (age = 16.9 ± 2.0 years, height = 170.6 ± 10.9 cm, mass = 54.6 ± 8.6 kg) were tested. Intervention(s): All participants performed an exhausting run on a treadmill. An isokinetic plantar-flexor and dorsiflexor maximal-strength test and a fatigue test were performed before and after the exhausting run. Plantar-pressure distribution was assessed at the beginning and end of the exhausting run. Main Outcome Measure(s): We recorded plantar-flexor and dorsiflexor peak torques and calculated the fatigue index. Plantar-pressure measurements were recorded 1 minute after the start of the run and before exhaustion. Plantar variables (ie, mean area, contact time, mean pressure, relative load) were determined for 9 selected regions. Results: Isokinetic peak torques were similar before and after the run in both muscle groups, whereas the fatigue index increased in plantar flexion (28.1%; P = .01) but not in dorsiflexion. For the whole foot, mean pressure decreased from 1 minute to the end (−3.4%; P = .003); however, mean area (9.5%; P = .005) and relative load (7.2%; P = .009) increased under the medial midfoot, and contact time increased under the central forefoot (8.3%; P = .01) and the lesser toes (8.9%; P = .008). Conclusions: Fatigue resistance in the plantar flexors declined after a high-intensity running bout performed by adolescent male distance runners. This phenomenon was associated with increased loading under the medial arch in the fatigued state but without any excessive pronation. PMID:25531143

  18. The Impact of Perceptual Load on the Non-Conscious Processing of Fearful Faces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Feng, Chunliang; Mai, Xiaoqin; Jia, Lina; Zhu, Xiangru; Luo, Wenbo; Luo, Yue-jia

    2016-01-01

    Emotional stimuli can be processed without consciousness. In the current study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to assess whether perceptual load influences non-conscious processing of fearful facial expressions. Perceptual load was manipulated using a letter search task with the target letter presented at the fixation point, while facial expressions were presented peripherally and masked to prevent conscious awareness. The letter string comprised six letters (X or N) that were identical (low load) or different (high load). Participants were instructed to discriminate the letters at fixation or the facial expression (fearful or neutral) in the periphery. Participants were faster and more accurate at detecting letters in the low load condition than in the high load condition. Fearful faces elicited a sustained positivity from 250 ms to 700 ms post-stimulus over fronto-central areas during the face discrimination and low-load letter discrimination conditions, but this effect was completely eliminated during high-load letter discrimination. Our findings imply that non-conscious processing of fearful faces depends on perceptual load, and attentional resources are necessary for non-conscious processing. PMID:27149273

  19. Damage Behaviors and Compressive Strength of Toughened CFRP Laminates with Thin Plies Subjected to Transverse Impact Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozeki, Tomohiro; Aoki, Yuichiro; Ogasawara, Toshio

    It has been recognized that damage resistance and strength properties of CFRP laminates can be improved by using thin-ply prepregs. This study investigates the damage behaviors and compressive strength of CFRP laminates using thin-ply and standard prepregs subjected to out-of-plane impact loadings. CFRP laminates used for the evaluation are prepared using the standard prepregs, thin-ply prepregs, and combinations of the both. Weight-drop impact test and post-impact compression test of quasi-isotropic laminates are performed. It is shown that the damage behaviors are different between the thin-ply and the standard laminates, and the compression-after-impact strength is improved by using thin-ply prepregs. Effects of the use of thin-ply prepregs and the layout of thin-ply layers on the damage behaviors and compression-after-impact properties are discussed based on the experimental results.

  20. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix D, Conservation, Load Management and Fuel Switching Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    Various conservation, load management, and fuel switching programs were considered as ways to reduce or shift system peak load. These programs operate at the end-use level, such as residential water heat. Figure D-1a shows what electricity consumption for water heat looks like on normal and extreme peak days. Load management programs, such as water heat control, are designed to reduce electricity consumption at the time of system peak. On the coldest day in average winter, system load peaks near 8:00 a.m. In a winter with extremely cold weather, electricity consumption increases fr all hours, and the system peak shifts to later in the morning. System load shapes in the Puget Sound area are shown in Figure D-1b for a normal winter peak day (February 2, 1988) and extreme peak day (February 3, 1989). Peak savings from any program are calculated to be the reduction in loads on the entire system at the hour of system peak. Peak savings for all programs are measured at 8:00 a.m. on a normal peak day and 9:00 a.m. on an extreme peak day. On extremely cold day, some water heat load shifts to much later in the morning, with less load available for shedding at the time of system peak. Models of hourly end-use consumption were constructed to simulate the impact of conservation, land management, and fuel switching programs on electricity consumption. Javelin, a time-series simulating package for personal computers, was chosen for the hourly analysis. Both a base case and a program case were simulated. 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. A high loading overland flow system: Impacts on soil characteristics, grass constituents, yields and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Wen, C G; Chen, T H; Hsu, F H; Lu, C H; Lin, J B; Chang, C H; Chang, S P; Lee, C S

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this paper are to determine effects of different grass species and their harvests on pollutant removal, elucidate impacts on soil characteristics and grass constituents, observe grass yield and quantify nutrient uptake by vegetation in an overland flow system (OLFS). Polluted creek water was applied to eight channels in the OLFS, which were planted with Paragrass, Nilegrass, Cattail, and Vetiver, with each two channels being randomly planted with a given grass species. The grass in one channel was harvested while that in the other channel was not. At a high rate of 27.8 m d(-1) hydraulic loading, the removal efficiencies of conventional pollutants such as BOD, COD, suspended solids (SS), and total coliforms in wastewater are not affected by the type of the grasses species, but those of nitrogen and phosphorus are affected by different species. Overall average removal efficiencies of BOD, COD, SS, ammonia, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and total coliforms through the OLFS are 42%, 48%, 78%, 47%, 40%, 33% and 89%, respectively. The concentration of nitrate, however, increases due to nitrification. Soil characteristics in OLFS have been changed significantly; specific conductivity, organic matter, exchangeable magnesium, extractable copper and zinc in soils all increase with time while pHs decrease. During the winter season, there is a significant accumulation of nitrate in grass with the subsequent reduction during the active growing season (Spring). The contents of nitrate and phosphorus in grass tissue are higher than those of grass in general pastureland, probably due to nutrient luxury uptake by grass. The overall grass yield, growth rate and nutrient uptake are quantified and implication of such high rate OLFS discussed. PMID:17234253

  2. A hypothesis on the mechanism of trauma of lung tissue subjected to impact load.

    PubMed

    Fung, Y C; Yen, R T; Tao, Z L; Liu, S Q

    1988-02-01

    When a compressive impact load is applied on the chest, as in automobile crash or bomb explosion, the lung may be injured and show evidences of edema and hemorrhage. Since soft tissues have good strength in compression, why does a compression wave cause edema? Our hypothesis is that tensile and shear stresses are induced in the alveolar wall on rebound from compression, and that the maximum principal stress (tensile) may exceed critical values for increased permeability of the epithelium to small solutes, or even fracture. Furthermore, small airways may collapse and trap gas in alveoli at a critical strain, causing traumatic atelectasis. The collapsed airways reopen at a higher strain after the wave passes, during which the expansion of the trapped gas will induce additional tension in the alveolar wall. To test this hypothesis, we made three new experiments: (1), measuring the effect of transient overstretch of the alveolar membrane on the rate of lung weight increase; (2) determining the critical pressure for reopening collapsed airways of rabbit lung subjected to cyclic compression and expansion; (3) cyclic compression of lung with trachea closed. We found that in isolated rabbit lung overstretching increases the rate of edema fluid formation, that the critical strain for airway reopening is higher than that for closing, and that these critical strains are strain-rate dependent, but independent of the state of the trachea, whether it is open or closed. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is presented to show that the maximum principal (tensile) stress is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum initial compressive stress at certain localities of the lung.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3279269

  3. Lumbar load attenuation for rotorcraft occupants using a design methodology for the seat impact energy-absorbing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Rasoul; Beheshti, Hamid; Lankarani, Hamid

    2012-12-01

    Aircraft occupant crash-safety considerations require a minimum cushion thickness to limit the relative vertical motion of the seat-pelvis during high vertical impact loadings in crash landings or accidents. In military aircraft and helicopter seat design, due to the potential for high vertical accelerations in crash scenarios, the seat system must be provided with an energy absorber to attenuate the acceleration level sustained by the occupants. Because of the limited stroke available for the seat structure, the design of the energy absorber becomes a trade-off problem between minimizing the stroke and maximizing the energy absorption. The available stroke must be used to prevent bottoming out of the seat as well as to absorb maximum impact energy to protect the occupant. In this study, the energy-absorbing system in a rotorcraft seat design is investigated using a mathematical model of the occupant/seat system. Impact theories between interconnected bodies in multibody mechanical systems are utilized to study the impact between the seat pan and the occupant. Experimental responses of the seat system and the occupant are utilized to validate the results from this study for civil and military helicopters according to FAR 23 and 25 and MIL-S-58095 requirements. A model for the load limiter is proposed to minimize the lumbar load for the occupant by minimizing the relative velocity between the seat pan and the occupant's pelvis. The modified energy absorber/load limiter is then implemented for the seat structure so that it absorbs the energy of impact in an effective manner and below the tolerable limit for the occupant in a minimum stroke. Results show that for a designed stroke, the level of occupant lumbar spine injury would be significantly attenuated using this modified energy-absorber system.

  4. Photocathode fatigue of L-24 PM head due to high intensity light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.F.

    1980-01-08

    The sensitivity of radiation detectors which utilizes photomultipliers was determined after exposing the multiplier phototubes to high intensity light pulses. Test results found that generally less than a 5% change was found. (FS)

  5. Transcranial MR-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Non-Invasive Functional Neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Beat; Morel, Anne; Zadicario, Eyal; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Martin, Ernst

    2010-03-01

    While the development of transcranial MR-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has been driven mainly by applications for tumor ablation this new intervention method is also very attractive for functional neurosurgery due to its non-invasiveness, the absence of ionizing radiation and the closed-loop intervention control by MRI. Here we provide preliminary data to demonstrate the clinical feasibility, safety and precision of non-invasive functional neurosurgery by transcranial MR-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound.

  6. High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) versus TENS and NSAIDs in low back pain: clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zati, Allesandro; Fortuna, Damiano; Valent, A.; Filippi, M. V.; Bilotta, Teresa W.

    2004-09-01

    Low back pain, caused by lumbar disc herniation, is prevalently treated with a conservative approach. In this study we valued the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT), compared with accepted therapies such as TENS and NSAIDs. Laser therapy obtained similar results in the short term, but better clinical effect over time than TENS and NSAIDs. In conclusion high intensity laser therapy appears to be a interesting new treatment, worthy of further research.

  7. Pubic Bone Osteomyelitis after Salvage High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Christopher M.; Gor, Ronak A.; Metro, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound can be used for the primary treatment of prostate cancer and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy or radiation. Complications of high-intensity focused ultrasound include urinary retention, urethral stenosis, stress incontinence, urinary tract infections, dysuria, impotence, and rarely, rectourethral or rectovesicular fistula. We describe a patient presenting with urinary retention, urinary tract infections and intermittent stress incontinence, later found to be associated with pubic bone osteomyelitis stemming from a prostatopubic fistula. PMID:24917777

  8. The impact of clickers instruction on cognitive loads and listening and speaking skills in college English class.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhonggen; Chen, Wentao; Kong, Yong; Sun, Xiao Ling; Zheng, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Clickers might own a bright future in China if properly introduced although they have not been widely acknowledged as an effective tool to facilitate English learning and teaching in Chinese contexts. By randomly selecting participants from undergraduates in a university in China over four academic years, this study aims to identify the impact of clickers on college English listening and speaking skills, and differences in cognitive loads between clickers and traditional multimedia assisted instruction modes. It was concluded that in China's college English class, compared with multimedia assisted instruction, (1) clickers could improve college English listening skills; (2) clickers could improve college English speaking skills; and (3) clickers could reduce undergraduates' cognitive loads in College English Class. Reasons for the results and defects in this study were also explored and discussed, based on learning, teaching and cognitive load theories. Some Suggestions for future research were also raised. PMID:25192424

  9. The Impact of Clickers Instruction on Cognitive Loads and Listening and Speaking Skills in College English Class

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhonggen; Chen, Wentao; Kong, Yong; Sun, Xiao Ling; Zheng, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Clickers might own a bright future in China if properly introduced although they have not been widely acknowledged as an effective tool to facilitate English learning and teaching in Chinese contexts. By randomly selecting participants from undergraduates in a university in China over four academic years, this study aims to identify the impact of clickers on college English listening and speaking skills, and differences in cognitive loads between clickers and traditional multimedia assisted instruction modes. It was concluded that in China's college English class, compared with multimedia assisted instruction, (1) clickers could improve college English listening skills; (2) clickers could improve college English speaking skills; and (3) clickers could reduce undergraduates' cognitive loads in College English Class. Reasons for the results and defects in this study were also explored and discussed, based on learning, teaching and cognitive load theories. Some Suggestions for future research were also raised. PMID:25192424

  10. Rough-water Impact-load Investigation of a Chine-immersed V-bottom Model Having a Dead-rise Angle of 10 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markey, Melvin F; Carpini, Thomas D

    1957-01-01

    A hydrodynamic rough-water impact-loads investigation of a fixed-trim V-bottom float with a beam-loading coefficient of 5.78 and dead-rise angle of 10 degrees was made at the Langley impact basin. The size of the waves varied from approximately 10 to 60 feet in length and 1 to 2 feet in height. Time histories were obtained showing the position of the model relative to the wave throughout the impact and typical examples are presented. The load coefficient was found to vary primarily with the slope of the impacting wave.

  11. The Effects of Racket Inertia Tensor on Elbow Loadings and Racket Behavior for Central and Eccentric Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Nesbit, Steven M.; Elzinga, Michael; Herchenroder, Catherine; Serrano, Monika

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the inertia tensors of tennis rackets and their influence on the elbow swing torques in a forehand motion, the loadings transmitted to the elbow from central and eccentric impacts, and the racket acceleration responses from central and eccentric impacts. Inertia tensors of various rackets with similar mass and mass center location were determined by an inertia pendulum and were found to vary considerably in all three orthogonal directions. Tennis swing mechanics and impact analyses were performed using a computer model comprised of a full-body model of a human, a parametric model of the racket, and an impact function. The swing mechanics analysis of a forehand motion determined that inertia values had a moderate linear effect on the pronation-supination elbow torques required to twist the racket, and a minor effect on the flexion-extension and valgus-varus torques. The impact analysis found that mass center inertia values had a considerable effect on the transmitted torques for both longitudinal and latitudinal eccentric impacts and significantly affected all elbow torque components. Racket acceleration responses to central and eccentric impacts were measured experimentally and found to be notably sensitive to impact location and mass center inertia values. Key Points Tennis biomechanics. Racket inertia tensor. Impact analysis. Full-body computer model. PMID:24260004

  12. Impact of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation, feed channel pressure drop increase and permeate flux decline in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Bucs, Sz S; Valladares Linares, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-12-15

    The influence of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation (biofouling) and pressure drop development in membrane filtration systems was investigated. Nutrient load is the product of nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity. Biofouling - excessive growth of microbial biomass in membrane systems - hampers membrane performance. The influence of biodegradable organic nutrient load on biofouling was investigated at varying (i) crossflow velocity, (ii) nutrient concentration, (iii) shear, and (iv) feed spacer thickness. Experimental studies were performed with membrane fouling simulators (MFSs) containing a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane and a 31 mil thick feed spacer, commonly applied in practice in RO and nanofiltration (NF) spiral-wound membrane modules. Numerical modeling studies were done with identical feed spacer geometry differing in thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil). Additionally, experiments were done applying a forward osmosis (FO) membrane with varying spacer thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil), addressing the permeate flux decline and biofilm development. Assessed were the development of feed channel pressure drop (MFS studies), permeate flux (FO studies) and accumulated biomass amount measured by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total organic carbon (TOC). Our studies showed that the organic nutrient load determined the accumulated amount of biomass. The same amount of accumulated biomass was found at constant nutrient load irrespective of linear flow velocity, shear, and/or feed spacer thickness. The impact of the same amount of accumulated biomass on feed channel pressure drop and permeate flux was influenced by membrane process design and operational conditions. Reducing the nutrient load by pretreatment slowed-down the biofilm formation. The impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance was reduced by applying a lower crossflow velocity and/or a thicker and/or a modified geometry feed spacer. The results indicate that cleanings can be delayed

  13. Impact of Working Memory Load on Cognitive Control in Trait Anxiety: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Senqing; Zeng, Qinghong; Luo, Yangmei; Duan, Haijun; Ding, Cody; Hu, Weiping; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Whether trait anxiety is associated with a general impairment of cognitive control is a matter of debate. This study investigated whether and how experimentally manipulated working memory (WM) load modulates the relation between trait anxiety and cognitive control. This question was investigated using a dual-task design in combination with event-related potentials. Participants were required to remember either one (low WM load) or six letters (high WM load) while performing a flanker task. Our results showed that a high WM load disrupted participants' ability to overcome distractor interference and this effect was exacerbated for the high trait-anxious (HTA) group. This exacerbation was reflected by larger interference effects (i.e., incongruent minus congruent) on reaction times (RTs) and N2 amplitudes for the HTA group than for the low trait-anxious group under high WM load. The two groups, however, did not differ in their ability to inhibit task-irrelevant distractors under low WM load, as indicated by both RTs and N2 amplitudes. These findings underscore the significance of WM-related cognitive demand in contributing to the presence (or absence) of a general cognitive control deficit in trait anxiety. Furthermore, our findings show that when limited WM resources are depleted by high WM load, HTA individuals exhibit less efficient recruitments of cognitive control required for the inhibition of distractors, therefore resulting in a greater degree of response conflict. PMID:25369121

  14. Impact on the deuterium retention of simultaneous exposure of tungsten to a steady state plasma and transient heat cycling loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, A.; Sergienko, G.; Wirtz, M.; Steudel, I.; Arakcheev, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Burdakov, A.; Dittmar, T.; Esser, H. G.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Linsmeier, Ch; Mertens, Ph; Möller, S.; Philipps, V.; Pintsuk, G.; Reinhart, M.; Schweer, B.; Shoshin, A.; Terra, A.; Unterberg, B.

    2016-02-01

    The impact on the deuterium retention of simultaneous exposure of tungsten to a steady-state plasma and transient cyclic heat loads has been studied in the linear PSI-2 facility with the main objective of qualifying tungsten (W) as plasma-facing material. The transient heat loads were applied by a high-energy laser, a Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm) with an energy per pulse of up to 32 J and a duration of 1 ms. A pronounced increase in the D retention by a factor of 13 has been observed during the simultaneous transient heat loads and plasma exposure. These data indicate that the hydrogen clustering is enhanced by the thermal shock exposures, as seen on the increased blister size due to mobilization and thermal production of defects during transients. In addition, the significant increase of the D retention during the simultaneous loads could be explained by an increased diffusion of D atoms into the W material due to strong temperature gradients during the laser pulse exposure and to an increased mobility of D atoms along the shock-induced cracks. Only 24% of the retained deuterium is located inside the near-surface layer (d<4 μm). Enhanced blister formation has been observed under combined loading conditions at power densities close to the threshold for damaging. Blisters are not mainly responsible for the pronounced increase of the D retention.

  15. Lateral erosion in an experimental bedrock channel: The influence of bed roughness on erosion by bed load impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Theodore K.; Gran, Karen B.; Sklar, Leonard S.; Paola, Chris

    2016-05-01

    Physical experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of bed load particle impacts as a mechanism of lateral bedrock erosion. In addition, we explored how changes in channel bed roughness, as would occur during development of an alluvial cover, influence rates of lateral erosion. Experimental channels were constructed to have erodible walls and a nonerodible bed using different mixtures of sand and cement. Bed roughness was varied along the length of the channel by embedding sediment particles of different size in the channel bed mixture. Lateral wall erosion from clear-water flow was negligible. Lateral erosion during periods in which bed load was supplied to the channel removed as much as 3% of the initial wetted cross-sectional area. The vertical distribution of erosion was limited to the base of the channel wall, producing channels with undercut banks. The addition of roughness elements to an otherwise smooth bed caused rates of lateral erosion to increase by as much as a factor of 7 during periods of bed load supply. However, a minimum roughness element diameter of approximately half the median bed load particle diameter was required before a substantial increase in erosion was observed. Beyond this minimum threshold size, further increases in the relative size of roughness elements did not substantially change the rate of wall erosion despite changes in total boundary shear stress. The deflection of saltating bed load particles into the channel wall by fixed roughness elements is hypothesized to be the driver of the observed increase in lateral erosion rates.

  16. Investigation on the innovative impact hydroforming technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihui, Lang; Shaohua, Wang; Chunlei, Yang

    2013-05-01

    Hydroforming has a rapid development recently which has good forming quality and less cost. However, it still cannot meet the requirements of forming complex parts with small features just like convex tables, or bars which are widely employed in automotive and aircraft industries. The impact hydroforming technology means the most features are formed by hydroforming and the small features are rapidly reshaped by high intensity impact energy in a very short time after the traditional hydroforming. The impact pressure rises to the peak in 10ms which belongs to dynamic loading. In this paper, impact hydroforming process is proposed. The generation and transmission of impact hydroforming energy and impact shock wave were studied and simulated. The deformation process of the metal disks under the dynamic impact loading condition presented impact hydroforming is an effective technology to form complex parts with small features.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Output Response of PVDF Sensor Attached on a Cantilever Beam Subjected to Impact Loading

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Cao Vu; Sasaki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Polyvinylidene Flouride (PVDF) is a film-type polymer that has been used as sensors and actuators in various applications due to its mechanical toughness, flexibility, and low density. A PVDF sensor typically covers an area of the host structure over which mechanical stress/strain is averaged and converted to electrical energy. This study investigates the fundamental “stress-averaging” mechanism for dynamic strain sensing in the in-plane mode. A numerical simulation was conducted to simulate the “stress-averaging” mechanism of a PVDF sensor attached on a cantilever beam subjected to an impact loading, taking into account the contribution of piezoelectricity, the cantilever beam’s modal properties, and electronic signal conditioning. Impact tests and FEM analysis were also carried out to verify the numerical simulation results. The results of impact tests indicate the excellent capability of the attached PVDF sensor in capturing the fundamental natural frequencies of the cantilever beam. There is a good agreement between the PVDF sensor’s output voltage predicted by the numerical simulation and that obtained in the impact tests. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the effects of sensor size and sensor position and it is shown that a larger sensor tends to generate higher output voltage than a smaller one at the same location. However, the effect of sensor location seems to be more significant for larger sensors due to the cancelling problem. Overall, PVDF sensors exhibit excellent sensing capability for in-plane dynamic strain induced by impact loading. PMID:27128919

  18. Numerical Simulation of Output Response of PVDF Sensor Attached on a Cantilever Beam Subjected to Impact Loading.

    PubMed

    Dung, Cao Vu; Sasaki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Polyvinylidene Flouride (PVDF) is a film-type polymer that has been used as sensors and actuators in various applications due to its mechanical toughness, flexibility, and low density. A PVDF sensor typically covers an area of the host structure over which mechanical stress/strain is averaged and converted to electrical energy. This study investigates the fundamental "stress-averaging" mechanism for dynamic strain sensing in the in-plane mode. A numerical simulation was conducted to simulate the "stress-averaging" mechanism of a PVDF sensor attached on a cantilever beam subjected to an impact loading, taking into account the contribution of piezoelectricity, the cantilever beam's modal properties, and electronic signal conditioning. Impact tests and FEM analysis were also carried out to verify the numerical simulation results. The results of impact tests indicate the excellent capability of the attached PVDF sensor in capturing the fundamental natural frequencies of the cantilever beam. There is a good agreement between the PVDF sensor's output voltage predicted by the numerical simulation and that obtained in the impact tests. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the effects of sensor size and sensor position and it is shown that a larger sensor tends to generate higher output voltage than a smaller one at the same location. However, the effect of sensor location seems to be more significant for larger sensors due to the cancelling problem. Overall, PVDF sensors exhibit excellent sensing capability for in-plane dynamic strain induced by impact loading. PMID:27128919

  19. Perihelion Power Constraint and Wheel-Off-Loading Impact on BepiColombo's Relativity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Anja Katharina; Jehn, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the consequences of the Perihelion Power Constraint (PPC) are presented along with the impact of the Momentum Wheel-Off-loading (WOL) events on the estimation precision of the post-Newtonian parameters (PNP). This analysis will provide an estimate of the outcome of the relativity experiment in the framework of the joint mission between ESA and JAXA, named BepiColombo. The Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), one of the two scientific elements of the composite spacecraft, aims to verify Einstein's theory of General Relativity plus alternative theories of gravitation to an unprecedented degree of accuracy [1]. The PPC describes the switch-off of the Ka-transponder when Mercury is ±35° around perihelion [2]. This causes a decrease in the quality of radiometric measurements. The implemented PPC distinguishes between different geometries such as inferior and superior constellations. Moreover, it differentiates between the case in which Mercury is close to superior solar conjunction (SSC) while being around perihelion and the one of only being in SSC. Our treatment has the essential effect that the standard deviation of range and doppler measurements is increased in the perihelion region by up to 1.83 ṡ 10‑5 km/s (doppler noise). There is no clear trend to be seen in the resulting PNP uncertainties. For instance, the value of the estimation bias of the PNP γ of 8.232 ṡ 10‑6 is almost by factor two larger than in the case when the PPC is not activated (4.243 ṡ 10‑6). But applying the PPC to the back-up trajectory this trend is not confirmed, since the reverse is true for the γ uncertainty σ(γPPC) < σ(γref). However, the order of magnitude is comparable to the results obtained by Schettino [3], that is 1.04 ṡ 10‑6. The influence of the WOL frequency of about 12 hours compared to about 24 hours is investigated. Wheel off-loadings are implemented in the software by increasing the diagonal values of the covariance matrix that correspond to

  20. Gold Nanocages Covered with Thermally-responsive Polymers for Controlled Release by High-intensity Focused Ultrasound**

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiyang; Cai, Xin; Kim, Chulhong; Sun, Guorong; Zhang, Yu; Deng, Rui; Yang, Miaoxin; Chen, Jingyi; Achilefu, Samuel; Wang, Lihong V.; Xia, Younan

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Au nanocages covered with smart, thermally-responsive polymers for controlled release with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU is a highly precise medical procedure that uses focused ultrasound to heat and destroy pathogenic tissue rapidly and locally in a non-invasive or minimally invasive manner. The released dosage could be remotely controlled by manipulating the power of HIFU and/or the duration of exposure. We demonstrated localized release within the focal volume of HIFU by using gelatin phantom samples containing dye-loaded Au nanocages. By placing chicken breast tissues on top of the phantoms, we further demonstrated the feasibility of this system for controlled release at depths up to 30 mm. Because it can penetrate more deeply into soft tissues than near-infrared light, HIFU is a potentially more effective external stimulus for rapid, on-demand drug release. PMID:21321760

  1. The impact of surface loading and dosing scheme on the skin uptake of fragrances.

    PubMed

    Berthaud, Fabienne; Smith, Benjamin; Boncheva, Mila

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the skin uptake of γ-undecalactone, decanol, and dodecyl acetate in an in vitro, un-occluded penetration assay in which they were applied to porcine skin at different finite loadings and application schemes. The pattern of fractional uptake differed between the chemicals and did not show the often assumed inverse correlation with surface loading. Furthermore, the mass uptake of identical cumulative amounts of the chemicals was not always additive. These results show that the uptake of fragrances in absence of occlusion and at finite loadings is chemical-specific and depends on the surface loading, the application scheme, and most probably, on the effects of the chemicals on the skin barrier efficiency. The observed lack of additivity might explain some of the differences in the responses observed in patch and repeated open application tests, and the boosting of the allergic state in sensitized individuals by sub-clinical exposures. PMID:24041533

  2. Assessment of load-frequency-control impacts caused by small wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtice, D. H.; Reddoch, T. W.

    A method is presented to analyze the effects small wind turbines' (WTs) output may have on the load frequency control process. A simulation model of a utility's automatic generation control (AGC) process is used with recorded real time system load data modified by synthesized data characterizing the aggregate output of small WTs. A series of WT output scenarios are defined for various WT penetrations of the total system load. WT output scenarios, varying in frequency and magnitude, are combined with system load variations to test the effectiveness of present AGC control strategies. System performance change from the base case is assessed using area control error (ACE) values, time between zero crossings, inadvertent accumulation, and control pulses sent to regulating units.

  3. Impact of Load Balancing on Unstructured Adaptive Grid Computations for Distributed-Memory Multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Andrew; Biswas, Rupak; Simon, Horst D.

    1996-01-01

    The computational requirements for an adaptive solution of unsteady problems change as the simulation progresses. This causes workload imbalance among processors on a parallel machine which, in turn, requires significant data movement at runtime. We present a new dynamic load-balancing framework, called JOVE, that balances the workload across all processors with a global view. Whenever the computational mesh is adapted, JOVE is activated to eliminate the load imbalance. JOVE has been implemented on an IBM SP2 distributed-memory machine in MPI for portability. Experimental results for two model meshes demonstrate that mesh adaption with load balancing gives more than a sixfold improvement over one without load balancing. We also show that JOVE gives a 24-fold speedup on 64 processors compared to sequential execution.

  4. Deterministic and probabilistic analysis of damping device resistance under impact loads from nuclear fuel container drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, J.; Bajer, M.; Barnat, J.; Smutný, J.

    2010-12-01

    Pedestrian-induced vibrations are a criterion for serviceability. This loading is significant for light-weight footbridge structures, but was established as a basic loading for the ceilings of various ordinary buildings. Wide variations of this action exist. To verify the different conclusions of various authors, vertical pressure measurements invoked during walking were performed. In the article the approaches of different design codes are also shown.

  5. Effect of high-intensity ultrasonic treatment on microstructure, hardness and wear behaviour of the hypereutectic Mg-5Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, M. E.; Waly, M. A.; El-Sheikh, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of high-intensity ultrasonic treatment (HIUST) on microstructure, hardness and wear behavior in Mg-5wt.%Si hypereutectic alloy has been investigated. The results showed clearly that without HIUST, most of primary Mg2Si appeared as coarse dendritic morphology with average size of about 200 µm. With HIUST, the average size of primary Mg2Si decreased significantly to about 33 µm and their morphologies changed to polyhedral shape. The modification mechanism is mainly attributed conjugation of two mechanisms: cavitation-enhanced heterogeneous nucleation and cavitation-induced dendrite fragmentation. The alloy treated with HIUST has higher hardness and wear resistance than that untreated with HIUST. The wear mechanism of investigated alloys at low applied load (10 N) and low sliding speed (0.3 m/s) is a mild abrasive oxidative wear with little adhesion. However, the wear mechanism due to the applied high loads (30, 50 N) at low sliding speed (0.3 m/s) and/or to the applied high sliding speeds (0.6, 0.9 m/s) under low load (10 N), could be described as delamination mechanism. The microstructures of the specimens were analyzed by optical microscope (OM) (model OPTIKA M-790, Italy). Energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) affiliated to field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) (model Quanta FEG, The Netherlands) were performed to reveal the concentration of alloying elements in selected areas of the microstructure.

  6. Recovery facilitation with Montmorency cherries following high-intensity, metabolically challenging exercise.

    PubMed

    Bell, Phillip G; Walshe, Ian H; Davison, Gareth W; Stevenson, Emma J; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-04-01

    The impact of Montmorency tart cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) concentrate (MC) on physiological indices and functional performance was examined following a bout of high-intensity stochastic cycling. Trained cyclists (n = 16) were equally divided into 2 groups (MC or isoenergetic placebo (PLA)) and consumed 30 mL of supplement, twice per day for 8 consecutive days. On the fifth day of supplementation, participants completed a 109-min cycling trial designed to replicate road race demands. Functional performance (maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), cycling efficiency, 6-s peak cycling power) and delayed onset muscle soreness were assessed at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 h post-trial. Blood samples collected at baseline, immediately pre- and post-trial, and at 1, 3, 5, 24, 48, and 72 h post-trial were analysed for indices of inflammation (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)), oxidative stress (lipid hydroperoxides), and muscle damage (creatine kinase). MVIC (P < 0.05) did not decline in the MC group (vs. PLA) across the 72-h post-trial period and economy (P < 0.05) was improved in the MC group at 24 h. IL-6 (P < 0.001) and hsCRP (P < 0.05) responses to the trial were attenuated with MC (vs. PLA). No other blood markers were significantly different between MC and PLA groups. The results of the study suggest that Montmorency cherry concentrate can be an efficacious functional food for accelerating recovery and reducing exercise-induced inflammation following strenuous cycling exercise. PMID:25794236

  7. Charcoal reflectance reveals early holocene boreal deciduous forests burned at high intensities.

    PubMed

    Hudspith, Victoria A; Belcher, Claire M; Kelly, Ryan; Hu, Feng Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Wildfire size, frequency, and severity are increasing in the Alaskan boreal forest in response to climate warming. One of the potential impacts of this changing fire regime is the alteration of successional trajectories, from black spruce to mixed stands dominated by aspen, a vegetation composition not experienced since the early Holocene. Such changes in vegetation composition may consequently alter the intensity of fires, influencing fire feedbacks to the ecosystem. Paleorecords document past wildfire-vegetation dynamics and as such, are imperative for our understanding of how these ecosystems will respond to future climate warming. For the first time, we have used reflectance measurements of macroscopic charcoal particles (>180μm) from an Alaskan lake-sediment record to estimate ancient charring temperatures (termed pyrolysis intensity). We demonstrate that pyrolysis intensity increased markedly from an interval of birch tundra 11 ky ago (mean 1.52%Ro; 485°C), to the expansion of trees on the landscape ~10.5 ky ago, remaining high to the present (mean 3.54%Ro; 640°C) irrespective of stand composition. Despite differing flammabilities and adaptations to fire, the highest pyrolysis intensities derive from two intervals with distinct vegetation compositions. 1) the expansion of mixed aspen and spruce woodland at 10 cal. kyr BP, and 2) the establishment of black spruce, and the modern boreal forest at 4 cal. kyr BP. Based on our analysis, we infer that predicted expansion of deciduous trees into the boreal forest in the future could lead to high intensity, but low severity fires, potentially moderating future climate-fire feedbacks. PMID:25853712

  8. Personalised Prescription of Scalable High Intensity Interval Training to Inactive Female Adults of Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Jacqueline L.

    2016-01-01

    Stepping is a convenient form of scalable high-intensity interval training (HIIT) that may lead to health benefits. However, the accurate personalised prescription of stepping is hampered by a lack of evidence on optimal stepping cadences and step heights for various populations. This study examined the acute physiological responses to stepping exercise at various heights and cadences in young (n = 14) and middle-aged (n = 14) females in order to develop an equation that facilitates prescription of stepping at targeted intensities. Participants completed a step test protocol consisting of randomised three-minute bouts at different step cadences (80, 90, 100, 110 steps·min-1) and step heights (17, 25, 30, 34 cm). Aerobic demand and heart rate values were measured throughout. Resting metabolic rate was measured in order to develop female specific metabolic equivalents (METs) for stepping. Results revealed significant differences between age groups for METs and heart rate reserve, and within-group differences for METs, heart rate, and metabolic cost, at different step heights and cadences. At a given step height and cadence, middle-aged females were required to work at an intensity on average 1.9 ± 0.26 METs greater than the younger females. A prescriptive equation was developed to assess energy cost in METs using multilevel regression analysis with factors of step height, step cadence and age. Considering recent evidence supporting accumulated bouts of HIIT exercise for health benefits, this equation, which allows HIIT to be personally prescribed to inactive and sedentary women, has potential impact as a public health exercise prescription tool. PMID:26848956

  9. Personalised Prescription of Scalable High Intensity Interval Training to Inactive Female Adults of Different Ages.

    PubMed

    Mair, Jacqueline L; Nevill, Alan M; De Vito, Giuseppe; Boreham, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    Stepping is a convenient form of scalable high-intensity interval training (HIIT) that may lead to health benefits. However, the accurate personalised prescription of stepping is hampered by a lack of evidence on optimal stepping cadences and step heights for various populations. This study examined the acute physiological responses to stepping exercise at various heights and cadences in young (n = 14) and middle-aged (n = 14) females in order to develop an equation that facilitates prescription of stepping at targeted intensities. Participants completed a step test protocol consisting of randomised three-minute bouts at different step cadences (80, 90, 100, 110 steps·min-1) and step heights (17, 25, 30, 34 cm). Aerobic demand and heart rate values were measured throughout. Resting metabolic rate was measured in order to develop female specific metabolic equivalents (METs) for stepping. Results revealed significant differences between age groups for METs and heart rate reserve, and within-group differences for METs, heart rate, and metabolic cost, at different step heights and cadences. At a given step height and cadence, middle-aged females were required to work at an intensity on average 1.9 ± 0.26 METs greater than the younger females. A prescriptive equation was developed to assess energy cost in METs using multilevel regression analysis with factors of step height, step cadence and age. Considering recent evidence supporting accumulated bouts of HIIT exercise for health benefits, this equation, which allows HIIT to be personally prescribed to inactive and sedentary women, has potential impact as a public health exercise prescription tool. PMID:26848956

  10. Charcoal Reflectance Reveals Early Holocene Boreal Deciduous Forests Burned at High Intensities

    PubMed Central

    Hudspith, Victoria A.; Belcher, Claire M.; Kelly, Ryan; Hu, Feng Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Wildfire size, frequency, and severity are increasing in the Alaskan boreal forest in response to climate warming. One of the potential impacts of this changing fire regime is the alteration of successional trajectories, from black spruce to mixed stands dominated by aspen, a vegetation composition not experienced since the early Holocene. Such changes in vegetation composition may consequently alter the intensity of fires, influencing fire feedbacks to the ecosystem. Paleorecords document past wildfire-vegetation dynamics and as such, are imperative for our understanding of how these ecosystems will respond to future climate warming. For the first time, we have used reflectance measurements of macroscopic charcoal particles (>180μm) from an Alaskan lake-sediment record to estimate ancient charring temperatures (termed pyrolysis intensity). We demonstrate that pyrolysis intensity increased markedly from an interval of birch tundra 11 ky ago (mean 1.52%Ro; 485°C), to the expansion of trees on the landscape ∼10.5 ky ago, remaining high to the present (mean 3.54%Ro; 640°C) irrespective of stand composition. Despite differing flammabilities and adaptations to fire, the highest pyrolysis intensities derive from two intervals with distinct vegetation compositions. 1) the expansion of mixed aspen and spruce woodland at 10 cal. kyr BP, and 2) the establishment of black spruce, and the modern boreal forest at 4 cal. kyr BP. Based on our analysis, we infer that predicted expansion of deciduous trees into the boreal forest in the future could lead to high intensity, but low severity fires, potentially moderating future climate-fire feedbacks. PMID:25853712

  11. Experimental transient and permanent deformation studies of steel-sphere-impacted or impulsively-loaded aluminum beams with clamped ends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witmer, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    The sheet explosive loading technique (SELT) was employed to obtain elastic-plastic, large-deflection transient and/or permanent strain data on simple well-defined structural specimens and materials: initially-flat 6061-T651 aluminum beams with both ends ideally clamped via integral construction. The SELT loading technique was chosen since it is both convenient and provides forcing function information of small uncertainty. These data will be useful for evaluating pertinent structural response prediction methods. A second objective was to obtain high-quality transient-strain data for a well-defined structural/material model subjected to impact by a rigid body of known mass, impact velocity, and geometry; large-deflection, elastic-plastic transient response conditions are of primary interest. The beam with both ends clamped and a steel sphere as the impacting body were chosen. The steel sphere was launched vertically by explosive propulsion to achieve various desired impact velocities. The sphere/beam impact tests resulted in producing a wide range of structural responses and permanent deformations, including rupture of the beam from excessive structural response in two cases. The transient and permanent strain data as well as the permanent deflection data obtained are of high quality and should be useful for checking and evaluating methods for predicting the responses of simple 2-d structures to fragment (sphere) impact. Transient strain data very close to the point of impact were not obtained over as long a time as desirable because the gage(s) in that region became detached during the transient response.

  12. Impact of combined transient plasma/heat loads on tungsten performance below and above recrystallization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenhoff, Th.; Bardin, S.; Greuner, H.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.; Morgan, T. W.; Pintsuk, G.; Pitts, R. A.; Riccardi, B.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of recrystallization on thermal shock resistance has been identified as an issue that may influence the long term performance of ITER tungsten (W) divertor components. To investigate this issue a unique series of experiments has been performed on ITER divertor W monoblock mock-ups in three EU high heat flux facilities: GLADIS (neutral beam), JUDITH 2 (electron beam) and Magnum-PSI (plasma beam). To simulate ITER mitigated edge localised modes, heat fluxes between 0.11 and 0.6 GW m-2 were applied for Δt  <  1 ms. Two different base temperatures, Tbase  =  1200 °C and 1500 °C, were chosen on which ~18 000/100 000 transient events were superimposed representing several full ITER burning plasma discharges in terms of number of transients and particle fluence. An increase in roughening for both e-beam and plasma loaded surfaces was observed when loading during or after recrystallization and when loading at higher temperature. However, regarding the formation of cracks and microstructural modifications the response was different for e-beam and plasma loaded surfaces. The samples loaded in Magnum-PSI did not crack nor show any sign of recrystallization, even at Tbase  =  1500 °C. This could be a dynamic hydrogen flux effect, because pre-loading of samples with hydrogen neutrals (GLADIS) or without hydrogen (e-beam JUDITH 2) did not yield this result. These results show clearly that the loading method used when investigating and qualifying the thermal shock performance of materials for ITER and future fusion reactors can play an important role. This should be properly accounted for and in fact should be the subject of further R&D.

  13. Assessing the Long Term Impact of Phosphorus Fertilization on Phosphorus Loadings Using AnnAGNPS

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yongping; Bingner, Ronald L.; Locke, Martin A.; Stafford, Jim; Theurer, Fred D.

    2011-01-01

    High phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields has been an environmental concern because of potential water quality problems in streams and lakes. To better understand the process of P loss and evaluate the effects of different phosphorus fertilization rates on phosphorus losses, the USDA Annualized AGricultural Non-Point Source (AnnAGNPS) pollutant loading model was applied to the Ohio Upper Auglaize watershed, located in the southern portion of the Maumee River Basin. In this study, the AnnAGNPS model was calibrated using USGS monitored data; and then the effects of different phosphorus fertilization rates on phosphorus loadings were assessed. It was found that P loadings increase as fertilization rate increases, and long term higher P application would lead to much higher P loadings to the watershed outlet. The P loadings to the watershed outlet have a dramatic change after some time with higher P application rate. This dramatic change of P loading to the watershed outlet indicates that a “critical point” may exist in the soil at which soil P loss to water changes dramatically. Simulations with different initial soil P contents showed that the higher the initial soil P content is, the less time it takes to reach the “critical point” where P loadings to the watershed outlet increases dramatically. More research needs to be done to understand the processes involved in the transfer of P between the various stable, active and labile states in the soil to ensure that the model simulations are accurate. This finding may be useful in setting up future P application and management guidelines. PMID:21776225

  14. Assessing the long term impact of phosphorus fertilization on phosphorus loadings using AnnAGNPS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongping; Bingner, Ronald L; Locke, Martin A; Stafford, Jim; Theurer, Fred D

    2011-06-01

    High phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields has been an environmental concern because of potential water quality problems in streams and lakes. To better understand the process of P loss and evaluate the effects of different phosphorus fertilization rates on phosphorus losses, the USDA Annualized AGricultural Non-Point Source (AnnAGNPS) pollutant loading model was applied to the Ohio Upper Auglaize watershed, located in the southern portion of the Maumee River Basin. In this study, the AnnAGNPS model was calibrated using USGS monitored data; and then the effects of different phosphorus fertilization rates on phosphorus loadings were assessed. It was found that P loadings increase as fertilization rate increases, and long term higher P application would lead to much higher P loadings to the watershed outlet. The P loadings to the watershed outlet have a dramatic change after some time with higher P application rate. This dramatic change of P loading to the watershed outlet indicates that a "critical point" may exist in the soil at which soil P loss to water changes dramatically. Simulations with different initial soil P contents showed that the higher the initial soil P content is, the less time it takes to reach the "critical point" where P loadings to the watershed outlet increases dramatically. More research needs to be done to understand the processes involved in the transfer of P between the various stable, active and labile states in the soil to ensure that the model simulations are accurate. This finding may be useful in setting up future P application and management guidelines. PMID:21776225

  15. High-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and hypersplenism: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Zhu, Hui; Mei, Zhechuan; Jin, Chengbing; Ran, Lifeng; Zhou, Kun; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Lian; She, Chaokun

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to preliminarily investigate the efficacy and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and hypersplenism. Nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma complicated by hypersplenism (5 male and 4 female; median age, 56 years; range, 51-66 years) were treated with ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound. Complications were recorded. Laboratory examination and magnetic resonance imaging were used to evaluate the efficacy. After high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment, mean spleen ablation ± SD of 28.76% ± 6.1% was discovered; meanwhile, the white blood cell count, platelet count, and liver function of the patients were substantially improved during the follow-up period. In addition, symptoms such as epistaxis and gingival bleeding were ameliorated or even eliminated, and the quality of life was improved. Follow-up imaging showed a nonperfused volume in the spleen and an absence of a tumor blood supply at the treated lesions in the liver. For the first time to our knowledge, high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation was used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma complicated by hypersplenism. High-intensity focused ultrasound may be an effective and safe alternative for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma complicated by hypersplenism, but further studies are necessary to clarify the mechanisms. PMID:24065267

  16. Gaussian vs non-Gaussian turbulence: impact on wind turbine loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J.; Mann, J.; Natarajan, A.; Patton, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    In wind energy applications the turbulent velocity field of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) is often characterised by Gaussian probability density functions. When estimating the dynamical loads on wind turbines this has been the rule more than anything else. From numerous studies in the laboratory, in Direct Numerical Simulations, and from in-situ measurements of the ABL we know, however, that turbulence is not purely Gaussian: the smallest and fastest scales often exhibit extreme behaviour characterised by strong non-Gaussian statistics. In this contribution we want to investigate whether these non-Gaussian effects are important when determining wind turbine loads, and hence of utmost importance to the design criteria and lifetime of a wind turbine. We devise a method based on Principal Orthogonal Decomposition where non-Gaussian velocity fields generated by high-resolution pseudo-spectral Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of the ABL are transformed so that they maintain the exact same second-order statistics including variations of the statistics with height, but are otherwise Gaussian. In that way we can investigate in isolation the question whether it is important for wind turbine loads to include non-Gaussian properties of atmospheric turbulence. As an illustration the Figure show both a non-Gaussian velocity field (left) from our LES, and its transformed Gaussian Counterpart (right). Whereas the horizontal velocity components (top) look close to identical, the vertical components (bottom) are not: the non-Gaussian case is much more fluid-like (like in a sketch by Michelangelo). The question is then: Does the wind turbine see this? Using the load simulation software HAWC2 with both the non-Gaussian and newly constructed Gaussian fields, respectively, we show that the Fatigue loads and most of the Extreme loads are unaltered when using non-Gaussian velocity fields. The turbine thus acts like a low-pass filter which average out the non-Gaussian behaviour on time

  17. Simulated impacts of climate change on phosphorus loading to Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale; Saad, David A.; Christiansen, Daniel E.; Lorenz, David J

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) loading to the Great Lakes has caused various types of eutrophication problems. Future climatic changes may modify this loading because climatic models project changes in future meteorological conditions, especially for the key hydrologic driver — precipitation. Therefore, the goal of this study is to project how P loading may change from the range of projected climatic changes. To project the future response in P loading, the HydroSPARROW approach was developed that links results from two spatially explicit models, the SPAtially Referenced Regression on Watershed attributes (SPARROW) transport and fate watershed model and the water-quantity Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). PRMS was used to project changes in streamflow throughout the Lake Michigan Basin using downscaled meteorological data from eight General Circulation Models (GCMs) subjected to three greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Downscaled GCMs project a + 2.1 to + 4.0 °C change in average-annual air temperature (+ 2.6 °C average) and a − 5.1% to + 16.7% change in total annual precipitation (+ 5.1% average) for this geographic area by the middle of this century (2045–2065) and larger changes by the end of the century. The climatic changes by mid-century are projected to result in a − 21.2% to + 8.9% change in total annual streamflow (− 1.8% average) and a − 29.6% to + 17.2% change in total annual P loading (− 3.1% average). Although the average projected changes in streamflow and P loading are relatively small for the entire basin, considerable variability exists spatially and among GCMs because of their variability in projected future precipitation.

  18. The high intensity solar cell - Key to low cost photovoltaic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. L.; Goradia, C.

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses the problems associated with conventional solar cells at high intensities and presents the design considerations and performance characteristics of the 'high intensity' (HI) solar cell which appears to eliminate the major problems. Test data obtained at greater than 250 AM1 suns gave a peak output power density of 2 W per sq cm at an efficiency exceeding 6% with an unoptimized cell operating at over 100 C. It appears that operation at 1000 AM1 suns at efficiencies greater than 10% is possible. At 1000 AM1 suns and 10% efficiency, the HI cell manufacturing cost is estimated to be $0.25/watt, with multi-megawatt annual production capability already existing within the industrial sector. A high intensity solar system was also analyzed to determine its cost effectiveness and to assess the benefits of further improving HI cell efficiency.

  19. Overview of the High Intensity Neutrino Source Linac R&D program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.; Appollinari, G.; Carneiro, J.P.; Gonin, I.; Hanna, B.; Hays, S.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lanfranco, G.; Madrak, R.L.; Moretti, A.; Nicol, T.; /Fermilab /Argonne

    2008-09-01

    The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is building a first-of-a-kind 60 MeV superconducting H- linac. The HINS Linac incorporates superconducting solenoids for transverse focusing, high power RF vector modulators for independent control of multiple cavities powered from a single klystron, and superconducting spoke-type accelerating cavities starting at 10 MeV. This will be the first application and demonstration of any of these technologies in a low-energy, high-intensity proton/H- linear accelerator. The HINS effort is relevant to a high intensity, superconducting H- linac that might serve the next generation of neutrino physics and muon storage ring/collider experiments. An overview of the HINS program, machine design, status, and outlook is presented.

  20. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy: behavior of biological specimens under high-intensity illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ping C.; Lin, Bai-Ling; Kao, Fu-Jen; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2000-07-01

    Recent development in multi-photon fluorescence microscopy, second and third harmonic generation microscopy (SHG and THG) and CARS open new dimensions in biological studies. Not only the technologies allow probing the biological specimen both functionally and structurally with increasing spatial and temporal resolution, but also raise the interest in how biological specimens respond to high intensity illumination commonly used in these types of microscopy. We have used maize leaf protoplast as a model system to evaluate the photo-induced response of living sample under high intensity illumination. It was found that cells can be seriously damaged by high intensity NIR irradiation even the linear absorption coefficient in low in these wavelengths. Micro-spectroscopy of single chloroplast also allows us to gain insight on the possible photo-damage mechanism. In addition to fluorescence emission, second harmonic generation was observed in the maize protoplasts.

  1. Modeling the impact of restoration efforts on phosphorus loading and transport through Everglades National Park, FL, USA.

    PubMed

    Long, Stephanie A; Tachiev, Georgio I; Fennema, Robert; Cook, Amy M; Sukop, Michael C; Miralles-Wilhelm, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Ecosystems of Florida Everglades are highly sensitive to phosphorus loading. Future restoration efforts, which focus on restoring Everglades water flows, may pose a threat to the health of these ecosystems. To determine the fate and transport of total phosphorus and evaluate proposed Everglades restoration, a water quality model has been developed using the hydrodynamic results from the M3ENP (Mike Marsh Model of Everglades National Park)--a physically-based hydrological numerical model which uses MIKE SHE/MIKE 11 software. Using advection-dispersion with reactive transport for the model, parameters were optimized and phosphorus loading in the overland water column was modeled with good accuracy (60%). The calibrated M3ENP-AD model was then modified to include future bridge construction and canal water level changes, which have shown to increase flows into ENP. These bridge additions increased total dissolved phosphorus (TP) load downstream in Shark Slough and decreased TP load in downstream Taylor Slough. However, there was a general decrease in TP concentration and TP mass per area over the entire model domain. The M3ENP-AD model has determined the mechanisms for TP transport and quantified the impacts of ENP restoration efforts on the spatial-temporal distribution of phosphorus transport. This tool can be used to guide future Everglades restoration decisions. PMID:25804875

  2. Impact of combined hydrogen plasma and transient heat loads on the performance of tungsten as plasma facing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, M.; Bardin, S.; Huber, A.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Morgan, T. W.; Pintsuk, G.; Reinhart, M.; Sergienko, G.; Steudel, I.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were performed in three different facilities in order to investigate the impact of combined steady state deuterium plasma exposure and ELM-like thermal shock events on the performance of ultra high purity tungsten. The electron beam facility JUDITH 1 was used to simulate pure thermal loads. In addition the linear plasma devices PSI-2 and Pilot-PSI have been used for successive as well as simultaneous exposure where the transient heat loads were applied by a high energy laser and the pulsed plasma operation, respectively. The results show that the damage behaviour strongly depends on the loading conditions and the sequence of the particle and heat flux exposure. This is due to hydrogen embrittlement and/or a higher defect concentration in the tungsten near surface region due to supersaturation of hydrogen. The different results in terms of damage formation from both linear plasma devices indicate that also the plasma parameters such as particle energy, flux and fluence, plasma impurities and the pulse shape have a strong influence on the damage performance. In addition, the different loading methods such as the scanning with the electron beam in contrast to the homogeneous exposure by the laser leads to an faster increase of the surface roughness due to plastic deformation.

  3. DNA damage, tumor mutational load and their impact on immune responses against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiou, Ioannis; Bamias, Aristotelis; Dimopoulos, Meletios-Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Advances in immunotherapy have changed the therapeutic landscape in many malignancies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors have already received regulatory approval in melanomas, lung, renal and bladder carcinomas. A common feature of these neoplasms is the increased mutational load, related to a possible increase number of tumor neoantigens that are recognized by the immune system. The mechanisms that DNA damage could confer to the mutational load and the formation of neoantigens and how this could be exploited to advance our immunotherapeutic strategies is discussed in this review. PMID:27563651

  4. Acute high-intensity exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in young, healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungyun; Brothers, R Matthew; Castelli, Darla M; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chen, Yen T; Salinas, Mandy M; Kim, Jihoon; Jung, Yeonhak; Calvert, Hannah G

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise can positively impact cognition. The present study examined the effect of acute high-intensity aerobic exercise on prefrontal-dependent cognitive performance and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Fifty-eight young adults were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (a) an acute bout of high-intensity exercise (n=29) or (b) a non-exercise control (n=29). Participants in the exercise group improved performance on inhibitory control in Stroop interference and on cognitive flexibility in Trail Making Test (TMT) Part-B compared with participants in the control group and increased BDNF immediately after exercise. There was a significant relationship between BDNF and TMT Part-B on the pre-post change following exercise. These findings provide support for the association between improved prefrontal-dependent cognitive performance and increased BDNF in response to acute exercise. We conclude that the changes in BDNF concentration may be partially responsible for prefrontal-dependent cognitive functioning following an acute bout of exercise. PMID:27450438

  5. Impact of suspended sediment and nutrient loading from land uses against water quality in the Hii River basin, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somura, H.; Takeda, I.; Arnold, J. G.; Mori, Y.; Jeong, J.; Kannan, N.; Hoffman, D.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryLake Shinji lies in eastern Shimane Prefecture, and is typical of brackish lakes in Japan. Water quality of the lake does not meet the expected environmental standards for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP), even though the national and prefectural governments have tried to improve water quality by developing maintenance scenarios for sewage, plant effluent, agricultural activity, and forestry. Consequently, detailed data of nutrient loading to the lake from river inflows is crucial to support strategies for improving the lake water environment. The Hii River contributes approximately 80% of the discharge flowing into the lake. In this study, we examine the Hii River catchment with a focus on land uses such as paddy fields, upland fields, residential areas, and forestry. Average annual discharges of suspended sediment (SS), TN, and TP loads were determined at Otsu, near the outlet of the basin into Lake Shinji. We also determined average yield per unit area of SS, TN, and TP loads from each land use. Yields per unit area from upland areas were the greatest, whereas yields from forests were the lowest. Forests were the largest contributor of SS, TN, and TP in the basin, because of its dominant land area. Upland fields had the second largest impact on these loads in the basin, because fertilizer applied to the fields is a major source of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Large differences in yields per unit area between fine and rainy day conditions were also observed, especially for SS and TP loads. Furthermore, we determined that a major pathway of N to the river was through groundwater, regardless of land use, whereas P was transported to the river with sediments, especially in paddy and upland fields. Based on these analyses, it will be difficult to reduce the SS load discharge in the basin in the future, because forestry is the major source. In contrast, N and P load reductions are straightforward, because the primary source is agricultural, and

  6. Fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp use in chambers and greenhouses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhans, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescent and High Intensity Discharge lamps have opened up great opportunities for researchers to study plant growth under controlled environment conditions and for commercial growers to increase plant production during low/light periods. Specific technical qualities of fluorescent and HID lamps have been critically reviewed. I will direct my remarks to fluorescent and high intensity discharge (HID) lamps in growth chambers, growth rooms, and greenhouses. I will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using each lamp in growth chambers, growth rooms and greenhouses.

  7. How broadband speech may avoid neural firing rate saturation at high intensities and maintain intelligibility

    PubMed Central

    Bashford, James A.; Warren, Richard M.; Lenz, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments examined the intelligibility enhancement produced when noise bands flank high intensity rectangular band speech. When white noise flankers were added to the speech individually at a low spectrum level (−30 dB relative to the speech) only the higher frequency flanker produced a significant intelligibility increase (i.e., recovery from intelligibility rollover). However, the lower-frequency flanking noise did produce an equivalent intelligibility increase when its spectrum level was increased by 10 dB. This asymmetrical intensity requirement, and other results, support previous suggestions that intelligibility loss at high intensities is reduced by lateral inhibition in the cochlear nuclei. PMID:25920887

  8. Impact of excessive occlusal load on successfully-osseointegrated dental implants: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michael; Chronopoulos, Vasileios; Mattheos, Nikos

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to review the available evidence on the response of the peri-implant bone when subjected to excessive occlusal forces. The search strategy included papers published in English in the Medline database and the Wiley Online Library from January 1991 to December 2011. Experimental or review papers reporting the conditions of the peri-implant bone of dental implants submitted to excessive occlusal loading in the presence of a controlled oral hygiene regime were eligible for inclusion. The knowledge regarding the response of the peri-implant bone when the dental implant is excessively loaded is limited, and the level of evidence is poor. With animal experimental studies showing conflicting results, it is unclear whether occlusal overload might cause marginal bone loss or total loss of osseointegration to already osseointegrated dental implants when the applied load exceeds the biologically-acceptable limit. This biological limit is also unknown. Furthermore, higher remodeling activity of the peri-implant bone is found around implants subjected to high loading forces. PMID:23918506

  9. Manipulation of Cognitive Load Variables and Impact on Auscultation Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ruth; Grierson, Lawrence; Norman, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Health profession educators have identified auscultation skill as a learning need for health professional students. This article explores the application of cognitive load theory (CLT) to designing cardiac and respiratory auscultation skill instruction for senior-level undergraduate nursing students. Three experiments assessed student auscultation…

  10. How does mass loading impact local versus global control on dayside reconnection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Brambles, O. J.; Wiltberger, M.; Lotko, W.; Ouellette, J. E.; Lyon, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the effects of magnetospheric mass loading on the control of dayside magnetic reconnection using global magnetospheric simulations. The study iys motivated by a recent debate on whether the integrated dayside magnetic reconnection rate is solely controlled by local processes (local-control theory) or global merging processes (global-control theory). The local-control theory suggests that the integrated dayside reconnection rate is controlled by the local plasma parameters. The global-control theory argues that the integrated rate is determined by the net force acting on the flow in the magnetosheath rather than the local microphysics. Controlled numerical simulations using idealized ionospheric outflow specifications suggest a possible mixed-control theory, that is, (1) a small amount of mass loading at the dayside magnetopause only redistributes local reconnection rate without a significant change in the integrated reconnection rate and (2) a large amount of mass loading reduces both local reconnection rates and the integrated reconnection rate on the dayside. The transition between global-control- and local-control-dominated regimes depends on (but not limited to) the source region, the amount, the location, and the spatial extension of the mass loading at the dayside magnetopause.

  11. The Impact of Wireless Technology on Loading Trucks at an Auto Parts Distribution Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goomas, David T.

    2012-01-01

    An intervention was introduced for truck loaders that used wireless vehicle mount computers that included auditory, visual feedback, and immediate data delivery. The implementation reliably reduced pallets from being loaded out of sequence for all outbound trucks in multistop routes. The role of the organizational behavior management (OBM)…

  12. Soldier-relevant body borne load impacts minimum foot clearance during obstacle negotiation.

    PubMed

    Brown, T N; Loverro, K L; Schiffman, J M

    2016-07-01

    Soldiers often trip and fall on duty, resulting in injury. This study examined ten male soldiers' ability to negotiate an obstacle. Participants had lead and trail foot minimum foot clearance (MFC) parameters quantified while crossing a low (305 mm) and high (457 mm) obstacle with (19.4 kg) and without (6 kg) body borne load. To minimize tripping risk, participants increased lead foot MFC (p = 0.028) and reduced lead (p = 0.044) and trail (p = 0.035) foot variability when negotiating an obstacle with body borne load. While obstacle height had no effect on MFC (p = 0.273 and p = 0.126), placing the trail foot closer to the high obstacle when crossing with body borne load, resulted in greater lead (R = 0.640, b = 0.241, p = 0.046) and trail (R = 0.636, b = 0.287, p = 0.048) MFC. Soldiers, when carrying typical military loads, may be able to minimize their risk of tripping over an obstacle by creating a safety margin via greater foot clearance with reduced variability. PMID:26995036

  13. Pre-curving analysis of an opening crack in a magnetoelectroelastic strip under in-plane impact loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Keqiang; Chen, Zengtao

    2012-12-01

    An opening crack in a magnetoelectroelastic strip under in-plane mechanical, electric, and magnetic impact loadings is considered for magneto-electrically impermeable and permeable crack surface boundary conditions. Laplace and Fourier transforms are applied to reduce the mixed boundary value problem of the crack to dual integral equations, which are expressed in terms of Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. The asymptotic fields near the crack tip are obtained in explicit form and the corresponding field intensity factors are defined. The crack curving phenomena are investigated by applying the criterion of maximum hoop stress intensity factors. Numerical results show that the hoop stress intensity factors are influenced by the electric and magnetic loadings and the geometric size ratios.

  14. Influence of Impact-Oscillatory Loading upon the Mechanical Properties of the VT-22 Titanium Alloy Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chausov, M. G.; Pylypenko, A. P.; Berezin, V. B.; Markashova, L. I.; Kushnariova, O. S.; Hutsaylyuk, V. B.

    2016-06-01

    This study shows the effect of the specific impact-oscillatory loading (Dynamical nonequilibrium process) on the VT-22 titanium α+β-type alloy mechanical properties and microstructure. Experiments were conducted using modified universal testing machine. Physical research revealed that significant microstructural refinement of the alloy is observed after such type of loading, as the result of which the fine grains are formed with subgrain refinement which takes place within the basis of alloy. It was found that overall plastic deformation of this alloy can be increased by a factor 2.75 compared with its initial state without significant loss of strength. Also we show that such process can be used as a preliminary microstructure refinement method for such alloy.

  15. Explicit finite element modelling of heel pad mechanics in running: inclusion of body dynamics and application of physiological impact loads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Peter Vee-Sin

    2015-01-01

    Many heel pathologies including plantar heel pain may result from micro tears/trauma in the subcutaneous tissues, in which internal tissue deformation/stresses within the heel pad play an important role. Previously, many finite element models have been proposed to evaluate stresses inside the heel pad, but the majority of these models only focus on static loading boundary conditions. This study explored a dynamics modelling approach to the heel pad subjected to realistic impact loads during running. In this model, the inertial property and action of the body are described by a lumped parameter model, while the heel/shoe interactions are modelled using a viscoelastic heel pad model with contact properties. The impact force pattern, dynamic heel pad deformation and stress states predicted by the model were compared with published experimental data. Further parametrical studies revealed the model responses, in terms of internal stresses in the skin and fatty tissue, change nonlinearly when body dynamics changes. A reduction in foot's touchdown velocity resulted in a less severe impact landing and stress relief inside the heel pad, for example peak von-Mises stress in fatty tissue, was reduced by 11.3%. Applications of the model may be extendable to perform iterative analyses to further understand the complex relationships between body dynamics and stress distributions in the soft tissue of heel pad during running. This may open new opportunities to study the mechanical aetiology of plantar heel pain in runners. PMID:24980181

  16. Assessing the Impact of Agricultural Pressures on N and P Loads and Potential Eutrophication Risk at Regional Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas, R.; Gascuel-odoux, C.; Delmas, M.; Moatar, F.

    2014-12-01

    Excessive nutrient loading of freshwater bodies results in increased eutrophication risk worldwide. The processes controlling N/P transfer in agricultural landscapes are well documented through scientific studies conducted in intensively monitored catchments. However, managers need tools to assess water quality and evaluate the contribution of agriculture to eutrophication at regional scales, including unmonitored or poorly monitored areas. To this end, we present an assessment framework which includes: i) a mass-balance model to estimate diffuse N/P transfer and retention and ii) indicators based on N:P:Si molar ratios to assess potential eutrophication risk from external loads. The model, called Nutting (Dupas et al., 2013), integrates variables for both detailed description of agricultural pressures (N surplus, soil P content) and characterisation of physical attributes of catchments (including spatial attributes). It was calibrated on 160 catchments, and applied to 2210 unmonitored headwater bodies in France (Dupas et al., under review). N and P retention represented 53% and 95% of soil N and P surplus, respectively, and was mainly controlled by runoff and an index characterising infiltration/runoff properties. According to our estimates, diffuse agricultural sources represented a mean of 97% of N loads and N exceeded Si in 93% of the catchments, whilst they represented 46% of P loads and P exceeded Si in 26-65% of the catchments. Estimated eutrophication risk was highly sensitive to assumptions about P bioavailability, hence the range of headwaters potentially at risk spanned 26-63% of the catchments, depending on assumptions. To reduce this uncertainty, we recommend introducing P bioavailability tests in water monitoring programs, especially in sensitive areas. Dupas R et al. Assessing N emissions in surface water at the national level: comparison of country-wide vs. regionalized models. Sci Total Environ 2013; 443: 152-62. Dupas R et al. Assessing the impact

  17. Perspectives on the impact on vocal function of heavy vocal load among working professional music theater performers.

    PubMed

    Phyland, Debra J; Thibeault, Susan L; Benninger, Michael S; Vallance, Neil; Greenwood, Kenneth M; Smith, Julian A

    2013-05-01

    Music theater singers (MTS) typically have a heavy vocal load, but the impact on their voices has not been previously evaluated. A group of 49 MTS from two professional productions were administered the Singing Voice Handicap Index (SVHI). Responses for the SVHI demonstrated that, although the SVHI supported the performers' self-report of healthy vocal status, it lacked the sensitivity to detect potential subtle fluctuations or changes in physical functioning of the voice for working singers. Secondarily, descriptive data regarding professional working singers' perspectives were collected regarding how their singing voices typically responded to performing in a music theater production after a show, across a working week, and across a production season. Seventy-nine currently performing MTS were involved in a series of focus group interviews (n=43) or a written survey (n=36) to detail their perception of the impact of performing in an eight-show per week professional production on their vocal function and vocal health. Thematic analysis revealed the MTS commonly perceived transient and variable changes in their singing voice status in both positive and negative directions after heavy vocal load. Based on these data, a list of 97 descriptors of these perceptual changes was generated using the singers' own terminology and experiences. These included symptoms of vocal impairment and vocal fatigue but also some novel descriptors of positive vocal changes to the physical functioning of the singing voice as a perceived consequence of heavy vocal load. This study offers new and valuable insights into performers' perceptions of the impact of performing in a musical theater production on physical aspects of vocal function. PMID:23415149

  18. Injury patterns to other body regions and load vectors in nearside impact occupants with and without shoulder injuries

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Stadter, Gregory W.; Halloway, Dale E.; Pintar, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    CIREN and NASS-CDS databases were used to analyze nearside impact injuries. Front seat occupants with and without shoulder injuries were examined on an individual basis in both databases. All vehicles were from model year 2000 or newer. Variables such as the type of collision, change in velocity, principal direction force, demographics, injuries scored by the MAIS and ISS metrics, and injuries to the head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis were included. Shoulder injuries included fractures to the humerus, scapula and clavicle, and associated joint traumas. The median changes in velocities for occupants with and without shoulder injuries were 36 and 32 km/h in CIREN and 29 and 32 km/h in NASS databases. Approximately two-thirds of all cases occurred below 40 km/h. In both databases, the clavicle, scapula and humerus fractures, and AC joint dislocations were found, and the scapula fracture was associated with the clavicle, AC joint, acromion and humerus injuries in few occupants. The clavicle fracture was associated with AC joint and humerus injuries only in the NASS database. Thorax, abdomen and pelvic injuries and skull fractures increased with the presence of shoulder injuries in both databases, albeit not at the same rate. Anterior oblique loading was more frequent than pure lateral loading in both databases suggesting the importance of the oblique vector in side impact trauma. These findings underscore a need for detailed examinations of shoulder load-sharing using biomechanical studies to better understand its role in side impact traumas, shoulder biofidelity and injury assessments in dummies. PMID:24406953

  19. Injury patterns to other body regions and load vectors in nearside impact occupants with and without shoulder injuries.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Stadter, Gregory W; Halloway, Dale E; Pintar, Frank A

    2013-01-01

    CIREN and NASS-CDS databases were used to analyze nearside impact injuries. Front seat occupants with and without shoulder injuries were examined on an individual basis in both databases. All vehicles were from model year 2000 or newer. Variables such as the type of collision, change in velocity, principal direction force, demographics, injuries scored by the MAIS and ISS metrics, and injuries to the head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis were included. Shoulder injuries included fractures to the humerus, scapula and clavicle, and associated joint traumas. The median changes in velocities for occupants with and without shoulder injuries were 36 and 32 km/h in CIREN and 29 and 32 km/h in NASS databases. Approximately two-thirds of all cases occurred below 40 km/h. In both databases, the clavicle, scapula and humerus fractures, and AC joint dislocations were found, and the scapula fracture was associated with the clavicle, AC joint, acromion and humerus injuries in few occupants. The clavicle fracture was associated with AC joint and humerus injuries only in the NASS database. Thorax, abdomen and pelvic injuries and skull fractures increased with the presence of shoulder injuries in both databases, albeit not at the same rate. Anterior oblique loading was more frequent than pure lateral loading in both databases suggesting the importance of the oblique vector in side impact trauma. These findings underscore a need for detailed examinations of shoulder load-sharing using biomechanical studies to better understand its role in side impact traumas, shoulder biofidelity and injury assessments in dummies. PMID:24406953

  20. Analyses of quasi-isotropic composite plates under quasi-static point loads simulating low-velocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    In thin composite laminates, the first level of visible damage occurs in the back face and is called back face spalling. A plate-membrane coupling model, and a finite element model to analyze the large deformation behavior of eight-ply quasi-isotropic circular composite plates under impact type point loads are developed. The back face spalling phenomenon in thin composite plates is explained by using the plate-membrane coupling model and the finite element model in conjunction with the fracture mechanics principles. The experimental results verifying these models are presented. Several conclusions concerning the deformation behavior are reached and discussed in detail.

  1. A drifting impact oscillator with periodic impulsive loading: Application to percussive drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depouhon, A.; Denoël, V.; Detournay, E.

    2013-09-01

    Percussive drilling is extensively used to drill hard rocks in the earth resource industry, where it performs best compared to other drilling technologies. In this paper, we propose a novel model of the process that consists of a drifting oscillator under impulsive loading coupled with a bilinear force/penetration interface law, together with a kinetic energy threshold for continuous bit penetration. Following the formulation of the model, we analyze its steady-state response and show that there exists a parallel between theoretical and experimental predictions, as both exhibit a maximum of the average penetration rate with respect to the vertical load on bit. In addition, the existence of complex long-term dynamics with the coexistence of periodic solutions in certain parameter ranges is demonstrated.

  2. Effect of high-intensity exercise on interleukin-15 expression in rabbit synovia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y H; Li, X D; Zhu, W B; Sun, G F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of high-intensity exercise on interleukin-15 (IL-15) expression in rabbit synovia. We utilized 24 New Zealand white rabbits, which were randomly divided equally into high-intensity exercise and control groups. The former were forced to run for 60 min/day over 4 weeks at the speed of 30 m/min. The histological changes of cartilage and knee joint synovia were investigated with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to measure IL-15 expression. From these analyses, we identified knee articular cartilage damage and synovitis in the high-intensity exercise group. This group also exhibited higher IL-15 expression in their synovial fluid and tissues than was observed in the control group (P < 0.05). These results suggested that high-intensity exercise might lead to synovitis and articular cartilage damage, and that IL-15 overexpression in synovia might be associated with post-traumatic osteoarthritis. PMID:26535700

  3. Assessment of MR Thermometry During High Intensity Ultrasound Ablation of the Canine Prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butts Pauly, Kim; Rieke, Viola; Pisani, Laura; Sommer, Graham; Bouley, Donna; Diederich, Chris; Ross, Anthony; Nau, Will; Kinsey, Adam; Dumoulin, Charles; Watkins, Ronald

    2006-05-01

    We are developing transurethral and interstitial ultrasound applicators for the local control of prostate cancer and BPH. The ultrasound energy will be delivered under magnetic resonance imaging guidance because it can provide exquisite temperature mapping capability. The purpose of this work was to evaluate MR thermometry during high intensity ultrasound ablation often canine prostates.

  4. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  5. Device to color modulate a stationary light beam gives high intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantz, W. A.

    1966-01-01

    Signal controlled system color modulates a beam of light while also providing high intensity and a stationary beam, either collimated or focused. The color modulation acquired by the presented system can be compatible with any color film by employing color filters formed to provide a color wedge having a color distribution compatible with the films color sensitivity.

  6. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  10. Inhibition of enteric pathogens using integrated high intensity 405 nm LED on the surface of almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogates inoculated onto the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic light was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light emitting diodes (LED). Al...

  11. Octupole Resonance in the AGS at High Intensity: A SIMBAD study

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.U.; D'Imperio, N.L.

    2005-06-08

    We studied the Octupole (Montague) resonance in the AGS, in its high intensity mode, by tracking with the PIC code SIMBAD. We calculated, turn-by-turn, the betatron tune footprint from the eigenvalues of the one-turn matrix. We show that one should exercise particular caution when the betatron tunes are close together, since the matrix gives ambiguous results at the resonance.

  12. 75 FR 52780 - Designation of Nine Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... PRESIDENT Office of National Drug Control Policy Designation of Nine Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy designated nine additional counties as High Drug Trafficking Areas pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 1706. The...

  13. 75 FR 21368 - Designation of Five Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... PRESIDENT Office of National Drug Control Policy Designation of Five Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy designated five additional counties as High Drug Trafficking Areas pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 1706. The...

  14. High Intensity Pressure Noise Transmission in Human Ear: A Three Dimensional Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawa, Takumi; Gan, Rong; Leckness, Kegan

    2015-03-01

    High intensity pressure noise generated by explosions and jet engines causes auditory damage and hearing loss of the military service personals, which are the most common disabilities in the veterans. Authors have investigated the high intensity pressure noise transmission from the ear canal to middle ear cavity. A fluid-structure interaction with a viscoelastic model for the tympanic membrane (TM) as well as the ossicular chain has been considered in the study. For the high intensity pressure simulation the geometry of the ear was based on a 3D finite element (FE) model of the human ear reported by Gan et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 2004). The model consists of the ear canal, TM, ossicular chain, and the middle ear cavity. The numerical approach includes two steps: 1) FE based finite-volume method simulation to compute pressure distributions in the ear canal and the middle ear cavity using CFX; and 2) FE modeling of TM and middle ear ossicles in response to high intensity sound using multi-physics analysis in ANSYS. The simulations provide the displacement of the TM/ossicular chain and the pressure fields in the ear canal and the middle ear cavity. These results are compared with human temporal bone experimental data obtained in our group. This work was supported by DOD W81XWH-14-1-0228.

  15. A High Intensity Multi-Purpose D-D Neutron Generator for Nuclear Engineering Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ka-Ngo Leung; Jasmina L. Vujic; Edward C. Morse; Per F. Peterson

    2005-11-29

    This NEER project involves the design, construction and testing of a low-cost high intensity D-D neutron generator for teaching nuclear engineering students in a laboratory environment without radioisotopes or a nuclear reactor. The neutron generator was designed, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  16. Edward Teller medal lecture: high intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.

    1997-06-02

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  17. The Edward teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. The Edward Teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M. H.

    1997-04-15

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  19. Outcome Evaluation of a High-Intensity Inpatient Sex Offender Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olver, Mark E.; Wong, Stephen C. P.; Nicholaichuk, Terry P.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment outcome of a high-intensity inpatient sex offender treatment program was evaluated by comparing the sexual recidivism rates of 472 treated and 282 untreated sex offenders. The program is designed for moderate- to high-risk sex offenders and follows the principles of effective correctional treatment. The current investigation is an…

  20. The Edward teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, M. H.

    1997-04-01

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  1. HILINC: High Intensity Learning Centers; Individualized Reading Instruction. Omaha Public Schools, Funded--Title I ESEA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Lloyd C.; And Others

    The High Intensity Learning Center System in Reading, funded under Title I of the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act, is a teacher support system which defines each student's unique reading needs and prescribes appropriate learning activities to fill those needs. It is a system that permits one teacher to manage the learning activities of up…

  2. Creatine supplementation spares muscle glycogen during high intensity intermittent exercise in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The effects of creatine (CR) supplementation on glycogen content are still debatable. Thus, due to the current lack of clarity, we investigated the effects of CR supplementation on muscle glycogen content after high intensity intermittent exercise in rats. Methods First, the animals were submitted to a high intensity intermittent maximal swimming exercise protocol to ensure that CR-supplementation was able to delay fatigue (experiment 1). Then, the CR-mediated glycogen sparing effect was examined using a high intensity intermittent sub-maximal exercise test (fixed number of bouts; six bouts of 30-second duration interspersed by two-minute rest interval) (experiment 2). For both experiments, male Wistar rats were given either CR supplementation or placebo (Pl) for 5 days. Results As expected, CR-supplemented animals were able to exercise for a significant higher number of bouts than Pl. Experiment 2 revealed a higher gastrocnemius glycogen content for the CR vs. the Pl group (33.59%). Additionally, CR animals presented lower blood lactate concentrations throughout the intermittent exercise bouts compared to Pl. No difference was found between groups in soleus glycogen content. Conclusion The major finding of this study is that CR supplementation was able to spare muscle glycogen during a high intensity intermittent exercise in rats. PMID:20205834

  3. Effectiveness and Safety of High-Intensity Interval Training in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francois, Monique E.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF Recent research has shown that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) can promote improvements in glucose control and cardiovascular health in individuals with type 2 diabetes. This article summarizes the evidence and highlights the ways in which HIIT might be safely implemented as an adjunct to more traditional exercise approaches. PMID:25717277

  4. Structural Analysis of Shipping Casks, Vol. 9. Energy Absorption Capabilities of Plastically Deformed Struts Under Specified Impact Loading Conditions (Thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.C.

    2001-02-19

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the energy absorption characteristics of plastically deformed inclined struts under impact loading. This information is needed to provide a usable method by which designers and analysts of shipping casks for radioactive or fissile materials can determine the energy absorption capabilities of external longitudinal fins on cylindrical casks under specified impact conditions. A survey of technical literature related to experimental determination of the dynamic plastic behavior of struts revealed no information directly applicable to the immediate problem, especially in the impact velocity ranges desired, and an experimental program was conducted to obtain the needed data. Mild-steel struts with rectangular cross sections were impacted by free-falling weights dropped from known heights. These struts or fin specimens were inclined at five different angles to simulate different angles of impact that fins on a shipping cask could experience under certain accident conditions. The resisting force of the deforming strut was measured and recorded as a function of time by using load cells instrumented with resistance strain gage bridges, signal conditioning equipment, an oscilloscope, and a Polaroid camera. The acceleration of the impacting weight was measured and recorded as a function of time during the latter portion of the testing program by using an accelerometer attached to the drop hammer, appropriate signal conditioning equipment, the oscilloscope, and the camera. A digital computer program was prepared to numerically integrate the force-time and acceleration-time data recorded during the tests to obtain deformation-time data. The force-displacement relationships were then integrated to obtain values of absorbed energy with respect to deformation or time. The results for various fin specimen geometries and impact angles are presented graphically, and these curves may be used to compute the energy absorption capacity of

  5. High intensity resistance training: effects on bone in older men and women.

    PubMed

    Maddalozzo, G F; Snow, C M

    2000-06-01

    There is evidence that high intensity resistance training promotes bone maintenance in older women, however, the effect of high intensity free weight training has not been investigated in older men or women. Furthermore, little is known about the chronic effect of weight training on serum insulin growth factor-I (IGF-I) in this population. We compared the effects of a moderate intensity seated resistance-training program with a high intensity standing free weight exercise program on bone mass and serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP3 in healthy older men and women. Twenty-eight men (54.6 +/- 3. 2 years) and 26 nonestrogen-replaced women (52.8 +/- 3.3 years) served as their own controls for 12 weeks, then were randomly assigned to a moderate or high intensity training group and trained three times/week for 24 weeks. Prior to and after the control period and at the end of training, bone mass and body composition were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), muscle strength by isokinetic dynamometry, muscular power by Wingate Anaerobic Power Test, and IGF-I by radioimmunoassay (RIA). A repeated measures analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) revealed that high intensity training resulted in a gain in spine BMD in men (1.9%), P < 0.05, but not in women, whereas moderate intensity training produced no changes in either gender at this site. Increases were observed at the greater trochanter, P < 0.03, in men regardless of training intensity, but not in women at any hip site. However, when compared with zero, both men and women in the high intensity group demonstrated significant increases in trochanteric BMD (1.3% and 2. 0%, respectively) and a decrease in femoral BMD (-1.8%). Neither circulating serum IGF-I nor IGFBP3 were altered by either training regimen, but both training programs resulted in improvements in total body strength (37.62%) and lean mass (males 4.1%, females 3. 1%). We conclude that although resistance training of moderate to high intensity produced

  6. Acute Effect of High-Intensity Eccentric Exercise on Vascular Endothelial Function in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngju; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Ra, Song-Gyu; Shiraki, Hitoshi; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    Choi, Y, Akazawa, N, Zempo-Miyaki, A, Ra, S-G, Shiraki, H, Ajisaka, R, and Maeda, S. Acute effect of high-intensity eccentric exercise on vascular endothelial function in young men. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2279-2285, 2016-Increased central arterial stiffness is as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence regarding the effects of high-intensity resistance exercise on vascular endothelial function and central arterial stiffness is conflicting. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acute high-intensity eccentric exercise on vascular endothelial function and central arterial stiffness. We evaluated the acute changes in endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and arterial stiffness after high-intensity eccentric exercise. Seven healthy, sedentary men (age, 24 ± 1 year) performed maximal eccentric elbow flexor exercise using their nondominant arm. Before and 45 minutes after eccentric exercise, carotid arterial compliance and brachial artery FMD and L-FMC in the nonexercised arm were measured. Carotid arterial compliance was significantly decreased, and β-stiffness index significantly increased after eccentric exercise. Brachial FMD was significantly reduced after eccentric exercise, whereas there was no significant difference in brachial L-FMC before and after eccentric exercise. A positive correlation was detected between change in arterial compliance and change in FMD (r = 0.779; p ≤ 0.05), and a negative correlation was detected between change in β-stiffness index and change in FMD (r = -0.891; p < 0.01) with eccentric exercise. In this study, acute high-intensity eccentric exercise increased central arterial stiffness; this increase was accompanied by a decrease in endothelial function caused by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation but not by a change in endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction. PMID:24832967

  7. Impulse gain and damage from very high dynamic loading using flyer impact

    SciTech Connect

    Osher, J.; Chau, H.; Gerassimenko, M.; Lee, R.; Pomykal, G.; Terhune, R.; Weingart, R.

    1991-07-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) 1 MJ and 87 kJ electric guns are in use for a variety of shock-wave applications using the hypervelocity impact of dielectric (or dielectric and metal composite) flyer plates on material samples. The 1 MJ electric gun is a newly completed facility and will be described. The specific applications discussed here include a study of momentum gain and spat damage produced by Kapton flyer impact on aluminium 6061-T6. The experimental impact measurements are used to calibrate code calculations that can be applied under more general hypervelocity impact conditions to typical relative orbital velocities near 10 km/s. The analytical results of code calculations supporting these study areas are also reported.

  8. Methods for data reduction and loads analysis of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster model water impact tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The methodology used to predict full scale space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) water impact loads from scale model test data is described. Tests conducted included 12.5 inch and 120 inch diameter models of the SRB. Geometry and mass characteristics of the models were varied in each test series to reflect the current SRB baseline configuration. Nose first and tail first water entry modes were investigated with full-scale initial impact vertical velocities of 40 to 120 ft/sec, horizontal velocities of 0 to 60 ft/sec., and off-vertical angles of 0 to plus or minus 30 degrees. The test program included a series of tests with scaled atmospheric pressure.

  9. Dynamic finite element analysis of the crack-inclusion interaction in aligned CNF composites under impact loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Huat Tung

    The interaction between a crack and an inclusion of microfiber in an aligned carbon nanofiber (CNF) toughened composite under impact loading conditions was studied by using dynamic finite element analysis (FEA). The nanocomposite material used in this study was T300/Epon 862 enhanced with aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs). The dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIFs) were evaluated to describe the dynamic fracture behavior of the fracture model. In this study, a numerical homogenization model using FEA was first employed to determine the effective material properties of the equivalent matrix material of Epon 862 and aligned CNFs. The effects of T300 microfiber inclusion eccentricity and CNF alignment angle on the DSIFs were examined in this study. The displacement extrapolation method for monoclinic materials was utilized to calculate the DSIFs. The numerical results demonstrated a mechanism known as "crack-tip shielding" and demonstrated that the CNF alignment angle has an impact on the DSIFs.

  10. A coupled fluid-structure dynamic analysis for water impact loads. [for Space Shuttle recoverable booster design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herting, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    In this paper a nonlinear transient, hydroelastic method is developed for response analysis of the Space Shuttle recoverable booster on water impact. At each time step, coupled equations of fluid flow and structure dynamics are solved with an iterative, self-correcting process. Rigid body motions are represented by large angle equations. Local deformations are represented by a NASTRAN-generated model of the three-dimensional structure. The fluid is represented by series solutions of the potential flow equation which include the effects of the local structure motions. The resulting water loads and structural stresses obtained will aid in qualification of the final structural design. Comparisons are made to experimental impact data to validate the method.

  11. Three-dimensional measurement of CFRP deformation during high-speed impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masayoshi; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Yoshimura, Akinori; Ogasawara, Toshio

    2011-08-01

    The deformation of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) caused by projectile impact governs the absorption or dissipation of kinetic energy of the projectile. However, three-dimensional (3D) numerical information about the CFRP deformations caused by the projectile impact is not yet available. Therefore, a 3D measurement was conducted to evaluate the deformation process and deformation behavior of the CFRPs under high-velocity projectile impact, and to subsequently evaluate the performance of the CFRPs. CFRPs having two different stacking sequences were used as the specimens. For measuring the deformation, a high-speed stereovision system comprised of two high-speed video cameras was adopted. An SUJ-2 sphere projectile was impacted against a specimen plate using a light-gas accelerator at an impact velocity of approximately 175 m/s, and the deformation was recorded by synchronously capturing the images using this system. The captured images were converted to stereo images by a 3D correlation method. The stereo images clearly revealed numerical differences in the deformation of the CFRPs having different stacking sequences. The result accuracy of the 3D measurement was verified by comparing their results with the direct measurement results. Moreover, the stereo images corresponded to the results from a numerical simulation of the CFRP deformations, which both qualitatively and quantitatively confirms the validity of the simulation. This 3D measurement method is a powerful and useful tool for evaluating the performance of CFRPs during high-velocity projectile impact.

  12. Impact of the river nutrient load variability on the North Aegean ecosystem functioning over the last decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiaras, K. P.; Petihakis, G.; Kourafalou, V. H.; Triantafyllou, G.

    2014-02-01

    The impact of river load variability on the North Aegean ecosystem functioning over the last decades (1980-2000) was investigated by means of a coupled hydrodynamic/biogeochemical model simulation. Model results were validated against available SeaWiFS Chl-a and in situ data. The simulated food web was found dominated by small cells, in agreement with observations, with most of the carbon channelled through the microbial loop. Diatoms and dinoflagellates presented a higher relative abundance in the more productive coastal areas. The increased phosphate river loads in the early 80s resulted in nitrogen and silicate deficiency in coastal, river-influenced regions. Primary production presented a decreasing trend for most areas. During periods of increased phosphate/nitrate inputs, silicate deficiency resulted in a relative decrease of diatoms, triggering an increase of dinoflagellates. Such an increase was simulated in the late 90s in the Thermaikos Gulf, in agreement with the observed increased occurrence of Harmful Algal Blooms. Microzooplankton was found to closely follow the relative increase of dinoflagellates under higher nutrient availability, showing a faster response than mesozooplankton. Sensitivity simulations with varying nutrient river inputs revealed a linear response of net primary production and plankton biomass. A stronger effect of river inputs was simulated in the enclosed Thermaikos Gulf, in terms of productivity and plankton composition, showing a significant increase of dinoflagellates relative abundance under increased nutrient loads.

  13. The impact of Best Management Practices on simulated streamflow and sediment load in a Central Brazilian catchment.

    PubMed

    Strauch, Michael; Lima, Jorge E F W; Volk, Martin; Lorz, Carsten; Makeschin, Franz

    2013-09-01

    The intense use of water for both public supply and agricultural production causes societal conflicts and environmental problems in the Brazilian Federal District. A serious consequence of this is nonpoint source pollution which leads to increasing water treatment costs. Hence, this study investigates in how far agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) might contribute to sustainable water resources management and soil protection in the region. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to study the impact of those practices on streamflow and sediment load in the intensively cropped catchment of the Pipiripau River. The model was calibrated and validated against measured streamflow and turbidity-derived sediment loads. By means of scenario simulations, it was found that structural BMPs such as parallel terraces and small sediment basins ('Barraginhas') can lead to sediment load reductions of up to 40%. The implementation of these measures did not adversely affect the water yield. In contrast, multi-diverse crop rotations including irrigated dry season crops were found to be disadvantageous in terms of water availability by significantly reducing streamflow during low flow periods. The study considers rainfall uncertainty by using a precipitation data ensemble, but nevertheless highlights the importance of well established monitoring systems due to related shortcomings in model calibration. Despite the existing uncertainties, the model results are useful for water resource managers to develop water and soil protection strategies for the Pipiripau River Basin and for watersheds with similar characteristics. PMID:23422359

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms in Burkina Faso: impact on plasma fasting homocysteine and after methionine loading test.

    PubMed

    Angius, Andrea; Simpore, Jacques; Persico, Ivana; Sassu, Alessandro; Prodi, Dionigio Antonio; Musumeci, Salvatore

    2007-01-01

    In Burkina Faso the levels of plasma homocysteine (Hcy) are lower and the methionine loading tests suggest a more effective Hcy metabolism. The polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) showed a relevant difference in the allele frequencies of T MTHFR-677 in young and in old subjects, while the allele frequency of C MTHFR-1298 was comparable in young and old subjects. The aim of this paper was to study the impact of the MTHFR polymorphisms on plasma fasting Hcy and after methionine loading in Burkina Faso. The young subjects with CC MTHFR-677 genotype had levels of Hcy significantly lower than CT and TT subjects. The level of Hcy in subjects who had AA, AC and CC MTHFR-1298 genotypes were comparable. The levels of Hcy after the methionine loading test were significantly higher in CT and TT MTHFR-677 genotype. These results suggest that the genetic situation in Burkina Faso is different from that of other Western countries and this guarantees the maintenance of lower plasma levels of Hcy in young and old Africans. The elevated levels of plasma Hcy in old subjects compared to young subjects, against the low prevalence of the T allele in elderly subjects, is discussed. PMID:17323822

  15. Impact of alprazolam in allostatic load and neurocognition of patients with anxiety disorders and chronic stress (GEMA): observational study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Carlos A; Remedi, Carolina; Núñez, Daniel A; D'Alessio, Luciana; Roldán, Emilio J A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The allostatic load model explains the additive effects of multiple biological processes that accelerate pathophysiology related to stress, particularly in the central nervous system. Stress-related mental conditions such as anxiety disorders and neuroticism (a well-known stress vulnerability factor), have been linked to disturbances of hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenal with cognitive implications. Nevertheless, there are controversial results in the literature and there is a need to determine the impact of the psychopharmacological treatment on allostatic load parameters and in cognitive functions. Gador study of Estres Modulation by Alprazolam, aims to determine the impact of medication on neurobiochemical variables related to chronic stress, metabolic syndrome, neurocognition and quality of life in patients with anxiety, allostatic load and neuroticism. Methods/analysis In this observational prospective phase IV study, highly sympthomatic patients with anxiety disorders (six or more points in the Hamilton-A scale), neuroticism (more than 18 points in the Neo five personality factor inventory (NEO-FFI) scale), an allostatic load (three positive clinical or biochemical items at Crimmins and Seeman criteria) will be included. Clinical variables of anxiety, neuroticism, allostatic load, neurobiochemical studies, neurocognition and quality of life will be determined prior and periodically (1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks) after treatment (on demand of alprazolam from 0.75 mg/day to 3.0 mg/day). A sample of n=55/182 patients will be considered enough to detect variables higher than 25% (pretreatment vs post-treatment or significant correlations) with a 1-ß power of 0–80. t Test and/or non-parametric test, and Pearson's test for correlation analysis will be determined. Ethics and dissemination This study protocol was approved by an Independent Ethics Committee of FEFyM (Foundation for Pharmacological Studies and Drugs, Buenos Aires) and by regulatory

  16. Evaluating seasonal loading models and their impact on global and regional reference frame alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Rong; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Ding, Kaihua; Yang, Shaomin; Wang, Qi

    2014-02-01

    Seasonal variations are observed in GPS time series, but are not included in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) models. Unmodeled seasonal variations at sites used for reference frame alignment are aliased into the reference frame parameters and bias all coordinates in the transformed solution. We augment ITRF2008 with seasonal loading models based either on Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) measurements or a suite of models for atmospheric pressure, continental hydrology, and nontidal ocean loading. We model the seasonal components using either annual and semiannual terms or a nonparametric approach. When we include a seasonal variation model, the weighted root-mean-square misfit after seven-parameter transformation decreases for 70-90% of the daily GPS solutions depending on the network and seasonal model used, relative to a baseline case using ITRF2008. When seasonal variations are included in the reference frame solution, the observed seasonal variations are more consistent with the GRACE-based model at 80-85% of the GPS sites that were not used in the frame alignment. The suite of forward models performs nearly as well as the GRACE-based model for North America, but substantially worse for other parts of the world. We interpret these findings to mean that the use of ITRF2008 without seasonal terms causes the amplitude of seasonal variations in the coordinate time series to be damped down relative to the true loading deformation and that the observed GPS time series are more consistent with a TRF model that includes seasonal variations. At present, a seasonal model derived from GRACE captures seasonal variations more faithfully than one based on hydrologic models.

  17. Assessing the impact of landuse change, climate change and reservoirs on suspended sediment load in Da river (China-Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Thinh, Le; Soncini, Andrea; Bocchiola, Daniele; Ranzi, Roberto; Rulli, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    data. In the period 1988-2005, when Hoa Binh reservoir was at fully normal water level, the sediment load reduced dramatically (90%). During 1986-2005, the sediment yield of Lai Chau gauging station and Ta Bu station was also reduced by forest, agricultural, development areas; grassland, shrubland, and mixed shrubland were being decreased. The impact of climate change on sediment load was then analyzed by feeding the model with properly downscaled climate scenarios from two GCMs (EC-EARTH, and CCSM4), and three SRES emission scenarios (RCP2.6, RPC4.5, and RPC8.5). The simulation results under climate change scenarios and year 2000 land use show mostly sediment load increase in Lai Chau, Ta Bu, Hoa Binh, Ban Cung, except for the scenario RCP2.6, showing a reduction at Ta Bu. The combination of climate change, land use change and impact of reservoirs in the catchment leads, for all the scenarios considered, to decreases in sediment load, with a maximum (96.67%) for EC-Earth RCP2.6 model in 2080-2099.

  18. A mathematical model of an active control landing gear for load control during impact and roll-out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Carden, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model of an active control landing gear (ACOLAG) was developed and programmed for operation on a digital computer. The mathematical model includes theoretical subsonic aerodynamics; first-mode wing bending and torsional characteristics; oleo-pneumatic shock strut with fit and binding friction; closed-loop, series-hydraulic control; empirical tire force-deflection characteristics; antiskid braking; and sinusoidal or random runway roughness. The mathematical model was used to compute the loads and motions for a simulated vertical drop test and a simulated landing impact of a conventional (passive) main landing gear designed for a 2268-kg (5000-lbm) class airplane. Computations were also made for a simply modified version of the passive gear including a series-hydraulic active control system. Comparison of computed results for the passive gear with experimental data shows that the active control landing gear analysis is valid for predicting the loads and motions of an airplane during a symmetrical landing. Computed results for the series-hydraulic active control in conjunction with the simply modified passive gear show that 20- to 30-percent reductions in wing force, relative to those occurring with the modified passive gear, can be obtained during the impact phase of the landing. These reductions in wing force could result in substantial increases in fatigue life of the structure.

  19. Impact of flow unsteadiness on maneuvers and loads of agile aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrah, M. Ameen; Ashley, Holt

    1989-01-01

    A program of airload measurements on a family of low-aspect-ratio delta wings with sharp leading edges, subjected to large amplitude pitch transients with angles of attack up to 90 deg, is reviewed. Even for small values of the pitch-rate parameter, representative of maneuvers anticipated for agile aircraft, the force and moment overshoots can exceed by 50 percent their steady-state values. This is explained in terms of the hysteretic behavior of the breakdown locations of leading-edge vortices. An approximate theoretical model is proposed which includes the breakdown hysteresis as part of a three-term representation of the unsteady chordwise load distribution.

  20. Cognitive Load and Self-Determination Theories Applied to E-Learning: Impact on Students' Participation and Academic Performance

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Guerra Grangeia, Tiago; de Jorge, Bruno; Franci, Daniel; Martins Santos, Thiago; Vellutini Setubal, Maria Silvia; Schweller, Marcelo; de Carvalho-Filho, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Emergency clerkships expose students to a stressful environment that require multiple tasks, which may have a direct impact on cognitive load and motivation for learning. To address this challenge, Cognitive Load Theory and Self Determination Theory provided the conceptual frameworks to the development of a Moodle-based online Emergency Medicine course, inspired by real clinical cases. Methods Three consecutive classes (2013–2015) of sixth-year medical students (n = 304) participated in the course, during a curricular and essentially practical emergency rotation. “Virtual Rounds” provided weekly virtual patients in narrative format and meaningful schemata to chief complaints, in order to simulate real rounds at Emergency Unit. Additional activities such as Extreme Decisions, Emergency Quiz and Electrocardiographic challenge offered different views of emergency care. Authors assessed student´s participation and its correlation with their academic performance. A survey evaluated students´ opinions. Students graduating in 2015 answered an online questionnaire to investigate cognitive load and motivation. Results Each student produced 1965 pageviews and spent 72 hours logged on. Although Clinical Emergency rotation has two months long, students accessed the online course during an average of 5.3 months. Virtual Rounds was the most accessed activity, and there was positive correlations between the number of hours logged on the platform and final grades on Emergency Medicine. Over 90% of students felt an improvement in their clinical reasoning and considered themselves better prepared for rendering Emergency care. Considering a Likert scale from 1 (minimum load) to 7 (maximum load), the scores for total cognitive load were 4.79±2.2 for Virtual Rounds and 5.56±1.96 for real medical rounds(p<0,01). Conclusions A real-world inspired online course, based on cognitive and motivational conceptual frameworks, seems to be a strong tool to engage students in